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Sample records for myocardial infarction trial

  1. [Trials with ACE-inhibitors in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Dalla Volta, S

    1994-12-01

    In acute myocardial infarction, the results of the trials with ACE-inhibitors have not been always good, in contrast with what has been observed in chronic heart failure. The comparison of these compounds with the placebo has demonstrated lack of reduction of mortality in the study CONSENSUS II, favorable results on the survival as first endpoint and on the secondary endpoints, as reinfarction, heart failure and stroke in the studies SOLVD, AIRE, GISSI 3, ISIS 4, and uncertain (interim report) results in the Chinese study. Nevertheless, the analysis of the recruitment of the patients with acute infarction and the way these patients have been treated seem to be the most important cause of the conflicting results. ACE-inhibitors have proved no efficacy in acute myocardial infarction without signs of left ventricular failure (CONSENSUS II), have worsened the clinical picture and the mortality in patients in shock or with severe heart failure in the acute phase. On the reverse, in presence of mild to moderate left ventricular dysfunction and failure, the use of ACE-inhibitors has been followed by reduction of mortality in the early (AIRE, GISSI 3, ISIS 4), medium term (GISSI 3) and long-term follow-up (up to 4 years in the AIRE study). In parallel with the reduction of the primary endpoint, also secondary endpoints have been favorably influenced by the different ACE-inhibitors. No differences have been observed among the different class of compounds. ACE-inhibitors seem, therefore, to have a clear indication in acute myocardial infarction with mild or moderate signs and symptoms of heart failure. PMID:7634258

  2. Ventricular function and infarct size: the Western Washington Intravenous Streptokinase in Myocardial Infarction Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.L.; Cerqueira, M.; Maynard, C.; Davis, K.; Kennedy, J.W.

    1988-04-01

    The Western Washington Intravenous Streptokinase in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial randomized 368 patients with symptoms and signs of acute myocardial infarction of less than 6 h duration to either conventional care or 1.5 million units of intravenous streptokinase. The mean time to randomization was 209 min and 52% of patients were randomized within 3 h of symptom onset. Quantitative, tomographic thallium-201 infarct size and radionuclide ejection fraction were measured at 8.2 +/- 7.5 weeks in 207 survivors who lived within a 100 mile radius of a centralized laboratory. Overall, infarct size as a percent of the left ventricle was 19 +/- 13% for control subjects and 15 +/- 13% for treatment patients (p = 0.03). For anterior infarction in patients entered within 3 h of symptom onset, infarct size was 28 +/- 13% in the control group versus 19 +/- 15% for the treatment group (p = 0.09). Left ventricular ejection fraction was 47 +/- 15% in the control versus 51 +/- 15% in the treatment group (p = 0.08). For anterior infarction of less than 3 h duration, the ejection fraction was 38 +/- 16% in the control versus 48 +/- 20% in the treatment group (p = 0.13). By statistical analysis incorporating the nonsurvivors, p values for all of these variables were less than or equal to 0.08. There was no benefit for patients with inferior infarction or for anterior infarction of greater than 3 h duration. It is concluded that intravenous streptokinase, when given within 3 h of symptom onset to patients with anterior infarction, reduces infarct size and improves ventricular function.

  3. Controlled Trial of Psychological Intervention in Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldenburg, Brian; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compared hospital-based psychological interventions for improving the physical, psychological, and life-style status of patients after myocardial infarction with routine medical and nursing care. Follow-ups showed intervention groups performed significantly better on measures of psychological and life-style functioning; they also reported fewer…

  4. Applying the results of large clinical trials in the management of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, J P; Schwartz, G G

    1996-01-01

    Mortality from acute myocardial infarction has declined in recent years, largely due to the widespread application of new pharmacologic and mechanical interventions that have been tested in large, prospective, randomized clinical trials. For practicing generalists, we review the key data from such trials that have shaped the current management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. We discuss the roles of thrombolytic therapy, coronary angioplasty, nitrates, beta- and calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, magnesium, and antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic agents. In addition, we highlight critical unanswered questions in the management of this disorder. PMID:8775936

  5. The Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Anxiety in Patients With Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Zahra; Taghadosi, Mohsen; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Farrokhian, Alireza; Tagharrobi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anxiety is an important mental health problem in patients with cardiac disease. Anxiety reduces patients’ quality of life and increases the risk of different cardiac complications. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial conduced on 68 patients with myocardial infarction hospitalized in coronary care units of a large-scale teaching hospital affiliated to Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran in 2013. By using the block randomization technique, patients were randomly assigned to experimental (33 patients receiving inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma twice a day for two subsequent days) and control (35 patients receiving routine care of study setting including no aromatherapy) groups. At the beginning of study and twenty minutes after each aromatherapy session, anxiety state of patients was assessed using the Spielberger’s State Anxiety Inventory. Data was analyzed using SPSS v. 16.0. We used Chi-square, Fisher’s exact, independent-samples T-test and repeated measures analysis of variance to analyze the study data. Results: The study groups did not differ significantly regarding baseline anxiety mean and demographic characteristics. However, after the administration of aromatherapy, anxiety mean in the experimental group was significantly lower than the control group. Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with lavender aroma can reduce anxiety in patients with myocardial infarction. Consequently, healthcare providers, particularly nurses, can use this strategy to improve postmyocardial infarction anxiety management. PMID:25389481

  6. Intravenous sodium nitrite in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: a randomized controlled trial (NIAMI)

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Nishat; Neil, Christopher; Bruce, Margaret; MacLennan, Graeme; Cotton, Seonaidh; Papadopoulou, Sofia; Feelisch, Martin; Bunce, Nicholas; Lim, Pitt O.; Hildick-Smith, David; Horowitz, John; Madhani, Melanie; Boon, Nicholas; Dawson, Dana; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Frenneaux, Michael; Siddiqi, Nishat; Neil, Christopher; Bruce, Margaret; MacLennan, Graeme; Cotton, Seonaidh; Dawson, Dana; Frenneaux, Michael; Singh, Satnam; Schwarz, Konstantin; Jagpal, Baljit; Metcalfe, Malcolm; Stewart, Andrew; Hannah, Andrew; Awsan, Noman; Broadhurst, Paul; Hogg, Duncan; Garg, Deepak; Slattery, Elaine; Davidson, Tracey; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Kaski, Juan-Carlos; Lim, Pitt O; Brown, Sue; Papadopoulou, Sofia A; Gonzalvez, Fatima; Roy, David; Firoozi, Sami; Bogle, Richard; Roberts, Elved; Rhodes, Jonathan; Hildick-Smith, David; de Belder, Adam; Cooter, Nina; Bennett, Lorraine; Horowitz, John; Rajendran, Sharmalar; Dautov, Rustem; Black, Marilyn; Jansen, Else; Boon, Nicholas; Struthers, Allan; Toff, William; Dargie, Henry; Lang, Chim; Nightingale, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Aim Despite prompt revascularization of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), substantial myocardial injury may occur, in part a consequence of ischaemia reperfusion injury (IRI). There has been considerable interest in therapies that may reduce IRI. In experimental models of AMI, sodium nitrite substantially reduces IRI. In this doubleblind randomized placebo controlled parallel-group trial, we investigated the effects of sodium nitrite administered immediately prior to reperfusion in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and results A total of 229 patients presenting with acute STEMI were randomized to receive either an i.v. infusion of 70 μmol sodium nitrite (n = 118) or matching placebo (n = 111) over 5 min immediately before primary percutaneous intervention (PPCI). Patients underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) at 6–8 days and at 6 months and serial blood sampling was performed over 72 h for the measurement of plasma creatine kinase (CK) and Troponin I. Myocardial infarct size (extent of late gadolinium enhancement at 6–8 days by CMR-the primary endpoint) did not differ between nitrite and placebo groups after adjustment for area at risk, diabetes status, and centre (effect size −0.7% 95% CI: −2.2%, +0.7%; P = 0.34). There were no significant differences in any of the secondary endpoints, including plasma troponin I and CK area under the curve, left ventricular volumes (LV), and ejection fraction (EF) measured at 6–8 days and at 6 months and final infarct size (FIS) measured at 6 months. Conclusions Sodium nitrite administered intravenously immediately prior to reperfusion in patients with acute STEMI does not reduce infarct size. PMID:24639423

  7. Clinical effects of anticoagulant therapy in suspected acute myocardial infarction: systematic overview of randomised trials.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, R.; MacMahon, S.; Flather, M.; Baigent, C.; Remvig, L.; Mortensen, S.; Appleby, P.; Godwin, J.; Yusuf, S.; Peto, R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Most randomised trials of anticoagulant therapy for suspected acute myocardial infarction have been small and, in some, aspirin and fibrinolytic therapy were not used routinely. A systematic overview (meta-analysis) of their results is needed, in particular to assess the clinical effects of adding heparin to aspirin. DESIGN: Computer aided searches, scrutiny of reference lists, and inquiry of investigators and companies were used to identify potentially eligible studies. On central review, 26 studies were found to involve unconfounded randomised comparisons of anticoagulant therapy versus control in suspected acute myocardial infarction. Additional information on study design and outcome was sought by correspondence with study investigators. SUBJECTS: Patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. INTERVENTIONS: No routine aspirin was used among about 5000 patients in 21 trials (including half of one small trial) that assessed heparin alone or heparin plus oral anticoagulants, and aspirin was used routinely among 68,000 patients in six trials (including the other half of one small trial) that assessed the addition of intravenous or high dose subcutaneous heparin. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Death, reinfarction, stroke, pulmonary embolism, and major bleeds (average follow up of about 10 days). RESULTS: In the absence of aspirin, anticoagulant therapy reduced mortality by 25% (SD 8%; 95% confidence interval 10% to 38%; 2P = 0.002), representing 35 (11) fewer deaths per 1000. There were also 10 (4) fewer strokes per 1000 (2P = 0.01), 19 (5) fewer pulmonary emboli per 1000 (2P < 0.001), and non-significantly fewer reinfarctions, with about 13 (5) extra major bleeds per 1000 (2P = 0.01). Similar sized effects were seen with the different anticoagulant regimens studied. In the presence of aspirin, however, heparin reduced mortality by only 6% (SD 3%; 0% to 10%; 2P = 0.03), representing just 5 (2) fewer deaths per 1000. There were 3 (1.3) fewer

  8. [Mortality of myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, E; Kirkorian, G

    2011-12-01

    Coronary disease is a major cause of death and disability. From 1975 to 2000, coronary mortality was reduced by half. Better treatments and reduction of risk factors are the main causes. This phenomenon is observed in most developed countries, but mortality from coronary heart disease continues to increase in developing countries. In-hospital mortality of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is in the range of 7 to 10% in registries. In infarction without ST segment elevation (NSTEMI), in-hospital mortality is around 5%. More recent studies found a similar in-hospital mortality for STEMI and NSTEMI. Because of patient selection and monitoring, mortality in clinical trials is much lower. After adjustment for the extent of coronary disease, age, risk factors, history of myocardial infarction, the excess mortality observed in women is fading. Many clinical, biological and laboratory parameters are associated with mortality in myocardial infarction. They refer to the immediate risk of death (ventricular rhythm disturbances, shock…), the extent of infarction (number of leads with ST elevation on the ECG, release of biomarkers, ejection fraction…), the presence of heart failure, the failure of reperfusion and the patient's baseline risk (age, renal function…). Risk scores, and more specifically the GRACE risk score, synthesize these different markers to predict the risk of death in a given patient. However, their use for the treatment of myocardial only concerns NSTEMI. Only a limited number of mechanical or pharmacological interventions reduces mortality of heart attack. The main benefits are observed with reperfusion by thrombolysis or primary angioplasty in STEMI, aspirin, heparin, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. Some medications such as bivalirudin and fondaparinux reduce mortality by decreasing the incidence of hemorrhagic complications. The guidelines classify interventions according to their benefit and especially their ability

  9. Experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Joison, Julio; Gilmour, David P.; Molokhia, Farouk A.; Pegg, C. A. S.; Hood, William B.

    1971-01-01

    The hemodynamic effects of tachycardia induced by atrial pacing were investigated in left ventricular failure of acute and healing experimental myocardial infarction in 20 intact, conscious dogs. Myocardial infarction was produced by gradual inflation of a balloon cuff device implanted around the left anterior descending coronary artery 10-15 days prior to the study. 1 hr after acute myocardial infarction, atrial pacing at a rate of 180 beats/min decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 19 to 8 mm Hg and left atrial pressure from 17 to 12 mm Hg, without change in cardiac output. In the healing phase of myocardial infarction 1 wk later, atrial pacing decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 17 to 9 mm Hg and increased the cardiac output by 37%. This was accompanied by evidence of peripheral vasodilation. In two dogs with healing anterior wall myocardial infarction, left ventricular failure was enhanced by partial occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery. Both the dogs developed pulmonary edema. Pacing improved left ventricular performance and relieved pulmonary edema in both animals. In six animals propranolol was given after acute infarction, and left ventricular function deteriorated further. However the pacing-induced augmentation of cardiac function was unaltered and, hence, is not mediated by sympathetics. The results show that the spontaneous heart rate in left ventricular failure of experimental canine myocardial infarction may be less than optimal and that maximal cardiac function may be achieved at higher heart rates. Images PMID:4395910

  10. Effect of verapamil on heart rate variability after an acute myocardial infarction. Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II.

    PubMed

    Vaage-Nilsen, M; Rasmussen, V

    1998-07-01

    Because decreased heart rate variability measured after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been demonstrated to predict subsequent mortality and sudden death, and an efficacy analysis of the Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II (DAVIT II) demonstrated that long-term postinfarction treatment with verapamil significantly reduced sudden death, the aim of the present substudy was to evaluate the effect of verapamil on heart-rate variability in the time and frequency domain, measured in two 5-minute segments during the day and night. Thirty-eight patients were examined by Holter monitoring, at 1 week, that is, before randomization, and at 1 month after infarction; 22 of the patients were examined 12-16 months after infarction as well. In both treatment groups (verapamil and placebo) no significant alteration of heart rate variability during the day-time was demonstrated from before to after 1 and 12-16 months of treatment. In accord with the known reduction of overall heart rate by verapamil, a significant increase of mean NN interval from before to after 1 (P = 0.0004) and 12-16 months (P = 0.004) of treatment was seen in the verapamil, but not in the placebo, group at night. Parameters generally interpreted as an index of parasympathetic modulation, that is, RMSSD, pNN50, and high-frequency power, increased significantly at 1 month (P = 0.04, P = 0.03, NS, respectively) and 12-16 months (P = 0.03, P = 0.04, P < 0.05) after AMI in the verapamil, but not in the placebo, group. In conclusion, the present study indicates that verapamil shifts the autonomic balance to a vagal preponderance or sympathetic attenuation in the postinfarction period. PMID:9784908

  11. Myocardial infarction and marijuana.

    PubMed

    Charles, R; Holt, S; Kirkham, N

    1979-04-01

    Myocardial infarction in the virtual absence of risk factors occurred in a 25-year old man shortly after smoking a cigarette containing marijuana. Subsequent coronary arteriography was normal. PMID:466984

  12. Relation of Left Ventricular Mass and Infarct Size in Anterior Wall ST-Segment Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction (from the EMBRACE STEMI Clinical Trial).

    PubMed

    Daaboul, Yazan; Korjian, Serge; Weaver, W Douglas; Kloner, Robert A; Giugliano, Robert P; Carr, Jim; Neal, Brandon J; Chi, Gerald; Cochet, Madeleine; Goodell, Laura; Michalak, Nathan; Rusowicz-Orazem, Luke; Alkathery, Turky; Allaham, Haytham; Routray, Sujit; Szlosek, Donald; Jain, Purva; Gibson, C Michael

    2016-09-01

    Biomarker measures of infarct size and myocardial salvage index (MSI) are important surrogate measures of clinical outcomes after a myocardial infarction. However, there is variability in infarct size unaccounted for by conventional adjustment factors. This post hoc analysis of Evaluation of Myocardial Effects of Bendavia for Reducing Reperfusion Injury in Patients With Acute Coronary Events (EMBRACE) ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) trial evaluates the association between left ventricular (LV) mass and infarct size as assessed by areas under the curve for creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and troponin I release over the first 72 hours (CK-MB area under the curve [AUC] and troponin I [TnI] AUC) and the MSI. Patients with first anterior STEMI, occluded left anterior descending artery, and available LV mass measurement in EMBRACE STEMI trial were included (n = 100) (ClinicalTrials.govNCT01572909). MSI, end-diastolic LV mass on day 4 cardiac magnetic resonance, and CK-MB and troponin I concentrations were evaluated by a core laboratory. After saturated multivariate analysis, dominance analysis was performed to estimate the contribution of each independent variable to the predicted variance of each outcome. In multivariate models that included age, gender, body surface area, lesion location, smoking, and ischemia time, LV mass remained independently associated with biomarker measures of infarct size (CK-MB AUC p = 0.02, TnI AUC p = 0.03) and MSI (p = 0.003). Dominance analysis demonstrated that LV mass accounted for 58%, 47%, and 60% of the predicted variances for CK-MB AUC, TnI AUC, and MSI, respectively. In conclusion, LV mass accounts for approximately half of the predicted variance in biomarker measures of infarct size. It should be considered as an adjustment variable in studies evaluating infarct size. PMID:27392509

  13. Thrombus aspiration in acute myocardial infarction: concepts, clinical trials, and current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vandermolen, Sebastian; Marciniak, Maciej; Byrne, Jonathan; De Silva, Kalpa

    2016-05-01

    The pathogenesis that underlies acute myocardial infarction is complex and multifactorial. One of the most important components, however, is the role of thrombus formation following atherosclerotic plaque rupture, leading to sudden coronary occlusion and subsequent ischemia and infarction. Thrombus aspiration provides the opportunity of intracoronary clot extraction with the aim to improve coronary and myocardial perfusion, by reducing the risk of no-reflow secondary to distal embolization of thrombus. The utility of thrombus aspiration during primary percutaneous coronary intervention has been assessed in an increasing number of observational and randomized studies. This article reviews the contemporary data and provides insights into the validity of thrombus aspiration in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:26751424

  14. Effect of additional treatment with EXenatide in patients with an Acute Myocardial Infarction (EXAMI): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction causes irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes and may lead to loss of ventricular function, morbidity and mortality. Infarct size is a major prognostic factor and reduction of infarct size has therefore been an important objective of strategies to improve outcomes. In experimental studies, glucagon-like peptide 1 and exenatide, a long acting glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, a novel drug introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, reduced infarct size after myocardial infarction by activating pro-survival pathways and by increasing metabolic efficiency. Methods The EXAMI trial is a multi-center, prospective, randomized, placebo controlled trial, designed to evaluate clinical outcome of exenatide infusion on top of standard treatment, in patients with an acute myocardial infarction, successfully treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. A total of 108 patients will be randomized to exenatide (5 μg bolus in 30 minutes followed by continuous infusion of 20 μg/24 h for 72 h) or placebo treatment. The primary end point of the study is myocardial infarct size (measured using magnetic resonance imaging with delayed enhancement at 4 months) as a percentage of the area at risk (measured using T2 weighted images at 3-7 days). Discussion If the current study demonstrates cardioprotective effects, exenatide may constitute a novel therapeutic option to reduce infarct size and preserve cardiac function in adjunction to reperfusion therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01254123 PMID:22067476

  15. Effect of Ischemic Postconditioning on Infarct Size in Patients With ST‐Elevation Myocardial Infarction Treated by Primary PCI Results of the POSTEMI (POstconditioning in ST‐Elevation Myocardial Infarction) Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Limalanathan, Shanmuganathan; Andersen, Geir Ø.; Kløw, Nils‐Einar; Abdelnoor, Michael; Hoffmann, Pavel; Eritsland, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Reduction of infarct size by ischemic postconditioning (IPost) has been reported in smaller proof‐of‐concept clinical studies, but has not been confirmed in other smaller studies. The principle needs to be evaluated in larger groups of ST‐elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients before being implemented in clinical practice. This study assessed the effect of ischemic postcoditioning (IPost) on infarct size in patients with STEMI treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and Results Patients with first‐time STEMI, <6 hours from symptom onset, referred to primary PCI were randomized to IPost or control groups. IPost was administered by 4 cycles of 1‐minute reocclusion and 1‐minute reperfusion, starting 1 minute after opening, followed by stenting. In the control group, stenting was performed immediately after reperfusion. The primary endpoint was infarct size measured by cardiac magnetic resonance after 4 months. A total of 272 patients were randomized. Infarct size (percent of left ventricular mass) after 4 months (median values and interquartile range) was 14.4% (7.7, 24.6) and 13.5% (8.1, 19.3) in the control group and IPost group, respectively (P=0.18). No significant impact of IPost was found when controlling for baseline risk factors of infarct size in a multivariate linear regression model (P=0.16). The effects of IPost on secondary endpoints, including markers of necrosis, myocardial salvage, and ejection fraction, as well as adverse cardiac events during follow‐up, were consistently neutral. Conclusions In contrast to several smaller trials reported previously, we found no significant effects of IPost on infarct size or secondary study outcomes. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov Unique identifier: NCT.No.PO1506. PMID:24760962

  16. New evidence from the CAPRICORN Trial: the role of carvedilol in high-risk, post-myocardial infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Sackner-Bernstein, Jonathan D

    2003-01-01

    The CAPRICORN (Carvedilol Post-Infarct Survival Control in Left Ventricular Dysfunction) trial established that the beta-blocker carvedilol reduces the risk of death in patients with left ventricular dysfunction post myocardial infarction, whether or not the infarct is complicated by clinical heart failure. Thus, the utility of the beta-blocker carvedilol is confirmed in the modern era as an adjunct to revascularization, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, aspirin, and statins. In addition, the results prompt us to review the prior studies of beta-blockers postinfarction. Critical review of CAPRICORN and earlier beta-blocker studies suggests that specific beta-blockers should be matched to specific clinical scenarios. The COMET (Carvedilol or Metoprolol European Trial) study reinforces this view by establishing that beta-blockers are not simply interchangeable agents. PMID:14564231

  17. Experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hood, William B.; Bianco, Jesus A.; Kumar, Raj; Whiting, Richard B.

    1970-01-01

    Compliance of the infarcted left ventricle was studied in dogs 3-5 days after occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Compliance was assessed from postmortem pressure-volume curves and from pressure-length measurements (mercury-in-silastic segment length gauges) made both in vivo and postmortem. Postmortem pressure-volume curves showed reduced compliance compared to sham-operated animals. Postmortem pressure-length curves of infarcted and adjacent normal myocardium indicated that the diminished total compliance could be attributed to an increase in stiffness of the infarcted area. This was confirmed by in vivo end-diastolic pressure-length changes produced by transient aortic occlusion. The infarcted area was akinetic, showing neither contraction nor aneurysmal bulging. In addition, anesthetized dogs with infarcts, when compared with sham-operated animals, had similar left ventricular end-diastolic volumes (indicator dilution method), but higher left ventricular end-diastolic pressures. Taken with previous observations, which show that systolic aneurysmal bulging is uniformly present at the onset of ischemia, these results indicate that stiffening of the ischemic myocardium occurs during the first 5 days after infarction, and show that elevation of left ventricular filling pressure does not necessarily signify ventricular dilatation. The results also suggest a mechanism whereby ventricular performance may improve during recovery from acute myocardial infarction. Images PMID:4914678

  18. Acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory processes after myocardial infarction have gained major interest in recent cardiovascular research. It is believed that not only the degree of cell recruitment to the heart plays a pivotal role in the quality of wound healing after myocardial infarction, but also the balance between different types or even subtypes of cells. It is also this balance which is thought to control key processes in tissue repair, such as apoptosis and neoangiogenesis. In this paper, we aim to review imaging strategies (with a special focus on nuclear molecular imaging strategies) that target cells and processes involved in postischemic inflammation and that have a high potential to be translated into clinic or that are already being used and evaluated in humans. PMID:27225319

  19. Noninvasive risk stratification after myocardial infarction: rationale, current evidence and the need for definitive trials.

    PubMed

    Exner, Derek

    2009-06-01

    Despite advances in therapies for myocardial infarction (MI), death attributed to a cardiac arrest from ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) remains an important problem. The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is effective in preventing death from VT/VF, but reliably identifying which post-MI patients would benefit from an ICD remains a major challenge. Beyond the initial post-MI period, the presence of significant left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, alone or in combination with the induction of sustained VT/VF during invasive testing, is the only proven means of selecting patients for a prophylactic ICD. However, these approaches identify only a fraction of those at risk. Furthermore, most patients with significant LV dysfunction after MI have a low, near-term risk of VT/VF. Noninvasive risk stratification tools have been developed to better identify patients likely to benefit from an ICD. To date, none of these tools has been proven useful in this regard. The factors leading to a cardiac arrest are complex, and a single test is unlikely to reliably predict risk. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac structure, conduction and repolarization along with autonomic modulation appear to be useful in predicting the risk of a cardiac arrest after MI, particularly when assessed in combination. However, randomized trials assessing the efficacy of ICD therapy in patients identified as being at risk are required. Until such data are available, significant LV dysfunction alone and in combination with the induction of VT/VF during invasive testing in the nonacute post-MI period remain the only proven methods to guide prophylactic ICD therapy. PMID:19521570

  20. Noninvasive risk stratification after myocardial infarction: Rationale, current evidence and the need for definitive trials

    PubMed Central

    Exner, Derek V

    2009-01-01

    Despite advances in therapies for myocardial infarction (MI), death attributed to a cardiac arrest from ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) remains an important problem. The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is effective in preventing death from VT/VF, but reliably identifying which post-MI patients would benefit from an ICD remains a major challenge. Beyond the initial post-MI period, the presence of significant left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, alone or in combination with the induction of sustained VT/VF during invasive testing, is the only proven means of selecting patients for a prophylactic ICD. However, these approaches identify only a fraction of those at risk. Furthermore, most patients with significant LV dysfunction after MI have a low, near-term risk of VT/VF. Noninvasive risk stratification tools have been developed to better identify patients likely to benefit from an ICD. To date, none of these tools has been proven useful in this regard. The factors leading to a cardiac arrest are complex, and a single test is unlikely to reliably predict risk. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac structure, conduction and repolarization along with autonomic modulation appear to be useful in predicting the risk of a cardiac arrest after MI, particularly when assessed in combination. However, randomized trials assessing the efficacy of ICD therapy in patients identified as being at risk are required. Until such data are available, significant LV dysfunction alone and in combination with the induction of VT/VF during invasive testing in the nonacute post-MI period remain the only proven methods to guide prophylactic ICD therapy. PMID:19521570

  1. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of L-carnitine in suspected acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R. B.; Niaz, M. A.; Agarwal, P.; Beegum, R.; Rastogi, S. S.; Sachan, D. S.

    1996-01-01

    In a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial, the effects of the administration of oral L-carnitine (2 g/day) for 28 days were compared in the management of 51 (carnitine group) and 50 (placebo group) patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. At study entry, the extent of cardiac disease, cardiac enzymes and lipid peroxides were comparable between the groups, although both groups showed an increase in cardiac enzymes and lipid peroxides. At the end of the 28-day treatment period, the mean infarct size assessed by cardiac enzymes showed a significant reduction in the carnitine group compared to placebo. Electrocardiographic assessment of infarct size revealed that the QRS-score was significantly less in the carnitine group compared to placebo (7.4 +/- 1.2 vs 10.7 +/- 2.0), while serum aspartate transaminase and lipid peroxides showed significant reduction in the carnitine group. Lactate dehydrogenase measured on the sixth or seventh day following infarction showed a smaller rise in the carnitine group compared to placebo. Angina pectoris (17.6 vs 36.0%), New York Heart Association class III and IV heart failure plus left ventricular enlargement (23.4 vs 36.0%) and total arrhythmias (13.7 vs 28.0%) were significantly less in the carnitine group compared to placebo. Total cardiac events including cardiac deaths and nonfatal infarction were 15.6% in the carnitine group vs 26.0% in the placebo group. It is possible that L-carnitine supplementation in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction may be protective against cardiac necrosis and complications during the first 28 days. PMID:8746285

  2. [Cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Ghannem, M; Ghannem, L; Ghannem, L

    2015-12-01

    Although the proofs of the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation accumulate, many patients are not sent to rehabilitation units, especially younger and very elderly patients. As the length of stay in acute care units decreases, rehabilitation offers more time to fully assess the patients' conditions and needs. Meta-analyses of randomised trials suggest that mortality can be improved by as much as 20-30%. In addition, rehabilitation helps managing risk factors, including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and sedentary behaviours. Physical training also helps improving exercise capacity. Because of all of these effects, cardiac rehabilitation for post-myocardial infarction patients has been given a class IA recommendation in current guidelines. PMID:26548984

  3. Trauma Induced Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lolay, Georges A.; Abdel-Latef, Ahmed K.

    2016-01-01

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the Trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out Aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction. PMID:26490501

  4. Valsartan after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Güleç, Sadi

    2014-12-01

    One of the important problems of the patients undergoing acute myocardial infarction (MI) is early development of heart failure. It has been revealed in various studies that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has a significant role in this process. The studies conducted with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have resulted in decreased mortality rate. Another RAAS blocker which was discovered about ten years later than other ACE inhibitors in historical process is angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) inhibiting the efficiency of angiotensin 2 by binding to angiotensin 1 receptor. Valsartan is one of the molecules of this group, which has higher number of large-scale randomized clinical studies. In this review, following presentation of a general overview on heart failure after acute MI, the efficiency of ARBs in this patient group will be discussed. This discussion will mostly emphasize the construction, outcomes and clinical importance of VALIANT (VALsartan In Acute myocardial iNfarcTion), which is the study on valsartan after acute MI heart failure. PMID:25604205

  5. An unusual myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Di Michele, Sara; Mirabelli, Francesca; Mankad, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Summary We present a 74-year-old male with a chondrosarcoma, who presented with chest pain. The history, electrocardiogram (ECG), and biomarkers established the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI); angiography did not show coronary atherosclerosis and, both initial transthoracic echocardiogram and chest computed tomography (CT), did not demonstrate any cardiac abnormalities. A second echocardiogram following a routine ECG showed presence of a mass involving the right ventricle and the cardiac apex that was confirmed by chest CT scan. We underline the importance of considering cardiac tumors in the clinical arena of MI management. Learning points Cardiac tumors cause ECG changes similar to ischemic heart diseases.Keep in mind cardiac tumors when performing transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) in the setting of suspected MI.TTE is the technique of choice in detecting cardiac tumors. PMID:26693309

  6. Masquerades of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    I summarize these observations in Figure 1. It represents every person in a hypothetical population who has myocardial infarction. A large but unknown number, some believe almost half, never get help. Mobile coronary care units are reducing this group, but so far only a little. When the diagnosis is not understood the disease is not recognized. Then come discovery and popularization. Hereafter masquerades hide some cases and the diagnosis is missed. Somewhere fairly early the diagnostic fad leads to false positive diagnosis. As new techniques are discovered, perfected and mastered, false positive errors and masquerades leading to oversights diminish but still exist. All the skill and technical virtuosity in the world will not be applied if we do not think of the disease. When we think of it, even obscure cases may be resolved easily. PMID:960416

  7. Low High-Density Lipoprotein and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, A; Hu, P P

    2015-01-01

    Low HDL is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction. This paper reviews our current understanding of HDL, HDL structure and function, HDL subclasses, the relationship of low HDL with myocardial infarction, HDL targeted therapy, and clinical trials and studies. Furthermore potential new agents, such as alirocumab (praluent) and evolocumab (repatha) are discussed. PMID:26692765

  8. Low High-Density Lipoprotein and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, A.; Hu, P. P.

    2015-01-01

    Low HDL is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction. This paper reviews our current understanding of HDL, HDL structure and function, HDL subclasses, the relationship of low HDL with myocardial infarction, HDL targeted therapy, and clinical trials and studies. Furthermore potential new agents, such as alirocumab (praluent) and evolocumab (repatha) are discussed. PMID:26692765

  9. Myocardial Infarction in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Amelia; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Advances in pharmacological treatment and effective early myocardial revascularization have –in recent years- led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, it has been suggested that compared to younger subjects, elderly AMI patients are less likely to receive evidence-based treatment, including myocardial revascularization therapy. Several reasons have been postulated to explain this trend, including uncertainty regarding the true benefits of the interventions commonly used in this setting as well as increased risk mainly associated with comorbidities. The diagnosis, management, and post-hospitalization care of elderly patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome pose many difficulties at present. A complex interplay of variables such as comorbidities, functional and socioeconomic status, side effects associated with multiple drug administration, and individual biologic variability, all contribute to creating a complex clinical scenario. In this complex setting, clinicians are often required to extrapolate evidence-based results obtained in cardiovascular trials from which older patients are often, implicitly or explicitly, excluded. This article reviews current recommendations regarding management of AMI in the elderly. PMID:22396870

  10. Design and rationale of a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effect of vitamin D on ventricular remodelling in patients with anterior myocardial infarction: the VITamin D in Acute Myocardial Infarction (VITDAMI) trial

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, José; González-Hernández, Ignacio; Llanos-Jiménez, Lucía; Alonso-Martín, Joaquín; Escudier-Villa, Juan M; Tarín, Nieves; Cristóbal, Carmen; Sanz, Petra; Pello, Ana M; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Orejas, Miguel; Tomás, Marta; Beltrán, Paula; Calero Rueda, Marta; Marcos, Esther; Serrano-Antolín, José María; Gutiérrez-Landaluce, Carlos; Jiménez, Rosa; Cabezudo, Jorge; Curcio, Alejandro; Peces-Barba, Germán; González-Parra, Emilio; Muñoz-Siscart, Raquel; González-Casaus, María Luisa; Lorenzo, Antonio; Huelmos, Ana; Goicolea, Javier; Ibáñez, Borja; Hernández, Gonzalo; Alonso-Pulpón, Luis M; Farré, Jerónimo; Lorenzo, Óscar; Mahíllo-Fernández, Ignacio; Egido, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Decreased plasma vitamin D (VD) levels are linked to cardiovascular damage. However, clinical trials have not demonstrated a benefit of VD supplements on left ventricular (LV) remodelling. Anterior ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) is the best human model to study the effect of treatments on LV remodelling. We present a proof-of-concept study that aims to investigate whether VD improves LV remodelling in patients with anterior STEMI. Methods and analysis The VITamin D in Acute Myocardial Infarction (VITDAMI) trial is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 144 patients with anterior STEMI will be assigned to receive calcifediol 0.266 mg capsules (Hidroferol SGC)/15 days or placebo on a 2:1 basis during 12 months. Primary objective: to evaluate the effect of calcifediol on LV remodelling defined as an increase in LV end-diastolic volume ≥10% (MRI). Secondary objectives: change in LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, ejection fraction, LV mass, diastolic function, sphericity index and size of fibrotic area; endothelial function; plasma levels of aminoterminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide, galectin-3 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1; levels of calcidiol (VD metabolite) and other components of mineral metabolism (fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), the soluble form of its receptor klotho, parathormone and phosphate). Differences in the effect of VD will be investigated according to the plasma levels of FGF-23 and klotho. Treatment safety and tolerability will be assessed. This is the first study to evaluate the effect of VD on cardiac remodelling in patients with STEMI. Ethics and dissemination This trial has been approved by the corresponding Institutional Review Board (IRB) and National Competent Authority (Agencia Española de Medicamentos y Productos Sanitarios (AEMPS)). It will be conducted in accordance with good clinical practice (International Council for Harmonisation of

  11. Outcomes after thrombus aspiration for ST elevation myocardial infarction: 1-year follow-up of the prospective randomised TOTAL trial

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Sanjit S; Cairns, John A; Yusuf, Salim; Rokoss, Michael J; Gao, Peggy; Meeks, Brandi; Kedev, Sasko; Stankovic, Goran; Moreno, Raul; Gershlick, Anthony; Chowdhary, Saqib; Lavi, Shahar; Niemela, Kari; Bernat, Ivo; Cantor, Warren J; Cheema, Asim N; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Welsh, Robert C; Sheth, Tej; Bertrand, Olivier F; Avezum, Alvaro; Bhindi, Ravinay; Natarajan, Madhu K; Horak, David; Leung, Raymond C M; Kassam, Saleem; Rao, Sunil V; El-Omar, Magdi; Mehta, Shamir R; Velianou, James L; Pancholy, Samir; Džavík, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Two large trials have reported contradictory results at 1 year after thrombus aspiration in ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In a 1-year follow-up of the largest randomised trial of thrombus aspiration, we aimed to clarify the longer-term benefits, to help guide clinical practice. Methods The trial of routine aspiration ThrOmbecTomy with PCI versus PCI ALone in Patients with STEMI (TOTAL) was a prospective, randomised, investigator-initiated trial of routine manual thrombectomy versus percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) alone in 10 732 patients with STEMI. Eligible adult patients (aged ≥18 years) from 87 hospitals in 20 countries were enrolled and randomly assigned (1:1) within 12 h of symptom onset to receive routine manual thrombectomy with PCI or PCI alone. Permuted block randomisation (with variable block size) was done by a 24 h computerised central system, and was stratified by centre. Participants and investigators were not masked to treatment assignment. The trial did not show a difference at 180 days in the primary outcome of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, or heart failure. However, the results showed improvements in the surrogate outcomes of ST segment resolution and distal embolisation, but whether or not this finding would translate into a longer term benefit remained unclear. In this longer-term follow-up of the TOTAL study, we report the results on the primary outcome (cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock, or heart failure) and secondary outcomes at 1 year. Analyses of the primary outcome were by modified intention to treat and only included patients who underwent index PCI. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01149044. Findings Between Aug 5, 2010, and July 25, 2014, 10 732 eligible patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to thrombectomy followed by PCI (n=5372) or to PCI alone (n=5360). After exclusions of patients who did not

  12. Thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Woo, K S; White, H D

    1994-07-01

    Thrombolytic therapy has revolutionized the treatment of acute myocardial infarction by reducing mortality and preserving left ventricular function. It is relatively safe and cost-effective. However, it is currently underused in most countries. Patients in whom thrombolysis is indicated include those with ST elevation on the electrocardiogram or bundle branch block pattern who present within 12 hours of myocardial infarction; the indications should be widened to include the elderly, patients who have undergone nontraumatic cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and women during menstruation. The risk-benefit ratio should be assessed for the individual patient. Prehospital thrombolytic treatment has been shown to be feasible with the support of well-trained staff and resuscitation equipment, and may be cost-effective in communities with time delays before hospitalization greater than 1 hour. The most important strategy is to shorten the "door to needle" time in hospital. The importance of full infarct-related artery flow (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction [TIMI] grade 3 flow) for preservation of ventricular function and survival has been documented in the second Thrombolysis Trial of Eminase in Acute Myocardial Infarction (TEAM 2) and the Global Utilization of Streptokinase and t-PA for Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) studies. Aspirin and heparin are beneficial adjunctive regimens to thrombolytic therapy but optimal epicardial reperfusion is achieved in only about half of patients. Improved thrombolytic, adjunctive antiplatelet, and antithrombotic regimens are required to achieve early full reperfusion, which is crucial to improve survival and quality of life. PMID:7919592

  13. Viewpoint: Central adjudication of myocardial infarction in outcome-driven clinical trials--common patterns in TRITON, RECORD, and PLATO?

