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Sample records for myosin ii motor

  1. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-01-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients' life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life. PMID:25072053

  2. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  3. Stretching Actin Filaments within Cells Enhances their Affinity for the Myosin II Motor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, Taro Q. P.; Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Nagasaki, Akira; Yumura, Shigehiko

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the myosin II motor domain (S1) preferentially binds to specific subsets of actin filaments in vivo, we expressed GFP-fused S1 with mutations that enhanced its affinity for actin in Dictyostelium cells. Consistent with the hypothesis, the GFP-S1 mutants were localized along specific portions of the cell cortex. Comparison with rhodamine-phalloidin staining in fixed cells demonstrated that the GFP-S1 probes preferentially bound to actin filaments in the rear cortex and cleavage furrows, where actin filaments are stretched by interaction with endogenous myosin II filaments. The GFP-S1 probes were similarly enriched in the cortex stretched passively by traction forces in the absence of myosin II or by external forces using a microcapillary. The preferential binding of GFP-S1 mutants to stretched actin filaments did not depend on cortexillin I or PTEN, two proteins previously implicated in the recruitment of myosin II filaments to stretched cortex. These results suggested that it is the stretching of the actin filaments itself that increases their affinity for the myosin II motor domain. In contrast, the GFP-fused myosin I motor domain did not localize to stretched actin filaments, which suggests different preferences of the motor domains for different structures of actin filaments play a role in distinct intracellular localizations of myosin I and II. We propose a scheme in which the stretching of actin filaments, the preferential binding of myosin II filaments to stretched actin filaments, and myosin II-dependent contraction form a positive feedback loop that contributes to the stabilization of cell polarity and to the responsiveness of the cells to external mechanical stimuli. PMID:22022566

  4. Myosin II Motor Activity in the Lateral Amygdala Is Required for Fear Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavin, Cristin F.; Rubio, Maria D.; Young, Erica; Miller, Courtney; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Learning induces dynamic changes to the actin cytoskeleton that are required to support memory formation. However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate filamentous actin (F-actin) dynamics during learning and memory are poorly understood. Myosin II motors are highly expressed in actin-rich growth structures including dendritic spines, and we have…

  5. Myosin II Motors and F-Actin Dynamics Drive the Coordinated Movement of the Centrosome and Soma during CNS Glial-Guided Neuronal Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Solecki, Dr. David; Trivedi, Dr. Niraj; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Kerekes, Ryan A; Gleason, Shaun Scott; Hatten, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Lamination of cortical regions of the vertebrate brain depends on glial-guided neuronal migration. The conserved polarity protein Par6{alpha} localizes to the centrosome and coordinates forward movement of the centrosome and soma in migrating neurons. The cytoskeletal components that produce this unique form of cell polarity and their relationship to polarity signaling cascades are unknown. We show that F-actin and Myosin II motors are enriched in the neuronal leading process and that Myosin II activity is necessary for leading process actin dynamics. Inhibition of Myosin II decreased the speed of centrosome and somal movement, whereas Myosin II activation increased coordinated movement. Ectopic expression or silencing of Par6{alpha} inhibited Myosin II motors by decreasing Myosin light-chain phosphorylation. These findings suggest leading-process Myosin II may function to 'pull' the centrosome and soma forward during glial-guided migration by a mechanism involving the conserved polarity protein Par6{alpha}.

  6. The structural coupling between ATPase activation and recovery stroke in the myosin II motor

    SciTech Connect

    Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2007-07-01

    Before the myosin motor head can perform the next power stroke, it undergoes a large conformational transition in which the converter domain, bearing the lever arm, rotates {approx} 65{sup o}. Simultaneous with this 'recovery stroke', myosin activates its ATPase function by closing the Switch-2 loop over the bound ATP. This coupling between the motions of the converter domain and of the 40 {angstrom}-distant Switch-2 loop is essential to avoid unproductive ATP hydrolysis. The coupling mechanism is determined here by finding a series of optimized intermediates between crystallographic end structures of the recovery stroke (Dictyostelium discoideum), yielding movies of the transition at atomic detail. The successive formation of two hydrogen bonds by the Switch-2 loop is correlated with the successive see-saw motions of the relay and SH1 helices that hold the converter domain. SH1 helix and Switch-2 loop communicate via a highly conserved loop that wedges against the SH1-helix upon Switch-2 closing.

  7. Myosin II Dynamics during Embryo Morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasza, Karen

    2013-03-01

    During embryonic morphogenesis, the myosin II motor protein generates forces that help to shape tissues, organs, and the overall body form. In one dramatic example in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, the epithelial tissue that will give rise to the body of the adult animal elongates more than two-fold along the head-to-tail axis in less than an hour. This elongation is accomplished primarily through directional rearrangements of cells within the plane of the tissue. Just prior to elongation, polarized assemblies of myosin II accumulate perpendicular to the elongation axis. The contractile forces generated by myosin activity orient cell movements along a common axis, promoting local cell rearrangements that contribute to global tissue elongation. The molecular and mechanical mechanisms by which myosin drives this massive change in embryo shape are poorly understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we generated a collection of transgenic flies expressing variants of myosin II with altered motor function and regulation. We found that variants that are predicted to have increased myosin activity cause defects in tissue elongation. Using biophysical approaches, we found that these myosin variants also have decreased turnover dynamics within cells. To explore the mechanisms by which molecular-level myosin dynamics are translated into tissue-level elongation, we are using time-lapse confocal imaging to observe cell movements in embryos with altered myosin activity. We are utilizing computational approaches to quantify the dynamics and directionality of myosin localization and cell rearrangements. These studies will help elucidate how myosin-generated forces control cell movements within tissues. This work is in collaboration with J. Zallen at the Sloan-Kettering Institute.

  8. Simulations of the myosin II motor reveal a nucleotide-state sensing element that controls the recovery stroke.

    PubMed

    Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, Stefan

    2006-08-18

    During the recovery stroke, the myosin motor is primed for the next power stroke by a 60 degree rotation of its lever arm. This reversible motion is coupled to the activation of the ATPase function of myosin through conformational changes along the relay helix, which runs from the Switch-2 loop near the ATP to the converter domain carrying the lever arm. Via a hydrogen bond between the side-chain of Asn475 on the relay helix and the Gly457/Ser456 peptide group on the Switch-2, the rotation of the converter domain is coupled to the formation of a hydrogen bond between Gly457 and gamma-phosphate that is essential for ATP hydrolysis. Here, molecular dynamics simulations of Dictyostelium discoideum myosin II in the two end conformations of the recovery stroke with different nucleotide states (ATP, ADP x Pi, ADP) reveal that the side-chain of Asn475 breaks away from Switch-2 upon ATP hydrolysis to make a hydrogen bond with Tyr573. This sensing of the nucleotide state is achieved by a small displacement of the cleaved gamma-phosphate towards Gly457 which in turn pushes Asn475 away. The sensing plays a dual role by (i) preventing the wasteful reversal of the recovery stroke while the nucleotide is in the ADP x Pi state, and (ii) decoupling the relay helix from Switch-2, thus allowing the power stroke to start upon initial binding to actin while Gly457 of Switch-2 keeps interacting with the Pi (known to be released only later after tight actin binding). A catalytically important salt bridge between Arg238 (on Switch-1) and Glu459 (on Switch-2), which covers the hydrolysis site, is seen to form rapidly when ATP is added to the pre-recovery stroke conformer and remains stable after the recovery stroke, indicating that it has a role in shaping the ATP binding site by induced fit. PMID:16859703

  9. The working stroke of the myosin II motor in muscle is not tightly coupled to release of orthophosphate from its active site

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle shortens faster against a lower load. This force–velocity relationship is the fundamental determinant of muscle performance in vivo and is due to ATP-driven working strokes of myosin II motors, during their cyclic interactions with the actin filament in each half-sarcomere. Crystallographic studies suggest that the working stroke is associated with the release of phosphate (Pi) and consists of 70 deg tilting of a light-chain domain that connects the catalytic domain of the myosin motor to the myosin tail and filament. However, the coupling of the working stroke with Pi release is still an unsolved question. Using nanometre–microsecond mechanics on skinned muscle fibres, we impose stepwise drops in force on an otherwise isometric contraction and record the isotonic velocity transient, to measure the mechanical manifestation of the working stroke of myosin motors and the rate of its regeneration in relation to the half-sarcomere load and [Pi]. We show that the rate constant of the working stroke is unaffected by [Pi], while the subsequent transition to steady velocity shortening is accelerated. We propose a new chemo-mechanical model that reproduces the transient and steady state responses by assuming that: (i) the release of Pi from the catalytic site of a myosin motor can occur at any stage of the working stroke, and (ii) a myosin motor, in an intermediate state of the working stroke, can slip to the next actin monomer during filament sliding. This model explains the efficient action of muscle molecular motors working as an ensemble in the half-sarcomere. PMID:23878374

  10. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  11. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  12. Myosin motor isoforms direct specification of actomyosin function by tropomyosins

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Joseph E.; Pollard, Luther W.; Murray, George G.; Lord, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Myosins and tropomyosins represent two cytoskeletal proteins that often work together with actin filaments in contractile and motile cellular processes. While the specialized role of tropomyosin in striated muscle myosin-II regulation is well characterized, its role in non-muscle myosin regulation is poorly understood. We previously showed that fission yeast tropomyosin (Cdc8p) positively regulates myosin-II (Myo2p) and myosin-V (Myo52p) motors. To understand the broader implications of this regulation we examined the role of two mammalian tropomyosins (Tpm3.1cy/Tm5NM1 and Tpm4.2cy/Tm4) recently implicated in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Like Cdc8p, the Tpm3.1cy and Tpm4.2cy isoforms significantly enhance Myo2p and Myo52p motor activity, converting non-processive Myo52p molecules into processive motors that can walk along actin tracks as single molecules. In contrast to the positive regulation of Myo2p and Myo52p, Cdc8p and the mammalian tropomyosins potently inhibited skeletal muscle myosin-II, while having negligible effects on the highly processive mammalian myosin-Va. In support of a conserved role for certain tropomyosins in regulating non-muscle actomyosin structures, Tpm3.1cy supported normal contractile ring function in fission yeast. Our work reveals that actomyosin regulation by tropomyosin is dependent on the myosin isoform, highlighting a general role for specific isoforms of tropomyosin in sorting myosin motor outputs. PMID:25712463

  13. Myosin VI: cellular functions and motor properties.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rhys; Lister, Ida; Schmitz, Stephan; Walker, Matthew; Veigel, Claudia; Trinick, John; Buss, Folma; Kendrick-Jones, John

    2004-01-01

    Myosin VI has been localized in membrane ruffles at the leading edge of cells, at the trans-Golgi network compartment of the Golgi complex and in clathrin-coated pits or vesicles, indicating that it functions in a wide variety of intracellular processes. Myosin VI moves along actin filaments towards their minus end, which is the opposite direction to all of the other myosins so far studied (to our knowledge), and is therefore thought to have unique properties and functions. To investigate the cellular roles of myosin VI, we identified various myosin VI binding partners and are currently characterizing their interactions within the cell. As an alternative approach, we have expressed and purified full-length myosin VI and studied its in vitro properties. Previous studies assumed that myosin VI was a dimer, but our biochemical, biophysical and electron microscopic studies reveal that myosin VI can exist as a stable monomer. We observed, using an optical tweezers force transducer, that monomeric myosin VI is a non-processive motor which, despite a relatively short lever arm, generates a large working stroke of 18 nm. Whether monomer and/or dimer forms of myosin VI exist in cells and their possible functions will be discussed. PMID:15647169

  14. Maximum limit to the number of myosin II motors participating in processive sliding of actin.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Khushboo; Puliyakodan, Mohammed Shabeel; Pandey, Vikas; Nath, Sunil; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed processive sliding and breakage of actin filaments at various heavy meromyosin (HMM) densities and ATP concentrations in IVMA. We observed that with addition of ATP solution, the actin filaments fragmented stochastically; we then determined mean length and velocity of surviving actin filaments post breakage. Average filament length decreased with increase in HMM density at constant ATP, and increased with increase in ATP concentration at constant HMM density. Using density of HMM molecules and length of actin, we estimated the number of HMM molecules per actin filament (N) that participate in processive sliding of actin. N is solely a function of ATP concentration: 88 ± 24 and 54 ± 22 HMM molecules (mean ± S.D.) at 2 mM and 0.1 mM ATP respectively. Processive sliding of actin filament was observed only when N lay within a minimum lower limit (Nmin) and a maximum upper limit (Nmax) to the number of HMM molecules. When N < Nmin the actin filament diffused away from the surface and processivity was lost and when N > Nmax the filament underwent breakage eventually and could not sustain processive sliding. We postulate this maximum upper limit arises due to increased number of strongly bound myosin heads. PMID:27554800

  15. Maximum limit to the number of myosin II motors participating in processive sliding of actin

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Khushboo; Puliyakodan, Mohammed Shabeel; Pandey, Vikas; Nath, Sunil; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed processive sliding and breakage of actin filaments at various heavy meromyosin (HMM) densities and ATP concentrations in IVMA. We observed that with addition of ATP solution, the actin filaments fragmented stochastically; we then determined mean length and velocity of surviving actin filaments post breakage. Average filament length decreased with increase in HMM density at constant ATP, and increased with increase in ATP concentration at constant HMM density. Using density of HMM molecules and length of actin, we estimated the number of HMM molecules per actin filament (N) that participate in processive sliding of actin. N is solely a function of ATP concentration: 88 ± 24 and 54 ± 22 HMM molecules (mean ± S.D.) at 2 mM and 0.1 mM ATP respectively. Processive sliding of actin filament was observed only when N lay within a minimum lower limit (Nmin) and a maximum upper limit (Nmax) to the number of HMM molecules. When N < Nmin the actin filament diffused away from the surface and processivity was lost and when N > Nmax the filament underwent breakage eventually and could not sustain processive sliding. We postulate this maximum upper limit arises due to increased number of strongly bound myosin heads. PMID:27554800

  16. PRIMARY PEPTIDE SEQUENCES FROM SQUID MUSCLE AND OPTIC LOBE MYOSIN IIs: A STRATEGY TO IDENTIFY AN ORGANELLE MYOSIN

    PubMed Central

    MEDEIROS, NELSON A.; REESE, THOMAS S.; JAFFE, HOWARD; DEGIORGIS, JOSEPH A.; BEARER, ELAINE L.