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Atar, Dan

    2012-09-01

    Central adjudication in randomised controlled outcome-driven trials represents a traditional approach to maintain data integrity by applying uniformed rules for assessment of clinical events. It was the purpose of this investigation to determine the patterns of myocardial infarction (MI) adjudication in the TRITON, RECORD, and PLATO trials. We were matching centrally-adjudicated MI's (CAMI's) from the official trial publication with the site-reported MI (SRMI's) count from the Food and Drug Administration's secondary analyses for the investigational compounds prasugrel (TRITON), rosiglitazone (RECORD), and ticagrelor (PLATO). CAMI numbers showed a remarkable discrepancy to SRMI's by more than a doubling of the difference: from 72 to 145 events in TRITON favoring prasugrel (from a hazard ratio [HR]=0.76, p=0.08; to a HR=0.76, p<0.001), and from 44 to 89 events in favour of ticagrelor in PLATO (from a HR=0.94, p=0.095; to a HR=0.84, p<0.001). In contrast, in the RECORD trial, the CAMI count was less than the SRMI count (from 24 to 8 events, from a HR=1.42, p=0.93; to a HR=1.14, p=0.96), in this case diminishing cardiovascular hazards in favour of rosiglitazone. In conclusion, central adjudication in the TRITON, the RECORD, and the PLATO trial turned out to have a critical impact on study outcomes. Trial publications should in the future include site-reported major efficacy and safety endpoints to preserve data integrity. The regulatory authorities should consider independent audits when there is a major disagreement between centrally adjudicated and site reported events influencing the results of a major clinical trial. PMID:22836596

  14. [Prehospital thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Carlsson, J; Schuster, H P; Tebbe, U

    1997-10-01

    The extent of myocardial damage occurring during acute myocardial infarction is time dependent, and there is abundant evidence from most clinical trials that mortality reduction is greatest in patients treated early with thrombolytic agents, although beneficial effects have been shown with treatment initiated up to 12 h after onset of symptoms. All studies on prehospital thrombolysis have conclusively shown the practicability and safety of patient selection and administration of the thrombolytic agent. The accuracy of diagnosis in the prehospital setting was comparable to trials of in-hospital thrombolysis, e.g., in the Myocardial Infarction Triage and Intervention Project (MITI) 98% of the patients enrolled had subsequent evidence of acute myocardial infarction. With regard to time savings, all randomized studies showed positive results. The smallest time gain was observed in the MITI trial: prehospital-treated patients received thrombolytic therapy an average of 33 min earlier than those treated in hospital. In the European Myocardial Infarction Project (EMIP) the difference in time between prehospital and hospital treatment was a median of 55 min. However, none of these trials was able to show a significant short-term mortality difference between the two groups. Only a meta analysis of five randomized studies with a combined median time gain of about 60 min showed a significant 17% reduction in short-term mortality for patients who received thrombolytic therapy in the prehospital phase. In the Grampian Region Early Anistreplase Trial (GREAT), a study performed in a more rural area than other studies, the time gain by prehospital initiation of thrombolysis was a median of 130 min. GREAT was the only study to date reporting a significant mortality benefit for prehospital-treated patients after 3 months and 1 year. In conclusion, prehospital thrombolysis is feasible and safe. Patients with acute myocardial infarction can be correctly identified and treated with

  15. Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills for the Secondary Prevention of Myocardial Infarction: A Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Hongcai; Zhang, Junhua; Yao, Chen; Liu, Baoyan; Gao, Xiumei; Ren, Ming; Cao, Hongbao; Dai, Guohua; Weng, Weiliang; Zhu, Sainan; Wang, Hui; Xu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Boli

    2013-01-01

    Background. Several types of drugs have been recommended for the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI). However, these conventional strategies have several limitations, such as low adherence, high cost, and side effects during long time use. Novel approaches to this problem are still needed. This trial aimed to test the effectiveness and safety of Qi-Shen-Yi-Qi Dripping Pills (QSYQ), a multi-ingredient Chinese patent medicine, for the secondary prevention of MI. Methods and Findings. A total of 3505 eligible patients were randomly assigned to QSYQ group (1746 patients) or aspirin group (1759). Patients took their treatments for 12 months. The final follow-up visit took place 6 months after the end of the trial drugs. The 12-month and 18-month estimated incidences of the primary outcome were 2.98% and 3.67%, respectively, in the QSYQ group. The figures were 2.96% and 3.81% in the aspirin group. No significant difference was identified between the groups. Conclusions. This trial did not show significant difference of primary and secondary outcomes between aspirin and QSYQ in patients who have had an MI. Though inconclusive, the result suggests that QSYQ has similar effects to aspirin in the secondary prevention of MI. PMID:23935677

  16. Usefulness of serum unbound free fatty acid levels to predict death early in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (from the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction [TIMI] II trial).

    PubMed

    Huber, Andrew H; Kampf, J Patrick; Kwan, Thomas; Zhu, Baolong; Adams, Jesse; Kleinfeld, Alan M

    2014-01-15

    Circulating total free fatty acid (FFA) levels are elevated early in myocardial infarction (MI) and have been associated with an increase in mortality. We investigated the association of serum unbound FFA (FFAu) levels with mortality in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation MI in the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction II trial. The Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction II trial enrolled patients within 4 hours of chest pain onset. The patients were treated with a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator within 1 hour of enrollment. The FFAu concentration was evaluated in serum samples from 1,834 patients obtained at baseline, before therapy. The FFAu level was an independent risk factor for death as early as at 1 day of hospitalization and continued to be an independent risk factor for the >3.8 years of follow-up. When adjusted for other cardiovascular risk factors, the FFAu levels in the fourth versus the first quartile remained an independent risk factor for death from MI (hazard ratio 5.0, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 13.0), all cardiac death (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 4.4), and all-cause death (hazard ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 3.1). Women were twice as likely to be in the upper 2 FFAu quartiles and had approximately twice the rate of death as men. In conclusion, FFAu elevation is 1 of the earliest molecular biomarkers of mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation MI and was independent of other risk factors known to affect the outcomes after ST-segment elevation MI. PMID:24176067

  17. Myocardial infarction following bee sting.

    PubMed

    Puvanalingam, A; Karpagam, P; Sundar, C; Venkatesan, S; Ragunanthanan

    2014-08-01

    Bee stings are commonly encountered worldwide. Various manifestations after bee sting have been described. Local reactions are common. Unusually, manifestations like vomiting, diarrhoea, dyspnoea, generalised oedema, acute renal failure, hypotension and collapse may occur. Rarely vasculitis, serum sickness, neuritis and encephalitis have been described which generally develop days to weeks after a sting. Acute coronary syndromes after hymenoptera stings and other environmental exposures are referred to as the Kounis syndrome or allergic myocardial ischaemia and infarction. We report a 60 year old male who developed myocardial infarction after multiple bee stings over his body. PMID:25856951

  18. Acute care of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M. B.; Lee, T. F.; Gin, K.; Ho, K.

    1996-01-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarct (AMI) need rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of thrombolytic therapy. Patients with suspected cardiac ischemia must receive a coordinated team response by the emergency room staff including rapid electrocardiographic analysis and a quick but thorough history and physical examination to diagnose AMI. Thrombolysis and adjunct therapies should be administered promptly when indicated. The choice of thrombolytics is predicated by the location of the infarct. PMID:8754702

  19. Clinical trials of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) demonstrate no increase in risk of myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death compared with placebo.

    PubMed

    Mittleman, M A; Glasser, D B; Orazem, J

    2003-09-01

    We pooled data regarding myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiovascular death from more than 120 clinical trials of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) conducted from 1993 to 2001. During placebo-controlled trials, the rate of MI or cardiovascular death was 0.91 (95% CI: 0.52-1.48) per 100 person-years (PY) of follow-up among sildenafil-treated patients compared with 0.84 (95% CI: 0.39-1.60) per 100 PY of follow-up among placebo-treated patients. The relative risk of MI or cardiovascular death was 1.08 (95% CI: 0.45-2.77) for sildenafil compared with placebo (p = 0.88). During open-label studies, the rate of MI or cardiovascular death was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.44-0.72) per 100 PY of follow-up. This analysis showed that the rates of MI and cardiovascular death were low and comparable between men treated with sildenafil and those treated with placebo. The use of sildenafil was not associated with an increase in the risk of MI or cardiovascular death. PMID:14529061

  20. Effect of Metformin Treatment on Lipoprotein Subfractions in Non-Diabetic Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Glycometabolic Intervention as Adjunct to Primary Coronary Intervention in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (GIPS-III) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eppinga, Ruben N.; Hartman, Minke H. T.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Lexis, Chris P. H.; Connelly, Margery A.; Lipsic, Erik; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; van der Harst, Pim; Dullaart, Robin P. F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metformin affects low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density (HDL) subfractions in the context of impaired glucose tolerance, but its effects in the setting of acute myocardial infarction (MI) are unknown. We determined whether metformin administration affects lipoprotein subfractions 4 months after ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI). Second, we assessed associations of lipoprotein subfractions with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and infarct size 4 months after STEMI. Methods 371 participants without known diabetes participating in the GIPS-III trial, a placebo controlled, double-blind randomized trial studying the effect of metformin (500 mg bid) during 4 months after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for STEMI were included of whom 317 completed follow-up (clinicaltrial.gov Identifier: NCT01217307). Lipoprotein subfractions were measured using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at presentation, 24 hours and 4 months after STEMI. (Apo)lipoprotein measures were obtained during acute STEMI and 4 months post-STEMI. LVEF and infarct size were measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Results Metformin treatment slightly decreased LDL cholesterol levels (adjusted P = 0.01), whereas apoB remained unchanged. Large LDL particles and LDL size were also decreased after metformin treatment (adjusted P<0.001). After adjustment for covariates, increased small HDL particles at 24 hours after STEMI predicted higher LVEF (P = 0.005). In addition, increased medium-sized VLDL particles at the same time point predicted a smaller infarct size (P<0.001). Conclusion LDL cholesterol and large LDL particles were decreased during 4 months treatment with metformin started early after MI. Higher small HDL and medium VLDL particle concentrations are associated with favorable LVEF and infarct size. PMID:26808474

  1. Acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Domes, Trustin; Szafran, Olga; Bilous, Cheryl; Olson, Odell; Spooner, G. Richard

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of care of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural health region. DESIGN Clinical audit employing multiple explicit criteria of care elements for emergency department and in-hospital AMI management. The audit was conducted using retrospective chart review. SETTING Twelve acute care health centres and hospitals in the East Central Health Region, a rural health region in Alberta, where medical and surgical services are provided almost entirely by family physicians. PARTICIPANTS Hospital inpatients with a confirmed discharge diagnosis of AMI (ICD-9-CM codes 410.xx) during the period April 1, 2001, to March 31, 2002, were included (177 confirmed cases). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of AMI care was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association and the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team and Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Quality of care indicators at three stages of patient care were assessed: at initial recognition and AMI management in the emergency department, during in-hospital AMI management, and at preparation for discharge from hospital. RESULTS In the emergency department, the quality of care was high for most procedural and therapeutic audit elements, with the exception of rapid electrocardiography, urinalysis, and provision of nitroglycerin and morphine. Average door-to-needle time for thrombolysis was 102.5 minutes. The quality of in-hospital care was high for most elements, but low for nitroglycerin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, daily electrocardiography, and counseling regarding smoking cessation and diet. Few patients received counseling for lifestyle changes at hospital discharge. Male and younger patients were treated more aggressively than female and older patients. Sites that used care protocols achieved better results in initial AMI management than sites that did not. Stress testing was not readily available in the rural

  2. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Cardioprotection in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, In Sook; Fumiaki, Ikeno

    2016-01-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia of 32–35℃ improved neurologic outcomes in outside hospital cardiac arrest survivor. Furthermore, in experimental studies on infarcted model and pilot studies on conscious patients with acute myocardial infarction, therapeutic hypothermia successfully reduced infarct size and microvascular resistance. Therefore, mild therapeutic hypothermia has received an attention as a promising solution for reduction of infarction size after acute myocardial infarction which are not completely solved despite of optimal reperfusion therapy. Nevertheless, the results from randomized clinical trials failed to prove the cardioprotective effects of therapeutic hypothermia or showed beneficial effects only in limited subgroups. In this article, we reviewed rationale for therapeutic hypothermia and possible mechanisms from previous studies, effective methods for clinical application to the patients with acute myocardial infarction, lessons from current clinical trials and future directions. PMID:26847278

  3. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on risk of myocardial infarction from the use of oral direct thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Artang, Ramin; Rome, Eric; Nielsen, Jørn Dalsgaard; Vidaillet, Humberto J

    2013-12-15

    Dabigatran has been associated with greater risk of myocardial infarction (MI) than warfarin. It is unknown whether the increased risk is unique to dabigatran, an adverse effect shared by other oral direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs), or the result of a protective effect of warfarin against MI. To address these questions, we systematically searched MEDLINE and performed a meta-analysis on randomized trials that compared oral DTIs with warfarin for any indication with end point of MIs after randomization. We furthermore performed a secondary meta-analysis on atrial fibrillation stroke prevention trials with alternative anticoagulants compared with warfarin with end point of MIs after randomization. A total of 11 trials (39,357 patients) that compared warfarin to DTIs (dabigatran, ximelagatran, and AZD0837) were identified. In these trials, patients treated with oral DTIs were more likely to experience an MI than their counterparts treated with warfarin (285 of 23,333 vs 133 of 16,024, odds ratio 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.66, p = 0.005). For secondary analysis, 8 studies (69,615 patients) were identified that compared warfarin with alternative anticoagulant including factor Xa inhibitors, DTIs, aspirin, and clopidogrel. There was no significant advantage in the rate of MIs with the use of warfarin versus comparators (odds ratio 1.06, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 1.34, p = 0.59). In conclusion, our data suggest that oral DTIs were associated with increased risk of MI. This increased risk appears to be a class effect of these agents, not a specific phenomenon unique to dabigatran or protective effect of warfarin. These findings support the need for enhanced postmarket surveillance of oral DTIs and other novel agents. PMID:24075284

  4. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  5. Thrombolysis for Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Webb, John; Thompson, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    Thrombolysis has an important role in the management of acute myocardial infarction. Early treatment can markedly reduce mortality and morbidity. This new standard of care requires knowledge of accepted indications and contraindications for thrombolysis as well as familiarity with available agents and regimens. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:21221398

  6. Prognostic evaluation by clinical exercise test scores in patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis for acute myocardial infarction (a Danish Trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2 Sub-Study).

    PubMed

    Valeur, Nana; Clemmensen, Peter; Grande, Peer; Saunamäki, Kari

    2007-10-01

    The prognostic accuracy of exercise testing after myocardial infarction is low, and different models have been proposed to enhance the predictive value for subsequent mortality. This study tested a simple score against 3 established scores. Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarctions were randomized in the Danish Trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2 (DANAMI-2) to either primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis with predischarge exercise testing. Clinical and exercise test data were collected prospectively and were available for 1,115 patients. A simple score was derived, awarding 1 point for history or new signs of heart failure, 1 point for a left ventricular ejection fraction <40%, 1 point for age >65 years in men and age >70 years in women, and 1 point for exercise capacity <5 METs in men and exercise capacity <4 METs in women. This DANAMI score was compared with the Veterans Affairs Medical Center score, the Duke treadmill score, and the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio Della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto Miocardico-2 (GISSI-2) score in multivariate Cox models and receiver-operating characteristic plots. All scoring systems were predictive of adverse outcomes. The DANAMI score performed better, with greater chi-square values (142 vs 53 to 88 for the prediction of death). Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves were compared and were larger for the DANAMI score (C-statistic 0.79 vs 0.71 to 0.74 for the other tests regarding mortality). The DANAMI score stratified patients into a small high-risk group (8% of the population with 43% mortality in 6 years), an intermediate-risk group (13% with 16% mortality in 6 years), and a low-risk group (79% with 4% mortality in 6 years). In conclusion, a simple exercise test score composed of age, METs, heart failure, and a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% seems to outperform the Duke treadmill score, Veterans Affairs Medical Center score, and GISSI-2 score in risk stratifying

  7. Transient myocardial ischaemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Currie, P; Saltissi, S

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence and characteristics of transient myocardial ischaemia were studied in 203 patients with recent acute myocardial infarction by both early (6.4 days) and late (38 days) ambulatory monitoring of the ST segment. Transient ST segment depression was much commoner during late (32% patients) than early (14%) monitoring. Most transient ischaemia (greater than 85% episodes) was silent and 80% of patients had only silent episodes. During late monitoring painful ST depression was accompanied by greater ST depression and tended to occur at a higher heart rate. Late transient ischaemia showed a diurnal distribution, occurred at a higher initial heart rate, and was more often accompanied by a further increase in heart rate than early ischaemia. Thus in the first 2 months after myocardial infarction transient ischaemia became increasingly common and more closely associated with increased myocardial oxygen demand. Because transient ischaemic episodes during early and late ambulatory monitoring have dissimilar characteristics they may also have different pathophysiologies and prognostic implications. PMID:2245108

  8. Efficacy of stem cell in improvement of left ventricular function in acute myocardial infarction - MI3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Velu; Madan, Hemant; Sofat, Sunil; Ganguli, Prosenjit; Jacob, M.J.; Datta, Rajat; Bharadwaj, Prashant; Sarkar, R.S.; Pandit, A.J.; Nityanand, Soniya; Goel, Pravin K.; Garg, Naveen; Gambhir, Sanjay; George, Paul V.; Chandy, Sunil; Mathews, Vikram; George, Oomen K.; Talwar, K.K.; Bahl, Ajay; Marwah, Neelam; Bhatacharya, Anish; Bhargava, Balram; Airan, Balram; Mohanty, Sujata; Patel, Chetan D.; Sharma, Alka; Bhatnagar, Shinjini; Mondal, A.; Jose, Jacob; Srivastava, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by irreparable and irreversible loss of cardiac myocytes. Despite major advances in the management of AMI, a large number of patients are left with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), which is a major determinant of short and long term morbidity and mortality. A review of 33 randomized control trials has shown varying improvement in left ventricular (LV) function in patients receiving stem cells compared to standard medical therapy. Most trials had small sample size and were underpowered. This phase III prospective, open labelled, randomized multicenteric trial was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy in improving the LVEF over a period of six months, after injecting a predefined dose of 5-10 × 108 autologous mononuclear cells (MNC) by intra-coronary route, in patients, one to three weeks post ST elevation AMI, in addition to the standard medical therapy. Methods: In this phase III prospective, multicentric trial 250 patients with AMI were included and randomized into stem cell therapy (SCT) and non SCT groups. All patients were followed up for six months. Patients with AMI having left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 20-50 per cent were included and were randomized to receive intracoronary stem cell infusion after successfully completing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Results: On intention-to-treat analysis the infusion of MNCs had no positive impact on LVEF improvement of ≥ 5 per cent. The improvement in LVEF after six months was 5.17 ± 8.90 per cent in non SCT group and 4.82 ± 10.32 per cent in SCT group. The adverse effects were comparable in both the groups. On post hoc analysis it was noted that the cell dose had a positive impact when infused in the dose of ≥ 5 × 108(n=71). This benefit was noted upto three weeks post AMI. There were 38 trial deviates in the SCT group which was a limitation of the study. Interpretation & conclusions: Infusion

  9. A Randomized Trial of Deferred Stenting Versus Immediate Stenting to Prevent No- or Slow-Reflow in Acute ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (DEFER-STEMI)

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, David; Oldroyd, Keith G.; McEntegart, Margaret; Haig, Caroline; Petrie, Mark C.; Eteiba, Hany; Hood, Stuart; Owens, Colum; Watkins, Stuart; Layland, Jamie; Lindsay, Mitchell; Peat, Eileen; Rae, Alan; Behan, Miles; Sood, Arvind; Hillis, W. Stewart; Mordi, Ify; Mahrous, Ahmed; Ahmed, Nadeem; Wilson, Rebekah; Lasalle, Laura; Généreux, Philippe; Ford, Ian; Berry, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess whether deferred stenting might reduce no-reflow and salvage myocardium in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Background No-reflow is associated with adverse outcomes in STEMI. Methods This was a prospective, single-center, randomized, controlled, proof-of-concept trial in reperfused STEMI patients with ≥1 risk factors for no-reflow. Randomization was to deferred stenting with an intention-to-stent 4 to 16 h later or conventional treatment with immediate stenting. The primary outcome was the incidence of no-/slow-reflow (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction ≤2). Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed 2 days and 6 months after myocardial infarction. Myocardial salvage was the final infarct size indexed to the initial area at risk. Results Of 411 STEMI patients (March 11, 2012 to November 21, 2012), 101 patients (mean age, 60 years; 69% male) were randomized (52 to the deferred stenting group, 49 to the immediate stenting). The median (interquartile range [IQR]) time to the second procedure in the deferred stenting group was 9 h (IQR: 6 to 12 h). Fewer patients in the deferred stenting group had no-/slow-reflow (14 [29%] vs. 3 [6%]; p = 0.006), no reflow (7 [14%] vs. 1 [2%]; p = 0.052) and intraprocedural thrombotic events (16 [33%] vs. 5 [10%]; p = 0.010). Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction coronary flow grades at the end of PCI were higher in the deferred stenting group (p = 0.018). Recurrent STEMI occurred in 2 patients in the deferred stenting group before the second procedure. Myocardial salvage index at 6 months was greater in the deferred stenting group (68 [IQR: 54% to 82%] vs. 56 [IQR: 31% to 72%]; p = 0.031]. Conclusions In high-risk STEMI patients, deferred stenting in primary PCI reduced no-reflow and increased myocardial salvage. (Deferred Stent Trial in STEMI; NCT01717573) PMID:24583294

  10. [Fibrinolysis in acute myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Bleifeld, W

    1987-10-24

    Fibrinolysis has opened up a new avenue in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In principle, the rate of reperfusion depends on the type of compound used, the mode of administration and the time between onset of symptoms and the beginning of treatment. With intracoronary streptokinase the reperfusion rate is of the order of 85%. Intravenous urokinase administered as a bolus results in a reopening rate of 50-60%; a similar rate of reperfusion is achieved with rt-PA as infusion, while i.v. streptokinase produces about 50% reopened coronary vessels. The final infarct size is decreased in 70% of patients if fibrinolysis is initiated within 2.5 hours after the onset of symptoms and followed by reopening of the occluded vessel. This results in a lowering of in-hospital mortality, which in various studies is of the order of 45-60%.- Bearing in mind the contraindications, fibrinolysis should be initiated within 3 hours. Hemodynamic improvement by a decrease of infarct size may also be achieved beyond 3 hours in large anterior myocardial infarctions and in posterior infarctions with cardiogenic shock. Early initiation of thrombolysis is of major importance in improving left ventricular function and lowering mortality following acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, prehospital thrombolytic therapy should be considered. - In the postinfarction phase coronary angiography is indicated in patients with angina at rest, stable angina of ECG signs of ischemia. In this situation transfer to a specialized cardiology division for possible percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is indicated. - Reocclusion after successful thrombolysis occurs in 20-30%, and it is therefore important to avoid reinfarction to improve the long term prognosis after AMI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3321420

  11. Infarct Artery Distribution and Clinical Outcomes in Occluded Artery Trial Subjects Presenting with Non ST elevation Myocardial Infarction (From the Long Term Follow-up of the Occluded Artery Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Venu; Ruzyllo, Witold; Carvalho, Antonio C.; Marconi, Jose; de Sousa, Almeida; Forman, Sandra A.; Jaworska, Krystyna; Lamas, Gervasio A.; Roik, Marek; Thuaire, Christophe; Turgeman, Yoav; Hochman, Judith S.

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that the insensitivity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in identifying acute circumflex occlusion would result in differences in the distribution of the infarct related artery (IRA) between patients with non ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) enrolled in the Occluded Artery Trial. We also sought to evaluate the impact of percutaneous intervention to the IRA on clinical outcomes for patients with NSTEMI. Overall NSTEMI subjects comprised 13% (n=283) of the trial population. The circumflex IRA was overrepresented in the NSTEMI group compared to patients enrolled with STEMI (42.5 vs. 11.2%; p<0.0001). The 7 year clinical outcomes for NSTEMI patients randomized to percutaneous intervention and optimal medical therapy versus optimal medical therapy alone were similar for the primary composite of Death, MI and Class IV Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) (22.3 vs. 20.23%, p=0.51, HR 1.20; 0.59-2.43); as well as the individual endpoints of Death (13.8 vs. 17.0%, p=0.51, HR 0.81;0.36-1.85); MI (6.1 vs. 5.1%, p=0.84, HR=1.11; 0.28-4.41); Class IV CHF (6.7 vs. 6.0%, p=0.45, HR 1.50;0.37-6.02). There was no interaction between MI type by ECG and treatment effect (p= NS). In conclusion the occluded circumflex IRA is overrepresented in the NSTEMI population. Consistent with the overall trial results, stable patients with NSTEMI and a totally occluded IRA did not benefit from randomization to PCI. PMID:23351464

  12. Solar activity and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, E; Mergentaler, J; Kotlarek-Haus, S; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, M; Kucharczyk, J; Janus, W

    1983-01-01

    The correlation between the incidence of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, the solar activity and geomagnetism in the period 1969-1976 was studied, basing on Wrocław hospitals material registered according to WHO standards; sudden death was assumed when a person died within 24 hours after the onset of the disease. The highest number of infarctions and sudden deaths was detected for 1975, which coincided with the lowest solar activity, and the lowest one for the years 1969-1970 coinciding with the highest solar activity. Such an inverse, statistically significant correlation was not found to exist between the studied biological phenomena and geomagnetism. PMID:6851574

  13. Ventricular Aneurysm Following Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Walters, M. B.

    1966-01-01

    Cineradiographic examination appears to be the best method for the study of cardiac pulsations. Fifty consecutive patients, who had sustained transmural myocardial infarction at least six months previously, were studied by this technique. Thirty-six had some abnormality of pulsation and eight had dynamic ventricular aneurysm. Six of the eight had suffered severe infarct. Functional recovery in those with aneurysm was not as complete as in the rest of the group. Two made a poor functional recovery, two a fair recovery, and four a moderately good recovery. Clinically, there were no systemic emboli in the patients with dynamic aneurysms. Five of the 50 had persistent ST-segment elevation and “coving” of the T waves; three of these patients had aneurysms. There was no good correlation between the electrocardiographic site of the infarct and the site of the abnormal pulsation. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5928534

  14. [Acute myocardial infarction during sport].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, M; Asakuma, S; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, T; Yasutomi, N; Iwasaki, T

    1995-10-01

    Thirty patients with acute myocardial infarction which occurred during sport were investigated to identify the type of sport, prodromata, situations at the onset of disease, habit of exercise, preceding medical evaluation, coronary risk factors, and coronary angiographic findings. Infarction occurred during golf in 12 patients, bowling in 4, gateball in 4, jogging or running in 5, baseball in 2, and tennis or table tennis in 3. The majority of the patients were playing ball games. Twenty-seven patients were men (90%) and 3 were women (10%). All patients had played the same kind of sport for several years. Twenty-four patients had one or more coronary risk factors, and especially 18 patients smoked cigarettes. Nine patients had experienced anterior chest pain but only two patients had received medical evaluation. Coronary angiography was performed in 25 patients (83.3%), revealing single-vessel disease in 14, two-vessel disease in 6, three-vessel disease in 4, and disease of all left main coronary trunks in 1. The acute episode of infarction occurred mainly in spring or fall. Many patients with acute myocardial infarction occurring during sport participate in sports of low or moderate dynamic and low static exercises which are generally regarded safe. Many patients had enjoyed their sports regularly for a long time. Though many patients had coronary risk factors, only a few had received a medical check before their heart attack. PMID:7500263

  15. Impact of pre-procedural cardiopulmonary instability in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (from the Harmonizing Outcomes With Revascularization and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial).

    PubMed

    Brener, Sorin J; Brodie, Bruce R; Guerchicoff, Alejandra; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Guagliumi, Giulio; Xu, Ke; Mehran, Roxana; Stone, Gregg W

    2014-10-01

    Rapid reperfusion with primary percutaneous coronary intervention improves survival in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Preprocedural cardiopulmonary instability and adverse events (IAE) may delay reperfusion time and worsen prognosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between preprocedural cardiopulmonary IAE, door-to-balloon time (DBT), and outcomes in the Harmonizing Outcomes With Revascularization and Stents in AMI (HORIZONS-AMI) trial. Preprocedural cardiopulmonary IAE included sustained ventricular or supraventricular tachycardia or fibrillation requiring cardioversion or defibrillation, heart block or bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, severe hypotension requiring vasopressors or intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Three-year outcomes of patients with and without IAE according to DBT were compared. Among 3,602 patients, 159 (4.4%) had ≥1 IAE. DBT did not differ significantly in patients with and without IAE; however, patients with IAE were less likely to have Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) grade 3 flow after percutaneous coronary intervention. Mortality at 3 years was significantly higher in patients with versus those without IAE (17.0% vs 6.3%, p<0.0001), and IAE was an independent predictor of mortality, whereas DBT was not. However, a significant interaction was present such that 3-year mortality was reduced in patients with DBT<99 minutes (the median) versus ≥99 minutes to a greater extent in patients with IAE (9.9% vs 20.7%, hazard ratio 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.16 to 1.16) compared with those without IAE (5.0% vs 7.2%, hazard ratio 0.69, 95% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.95) (p for interaction=0.004). In conclusion, IAE before PCI is an independent predictor of death and identifies a high-risk group in whom faster reperfusion may be particularly important to improve survival. PMID

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is an independent predictor of death but not atherosclerotic events in patients with myocardial infarction: analysis of the Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial (VALIANT)

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Nathaniel M.; Huang, Zhen; Pieper, Karen S.; Solomon, Scott D.; Kober, Lars; Velazquez, Eric J.; Swedberg, Karl; Pfeffer, Marc A.; McMurray, John J.V.; Maggioni, Aldo P.

    2009-01-01

    Aims Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). However, the impact on mode of death and risk of atherosclerotic events is unknown. Methods and results We assessed the risk of death and major cardiovascular (CV) events associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 14 703 patients with acute MI enrolled in the Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction (VALIANT) trial. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CV outcomes. A total of 1258 (8.6%) patients had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Over a median follow-up period of 24.7 months, all-cause mortality was 30% in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, compared with 19% in those without. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.14 (95% confidence interval 1.02–1.28). This reflected increased incidence of both non-CV death [HR 1.86 (1.43–2.42)] and sudden death [HR 1.26 (1.03–1.53)]. The unadjusted risk of all pre-specified CV outcomes was increased. However, after multivariate adjustment, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was not an independent predictor of atherosclerotic events [MI or stroke: HR 0.98 (0.77–1.23)]. Mortality was significantly lower in patients receiving beta-blockers, irrespective of airway disease. Conclusion In high-risk patients with acute MI, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with increased mortality and non-fatal clinical events (both CV and non-CV). However, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease did not experience a higher rate of atherosclerotic events. PMID:19176539

  17. Thrombus aspiration in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Karim D; Zijlstra, Felix

    2016-07-01

    The success of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is often hampered by incomplete microvascular myocardial reperfusion owing to distal embolization of thrombus resulting in microvascular obstruction. To address this problem, thrombus aspiration devices have been developed that can be used to evacuate coronary thrombus either manually or mechanically. Thrombus aspiration has the potential to reduce the local thrombus load, minimize the need for balloon predilatation, facilitate direct stenting, prevent distal embolization, and ultimately improve myocardial reperfusion. Furthermore, thrombus aspiration has enabled us to study coronary thrombus in vivo, and has facilitated recognition of distinct mechanisms of coronary thrombosis. Clinical trials focusing on manual thrombus aspiration in primary PCI have generally shown improved myocardial reperfusion. However, in two large trials powered for clinical end points, no reduction in 1-year mortality or other adverse clinical events was observed with the use of this strategy. Moreover, one of these trials showed a marginally increased risk of stroke. Consequently, current guidelines do not recommend routine use of thrombus aspiration. Future studies should focus on the identification of subgroups of patients with STEMI who might derive benefit from manual thrombus aspiration, and establish the effect of operator performance on the efficacy and safety of the procedure. PMID:26961064

  18. The effectiveness of antioxidant vitamins C and E in reducing myocardial infarct size in patients subjected to percutaneous coronary angioplasty (PREVEC Trial): study protocol for a pilot randomized double-blind controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Oxidative stress has been involved in the ischemia-reperfusion injury in AMI. It has been suggested that reperfusion accounts for up to 50% of the final size of a myocardial infarct, a part of the damage likely to be prevented.Therefore, we propose that antioxidant reinforcement through vitamins C and E supplementation should protect against the ischemia-reperfusion damage, thus decreasing infarct size. The PREVEC Trial (Prevention of reperfusion damage associated with percutaneous coronary angioplasty following acute myocardial infarction) seeks to evaluate whether antioxidant vitamins C and E reduce infarct size in patients subjected to percutaneous coronary angioplasty after AMI. Methods/Design This is a randomized, 1:1, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The study takes place at two centers in Chile: University of Chile Clinical Hospital and San Borja Arriarán Clinical Hospital. The subjects will be 134 adults with acute myocardial infarction with indication for percutaneous coronary angioplasty. This intervention is being performed as a pilot study, involving high-dose vitamin C infusion plus oral administration of vitamin E (Vitamin-treatment group) or placebo (Control group) during the angioplasty procedure. Afterward, the Vitamin-treatment group receives oral doses of vitamins C and E, and the Control group receives placebo for 84 days after coronary angioplasty. Primary outcome is infarct size, assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), measured 6 and 84 days after coronary angioplasty. Secondary outcomes are ejection fraction, measured 6 and 84 days after coronary angioplasty with CMR, and biomarkers for oxidative stress, antioxidant status, heart damage, and inflammation, which will be measured at baseline, at the onset of reperfusion, 6 to 8 hours after revascularization, and at hospital discharge. Discussion The ischemia-reperfusion event

  19. Morphine delays and attenuates ticagrelor exposure and action in patients with myocardial infarction: the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled IMPRESSION trial

    PubMed Central

    Kubica, Jacek; Adamski, Piotr; Ostrowska, Małgorzata; Sikora, Joanna; Kubica, Julia Maria; Sroka, Wiktor Dariusz; Stankowska, Katarzyna; Buszko, Katarzyna; Navarese, Eliano Pio; Jilma, Bernd; Siller-Matula, Jolanta Maria; Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Rość, Danuta; Koziński, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Aims The currently available data indicate a drug–drug interaction between morphine and oral P2Y12 receptor inhibitors, when administered together. The aim of this trial was to assess the influence of infused morphine on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ticagrelor and its active metabolite (AR-C124910XX) in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods and results In a single-centre, randomized, double-blind trial, patients were assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive intravenously either morphine (5 mg) or placebo, followed by a 180 mg loading dose of ticagrelor. Pharmacokinetics was determined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and ticagrelor antiplatelet effects were measured with up to three different platelet function tests: vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation assay, multiple electrode aggregometry and VerifyNow. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessment was performed in 70 patients (35 in each study group). Morphine lowered the total exposure to ticagrelor and its active metabolite by 36% (AUC(0–12): 6307 vs. 9791 ng h/mL; P = 0.003), and 37% (AUC(0–12): 1503 vs. 2388 ng h/mL; P = 0.008), respectively, with a concomitant delay in maximal plasma concentration of ticagrelor (4 vs. 2 h; P = 0.004). Multiple regression analysis showed that lower AUC(0–12) values for ticagrelor were independently associated with the administration of morphine (P = 0.004) and the presence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014). All three methods of platelet reactivity assessment showed a stronger antiplatelet effect in the placebo group and a greater prevalence of high platelet reactivity in patients receiving morphine. Conclusions Morphine delays and attenuates ticagrelor exposure and action in patients with myocardial infarction. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02217878. PMID:26491112

  20. Informed shared decision-making programme on the prevention of myocardial infarction in type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Buhse, Susanne; Mühlhauser, Ingrid; Heller, Tabitha; Kuniss, Nadine; Müller, Ulrich Alfons; Kasper, Jürgen; Lehmann, Thomas; Lenz, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate an informed shared decision-making programme (ISDM-P) for people with type 2 diabetes under high fidelity conditions. Design Randomised, single-blinded trial with sham control intervention and follow-up of 6 months. Setting Single-centre diabetes clinic providing care according to the national disease management programme in Germany. Participants 154 people with type 2 diabetes without diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease or stroke. Interventions The ISDM-P is executed by diabetes educators. Core component is a patient decision aid on the prevention of myocardial infarction supplemented by a 90 min group teaching session. The structurally equivalent control intervention addresses stress issues. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was risk comprehension, including realistic expectations about benefits and harms of interventions. It was assessed by a 12-item questionnaire after the teaching session when patients set and prioritise their treatment goals. Key secondary outcome was adherence to treatment goals, operationalised as achievement of individual goals and medication uptake. ISDM-P teaching sessions were video-taped to monitor intervention fidelity. Results 72 of 77 ISDM-P and 71 of 77 control patients completed the questionnaire (score 0–12). ISDM-P patients achieved higher levels of risk comprehension, mean score 8.25 vs 2.62, difference 5.63 (95% CI 4.82 to 6.44), and realistic expectations (score 0–6), 4.51 vs 0.85, 3.67 (3.23 to 4.11). More ISDM-P patients wished to take statins, 59.2% vs 30.4%, 28.7% (12.9% to 44.5%); more prioritised blood pressure control, 51.4% vs 25.7%, and fewer intensive glucose control, 33.3% vs 60%, p=0.002. More ISDM-P patients achieved their glycated haemoglobin goals, 95.8% vs 85.7%, 10.1% (0.6% to 19.5%). Achievement of prioritised goals and medication uptake were comparable between groups. Conclusions The ISDM-P on preventive measures in type 2 diabetes was effective under high fidelity

  1. ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Franken, Marcelo; Nussbacher, Amit; Liberman, Alberto; Wajngarten, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are the leading causes of death in the elderly. The suspicion and diagnosis of ACS in this age group is more difficult, since typical angina is less frequent. The morbidity and mortality is greater in older age patients presenting ACS. Despite the higher prevalence and greater risk, elderly patients are underrepresented in major clinical trials from which evidence based recommendations are formulated. The authors describe, in this article, the challenges in the diagnosis and management of ST elevation myocardial infarction in the elderly, and discuss the available evidence. PMID:22916055

  2. Impact of iodinated contrast injections on percent diameter coronary arterial stenosis and implications for trials of intracoronary pharmacotherapies in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C Michael; Buros, Jacqueline; Ciaglo, Lauren N; Southard, Matthew C; Takao, Shaun; Harrigan, Caitlin; Filopei, Jason; Lew, Michelle; Marble, Susan J; Murphy, Sabina A; Cohen, Mauricio G

    2007-07-01

    Administration of fibrinolytic, antiplatelet, and antithrombotic agents by the intracoronary route may disaggregate clot, but the potential role of the mechanical force of the injection itself in decreasing clot burden has not been studied. Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction who were pretreated in the emergency room (ER) with unfractionated heparin and aspirin in the TITAN-TIMI 34 study were randomized to treatment with eptifibatide in the ER (n = 131) versus after diagnostic catheterization (n = 150). Quantitative coronary angiography was used to assess change in diameter stenosis from time of first contrast injection to injection before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) immediately preceding wire placement down the culprit artery in a matching view. Successful perfusion of the myocardium was assessed after PCI by the presence of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction myocardial perfusion grade of 2 or 3. In patients treated with eptifibatide in the ER, there was a 1.3% absolute improvement in diameter stenosis from the first injection to the injection before PCI (p = 0.02), whereas there was no change in diameter stenosis in patients not treated with eptifibatide in the ER (0.0%, p = NS). Each 1% improvement in percent diameter stenosis during diagnostic injections before PCI was strongly correlated with an open muscle after PCI (adjusted odds ratio 1.09, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.16, p = 0.012). In conclusion, the mechanical force of a contrast injection decreases thrombotic burden in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction pretreated with eptifibatide but not with placebo. Future trials of intracoronary pharmacotherapies should include a control arm in which saline is injected to account for the potential clot disaggregation that occurs as a result of iodinated contrast injections, particularly if the patient has been pretreated with aggressive pharmacotherapy. PMID:17599433

  3. [The latest treatments for myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Florence

    2015-03-01

    Ischemic heart disease and its main complication, myocardial infarction, remain the leading cause of death after the age of forty in developed countries. Myocardial infarction is the consequence of a sudden obstruction of a coronary artery by a thrombus. Thrombolysis and coronary angioplasty are the two emergency coronary artery revascularisation techniques. A medication-based treatment and adapted lifestyle aim to prevent repeat infarction. PMID:26040139

  4. Randomized controlled trial of a self-efficacy enhancement program for the cardiac rehabilitation of Thai patients with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Vibulchai, Nisakorn; Thanasilp, Sureeporn; Preechawong, Sunida

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the effects of a self-efficacy enhancement program for the cardiac rehabilitation of Thai patients who had a myocardial infarction. Sixty-six hospitalized patients of various ages and both genders were randomly assigned to either an experimental or a control group. Participants in the experimental group took part in three individualized in-hospital education sessions and three weekly sessions of telephone counseling. The control group primarily engaged in a supervised exercise and activities of a daily living performance regimen, and received education in this regard. Self-efficacy and functional status were measured via questionnaire. Four weeks after discharge, the experimental group was found to have significantly higher total self-efficacy and functional status scores than the control group. In addition, the experimental group exhibited significantly higher subscale scores on social activity, household tasks, occupation, and exercise self-efficacy than the control group. These results indicate that the program is effective in improving the self-efficacy and functional status of Thai patients who have had a myocardial infarction. PMID:26415520

  5. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Sáez, P; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step toward simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size. PMID:26583449

  6. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Virag, Jitka A I; Lust, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or "clock genes," are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  7. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Virag, Jitka A. I.; Lust, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or “clock genes,” are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  8. Strategies to attenuate micro-vascular obstruction during P-PCI: the randomized reperfusion facilitated by local adjunctive therapy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction trial

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Sheraz A.; McCann, Gerry P.; Greenwood, John P.; Kunadian, Vijay; Khan, Jamal N.; Mahmoud, Islam Z.; Blackman, Daniel J.; Been, Martin; Abrams, Keith R.; Shipley, Lorraine; Wilcox, Robert; Adgey, A.A. Jennifer; Gershlick, Anthony H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Microvascular obstruction (MVO) following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) treatment of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) contributes to infarct expansion, left ventricular (LV) remodelling, and worse clinical outcomes. The REFLO-STEMI trial tested whether intra-coronary (IC) high-dose adenosine or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) reduce infarct size and/or MVO determined by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods and results REFLO-STEMI, a prospective, open-label, multi-centre trial with blinded endpoints, randomized (1:1:1) 247 STEMI patients with single vessel disease presenting within 6 h of symptom onset to IC adenosine (2–3 mg total) or SNP (500 μg total) immediately following thrombectomy and again following stenting, or to standard PPCI. The primary endpoint was infarct size % LV mass (%LVM) on CMR undertaken 24–96 h after PPCI (n = 197). Clinical follow-up was to 6 months. There was no significant difference in infarct size (%LVM, median, interquartile range, IQR) between adenosine (10.1, 4.7–16.2), SNP (10.0, 4.2–15.8), and control (8.3, 1.9–14.0), P = 0.062 and P = 0.160, respectively, vs. control. MVO (% LVM, median, IQR) was similar across groups (1.0, 0.0–3.7, P = 0.205 and 0.6, 0.0–2.4, P = 0.244 for adenosine and SNP, respectively, vs. control 0.3, 0.0–2.8). On per-protocol analysis, infarct size (%LV mass, 12.0 vs. 8.3, P = 0.031), major adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio, HR, 5.39 [1.18–24.60], P = 0.04) at 30 days and 6 months (HR 6.53 [1.46–29.2], P = 0.01) were increased and ejection fraction reduced (42.5 ± 7.2% vs. 45.7 ± 8.0%, P = 0.027) in adenosine-treated patients compared with control. Conclusions High-dose IC adenosine and SNP during PPCI did not reduce infarct size or MVO measured by CMR. Furthermore, adenosine may adversely affect mid-term clinical outcome. Clinical Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01747174; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show

  9. Right Ventricular Function After Acute Myocardial Infarction Treated With Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the Glycometabolic Intervention as Adjunct to Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction III Trial).

    PubMed

    Gorter, Thomas M; Lexis, Chris P H; Hummel, Yoran M; Lipsic, Erik; Nijveldt, Robin; Willems, Tineke P; van der Horst, Iwan C C; van der Harst, Pim; van Melle, Joost P; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J

    2016-08-01

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is a powerful risk marker after acute myocardial infarction (MI). Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has markedly reduced myocardial damage of the left ventricle, but reliable data on RV damage using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are scarce. In a recent trial of patients with acute MI treated with primary PCI, in which the primary end point was left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction after 4 months measured with MRI, we conducted a prospectively defined substudy in which we examined RV function. RV ejection fraction (RVEF) and RV scar size were measured with MRI at 4 months. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and RV free wall longitudinal strain (FWLS) were assessed using echocardiography before discharge and at 4 months. We studied 258 patients without diabetes mellitus; their mean age was 58 ± 11 years, 79% men and mean LV ejection fraction was 54 ± 8%. Before discharge, 5.2% of patients had TAPSE <17 mm, 32% had FWLS > -20% and 11% had FWLS > -15%. During 4 months, TAPSE increased from 22.8 ± 3.6 to 25.1 ± 3.9 mm (p <0.001) and FWLS increased from -22.6 ± 5.8 to -25.9 ± 4.7% (p <0.001). After 4 months, mean RVEF on MRI was 64.1 ± 5.2% and RV scar was detected in 5 patients (2%). There was no correlation between LV scar size and RVEF (p = 0.9), TAPSE (p = 0.1), or RV FWLS (p = 0.9). In conclusion, RV dysfunction is reversible in most patients and permanent RV ischemic injury is very uncommon 4 months after acute MI treated with primary PCI. PMID:27265672

  10. Clinical benefit of adenosine as an adjunct to reperfusion in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients: An updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Sirker, Alex; Loke, Yoon K.; Garcia-Dorado, David; Hausenloy, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adenosine administered as an adjunct to reperfusion can reduce coronary no-reflow and limit myocardial infarct (MI) size in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients. Whether adjunctive adenosine therapy can improve clinical outcomes in reperfused STEMI patients is not clear and is investigated in this meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods We performed an up-to-date search for all RCTs investigating adenosine as an adjunct to reperfusion in STEMI patients. We calculated pooled relative risks using a fixed-effect meta-analysis assessing the impact of adjunctive adenosine therapy on major clinical endpoint including all-cause mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and heart failure. Surrogate markers of reperfusion were also analyzed. Results 13 RCTs (4273 STEMI patients) were identified and divided into 2 subgroups: intracoronary adenosine versus control (8 RCTs) and intravenous adenosine versus control (5 RCTs). In patients administered intracoronary adenosine, the incidence of heart failure was significantly lower (risk ratio [RR] 0.44 [95% CI 0.25–0.78], P = 0.005) and the incidence of coronary no-reflow was reduced (RR for TIMI flow<3 postreperfusion 0.68 [95% CI 0.47–0.99], P = 0.04). There was no difference in heart failure incidence in the intravenous adenosine group but most RCTs in this subgroup were from the thrombolysis era. There was no difference in non-fatal MI or all-cause mortality in both subgroups. Conclusion We find evidence of improved clinical outcome in terms of less heart failure in STEMI patients administered intracoronary adenosine as an adjunct to reperfusion. This finding will need to be confirmed in a large adequately powered prospective RCT. PMID:26402450

  11. The effect of metformin on cardiovascular risk profile in patients without diabetes presenting with acute myocardial infarction: data from the Glycometabolic Intervention as adjunct to Primary Coronary Intervention in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (GIPS-III) trial

    PubMed Central

    Lexis, Chris P H; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N A; Lipsic, Erik; Valente, Mattia A E; Muller Kobold, Anneke C; de Boer, Rudolf A; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; van der Harst, Pim; van der Horst, Iwan C C

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with diabetes mellitus, metformin treatment is associated with reduced mortality and attenuation of cardiovascular risk. As a subanalysis of the Glycometabolic Intervention as adjunct to Primary Coronary Intervention in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (GIPS-III) study, we evaluated whether metformin treatment in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) without diabetes improves the cardiovascular risk profile. Methods A total of 379 patients, without known diabetes, presenting with STEMI were randomly allocated to receive metformin 500 mg twice daily or placebo for 4 months. Results After 4 months, the cardiovascular risk profile of patients receiving metformin (n=172) was improved compared with placebo (n=174); glycated hemoglobin (5.83% (95% CI 5.79% to 5.87%) vs 5.89% (95% CI 5.85% to 5.92%); 40.2 mmol/mol (95% CI 39.8 to 40.6) vs 40.9 mmol/mol (40.4 to 41.2), p=0.049); total cholesterol (3.85 mmol/L (95% CI 3.73 to 3.97) vs 4.02 mmol/L (95% CI 3.90 to 4.14), p=0.045); low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (2.10 mmol/L (95% CI 1.99 to 2.20) vs 2.3 mmol/L (95% CI 2.20 to 2.40), p=0.007); body weight (83.8 kg (95% CI 83.0 to 84.7) vs 85.2 kg (95% CI 84.4 to 86.1), p=0.024); body mass index (26.8 kg/m2 (95% CI 26.5 to 27.0) vs 27.2 kg/m2 (95% CI 27.0 to 27.5), p=0.014). Levels of fasting glucose, postchallenge glucose, insulin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and blood pressure were similar in both groups. Conclusions Among patients with STEMI without diabetes, treatment with metformin for 4 months resulted in a modest improvement of the cardiovascular risk profile compared with placebo. Trial register number NCT01217307. PMID:26688733

  12. Clinical disease registries in acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Reza; Hussain, Hussain; Brisk, Robert; Boardman, Leanne; Weston, Clive

    2014-01-01

    Disease registries, containing systematic records of cases, have for nearly 100 years been valuable in exploring and understanding various aspects of cardiology. This is particularly true for myocardial infarction, where such registries have provided both epidemiological and clinical information that was not readily available from randomised controlled trials in highly-selected populations. Registries, whether mandated or voluntary, prospective or retrospective in their analysis, have at their core a common study population and common data definitions. In this review we highlight how registries have diversified to offer information on epidemiology, risk modelling, quality assurance/improvement and original research-through data mining, transnational comparisons and the facilitation of enrolment in, and follow-up during registry-based randomised clinical trials. PMID:24976913

  13. Determination of the Role of Oxygen in Suspected Acute Myocardial Infarction by Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-25

    Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI); Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS); ST Elevation (STEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Ischemic Reperfusion Injury; Non-ST Elevation (NSTEMI) Myocardial Infarction; Angina, Unstable

  14. Myocardial infarction in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Egred, M; Viswanathan, G; Davis, G

    2005-01-01

    Although myocardial infarction (MI) mainly occurs in patients older than 45, young men or women can suffer MI. Fortunately, its incidence is not common in patients younger than 45 years. However, the disease carries a significant morbidity, psychological effects, and financial constraints for the person and the family when it occurs at a young age. The causes of MI among patients aged less than 45 can be divided into four groups: (1) atheromatous coronary artery disease; (2) non-atheromatous coronary artery disease; (2) hyper-coagulable states; (4) MI related to substance misuse. There is a considerable overlap between all the groups. This article reviews the literature and highlights the practical issues involved in the management of young adults with MI. PMID:16344295

  15. Myocardial infarction size: measurement and modification

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The majority of in-hospital deaths from acute myocardial infarction occur as a result of the “power failure” syndrome (severe congestive heart failure and cardiogenic shock), which results from extensive loss of myocardium. The death of myocardial cells is sequential over many hours. Surrounding the central zone of necrosis in an acute myocardial infarction is a zone of ischemic myocardium whose fate might be altered by interventions during the early phase of the infarction. ST-segment mapping, serial measurement of the serum concentration of creatine phosphokinase and myocardial imaging by means of radionuclides are being developed for the noninvasive assessment of infarct size in animals and humans. A number of interventions appear to limit infarct size in animals. There have been relatively few studies in humans to date, but preliminary results suggest that infarct size might be limited by certain interventions. The research has provided important practical benefits in terms of understanding the course of acute myocardial infarction and the potential effects of conventional therapies. For the present, interventions designed to limit infarct size remain in the realm of clinical research; routine clinical use would be inappropriate. PMID:69481

  16. A History of Streptokinase Use in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sikri, Nikhil; Bardia, Amit

    2007-01-01

    A serendipitous discovery by William Smith Tillett in 1933, followed by many years of work with his student Sol Sherry, laid a sound foundation for the use of streptokinase as a thrombolytic agent in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. The drug found initial clinical application in combating fibrinous pleural exudates, hemothorax, and tuberculous meningitis. In 1958, Sherry and others started using streptokinase in patients with acute myocardial infarction and changed the focus of treatment from palliation to “cure.” Initial trials that used streptokinase infusion produced conflicting results. An innovative approach of intracoronary streptokinase infusion was initiated by Rentrop and colleagues in 1979. Subsequently, larger trials of intracoronary infusion achieved reperfusion rates ranging from 70% to 90%. The need for a meticulously planned and systematically executed randomized multicenter trial was fulfilled by the Gruppo Italiano per la Sperimentazione della Streptochinasi nell'Infarto Miocardico (GISSI) trial in 1986, which not only validated streptokinase as an effective therapeutic method but also established a fixed protocol for its use in acute myocardial infarction. Currently, despite the wide use of tissue plasminogen activator in developed nations, streptokinase remains essential to the management of acute myocardial infarction in developing nations. PMID:17948083

  17. Does Cardiac Rehabilitation After Myocardial Infarction Favorably Affect Prognosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses the limitations of 14 randomized controlled trials of exercise rehabilitation for patients who sustained myocardial infarction. The difficulty of sampling patients and controlling the sample size is discussed and the benefits of pooled statistical evidence are considered. (JL)

  18. Cell therapy for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Yang, Han-Mo; Cho, Hyun-Jai

    2010-05-01

    Ischemic heart disease, particularly acute myocardial infarction (MI), is the worldwide health care problem and the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The fundamental treatment of MI remains a major unmet medical need. Although recent tremendous advances have been made in the treatment for acute MI such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and medical and surgical therapies, myocardial cell loss after ischemia and subsequent, adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure are demanding for new therapeutic strategy. Since the first experimental studies of adult stem cell therapy into the ischemic heart were performed in the early 1990s, the identification and potential application of stem and/or progenitor cells has triggered attempts to regenerate damaged heart tissue and cell-based therapy is a promising option for treatment of MI. In this review, we would like to discuss the pathogenesis of acute MI, current standard treatments and their limitation, clinical results of recent stem or progenitor cell therapy which have shown a favorable safety profile with modest improvement in cardiac function, and putative mechanisms of benefits. PMID:24855535

  19. [Thrombolytic treatment of acute myocardial infarct. 1].

    PubMed

    Soares-Costa, J T; Soares-Costa, T J; Gabriel, H M

    1998-05-01

    I-Rationale of thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). II-Thrombolytic drugs. III-Effects of thrombolytic therapy on mortality. IV-Studies comparing the effects of various thrombolytic agents on mortality. PMID:9951051

  20. Action of acetylstrophanthidin on experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, G. T.; Pope, S. E.; Harrison, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental animal model with acute myocardial infarction of a size insufficient to produce profound heart failure or shock was used to study the effects of acute infarction on digitalis tolerance and the hemodynamic changes produced by moderate and large doses of acetylstrophanthidin. With acute myocardial infarction, digitalis toxic arrhythmias could be precipitated with significantly lower doses of digitalis than in animals without myocardial infarction. There was no precise correlation between the size of infarction and the toxic dose of glycoside. Coronary artery ligation produced a stable but relatively depressed circulatory state, as evidenced by lowered cardiac output and stroke volume and elevated systemic vascular resistance and left atrial mean pressure. When digitalis was infused, the following significant changes were observed at nontoxic doses: (1) elevation of aortic and left ventricular pressures; (2) further decline in cardiac output; and (3) decreased left atrial mean pressure.

  1. A randomized, open-label, multicenter trial for the safety and efficacy of adult mesenchymal stem cells after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Won; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Youn, Young-Jin; Ahn, Min-Soo; Kim, Jang-Young; Yoo, Byung-Su; Yoon, Junghan; Kwon, Woocheol; Hong, In-Soo; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kwan, Jun; Park, Keum Soo; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yang Soo; Hong, Mun K

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the intracoronary administration of bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may improve left ventricular function in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, there is still argumentative for the safety and efficacy of MSCs in the AMI setting. We thus performed a randomized pilot study to investigate the safety and efficacy of MSCs in patients with AMI. Eighty patients with AMI after successful reperfusion therapy were randomly assigned and received an intracoronary administration of autologous BM-derived MSCs into the infarct related artery at 1 month. During follow-up period, 58 patients completed the trial. The primary endpoint was changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 6 month. We also evaluated treatment-related adverse events. The absolute improvement in the LVEF by SPECT at 6 month was greater in the BM-derived MSCs group than in the control group (5.9% ± 8.5% vs 1.6% ± 7.0%; P=0.037). There was no treatment-related toxicity during intracoronary administration of MSCs. No significant adverse cardiovascular events occurred during follow-up. In conclusion, the intracoronary infusion of human BM-derived MSCs at 1 month is tolerable and safe with modest improvement in LVEF at 6-month follow-up by SPECT. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT01392105). PMID:24431901

  2. A Randomized, Open-Label, Multicenter Trial for the Safety and Efficacy of Adult Mesenchymal Stem Cells after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Won; Youn, Young-Jin; Ahn, Min-Soo; Kim, Jang-Young; Yoo, Byung-Su; Yoon, Junghan; Kwon, Woocheol; Hong, In-Soo; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kwan, Jun; Park, Keum Soo; Choi, Donghoon; Jang, Yang Soo; Hong, Mun K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the intracoronary administration of bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may improve left ventricular function in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, there is still argumentative for the safety and efficacy of MSCs in the AMI setting. We thus performed a randomized pilot study to investigate the safety and efficacy of MSCs in patients with AMI. Eighty patients with AMI after successful reperfusion therapy were randomly assigned and received an intracoronary administration of autologous BM-derived MSCs into the infarct related artery at 1 month. During follow-up period, 58 patients completed the trial. The primary endpoint was changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 6 month. We also evaluated treatment-related adverse events. The absolute improvement in the LVEF by SPECT at 6 month was greater in the BM-derived MSCs group than in the control group (5.9%±8.5% vs 1.6%±7.0%; P=0.037). There was no treatment-related toxicity during intracoronary administration of MSCs. No significant adverse cardiovascular events occurred during follow-up. In conclusion, the intracoronary infusion of human BM-derived MSCs at 1 month is tolerable and safe with modest improvement in LVEF at 6-month follow-up by SPECT. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT01392105) PMID:24431901

  3. Coronary microvascular obstruction in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Scalone, Giancarla; Lerman, Amir; Crea, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The success of a primary percutaneous intervention (PCI) in the setting of ST elevation myocardial infarction depends on the functional and structural integrity of coronary microcirculation. Coronary microvascular dysfunction and obstruction (CMVO) occurs in up to half of patients submitted to apparently successful primary PCI and is associated to a much worse outcome. The current review summarizes the complex mechanisms responsible for CMVO, including pre-existing coronary microvascular dysfunction, and highlights the current limitations in the assessment of microvascular function. More importantly, at the light of the substantial failure of trials hitherto published on the treatment of CMVO, this review proposes a novel integrated therapeutic approach, which should overcome the limitations of previous studies. PMID:26364289

  4. [Ventricular Septal Perforation after Inferior Myocardial Infarction].

    PubMed

    Sato, Hisashi; Nakayama, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Hideya; Takahashi, Baku

    2016-07-01

    We report a rare case of ventricular septal perforation (VSP) after inferior myocardial infarction. Surgical repair of VSP after inferior infarction is technically difficult because of its anatomical location. An 81-year-old female presented with dyspnea on the 8th day after percutaneous coronary intervention for acute inferior myocardial infarction. Echocardiography revealed a ventricular septal perforation. Urgent operation was performed. There was a VSP around the base of the ventricular septum. The myocardial infarction extended to the adjacent muscle of the mitral valve annulus. Two bovine pericardial patches were used in the left ventricular cavity. The patches were sewn on the mitral valve annulus which was the only normal tissue in the region. The 1st patch was used to close the VSP directly, and the 2nd patch was sutured to the normal myocardium to exclude the infracted area. No residual shunt flow was observed. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:27365060

  5. [Occupational stress and myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Consoli, Silla M

    2015-01-01

    Besides the best-known role of depressed mood, occupational stress deserves to be taken as a coronary risk factor. There are two basic models to define occupational stress: Karasek's model (high job psychological demands associated with low decision latitude, or even low social support at work) and Siegrist's model (imbalance between efforts and rewards received). The combination of the two models better reflects the coronary risk than each model alone. Occupational stress appears both as a risk factor and a prognostic factor after the occurrence of myocardial infarction. The relevance of the models is best in men or in younger age subjects. In women, role conflicts (occupational/domestic), the existence of excessive "intrinsic" efforts (job over investment) and association with marital stress provide more specific information. Burnout, particularly among health professionals, and bullying at work are also linked to cardiovascular risk. Occupational stress is a collective indicator of health at work, valuable to the employer. At an individual level, it can lead to therapeutic preventive approaches. PMID:26150284

  6. Molecular genetics of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Sahoko; Nishida, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial infarction (MI) is an important clinical problem because of its large contribution to mortality. The main causal and treatable risk factors for MI include hypertension, hypercholesterolemia or dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. In addition to these risk factors, recent studies have shown the importance of genetic factors and interactions between multiple genes and environmental factors. Disease prevention is an important strategy for reducing the overall burden of MI, with the identification of markers for disease risk being key both for risk prediction and for potential intervention to lower the chance of future events. Although genetic linkage analyses of families and sib-pairs as well as candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have implicated several loci and candidate genes in predisposition to coronary heart disease (CHD) or MI, the genes that contribute to genetic susceptibility to these conditions remain to be identified definitively. In this review, we summarize both candidate loci for CHD or MI identified by linkage analyses and candidate genes examined by association studies. We also review in more detail studies that have revealed the association with MI or CHD of polymorphisms in MTHFR, LPL, and APOE by the candidate gene approach and those in LTA and at chromosomal region 9p21.3 by genome-wide scans. Such studies may provide insight into the function of implicated genes as well as into the role of genetic factors in the development of CHD and MI. PMID:18704761

  7. Risk stratification after myocardial infarction. Clinical overview

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, R.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Many patients with an acute myocardial infarction can be stratified into subgroups that are at high risk for morbidity and mortality on the basis of clinical characteristics that indicate recurrent myocardial ischemia, persistent left ventricular dysfunction, and/or recurrent cardiac arrhythmias. In patients with uncomplicated myocardial infarction the assessment of symptoms, physical findings, and ECG changes during predischarge exercise testing often identifies patients at increased risk for further cardiac events. Because of the suboptimum sensitivity and specificity of the exercise ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia, myocardial perfusion imaging with 201Tl and/or assessment of global and segmental ventricular function by two-dimensional echocardiography or radionuclide cineangiography during or immediately after exercise are often added to the predischarge risk stratification.

  8. Therapeutic hypothermia for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction-combined analysis of the RAPID MI-ICE and the CHILL-MI trials.

    PubMed

    Erlinge, David; Götberg, Matthias; Noc, Marko; Lang, Irene; Holzer, Michael; Clemmensen, Peter; Jensen, Ulf; Metzler, Bernhard; James, Stefan; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Omerovic, Elmir; Koul, Sasha; Engblom, Henrik; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan; Östlund, Ollie; Wallentin, Lars; Klos, Bradley; Harnek, Jan; Olivecrona, Göran K

    2015-06-01

    In the randomized rapid intravascular cooling in myocardial infarction as adjunctive to percutaneous coronary intervention (RAPID MI-ICE) and rapid endovascular catheter core cooling combined with cold saline as an adjunct to percutaneous coronary intervention for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction CHILL-MI studies, hypothermia was rapidly induced in conscious patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) by a combination of cold saline and endovascular cooling. Twenty patients in RAPID MI-ICE and 120 in CHILL-MI with large STEMIs, scheduled for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within <6 hours after symptom onset were randomized to hypothermia induced by rapid infusion of 600-2000 mL cold saline combined with endovascular cooling or standard of care. Hypothermia was initiated before PCI and continued for 1-3 hours after reperfusion aiming at a target temperature of 33°C. The primary endpoint was myocardial infarct size (IS) as a percentage of myocardium at risk (IS/MaR) assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 4±2 days. Patients randomized to hypothermia treatment achieved a mean core body temperature of 34.7°C before reperfusion. Although significance was not achieved in CHILL-MI, in the pooled analysis IS/MaR was reduced in the hypothermia group, relative reduction (RR) 15% (40.5, 28.0-57.6 vs. 46.6, 36.8-63.8, p=0.046, median, interquartile range [IQR]). IS/MaR was predominantly reduced in early anterior STEMI (0-4h) in the hypothermia group, RR=31% (40.5, 28.8-51.9 vs. 59.0, 45.0-67.8, p=0.01, median, IQR). There was no mortality in either group. The incidence of heart failure was reduced in the hypothermia group (2 vs. 11, p=0.009). Patients with large MaR (>30% of the left ventricle) exhibited significantly reduced IS/MaR in the hypothermia group (40.5, 27.0-57.6 vs. 55.1, 41.1-64.4, median, IQR; hypothermia n=42 vs. control n=37, p=0.03), while patients with MaR<30% did not show effect of hypothermia (35

  9. Intensive lowering of LDL cholesterol with 80 mg versus 20 mg simvastatin daily in 12 064 survivors of myocardial infarction: a double-blind randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Study of the Effectiveness of Additional Reductions in Cholesterol and Homocysteine (SEARCH) Collaborative Group

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Lowering of LDL cholesterol reduces major vascular events, but whether more intensive therapy safely produces extra benefits is uncertain. We aimed to establish efficacy and safety of more intensive statin treatment in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Methods We undertook a double-blind randomised trial in 12 064 men and women aged 18–80 years with a history of myocardial infarction. Participants were either currently on or had clear indication for statin therapy, and had a total cholesterol concentration of at least 3·5 mmol/L if already on a statin or 4·5 mmol/L if not. Randomisation to either 80 mg or 20 mg simvastatin daily was done centrally using a minimisation algorithm. Participants were assessed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 months after randomisation and then every 6 months until final follow-up. The primary endpoint was major vascular events, defined as coronary death, myocardial infarction, stroke, or arterial revascularisation. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered, number ISRCTN74348595. Findings 6031 participants were allocated 80 mg simvastatin daily, and 6033 allocated 20 mg simvastatin daily. During a mean follow-up of 6·7 (SD 1·5) years, allocation to 80 mg simvastatin produced an average 0·35 (SE 0·01) mmol/L greater reduction in LDL cholesterol compared with allocation to 20 mg. Major vascular events occurred in 1477 (24·5%) participants allocated 80 mg simvastatin versus 1553 (25·7%) of those allocated 20 mg, corresponding to a 6% proportional reduction (risk ratio 0·94, 95% CI 0·88–1·01; p=0·10). There were no apparent differences in numbers of haemorrhagic strokes (24 [0·4%] vs 25 [0·4%]) or deaths attributed to vascular (565 [9·4%] vs 572 [9·5%]) or non-vascular (399 [6·6%] vs 398 [6·6%]) causes. Compared with two (0·03%) cases of myopathy in patients taking 20 mg simvastatin daily, there were 53 (0·9%) cases in the 80 mg group. Interpretation The 6% (SE 3·5%) reduction in major

  10. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in acute myocardial infarction and ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy provides a sensitive and reliable method of detecting acute myocardial infarction and ischemia when imaging is performed with understanding of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of the technique. The results of scintigraphy are related to the time interval between onset of symptoms and time of imaging. During the first 6 hr after chest pain almost all patients with acute myocardial infarction and approximately 50% of the patients with unstable angina will demonstrate /sup 201/TI pefusion defects. Delayed imaging at 2-4 hr will permit distinction between ischemia and infarction. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, the size of the perfusion defect accurately reflects the extent of the infarcted and/or jeopardized myocardium, which may be used for prognostic stratification. In view of the characteristics of /sup 201/TI scintigraphy, the most practical application of this technique is in patients in whom myocardial infarction has to be ruled out, and for early recognition of patients at high risk for complications.

  11. Myocardial Infarction: Symptoms and Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lei; Liu, Min; Sun, RongRong; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a term used for an event of heart attack which is due to formation of plaques in the interior walls of the arteries resulting in reduced blood flow to the heart and injuring heart muscles because of lack of oxygen supply. The symptoms of MI include chest pain, which travels from left arm to neck, shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, abnormal heart beating, anxiety, fatigue, weakness, stress, depression, and other factors. The immediate treatment of MI include, taking aspirin, which prevents blood from clotting, and nitro-glycerin to treat chest pain and oxygen. The heart attack can be prevented by taking an earlier action to lower those risks by controlling diet, fat, cholesterol, salt, smoking, nicotine, alcohol, drugs, monitoring of blood pressure every week, doing exercise every day, and loosing body weight. The treatment of MI includes, aspirin tablets, and to dissolve arterial blockage injection of thrombolytic or clot dissolving drugs such as tissue plasminogen activator, streptokinase or urokinase in blood within 3 h of the onset of a heart attack. The painkillers such as morphine or meperidine can be administered to relieve pain. Nitroglycerin and antihypertensive drugs such as beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors or calcium channel blockers may also be used to lower blood pressure and to improve the oxygen demand of heart. The ECG, coronary angiography and X-ray of heart and blood vessels can be performed to observe the narrowing of coronary arteries. In this article the causes, symptoms and treatments of MI are described. PMID:25638347

  12. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Behringer, Wilhelm

    2008-12-01

    About 17 million people worldwide die from cardiovascular diseases each year. Impaired neurologic function after sudden cardiac arrest is a major cause of death in these patients. Up to now, no specific post-arrest therapy was available to improve outcome. Recently, two randomized clinical trials of mild therapeutic hypothermia after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest showed improvement of neurological outcome and reduced mortality. A broad implementation of this new therapy could save thousands of lives worldwide, as only 6 patients have to be treated to get one additional patient with favourable neurological recovery. At present, myocardial reperfusion by thrombolytic therapy or primary PCI as early as possible is the most effective therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Mild therapeutic hypothermia might be a promising new therapy to prevent reperfusion injury after myocardial infarction, but its use in daily clinical routine cannot be recommended with the available evidence. PMID:19137812

  13. Repetitive Myocardial Infarctions Secondary to Delirium Tremens

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzberg, David; Shiroff, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Delirium tremens develops in a minority of patients undergoing acute alcohol withdrawal; however, that minority is vulnerable to significant morbidity and mortality. Historically, benzodiazepines are given intravenously to control withdrawal symptoms, although occasionally a more substantial medication is needed to prevent the devastating effects of delirium tremens, that is, propofol. We report a trauma patient who required propofol sedation for delirium tremens that was refractory to benzodiazepine treatment. Extubed prematurely, he suffered a non-ST segment myocardial infarction followed by an ST segment myocardial infarction requiring multiple interventions by cardiology. We hypothesize that his myocardial ischemia was secondary to an increased myocardial oxygen demand that occurred during his stress-induced catecholamine surge during the time he was undertreated for delirium tremens. This advocates for the use of propofol for refractory benzodiazepine treatment of delirium tremens and adds to the literature on the instability patients experience during withdrawal. PMID:25197580

  14. Repetitive myocardial infarctions secondary to delirium tremens.

    PubMed

    Schwartzberg, David; Shiroff, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Delirium tremens develops in a minority of patients undergoing acute alcohol withdrawal; however, that minority is vulnerable to significant morbidity and mortality. Historically, benzodiazepines are given intravenously to control withdrawal symptoms, although occasionally a more substantial medication is needed to prevent the devastating effects of delirium tremens, that is, propofol. We report a trauma patient who required propofol sedation for delirium tremens that was refractory to benzodiazepine treatment. Extubed prematurely, he suffered a non-ST segment myocardial infarction followed by an ST segment myocardial infarction requiring multiple interventions by cardiology. We hypothesize that his myocardial ischemia was secondary to an increased myocardial oxygen demand that occurred during his stress-induced catecholamine surge during the time he was undertreated for delirium tremens. This advocates for the use of propofol for refractory benzodiazepine treatment of delirium tremens and adds to the literature on the instability patients experience during withdrawal. PMID:25197580

  15. Primary coronary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Popma, J J; Chuang, Y C; Satler, L F; Kleiber, B; Leon, M B

    1994-01-01

    In some patients with acute myocardial infarction, thrombolytic therapy may be limited by its failure to reperfuse the occluded artery, by recurrent ischemia (despite initially successful reperfusion), and by major hemorrhagic complications. Primary coronary angioplasty may circumvent these limitations. This article reviews the results of primary angioplasty reported in patients with myocardial infarction and makes recommendations for its use. The review includes pertinent articles found in the English language literature from July 1987 to July 1993 on MEDLINE. Nonrandomized series of primary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction have demonstrated high procedural success rates (86% to 99%) and infrequent recurrent ischemia (4%). Two randomized trials comparing primary angioplasty and thrombolytic therapy have shown that primary angioplasty results in lower mortality, less recurrent ischemia, shorter length of hospital stay, and improved left ventricular function. Two other randomized studies have shown little benefit from primary angioplasty on myocardial salvage, recurrent ischemia, or ventricular function. One major limitation of primary angioplasty is that it requires 24-hour availability of a catheterization laboratory and experienced surgical personnel. Primary angioplasty may be the preferred approach in patients with extensive myocardial infarction who have immediate (< 120 min) access to a cardiac catheterization laboratory with experienced personnel. Patients having 1) contraindications to thrombolytic therapy, 2) cardiogenic shock, 3) prior coronary bypass surgery, or 4) "stuttering" onset of pain may also benefit from primary angioplasty. Poor candidates for this procedure are those with a small myocardial infarction, those in whom undue delays in access to a cardiac catheterization facility would be expected, or those with complex coronary anatomy, including left main coronary artery disease. PMID:8061539

  16. Recurrent myocardial infarction with patent coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, L. J.; Khan, A. H.; Bornheimer, J.; Finck, E.; Tatter, D.