    2013-01-01

    The squid giant axon provides an excellent model system for the study of actin-based organelle transport likely to be mediated by myosins, but the identification of these motors has proven to be difficult. Here the authors purified and obtained primary peptide sequence of squid muscle myosin as a first step in a strategy designed to identify myosins in the squid nervous system. Limited digestion yielded fourteen peptides derived from the muscle myosin which possess high amino acid sequence identities to myosin II from scallop (60–95%) and chick pectoralis muscle (31–83%). Antibodies generated to this purified muscle myosin were used to isolate a potential myosin from squid optic lobe which yielded 11 peptide fragments. Sequences from six of these fragments identified this protein as a myosin II. The other five sequences matched myosin II (50–60%, identities), and some also matched unconventional myosins (33–50%). A single band that has a molecular weight similar to the myosin purified from optic lobe copurifies with axoplasmic organelles, and, like the optic lobe myosin, this band is also recognized by the antibodies raised against squid muscle myosin II. Hence, this strategy provides an approach to the identification of a myosin associated with motile axoplasmic organelles. PMID:9878103

  17. Association of a Nonmuscle Myosin II with Axoplasmic Organelles

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgis, Joseph A.; Reese, Thomas S.; Bearer, Elaine L.

    2002-01-01

    Association of motor proteins with organelles is required for the motors to mediate transport. Because axoplasmic organelles move on actin filaments, they must have associated actin-based motors, most likely members of the myosin superfamily. To gain a better understanding of the roles of myosins in the axon we used the giant axon of the squid, a powerful model for studies of axonal physiology. First, a ∼220 kDa protein was purified from squid optic lobe, using a biochemical protocol designed to isolate myosins. Peptide sequence analysis, followed by cloning and sequencing of the full-length cDNA, identified this ∼220 kDa protein as a nonmuscle myosin II. This myosin is also present in axoplasm, as determined by two independent criteria. First, RT-PCR using sequence-specific primers detected the transcript in the stellate ganglion, which contains the cell bodies that give rise to the giant axon. Second, Western blot analysis using nonmuscle myosin II isotype-specific antibodies detected a single ∼220 kDa band in axoplasm. Axoplasm was fractionated through a four-step sucrose gradient after 0.6 M KI treatment, which separates organelles from cytoskeletal components. Of the total nonmuscle myosin II in axoplasm, 43.2% copurified with organelles in the 15% sucrose fraction, while the remainder (56.8%) was soluble and found in the supernatant. This myosin decorates the cytoplasmic surface of 21% of the axoplasmic organelles, as demonstrated by immunogold electron-microscopy. Thus, nonmuscle myosin II is synthesized in the cell bodies of the giant axon, is present in the axon, and is associated with isolated axoplasmic organelles. Therefore, in addition to myosin V, this myosin is likely to be an axoplasmic organelle motor. PMID:11907281

  18. Anti-β2GPI antibodies stimulate endothelial cell microparticle release via a nonmuscle myosin II motor protein-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Lominadze, George; Hsi, Linda; Willard, Belinda; Wu, Meifang; McCrae, Keith R

    2013-11-28

    The antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by thrombosis and recurrent fetal loss in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs). Most pathogenic APLAs are directed against β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), a plasma phospholipid binding protein. One mechanism by which circulating antiphospholipid/anti-β2GPI antibodies may promote thrombosis is by inducing the release of procoagulant microparticles from endothelial cells. However, there is no information available concerning the mechanisms by which anti-β2GPI antibodies induce microparticle release. In seeking to identify proteins phosphorylated during anti-β2GPI antibody-induced endothelial activation, we observed phosphorylation of nonmuscle myosin II regulatory light chain (RLC), which regulates cytoskeletal assembly. In parallel, we observed a dramatic increase in the formation of filamentous actin, a two- to fivefold increase in the release of endothelial cell microparticles, and a 10- to 15-fold increase in the expression of E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and tissue factor messenger RNA. Microparticle release, but not endothelial cell surface E-selectin expression, was blocked by inhibiting RLC phosphorylation or nonmuscle myosin II motor activity. These results suggest that distinct pathways, some of which mediate cytoskeletal assembly, regulate the endothelial cell response to anti-β2GPI antibodies. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II activation may provide a novel approach for inhibiting microparticle release by endothelial cells in response to anti-β2GPI antibodies. PMID:23954892

  19. Anti-β2GPI antibodies stimulate endothelial cell microparticle release via a nonmuscle myosin II motor protein-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Lominadze, George; Hsi, Linda; Willard, Belinda; Wu, Meifang

    2013-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by thrombosis and recurrent fetal loss in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs). Most pathogenic APLAs are directed against β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), a plasma phospholipid binding protein. One mechanism by which circulating antiphospholipid/anti-β2GPI antibodies may promote thrombosis is by inducing the release of procoagulant microparticles from endothelial cells. However, there is no information available concerning the mechanisms by which anti-β2GPI antibodies induce microparticle release. In seeking to identify proteins phosphorylated during anti-β2GPI antibody-induced endothelial activation, we observed phosphorylation of nonmuscle myosin II regulatory light chain (RLC), which regulates cytoskeletal assembly. In parallel, we observed a dramatic increase in the formation of filamentous actin, a two- to fivefold increase in the release of endothelial cell microparticles, and a 10- to 15-fold increase in the expression of E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and tissue factor messenger RNA. Microparticle release, but not endothelial cell surface E-selectin expression, was blocked by inhibiting RLC phosphorylation or nonmuscle myosin II motor activity. These results suggest that distinct pathways, some of which mediate cytoskeletal assembly, regulate the endothelial cell response to anti-β2GPI antibodies. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II activation may provide a novel approach for inhibiting microparticle release by endothelial cells in response to anti-β2GPI antibodies. PMID:23954892

  20. Stochastic dynamics and mechanosensitivity of myosin II minifilaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Philipp J.; Erdmann, Thorsten; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2014-09-01

    Tissue cells are in a state of permanent mechanical tension that is maintained mainly by myosin II minifilaments, which are bipolar assemblies of tens of myosin II molecular motors contracting actin networks and bundles. Here we introduce a stochastic model for myosin II minifilaments as two small myosin II motor ensembles engaging in a stochastic tug-of-war. Each of the two ensembles is described by the parallel cluster model that allows us to use exact stochastic simulations and at the same time to keep important molecular details of the myosin II cross-bridge cycle. Our simulation and analytical results reveal a strong dependence of myosin II minifilament dynamics on environmental stiffness that is reminiscent of the cellular response to substrate stiffness. For small stiffness, minifilaments form transient crosslinks exerting short spikes of force with negligible mean. For large stiffness, minifilaments form near permanent crosslinks exerting a mean force which hardly depends on environmental elasticity. This functional switch arises because dissociation after the power stroke is suppressed by force (catch bonding) and because ensembles can no longer perform the power stroke at large forces. Symmetric myosin II minifilaments perform a random walk with an effective diffusion constant which decreases with increasing ensemble size, as demonstrated for rigid substrates with an analytical treatment.

  1. Genetic suppression of a phosphomimic myosin II identifies system-level factors that promote myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yixin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Surcel, Alexandra; Miller, Christopher; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2014-01-01

    How myosin II localizes to the cleavage furrow in Dictyostelium and metazoan cells remains largely unknown despite significant advances in understanding its regulation. We designed a genetic selection using cDNA library suppression of 3xAsp myosin II to identify factors involved in myosin cleavage furrow accumulation. The 3xAsp mutant is deficient in bipolar thick filament assembly, fails to accumulate at the cleavage furrow, cannot rescue myoII-null cytokinesis, and has impaired mechanosensitive accumulation. Eleven genes suppressed this dominant cytokinesis deficiency when 3xAsp was expressed in wild-type cells. 3xAsp myosin II's localization to the cleavage furrow was rescued by constructs encoding rcdBB, mmsdh, RMD1, actin, one novel protein, and a 14-3-3 hairpin. Further characterization showed that RMD1 is required for myosin II cleavage furrow accumulation, acting in parallel with mechanical stress. Analysis of several mutant strains revealed that different thresholds of myosin II activity are required for daughter cell symmetry than for furrow ingression dynamics. Finally, an engineered myosin II with a longer lever arm (2xELC), producing a highly mechanosensitive motor, could also partially suppress the intragenic 3xAsp. Overall, myosin II accumulation is the result of multiple parallel and partially redundant pathways that comprise a cellular contractility control system. PMID:25318674