    1997-01-01

    Two separate episodes of severe chest pain occurred several years apart in a 25-year-old male patient with typical clinical findings of acute myocardial infarction with each episode. Cardiac catheterization following the second infarction confirmed the presence of myocardial dysfunction with apical akinesis and dyskinesis. Both coronary arteries were radiologically patent; however, there was evidence of probable recanalization of the right coronary artery. Several months later, the patient developed flank pain, hematuria, progressive renal failure, and cardiac decompensation, and died with intractable arrhythmias. At autopsy, a large apical mitral thrombosis was found and was the presumptive source of multiple systemic emboli. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9195802

  17. Decreased selenium levels in acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, F.J.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; de Bruijn, A.M.; Kruyssen, D.H.C.M.; de Bruin, M.; Valkenburg, H.A. )

    1989-02-24

    To study the association between selenium status and the risk of myocardial infarction, the authors compared plasma, erythrocyte, and toenail selenium levels and the activity of erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase among 84 patients with acute myocardial infarction and 84 population controls. Mean concentrations of all selenium measurements were lower in cases than controls. The differences were statistically significant, except for the plasma selenium level. A positive trend in the risk of acute myocardial infarction from high to low toenail selenium levels was observed, which persisted after adjustment for other risk factors for myocardial infarction. In contrast, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher in cases than controls. Because toenail selenium level reflects blood levels up to one year before sampling, these findings suggest that a low selenium status was present before the infarction and, thus, may be of etiologic relevance. The higher glutathione peroxidase activity in the cases may be interpreted as a defense against increased oxidant stress either preceding or following the acute event.

  18. Fractional flow reserve vs. angiography in guiding management to optimize outcomes in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: the British Heart Foundation FAMOUS–NSTEMI randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Layland, Jamie; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Curzen, Nick; Sood, Arvind; Balachandran, Kanarath; Das, Raj; Junejo, Shahid; Ahmed, Nadeem; Lee, Matthew M.Y.; Shaukat, Aadil; O'Donnell, Anna; Nam, Julian; Briggs, Andrew; Henderson, Robert; McConnachie, Alex; Berry, Colin; Hannah, Andrew; Stewart, Andrew; Metcalfe, Malcolm; Norrie, John; Chowdhary, Saqib; Clark, Andrew; Henderson, Robert; Balachandran, Kanarath; Berry, Colin; Baird, Gordon; O'Donnell, Anna; Sood, Arvind; Curzen, Nick; Das, Raj; Ford, Ian; Layland, Jamie; Junejo, Shahid; Oldroyd, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Aim We assessed the management and outcomes of non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients randomly assigned to fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided management or angiography-guided standard care. Methods and results We conducted a prospective, multicentre, parallel group, 1 : 1 randomized, controlled trial in 350 NSTEMI patients with ≥1 coronary stenosis ≥30% of the lumen diameter assessed visually (threshold for FFR measurement) (NCT01764334). Enrolment took place in six UK hospitals from October 2011 to May 2013. Fractional flow reserve was disclosed to the operator in the FFR-guided group (n = 176). Fractional flow reserve was measured but not disclosed in the angiography-guided group (n = 174). Fractional flow reserve ≤0.80 was an indication for revascularization by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). The median (IQR) time from the index episode of myocardial ischaemia to angiography was 3 (2, 5) days. For the primary outcome, the proportion of patients treated initially by medical therapy was higher in the FFR-guided group than in the angiography-guided group [40 (22.7%) vs. 23 (13.2%), difference 95% (95% CI: 1.4%, 17.7%), P = 0.022]. Fractional flow reserve disclosure resulted in a change in treatment between medical therapy, PCI or CABG in 38 (21.6%) patients. At 12 months, revascularization remained lower in the FFR-guided group [79.0 vs. 86.8%, difference 7.8% (−0.2%, 15.8%), P = 0.054]. There were no statistically significant differences in health outcomes and quality of life between the groups. Conclusion In NSTEMI patients, angiography-guided management was associated with higher rates of coronary revascularization compared with FFR-guided management. A larger trial is necessary to assess health outcomes and cost-effectiveness. PMID:25179764

  19. Molecular Imaging of Healing After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Naresh, Nivedita K; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Leor, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The progression from acute myocardial infarction (MI) to heart failure continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Potential new therapies for improved infarct healing such as stem cells, gene therapy, and tissue engineering are being investigated. Noninvasive imaging plays a central role in the evaluation of MI and infarct healing, both clinically and in preclinical research. Traditionally, imaging has been used to assess cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability. However, new imaging methods can be used to assess biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. We review molecular imaging techniques for evaluating the biology of infarct healing and repair. Specifically, we cover recent advances in imaging the various phases of MI and infarct healing such as apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix deposition, and scar formation. Significant progress has been made in preclinical molecular imaging, and future challenges include translation of these methods to clinical practice. PMID:21869911

  20. Effect of the Use and Timing of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Delivery on Left Ventricular Function After Acute Myocardial Infarction: The TIME Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Traverse, Jay H.; Henry, Timothy D.; Pepine, Carl J.; Willerson, James T.; Zhao, David X.M.; Ellis, Stephen G.; Forder, John R.; Anderson, R. David; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K.; Penn, Marc S.; Perin, Emerson C.; Chambers, Jeffrey; Baran, Kenneth W.; Raveendran, Ganesh; Lambert, Charles; Lerman, Amir; Simon, Daniel I.; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Lai, Dejian; Gee, Adrian P.; Taylor, Doris A.; Cogle, Christopher R.; Thomas, James D.; Olson, Rachel E.; Bowman, Sherry; Francescon, Judy; Geither, Carrie; Handberg, Eileen; Kappenman, Casey; Westbrook, Lynette; Piller, Linda B.; Simpson, Lara M.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Loghin, Catalin; Aguilar, David; Richman, Sara; Zierold, Claudia; Spoon, Daniel B.; Bettencourt, Judy; Sayre, Shelly L.; Vojvodic, Rachel W.; Skarlatos, Sonia I.; Gordon, David J.; Ebert, Ray F.; Kwak, Minjung; Moyé, Lemuel A.; Simari, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Context While the delivery of cell therapy following ST segment myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been evaluated in previous clinical trials, the influence of the timing of cell delivery on the effect on left ventricular (LV) function has not been analyzed in a trial that randomly designated the time of delivery. Objective To determine 1) the effect of intracoronary autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMC) delivery following STEMI on recovery of global and regional LV function and 2) if timing of BMC delivery (3 versus 7 days following reperfusion) influences this effect. Design, Setting, and Patients Between July 17, 2008 and November 15, 2011, 120 patients were enrolled in a randomized, 2×2 factorial, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN) of patients with LV dysfunction (LV Ejection Fraction (LVEF) ≤45%) following successful primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of anterior STEMI. Interventions Intracoronary infusion of 150 × 106 BMCs or placebo (randomized 2:1 BMC:placebo) within 12 hours of aspiration and processing administered at Day 3 or Day 7 (randomized 1:1) post-PCI. Main Outcome Measures Co-primary endpoints were: 1) Change in global (LVEF) and regional (wall motion) LV function in infarct and border zones at 6 months measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and 2) Change in LV function as affected by timing of treatment on Day 3 versus Day 7. Secondary endpoints included major adverse cardiovascular events as well as changes in LV volumes and infarct size. Results Patient mean age was 56.9±10.9 years with 87.5% male. At 6 months, LVEF increased similarly in both BMC (45.2±10.6 to 48.3±13.3 %) and placebo groups (44.5±10.8 to 47.8±13.6 %). No detectable treatment effect on regional LV function was observed in either infarct or border zones. Differences between therapy groups in the change in global LV

  1. Myocardial infarction complicated by ventricular septal rupture.

    PubMed

    Sahjian, Michael; Ventriglia, Rich; Bolton, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Transporting patients with an ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is a fairly common practice for most critical care transport teams. When a STEMI is complicated by ventricular septal rupture, the care can become more challenging, especially if the rupture is not yet diagnosed. This article describes such a transport and reviews the pathophysiology of the process along with treatment options. PMID:22225564

  2. Rehabilitation of Patients Following Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, James A.; Emery, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    Examines three behavioral strategies in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) for formal treatment for physical and psychosocial sequelae of myocardial infarction (MI): exercise therapy, Type A modification, and nonspecific psychological therapies. Concludes CR improves the quality of life among post-MI patients, but does not prolong life or significantly…

  3. Perceived Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Hawes, Armani M.; Smith, Jacqui

    2015-01-01

    Background The main strategy for alleviating heart disease has been to target individuals and encourage them to change their health behaviors. Though important, emphasis on individuals has diverted focus and responsibility away from neighborhood characteristics, which also strongly influence people’s behaviors. Although a growing body of research has repeatedly demonstrated strong associations between neighborhood characteristics and cardiovascular health, it has typically focused on negative neighborhood characteristics. Only a few studies have examined the potential health enhancing effects of positive neighborhood characteristics, such as perceived neighborhood social cohesion. Methods Using multiple logistic regression models, we tested whether higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with lower incidence of myocardial infarction. Prospective data from the Health and Retirement Study—a nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50—were used to analyze 5,276 participants with no history of heart disease. Respondents were tracked for four years and analyses adjusted for relevant sociodemographic, behavioral, biological, and psychosocial factors. Results In a model that adjusted for age, gender, race, marital status, education, and total wealth, each standard deviation increase in perceived neighborhood social cohesion was associated with a 22% reduced odds of myocardial infarction (OR = 0.78, 95% CI, 0.63–0.94. The association between perceived neighborhood social cohesion and myocardial infarction remained even after adjusting for behavioral, biological, and psychosocial covariates. Conclusions Higher perceived neighborhood social cohesion may have a protective effect against myocardial infarction. PMID:25135074

  4. Multispectral optoacoustic tomography of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Taruttis, Adrian; Wildgruber, Moritz; Kosanke, Katja; Beziere, Nicolas; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Rummeny, Ernst; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the feasibility of a high resolution optical imaging strategy for myocardial infarction. Background Near-infrared approaches to imaging cardiovascular disease enable visualization of disease-associated biological processes in vivo. However, even at the scale of small animals, the strong scattering of light prevents high resolution imaging after the first 1–2 mm of tissue, leading to degraded signal localization. Methods Multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) was used to non-invasively image myocardial infarction (MI) in a murine model of coronary artery ligation at resolutions not possible with current deep-tissue optical imaging methods. Post-MI imaging was based on resolving the spectral absorption signature of a dendritic polyglycerol sulfate-based (dPGS) near-infrared imaging agent targeted to P- and L-selectin. Results In vivo imaging succeeded in detection of the agent in the injured myocardium after intravenous injection. The high anatomic resolution (<200 μm) achieved by the described method allowed signals originating in the infarcted heart to be distinguished from uptake in adjacent regions. Histological analysis found dPGS signal in infarcted areas, originating from leukocytes and endothelial cells. Conclusions MSOT imaging of myocardial infarction provides non-invasive visualization of optical contrast with a high spatial resolution that is not degraded by the scattering of light. PMID:25327410

  5. Administration of intracoronary eptifibatide during ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Duane S; Kirtane, Ajay J; Ruocco, Nicholas A; Deibele, Albert J; Shui, Amy; Buros, Jacki; Murphy, Sabina A; Gibson, C Michael

    2005-12-01

    Distal embolization of atherothrombotic material during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with impaired myocardial perfusion, abnormal left ventricular function, and higher mortality. At high local concentrations, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor antagonists have been demonstrated to promote clot disaggregation in vitro. Intracoronary administration of eptifibatide in vivo may increase local drug concentration by several orders of magnitude and promote clot disaggregation with a minimal increase in systemic drug concentrations. We hypothesized that intracoronary administration of eptifibatide before primary PCI for ST-elevation myocardial infarction would be safe and would be associated with high rates of normal myocardial perfusion. Clinical and angiographic data were pooled from patients who underwent primary PCI and received intracoronary eptifibatide as part of clinical practice. In-hospital adverse events were collected retrospectively. No deaths, urgent revascularizations, or reinfarctions were observed among the 59 patients who were treated with intracoronary eptifibatide. There were no Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) major bleeding events. Two TIMI minor bleeding events were noted. Normal TIMI myocardial perfusion grade 3 flow after PCI was noted in 54.4% of patients. No adverse events. including arrhythmias, were noted during intracoronary eptifibatide administration. In conclusion, intracoronary eptifibatide can be administered safely during primary PCI and is associated with few adverse events. Relatively high rates of normal myocardial perfusion were observed after primary PCI with adjunctive intracoronary eptifibatide. Further prospective randomized trials are warranted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intracoronary eptifibatide. PMID:16310428

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation using the Family-Centered Empowerment Model versus home-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with myocardial infarction: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian-Azimi, Amir; Hajiesmaieli, Mohammadreza; Kangasniemi, Mari; Alhani, Fatemah; Jelvehmoghaddam, Hosseinali; Fathi, Mohammad; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Ardehali, Seyed H; Hatamian, Sevak; Gahremani, Mehdi; Mosavinasab, Seyed M M; Rostami, Zohreh; Madani, Seyed J; Izadi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if a hybrid cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme using the Family-Centered Empowerment Model (FCEM) as compared with standard CR will improve patient quality of life, perceived stress and state anxiety of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods We conducted a randomised controlled trial in which patients received either standard home CR or CR using the FCEM strategy. Patient empowerment was measured with FCEM questionnaires preintervention and postintervention for a total of 9 assessments. Quality of life, perceived stress, and state and trait anxiety were assessed using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), the 14-item Perceived Stress, and the 20-item State and 20-item Trait Anxiety questionnaires, respectively. Results 70 patients were randomised. Baseline characteristics were similar. Ejection fraction was significantly higher in the intervention group at measurements 2 (p=0.01) and 3 (p=0.001). Exercise tolerance measured as walking distance was significantly improved in the intervention group throughout the study. The quality of life results in the FCEM group showed significant improvement both within the group over time (p<0.0001) and when compared with control (p<0.0001). Similarly, the perceived stress and state anxiety results showed significant improvement both within the FCEM group over time (p<0.0001) and when compared with control (p<0.0001). No significant difference was found either within or between groups for trait anxiety. Conclusions The family-centred empowerment model may be an effective hybrid cardiac rehabilitation method for improving the physical and mental health of patients post-MI; however, further study is needed to validate these findings. Clinical Trials.gov identifier NCT02402582. Trial registration number NCT02402582. PMID:27110376

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Nakić, Dario; Vcev, Aleksandar; Jović, Albino; Patrk, Jogen; Zekanović, Drazen; Klarin, Ivo; Ivanac, Kresimir; Mrden, Anamarija; Balen, Sanja

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether H. pylori infection is an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), determine is there a link between H. pylori infection and severity of disease. In this prospective, single centre study, were enrolled 100 patients with AMI and control group was consisted 93 healthy individuals. The results of this study showed no difference between H. pylori seropositivity distribution in the investigate and control group (29 vs. 26 %) and there was no significant difference on the severity of the disease. There was significant association in the patients with three and more risk factors, where the patients with lower blood pressure (124.4/77.4 vs. 145.9/87.7 mmHg) and better controlled diabetes (HbA1c 6.1% vs. 6.9%) had greater risk for AMI if they are H. pylori seropositive. The large multicentric trials would be needed to define a precise role of H. pylori infection on the developement of AMI. PMID:22053556

  8. Role of risk stratification after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kuriachan, Vikas; Exner, Derek V

    2009-02-01

    Despite advances in medical and surgical therapy for patients with heart disease, sudden cardiac death remains an important public health problem that prematurely ends the lives of more than 300,000 persons each year in North America. Many of these deaths occur in patients with a history of myocardial infarction (MI). Although severe left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction is used to identify patients at risk of sudden death after MI, most cardiac arrests occur in those with only mild LV dysfunction. Further, severe LV dysfunction is not a specific indicator for cardiac arrest. Risk stratification, to identify patients most likely to benefit from implantable defibrillator therapy after MI, is an essential area of investigation. Because the development of cardiac arrest is complex and likely requires the confluence of several factors, using a single test to predict the risk of sudden death or to guide implantable defibrillator therapy is unlikely to be successful. Tests that assess cardiac structure, including repolarization, and those that evaluate autonomic modulation and other factors have been developed with the goal of identifying patients at highest risk of cardiac arrest after MI. These tests, particularly in combination, appear to identify patients who may benefit from implantable defibrillator therapy after MI. Ongoing and planned randomized controlled trials will assess whether these tests can be used to guide implantable defibrillator therapy. Until the data from these studies are available, severe LV dysfunction remains the only proven approach to guide implantable defibrillator therapy after MI. PMID:19141257

  9. [Family experiences post-acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Raquel Pötter; Budó, Maria de Lourdes Denardin; Simon, Bruna Sodré; Wünsch, Simone; Oliveira, Stefanie Griebeler; Barbosa, Mariane da Silva

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the family experiences post-infarction. Qualitative, descriptive and exploratory research, carried out with six families of post-infarction patients. Data collection was conducted in families' homes, in the period of February to May of 2012, through observation and interviews with the family. The software Atlas Ti 6.2 was used to code the interviews and the data were explored with thematic analysis. Two categories emerged "Difficult times": immediate consequence of acute myocardial infarction for the families; and "We reeducate ourselves--we can adapt ourselves": current experience of families. The immediate post-infarction experience is permeated by several feelings, with the need for families to adapt to fit into the needs. The current experience shows changes in families due to the disease. The family is the main responsible for the care giving, although Nursing should exchange and share knowledge. PMID:24344600

  10. The Nurse-Led Telephone Follow-Up on Medication and Dietary Adherence among Patients after Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Seyed Saeed; Shaabani, Maryam; Momennassab, Marzieh; Aghasadeghi, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adherence to dietary and medication regimen plays an important role in successful treatment and reduces the negative complications and severity of the disease. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of nurse-led telephone follow-up on the level of adherence to dietary and medication regimen among patients after Myocardial Infarction (MI). Methods: This non-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 100 elderly patients with MI who had referred to the cardiovascular clinics in Shiraz. Participants were selected and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups using balanced block randomization method. The intervention group received a nurse-led telephone follow-up. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, Morisky’s 8-item medication adherence questionnaire, and dietary adherence questionnaire before and three months after the intervention. Data analysis was done by the SPSS statistical software (version 21), using paired t-test for intra-group and Chi-square and t-test for between groups comparisons. Significance level was set at<0.05. Results: The results of Chi-square test showed no statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups with respect to their adherence to dietary and medication regimen before the intervention (P>0.05). However, a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in this regard after the intervention (P<0.05). The mean differences of dietary and medication adherence scores between pre- and post-tests were significantly different between the two groups. Independent t-test showed these differences (P=0.001). Conclusion: The results of the present study confirmed the positive effects of nurse-led telephone follow-up as a method of tele-nursing on improvement of adherence to dietary and medication regimen in the patients with MI. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201409148505N8 PMID:27382586

  11. Outcome of the HORIZONS-AMI trial: bivalirudin enhances long-term survival in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashish; Feldman, Dmitriy N

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the US. For patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), urgent reperfusion of the culprit arterial occlusion, often achieved via primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), reduces post-MI mortality and other major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Adjunctive antithrombotic and antiplatelet therapies are used during PCI to reduce MACE rates. Currently, a variety of antithrombotic options are available for peri-procedural use. The most commonly used agents include unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin ± glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPI). These agents reduce the rates of peri-procedural ischemic and thrombotic events, though these benefits come at the cost of an increase in bleeding complications. Bivalirudin is a direct thrombin inhibitor with a short half-life and linear pharmacokinetics, which results in predictable serum concentrations and anticoagulant effect. Bivalirudin has emerged as an efficacious and safe alternative to heparin plus GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in both stable coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome patients. In the HORIZONS-AMI trial, monotherapy with bivalirudin was compared with the combination of heparin and a GPI in a large population of patients with STEMI who underwent primary PCI. Bivalirudin treatment was associated with improved event-free survival at 30 days and reduced rates of major bleeding. Based on the results of the trial, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and European Society of Cardiology guidelines have incorporated recommendations for bivalirudin use in the setting of STEMI. Recently, 3-year follow-up data from the HORIZONS-AMI cohort were published, demonstrating sustained benefits in patients treated with bivalirudin, including reduced rates of mortality, cardiovascular mortality, reinfarction, and major bleeding events. These results further support the use of bivalirudin in the

  12. Efficacy of long-term anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, P. F.; Deckers, J. W.; Jonker, J. J.; van Domburg, R. T.; Azar, A. J.; Hofman, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the efficacy of long term oral anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Analysis of the effect of anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of hospital survivors of myocardial infarction based upon age, gender, history of hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, Killip class, anterior location of infarction, thrombolytic therapy, and use of beta blockers. SUBJECTS--Participants of a multicentre, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial that assessed the effect of oral anticoagulant treatment on mortality as well as cerebrovascular and cardiovascular morbidity in 3404 hospital survivors of acute myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The effect of anticoagulant treatment on recurrent myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular events, and vascular events (the composite endpoint of reinfarction, cerebrovascular event, and vascular death). RESULTS--Long term anticoagulant treatment was associated with a reduction in mortality of 10% (95% confidence interval -11% to 27%), recurrent myocardial infarction of 53% (41% to 62%), cerebrovascular events of 40% (10% to 60%) and vascular events of 35% (24% to 45%). Treatment effect with respect to recurrent myocardial infarction was comparable among all subgroups of patients. Although treatment effect appeared to be somewhat smaller in females than in males (-11% v -45%), and in patients with diabetes compared to those without (-14% v -42%) with respect to vascular events, none of these differences reached statistical significance. In multivariate analysis, more advanced age, previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, and heart failure during admission were independently associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular complications. CONCLUSIONS--The relative benefit of long term anticoagulant therapy in survivors of myocardial infarction is not modified by known prognostic factors for

  13. How reliable is myocardial imaging in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Willerson, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Myocardial scintigraphic techniques available presently allow a sensitive and relatively specific diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction when they are used correctly, although every technique has definite limitations. Small myocardial infarcts (less than 3 gm.) may be missed, and there are temporal limitations in the usefulness of the scintigraphic techniques. The development of tomographic methodology that may be used with single-photon radionuclide emitters (including technetium and /sup 201/Tl will allow the detection of relatively small abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and regions of myocardial infarction and will help to provide a more objective interpretation of the myocardial scintigrams. The use of overlay techniques allowing simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion, infarct-avid imaging, and radionuclide ventriculograms will provide insight into the relevant aspects of the extent of myocardial damage, the relationship of damage to myocardial perfusion, and the functional impact of myocardial infarction on ventricular performance.

  14. Painless acute myocardial infarction on Mount Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Nasiruddin; Rajhy, Mubina; Bapumia, Mustaafa

    2016-01-01

    An individual experiencing dyspnoea or syncope at high altitude is commonly diagnosed to have high-altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is generally not considered in the differential diagnosis. There have been very rare cases of AMI reported only from Mount Everest. We report a case of painless ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) that occurred while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro. A 51-year-old man suffered dyspnoea and loss of consciousness near the mountain peak, at about 5600 m. At a nearby hospital, he was treated as a case of high-altitude pulmonary edema. ECG was not obtained. Two days after the incident, he presented to our institution with continued symptoms of dyspnoea, light-headedness and weakness, but no pain. He was found to have inferior wall and right ventricular STEMI complicated by complete heart block. He was successfully managed with coronary angioplasty, with good recovery. PMID:26989121

  15. Prophylactic lidocaine in suspected acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Goodman, S L; Geiderman, J M; Bernstein, I J

    1979-06-01

    The incidence of serious ventricular arrhythmias following acute myocardial infarction is highest during the first few hours after injury, and thereafter declines. Several investigations into the prophylactic use of lidocaine to prevent the development of arrhythmias have shown that lidocaine, given in therapeutic doses, is effective in preventing ventricular fibrillation and in reducing early mortality. Lidocaine was found to be effective when given either by the intravenous or by the intramuscular routes. The recommended dosage is 100 mg given as an intravenous bolus followed by 2 to 4 mg/min as an infusion, which should be given by infusion pump. Another recommendation is to use two 100 mg boluses 20 minutes apart, along with the same infusion. We recommend that lidocaine be started as soon as possible in all patients suspected of having suffered acute myocardial infarction. PMID:449144

  16. Amphetamine Abuse Related Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O'Dene; Kumar, Rajan; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Curry, Bryan H.

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine abuse is a global problem. The cardiotoxic manifestations like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or arrhythmia related to misuse of amphetamine and its synthetic derivatives have been documented but are rather rare. Amphetamine-related AMI is even rarer. We report two cases of men who came to emergency department (ED) with chest pain, palpitation, or seizure and were subsequently found to have myocardial infarction associated with the use of amphetamines. It is crucial that, with increase in amphetamine abuse, clinicians are aware of this potentially dire complication. Patients with low to intermediate risk for coronary artery disease with atypical presentation may benefit from obtaining detailed substance abuse history and urine drug screen if deemed necessary. PMID:26998366

  17. Acute Myocardial Infarction in Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Kavita; Hiremath, Shirish; Lakade, Sachin; Davakhar, Sudarshan

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old male, known case of nephrotic syndrome since 12 years, hypertensive presented with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and accelerated hypertension. Coronary angiography revealed 100% thrombotic occlusion of mid left anterior descending artery, treated with thrombus aspiration and intracoronary tirofiban and nitroglycerine. He was stabilized within 24 hours. The pathogenesis of AMI in nephrotic syndrome has been discussed with this case report. PMID:27608787

  18. Myocardial infarction: management of the subacute period.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Michael G; Smith, Dustin K; McConnon, Michael L

    2013-11-01

    Optimal management of myocardial infarction in the subacute period focuses on improving the discharge planning process, implementing therapies early to prevent recurrent myocardial infarction, and avoiding hospital readmission. Evidence-based guidelines for the care of patients with acute coronary syndrome are not followed up to 25% of the time. Antiplatelet therapy, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, beta blockers, and statins constitute the foundation of medical therapy. Early noninvasive stress testing is an important risk assessment tool, especially in patients who do not undergo revascularization. Discharge preparation should include a review of medications, referral for exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation, activity recommendations, education about lifestyle modification and recognition of cardiac symptoms, and a clear follow-up plan. Because nonadherence to medications is common in patients after a myocardial infarction and is associated with increased mortality risk, modifiable factors associated with medication self-discontinuation should be addressed before discharge. Structured discharge processes should be used to enhance communication and facilitate the transition from the hospital to the family physician's care. PMID:24364634

  19. [Mosaic portrait method in the prognosis of myocardial infarct complications].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, G M; Ardashev, V N; Kats, M D; Galkina, T A

    1981-06-01

    A mosaic portrait of variants of the course of myocardial infarction differing in the clinical picture of the first days of the disease was created by means of methods of Boolean algebra and electronic computers. A total of 354 patients with transmural myocardial infarction were examined., The created models allow the development of some complications of myocardial infarction to be prognosticated exact within 90%. PMID:7021950

  20. Incidence of myocardial infarction and weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staiger, Henning

    1982-08-01

    Extreme values of temperature and/or humidity in the temperate climate of Hamburg are not able to explain the influence of weather on day-to-day fluctuations of morbidity. Short term changes in weather are described by two objective classifications as deviation from the meteorological past: 1. the temperature-humidity-environment, derived from values of temperature and water vapour pressure at 07.00 h, 2. changes in the cyclonality, derived from the difference of 500 and 850 mbar vorticity values. Their suitability for human biometeorology is illustrated with a material of 1262 subjects who suffered from acute myocardial infarction. For these investigated cases it was known whether angina pectoris was already manifest before the infarction or not. The daily weather conditions have a significant effect on the incidence of acute myocardial infarction according to angina pectoris. Compared to subjects with angina pectoris those without angina pectoris show an increased susceptibility to infarction during changes in weather conditions to warmer/more humid and also during all strong changes in the cyclonality whereby the temperature-humidity-environment seems to leave only the role of an indicator too. Persons with a preceeding angina pectoris are more sensitive agains rapid changes in weather conditions.

  1. Myocardial infarction--fusion or confusion?

    PubMed

    Ardhanari, Sivakumar; Shah, Ashok J; Thakur, Ranjan K

    2009-09-01

    A patient with a dualchamber pacemaker with dynamic atrioventricular delay (AVD) experienced acute substernal chest pain. The rhythm strip in the ambulance showed intermittent ST elevation in the inferior leads. An emergent cardiac catheterization revealed nonobstructive coronary artery disease. Rate-responsive dual-chamber pacing with dynamic AVD was responsible for varying devvgrees of ventricular fusion due to competition with the patient's normal conduction. Intermittent ST elevation, evident only during ventricular fusion should have suggested secondary ventricular repolarization and not myocardial injury, but concomitant chest pain and inconspicuous bipolar pacing artifacts added to the confusion. Ventricular pacing may not only mask acute ST-T changes due to myocardial injury, but can also mimic acute myocardial infarction. PMID:19726827

  2. The prognostic importance of left ventricular function in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: the HORIZONS-AMI trial

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Vivian G; Meller, Stephanie; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Guagliumi, Giulio; Peruga, Jan Z; Brodie, Bruce; Shah, Ruchit; Mehran, Roxana; Stone, Gregg W

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Left ventricular (LV) dysfunction during and after hospitalization for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is associated with increased mortality. Whether baseline LV dysfunction impacts STEMI outcomes is not well studied. Furthermore, whether bivalirudin and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) are beneficial in patients with LV dysfunction is unknown. We studied the impact of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) on outcomes of patients with STEMI in the HORIZONS-AMI trial. Methods: LVEF was determined in 2648 (73.5%) of 3602 enrolled STEMI patients, who were divided into three groups according to LV function: (1) severely impaired (LVEF <40%); (2) moderately impaired (LVEF 40–50%); and (3) normal (LVEF ≥50%). Results: Compared to patients with normal LV function, those with severely impaired LVEF had higher 1-year rates of net adverse clinical events (27.1 vs. 14.2%, p<0.0001), major adverse cardiovascular events (20.7 vs. 9.5%, p<0.0001), cardiac death (10.6 vs. 1.2%, p<0.0001), and non-coronary artery bypass graft major bleeding (12.5 vs. 6.6%, p=0.001), differences which persisted after adjustment for baseline characteristics. Among patients with LVEF <40%, treatment with bivalirudin compared to heparin+GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors resulted in reduced 1-year mortality (5.8 vs. 18.3%, p=0.007). Patients with LVEF <40% receiving PES rather than bare metal stents had lower rates of 1-year ischaemia-driven target lesion revascularization (2.9 vs. 12.6%, p=0.02) and reinfarction (4.5 vs. 14.7%, p=0.03). Conclusions: Among patients with STEMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention, adverse events are markedly increased in those with LVEF <40% during the index revascularization procedure. Nevertheless, these high-risk patients experience substantial clinical benefits from bivalirudin and PES. PMID:24562805

  3. Type 2 myocardial infarction: the chimaera of cardiology?

    PubMed

    Collinson, Paul; Lindahl, Bertil

    2015-11-01

    The term type 2 myocardial infarction first appeared as part of the universal definition of myocardial infarction. It was introduced to cover a group of patients who had elevation of cardiac troponin but did not meet the traditional criteria for acute myocardial infarction although they were considered to have an underlying ischaemic aetiology for the myocardial damage observed. Since first inception, the term type 2 myocardial infarction has always been vague. Although attempts have been made to produce a systematic definition of what constitutes a type 2 myocardial infarction, it has been more often characterised by what it is not rather than what it is. Clinical studies that have used type 2 myocardial infarction as a diagnostic criterion have produced disparate incidence figures. The range of associated clinical conditions differs from study to study. Additionally, there are no agreed or evidence-based treatment strategies for type 2 myocardial infarction. The authors believe that the term type 2 myocardial infarction is confusing and not evidence-based. They consider that there is good reason to stop using this term and consider instead the concept of secondary myocardial injury that relates to the underlying pathophysiology of the primary clinical condition. PMID:26220812

  4. Impact of a thrombolysis research trial on time to treatment for acute myocardial infarction in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Boisjolie, C R; Sharkey, S W; Cannon, C P; Brunette, D; Haugland, J M; Thatcher, J L; Henry, T D

    1995-08-15

    Because time to treatment in AMI is a critical factor in long-term outcome, it is important that complex trials designed to improve reperfusion therapy do not delay the time to treatment. Participation in the TIMI 5 trial did not significantly prolong our door-to-needle time. These results indicate that, if done carefully, complex, labor-intensive studies can be performed within a reasonable time limit. Care should be taken to design protocols incorporating easy drug preparation, informed consent by the ED, and efficiency of trial initiation. PMID:7639167

  5. Dabigatran Etexilate and Risk of Myocardial Infarction, Other Cardiovascular Events, Major Bleeding, and All‐Cause Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta‐analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Douxfils, Jonathan; Buckinx, Fanny; Mullier, François; Minet, Valentine; Rabenda, Véronique; Reginster, Jean‐Yves; Hainaut, Philippe; Bruyère, Olivier; Dogné, Jean‐Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background Signals of an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) have been identified with dabigatran etexilate in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods and Resules We conducted searches of the published literature and a clinical trials registry maintained by the drug manufacturer. Criteria for inclusion in our meta‐analysis included all RCTs and the availability of outcome data for MI, other cardiovascular events, major bleeding, and all‐cause mortality. Among the 501 unique references identified, 14 RCTs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Stratification analyses by comparators and doses of dabigatran etexilate were conducted. Peto odds ratio (ORPETO) values using the fixed‐effect model (FEM) for MI, other cardiovascular events, major bleeding, and all‐cause mortality were 1.34 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.65, P=0.007), 0.93 (95%CI 0.83 to 1.06, P=0.270), 0.88 (95% CI 0.79 to 0.99, P=0.029), and 0.89 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.00, P=0.041). When compared with warfarin, ORPETO values using FEM were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.80, P=0.005), 0.94 (95%CI 0.83 to 1.06, P=0.293), 0.85 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.96, P=0.007), and 0.90 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.01, P=0.061), respectively. In RCTs using the 150‐mg BID dosage, the ORPETO values using FEM were 1.45 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.91, P=0.007), 0.95 (95% CI 0.82 to 1.09, P=0.423), 0.92 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.05, P=0.228), and 0.88 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.00, P=0.045), respectively. The results of the 110‐mg BID dosage were mainly driven by the RE‐LY trial. Conclusions This meta‐analysis provides evidence that dabigatran etexilate is associated with a significantly increased risk of MI. This increased risk should be considered taking into account the overall benefit in terms of major bleeding and all‐cause mortality. PMID:24906369