  2. Dual role of myosin II during Drosophila imaginal disc metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Aldaz, Silvia; Escudero, Luis M; Freeman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein non-muscle myosin II is a major driver of the movements that sculpt three-dimensional organs from two-dimensional epithelia. The machinery of morphogenesis is well established but the logic of its control remains unclear in complex organs. Here we use live imaging and ex vivo culture to report a dual role of myosin II in regulating the development of the Drosophila wing. First, myosin II drives the contraction of a ring of cells that surround the squamous peripodial epithelium, providing the force to fold the whole disc through about 90°. Second, myosin II is needed to allow the squamous cells to expand and then retract at the end of eversion. The combination of genetics and live imaging allows us to describe and understand the tissue dynamics, and the logic of force generation needed to transform a relatively simple imaginal disc into a more complex and three-dimensional adult wing. PMID:23612302

  3. Chaperone-enhanced purification of unconventional myosin 15, a molecular motor specialized for stereocilia protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bird, Jonathan E; Takagi, Yasuharu; Billington, Neil; Strub, Marie-Paule; Sellers, James R; Friedman, Thomas B

    2014-08-26

    Unconventional myosin 15 is a molecular motor expressed in inner ear hair cells that transports protein cargos within developing mechanosensory stereocilia. Mutations of myosin 15 cause profound hearing loss in humans and mice; however, the properties of this motor and its regulation within the stereocilia organelle are unknown. To address these questions, we expressed a subfragment 1-like (S1) truncation of mouse myosin 15, comprising the predicted motor domain plus three light-chain binding sites. Following unsuccessful attempts to express functional myosin 15-S1 using the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9)-baculovirus system, we discovered that coexpression of the muscle-myosin-specific chaperone UNC45B, in addition to the chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) significantly increased the yield of functional protein. Surprisingly, myosin 15-S1 did not bind calmodulin with high affinity. Instead, the IQ domains bound essential and regulatory light chains that are normally associated with class II myosins. We show that myosin 15-S1 is a barbed-end-directed motor that moves actin filaments in a gliding assay (∼ 430 nm · s(-1) at 30 °C), using a power stroke of 7.9 nm. The maximum ATPase rate (k(cat) ∼ 6 s(-1)) was similar to the actin-detachment rate (k(det) = 6.2 s(-1)) determined in single molecule optical trapping experiments, indicating that myosin 15-S1 was rate limited by transit through strongly actin-bound states, similar to other processive myosin motors. Our data further indicate that in addition to folding muscle myosin, UNC45B facilitates maturation of an unconventional myosin. We speculate that chaperone coexpression may be a simple method to optimize the purification of other myosin motors from Sf9 insect cells. PMID:25114250

  4. Contribution of myosin II activity to cell spreading dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nisenholz, Noam; Paknikar, Aishwarya; Köster, Sarah; Zemel, Assaf

    2016-01-14

    Myosin II activity and actin polymerization at the leading edge of the cell are known to be essential sources of cellular stress. However, a quantitative account of their separate contributions is still lacking; so is the influence of the coupling between the two phenomena on cell spreading dynamics. We present a simple analytic elastic theory of cell spreading dynamics that quantitatively demonstrates how actin polymerization and myosin activity cooperate in the generation of cellular stress during spreading. Consistent with experiments, myosin activity is assumed to polarize in response to the stresses generated during spreading. The characteristic response time and the overall spreading time are predicted to determine different evolution profiles of cell spreading dynamics. These include, a (regular) monotonic increase of cell projected area with time, a non-monotonic (overshooting) profile with a maximum, and damped oscillatory modes. In addition, two populations of myosin II motors are distinguished based on their location in the lamella; those located above the major adhesion zone at the cell periphery are shown to facilitate spreading whereas those in deeper regions of the lamella are shown to oppose spreading. We demonstrate that the attenuation of myosin activity in the two regions may result in reciprocal effects on spreading. These findings provide important new insight into the function of myosin II motors in the course of spreading. PMID:26481613

  5. Regulation of Myosin II Dynamics by Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation of Its Light Chain in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II, an actin-based motor protein, plays an essential role in actin cytoskeleton organization and cellular motility. Although phosphorylation of its regulatory light chain (MRLC) is known to be involved in myosin II filament assembly and motor activity in vitro, it remains unclear exactly how MRLC phosphorylation regulates myosin II dynamics in vivo. We established clones of Madin Darby canine kidney II epithelial cells expressing MRLC-enhanced green fluorescent protein or its mutants. Time-lapse imaging revealed that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are required for proper dynamics of myosin II. Inhibitors affecting myosin phosphorylation and MRLC mutants indicated that monophosphorylation of MRLC is required and sufficient for maintenance of stress fibers. Diphosphorylated MRLC stabilized myosin II filaments and was distributed locally in regions of stress fibers where contraction occurs, suggesting that diphosphorylation is involved in the spatial regulation of myosin II assembly and contraction. We further found that myosin phosphatase or Zipper-interacting protein kinase localizes to stress fibers depending on the activity of myosin II ATPase. PMID:17151359

  6. Collective Dynamics of Elastically Coupled Myosin V Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hailong; Efremov, Artem K.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Krementsova, Elena B.; Driver, Jonathan W.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Diehl, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of the collective behaviors of different classes of processive motor proteins has become increasingly important to understand various intracellular trafficking and transport processes. This work examines the dynamics of structurally-defined motor complexes containing two myosin Va (myoVa) motors that are linked together via a molecular scaffold formed from a single duplex of DNA. Dynamic changes in the filament-bound configuration of these complexes due to motor binding, stepping, and detachment were monitored by tracking the positions of different color quantum dots that report the position of one head of each myoVa motor on actin. As in studies of multiple kinesins, the run lengths produced by two myosins are only slightly larger than those of single motor molecules. This suggests that internal strain within the complexes, due to asynchronous motor stepping and the resultant stretching of motor linkages, yields net negative cooperative behaviors. In contrast to multiple kinesins, multiple myosin complexes move with appreciably lower velocities than a single-myosin molecule. Although similar trends are predicted by a discrete state stochastic model of collective motor dynamics, these analyses also suggest that multiple myosin velocities and run lengths depend on both the compliance and the effective size of their cargo. Moreover, it is proposed that this unique collective behavior occurs because the large step size and relatively small stalling force of myoVa leads to a high sensitivity of motor stepping rates to strain. PMID:22718762

  7. Force generation by kinesin and myosin cytoskeletal motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Kull, F Jon; Endow, Sharyn A

    2013-01-01

    Kinesins and myosins hydrolyze ATP, producing force that drives spindle assembly, vesicle transport and muscle contraction. How do motors do this? Here we discuss mechanisms of motor force transduction, based on their mechanochemical cycles and conformational changes observed in crystal structures. Distortion or twisting of the central β-sheet - proposed to trigger actin-induced Pi and ADP release by myosin, and microtubule-induced ADP release by kinesins - is shown in a movie depicting the transition between myosin ATP-like and nucleotide-free states. Structural changes in the switch I region form a tube that governs ATP hydrolysis and Pi release by the motors, explaining the essential role of switch I in hydrolysis. Comparison of the motor power strokes reveals that each stroke begins with the force-amplifying structure oriented opposite to the direction of rotation or swing. Motors undergo changes in their mechanochemical cycles in response to small-molecule inhibitors, several of which bind to kinesins by induced fit, trapping the motors in a state that resembles a force-producing conformation. An unusual motor activator specifically increases mechanical output by cardiac myosin, potentially providing valuable information about its mechanism of function. Further study is essential to understand motor mechanochemical coupling and energy transduction, and could lead to new therapies to treat human disease. PMID:23487037