  6. [Myocardial infarction: Role of new antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    Silvain, Johanne; Bellemain, Anne; Ecollan, Patrick; Montalescot, Gilles; Collet, Jean-Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Thienopyridines have become the cornerstone of treatment of percutaneous coronary intervention although no survival benefit has ever been shown with clopidogrel despite increasing loading doses. Newly developed P2Y(12) inhibitors are more potent, more predictable and have a faster onset of action than clopidogrel, characteristics that make them particularly attractive for high-risk PCI. Four new P2Y(12) inhibitors have been tested each of them having particular individual properties. Prasugrel is an oral prodrug leading to irreversible blockade of the P2Y(12) receptor and is approved worldwide for ACS PCI. Ticagrelor is a direct-acting and reversible inhibitor of the P2Y(12) receptor with potentially more pleiotropic effects. Cangrelor is an intravenous direct and reversible inhibitor of the P2Y(12) receptor providing the highest level of inhibition and elinogrel is an intravenous and oral P2Y(12) antagonist with a direct and reversible action. Both prasugrel and ticagrelor, opposed to clopidogrel, have shown that stronger P2Y(12) inhibition led respectively to significant 19 % and 16 % relative risk reduction of a similar primary endpoint combining cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. Both drugs showed a significant 0.6 % absolute excess of TIMI major bleeding not related to CABG surgery. The effect of these new compounds is prompt, predictable and powerful as compared to clopidogrel. Their net benefit is particularly marked in PCI for STEMI patients, in which there is no significant increase in major bleeding when compared with clopidogrel. However, because in clinical trials patients perceived to be at higher risk for bleeding usually are excluded, the risk of major and even fatal bleeding might even be higher in a "real-world" setting i.e. in the elderly patient with comorbidities. PMID:21511430

  7. No reflow phenomenon in percutaneous coronary interventions in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjiv; Gupta, Madan Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is effective in opening the infarct related artery and restoring thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow 3 (TIMI-flow 3) in large majority of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). However there remain a small but significant proportion of patients, who continue to manifest diminished myocardial reperfusion despite successful opening of the obstructed epicardial artery. This phenomenon is called no-reflow. Clinically it manifests with recurrence of chest pain and dyspnea and may progress to cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, serious arrhythmias and acute heart failure. No reflow is regarded as independent predictor of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. No reflow is a multi-factorial phenomenon. However micro embolization of atherothrombotic debris during PCI remains the principal mechanism responsible for microvascular obstruction. This review summarizes the pathogenesis, diagnostic methods and the results of various recent randomized trials and studies on the prevention and management of no-reflow. PMID:27543480

  8. Intracoronary administration of anisodamine and nicorandil in individuals undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention for acute inferior myocardial infarction: A randomized factorial trial

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, CHUNHONG; FU, XIANGHUA; LI, WEI; JIA, XINWEI; BAI, SHIRU; GENG, WEI; XING, KUN

    2015-01-01

    In acute inferior myocardial infarction (AIMI), numerous conventional drugs that are used to improve the myocardial microcirculation can significantly reduce blood pressure (BP) and coronary perfusion pressure, aggravate bradyarrhythmia and cause a deterioration in the hemodynamic state of the whole body, which greatly limits the application of these drugs in clinical settings. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of anisodamine and nicorandil regimens on the prevention of no-reflow (NR) and the amelioration of myocardial reperfusion in patients with AIMI undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A total of 104 consecutive patients with AIMI were included in this study and randomly assigned to one of four groups: A (control group), B (anisodamine group), C (nicorandil group) and D (anisodamine and nicorandil group). Patients underwent PCI via transradial artery access and the angiographic results were evaluated. Coronary diastolic BP (DBP) and systolic and mean BPs were measured by invasive catheterization. The primary end-point was a post-PCI Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) myocardial perfusion grade (TMPG) of 3. Composite end-points (mortality + new MI + target vessel revascularization) were evaluated during the hospital stay and 30 days after discharge. Following the procedure, the proportion of patients achieving TMPG 3 was significantly higher in group D than that in the other groups (P=0.014); furthermore, the incidence of a postprocedural TIMI score of 3 was the highest in group D. Three days after the procedure, the peak creatine kinase-MB and cardiac troponin I levels were the lowest and the left ventricular ejection fraction was the highest in group D. A thrombus score of 3/4 and low DBP were the independent risk factors for poor myocardial reperfusion (expressed as TMPG <3), while 2 mg anisodamine plus 2 mg nicorandil prior to PCI was protective for optimal myocardial reperfusion following the procedure

  9. Clinical, functional, and angiographic distinctions between Q wave and non-Q wave myocardial infarction: evidence of spontaneous reperfusion and implications for intervention trials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    We prospectively evaluated 241 consecutive patients with creatine kinase (MB fraction)-confirmed acute myocardial infarction with predischarge quantitative thallium-201 scintigraphy, coronary angiography, radionuclide ventriculography, and 24 hr Holter monitoring. Based on serial electrocardiograms, 154 patients had Q wave (QMI) and 87 had non-Q wave (NQMI) infarction. Despite less myocardial necrosis and better left ventricular function, the NQMI group had the same long-term survival as the QMI group. During 27 months of follow-up, patients with NQMI experienced more reinfarctions (p = .009), had a higher rate of unstable angina pectoris requiring rehospitalization (p = .034), and had a greater likelihood of subsequent bypass surgery or angioplasty (p = .018). Based on our thallium scintigraphic data, the greater clinical instability after NQMI appeared to be related to the presence of a larger residual mass of viable but jeopardized myocardium within the perfusion zone of the infarct-related vessel. Our results also indicate that the pathogenesis of NQMI may involve early spontaneous reperfusion and that patients with NQMI can experience sudden death despite well-preserved left ventricular function.

  10. An evidence-based shared decision making programme on the prevention of myocardial infarction in type 2 diabetes: protocol of a randomised-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lack of patient involvement in decision making has been suggested as one reason for limited treatment success. Concepts such as shared decision making may contribute to high quality healthcare by supporting patients to make informed decisions together with their physicians. A multi-component shared decision making programme on the prevention of heart attack in type 2 diabetes has been developed. It aims at improving the quality of decision-making by providing evidence-based patient information, enhancing patients’ knowledge, and supporting them to actively participate in decision-making. In this study the efficacy of the programme is evaluated in the setting of a diabetes clinic. Methods/Design A single blinded randomised-controlled trial is conducted to compare the shared decision making programme with a control-intervention. The intervention consists of an evidence-based patient decision aid on the prevention of myocardial infarction and a corresponding counselling module provided by diabetes educators. Similar in duration and structure, the control-intervention targets nutrition, sports, and stress coping. A total of 154 patients between 40 and 69 years of age with type 2 diabetes and no previous diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease or stroke are enrolled and allocated either to the intervention or the control-intervention. Primary outcome measure is the patients’ knowledge on benefits and harms of heart attack prevention captured by a standardised knowledge test. Key secondary outcome measure is the achievement of treatment goals prioritised by the individual patient. Treatment goals refer to statin taking, HbA1c-, blood pressure levels and smoking status. Outcomes are assessed directly after the counselling and at 6 months follow-up. Analyses will be carried out on intention-to-treat basis. Concurrent qualitative methods are used to explore intervention fidelity and to gain insight into implementation processes. Discussion Interventions to

  11. [Therapy of acute myocardial infarction in the prehospital setting].

    PubMed

    Arntz, H R

    2008-09-01

    The time period from symptom onset to hospital admission is of outstanding importance for the prognosis of a patient with an acute myocardial infarction. He is threatened by sudden cardiac death triggered by ventricular fibrillation on the one hand and on the other hand this period offers the chance for a timely decision on the optimal reperfusion strategy. A broad spectrum of therapeutic opportunities regarding thrombolysis, antiplatelets and anticoagulation has been proven to be effective in large randomised trials and registries. These results should influence the individual decision on reperfusion treatment as well as the patient's conditions, time lines, logistics and local resources. PMID:18629465

  12. The allometric model in chronic myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An allometric relationship between different electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters and infarcted ventricular mass was assessed in a myocardial infarction (MI) model in New Zealand rabbits. Methods A total of fifteen animals were used, out of which ten underwent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation to induce infarction (7–35% area). Myocardial infarction (MI) evolved and stabilized during a three month-period, after which, rabbits were sacrificed and the injured area was histologically confirmed. Right before sacrifice, ECGs were obtained to correlate several of its parameters to the infarcted mass. The latter was normalized after combining data from planimetry measurements and heart weight. The following ECG parameters were studied: RR and PR intervals, P-wave duration (PD), QRS duration (QRSD) and amplitude (QRSA), Q-wave (QA), R-wave (RA) and S-wave (SA) amplitudes, T-wave peak amplitude (TA), the interval from the peak to the end of the T-wave (TPE), ST-segment deviation (STA), QT interval (QT), corrected QT and JT intervals. Corrected QT was analyzed with different correction formulae, i.e., Bazett (QTB), Framingham (QTFRA), Fridericia (QTFRI), Hodge (QTHO) and Matsunaga (QTMA) and compared thereafter. The former variables and infarcted ventricular mass were then fitted to the allometric equation in terms of deviation from normality, in turn derived after ECGs in 5 healthy rabbits. Results Six variables (JT, QTB, QA, SA, TA and STA) presented statistical differences among leads. QT showed the best allometric fit (r = 0.78), followed by TA (r = 0.77), STA (r = 0.75), QTFRA (r = 0.72), TPE (r = 0.69), QTFRI (r = 0.68) and QTMA (r = 0.68). Corrected QT’s (QTFRA, QTFRI and QTMA) performed worse than the uncorrected counterpart (QT), the former scaling allometrically with similar goodness of fits. Conclusions QT, TA, STA and TPE could possibly be used to assess infarction extent in an old MI event through the

  13. Improving the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    The diagnosis of early myocardial infarction, especially in association with atypical clinical presentations, can be difficult to establish. Continued observation of high-risk patients, with multiple serial electrocardiographs and the use of other diagnostic modalities as available, is essential to prevent the inadvertent premature discharge of patients with evolving myocardial infarcts from the accident and emergency department. PMID:9015461

  14. Predictors of Appraisal and Coping Dimensions in Myocardial Infarction Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyong Sil; Martin, Peter

    This study attempted to identify predictors of perception and coping after the occurrence of a myocardial infarction. Sixty males and 17 females who had suffered from a myocardial infarction within 3 months prior to the research were recruited from a hospital rehabilitation program. Subjects completed the Peri-Life Events Scale, the 16-PF…

  15. Acute myocardial infarction complicating subarachnoid haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, L.B.J.; Otterspoor, L.C.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2009-01-01

    An acute myocardial infarction is a rare complication of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The combination of these two conditions imposes important treatment dilemmas. We describe two patients with this combination of life-threatening conditions. Patient 1 was treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention followed by clipping of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Six months after discharge the patient's memory and orientation had almost completely recovered. Patient 2 was treated with aspirin until coiling of the aneurysm could be performed. After successful coiling low-molecular-weight heparin was added. One week later the patient died due to a free wall rupture. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:284-7.19789696) PMID:19789696

  16. The outcomes of intra-aortic balloon pump usage in patients with acute myocardial infarction: a comprehensive meta-analysis of 33 clinical trials and 18,889 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhong-Guo; Gao, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Li-Wen; Li, Xiao-Bo; Shao, Ming-Xue; Ji, Qian; Zhu, Hao; Ren, Yi-Zhi; Chen, Shao-Liang; Tian, Nai-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) usage in patients with acute myocardial infarction remain controversial. This study sought to evaluate the outcomes of IABP usage in these patients. Methods Medline, EMBASE, and other internet sources were searched for relevant clinical trials. The primary efficacy endpoints (in-hospital, midterm, and long-term mortality) and secondary endpoints (reinfarction, recurrent ischemia, and new heart failure in the hospital) as well as safety endpoints (severe bleeding requiring blood transfusion and stroke in-hospital) were subsequently analyzed. Results Thirty-three clinical trials involving 18,889 patients were identified. The risk of long-term mortality in patients suffering from acute myocardial infarction was significantly decreased following IABP use (odds ratio [OR] 0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.48–0.91, P=0.010). Both in-hospital and midterm mortality did not differ significantly between the IABP use group and no IABP use group (in-hospital: OR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.59–1.28, P=0.479; midterm: OR 1.12, 95% CI: 0.53–2.38, P=0.768). IABP insertion was not associated with the risk reduction of reinfarction, recurrent ischemia, or new heart failure. However, IABP use increased the risk of severe bleeding requiring blood transfusion (OR 2.05, 95% CI: 1.29–3.25, P=0.002) and stroke (OR 1.71, 95% CI: 1.04–2.82, P=0.035). In the thrombolytic therapy and cardiogenic shock subgroups, reduced mortality rates following IABP use were observed. Conclusion IABP insertion is associated with feasible benefits with respect to long-term survival rates in patients suffering from acute myocardial infarction, particularly those suffering from cardiogenic shock and receiving thrombolytic therapy, but at the cost of higher incidence of severe bleeding and stroke. PMID:27042021

  17. Home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation after myocardial infarction or revascularisation: design and rationale of the Birmingham Rehabilitation Uptake Maximisation Study (BRUM): a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN72884263

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Kate; Lip, Gregory YH; Sandercock, Josie; Greenfield, Sheila M; Raftery, James P; Mant, Jonathan; Taylor, Rod; Lane, Deirdre; Lee, Kaeng Wai; Stevens, AJ

    2003-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation following myocardial infarction reduces subsequent mortality, but uptake and adherence to rehabilitation programmes remains poor, particularly among women, the elderly and ethnic minority groups. Evidence of the effectiveness of home-based cardiac rehabilitation remains limited. This trial evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of home-based compared to hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation. Methods/design A pragmatic randomised controlled trial of home-based compared with hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation in four hospitals serving a multi-ethnic inner city population in the United Kingdom was designed. The home programme is nurse-facilitated, manual-based using the Heart Manual. The hospital programmes offer comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in an out-patient setting. Patients We will randomise 650 adult, English or Punjabi-speaking patients of low-medium risk following myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass graft who have been referred for cardiac rehabilitation. Main outcome measures Serum cholesterol, smoking cessation, blood pressure, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score, distance walked on Shuttle walk-test measured at 6, 12 and 24 months. Adherence to the programmes will be estimated using patient self-reports of activity. In-depth interviews with non-attendees and non-adherers will ascertain patient views and the acceptability of the programmes and provide insights about non-attendance and aims to generate a theory of attendance at cardiac rehabilitation. The economic analysis will measure National Health Service costs using resource inputs. Patient costs will be established from the qualitative research, in particular how they affect adherence. Discussion More data are needed on the role of home-based versus hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation for patients following myocardial infarction and revascularisation, which would be provided by the Birmingham Rehabilitation

  18. Adenosine as an Adjunct Therapy in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients: Myth or Truth?

    PubMed

    Kassimis, George; Davlouros, Periklis; Patel, Niket; De Maria, Gianluigi; Kallistratos, Manolis S; Kharbanda, Rajesh K; Manolis, Athanasios J; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Banning, Adrian P

    2015-10-01

    Early reperfusion represents the key strategy in ST elevation myocardial infarction. However, reperfusion may induce myocardial damage due to the reperfusion myocardial injury, compromising the full potential of reperfusion therapy and accounting for unfavourable results in high risk patients. Adenosine seems to attenuate ischemia reperfusion injury, and thus represents a promising therapeutic option for treating such patients. However, previous randomized clinical trials have collectively failed to demonstrate whether adenosine can effectively reduce measures of myocardial injury and improve clinical outcome, despite its good basic evidence. The failure of such trials to show a real beneficial action may be in part related to specific factors other than adenosine's clinical efficacy. The purpose of this review is to explain the rationale for the use of adenosine as an adjunctive pharmacological cardio-protective agent following reperfusion of the ischemic myocardium, to address the weakness of previous trials and to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effect of adenosine administration on reperfusion myocardial injury in patients with myocardial infarction. Although some preclinical and clinical studies point towards the beneficial role of adenosine in the prevention and treatment of no-reflow phenomenon in myocardial infarction, many unanswered questions still remain, including the optimal clinical indication, mode, dosage, duration and timing of application, and the exact mechanisms leading to potential benefits. Clarifying these issues will depend on further properly designed, adequately powered and well conducted clinical trials, which will probably provide us with the definite answers. PMID:26150100

  19. Incidence and prognostic significance of atrial fibrillation in acute myocardial infarction: the GISSI-3 data

    PubMed Central

    Pizzetti, F; Turazza, F; Franzosi, M; Barlera, S; Ledda, A; Maggioni, A; Santoro, L; Tognoni, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Atrial fibrillation is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of myocardial infarction may have changed the impact of this arrhythmia.
OBJECTIVE—To assess the incidence and prognosis of atrial fibrillation complicating myocardial infarction in a large population of patients receiving optimal treatment, including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.
METHODS—Data were derived from the GISSI-3 trial, which included 17 944 patients within the first 24 hours after acute myocardial infarction. Atrial fibrillation was recorded during the hospital stay, and follow up visits were planned at six weeks and six months. Survival of the patients at four years was assessed through census offices.
RESULTS—The incidence of in-hospital atrial fibrillation or flutter was 7.8%. Atrial fibrillation was associated with indicators of a worse prognosis (age > 70 years, female sex, higher Killip class, previous myocardial infarction, treated hypertension, high systolic blood pressure at entry, insulin dependent diabetes, signs or symptoms of heart failure) and with some adverse clinical events (reinfarction, sustained ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation). After adjustment for other prognostic factors, atrial fibrillation remained an independent predictor of increased in-hospital mortality: 12.6% v 5%, adjusted relative risk (RR) 1.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.67 to 2.34. Data on long term mortality (four years after acute myocardial infarction) confirmed the persistent negative influence of atrial fibrillation (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.60 to 1.99).
CONCLUSIONS—Atrial fibrillation is an indicator of worse prognosis after acute myocardial infarction, both in the short term and in the long term, even in an unselected population.


Keywords: atrial fibrillation; acute myocardial infarction; prognosis PMID:11602545

  20. Characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction by positron-emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.; Biello, D.; Welch, M.J.; Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Roberts, R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-04-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether positron emission tomography (PET) performed after i.v. 11C-palmitate permits detection and characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction. PET was performed after the i.v. injection of 11C-palmitate in 10 normal subjects, 24 patients with initial nontransmural myocardial infarction (defined electrocardiographically), and 22 patients with transmural infarction. Depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate was detected with sagittal, coronal and transverse reconstructions, and quantified based on 14 contiguous transaxial reconstructions. Defects with homogeneously intense depression of accumulation of tracer were detected in all 22 patients with transmural infarction (100%). Abnormalities of the distribution of 11C-palmitate in the myocardium were detected in 23 patients with nontransmural infarction (96%). Thallium scintigrams were abnormal in only 11 of 18 patients with nontransmural infarction (61%). Tomographically estimated infarct size was greater among patients with transmural infarction (50.4 +/- 7.8 PET-g-Eq/m2 (+/- SEM SEM)) compared with those with nontransmural infarction (19 +/- 4 PET-g-Eq, p less than 0.01). Residual accumulation of 11C-palmitate within regions of infarction was more intensely depressed among patients with transmural compared to nontransmural infarction (33 +/- 1 vs 39 +/- 1% maximal myocardial radioactivity, p less than 0.01). Thus, PET and metabolic imaging with 11C-palmitate is a sensitive means of detecting, quantifying and characterizing nontransmural and transmural myocardial infarction.

  1. Rate of fibrinogen breakdown related to coronary patency and bleeding complications in patients with thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction--results from the PRIMI trial.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, H; Schmitz-Huebner, U; Windeler, J; Bär, F; Meyer, J; van de Loo, J

    1992-09-01

    Four hundred and one patients with acute myocardial infarction of less than 4 h duration were randomized to receive intravenous thrombolytic treatment with either 80 mg of full length unglycosylated single-chain-urokinase plasminogen activator (INN saruplase) or 1.5 million IU of streptokinase delivered over a 60 min period. Angiographic patency rates were higher at 60 min in saruplase treated patients (71.8% vs 48%; P less than 0.001), but did not differ significantly at 90 min (71.2% vs 63.9%; P = 0.15). Fibrinogen levels dropped markedly in both groups, the decrease being delayed and less pronounced with saruplase. Total fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products and D-dimer values rose earlier and to higher peak values in streptokinase treated patients. In both groups marked plasminogen and alpha 2-antiplasmin consumption was observed. Lower fibrinogen levels, and in particular the faster rate of fibrinogen breakdown, were associated with higher patency rates at 90 min (P less than 0.05). Patients with bleeding complications had lower 'lowest points' and a more rapid decrease in fibrinogen (P less than 0.05). These findings were not related to the drug used. Increased heparin levels at 6 to 12 h were correlated to bleeding complications in streptokinase treated patients. It is concluded that the rate of fibrinogen breakdown during and following thrombolytic treatment for acute myocardial infarction is related to early vessel patency and bleeding complications. PMID:1396833

  2. Association of urinary cadmium and myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Charles J. Frithsen, Ivar L.

    2008-02-15

    We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individuals 45-79 years old in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994) (NHANES III). Myocardial infarction was determined by electrocardiogram (ECG). Our sample included 4912 participants, which when weighted represented 52,234,055 Americans. We performed adjusted logistic regressions with the Framingham risk score, pack-years of smoking, race-ethnicity, and family history of heart attack, and diabetes as covariates. Urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.86 (95% CI 1.26-2.75) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine. This result supports the hypothesis that cadmium is associated with coronary heart disease. When logistic regressions were done by gender, women, but not men, showed a significant association of urinary cadmium with myocardial infarction. Women with urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.80 (95% CI 1.06-3.04) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine. When the analysis was restricted to never smokers (N=2187) urinary cadmium {>=}0.88 {mu}g/g creatinine had an odds ratio of 1.85 (95% CI 1.10-3.14) compared to urinary cadmium <0.43 {mu}g/g creatinine.

  3. [Recurrent myocardial infarctions: specific changes in biomarkers and in myocardial remodeling (case-control study)].

    PubMed

    Volkova, E G; Malykhina, O P; Levashov, S Iu

    2007-01-01

    Basing on a case-control study (n=81) with the use of standard methods of myocardial infarction verification, examination of hemogram, troponin T, C-reactive protein, echocardiography data it was established that markers of myocardial infarction (troponin T level) and inflammation (C reactive protein level, lymphopenia) during recurrent infarctions are less pronounced than during first infarctions. Remodeling in recurrent infarctions had the following specific characteristics: increase of left ventricular end diastolic dimension, myocardial mass index, diastolic dysfunction and stroke volume with unchanged ejection fraction. PMID:18260891

  4. Prevention of stroke and myocardial infarction by amlodipine and Angiotensin receptor blockers: a quantitative overview.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Guang; Li, Yan; Franklin, Stanley S; Safar, Michel

    2007-07-01

    In the present quantitative overview of outcome trials, we investigated the efficacy of amlodipine or angiotensin receptor blockers in the prevention of stroke and myocardial infarction in patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, or diabetic nephropathy. The analysis included 12 trials of 94 338 patients. The analysis of trials involving an amlodipine group showed that amlodipine provided more protection against stroke and myocardial infarction than other antihypertensive drugs, including angiotensin receptor blockers (-19%, P<0.0001 and -7%, P=0.03) and placebo (-37%, P=0.06 and -29%, P=0.04). The analysis of trials involving an angiotensin receptor blocker group showed contrasting results between trials versus amlodipine and trials versus other antihypertensive drugs for stroke (+19% versus -25%; P<0.0001) and myocardial infarction (+21% versus +1%; P=0.03). The results of 3 trials comparing an angiotensin receptor blocker with placebo were neutral (P> or =0.14). The within-trial between-group difference in achieved systolic pressure ranged from -1.1 to +4.7 mm Hg for trials involving an amlodipine group and from -2.8 to +4.0 mm Hg for trials involving an angiotensin receptor blocker group. The metaregression analysis correlating odds ratios with blood pressure differences showed a negative relationship (regression coefficients: -3% to -8%), which reached statistical significance (regression coefficient: -6%; P=0.01) for stroke in trials involving an amlodipine group. In conclusion, blood pressure differences largely accounted for cardiovascular outcome. PMID:17502490

  5. Cardioprotective Properties of Aerobic and Resistance Training Against Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Barboza, C A; Souza, G I H; Oliveira, J C M F; Silva, L M; Mostarda, C T; Dourado, P M M; Oyama, L M; Lira, F S; Irigoyen, M C; Rodrigues, B

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise training on ventricular morphometry and function, physical capacity, autonomic function, as well as on ventricular inflammatory status in trained rats prior to myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: sedentary+Sham, sedentary+myocardial infarction, aerobic trained+myocardial infarction, and resistance trained+myocardial infarction. Sham and myocardial infarction were performed after training periods. In the days following the surgeries, evaluations were performed. Aerobic training prevents aerobic (to a greater extent) and resistance capacity impairments, ventricular dysfunction, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic disorders (vagal tonus decrease and sympathetic tonus increase) triggered by myocardial infarction. Resistance training was able to prevent negative changes to aerobic and resistance capacity (to a greater extent) but not to ventricular dysfunction, and it prevented cardiovascular sympathetic increments. Additionally, both types of training reduced left ventricle inflammatory cytokine concentration. Our results suggest that aerobic and, for the first time, dynamic resistance training were able to reduce sympathetic tonus to the heart and vessels, as well as preventing the increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the left ventricle of trained groups. These data emphasizes the positive effects of aerobic and dynamic resistance training on the prevention of the negative changes triggered by myocardial infarction. PMID:26928914

  6. Thrombus aspiration in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Meneguz-Moreno, R A; Costa, R A; A, A; Ribamar Costa, J; Abizaid, A

    2015-12-01

    Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has become the treatment of choice in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) throughout the last years. A significant number of studies have demonstrated a morbidity and mortality benefit over thrombolysis, which has been attributed to better coronary perfusion in patients undergoing primary PCI. Even though it usually achieves normal flow in the affected epicardial vessel, myocardial reperfusion is not fully restored in a significant percentage of patients. This is commonly the result of distal thrombus embolization with subsequent impairment of myocardial microcirculation. Recognition of this has led to the development of a number of devices with different mechanisms, including thrombus aspiration catheters, in order to reduce distal embolization and therefore improve myocardial perfusion. Recent studies indeed demonstrate that the use of such devices offer additional clinical advantage in patients undergoing primary PCI in comparison to the standard PCI, whether in other trials it could not be proved. This paper focuses on general mechanisms of thrombus formation and discusses favorable and unfavorable studies towards thrombus aspiration in STEMI and its main aspects and it comes up with specific subjects that could benefit or not from the procedure of thrombus aspiration. PMID:26603617

  7. Everolimus-eluting bioresorbable stent vs. durable polymer everolimus-eluting metallic stent in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: results of the randomized ABSORB ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction—TROFI II trial

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté, Manel; Windecker, Stephan; Iñiguez, Andres; Okkels-Jensen, Lisette; Cequier, Angel; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Hofma, Sjoerd H.; Räber, Lorenz; Christiansen, Evald Høi; Suttorp, Maarten; Pilgrim, Thomas; Anne van Es, Gerrit; Sotomi, Yohei; García-García, Hector M.; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) feature thrombus-rich lesions with large necrotic core, which are usually associated with delayed arterial healing and impaired stent-related outcomes. The use of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (Absorb) has the potential to overcome these limitations owing to restoration of native vessel lumen and physiology at long term. The purpose of this randomized trial was to compare the arterial healing response at short term, as a surrogate for safety and efficacy, between the Absorb and the metallic everolimus-eluting stent (EES) in patients with STEMI. Methods and results ABSORB-STEMI TROFI II was a multicentre, single-blind, non-inferiority, randomized controlled trial. Patients with STEMI who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention were randomly allocated 1:1 to treatment with the Absorb or EES. The primary endpoint was the 6-month optical frequency domain imaging healing score (HS) based on the presence of uncovered and/or malapposed stent struts and intraluminal filling defects. Main secondary endpoint included the device-oriented composite endpoint (DOCE) according to the Academic Research Consortium definition. Between 06 January 2014 and 21 September 2014, 191 patients (Absorb [n = 95] or EES [n = 96]; mean age 58.6 years old; 17.8% females) were enrolled at eight centres. At 6 months, HS was lower in the Absorb arm when compared with EES arm [1.74 (2.39) vs. 2.80 (4.44); difference (90% CI) −1.06 (−1.96, −0.16); Pnon-inferiority <0.001]. Device-oriented composite endpoint was also comparably low between groups (1.1% Absorb vs. 0% EES). One case of definite subacute stent thrombosis occurred in the Absorb arm (1.1% vs. 0% EES; P = ns). Conclusion Stenting of culprit lesions with Absorb in the setting of STEMI resulted in a nearly complete arterial healing which was comparable with that of metallic EES at 6 months. These findings provide the basis for further exploration in

  8. Effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular function in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S.; Tortoledo, F.E.; Batty, J.W.; Raizner, A.E.

    1985-05-01

    The effects of coronary artery recanalization by intracoronary administration of streptokinase on left ventricular function during acute myocardial infarction have received increasing attention in recent years. Although myocardial dysfunction is often more pronounced in the right ventricle than in the left ventricle in patients with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction, the effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular dysfunction has not been previously addressed. Accordingly, in this investigation, 54 patients who participated in a prospective, controlled, randomized trial of recanalization during acute myocardial infarction were studied. Among 30 patients with inferior wall infarction, 19 had right ventricular dysfunction on admission; 11 of these 19 had positive uptake of technetium-99m pyrophosphate in the right ventricle, indicative of right ventricular infarction. Patients with successful recanalization exhibited improved right ventricular ejection fraction from admission to day 10. However, control patients and patients who did not undergo recanalization also exhibited improvement. These data indicate that the right ventricular dysfunction commonly associated with inferior wall infarction is often transient, and improvement is the rule, irrespective of early recanalization of the infarct vessel.

  9. Calpain inhibition preserves myocardial structure and function following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mani, Santhosh K; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Zavadzkas, Juozas A; Jeffords, Laura B; Rivers, William T; Zile, Michael R; Mukherjee, Rupak; Spinale, Francis G; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2009-11-01

    Cardiac pathology, such as myocardial infarction (MI), activates intracellular proteases that often trigger programmed cell death and contribute to maladaptive changes in myocardial structure and function. To test whether inhibition of calpain, a Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine protease, would prevent these changes, we used a mouse MI model. Calpeptin, an aldehydic inhibitor of calpain, was intravenously administered at 0.5 mg/kg body wt before MI induction and then at the same dose subcutaneously once per day. Both calpeptin-treated (n = 6) and untreated (n = 6) MI mice were used to study changes in myocardial structure and function after 4 days of MI, where end-diastolic volume (EDV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) were measured by echocardiography. Calpain activation and programmed cell death were measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). In MI mice, calpeptin treatment resulted in a significant improvement in EF [EF decreased from 67 + or - 2% pre-MI to 30 + or - 4% with MI only vs. 41 + or - 2% with MI + calpeptin] and attenuated the increase in EDV [EDV increased from 42 + or - 2 microl pre-MI to 73 + or - 4 microl with MI only vs. 55 + or - 4 microl with MI + calpeptin]. Furthermore, calpeptin treatment resulted in marked reduction in calpain- and caspase-3-associated changes and TUNEL staining. These studies indicate that calpain contributes to MI-induced alterations in myocardial structure and function and that it could be a potential therapeutic target in treating MI patients. PMID:19734364

  10. Protocol: does sodium nitrite administration reduce ischaemia-reperfusion injury in patients presenting with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction? Nitrites in acute myocardial infarction (NIAMI)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whilst advances in reperfusion therapies have reduced early mortality from acute myocardial infarction, heart failure remains a common complication, and may develop very early or long after the acute event. Reperfusion itself leads to further tissue damage, a process described as ischaemia-reperfusion-injury (IRI), which contributes up to 50% of the final infarct size. In experimental models nitrite administration potently protects against IRI in several organs, including the heart. In the current study we investigate whether intravenous sodium nitrite administration immediately prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction will reduce myocardial infarct size. This is a phase II, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded and multicentre trial. Methods and outcomes The aim of this trial is to determine whether a 5 minute systemic injection of sodium nitrite, administered immediately before opening of the infarct related artery, results in significant reduction of IRI in patients with first acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI). The primary clinical end point is the difference in infarct size between sodium nitrite and placebo groups measured using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) performed at 6–8 days following the AMI and corrected for area at risk (AAR) using the endocardial surface area technique. Secondary end points include (i) plasma creatine kinase and Troponin I measured in blood samples taken pre-injection of the study medication and over the following 72 hours; (ii) infarct size at six months; (iii) Infarct size corrected for AAR measured at 6–8 days using T2 weighted triple inversion recovery (T2-W SPAIR or STIR) CMR imaging; (iv) Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction measured by CMR at 6–8 days and six months following injection of the study medication; and (v) LV end systolic volume index at 6–8 days and six months. Funding, ethics and

  11. The importance of early patency after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Grover, A; Rihal, C S

    1995-07-01

    The importance of achieving rapid patency of the infarct-related artery during acute myocardial infarction has become well recognized. Early, sustained patency of the infarct-related vessel correlates with improved left ventricular function, better in-hospital outcomes, and lower mortality. Various strategies designed to improve early patency, including "prehospital" thrombolysis, use of an accelerated recombinant tissue plasminogen activator regimen, and immediate angioplasty have been studied. This paper reviews the importance of achieving early patency, the various strategies employed, and the evidence for their efficacy. Future directions in treatment of acute myocardial infarction are touched upon briefly. PMID:7549077

  12. Cortical laminar necrosis following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Simona; Silvestrini, Mauro; Provinciali, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    The cortical laminar necrosis (CLN) is a permanent injury characterized by the selective delayed necrosis of the cerebral cortex, mainly of the third layer, and usually greater in the depths and sides of the sulci than over the crest of the gyri. The damage involves all cellular components - either neurons, glia cells and blood vessels - and results in a focal cortical band of pan-necrosis detectable in late sub-acute or chronic stages of reduced energy supply to the brain. The CLN has been described in different conditions as hypoxia, hypoglycemia and status epilepticus. At brain CT or MR scans it appears with pathognomonic highly hyperdense or T1-hyperintense lesions following the gyral anatomy of the cerebral cortex. We reported a case of CLN associated to myocardial infarct and discussed the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27375142

  13. [Myocardial infarction and thromboembolism during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Härtel, Dirk; Sorges, Eckhard; Carlsson, Jörg; Römer, Volker; Tebbe, Ulrich

    2003-05-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a very rare event during pregnancy and bears the problem of misdiagnosis. However, about 150 cases have been published worldwide with a preponderance of anterior wall infarcts. With more women delaying childbearing until an older age and increasing prevalence of smoking in young women, it can be expected that all forms of coronary artery disease--including acute myocardial infarction--will be seen more often in the future. Among the causes of coronary artery occlusion in pregnancy are (1) rupture of very small coronary artery plaques triggered by different events, e.g., hypertension; (2) plain coronary artery disease; (3) dissection of coronary arteries; (4) coronary artery spasms with/without arterial thrombosis. Prompt diagnosis and immediate therapy are necessary to lower the high mortality of mother and fetus. The gold standard in the therapy of acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is immediate coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) with or without stent implantation. Application of thrombolytics (recombinant tissue plasminogen activator [rt-PA], r-PA, streptokinase [SK], urokinase [UK]) has been reported in single patients but should be limited to cases where acute PTCA is not available and where the infarct occurs before the 14th week of pregnancy because of possible embryopathy. If the patient is in the last 10 weeks of pregnancy, anticipation of delivery should be part of the medical planning. Consultation with an obstetrician must be obtained as soon as the patient enters the hospital. Besides bleeding complications, venous thrombosis with pulmonary embolism is among the most common causes of death during pregnancy. Pregnancy-related changes in physiology - increase in the resistance to flow from the lower extremities to the heart - and congenital coagulation abnormalities are most important to be recognized. This leads to the fact that superficial and deep venous thromboses

  14. LAD-Ligation: A Murine Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, Mandy V.V.; Meyberg, Danja; Deuse, Tobias; Tang-Quan, Karis R.; Robbins, Robert C.; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Schrepfer, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    Research models of infarction and myocardial ischemia are essential to investigate the acute and chronic pathobiological and pathophysiological processes in myocardial ischemia and to develop and optimize future treatment. Two different methods of creating myocardial ischemia are performed in laboratory rodents. The first method is to create cryo infarction, a fast but inaccurate technique, where a cryo-pen is applied on the surface of the heart (1-3). Using this method the scientist can not guarantee that the cryo-scar leads to ischemia, also a vast myocardial injury is created that shows pathophysiological side effects that are not related to myocardial infarction. The second method is the permanent ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Here the LAD is ligated with one single stitch, forming an ischemia that can be seen almost immediately. By closing the LAD, no further blood flow is permitted in that area, while the surrounding myocardial tissue is nearly not affected. This surgical procedure imitates the pathobiological and pathophysiological aspects occurring in infarction-related myocardial ischemia. The method introduced in this video demonstrates the surgical procedure of a mouse infarction model by ligating the LAD. This model is convenient for pathobiological and pathophysiological as well as immunobiological studies on cardiac infarction. The shown technique provides high accuracy and correlates well with histological sections. PMID:19829290

  15. Earliest electrocardiographic evidence of myocardial infarction: implications for thrombolytic treatment. The GREAT Group.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, J; Trent, R; Rawles, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the incidence of the earliest electrocardiographic changes in patients with suspected myocardial infarction and their sensitivity and specificity for predicting the final diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Retrospective study of paired electrocardiograms recorded at home and on admission to hospital. SETTING--29 rural practices in Grampian and teaching hospitals in Aberdeen. PATIENTS--137 patients participating in the early anistreplase trial in the Grampian region, who received placebo at home and for whom paired electrocardiograms were available. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Classified electrocardiographic abnormalities and diagnosis at discharge. RESULTS--Electrocardiograms were recorded immediately before injection of placebo at home and anistreplase in hospital at median times of 110 and 240 minutes after the onset of symptoms. Definite or probable myocardial infarction was later confirmed in 93 (68%) patients. Of these, 66 (71%) had the same findings on both electrocardiograms of either ST elevation, bundle branch block, or a non-specific abnormality, while 27 (29%) showed a major change of classification between home and hospital recordings; 21 (23%) had ST elevation or bundle branch block on only one of the paired recordings. Although ST elevation was the commonest abnormality in the 93 patients with myocardial infarction, in only 51 was it recorded at home (sensitivity 55%) and in 49 on admission (sensitivity 53%). Of 57 patients with ST elevation at home, six did not have infarction (specificity 86%), while of 51 with ST elevation on admission, two did not have infarction (specificity 95%). CONCLUSIONS--Elevation of the ST segment is a transient electrocardiographic abnormality that has high specificity but low sensitivity for predicting the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; it is an unsatisfactory precondition for giving thrombolytic treatment to patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. PMID:8267742

  16. Nicardipine in models of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Alps, B. J.; Calder, C.; Wilson, A.

    1985-01-01

    1 In a dog model of partial myocardial ischaemia, superimposed ST segment elevations in epicardial ECGs were inhibited by nicardipine over a cumulative i.v. dose range of 1-20 μg kg-1. 2 Over the cumulative i.v. dose range of 0.5-166.5 μg kg-1, nicardipine had little overall effect on gross cardiac conduction, at spontaneous heart rate. 3 Dogs that received oral 1-2 mg kg-1 nicardipine daily for 16 weeks and then survived 1 week occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) developed a superior coronary collateral circulation compared with untreated animals. 4 Nicardipine given by three different dosing schedules to baboons markedly limited myocardial infarction over a 6 h period of LAD occlusion. 5 Compared with a group of completely untreated dogs, there was protection of the myocardium in the animals given nicardipine that survived 3 months occlusion of the LAD. ImagesFigure 7 PMID:4027150

  17. Primary angioplasty vs. fibrinolysis in very old patients with acute myocardial infarction: TRIANA (TRatamiento del Infarto Agudo de miocardio eN Ancianos) randomized trial and pooled analysis with previous studies

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Héctor; Betriu, Amadeo; Heras, Magda; Alonso, Joaquín J.; Cequier, Angel; García, Eulogio J.; López-Sendón, José L.; Macaya, Carlos; Hernández-Antolín, Rosana; Bueno, Héctor; Hernández-Antolín, Rosana; Alonso, Joaquín J.; Betriu, Amadeo; Cequier, Angel; García, Eulogio J.; Heras, Magda; López-Sendón, José L.; Macaya, Carlos; Azpitarte, José; Sanz, Ginés; Chamorro, Angel; López-Palop, Ramón; Sionis, Alex; Arós, Fernando; García-Fernández, Eulogio; Rubio, Rafael; Hernández, Felipe; Tascón, Juan Carlos; Moreu, José; Betriu, Amadeu; Heras, Magda; Hernández-Antolín, Rosana; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Morís, César; de Posada, Ignacio Sánchez; Cequier, Ángel; Esplugas, Enrique; Melgares, Rafael; Bosa, Francisco; García-González, Martín Jesús; Lezáun, Román; Carmona, José Ramón; Vázquez, José Manuel; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso; Picart, Joan García; de Rozas, José Domínguez; Fernández, José Díaz; Vázquez, Felipe Fernández; Alonso, Norberto; Zueco, José Javier; San José, José María; San Román, Alberto; Hernández, Carolina; García, José María Hernández; Alcántara, Ángel García; Bethencourt, Armando; Fiol, Miquel; Mancisidor, Xabier; Mancisidor, Xabier; Ruiz, Rafael; Hidalgo, Rafael; Sobrino, Nicolás; Maqueda, Isidoro González; Torres, Alfonso; Arós, Fernando; Amaro, Antonio; Jaquet, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Aims To compare primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) and fibrinolysis in very old patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), in whom head-to-head comparisons between both strategies are scarce. Methods and results Patients ≥75 years old with STEMI <6 h were randomized to pPCI or fibrinolysis. The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause mortality, re-infarction, or disabling stroke at 30 days. The trial was prematurely stopped due to slow recruitment after enroling 266 patients (134 allocated to pPCI and 132 to fibrinolysis). Both groups were well balanced in baseline characteristics. Mean age was 81 years. The primary endpoint was reached in 25 patients in the pPCI group (18.9%) and 34 (25.4%) in the fibrinolysis arm [odds ratio (OR), 0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38–1.23; P = 0.21]. Similarly, non-significant reductions were found in death (13.6 vs. 17.2%, P = 0.43), re-infarction (5.3 vs. 8.2%, P = 0.35), or disabling stroke (0.8 vs. 3.0%, P = 0.18). Recurrent ischaemia was less common in pPCI-treated patients (0.8 vs. 9.7%, P< 0.001). No differences were found in major bleeds. A pooled analysis with the two previous reperfusion trials performed in older patients showed an advantage of pPCI over fibrinolysis in reducing death, re-infarction, or stroke at 30 days (OR, 0.64; 95% CI 0.45–0.91). Conclusion Primary PCI seems to be the best reperfusion therapy for STEMI even for the oldest patients. Early contemporary fibrinolytic therapy may be a safe alternative to pPCI in the elderly when this is not available. Clinicaltrials.gov # NCT00257309. PMID:20971744

  18. Inflammatory markers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Seropian, Ignacio M; Sonnino, Chiara; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Biasucci, Luigi M; Abbate, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    After acute myocardial infarction, ventricular remodeling is characterized by changes at the molecular, structural, geometrical and functional level that determine progression to heart failure. Inflammation plays a key role in wound healing and scar formation, affecting ventricular remodeling. Several, rather different, components of the inflammatory response were studied as biomarkers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. Widely available and inexpensive tests, such as leukocyte count at admission, as well as more sophisticated immunoassays provide powerful predictors of adverse outcome in patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction. We review the value of inflammatory markers in ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction and their association with ventricular remodeling, heart failure and sudden death. In conclusion, the use of these biomarkers may identify subjects at greater risk of adverse events and perhaps provide an insight into the mechanisms of disease progression. PMID:25681486

  19. An Unusual Complication Following Transarterial Chemoembolization: Acute Myocardial Infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Yiliang; Chang Weichou; Kuo Wuhsien; Huang Tienyu; Chu Hengcheng; Hsieh Tsaiyuan; Chang Weikuo

    2010-02-15

    Transarterial chemoembolization has been widely used to treat unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Various complications have been reported, but they have not included acute myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction results mainly from coronary artery occlusion by plaques that are vulnerable to rupture or from coronary spasm, embolization, or dissection of the coronary artery. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case report that describes a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent transarterial chemoembolization and died subsequently of acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of this complication induced by transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma. This case illustrates the need to be aware of acute myocardial infarction when transarterial chemoembolization is planned for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, especially in patients with underlying coronary artery disease.

  20. Acute myocardial infarction due to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, R K; Singh, Arun; Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sinha, Ajay; Saurabh; Kumar, Amit

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of blunt chest injury following a road accident leading to damage of the left main and left anterior descending coronary arteries causing acute myocardial infarction in a young person. PMID:12674188

  1. Acute myocardial infarction and sudden death in Sioux Indians.

    PubMed Central

    Hrabovsky, S L; Welty, T K; Coulehan, J L

    1989-01-01

    While some Indian tribes have low rates of acute myocardial infarction, Northern Plains Indians, including the Sioux, have rates of morbidity and mortality from acute myocardial infarction higher than those reported for the United States population in general. In a review of diagnosed cases of acute myocardial infarction over a 3-year period in 2 hospitals serving predominantly Sioux Indians, 8% of cases were found misclassified, and 22% failed to meet rigorous diagnostic criteria, although the patients did indeed have ischemic heart disease. Patients had high frequencies of complications and risk factors and a fatality rate of 16% within a month of admission. Sudden deaths likely due to ischemic heart disease but in persons not diagnosed as having acute myocardial infarction by chart review occurred 3 times more frequently than deaths occurring within a month of clinical diagnosis. PMID:2735047

  2. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells improve myocardial function in a swine model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; Kong, Feng; Qi, Tong-Gang; Cheng, Guang-Hui; Wang, Jue; Sun, Chao; Luan, Yun

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to confirm the effect and elucidate the mechanism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMI was induced in mini‑swine by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery, and BMSCs (1x107) were injected via a sterile microinjection into the ischemic area. Six months postoperatively, electrocardiograph‑gated single photon emission computed tomography revealed that the myocardial filling defect was reduced and the left ventricular ejection fraction was improved in the BMSC group compared with the control group (P<0.05). Histopathological examination indicated that, in the BMSC treatment group, the percentage of survived myocardial tissue and the vessel density were increased, and the percentage of apoptosis was decreased compared with controls (P<0.05). Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction results indicated that the expression levels of multiple inflammatory factors were significantly upregulated in the BMSC group compared with levels in the control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that BMSC injection significantly improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size in six months, indicating that this method may be valuable for future study in clinical trials. PMID:25060678

  3. Circulatory responses to hypoxia in experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroll, M.; Robison, S. C.; Harrison, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three levels of decreased arterial oxygen saturation elicited a graded circulatory response in dogs, manifested by stepwise increases in cardiac output, left ventricular dp/dt, and stroke volume, and decreases in systemic vascular resistance. Responses to similar hypoxia challenges after experimental myocardial infarction were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less. Although the circulatory compensation for hypoxia was less effective after myocardial infarction, no further deterioration of the haemodynamics was noted.

  4. Subacute cardiac rupture complicating myocardial infarction. A case report.

    PubMed

    Rosato, G; Santomauro, M; Stanco, G; Petillo, F; Sauro, R; Chiariello, M; Spampinato, N; Rotiroti, D

    1996-02-01

    The authors have focused this study on the emergence of subacute ventricular free wall rupture in a seventy-six-year-old patient admitted to hospital for inferior acute myocardial infarction. After six days he showed clinical signs of bradycardia and hypotension evolving to electromechanical dissociation. Given an adequate pharmacologic therapy, the patient was submitted to echocardiography, which was believed to be consistent with myocardial rupture, showing a moderate to large pericardial effusion. Pericardiocentesis of 150 mL of bloody fluid resulted in a further improvement in his hemodynamics. The patient underwent cardiac surgery with repair of the myocardial rupture through a large diaphragmatic infarction by a Dacron polyester fiber graft and pacemaker placement. In conclusion the authors confirm the relevant role of clinical data such as persistent chest pain and hemodynamic instability and the value of echocardiography in identifying subacute myocardial free wall rupture after an episode of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:8595015

  5. Acute Myocardial Infarction in a 26-Year-Old Patient With Familial Hypercholesteremia.

    PubMed

    Miyayama, Takeshi; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Komaki, Tomo; Kuwano, Takashi; Morii, Joji; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-07-01

    A 26-year-old male suffered sustained chest pain. Electrocardiogram showed ST-segment elevation in the anteroseptal wall and reciprocal ST-segment change in the inferior wall. The troponin-I level and the white blood cell count were elevated. We gave a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. He underwent urgent coronary angiography, which revealed 90% diffuse stenosis in the middle right coronary artery and total occlusion in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Since the electrocardiogram indicated that the culprit lesion was in the proximal LAD, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention. The coronary flow in the LAD was classified as thrombolysis in myocardial infarction trial 3. His coronary risk factors were obesity, smoking, family history, hypertension and diabetes, in addition to heterozygous familial hypercholesteremia (FH). Herein, we describe the case of a young patient with acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction and discuss the potential importance of controlling cholesterol levels in FH. PMID:27298669

  6. Acute Myocardial Infarction in a 26-Year-Old Patient With Familial Hypercholesteremia

    PubMed Central

    Miyayama, Takeshi; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Komaki, Tomo; Kuwano, Takashi; Morii, Joji; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    A 26-year-old male suffered sustained chest pain. Electrocardiogram showed ST-segment elevation in the anteroseptal wall and reciprocal ST-segment change in the inferior wall. The troponin-I level and the white blood cell count were elevated. We gave a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. He underwent urgent coronary angiography, which revealed 90% diffuse stenosis in the middle right coronary artery and total occlusion in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). Since the electrocardiogram indicated that the culprit lesion was in the proximal LAD, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention. The coronary flow in the LAD was classified as thrombolysis in myocardial infarction trial 3. His coronary risk factors were obesity, smoking, family history, hypertension and diabetes, in addition to heterozygous familial hypercholesteremia (FH). Herein, we describe the case of a young patient with acute anteroseptal myocardial infarction and discuss the potential importance of controlling cholesterol levels in FH. PMID:27298669

  7. Early-phase myocardial infarction: Evaluation by MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tscholakoff, D.; Higgins, C.B.; McNamara, M.T.; Derugin, N.

    1986-06-01

    In vivo gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 12 dogs immediately after occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and serially up to 5 hours and again between 4 and 14 days. This was done to evaluate the appearance of acute myocardial infarcts and to determine how soon after coronary artery occlusion MR imaging can demonstrate the site of acute myocardial ischemia. In nine dogs with postmortem evidence of myocardial infarction, regional increase of signal intensity of the myocardium was present by 3 hours after coronary occlusion and conformed to the site of myocardial infarct found at autopsy. The signal intensity on T2-weighted images of the infarcted on T2-weighted images of the infarcted myocardium was significantly greater than that of normal myocardium at 3, 4, and 5 hours after occlusion. The T2 (spin-spin) relaxation time was significantly prolonged in the region of myocardial infarct at 3, 4, and 5 hours post-occlusion compared with normal myocardium. Myocardial wall thinning and increased intracavitary flow signal were found in six dogs with comparable pre- and postocclusion images in late systole.

  8. Experimental model of myocardial infarction: Histopathology and reperfusion damage revisited.

    PubMed

    Kren, Leos; Meluzin, Jaroslav; Pavlovsky, Zdenek; Mayer, Jiri; Kala, Petr; Groch, Ladislav; Hornacek, Ivan; Rauser, Petr; Vlasin, Michal

    2010-09-15

    The goal of this pilot study was to create an experimental model of myocardial infarction (for subsequent evaluation of the effectiveness of an alternative way of stem cell application - intracoronary cell infusion in the management of acute myocardial infarction). Four experimental animals, female pigs weighing between 30 and 40 kg, were used in the initial phase of this study to create an experimental model of acute myocardial infarction. An experimental myocardial infarction was performed via occlusion of the interventricular arm of the left coronary artery for 90 min. The hearts were examined 1 h, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after the procedure. Macroscopically, red infarction characteristic of reperfusion was found. Microscopically, the healing process with granulation tissue production/collagen deposition was remarkably accelerated compared to literature data. Repair processes in reperfused experimental myocardial infarction and/or reperfused autopsy specimens should not be evaluated on the basis of literature data only. Large collections of extracellular calcium were present. This phenomenon is not well described in the literature and probably has the potential for significantly interfering with the repair process. The histopathology of reperfused acute myoardial infarction deserves to be studied in further investigations. PMID:20451332

  9. Intracoronary Cardiosphere-Derived Cells After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Malliaras, Konstantinos; Makkar, Raj R.; Smith, Rachel R.; Cheng, Ke; Wu, Edwin; Bonow, Robert O.; Marbán, Linda; Mendizabal, Adam; Cingolani, Eugenio; Johnston, Peter V.; Gerstenblith, Gary; Schuleri, Karl H.; Lardo, Albert C.; Marbán, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to report full 1-year results, detailed magnetic resonance imaging analysis, and determinants of efficacy in the prospective, randomized, controlled CADUCEUS (CArdiosphere-Derived aUtologous stem CElls to reverse ventricUlar dySfunction) trial. Background Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) exerted regenerative effects at 6 months in the CADUCEUS trial. Complete results at the final 1-year endpoint are unknown. Methods Autologous CDCs (12.5 to 25 × 106) grown from endomyocardial biopsy specimens were infused via the intracoronary route in 17 patients with left ventricular dysfunction 1.5 to 3 months after myocardial infarction (MI) (plus 1 infused off-protocol 14 months post-MI). Eight patients were followed as routine-care control patients. Results In 13.4 months of follow-up, safety endpoints were equivalent between groups. At 1 year, magnetic resonance imaging revealed that CDC-treated patients had smaller scar size compared with control patients. Scar mass decreased and viable mass increased in CDC-treated patients but not in control patients. The single patient infused 14 months post-MI responded similarly. CDC therapy led to improved regional function of infarcted segments compared with control patients. Scar shrinkage correlated with an increase in viability and with improvement in regional function. Scar reduction correlated with baseline scar size but not with a history of temporally remote MI or time from MI to infusion. The changes in left ventricular ejection fraction in CDC-treated subjects were consistent with the natural relationship between scar size and ejection fraction post-MI. Conclusions Intracoronary administration of autologous CDCs did not raise significant safety concerns. Preliminary indications of bioactivity include decreased scar size, increased viable myocardium, and improved regional function of infarcted myocardium at 1 year post-treatment. These results, which are consistent with therapeutic regeneration

  10. Approaches to Improving Cardiac Structure and Function During and After an Acute Myocardial Infarction: Acute and Chronic Phases.

    PubMed

    Kloner, Robert A; Dai, Wangde; Hale, Sharon L; Shi, Jianru

    2016-07-01

    While progress has been made in improving survival following myocardial infarction, this injury remains a major source of mortality and morbidity despite modern reperfusion therapy. While one approach has been to develop therapies to reduce lethal myocardial cell reperfusion injury, this concept has not translated to the clinics, and several recent negative clinical trials raise the question of whether reperfusion injury is important in humans undergoing reperfusion for acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. Therapy aimed at reducing myocardial cell death while the myocytes are still ischemic is more likely to further reduce myocardial infarct size. Developing new therapies to further reduce left ventricular remodeling after the acute event is another approach to preserving structure and function of the heart after infarction. Such therapy may include chronic administration of pharmacologic agents and/or therapies developed from the field of regenerative cardiology, including cellular or non-cellular materials such as extracellular matrix. The optimal therapy will be to administer agents that both reduce myocardial infarct size in the acute phase of infarction as well as reduce adverse left ventricular remodeling during the chronic or healing phase of myocardial infarction. Such a dual approach will help optimize the preservation of both cardiac structure and function. PMID:26612091

  11. ECG findings after myocardial infarction in children after Kawasaki disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, T.; Takao, A.; Kondoh, C.; Nakazawa, M.; Hiroe, M.; Matsumoto, Y.

    1988-10-01

    Standard 12-lead ECGs were evaluated in 17 children with myocardial infarction and 78 children without myocardial infarction after Kawasaki disease; sensitivity and specificity of the ECG infarction criteria were determined. The presence or absence of myocardial infarction was determined from either clinical examination results (coronary angiography, ventriculography, and thallium-201 myocardial imaging) or autopsy findings. Of seven patients with inferior infarction, abnormally deep Q waves in lead II, III, or aVF were observed in six, but the duration was greater than 0.04 second in only one (14%). The sensitivity and specificity of inferior infarction criteria based on Q wave amplitude were 86% and 97%, respectively. Of eight patients with anterior infarction, seven (88%) had abnormally deep and wide (greater than or equal to 0.04 second) Q waves in anterior chest leads. The sensitivity and specificity of the infarction criteria based on the amplitude and duration of the Q wave were 75% and 99%, respectively. Of seven patients with lateral infarction, Q waves were observed in lead I, aVL, or both in four patients, and in all of these patients Q waves were wider than 0.04 second. In two patients with both inferior and anterior infarction, Q waves were observed only in leads II, III, and aVF; in only one patient were the Q waves wider than 0.04 second. Thus deep Q waves in lead II, III, or aVF that are not wider than 0.04 second may indicate inferior infarction in children. Q waves in lead I, aVL, and chest leads associated with anterolateral infarction are in most instances deep and wide.

  12. Prognostic value of radionuclide exercise testing after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Schocken, D.D.

    1984-08-01

    Abnormal systolic ventricular function and persistent ischemia are sensitive indicators of poor prognosis following myocardial infarction. The use of exercise improves the utility of both radionuclide ventriculography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the identification of postinfarction patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac events. 51 references.

  13. Myocardial Hemorrhage After Acute Reperfused ST-Segment–Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, David; Haig, Caroline; Ahmed, Nadeem; McEntegart, Margaret; Petrie, Mark C.; Eteiba, Hany; Hood, Stuart; Watkins, Stuart; Lindsay, M. Mitchell; Davie, Andrew; Mahrous, Ahmed; Mordi, Ify; Rauhalammi, Samuli; Sattar, Naveed; Welsh, Paul; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Ford, Ian; Oldroyd, Keith G.

    2016-01-01

    Background— The success of coronary reperfusion therapy in ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction (MI) is commonly limited by failure to restore microvascular perfusion. Methods and Results— We performed a prospective cohort study in patients with reperfused ST-segment–elevation MI who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance 2 days (n=286) and 6 months (n=228) post MI. A serial imaging time-course study was also performed (n=30 participants; 4 cardiac magnetic resonance scans): 4 to 12 hours, 2 days, 10 days, and 7 months post reperfusion. Myocardial hemorrhage was taken to represent a hypointense infarct core with a T2* value of <20 ms. Microvascular obstruction was assessed with late gadolinium enhancement. Adverse remodeling was defined as an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic volume ≥20% at 6 months. Cardiovascular death or heart failure events post discharge were assessed during follow-up. Two hundred forty-five patients had evaluable T2* data (mean±age, 58 [11] years; 76% men). Myocardial hemorrhage 2 days post MI was associated with clinical characteristics indicative of MI severity and inflammation. Myocardial hemorrhage was a multivariable associate of adverse remodeling (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.64 [1.07–6.49]; P=0.035). Ten (4%) patients had a cardiovascular cause of death or experienced a heart failure event post discharge, and myocardial hemorrhage, but not microvascular obstruction, was associated with this composite adverse outcome (hazard ratio, 5.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.25–27.74; P=0.025), including after adjustment for baseline left ventricular end-diastolic volume. In the serial imaging time-course study, myocardial hemorrhage occurred in 7 (23%), 13 (43%), 11 (33%), and 4 (13%) patients 4 to 12 hours, 2 days, 10 days, and 7 months post reperfusion. The amount of hemorrhage (median [interquartile range], 7.0 [4.9–7.5]; % left ventricular mass) peaked on day 2 (P<0.001), whereas microvascular

  14. Radionuclide imaging of myocardial infarction using Tc-99m TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Campbell, S.; Kirshenbaum, J.M.; Lister-James, J.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Antman, E.

    1985-05-01

    The cationic complex Tc-99m t-butylisonitrile (TBI) concentrates in the myocardial tissue of several animal species. Its myocardial distribution is proportional to blood flow both in zones of ischemia and in normal myocardium at rest. Planar, tomographic, and gated myocardial images have been obtained using Tc-99m TBI in the human. The authors investigated the potential application of Tc-99m TBI imaging to detect and localize myocardial infarction. Four subjects without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease and five patients with ECG evidence of previous myocardial infarction were studied. Tc-99m TBI (10mCi) was injected intravenously with the patient in a resting state with planar imaging in the anterior, 30 and 70 degree LAO projections beginning one hr after injection. The distribution of the tracer was homogeneous throughout the left ventricular wall in the normal subjects. Regional perfusion defects were present in 4/5 of the patients with myocardial infarction. Location of the defects corresponded to the location of the infarct using ECG criteria (2 inferoposterior and 2 anterior). The patient in whom the Tc-99m TBI image appeared normal had sustained a subendocardial myocardial infarct which could not be localized by ECG; the other 4 pts had transmural infarcts. Anterior and 30 degree LAO images were of excellent quality in all cases; there was overlap of the liver on the inferior wall of the left ventricle on the 70 degree LAO views. The authors conclude that accurate perfusion imaging may be possible using Tc-99m TBI in patients with transmural myocardial infarction.

  15. [Myocardial infarct immediately after a normal exercise test].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Jaume, A; González-Hermosillo, J A; Iturralde, P; Romero, L; Colín, L; Villarreal, A

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of myocardial infarction immediately following a normal stress testing, are described. The incidence and possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed. In one of the patients it was difficult to establish the pathophysiological mechanism which was the cause of the ischemic event. In the other, the coronary arteriography revealed only minimal obstructive disease. Therefore, coronary vasospasm with thrombus formation as a cause of the infarction ia an interesting speculative possibility in view of the angiographic findings. Acute myocardial infarction after a normal electrocardiographic response to maximal exercise testing is extremely rare, and the precise pathophysiologic mechanism that leads to his complication is not clear. PMID:2344228

  16. Use of thallium 201 myocardial imaging to exclude myocardial infarction after dissection in congenital coarctation of the aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Halon, D.A.; Weiss, A.T.; Tzivoni, D.; Atlan, H.; Gotsman, M.S.

    1981-10-01

    The use of a mobile gamma camera with thallium 201 myocardial imaging is described to exclude myocardial infarction in a patient admitted to the coronary care unit in shock and with clinical, enzyme, and ECG changes consistent with infarction. The patient suffered from acute aortic dissection associated with congenital coarctation of the aorta. The myocardial scan excluded transmural myocardial injury.

  17. Nitroglycerin Use in Myocardial Infarction Patients: Risks and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Julio C.B.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and its sequelae are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nitroglycerin remains a first-line treatment for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction. Nitroglycerin achieves its benefit by giving rise to nitric oxide, which causes vasodilation and increases blood flow to the myocardium. However, continuous delivery of nitroglycerin results in tolerance, limiting the use of this drug. Nitroglycerin tolerance is due, at least in part, to inactivation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), an enzyme that converts nitroglycerin to the vasodilator, nitric oxide. We have recently found that, in addition to nitroglycerin’s effect on the vasculature, sustained treatment with nitroglycerin negatively affects cardiomyocyte viability following ischemia, thus resulting in increased infarct size in a myocardial infarction model in animals. Co-administration of Alda-1, an activator of ALDH2, with nitroglycerin improves metabolism of reactive aldehyde adducts and prevents the nitroglycerin-induced increase in cardiac dysfunction following myocardial infarction. In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms associated with the benefits and risks of nitroglycerin administration in myocardial infarction. (167 of 200). PMID:22040938

  18. Improved survival with simendan after experimental myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Levijoki, J; Pollesello, P; Kaheinen, P; Haikala, H

    2001-05-11

    This study compared the effects of simendan, a calcium sensitizer, with those of milrinone and enalapril on survival of rats with healed myocardial infarction. Seven days after ligation-induced myocardial infarction, the rats were randomized to control, milrinone, enalapril, or simendan groups. All compounds were administered via the drinking water for 312 days, at which time there was 80% mortality in the control group--the study's primary endpoint. The infarct sizes were similar across all groups. At endpoint, the mortality rates were: 63% (milrinone), 56% (enalapril) and 53% (simendan); the risk reductions were 25% (P = 0.04 vs. control) and 28% (P = 0.02 vs. control) with enalapril and simendan, respectively. Milrinone had no statistically significant effect on the survival rate. These findings suggest that, like enalapril, simendan improved survival in rats with healed myocardial infarction. PMID:11426847

  19. Exercise test in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hsi, W L; Lai, J S

    1996-01-01

    Although maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and oxygen consumption at anaerobic threshold (VO2AT) were used to measure cardiac function, the clinical significance in acute myocardial infarction (MI) has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare VO2max and VO2AT between post-MI patients and healthy men and to correlate the parameters to other clinical measures. Forty-three active healthy men, 44 sedentary healthy men, and 43 post-MI patients were studied using incremental cycle exercise test. Their work rates, oxygen consumption, heart rates, oxygen pulses, ventilation, and other parameters at VO2max and VO2AT were determined with spirometer, gas concentration analyzer, and electrocardiograph. Anaerobic threshold was determined by analyzing the ventilatory parameters. Most of the exercise test parameters at VO2max were greatest in the active men, intermediate in the sedentary men, and least in the post-MI patients (P < 0.01) whereas the rate-pressure products of the active men and sedentary men were not significantly different from each other and were greater than those of the post-MI patients (P < 0.01). In the post-MI patients, VO2max was inversely correlated to the peak serum level of creatine phosphokinase MB isoenzyme (P < 0.01) and associated with extensive infarction (P < 0.05). Most of the parameters at VO2AT were greater in the active men than in the sedentary men (P < 0.01) but not significantly different between the sedentary men and post-MI patients. In the post-MI patients, VO2AT was significantly correlated to left ventricular ejection fraction (P < 0.01) and associated with heart failure (P < 0.05). The results revealed that VO2max and VO2AT had different clinical significance in post-MI patients; VO2max was related to the infarct size, and VO2AT was related to the pumping function of heart. PMID:8777021

  20. Copeptin Testing in Acute Myocardial Infarction: Ready for Routine Use?

    PubMed Central

    Reinstadler, Sebastian Johannes; Klug, Gert; Metzler, Bernhard; Mair, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Suspected acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of admission to emergency departments. In the last decade, biomarkers revolutionized the management of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes. Besides their pivotal assistance in timely diagnosis, biomarkers provide additional information for risk stratification. Cardiac troponins I and T are the most sensitive and specific markers of acute myocardial injury. Nonetheless, in order to overcome the remaining limitations of these markers, novel candidate biomarkers sensitive to early stage of disease are being extensively investigated. Among them, copeptin, a stable peptide derived from the precursor of vasopressin, emerged as a promising biomarker for the evaluation of suspected acute myocardial infarction. In this review, we summarize the currently available evidence for the usefulness of copeptin in the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction in comparison with routine biomarkers. PMID:25960596

  1. Thrombolytic treatment for myocardial infarction: an examination of practice in 39 United Kingdom hospitals. Myocardial Infarction Audit Group.

    PubMed Central

    Birkhead, J. S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine use of thrombolytic drugs for myocardial infarction and use of contraindications to treatment in the United Kingdom. DESIGN: Observational study, based on a continuing audit. SETTING: 39 hospitals in the United Kingdom. PATIENTS: 30,029 patients admitted between November 1992 and June 1995 with suspected myocardial infarction. RESULTS: Of 13,628 patients with a final diagnosis of definite myocardial infarction 10,316 (75.7%) were considered eligible for thrombolytic treatment on the basis of typical cardiographic changes or new left bundle branch block. Of these, 8139 (59.7%) were diagnosed at admission to hospital and 6991 (85.9%) were administered thrombolytic drugs; 14.1% were considered too late for treatment or had a clinical contraindication. In 2177 patients (16% of 13,628)-thrombolytic treatment was given in the absence of contraindications and after the diagnosis of infarction had been confirmed by further electrocardiographic evidence. A further 591 (4.3%) with a final diagnosis of definite infarction without typical cardiographic changes also received thrombolytic treatment as did 1018 patients without a final diagnosis of definite infarction. In total, 9459 of 13,628 patients (71.6%) received thrombolytic treatment. The range of use of treatment between hospitals for a final diagnosis of infarction was 49.1-85.4%. This variation reflected differences in the frequency with which a diagnosis of definite myocardial infarction was made at admission, and the subsequent use of clinical contraindications to thrombolytic treatment. CONCLUSIONS: 75.7% of patients with a final diagnosis of definite myocardial infarction were eligible for thrombolytic treatment on the basis of cardiographic changes. Differences between hospitals in the frequency with which a diagnosis of infarction was made on admission, and differences in subsequent use of thrombolytic drugs, results in wide variation in treatment rates. Differences in use of thrombolytic

  2. Spirituality in survivors of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Momennasab, Marzieh; Moattari, Marzieh; Abbaszade, Abbas; Shamshiri, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Life-threatening and stressful events, such as myocardial infarction (MI) can lead to an actual crisis, which affects the patients spiritually as well as physically, psychologically, and socially. However, the focus of health care providers is on physical needs. Furthermore, the spirituality of the patients experiencing heart attack in the light of our cultural context is not well addressed in the literature. This study is aimed at exploring the spiritual experiences of the survivors of the MI. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative research a grounded theory approach was used. Key informants were 9 MI patients hospitalized in the coronary care units of 3 hospitals in Shiraz. In addition, 7 nurses participated in the study. In-depth interviews and a focus group were used to generate data. Data analysis was done based on Strauss and Corbin method. Constant comparison analysis was performed until data saturation. Results: Five main categories emerged from the data, including perceived threat, seeking spiritual support, referring to religious values, increasing faith, and realization. The latter with its 3 subcategories was recognized as core category and represents a deep understanding beyond knowing. At the time of encountering MI, spirituality provided hope, strength, and peace for the participants. Conclusion: Based on the results we can conclude that connecting to God, religious values, and interconnectedness to others are the essential components of the participants’ spiritual experience during the occurrence of MI. Spirituality helps patients to overcome this stressful life-threatening situation. PMID:23853646

  3. Hypertension and acute myocardial infarction: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pedrinelli, Roberto; Ballo, Piercarlo; Fiorentini, Cesare; Denti, Silvia; Galderisi, Maurizio; Ganau, Antonello; Germanò, Giuseppe; Innelli, Pasquale; Paini, Anna; Perlini, Stefano; Salvetti, Massimo; Zacà, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    History of hypertension is a frequent finding in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its recurring association with female sex, diabetes, older age, less frequent smoking and more frequent vascular comorbidities composes a risk profile quite distinctive from the normotensive ischemic counterpart.Antecedent hypertension associates with higher rates of death and morbid events both during the early and long-term course of AMI, particularly if complicated by left ventricular dysfunction and/or congestive heart failure. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade, through either angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, angiotensin II receptor blockade or aldosterone antagonism, exerts particular benefits in that high-risk hypertensive subgroup.In contrast to the negative implications carried by antecedent hypertension, higher systolic pressure at the onset of chest pain associates with lower mortality within 1 year from coronary occlusion, whereas increased blood pressure recorded after hemodynamic stabilization from the acute ischemic event bears inconsistent relationships with recurring coronary events in the long-term follow-up.Whether antihypertensive treatment in post-AMI hypertensive patients prevents ischemic relapses is uncertain. As a matter of fact, excessive diastolic pressure drops may jeopardize coronary perfusion and predispose to new acute coronary events, although the precise cause-effect mechanisms underlying this phenomenon need further evaluation. PMID:22317927

  4. Reducing myocardial infarct size: challenges and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Yellon, Derek M; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2016-01-01

    Despite prompt reperfusion by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), the mortality and morbidity of patients presenting with an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) remain significant with 9% death and 10% heart failure at 1 year. In these patients, one important neglected therapeutic target is ‘myocardial reperfusion injury’, a term given to the cardiomyocyte death and microvascular dysfunction which occurs on reperfusing ischaemic myocardium. A number of cardioprotective therapies (both mechanical and pharmacological), which are known to target myocardial reperfusion injury, have been shown to reduce myocardial infarct (MI) size in small proof-of-concept clinical studies—however, being able to demonstrate improved clinical outcomes has been elusive. In this article, we review the challenges facing clinical cardioprotection research, and highlight future therapies for reducing MI size and preventing heart failure in patients presenting with STEMI at risk of myocardial reperfusion injury. PMID:26674987

  5. [Quantitative evaluation of acute myocardial infarction by In-111 antimyosin Fab myocardial imaging].