  8. Force generation by kinesin and myosin cytoskeletal motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kull, F. Jon; Endow, Sharyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Kinesins and myosins hydrolyze ATP, producing force that drives spindle assembly, vesicle transport and muscle contraction. How do motors do this? Here we discuss mechanisms of motor force transduction, based on their mechanochemical cycles and conformational changes observed in crystal structures. Distortion or twisting of the central β-sheet – proposed to trigger actin-induced Pi and ADP release by myosin, and microtubule-induced ADP release by kinesins – is shown in a movie depicting the transition between myosin ATP-like and nucleotide-free states. Structural changes in the switch I region form a tube that governs ATP hydrolysis and Pi release by the motors, explaining the essential role of switch I in hydrolysis. Comparison of the motor power strokes reveals that each stroke begins with the force-amplifying structure oriented opposite to the direction of rotation or swing. Motors undergo changes in their mechanochemical cycles in response to small-molecule inhibitors, several of which bind to kinesins by induced fit, trapping the motors in a state that resembles a force-producing conformation. An unusual motor activator specifically increases mechanical output by cardiac myosin, potentially providing valuable information about its mechanism of function. Further study is essential to understand motor mechanochemical coupling and energy transduction, and could lead to new therapies to treat human disease. PMID:23487037

  9. Isoforms Confer Characteristic Force Generation and Mechanosensation by Myosin II Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Samantha; Alberts, Jon; Gardel, Margaret L.; Munro, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Myosin II isoforms with varying mechanochemistry and filament size interact with filamentous actin (F-actin) arrays to generate contractile forces in muscle and nonmuscle cells. How myosin II force production is shaped by isoform-specific motor properties and environmental stiffness remains poorly understood. Here, we used computer simulations to analyze force production by an ensemble of myosin motors against an elastically tethered actin filament. We found that force output depends on two timescales: the duration of F-actin attachment, which varies sharply with the ensemble size, motor duty ratio, and external load; and the time to build force, which scales with the ensemble stall force, gliding speed, and environmental stiffness. Although force-dependent kinetics were not required to sense changes in stiffness, the myosin catch bond produced positive feedback between the attachment time and force to trigger switch-like transitions from transient attachments, generating small forces, to high-force-generating runs. Using parameters representative of skeletal muscle myosin, nonmuscle myosin IIB, and nonmuscle myosin IIA revealed three distinct regimes of behavior, respectively: 1) large assemblies of fast, low-duty ratio motors rapidly build stable forces over a large range of environmental stiffness; 2) ensembles of slow, high-duty ratio motors serve as high-affinity cross-links with force buildup times that exceed physiological timescales; and 3) small assemblies of low-duty ratio motors operating at intermediate speeds are poised to respond sharply to changes in mechanical context—at low force or stiffness, they serve as low-affinity cross-links, but they can transition to force production via the positive-feedback mechanism described above. Together, these results reveal how myosin isoform properties may be tuned to produce force and respond to mechanical cues in their environment. PMID:25902439

  10. Insights into the Chemomechanical Coupling of the Myosin Motor from Simulation of Its ATP Hydrolysis Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzl, S.M.; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2006-03-01

    The molecular motor myosin converts chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work, thus driving a variety of essential motility processes. Although myosin function has been studied extensively, the catalytic mechanism of ATP hydrolysis and its chemomechanical coupling to the motor cycle are not completely understood. Here, the catalysis mechanism in myosin II is examined using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical reaction path calculations. The resulting reaction pathways, found in the catalytically competent closed/closed conformation of the Switch-1/Switch-2 loops of myosin, are all associative with a pentavalent bipyramidal oxyphosphorane transition state but can vary in the activation mechanism of the attacking water molecule and in the way the hydrogens are transferred between the heavy atoms. The coordination bond between the Mg2+ metal cofactor and Ser237 in the Switch-1 loop is broken in the product state, thereby facilitating the opening of the Switch-1 loop after hydrolysis is completed, which is required for subsequent strong rebinding to actin. This reveals a key element of the chemomechanical coupling that underlies the motor cycle, namely, the modulation of actin unbinding or binding in response to the ATP or ADP{circle_dot}Pi state of nucleotide-bound myosin.

  11. Arabidopsis myosin XI: a motor rules the tracks.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chao; Henty-Ridilla, Jessica L; Szymanski, Daniel B; Staiger, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Plant cell expansion relies on intracellular trafficking of vesicles and macromolecules, which requires myosin motors and a dynamic actin network. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myosin XI powers the motility of diverse cellular organelles, including endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, endomembrane vesicles, peroxisomes, and mitochondria. Several recent studies show that there are changes in actin organization and dynamics in myosin xi mutants, indicating that motors influence the molecular tracks they use for transport. However, the mechanism by which actin organization and dynamics are regulated by myosin XI awaits further detailed investigation. Here, using high spatiotemporal imaging of living cells, we quantitatively assessed the architecture and dynamic behavior of cortical actin arrays in a mutant with three Myosin XI (XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K) genes knocked out (xi3KO). In addition to apparent reduction of organ and cell size, the mutant showed less dense and more bundled actin filament arrays in epidermal cells. Furthermore, the overall actin dynamicity was significantly inhibited in the xi3KO mutant. Because cytoskeletal remodeling is contributed mainly by filament assembly/disassembly and translocation/buckling, we also examined the dynamic behavior of individual actin filaments. We found that the xi3KO mutant had significantly decreased actin turnover, with a 2-fold reduction in filament severing frequency. Moreover, quantitative analysis of filament shape change over time revealed that myosin XI generates the force for buckling and straightening of both single actin filaments and actin bundles. Thus, our data provide genetic evidence that three Arabidopsis class XI myosins contribute to actin remodeling by stimulating turnover and generating the force for filament shape change. PMID:25237128

  12. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications. PMID:27401928

  13. Dynamics of myosin II organization into contractile networks and fibers at the medial cell cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wei

    The cellular morphology of adhered cells depends crucially on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked stress fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and mini-filament assembly of non-muscle myosin II is an important component of cell-level cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. To monitor the dynamics of non-muscle myosin II, we used confocal microscopy to image cultured HeLa cells that stably express myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). MRLC-GFP was monitored in time-lapse movies at steady state and during the response of cells to varying concentrations of blebbistatin (which disrupts actomyosin stress fibers). Using image correlation spectroscopy analysis, we quantified the kinetics of disassembly and reassembly of actomyosin networks and compared to studies by other groups. This analysis suggested the following processes: myosin minifilament assembly and disassembly; aligning and contraction; myosin filament stabilization upon increasing contractile tension. Numerical simulations that include those processes capture some of the main features observed in the experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness. We discuss methods to monitor myosin reorganization using non-linear imaging methods.

  14. Dynamics of myosin II organization into cortical contractile networks and fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wei; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, Daniel; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    The morphology of adhered cells critically depends on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked stress fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and mini-filament assembly of non-muscle myosin II is an important component of cell-level cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. To monitor the dynamics of myosin II, we used confocal microscopy to image cultured HeLa cells that stably express myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). MRLC-GFP was monitored in time-lapse movies at steady state and during the response of cells to varying concentrations of blebbistatin which disrupts actomyosin stress fibers. Using image correlation spectroscopy analysis, we quantified the kinetics of disassembly and reassembly of actomyosin networks and compared them to studies by other groups. This analysis suggested that the following processes contribute to the assembly of cortical actomyosin into fibers: random myosin mini-filament assembly and disassembly along the cortex; myosin mini-filament aligning and contraction; stabilization of cortical myosin upon increasing contractile tension. We developed simple numerical simulations that include those processes. The results of simulations of cells at steady state and in response to blebbistatin capture some of the main features observed in the experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness.