    PubMed

    Naruse, H; Morita, M; Itano, M; Yamamoto, J; Kawamoto, H; Fukutake, N; Ohyanagi, M; Iwasaki, T; Fukuchi, M

    1991-11-01

    For quantitative evaluation of acute myocardial infarction, In-111 antimyosin Fab myocardial imaging (InAM) was performed in 17 patients with myocardial infarction who underwent Tl-201 (TL) and Tc-99m pyrophosphate (PYP) myocardial imaging in acute phase. For calculating the infarct size, voxel counter method was used for analysis in PYP and InAM, and extent and severity score were used on bull's-eye polar map in TL. The most appropriate cut-off level ranged from 65 to 80% by the fundamental experiment using cardiac phantom. The cut-off level of 0.70 (InAM) and 0.65 (PYP) were used for clinical application of voxel counter analysis. The infarct size calculated by InAM and PYP was compared with wall motion abnormality index by echocardiography (WMAI), TL extent score, TL severity score, peak CK and sigma CK. Infarct size by InAM showed the following correlations with other indices. PYP: r = 0.26 (ns), TL extent score: r = 0.72 (p less than 0.01), TL severity score: r = 0.65 (p less than 0.05), WMAI: r = 0.69 (p less than 0.05). The infarct size by PYP did not show any correlations with these indices. Therefore, the infarct size by InAM showed better correlations with TL and WMAI than that of PYP. So InAM was considered superior to PYP for quantitative evaluation of acute myocardial infarction. PMID:1770642

  6. Value of positive myocardial infarction imaging in coronary care units.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S P; Pereira-Prestes, A V; Ell, P J; Donaldson, R; Somerville, W; Emanuel, R W

    1979-01-01

    Positive myocardial imaging was undertaken on 120 unselected patients admitted to a coronary care unit with clinical suspicion of acute myocardial infarction. Multipurpose mobile gamma-cameras were used for serial imaging after administration of 99mtechnetium-labelled imidodiphosphonate, a low-cost radiopharmaceutical that is 97% specific for myocardial necrosis, with myocardial uptake and blood clearance most suitable for myocardial imaging. The sensitivty of detection was 94% for patients whose infarction was unequivocal on the ECG; when the presence of raised enzyme concentrations was also used as a criterion for myocardial necrosis, the overall sensitivity for all 120 patients remained 94%. In 73 patients (61%), whose ECGs were unhelpful or difficult to interpret, scintigraphy allowed infarction to be diagnosed in 11 (15%) and to be excluded in five (7%). In 32 (44%) of this group whose ECGs were totally uninterpretable due to previous myocardial damage or disorders of electrical activation, scintigraphy provided confirmation of a diagnosis that otherwise rested only on whether enzyme concentrations were raised. Myocardial imaging is thus a useful technique that permits more definite diagnosis in patients for whom ECG and enzyme data are uncertain. PMID:761017

  7. Prediction of functional recovery and prognosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction by 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl myocardial single photon emission computed tomography: a multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Nishimura, S; Kajiya, T; Sugihara, H; Kitahara, K; Imai, K; Muramatsu, T; Takahashi, N; Yoshida, H; Osada, T; Terada, K; Ito, T; Naruse, H; Iwabuchi, M

    1998-10-01

    123I-BMIPP [15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid] was developed for metabolic imaging with SPECT. A multicenter collaborative study was conducted on a large patient series to determine whether 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl myocardial SPECT are of use in predicting the prognosis and ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Patients with uncomplicated first AMI underwent resting 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl myocardial SPECT in the subacute phase after the onset of AMI. Of these, 167 patients who had been followed up for an average of 22 months were retrospectively reviewed to predict serious cardiac events and recurrent ischemia. In addition, the association between changes in radionuclide parameters and recurrent ischemia was investigated in Subgroup A (58 patients) who had repeated SPECT in the chronic phase. Furthermore, prediction of the ejection fraction (EF) was investigated in Subgroup B (94 patients) and Subgroup C (76 patients) in whom left ventriculography was performed at the time of discharge and 90 days or more after the onset, respectively. The prognosis was generally favorable, with 4 cases of cardiac death (2%), 3 of heart failure (2%), 4 of nonfatal reMI (2%), and 25 of recurrent ischemia (15%). The results of Cox multivariate regression analysis revealed a high probability of serious cardiac events in patients who were elderly (p = 0.04), who had 90% or more residual stenosis of the infarct-related artery (p = 0.09), and who had a high BMIPP defect score (p = 0.17). There was a high probability of recurrent ischemia in elderly patients (p = 0.10) who had multi-vessel disease (p = 0.03), but no association was found with radionuclide parameters in the subacute phase. In Subgroup A, however, the probability of recurrent ischemia tended to be high in patients with a large mismatch scorebetween 123I-BMIPP and 201Tl in the subacute to chronic phase. An important observation was that the extent of BMIPP defect was more strongly

  8. Collaborative overview of randomised trials of antiplatelet therapy--I: Prevention of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke by prolonged antiplatelet therapy in various categories of patients. Antiplatelet Trialists' Collaboration.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the effects of "prolonged" antiplatelet therapy (that is, given for one month or more) on "vascular events" (non-fatal myocardial infarctions, non-fatal strokes, or vascular deaths) in various categories of patients. DESIGN--Overviews of 145 randomised trials of "prolonged" antiplatelet therapy versus control and 29 randomised comparisons between such antiplatelet regimens. SETTING--Randomised trials that could have been available by March 1990. SUBJECTS--Trials of antiplatelet therapy versus control included about 70,000 "high risk" patients (that is, with some vascular disease or other condition implying an increased risk of occlusive vascular disease) and 30,000 "low risk" subjects from the general population. Direct comparisons of different antiplatelet regimens involved about 10,000 high risk patients. RESULTS--In each of four main high risk categories of patients antiplatelet therapy was definitely protective. The percentages of patients suffering a vascular event among those allocated antiplatelet therapy versus appropriately adjusted control percentages (and mean scheduled treatment durations and net absolute benefits) were: (a) among about 20,000 patients with acute myocardial infarction, 10% antiplatelet therapy v 14% control (one month benefit about 40 vascular events avoided per 1000 patients treated (2P < 0.00001)); (b) among about 20,000 patients with a past history of myocardial infarction, 13% antiplatelet therapy v 17% control (two year benefit about 40/1000 (2P < 0.00001)); (c) among about 10,000 patients with a past history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack, 18% antiplatelet therapy v 22% control (three year benefit about 40/1000 (2P < 0.00001)); (d) among about 20,000 patients with some other relevant medical history (unstable angina, stable angina, vascular surgery, angioplasty, atrial fibrillation, valvular disease, peripheral vascular disease, etc), 9% v 14% in 4000 patients with unstable angina (six month

  9. Human Umbilical Cord Blood for Transplantation Therapy in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A; Franzese, Nick; Staples, Meaghan; Weinbren, Nathan L.; Babilonia, Monica; Patel, Jason; Merchant, Neil; Simancas, Alejandra Jacotte; Slakter, Adam; Caputo, Mathew; Patel, Milan; Franyuti, Giorgio; Franzblau, Max H.; Suarez, Lyanne; Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Diamandis, Theo; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kaneko, Yuji; Miller, Leslie W.; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising therapy for myocardial infarction. Endogenous repair of the heart muscle after myocardial infarction is a challenge because adult cardiomyocytes have a limited capacity to proliferate and replace damaged cells. Pre-clinical and clinical evidence has shown that cell based therapy may promote revascularization and replacement of damaged myocytes after myocardial infarction. Adult stem cells can be harvested from different sources including bone marrow, skeletal myoblast, and human umbilical cord blood cells. The use of these cells for the repair of myocardial infarction presents various advantages over other sources of stem cells. Among these are easy harvesting, unlimited differentiation capability, and robust angiogenic potential. In this review, we discuss the milestone findings and the most recent evidence demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy and safety of the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with gene therapy, highlighting the importance of optimizing the timing, dose and delivery methods, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of action that will guide the clinical entry of this innovative treatment for ischemic disorders, specifically myocardial infarction. PMID:24307973

  10. Quantitation of Acute Necrosis After Experimental Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, Xin-Yi; Dehn, Shirley; Adelman, Jeremy; Lipsitz, Jeremy; Thorp, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is death and necrosis of myocardial tissue secondary to ischemia. MI is associated with adverse cardiac remodeling, progressive heart chamber dilation, ventricular wall thinning, and loss of cardiac function. Myocardial necrosis can be experimentally induced in rodents to simulate human MI by surgical occlusion of coronary arteries. When induced in knockout or transgenic mice, this model is useful for the identification of molecular modulators of cell death, cardiac remodeling, and preclinical therapeutic potential. Herein we outline in tandem, methods for microsurgical ligation of the left anterior descending artery followed by quantitation of myocardial necrosis. Necrosis is quantified after staining the heart with triphenyltetrazolium chloride. PMID:23733573

  11. Myocardial infarction and intramyocardial injection models in swine

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Frederic C; Telukuntla, Kartik S; Karantalis, Vasileios; Suncion, Viky Y; Heldman, Alan W; Mushtaq, Muzammil; Williams, Adam R; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable and reproducible large animal models that closely replicate the clinical sequelae of myocardial infarction (MI) are important for the translation of basic science research into bedside medicine. Swine are well accepted by the scientific community for cardiovascular research, and they represent an established animal model for preclinical trials for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of novel therapies. Here we present a protocol for using porcine models of MI created with a closed-chest coronary artery occlusion-reperfusion technique. This creates a model of MI encompassing the anteroapical, lateral and septal walls of the left ventricle. This model infarction can be easily adapted to suit individual study design and enables the investigation of a variety of possible interventions. This model is therefore a useful tool for translational research into the pathophysiology of ventricular remodeling and is an ideal testing platform for novel biological approaches targeting regenerative medicine. This model can be created in approximately 8–10 h. PMID:22790084

  12. The high-risk myocardial infarction database initiative.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, Kenneth; Bebchuk, Judith; Wittes, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Four randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trials--VALIANT, EPHESUS, OPTIMAAL, and CAPRICORN evaluated pharmacologic intervention in a total of 28,771 high-risk patients following acute MI complicated with signs of heart failure or evidence of left ventricular dysfunction. The demographic profiles of the 4 study cohorts were similar. The High-Risk MI Database Initiative constructed a common database by merging the data captured by these 4 large trials. The merged data set did not contain the randomized study treatment, so no comparisons could be made between the agents investigated. A total of more than 17,600 subjects experienced a cardiovascular end point. Approximately 5100 deaths occurred, and more than 15,700 subjects experienced a hospitalization. The primary objectives of this initiative were to use this large database to define more precisely the prognostic profile of this high-risk population, to perform rigorous, adequately-sized, subset analyses, to provide epidemiologic information and event rate estimation based on baseline demographics. The methodological challenges and limitations of such an analyses are discussed. It is proposed that some thoughtful foresight and planning could enable us to use the large number of clinical events that accrue during randomized clinical trials to address questions of scientific and clinical interest. PMID:22226005

  13. Radionuclide imaging of myocardial perfusion and viability in assessment of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D.S.; Kiat, H.; Maddahi, J.; Shah, P.K.

    1989-07-18

    Technical advances in radionuclide imaging have important implications for the management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Single-photon emission computerized tomography with thallium 201 (TI-201) offers greater accuracy than planar imaging in detecting, localizing and sizing myocardial perfusion defects. Use of single-photon emission computerized tomography with TI-201 should allow for a more accurate assessment of prognosis after myocardial infarction. A new radiopharmaceutical, technetium 99-m methoxyisobutyl isonitrile, provides a number of advantages over TI-201, including higher quality images, lack of redistribution, and the ability to assess first-pass ventricular function. Applications of TI-201 and technetium 99-m methoxyisobutyl isonitrile include assessment of arterial patency and myocardial salvage immediately after thrombolytic therapy, detection of resting ischemia after thrombolytic therapy, targeting of subsets of patients for further intervention, and predischarge assessment to predict the future course of patients after an acute myocardial infarction.

  14. Ticagrelor overcomes high platelet reactivity in patients with acute myocardial infarction or coronary artery in-stent restenosis: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Yang, Yawei; Chen, Tao; Liu, Yu; Cao, Ailin; Liu, Junmei; Wang, Zhuo; Zhao, Xianxian; Qin, Yongwen; Ma, Liping

    2015-01-01

    High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) is accompanied by an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Direct comparison of the antiplatelet effects between ticagrelor and high-dose clopidogrel has not yet been reported in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or coronary artery in-stent restenosis (ISR) patients with HTPR. Consecutive patients with AMI or coronary artery ISR treated with standard-dose clopidogrel (75 mg/day) were screened with the VerifyNow assay, defining HTPR as P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs) >208. Of the 102 screened patients, 48 (47.06%) patients with HTPR were randomly assigned to either ticagrelor (180 mg/90 mg twice daily) or high-dose clopidogrel (150 mg/day) for 24 hours. Baseline characteristics and mean PRUs were similar in both groups. After 24 hours, ticagrelor was associated with a significantly lower platelet reactivity than high-dose clopidogrel (44.38 ± 40.26  vs. 212.58 ± 52.34 PRU, P < 0.05). No patient receiving ticagrelor exhibited HTPR, whereas 15 (62.50%) patients after treatment with high-dose clopidogrel remained HTPR (P < 0.05). During the follow-up (mean, 138.42 ± 53.59 days), no patient exhibited a major bleeding event in either treatment group. In conclusion, in patients with AMI or coronary artery ISR exhibiting HTPR after standard clopidogrel treatment, ticagrelor is significantly more effective compared with high-dose clopidogrel in overcoming HTPR. PMID:26350388

  15. Ticagrelor overcomes high platelet reactivity in patients with acute myocardial infarction or coronary artery in-stent restenosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Yang, Yawei; Chen, Tao; Liu, Yu; Cao, Ailin; Liu, Junmei; Wang, Zhuo; Zhao, Xianxian; Qin, Yongwen; Ma, Liping

    2015-01-01

    High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) is accompanied by an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Direct comparison of the antiplatelet effects between ticagrelor and high-dose clopidogrel has not yet been reported in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or coronary artery in-stent restenosis (ISR) patients with HTPR. Consecutive patients with AMI or coronary artery ISR treated with standard-dose clopidogrel (75 mg/day) were screened with the VerifyNow assay, defining HTPR as P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs)>208. Of the 102 screened patients, 48 (47.06%) patients with HTPR were randomly assigned to either ticagrelor (180 mg/90 mg twice daily) or high-dose clopidogrel (150 mg/day) for 24 hours. Baseline characteristics and mean PRUs were similar in both groups. After 24 hours, ticagrelor was associated with a significantly lower platelet reactivity than high-dose clopidogrel (44.38±40.26  vs. 212.58±52.34 PRU, P<0.05). No patient receiving ticagrelor exhibited HTPR, whereas 15 (62.50%) patients after treatment with high-dose clopidogrel remained HTPR (P<0.05). During the follow-up (mean, 138.42±53.59 days), no patient exhibited a major bleeding event in either treatment group. In conclusion, in patients with AMI or coronary artery ISR exhibiting HTPR after standard clopidogrel treatment, ticagrelor is significantly more effective compared with high-dose clopidogrel in overcoming HTPR. PMID:26350388

  16. Long-term clinical outcome of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients with and without diabetes mellitus in the Zwolle trial

    PubMed Central

    Timmer, J.R.; van der Horst, I.C.C.; Henriques, J.P.S.; Thomas, K.; Bilo, H.J.G.; Hoorntje, J.C.A.; de Boer, M.J.; Suryapranata, H.; Zijlstra, F.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives We sought to compare long-term survival after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or thrombolytic therapy. Background DM is an adverse prognostic factor after STEMI. However, there is only limited information about long-term clinical outcome in STEMI patients with DM treated with PCI or thrombolysis. Methods Patients with STEMI (n=395) were randomised to treatment either with intravenous streptokinase or PCI. Mean follow-up was 8±2 years. We studied long-term mortality of patients with DM (n=32) and without DM (n=363) and the interaction with the treatment regimen. Results After eight years, a total of 17 patients with DM (53%) died compared with 88 (24%) patients without DM (OR 3.5, p<0.001). Reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) after STEMI was more often present in patients with DM compared with patients without DM (31% vs. 15%, p=0.01). Multivariate analysis revealed that DM (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-4.7, p=0.002), reduced LVEF (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5-3.8, p<0.001) and age ≥60 years (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.5-3.8, p<0.001) were independent risk factors for long-term mortality. Patients with DM treated with PCI had less LVEF (13% vs. 53%, p=0.01) and lower long-term mortality rates (38% vs. 69%, p=0.08) compared with treatment with thrombolysis. Conclusions STEMI patients with DM are a high-risk group with higher long-term mortality rates compared with patients without DM. PCI is the treatment of choice, particularly in DM patients. PMID:25696147

  17. Impact of percutaneous coronary intervention on biomarker levels in patients in the subacute phase following myocardial infarction: the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) biomarker ancillary study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) Biomarker substudy was to evaluate the impact of infarct related artery (IRA) revascularization on serial levels of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and dynamics of other biomarkers related to left ventricular remodeling, fibrosis and angiogenesis. Methods Patients were eligible for OAT-Biomarker based on the main OAT criteria. Of 70 patients (age 60.8 ± 8.8, 25% women) enrolled in the substudy, 37 were randomized to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and 33 to optimal medical therapy alone. Baseline serum samples were obtained prior to OAT randomization with follow up samples taken at one year. The primary outcome was percent change of NT-proBNP from baseline to 1 year. The secondary outcomes were respective changes of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), and Galectin-3. Results Paired (baseline and one-year) serum samples were obtained in 62 subjects. Baseline median NT-proBNP level was 944.8 (455.3, 1533) ng/L and decreased by 69% during follow-up (p < 0.0001). Baseline MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels increased significantly from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.034, and p = 0.027 respectively), while MMP-9 level decreased from baseline (p = 0.038). Levels of VEGF and Galectin-3 remained stable at one year (p = NS for both). No impact of IRA revascularization on any biomarker dynamics were noted. Conclusions There were significant changes in measured biomarkers related to LV remodeling, stress, and fibrosis following MI between 0 and 12 month. Establishing infarct vessel patency utilizing stenting 24 hours-28 days post MI did not however influence the biomarkers’ release. PMID:24156746

  18. Cardiovascular collapse after myocardial infarction due to centipede bite.

    PubMed

    Üreyen, Çağin Mustafa; Arslan, Şakir; Baş, Cem Yunus

    2015-07-01

    Centipede bites have been reported to cause localized and/or systemic symptoms including local pain, erythema and edema, nausea and vomiting, palpitations, headache, lymphadenopathy, and rhabdomyolysis. However, acute myocardial infarction due to centipede envenomation is reported in only three cases in English medical literature.We present a case of 31-year-old male bitten by a golden colored centipede leading to myocardial infarction and cardiopulmonary arrest which is seen very rarely. The patient was admitted to emergency department with a swollen and painful right foot. However, typical chest pain became the major complaint and cardiopulmonary arrest developed while electrocardiography was being obtained. The patient was resuscitated successfully for 5 min and acute infero-posterolateral myocardial infarction was detected on electrocardiography. PMID:25994876

  19. Amphetamine Containing Dietary Supplements and Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Perez-Downes, Julio; Hritani, Abdulwahab; Baldeo, Candice; Antoun, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Weight loss is one of the most researched and marketed topics in American society. Dietary regimens, medications that claim to boost the metabolism, and the constant pressure to fit into society all play a role in our patient's choices regarding new dietary products. One of the products that are well known to suppress appetite and cause weight loss is amphetamines. While these medications suppress appetite, most people are not aware of the detrimental side effects of amphetamines, including hypertension, tachycardia, arrhythmias, and in certain instances acute myocardial infarction. Here we present the uncommon entity of an acute myocardial infarction due to chronic use of an amphetamine containing dietary supplement in conjunction with an exercise regimen. Our case brings to light further awareness regarding use of amphetamines. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion of use of these substances when young patients with no risk factors for coronary artery disease present with acute arrhythmias, heart failure, and myocardial infarctions. PMID:27516911

  20. ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction management in Europe.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, Marco; Sonia Petronio, Anna

    2009-10-01

    The rate of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction varies between European countries, as does total mortality as a result of acute myocardial infarction. These differences arise partly because of differences between countries in the time delay from symptom onset to first medical contact, and from first medical contact to reperfusion with thrombolysis or PCI. The European Society of Cardiology guidelines emphasize the importance of early reperfusion therapy. There are, however, often logistical delays in transport of the patient, in diagnosis of myocardial infarction and in preparation of medical teams to be available to perform PCI. Studies have shown that door-to-balloon time may improve with an integrated approach coordinating systems, procedures and institutions, and steps such as including prehospital triage and prehospital electrocardiogram transmission can dramatically reduce door-to-balloon time. Early transfer to PCI is associated with fewer ischaemic complications. PMID:19851218

  1. Recurrent myocardial infarction secondary to Prinzmetal’s variant angina

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Dale; Dhillon, Priyanka; Niranjan, Selvanayagam

    2015-01-01

    Prinzmetal’s variant angina describes chest pain secondary to reversible coronary artery vasospasm in the context of both diseased and non-diseased coronary arteries. Symptoms typically occur when the patient is at rest and are associated with transient ST-segment elevation. Acute episodes respond to glyceryl trinitrate, but myocardial infarction and other potentially fatal complications can occur, and long-term management can be challenging. Although it is not well understood, the underlying mechanism appears to involve a combination of endothelial damage and vasoactive mediators. In this case, a 35-year-old woman with myocardial infarction secondary to coronary artery vasospasm experienced recurrent chest pain. Coronary angiography revealed severe focal stenosis in the mid left anterior descending artery, which completely resolved after administration of intracoronary glyceryl trinitrate. The patient was discharged on nitrates and calcium channel blockers. The patient re-presented with another myocardial infarction, requiring up-titration of medical therapy. PMID:26034323

  2. Amphetamine Containing Dietary Supplements and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hritani, Abdulwahab; Antoun, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Weight loss is one of the most researched and marketed topics in American society. Dietary regimens, medications that claim to boost the metabolism, and the constant pressure to fit into society all play a role in our patient's choices regarding new dietary products. One of the products that are well known to suppress appetite and cause weight loss is amphetamines. While these medications suppress appetite, most people are not aware of the detrimental side effects of amphetamines, including hypertension, tachycardia, arrhythmias, and in certain instances acute myocardial infarction. Here we present the uncommon entity of an acute myocardial infarction due to chronic use of an amphetamine containing dietary supplement in conjunction with an exercise regimen. Our case brings to light further awareness regarding use of amphetamines. Clinicians should have a high index of suspicion of use of these substances when young patients with no risk factors for coronary artery disease present with acute arrhythmias, heart failure, and myocardial infarctions. PMID:27516911

  3. Myocardial repair/remodelling following infarction: roles of local factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is a global health problem, appearing most commonly in patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI). Cardiac remodelling, particularly fibrosis, seen in both the infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium is recognized to be a major determinant of the development of impaired ventricular function, leading to a poor prognosis. Elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of extracellular matrix is essential for designing cardioprotective and reparative strategies that could regress fibrosis after infarction. Multiple factors contribute to left ventricular remodelling at different stages post-MI. This review will discuss the role of oxidative stress and locally produced angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of myocardial repair/remodelling after MI. PMID:19050008

  4. Estimating the size of myocardial infarction by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, L W; Ridgway, J P; Nicoll, J J; Bell, D; Best, J J; Muir, A L

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To develop a method to measure myocardial infarct size by magnetic resonance imaging and to compare the results with pyrophosphate scanning by single photon emission computed tomography. DESIGN--All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging and pyrophosphate scanning 5-7 days after the onset of symptoms. Both measurements of infarct size were compared with the release of creatine kinase MB and with ventricular performance estimated by radionuclide ventriculography. PATIENTS--19 patients (age 40-68 years) who had sustained their first uncomplicated myocardial infarction and who had not been treated with thrombolytic therapy. RESULTS--The site of infarction was clearly shown by both imaging techniques and was identical in each patient. The volume of infarcted tissue measured by magnetic resonance imaging agreed well with the infarct size measured by single photon emission tomography (mean difference 2.7 cm3). Correlations of both imaging techniques with the release of creatine kinase MB were best when total release rather than peak release was used. Both imaging techniques correlated closely with the subsequent ventricular performance. CONCLUSIONS--Magnetic resonance imaging after acute infarction allows measurement of infarct size and this may prove useful in assessing new treatments designed to salvage myocardium. Images PMID:1836135

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition after myocardial infarction: a new approach to prevent heart failure?

    PubMed

    Creemers, E E; Cleutjens, J P; Smits, J F; Daemen, M J

    2001-08-01

    Increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been implicated in numerous disease processes, including tumor growth and metastasis, arthritis, and periodontal disease. It is now becoming increasingly clear that extracellular matrix degradation by MMPs is also involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and myocardial infarction. Administration of synthetic MMP inhibitors in experimental animal models of these cardiovascular diseases significantly inhibits the progression of, respectively, atherosclerotic lesion formation, neointima formation, left ventricular remodeling, pump dysfunction, and infarct healing. This review focuses on the role of MMPs in cardiovascular disease, in particular myocardial infarction and the subsequent progression to heart failure. MMPs, which are present in the myocardium and capable of degrading all the matrix components of the heart, are the driving force behind myocardial matrix remodeling. The recent finding that acute pharmacological inhibition of MMPs or deficiency in MMP-9 attenuates left ventricular dilatation in the infarcted mouse heart led to the proposal that MMP inhibitors could be used as a potential therapy for patients at risk for the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Although these promising results encourage the design of clinical trials with MMP inhibitors, there are still several unresolved issues. This review describes the biology of MMPs and discusses new insights into the role of MMPs in several cardiovascular diseases. Attention will be paid to the central role of the plasminogen system as an important activator of MMPs in the remodeling process after myocardial infarction. Finally, we speculate on the use of MMP inhibitors as potential therapy for heart failure. PMID:11485970

  6. Asymptomatic myocardial infarction in Kawasaki disease: Long-term prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, I.; Onouchi, Z.; Hayano, T.; Hamaoka, K.; Kiyosawa, N. )

    1991-04-01

    Eight patients with Kawasaki disease who had sustained asymptomatic myocardial infarction 8-15 years ago (mean, 13.1 years) were reexamined by various noninvasive cardiac function tests to assess long-term prognosis. At present, electrocardiograms (ECGs) are normal in six patients. However, all eight patients had a prolonged preejection period (PEP) to left ventricular ejection time (LVET) ratio 30 s after amylnitrate (AN) inhalation. Six patients had perfusion defects by exercise thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy, and two patients developed ST segment depression in treadmill exercise testing. These patients are symptom-free even though their physical activity has not been restricted. Yet they proved to have serious abnormalities suggesting sequelae of myocardial infarction or existing myocardial ischemia. Judging from the results of noninvasive cardiac function tests and recently performed coronary angiography, five of the eight patients require coronary bypass surgery.

  7. Paradoxical coronary artery embolism - a rare cause of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Fayaz A; Kransdorf, Evan P; Abudiab, Muaz M; Sweeney, John P

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical coronary artery embolism is a rare, but often an underdiagnosed cause of acute myocardial infarction. It should be considered in patient who presents with chest pain and otherwise having a low risk profile for atherosclerosis coronary artery disease. We describe a case of paradoxical coronary artery embolism causing ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with upper extremity venous thrombosis. Echocardiography demonstrated a patent foramen ovale (PFO) with bidirectional shunt. In addition to treatment of acute coronary event closure of the PFO should be considered to prevent a recurrence. PMID:25774255

  8. Paradoxical Coronary Artery Embolism - A Rare Cause of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fayaz A.; Kransdorf, Evan P.; Abudiab, Muaz M.; Sweeney, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical coronary artery embolism is a rare, but often an underdiagnosed cause of acute myocardial infarction. It should be considered in patient who presents with chest pain and otherwise having a low risk profile for atherosclerosis coronary artery disease. We describe a case of paradoxical coronary artery embolism causing ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with upper extremity venous thrombosis. Echocardiography demonstrated a patent foramen ovale (PFO) with bidirectional shunt. In addition to treatment of acute coronary event closure of the PFO should be considered to prevent a recurrence. PMID:25774255

  9. Acute myocardial infarction in young adults: causes and management

    PubMed Central

    Osula, S; Bell, G; Hornung, R

    2002-01-01

    The case report in this review illustrates an acute myocardial infarction in a young adult probably due to arterial thrombosis that can be attributed to a hypercoagulable state resulting from the nephrotic syndrome. Although rare, acute myocardial infarction should be considered in young adults presenting with chest pain. A detailed clinical history may help to identify the aetiology, and guide subsequent management, but diagnostic coronary angiography is essential. Careful risk factor modification and treatment of the underlying cause should reduce the incidence of recurrent cardiac events. PMID:11796868

  10. Imaging Macrophage Development and Fate in Atherosclerosis and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are central regulators of disease progression in both atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. In atherosclerosis, macrophages are the dominant leukocyte population that influences lesional development. In myocardial infarction, which is caused by atherosclerosis, macrophages accumulate readily and play important roles in inflammation and healing. Molecular imaging has grown considerably as a field and can reveal biological process at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. Here we explore how various imaging modalities, from intravital microscopy in mice to organ-level imaging in patients, are contributing to our understanding of macrophages and their progenitors in cardiovascular disease. PMID:23207281

  11. Myocardial infarct death, the population at risk, and temperature habituation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, David B.; Auliciems, Andris

    1993-03-01

    Daily myocardial infarct deaths from Brisbane, 29°28' S, and Montreal, 45°30' N, were used to derive a “pool of susceptible individuals”. Pool size had no effect on the minimum death temperature but large pools increased the value of the acceleration temperature in Brisbane and the maximum death temperature in Montreal. Moderately sized pools in Montreal appeared to produce reduced death rates in cold conditions from both cold avoidance and habituation. A generalized relationship between temperature and myocardial infarct death is postulated.

  12. Evaluating variable selection methods for diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dreiseitl, S; Ohno-Machado, L; Vinterbo, S

    1999-01-01

    This paper evaluates the variable selection performed by several machine-learning techniques on a myocardial infarction data set. The focus of this work is to determine which of 43 input variables are considered relevant for prediction of myocardial infarction. The algorithms investigated were logistic regression (with stepwise, forward, and backward selection), backpropagation for multilayer perceptrons (input relevance determination), Bayesian neural networks (automatic relevance determination), and rough sets. An independent method (self-organizing maps) was then used to evaluate and visualize the different subsets of predictor variables. Results show good agreement on some predictors, but also variability among different methods; only one variable was selected by all models. PMID:10566358

  13. Preoperative myocardial ischaemia: its relation to perioperative infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, H; Davies, G; Westaby, S; Prendiville, O F; Sapsford, R N; Oakley, C M

    1987-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were randomly allocated to a preoperative (24 h) intravenous infusion of isosorbide dinitrate (1.5-15 mg/hr) (50 patients) or to placebo (50 patients). The characteristics of the two groups were similar. Evidence of acute myocardial ischaemia was sought by continuous electrocardiographic Holter recordings and acute myocardial infarction by the appearance of new Q waves and increased activity of the creatine kinase MB isoenzyme. Episodes of acute myocardial ischaemia were found in 18% of patients in the control group and in none of those who received isosorbide dinitrate. None the less, the frequency of perioperative myocardial infarction was similar (22% and 18% respectively) in the two groups. Perioperative infarction was significantly more common in women, in patients with unstable angina or poor left ventricular function, in those who had coronary endarterectomy, and in those in whom the aortic clamping time was greater than 50 minutes. These factors may have obscured any effect that prevention of preoperative ischaemia had on perioperative infarction. Preoperative infusion of isosorbide dinitrate eliminated preoperative ischaemia but did not influence the occurrence of perioperative infarction. The probable benefits of prevention of preoperative ischaemia on postoperative left ventricular function, which is a determinant of long term survival, remain to be established. PMID:3304371

  14. Myocardial Infarction in Neonatal Mice, A Model of Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blom, Jessica N; Lu, Xiangru; Arnold, Paul; Feng, Qingping

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction induced by coronary artery ligation has been used in many animal models as a tool to study the mechanisms of cardiac repair and regeneration, and to define new targets for therapeutics. For decades, models of complete heart regeneration existed in amphibians and fish, but a mammalian counterpart was not available. The recent discovery of a postnatal window during which mice possess regenerative capabilities has led to the establishment of a mammalian model of cardiac regeneration. A surgical model of mammalian cardiac regeneration in the neonatal mouse is presented herein. Briefly, postnatal day 1 (P1) mice are anesthetized by isoflurane and placed on an ice pad to induce hypothermia. After the chest is opened, and the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) is visualized, a suture is placed around the LAD to inflict myocardial ischemia in the left ventricle. The surgical procedure takes 10-15 min. Visualizing the coronary artery is crucial for accurate suture placement and reproducibility. Myocardial infarction and cardiac dysfunction are confirmed by triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and echocardiography, respectively. Complete regeneration 21 days post myocardial infarction is verified by histology. This protocol can be used to as a tool to elucidate mechanisms of mammalian cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction. PMID:27286473

  15. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of intracoronary application of a novel bioabsorbable cardiac matrix for the prevention of ventricular remodeling after large ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: Rationale and design of the PRESERVATION I trial.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sunil V; Zeymer, Uwe; Douglas, Pamela S; Al-Khalidi, Hussein; Liu, Jingyu; Gibson, C Michael; Harrison, Robert W; Joseph, Diane S; Heyrman, Reinilde; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2015-11-01

    Postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling can result in chronic heart failure and functional impairment. Although pharmacological strategies for established heart failure can be beneficial, preventing remodeling remains a challenge. Injectable bioabsorbable alginate or "bioabsorbable cardiac matrix" (BCM), composed of an aqueous mixture of sodium alginate and calcium gluconate, is a sterile colorless liquid that is a polysaccharide polymer produced from brown seaweed. When exposed to excess ionized calcium present in infarcted myocardium, BCM assembles to form a flexible gel, structurally resembling extracellular matrix, which provides temporary structural support to the infarct zone through and beyond the time needed for mature fibrotic tissue to develop. The PRESERVATION I trial is an early phase randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial comparing intracoronary application of 4 mL of BCM with saline control in patients who develop large infarctions after successful reperfusion of large ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI). Subjects will be randomized 2:1 to either BCM or saline control and will have the study device deployed through an intracoronary microcatheter in the infarct-related artery 2 to 5 days after index ST-segment elevation MI treated with successful primary or rescue percutaneous coronary intervention. The primary effectiveness end point is the absolute change in LV diastolic volume index as measured by 3-dimensional echocardiography from baseline to 6 months after BCM deployment. Secondary effectiveness end points include clinical outcomes, patient-reported quality of life, additional echocardiographic measures, and functional status measures. In summary, the PRESERVATION I trial is a randomized double-blind trial evaluating the effectiveness and safety of the novel device BCM in preventing LV remodeling patients who have large MIs despite undergoing successful primary or rescue percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID

  16. Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields in Patients with Myocardial Infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo-Dorantes, L.; Valle, L.; Uruchurtu, E.; Medel, A.; García-Mayen, F.; Serrano-Luna, G.

    2003-09-01

    Healing of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is associated with inflammatory response, which promotes healing and scar formation. Activation of a local inflammatory response in patients with sequel of AMI could have an important role to enhance angiogenesis and regeneration of hibernating myocardial tissue. Chronic arterial leg ulcers have a similar etiology, and healing has been promoted by exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF). We report the evolution of three AMI patients with sequel of AMI that were exposed to ELF.

  17. Spatial analysis of myocardial infarction in Iran: National report from the Iranian myocardial infarction registry

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Ali; Soori, Hamid; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Etemad, Koorosh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Iran. No spatial analysis of MI has been conducted to date. The present study was conducted to determine the pattern of MI incidence and to identify the associated factors in Iran by province. Materials and Methods: This study has two parts. One part is prospective and hospital-based, and the other part is an ecological study. In this study, the data of 20,750 new MI cases registered in Iranian Myocardial Infarction Registry in 2012 were used. For spatial analysis in global and local, spatial autocorrelation, Moran's I, Getis-Ord, and logistic regression models were used. Data were analyzed by Stata software and ArcGIS 9.3. Results: Based on autocorrelation coefficient, a specific pattern was observed in the distribution of MI incidence in different provinces (Moran's I: 0.75, P < 0.001). Spatial pattern of incidence was approximately the same in men and women. MI incidence was clustering in six provinces (North Khorasan, Yazd, Kerman, Semnan, Golestan, and Mazandaran). Out of the associated factors with clustered MI in six provinces, temperature, humidity, hypertension, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) could be mentioned. Hypertension, smoking, and BMI contributed to clustering with, respectively, 2.36, 1.31, and 1.31 odds ratio. Conclusion: Addressing the place-based pattern of incidence and clarifying their epidemiologic dimension, including spatial analysis, has not yet been implemented in Iran. Report on MI incidence rate by place and formal borders is useful and is used in the planning and prioritization in different levels of health system. PMID:26487871

  18. Current trend of acute myocardial infarction in Korea (from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry from 2006 to 2013).

    PubMed

    Kook, Hyun Yi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Oh, Sangeun; Yoo, Sung-Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Ju Han; Chai, Leem Soon; Kim, Young Jo; Kim, Chong Jin; Chan Cho, Myeong

    2014-12-15

    Although the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Korea has been rapidly changed because of westernization of diet, lifestyle, and aging of the population, the recent trend of the myocardial infarction have not been reported by classification. We investigated recent trends in the incidence and mortality associated with the 2 major types of AMI. We reviewed 39,978 patients registered in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry for either ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from 2006 to 2013. When the rate for AMI were investigated according to each year, the incidence rates of STEMI decreased markedly from 60.5% in 2006 to 48.1% in 2013 (p <0.001). In contrast, a gradual increase in the incidence rates of NSTEMI was observed from 39.5% in 2006 to 51.9% in 2013 (p <0.001). As risk factors, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia were much more common in patients with NSTEMI than STEMI. Among medical treatments, the use of β blockers, angiotensin receptor blocker, and statin were increased from 2006 to 2013 in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI. Patients with STEMI and NSTEMI were more inclined to be increasingly treated by invasive treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the trend of myocardial infarction has been changed rapidly in the aspect of risk factors, ratio of STEMI versus NSTEMI, and therapeutic strategies during the recent 8 years in Korea. PMID:25438907

  19. Stem Cell Therapy for Myocardial Infarction 2001-2013 Revisited.

    PubMed

    Edlinger, Christoph; Schreiber, Catharina; Wernly, Bernhard; Anker, Alexandra; Ruzicka, Katja; Jung, Christian; Hoppe, Uta C; Lichtenauer, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Stem cell therapy for ischemic heart disease was an emerging concept in the early 2000s. First hopes were largely overshadowed by rather inconsistent results in human trials conducted in the middle of the decade. We aimed at investigating how the field of stem cell research expanded worldwide over the years using scientometric methods. We performed a PubMed inquiry and screened a total of 2609 publications dealing with stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction in the years 2001-2013. Density equalizing maps were used to visualize important centres of stem cell research worldwide. This systematic bibliometric study revealed an increasing research interest in the field of stem cell research in the context of ischemic heart disease over the last decade. Though some of the large human trials failed to show significant effects of stem cell therapy, especially basic science represents an ever growing field that evolved promising new concepts over the last couple of years. The scientific principle of protective paracrine mediators released from transplanted stem cells seems to bear great potential for future cell-free therapeutic use. However, further mechanistic insights are needed before transition from bench to bedside should be attempted, taking the lessons learned from previous studies into account. PMID:26105665

  20. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Patients who sustain complicated acute myocardial infarction in whom thrombolytic agents either fail or are contraindicated often need mechanical revascularization other than PTCA. In 24 patients with acute infarction complicated by continuous chest pain and ischemia who either received lytics or with contraindication to lytics, a holmium:YAG laser (Eclipse Surgical Technologies, Palo Alto, CA) was utilized for thrombolysis and plaque ablation. Clinical success was achieved in 23/24 patients, with 23 patients (94%) surviving the acute infarction. Holmium:YAG laser is very effective and safe in thrombolysis and revascularization in this complicated clinical setting.

  1. Altered filtrability of white blood cells after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bogár, L; Mikita, J; Nash, G B; Smith, M J; Dormandy, J A; Tekeres, M

    1989-01-01

    Abnormal white blood cell rheological behaviour has been implicated as a cause of blood flow disturbances under conditions of ischaemia and reduced perfusion pressure. Accordingly, we have tested the mechanical properties of white cells following myocardial infarction by measuring the rate at which suspension of these cells cause plugging of Nuclepore filters. The number of clogging particles in a standard white cell suspension increased by the third day after infarction but subsequently decreased to the control levels. Since white cells can cause blockage of narrow blood vessels, it is assumed that such changes in cellular properties may influence the eventual extent of infarction. PMID:2812961

  2. Interrater reliability of a national acute myocardial infarction register

    PubMed Central

    Govatsmark, Ragna Elise Støre; Sneeggen, Sylvi; Karlsaune, Hanne; Slørdahl, Stig Arild; Bønaa, Kaare Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease-specific registers may be used for measuring and improving healthcare and patient outcomes, and for disease surveillance and research, provided they contain valid and reliable data. The aim of this study was to assess the interrater reliability of all variables in a national myocardial infarction register. Methods We randomly selected 280 patients who had been enrolled from 14 hospitals to the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction Register during the year 2013. Experienced audit nurses, who were blinded to the data about the 280 patients already in the register, completed the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction paper forms for 240 patients by review of medical records. We then extracted all registered data on the same patients from the Norwegian Myocardial Infarction Register. To compare the interrater reliability between the register and the audit nurses, we calculated intraclass correlations coefficient for continuous variables, Cohen’s kappa and Gwet’s first agreement coefficient (AC1) for nominal variables, and quadratic weighted Cohen’s kappa and Gwet’s second AC for ordinal variables. Results We found excellent (AC1 >0.80) or good (AC1 0.61–0.80) agreement for most variables, including date and time variables, medical history, investigations and treatments during hospitalization, medication at discharge, and ST-segment elevation or non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction. However, only moderate agreement (AC1 0.41–0.60) was found for family history of coronary heart disease, diagnostic electrocardiography, and complications during hospitalization, whereas fair agreement (AC1 0.21–0.40) was found for acute myocardial infarction location. A high percentage of missing data was found for symptom onset, family history, body mass index, infarction location, and new Q-wave. Conclusion Most variables in Norwegian Myocardial Infarction Register had excellent or good reliability. However, some important variables had lower

  3. Serum estrogen levels in men with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Klaiber, E L; Broverman, D M; Haffajee, C I; Hochman, J S; Sacks, G M; Dalen, J E

    1982-12-01

    Serum estradiol and serum estrone levels were assessed in 29 men in 14 men in whom myocardial infarction was ruled out; in 12 men without apparent coronary heart disease but hospitalized in an intensive care unit; and in 28 men who were not hospitalized and who acted as control subjects. (The 12 men who were hospitalized but who did not have coronary heart disease were included to control for physical and emotional stress of a severe medical illness.) Ages ranged from 21 to 56 years. Age, height, and weight did not differ significantly among groups. Blood samples were obtained in the patient groups on each of the first three days of hospitalization. The serum estrone level was significantly elevated in all four patient groups when compared with that in the control group. Estrone level, then, did not differentiate patients with and without coronary heart disease. Serum estradiol levels were significantly elevated in the groups with myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and in the group in whom myocardial infarction was ruled out. However, estradiol levels were not significantly elevated in the group in the intensive care unit without coronary heart disease when compared to the level in the normal control group. Serum estradiol levels, then, were elevated in men with confirmed or suspected coronary heart disease but were not elevated in men without coronary heart disease even under the stressful conditions found in an intensive care unit. Serum estradiol levels were significantly and positively correlated (p less than 0.03) with serum total creatine phosphokinase levels in the patients with myocardial infarction. The five patients with myocardial infarction who died within 10 days of admission had markedly elevated serum estradiol levels. The potential significance of these serum estradiol elevations is discussed in terms of estradiol's ability to enhance adrenergic neural activity and the resultant increase in myocardial oxygen demand. PMID:7148879

  4. Spontaneous changes in /sup 201/Tl myocardial perfusion imaging after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Buda, A.J.; Dubbin, J.D.; MacDonald, I.L.; Strauss, H.D.; Orr, S.A.; Meindok, H.

    1982-12-01

    To examine regional myocardial perfusion after myocardial infarction, 26 patients underwent exercise electrocardiographic testing with /sup 201/Tl myocardial perfusion imaging 3 weeks and 3 months after infarction. At 3 weeks, 9 of 26 patients (35%) had myocardial ischemia by exercise electrocardiographic testing, whereas 18 of 26 (69%) had ischemia by /sup 201/Tl imaging. The /sup 201/Tl scintigrams were scored by dividing each image, in 3 views, into 5 segments, using a 5-point scoring scheme. The exercise /sup 201/Tl score was 44.3 +/- 1.2 and increased to 47.3 +/- 1.2 in the redistribution study (p less than 0.001). Three months after infarction, although there was a significantly greater rate-pressure product which would predict a larger ischemic defect and a decrease in the stress /sup 201/Tl score, the stress score was improved (48.3 +/- 1.1, p less than 0.001). The redistribution score was similar, that is, 48.9 +/- 1.0. The improvement in /sup 201/Tl myocardial perfusion was associated with a loss of stress-induced ischemia in 8 patients (30%). These results indicate that spontaneous improvements in /sup 201/Tl myocardial perfusion imaging may occur after myocardial infarction.

  5. Space weather and myocardial infarction diseases at subauroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, Sergey; Kleimenova, Natalia; Petrova, Palmira

    The relationship of the number of calls for the emergency medical care in Yakutsk (subauroral latitudes) in connection with myocardial infarction diseases during years near the maximum (1992) and minimum (1998) of the 11-year geomagnetic disturbance cycle to space weather parameters has been studied. It is found that at subauroral latitudes, the increase of geomagnetic activity, namely, the occurrence of night magnetospheric substorms, plays the important role in the exacerbation of myocardial infarctions. Substorms are accompanied by Pi1 irregular geomagnetic pulsations with periods of (0.5-3.0) Hz, coinciding with heart rhythms of a human being, thus, these waves can be a biotropic factor negatively influencing on the occurrence of myocardial infarctions. The comparison of seasonal change of the number of calls for emergency medical care to patients at subauroral latitudes with a simultaneous seasonal change of fatal endings because of an infarction at low latitudes (Bulgaria) has shown their essential difference. Thus, in Bulgaria the maximum of infarctions have been marked in winter, and minimum - in summer, and in Yakutsk a few maxima coinciding with the sharp and considerable increases of the level of the planetary geomagnetic disturbances have been observed. In this case, in Bulgaria the infarctions could be connected with availability of the Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations. Thus, the stable quasi-sinusoidal Pc1 pulsations can be a biotropic factor influencing on the development of myocardial infarctions at middle latitudes and the Pi1 irregular geomagnetic pulsations, which do not propagate to the lower latitudes, could be a biotropic factor at subauroral latitudes.

  6. Atrial myocardial infarction: A tale of the forgotten chamber.

    PubMed

    Lu, Marvin Louis Roy; De Venecia, Toni; Patnaik, Soumya; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    It has been almost a century since atrial infarction was first described, yet data describing its significance remain limited. To date, there are still no universally accepted criteria for the diagnosis of atrial infarction. Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of atrial infarction but it has also been described in cor pulmonale and pulmonary hypertension. Atrial infarction almost always occurs concomitantly with ventricular infarction. Its clinical presentation depends largely on the extent and site of ventricular involvement. Atrial infarction can present with supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Electrocardiographic (ECG) criteria for diagnosing atrial infarction have been described but none have yet to be validated by prospective studies. Atrial ECG patterns include abnormal P-wave morphologies, PR-segment deviations, as well as transient rhythm abnormalities, including atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, atrial tachycardia, wandering atrial pacemaker (WAP) and atrioventricular (AV) blocks. Complications of atrial infarction include thromboembolic events and cardiogenic shock. There are no specific additional recommendations in the management of myocardial infarction with suspected involvement of the atria. The primary goal remains coronary reperfusion and maintenance of, or conversion to, sinus rhythm. PMID:26485186

  7. Adaptation to a Myocardial Infarction from a Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Explored the interactional effect between victims' (N=30) adult developmental stage and their coping and emotional reactions following a myocardial infarction (MI). The findings point to the usefulness of adult developmental psychology in understanding the divergent emotional and coping reactions of MI patients across the life-cycle. (Author/JAC)

  8. Group Counseling Approaches with Persons Who Have Sustained Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livneh, Hanoch; Sherwood-Hawes, Ardis

    1993-01-01

    Presents group counseling strategies for working with clients who have sustained myocardial infarctions, or heart attacks. MI victims can be assisted with transition from hospital, readjustment to daily life, coping with fears and frustrations of life and the illness. Advantages of counseling, primary goals, and common topics are discussed.…

  9. When to consider an implantable cardioverter defibrillator following myocardial infarction?

    PubMed

    Szwejkowski, Benjamin R; Wright, Gary A; Connelly, Derek T; Gardner, Roy S

    2015-12-01

    After reading this article the reader should be familiar with: Current guidelines for implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) use post myocardial infarction (MI) and ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Primary prevention ICD guidelines. Secondary prevention ICD guidelines. Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in patients post MI and the use of ICDs. Programming ICDs. PMID:26526420

  10. THE THROMBOLYSIS IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION STUDY (TIMI II)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compares the following two treatment strategies in patients with acute myocardial infarction: (1) routine coronary arteriography performed 18 to 48 hours after the administration of rt-PA, followed by prophylactic PTCA (or CABG) if arteriography demonstrated that the anatomy was ...

  11. Phaeochromocytoma presenting with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed A; Abdullah, Abdullah Sayied; Kiernan, Thomas John

    2016-01-01

    Phaeochromocytoma is a rare endocrine disorder with different cardiovascular presentations. In this brief report, we discuss a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction secondary to phaeochromocytoma. Coronary angiogram showed non-obstructive coronary artery disease. PMID:26857585

  12. Modeling Myocardial Infarction in Mice: Methodology, Monitoring, Pathomorphology

    PubMed Central

    Ovsepyan, A.A.; Panchenkov, D.N.; Prokhortchouk, E.B.; Telegin, G.B.; Zhigalova, N.A.; Golubev, E.P.; Sviridova, T.E.; Matskeplishvili, S.T.; Skryabin, K.G.; Buziashvili, U.I.

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is one of the most serious and widespread diseases in the world. In this work, a minimally invasive method for simulating myocardial infarction in mice is described in the Russian Federation for the very first time; the procedure is carried out by ligation of the coronary heart artery or by controlled electrocoagulation. As a part of the methodology, a series of anesthetic, microsurgical and revival protocols are designed, owing to which a decrease in the postoperational mortality from the initial 94.6 to 13.6% is achieved. ECG confirms the development of large-focal or surface myocardial infarction. Postmortal histological examination confirms the presence of necrosis foci in the heart muscles of 87.5% of animals. Altogether, the medical data allow us to conclude that an adequate mouse model for myocardial infarction was generated. A further study is focused on the standardization of the experimental procedure and the use of genetically modified mouse strains, with the purpose of finding the most efficient therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:22649679

  13. RNA interference targeting SHP-1 attenuates myocardial infarction in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Masahiro; Tsuchida, Keiko; Hata, Tomoji; Makino, Naoki

    2005-12-01

    The Src homology domain 2 (SH2)-containing tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) plays a key role in apoptosis and decreases phosphorylation of Akt. Apoptosis of cardiomyocytes is thought to contribute to the increased area of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and Akt activation exerts a powerful cardioprotective effect after ischemia. Thus, a therapeutic strategy designed to inhibit expression of SHP-1 would be beneficial in AMI. Here we report that siRNA targeting SHP-1 reduced infarct size in a rat model of AMI. Upon injection into the ischemic left ventricular wall, the vector-based siRNA significantly suppressed the increase in the SHP-1 mRNA and the SHP-1 protein levels. The siRNA vector also significantly reduced the SHP-1 that bound to Fas-R. The SHP-1 siRNA vector increased phospho-Akt and reduced DNA fragmentation and caspase activity compared with the scramble siRNA vector. Finally, the area of myocardial infarction was significantly smaller with the SHP-1 siRNA vector than with the scramble siRNA vector at 2 days after LCA ligation. In conclusion, SHP-1 in the heart increased from the early stage of AMI, and this increase was thought to contribute to the increased area of myocardial infarction. Suppression of SHP-1 with the SHP-1 siRNA vector markedly reduced the infarct size in AMI. PMID:16223786

  14. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    van Hout, Gerardus PJ; Teuben, Michel PJ; Heeres, Marjolein; de Maat, Steven; de Jong, Renate; Maas, Coen; Kouwenberg, Lisanne HJA; Koenderman, Leo; van Solinge, Wouter W; de Jager, Saskia CA; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E

    2015-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting translational failure. Experimentally, MI is induced artificially and the effect of the experimental procedures may influence outcome and thus clinical applicability. The aim of this study was to investigate if invasive surgery, as in the common open chest MI model affects IS and cardiac function. Twenty female landrace pigs were subjected to MI by transluminal balloon occlusion. In 10 of 20 pigs, balloon occlusion was preceded by invasive surgery (medial sternotomy). After 72 hrs, pigs were subjected to echocardiography and Evans blue/triphenyl tetrazoliumchloride double staining to determine IS and area at risk. Quantification of IS showed a significant IS reduction in the open chest group compared to the closed chest group (IS versus area at risk: 50.9 ± 5.4% versus 69.9 ± 3.4%, P = 0.007). End systolic LV volume and LV ejection fraction measured by echocardiography at follow-up differed significantly between both groups (51 ± 5 ml versus 65 ± 3 ml, P = 0.033; 47.5 ± 2.6% versus 38.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.005). The inflammatory response in the damaged myocardium did not differ between groups. This study indicates that invasive surgery reduces IS and preserves cardiac function in a porcine MI model. Future studies need to elucidate the effect of infarct induction technique on the efficacy of pharmacological therapies in large animal cardioprotection studies. PMID:26282710

  15. Regional left ventricular myocardial contractility and stress in a finite element model of posterobasal myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F; Sun, Kay; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Ge, Liang; Saloner, David; Wallace, Arthur W; Ratcliffe, Mark B; Guccione, Julius M

    2011-04-01

    Recently, a noninvasive method for determining regional myocardial contractility, using an animal-specific finite element (FE) model-based optimization, was developed to study a sheep with anteroapical infarction (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001). Using the methodology developed in the previous study (Sun et al., 2009, "A Computationally Efficient Formal Optimization of Regional Myocardial Contractility in a Sheep With Left Ventricular Aneurysm," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(11), p. 111001), which incorporates tagged magnetic resonance images, three-dimensional myocardial strains, left ventricular (LV) volumes, and LV cardiac catheterization pressures, the regional myocardial contractility and stress distribution of a sheep with posterobasal infarction were investigated. Active material parameters in the noninfarcted border zone (BZ) myocardium adjacent to the infarct (T(max_B)), in the myocardium remote from the infarct (T(max_R)), and in the infarct (T(max_I)) were estimated by minimizing the errors between FE model-predicted and experimentally measured systolic strains and LV volumes using the previously developed optimization scheme. The optimized T(max_B) was found to be significantly depressed relative to T(max_R), while T(max_I) was found to be zero. The myofiber stress in the BZ was found to be elevated, relative to the remote region. This could cause further damage to the contracting myocytes, leading to heart failure. PMID:21428685

  16. Acute Anteroseptal Myocardial Infarction after a Negative Exercise Stress Test

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alawi, Abdullah M.; Janardan, Jyotsna; Peck, Kah Y.; Soward, Alan

    2016-01-01

    A myocardial infarction is a rare complication which can occur after an exercise stress test. We report a 48-year-old male who was referred to the Mildura Cardiology Practice, Victoria, Australia, in August 2014 with left-sided chest pain. He underwent an exercise stress test which was negative for myocardial ischaemia. However, the patient presented to the Emergency Department of the Mildura Base Hospital 30 minutes after the test with severe retrosternal chest pain. An acute anteroseptal ST segment elevation myocardial infarction was observed on electrocardiography. After thrombolysis, he was transferred to a tertiary hospital where coronary angiography subsequently revealed significant left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis. Thrombus aspiration and a balloon angioplasty were performed. The patient was discharged three days after the surgical procedure in good health. PMID:27226918

  17. Acute Myocardial Infarction Complicating Active Ulcerative Colitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitraki, Eva D.; Ahamed, Mubarak; Bunce, Nicholas H.

    2011-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease that predominantly affects the gastrointestinal (GI) tract but can involve extraintestinal organs including musculoskeletal system and skin. The most frequent cardiac manifestations of UC are pericarditis and myocarditis. Patients display an increased risk for venous thromboembolic complications and mesenteric ischemia, but the association with ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction is uncertain. We present the case of a 27-year-old man with anti-PRIII ANCA-positive ulcerative colitis and increased factor VIII activity who presented with an acute myocardial infarction. We discuss possible causative links between these clinical entities and demonstrate the role of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with underlying inflammatory conditions who present with chest pain and evidence of myocardial damage. PMID:24826231

  18. 131Cs myocardial scintigraphy. Application to assessment of anterior myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Burguet, W; Merchie, G; Kulbertus, H

    1975-01-01

    Earlier studies have indicated that caesium-131 is a good myocardial scanning agent for the demonstration of anterior infarcts. One hundred and ten patients with documented anterior myocardial infarction were studied by 131Cs myocardial scintigraphy. An anterior area of decreased uptake of caesium was noted in all but 3 subjects whose necrotic zone was likely to be of small dimensions. In 20 cases, the scintigram showed a definite, sometimes very large, cold area whereas the electrocardiogram failed to display any diagnostic feature of myocardial necrosis. In most of the latter instances, the electrocardiographic diagnosis was obscured by the presence of intraventricular conduction disturbances. In order to visualize the intracardiac cavities, the 131Cs investigation was usually completed by a 113mIn scintigram, which allowed recognition of a parietal aneurysm in 12 of the 18 patients with extensive anterior lesions. In each case, an index of necrosis was computed from planimetric measurements of the infarcted area as compared to the total left ventricular surfact in both the anteroposterior and left anterior oblique projections. This index was shown to correlate with the incidence of major complications developing after the acute episode of coronary occlusion. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the method are briefly discussed. It is felt that myocardial scintigraphy represents a sound approach to the semiquantitative assessment of anterior myocardial infarction; the clinical usefulness of the technique seems sufficiently demonstrated to prompt further research in this field. Images PMID:1191417

  19. High-Dose Statin Pretreatment Decreases Periprocedural Myocardial Infarction and Cardiovascular Events in Patients Undergoing Elective Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Meta-Analysis of Twenty-Four Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le; Peng, Pingan; Zhang, Ou; Xu, Xiaohan; Yang, Shiwei; Zhao, Yingxin; Zhou, Yujie

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that high-dose statin pretreatment may reduce the risk of periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) for certain patients; however, previous analyses have not considered patients with a history of statin maintenance treatment. In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), we reevaluated the efficacy of short-term high-dose statin pretreatment to prevent PMI and MACE in an expanded set of patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods We searched the PubMed/Medline database for RCTs that compared high-dose statin pretreatment with no statin or low-dose statin pretreatment as a prevention of PMI and MACE. We evaluated the incidence of PMI and MACE, including death, spontaneous myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization at the longest follow-up for each study for subgroups stratified by disease classification and prior low-dose statin treatment. Results Twenty-four RCTs with a total of 5,526 patients were identified. High-dose statin pretreatment was associated with 59% relative reduction in PMI (odds ratio [OR]: 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.34–0.49; P<0.00001) and 39% relative reduction in MACE (OR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.45–0.83; P = 0.002). The benefit of high-dose statin pretreatment on MACE was significant for statin-naive patients (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.50–0.95; P = 0.02) and prior low dose statin-treated patients (OR: 0.28; 95% CI: 0.12–0.65; P = 0.003); and for patients with acute coronary syndrome (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.34–0.79; P = 0.003), but not for patients with stable angina (OR: 0.71; 95% CI 0.45–1.10; P = 0.12). Long-term effects on survival were less obvious. Conclusions High-dose statin pretreatment can result in a significant reduction in PMI and MACE for patients undergoing elective PCI. The positive effect of high-dose statin pretreatment on PMI and MACE is significant for statin

  20. Role of myocardial perfusion imaging in evaluating thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1987-03-01

    Myocardial thallium-201 scintigraphy is being increasingly employed as a method for assessing the efficacy of coronary reperfusion in acute myocardial infarction. New thallium uptake after intracoronary tracer administration after successful recanalization indicates that nutrient blood flow has been successfully restored. One may also presume that some myocardial salvage occurred if thallium administered in this manner is transported intracellularly by myocytes with intact sarcolemmal membranes. However, if one injects thallium by way of the intracoronary route immediately after reperfusion, the initial uptake of thallium in reperfused myocardium may predominantly represent hyperemic flow and regional thallium counts measured may not be proportional to the mass of viable myocytes. When thallium is injected intravenously during the occlusion phase the degree of redistribution after thrombolysis is proportional to the degree of flow restoration and myocardial viability. When thallium is injected for the first time intravenously immediately after reperfusion, an overestimation of myocardial salvage may occur because of excess thallium uptake in the infarct zone consequent to significant hyperemia. Another approach to myocardial thallium scintigraphy in patients undergoing thrombolytic therapy is to administer two separate intravenous injections before and 24 hours or later after treatment. Finally, patients with acute myocardial infarction who receive intravenous thrombolytic therapy are candidates for predischarge exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy for risk stratification and detection of residual ischemia.

  1. Depression Increases Sympathetic Activity and Exacerbates Myocardial Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction: Evidence from an Animal Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Yuan, Xiaoran; Ruan, Bing; Sun, Lifang; Tang, Yanhong; Yang, Bo; Hu, Dan; Huang, Congxin

    2014-01-01

    Depression is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Excessive sympathetic activation and serious myocardial remodeling may contribute to this association. The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of depression on sympathetic activity and myocardial remodeling after MI. Wild-type (WT) rats were divided into a sham group (Sham), a myocardial infarction group (MI), a depression group (D), and a myocardial infarction plus depression group (MI+D). Compared with controls, the MI+D animals displayed depression-like behaviors and attenuated body weight gain. The evaluation of sympathetic activity showed an increased level in plasma concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine and higher expression of myocardial tyrosine hydroxylase in the MI+D group than the control groups (p<0.05 for all). Cardiac function and morphologic analyses revealed a decreased fractional shortening accompanied by increased left ventricular dimensions, thinning myocardium wall, and reduced collagen repair in the MI+D group compared with the MI group (p<0.05 for all). Frequent premature ventricular contractions, prolonged QT duration and ventricular repolarization duration, shorted effective refractory period, and increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmia were displayed in MI+D rats. These results indicate that sympathetic hyperactivation and exacerbated myocardial remodeling may be a plausible mechanism linking depression to an adverse prognosis after MI. PMID:25036781

  2. [Antithrombotic therapy after myocardial infarction: arguments for the use of acetylsalicylic acid and coumarin derivatives].

    PubMed

    Waskowsky, W M; Brouwer, A; Verheugt, F W A

    2005-01-01

    Patients who survived myocardial infarction and who are being treated with the current optimal therapy (antithrombotics, statins and beta-blockers), have a 10-20% chance of death, re-infarction and stroke within in the first year. A possible explanation for this could be an increased activation and generation ofthrombin for at least 6 months following the cardiovascular event preceding preventative therapy. Acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel do not affect activation by thrombin of the platelet aggregation and the clotting cascade. The additional use of cumarin derivatives could therefore reduce the chance of recurring thrombotic events, and subsequently improve prognosis. Since the nineteen-nineties several randomised trials have been conducted to study the clinical relevance ofcumarin derivatives both with and without acetylsalicylic acid, in patients who had had a myocardial infarction. The conclusions of these studies were not unambiguous. If the international normalized ratio (INR) was kept > 2 for a long period, by means of frequent check-ups and effective dosage adjustment, the chance of death, recurrent myocardial infarction or stroke was 30-50% lower than when acetylsalicylic acid only was used. The risk of bleeding was raised by 2-4 times, but there were no life-threatening episodes of bleeding. In view of the recent development of anticoagulant agents, for which monitoring seems to be becoming unnecessary, identification of patients who would benefit most from a combined antithrombotic strategy is warranted. PMID:15688836

  3. Pathological observation of acute myocardial infarction in Chinese miniswine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuang; Wang, Shao-Xin; Dong, Ping-Shuan; Wang, Li-Ping; Duan, Na-Na; Wang, Yan-Yu; Wang, Ke; Li, Zhuan-Zhen; Wei, Li-Juan; Meng, Ya-Li; Cheng, Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    The acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model in Chinese miniswine was built by percutaneous coronary artery occlusion. Pathological observation of AMI was performed, and the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the infarct sites was detected at different days after modeling in Chinese miniswine. The experimental findings may be used as the basis for blood flow reconstruction and intervention after AMI. Seven experimental Chinese miniswine were subjected to general anesthesia and Seldinger right femoral artery puncture. After coronary angiography, the gelfoam was injected via the microtube to occlude the obtuse marginal branch (OM branch). At 1 d, 3 d, 5 d, 7 d, 10 d, 14 d and 17 d after modeling, hetatoxylin-eosin (HE) staining was performed to observe the pathological changes and to detect the expression of TNF-α in the myocardial tissues. Cytoplasmic acidophilia of the necrotic myocardial tissues at 1 d after modeling was enhanced, and cytoplasmic granules were formed; at 3 d, the margins of the necrotic myocardial tissues were infiltrated by a large number of inflammatory cells; at 5 d, the nuclei of the necrotic myocardial cells were fragmented; at 7 d, extensive granulation tissues were formed at the margin of the necrotic myocardial tissues; at 10 d, part of the granulation tissues were replaced by fibrous scar tissues; at 14-17 d, all granulation tissues were replaced by fibrous scar tissues. Immunohistochemical detection indicated that no TNF-α expression in normal myocardial tissues. The TNF-α expression was first detected at 3 d in the necrotic myocardial tissues and then increased at 5 d and 7 d. After reaching the peak at 10 d, the expression began to decrease at 14 d and the decrease continued at 17 d. Coronary angiography showed the disappearance of blood flow at the distal end of OM branch occluded by gelfoam, indicating that AMI model was constructed successfully. The repair of the infarcted myocardium began at 10-17 d after

  4. Prognostic significance of infarct core pathology revealed by quantitative non-contrast in comparison with contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, David; Haig, Caroline; Rauhalammi, Sam; Ahmed, Nadeem; Mordi, Ify; McEntegart, Margaret; Petrie, Mark C.; Eteiba, Hany; Hood, Stuart; Watkins, Stuart; Lindsay, Mitchell; Mahrous, Ahmed; Ford, Ian; Tzemos, Niko; Sattar, Naveed; Welsh, Paul; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Berry, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess the prognostic significance of infarct core tissue characteristics using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in survivors of acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Methods and results We performed an observational prospective single centre cohort study in 300 reperfused STEMI patients (mean ± SD age 59 ± 12 years, 74% male) who underwent CMR 2 days and 6 months post-myocardial infarction (n = 267). Native T1 was measured in myocardial regions of interest (n = 288). Adverse remodelling was defined as an increase in left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume ≥20% at 6 months. All-cause death or first heart failure hospitalization was a pre-specified outcome that was assessed during follow-up (median duration 845 days). One hundred and sixty (56%) patients had a hypo-intense infarct core disclosed by native T1. In multivariable regression, infarct core native T1 was inversely associated with adverse remodelling [odds ratio (95% confidence interval (CI)] per 10 ms reduction in native T1: 0.91 (0.82, 0.00); P = 0.061). Thirty (10.4%) of 288 patients died or experienced a heart failure event and 13 of these events occurred post-discharge. Native T1 values (ms) within the hypo-intense infarct core (n = 160 STEMI patients) were inversely associated with the risk of all-cause death or first hospitalization for heart failure post-discharge (for a 10 ms increase in native T1: hazard ratio 0.730, 95% CI 0.617, 0.863; P < 0.001) including after adjustment for left ventricular ejection fraction, infarct core T2 and myocardial haemorrhage. The prognostic results for microvascular obstruction were similar. Conclusion Infarct core native T1 represents a novel non-contrast CMR biomarker with potential for infarct characterization and prognostication in STEMI survivors. Confirmatory studies are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02072850. PMID:26261290

  5. Protein Therapeutics for Cardiac Regeneration after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Vincent F.M.; Lee, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    Although most medicines have historically been small molecules, many newly approved drugs are derived from proteins. Protein therapies have been developed for treatment of diseases in almost every organ system, including the heart. Great excitement has now arisen in the field of regenerative medicine, particularly for cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction. Every year, millions of people suffer from acute myocardial infarction, but the adult mammalian myocardium has limited regeneration potential. Regeneration of the heart after myocardium infarction is therefore an exciting target for protein therapeutics. In this review, we discuss different classes of proteins that have therapeutic potential to regenerate the heart after myocardial infarction. Protein candidates have been described that induce angiogenesis, including fibroblast growth factors and vascular endothelial growth factors, although thus far clinical development has been disappointing. Chemotactic factors that attract stem cells, e.g. hepatocyte growth factor and stromal cell derived factor-1, may also be useful. Finally, neuregulins and periostin are proteins that induce cell cycle reentry of cardiomyocytes, and growth factors like IGF-1 can induce growth and differentiation of stem cells. As our knowledge of the biology of regenerative processes and the role of specific proteins in these processes increases, the use of proteins as regenerative drugs could develop as a cardiac therapy. PMID:20607468

  6. Suspected acute myocardial infarction in a dystrophin-deficient dog.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sarah Morar; Coleman, Amanda Erickson; Guo, Lee-Jae; Tou, Sandra; Keene, Bruce W; Kornegay, Joe N

    2016-06-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a model for the genetically homologous human disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Unlike the mildly affected mdx mouse, GRMD recapitulates the severe DMD phenotype. In addition to skeletal muscle involvement, DMD boys develop cardiomyopathy. While the cardiomyopathy of DMD is typically slowly progressive, rare early episodes of acute cardiac decompensation, compatible with myocardial infarction, have been described. We report here a 7-month-old GRMD dog with an apparent analogous episode of myocardial infarction. The dog presented with acute signs of cardiac disease, including tachyarrhythmia, supraventricular premature complexes, and femoral pulse deficits. Serum cardiac biomarkers, cardiac-specific troponin I (cTnI) and N-terminal prohormone of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), were markedly increased. Echocardiography showed areas of hyperechoic myocardial enhancement, typical of GRMD cardiomyopathy. Left ventricular dyskinesis and elevated cTnI were suggestive of acute myocardial damage/infarction. Over a 3-year period, progression to a severe dilated phenotype was observed. PMID:27105608

  7. Transient myocardial ischaemia after acute myocardial infarction does not induce ventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed Central

    Currie, P; Saltissi, S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To see whether transient myocardial ischaemia on ambulatory monitoring after myocardial infarction is associated with ventricular arrhythmias. DESIGN--A prospective study. SETTING--The coronary care unit, general medical wards, and cardiorespiratory department of a major teaching hospital. PATIENTS--203 consecutive patients without specific exclusion criteria admitted with acute myocardial infarction. INTERVENTIONS--24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring for ventricular arrhythmias and ST depression both early (mean 6.3 days after infarction, n = 201) and late (mean 38 days, n = 177). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Episodes of myocardial ischaemia were identified during ambulatory monitoring by transient ST depression of > or = 1.0 mm lasting for > or = 30 s. Ventricular arrhythmias were single extrasystoles, couplets, or ventricular tachycardia. RESULTS--All ventricular arrhythmias were significantly more frequent in late than early monitoring. The arrhythmias included couplets (in 83/174 (48%) v 49/200 (25%) of patients, p = 0.0000028) and ventricular tachycardia (29/174 (17%) v 15/199 (8%), p = 0.0064). Patients with ST depression (29 early; 56 late), compared with those without ischaemia, did not experience a significant increase in single extrasystoles, couplets (31% v 23% early; 47% v 48% late), or ventricular tachycardia (3% v 8% early; 18% v 16% late). Even patients with frequent (> or = 3 episodes), and deep (> or = 1.5 mm) or prolonged (> or = 20 min) ST depression had no increase in arrhythmias. CONCLUSIONS--Ventricular arrhythmias after myocardial infarction are not associated with transient myocardial ischaemia during daily activities. This study does not support the belief that to abolish silent ischaemia would reduce the incidence of sudden death due to uncontrollable ventricular arrhythmias after myocardial infarction. PMID:8489860

  8. Thrombolytic-related complication in a case of misdiagnosed myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Irivbogbe, Osereme; Mirrer, Brooks; Loarte, Pablo; Gale, Michael; Cohen, Ronny

    2014-06-01

    The importance of early thrombolysis in acute myocardial infarction has been highlighted in several large trials. The clinical decision is often taken by physicians who need to take a rapid action with the risk of misdiagnosing non-coronary events that mimic myocardial infarction. Here we describe a case of acute pericarditis in a 37-year-old man whom received thrombolysis and developed a sudden hemorrhagic pericardial effusion that evolved rapidly into a cardiac tamponade. These errors leading to lethal thrombolysis complications have been surprisingly rare; but a correct diagnosis of aortic dissection or hemorrhagic pericarditis needs to be stressed because even after obtaining the correct diagnosis, the prolonged disturbance of hemostasis prevents a rapid therapy being instigated. PMID:24749992

  9. Long-term antithrombotic pharmacotherapy following ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Sergio; Capodanno, Davide

    2016-06-01

    The selection and optimal duration of pharmacological agents to counteract thrombotic processes activated in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) still remain a debated issue in current clinical practice. Recently published trials have highlighted the potential benefits of dual-antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) extended beyond the currently recommended 12-months term. Anticoagulation with non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in addition to DAPT has also been explored. Importantly, benefits of prolonged antithrombotic management strategies could be offset by harms following bleeding complications, therefore careful assessment of a patient benefit-risk profile must be used to drive individualized medical decisions. Appraising current available evidence is useful to inform clinical practice and to optimize the pharmacological management of patients with STEMI. Accordingly, we provide an overview of the literature focusing on long-term antithrombotic management strategies in patients with a recent or prior myocardial infarction, with a primary focus on STEMI. PMID:26934659

  10. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz; Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar; Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the effects of VEGF165 gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Methods Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF165 treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. Results There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF165. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF165, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. Conclusion The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF165 seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct. PMID:25993074