  15. Myosin VI is a processive motor with a large step size

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Ronald S.; Rice, Sarah E.; Wells, Amber L.; Purcell, Thomas J.; Spudich, James A.; Sweeney, H. Lee

    2001-01-01

    Myosin VI is a molecular motor involved in intracellular vesicle and organelle transport. To carry out its cellular functions myosin VI moves toward the pointed end of actin, backward in relation to all other characterized myosins. Myosin V, a motor that moves toward the barbed end of actin, is processive, undergoing multiple catalytic cycles and mechanical advances before it releases from actin. Here we show that myosin VI is also processive by using single molecule motility and optical trapping experiments. Remarkably, myosin VI takes much larger steps than expected, based on a simple lever-arm mechanism, for a myosin with only one light chain in the lever-arm domain. Unlike other characterized myosins, myosin VI stepping is highly irregular with a broad distribution of step sizes. PMID:11707568

  16. Temperature dependence of myosin-II tail fragment assembly.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Peggy M; Hostetter, Daniel R; Rice, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    Dictyostelium myosin-II bipolar thick filament (BTF) assembly is heavily dependent on ionic strength and temperature and is reversible by the phosphorylation of just three threonines. Truncated tail fragments of Dictyostelium myosin-II are commonly used as models for BTF assembly, as they self-assemble into regular paracrystals that recapitulate the ionic strength and phosphorylation dependence of full-length Dictyostelium myosin-II BTF assembly. Here we show that Dictyostelium myosin-II tail fragment assembly is highly temperature dependent, similar to full-length Dictyostelium myosin-II. Assembly of paracrystals was far more robust at 4 degrees C than at higher temperatures. Pre-assembled paracrystals disassembled completely when shifted to 37 degrees C, indicating that assembly does not greatly improve the thermostability of these tail fragments. The melting temperatures of individual Dictyostelium myosin-II tail coiled-coils under both low and high ionic strength conditions that prohibit paracrystal assembly are extremely low, 21 degrees C and 28 degrees C, respectively. These data are consistent with reversible thermal denaturation of the coiled-coil as the most likely explanation for assembly incompetence under either very low ionic strength or high temperature conditions. Assembled paracrystals of a structurally similar fragment of nonmuscle myosin-IIA were far more thermodynamically stable than their Dictyostelium counterparts at the temperatures examined here. PMID:18784979

  17. Atg1-mediated myosin II activation regulates autophagosome formation during starvation-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hong-Wen; Wang, Yu-Bao; Wang, Shiu-Lan; Wu, Mei-Hsuan; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chen, Guang-Chao

    2011-02-16

    Autophagy is a membrane-mediated degradation process of macromolecule recycling. Although the formation of double-membrane degradation vesicles (autophagosomes) is known to have a central role in autophagy, the mechanism underlying this process remains elusive. The serine/threonine kinase Atg1 has a key role in the induction of autophagy. In this study, we show that overexpression of Drosophila Atg1 promotes the phosphorylation-dependent activation of the actin-associated motor protein myosin II. A novel myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)-like protein, Spaghetti-squash activator (Sqa), was identified as a link between Atg1 and actomyosin activation. Sqa interacts with Atg1 through its kinase domain and is a substrate of Atg1. Significantly, myosin II inhibition or depletion of Sqa compromised the formation of autophagosomes under starvation conditions. In mammalian cells, we found that the Sqa mammalian homologue zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) and myosin II had a critical role in the regulation of starvation-induced autophagy and mammalian Atg9 (mAtg9) trafficking when cells were deprived of nutrients. Our findings provide evidence of a link between Atg1 and the control of Atg9-mediated autophagosome formation through the myosin II motor protein. PMID:21169990

  18. Melanophilin Stimulates Myosin-5a Motor Function by Allosterically Inhibiting the Interaction between the Head and Tail of Myosin-5a

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lin-Lin; Cao, Qing-Juan; Zhang, Hai-Man; Zhang, Jie; Cao, Yang; Li, Xiang-dong

    2015-01-01

    The tail-inhibition model is generally accepted for the regulation of myosin-5a motor function. Inhibited myosin-5a is in a folded conformation in which its globular tail domain (GTD) interacts with its head and inhibits its motor function, and high Ca2+ or cargo binding may reduce the interaction between the GTD and the head of myosin-5a, thus activating motor activity. Although it is well established that myosin-5a motor function is regulated by Ca2+, little is known about the effects of cargo binding. We previously reported that melanophilin (Mlph), a myosin-5a cargo-binding protein, is capable of activating myosin-5a motor function. Here, we report that Mlph-GTBDP, a 26 amino-acid-long peptide of Mlph, is sufficient for activating myosin-5a motor function. We demonstrate that Mlph-GTBDP abolishes the interaction between the head and GTD of myosin-5a, thereby inducing a folded-to-extended conformation transition for myosin-5a and activating its motor function. Mutagenesis of the GTD shows that the GTD uses two distinct, non-overlapping regions to interact with Mlph-GTBDP and the head of myosin-5a. We propose that the GTD is an allosteric protein and that Mlph allosterically inhibits the interaction between the GTD and head of myosin-5a, thereby activating myosin-5a motor function. PMID:26039755

  19. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2006-12-01

    Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by {approx}60 degrees. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin's ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a see-saw motion of the relay helix, followed by a piston/seesaw motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery stroke by using Principal Component Analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions.

  20. Microfluidic Investigation Reveals Distinct Roles for Actin Cytoskeleton and Myosin II Activity in Capillary Leukocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Sylvain; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre; Théodoly, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Circulating leukocyte sequestration in pulmonary capillaries is arguably the initiating event of lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome. We present a microfluidic investigation of the roles of actin organization and myosin II activity during the different stages of leukocyte trafficking through narrow capillaries (entry, transit and shape relaxation) using specific drugs (latrunculin A, jasplakinolide, and blebbistatin). The deformation rate during entry reveals that cell stiffness depends strongly on F-actin organization and hardly on myosin II activity, supporting a microfilament role in leukocyte sequestration. In the transit stage, cell friction is influenced by stiffness, demonstrating that the actin network is not completely broken after a forced entry into a capillary. Conversely, membrane unfolding was independent of leukocyte stiffness. The surface area of sequestered leukocytes increased by up to 160% in the absence of myosin II activity, showing the major role of molecular motors in microvilli wrinkling and zipping. Finally, cell shape relaxation was largely independent of both actin organization and myosin II activity, whereas a deformed state was required for normal trafficking through capillary segments. PMID:19450501

  1. Myosin-II sets the optimal response time scale of chemotactic amoeba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Westendorf, Christian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    The response dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton to external chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in numerous cellular functions. One of the key players that governs the dynamics of the actin network is the motor protein myosin-II. Here we investigate the role of myosin-II in the response of the actin system to external stimuli. We used a microfluidic device in combination with a photoactivatable chemoattractant to apply stimuli to individual cells with high temporal resolution. We directly compare the actin dynamics in Dictyostelium discodelium wild type (WT) cells to a knockout mutant that is deficient in myosin-II (MNL). Similar to the WT a small population of MNL cells showed self-sustained oscillations even in absence of external stimuli. The actin response of MNL cells to a short pulse of chemoattractant resembles WT during the first 15 sec but is significantly delayed afterward. The amplitude of the dominant peak in the power spectrum from the response time series of MNL cells to periodic stimuli with varying period showed a clear resonance peak at a forcing period of 36 sec, which is significantly delayed as compared to the resonance at 20 sec found for the WT. This shift indicates an important role of myosin-II in setting the response time scale of motile amoeba. Institute of Physics und Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.

  2. The myosin X motor is optimized for movement on actin bundles.

    PubMed

    Ropars, Virginie; Yang, Zhaohui; Isabet, Tatiana; Blanc, Florian; Zhou, Kaifeng; Lin, Tianming; Liu, Xiaoyan; Hissier, Pascale; Samazan, Frédéric; Amigues, Béatrice; Yang, Eric D; Park, Hyokeun; Pylypenko, Olena; Cecchini, Marco; Sindelar, Charles V; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Myosin X has features not found in other myosins. Its structure must underlie its unique ability to generate filopodia, which are essential for neuritogenesis, wound healing, cancer metastasis and some pathogenic infections. By determining high-resolution structures of key components of this motor, and characterizing the in vitro behaviour of the native dimer, we identify the features that explain the myosin X dimer behaviour. Single-molecule studies demonstrate that a native myosin X dimer moves on actin bundles with higher velocities and takes larger steps than on single actin filaments. The largest steps on actin bundles are larger than previously reported for artificially dimerized myosin X constructs or any other myosin. Our model and kinetic data explain why these large steps and high velocities can only occur on bundled filaments. Thus, myosin X functions as an antiparallel dimer in cells with a unique geometry optimized for movement on actin bundles. PMID:27580874

  3. Mammalian SEPT2 is required for scaffolding nonmuscle myosin II and its kinases.

    PubMed

    Joo, Emily; Surka, Mark C; Trimble, William S

    2007-11-01

    Mammalian septin SEPT2 belongs to a conserved family of filamentous GTPases that are associated with actin stress fibers in interphase cells and the contractile ring in dividing cells. Although SEPT2 is essential for cytokinesis, its role in this process remains undefined. Here, we report that SEPT2 directly binds nonmuscle myosin II (myosin II), and this association is important for fully activating myosin II in interphase and dividing cells. Inhibition of the SEPT2-myosin II interaction in interphase cells results in loss of stress fibers, while in dividing cells this causes instability of the ingressed cleavage furrow and dissociation of the myosin II from the Rho-activated myosin kinases ROCK and citron kinase. We propose that SEPT2-containing filaments provide a molecular platform for myosin II and its kinases to ensure the full activation of myosin II that is necessary for the final stages of cytokinesis. PMID:17981136

  4. Non-Muscle Myosin II Regulation of Lung Epithelial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Plosa, Erin J.; Gooding, Kimberly A.; Zent, Roy; Prince, Lawrence S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The regulation of epithelial cell shape and orientation during lung branching morphogenesis is not clearly understood. Non-muscle myosins regulate cell size, morphology, and planar cell polarity. Here we test the hypothesis that non-muscle myosin II (NM II) regulates lung epithelial morphology in a spatially restricted manner. Results Epithelial cell orientation at airway tips in fetal mouse lungs underwent a significant transformation at E17. Treatment of E15 lung explants with the NM II inhibitor blebbistatin increased airway branching, epithelial cell size, and the degree of anisotropy in epithelial cells lining the airway stalks. In cultured MLE-12 lung epithelial cells, blebbistatin increased cell velocity, but left the migratory response to FGF-10 unchanged. Conclusions In the developing lung, NM II acts to constrain cell morphology and orientation, but may be suppressed at sites of branching and cell migration. The regulation of epithelial orientation may therefore undergo dynamic variations from E15 to E17. PMID:22972683

  5. Mechanical coordination in motor ensembles revealed using engineered artificial myosin filaments.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, R F; Sommese, R F; Adhikari, A S; Taylor, R E; Sutton, S; Spudich, J A; Sivaramakrishnan, S

    2015-08-01

    The sarcomere of muscle is composed of tens of thousands of myosin motors that self-assemble into thick filaments and interact with surrounding actin-based thin filaments in a dense, near-crystalline hexagonal lattice. Together, these actin-myosin interactions enable large-scale movement and force generation, two primary attributes of muscle. Research on isolated fibres has provided considerable insight into the collective properties of muscle, but how actin-myosin interactions are coordinated in an ensemble remains poorly understood. Here, we show that artificial myosin filaments, engineered using a DNA nanotube scaffold, provide precise control over motor number, type and spacing. Using both dimeric myosin V- and myosin VI-labelled nanotubes, we find that neither myosin density nor spacing has a significant effect on the gliding speed of actin filaments. This observation supports a simple model of myosin ensembles as energy reservoirs that buffer individual stochastic events to bring about smooth, continuous motion. Furthermore, gliding speed increases with cross-bridge compliance, but is limited by Brownian effects. As a first step to reconstituting muscle motility, we demonstrate human β-cardiac myosin-driven gliding of actin filaments on DNA nanotubes. PMID:26149240

  6. Mechanical coordination in motor ensembles revealed using engineered artificial myosin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, R. F.; Sommese, R. F.; Adhikari, A. S.; Taylor, R. E.; Sutton, S.; Spudich, J. A.; Sivaramakrishnan, S.

    2015-08-01

    The sarcomere of muscle is composed of tens of thousands of myosin motors that self-assemble into thick filaments and interact with surrounding actin-based thin filaments in a dense, near-crystalline hexagonal lattice. Together, these actin-myosin interactions enable large-scale movement and force generation, two primary attributes of muscle. Research on isolated fibres has provided considerable insight into the collective properties of muscle, but how actin-myosin interactions are coordinated in an ensemble remains poorly understood. Here, we show that artificial myosin filaments, engineered using a DNA nanotube scaffold, provide precise control over motor number, type and spacing. Using both dimeric myosin V- and myosin VI-labelled nanotubes, we find that neither myosin density nor spacing has a significant effect on the gliding speed of actin filaments. This observation supports a simple model of myosin ensembles as energy reservoirs that buffer individual stochastic events to bring about smooth, continuous motion. Furthermore, gliding speed increases with cross-bridge compliance, but is limited by Brownian effects. As a first step to reconstituting muscle motility, we demonstrate human β-cardiac myosin-driven gliding of actin filaments on DNA nanotubes.

  7. Harmonic force spectroscopy reveals a force-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian; Mortensen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James

    2014-03-01

    A muscle contracts rapidly under low load, but slowly under high load. Its molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, however. During contraction, myosins in thick filaments interact with actin in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound (force producing) state and a weakly bound (relaxed) state. Huxley et al. have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by a load. We use a new method we call ``harmonic force spectroscopy'' to extract a load-velocity curve from a single human beta cardiac myosin II motor. With a dual-beam optical trap, we hold an actin dumbbell over a myosin molecule anchored to the microscope stage that oscillates sinusoidally. Upon binding, the motor experiences an oscillatory load with a mean that is directed forward or backward, depending on binding location We find that the bound time at saturating [ATP] is exponentially correlated with the mean load, which is explained by Arrhenius transition theory. With a stroke size measurement, we obtained a load-velocity curve from a single myosin. We compare the curves for wild-type motors with mutants that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, to understand the effects on the contractile cycle

  8. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2007-03-01

    Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by 60{sup o}. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a seesaw motion of the relay helix, followed by a piston-like motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery-stroke by using principal component analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large-amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions. Moreover, the results demonstrate that the seesaw motion of the relay helix dominates in the dynamics of the pre-recovery stroke structure, but not in the dynamics of the post-recovery stroke structure, and vice versa for the piston motion of the SH1 helix. This is consistent with the order of the proposed two-phase model for the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke. Molecular movies of these principal motions are available at http://www.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/groups/biocomp/fischer.

  9. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel molecular motor, Leishmania myosin-XXI.

    PubMed

    Batters, Christopher; Woodall, Katy A; Toseland, Christopher P; Hundschell, Christian; Veigel, Claudia

    2012-08-10

    The genome of the Leishmania parasite contains two classes of myosin. Myosin-XXI, seemingly the only myosin isoform expressed in the protozoan parasite, has been detected in both the promastigote and amastigote stages of the Leishmania life cycle. It has been suggested to perform a variety of functions, including roles in membrane anchorage, but also long-range directed movements of cargo. However, nothing is known about the biochemical or mechanical properties of this motor. Here we designed and expressed various myosin-XXI constructs using a baculovirus expression system. Both full-length (amino acids 1-1051) and minimal motor domain constructs (amino acids 1-800) featured actin-activated ATPase activity. Myosin-XXI was soluble when expressed either with or without calmodulin. In the presence of calcium (pCa 4.1) the full-length motor could bind a single calmodulin at its neck domain (probably amino acids 809-823). Calmodulin binding was required for motility but not for ATPase activity. Once bound, calmodulin remained stably attached independent of calcium concentration (pCa 3-7). In gliding filament assays, myosin-XXI moved actin filaments at ∼15 nm/s, insensitive to both salt (25-1000 mm KCl) and calcium concentrations (pCa 3-7). Calmodulin binding to the neck domain might be involved in regulating the motility of the myosin-XXI motor for its various cellular functions in the different stages of the Leishmania parasite life cycle. PMID:22718767

  10. Strain Mediated Adaptation Is Key for Myosin Mechanochemistry: Discovering General Rules for Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Biman; Onuchic, José N.

    2016-01-01

    A structure-based model of myosin motor is built in the same spirit of our early work for kinesin-1 and Ncd towards physical understanding of its mechanochemical cycle. We find a structural adaptation of the motor head domain in post-powerstroke state that signals faster ADP release from it compared to the same from the motor head in the pre-powerstroke state. For dimeric myosin, an additional forward strain on the trailing head, originating from the postponed powerstroke state of the leading head in the waiting state of myosin, further increases the rate of ADP release. This coordination between the two heads is the essence of the processivity of the cycle. Our model provides a structural description of the powerstroke step of the cycle as an allosteric transition of the converter domain in response to the Pi release. Additionally, the variation in structural elements peripheral to catalytic motor domain is the deciding factor behind diverse directionalities of myosin motors (myosin V & VI). Finally, we observe that there are general rules for functional molecular motors across the different families. Allosteric structural adaptation of the catalytic motor head in different nucleotide states is crucial for mechanochemistry. Strain-mediated coordination between motor heads is essential for processivity and the variation of peripheral structural elements is essential for their diverse functionalities. PMID:27494025

  11. Strain Mediated Adaptation Is Key for Myosin Mechanochemistry: Discovering General Rules for Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Jana, Biman; Onuchic, José N

    2016-08-01

    A structure-based model of myosin motor is built in the same spirit of our early work for kinesin-1 and Ncd towards physical understanding of its mechanochemical cycle. We find a structural adaptation of the motor head domain in post-powerstroke state that signals faster ADP release from it compared to the same from the motor head in the pre-powerstroke state. For dimeric myosin, an additional forward strain on the trailing head, originating from the postponed powerstroke state of the leading head in the waiting state of myosin, further increases the rate of ADP release. This coordination between the two heads is the essence of the processivity of the cycle. Our model provides a structural description of the powerstroke step of the cycle as an allosteric transition of the converter domain in response to the Pi release. Additionally, the variation in structural elements peripheral to catalytic motor domain is the deciding factor behind diverse directionalities of myosin motors (myosin V & VI). Finally, we observe that there are general rules for functional molecular motors across the different families. Allosteric structural adaptation of the catalytic motor head in different nucleotide states is crucial for mechanochemistry. Strain-mediated coordination between motor heads is essential for processivity and the variation of peripheral structural elements is essential for their diverse functionalities. PMID:27494025

  12. Motor coupling through lipid membranes enhances transport velocities for ensembles of myosin Va

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shane R.; Trybus, Kathleen M.; Warshaw, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Myosin Va is an actin-based molecular motor responsible for transport and positioning of a wide array of intracellular cargoes. Although myosin Va motors have been well characterized at the single-molecule level, physiological transport is carried out by ensembles of motors. Studies that explore the behavior of ensembles of molecular motors have used nonphysiological cargoes such as DNA linkers or glass beads, which do not reproduce one key aspect of vesicular systems—the fluid intermotor coupling of biological lipid membranes. Using a system of defined synthetic lipid vesicles (100- to 650-nm diameter) composed of either 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) (fluid at room temperature) or 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) (gel at room temperature) with a range of surface densities of myosin Va motors (32–125 motors per μm2), we demonstrate that the velocity of vesicle transport by ensembles of myosin Va is sensitive to properties of the cargo. Gel-state DPPC vesicles bound with multiple motors travel at velocities equal to or less than vesicles with a single myosin Va (∼450 nm/s), whereas surprisingly, ensembles of myosin Va are able to transport fluid-state DOPC vesicles at velocities significantly faster (>700 nm/s) than a single motor. To explain these data, we developed a Monte Carlo simulation that suggests that these reductions in velocity can be attributed to two distinct mechanisms of intermotor interference (i.e., load-dependent modulation of stepping kinetics and binding-site exclusion), whereas faster transport velocities are consistent with a model wherein the normal stepping behavior of the myosin is supplemented by the preferential detachment of the trailing motor from the actin track. PMID:25201964

  13. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Progress report, [July 1, 1992--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    We have evidence for at least nine myosin-like genes in Arbidopsis, six of which have been cloned by a PCR-based method from genomic DNA, two have been isolated by genomic DNA cloning, and four have been identified by cDNA cloning. Most of our attention has been focused on the four myosin genes for which we have cDNA clones, and these cDNAs have now been sequenced to completion. Each of these myosins is similar in overall structure, with each containing the characteristic myosin head (motor) domain, which possesses ATP- and actin-binding motifs, a series of IQ repeats, which may be involved in calmodulin binding, a domain with a high probability of forming an alpha-helical coiled-coil secondary structure, which may allow the polypeptides to form dimers, and a variable tail domain, which may serve to define the specific cellular component that each myosin interacts with. One of these myosin genes, called MYA1, displays structural similarity to class of myosins that includes the yeast MYO2, mouse Dilute, and chicken p190 proteins, and this group of myosins is thought to play a role in intracellular trafficking of organelles. Because MYA1 is similar to this interesting class of myosins, we have chosen to conduct detailed studies of MYA1.

  14. Formation of contractile networks and fibers in the medial cell cortex through myosin-II turnover, contraction, and stress-stabilization.

    PubMed

    Nie, Wei; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, H Daniel; Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of adhered cells depends crucially on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and minifilament assembly of non-muscle myosin-II is an important component of cortical cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. We used experiments and computational modeling to study cortical myosin-II dynamics in adhered cells. Confocal microscopy was used to image the medial cell cortex of HeLa cells stably expressing myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). The distribution of MRLC-GFP fibers and focal adhesions was classified into three types of network morphologies. Time-lapse movies show: myosin foci appearance and disappearance; aligning and contraction; stabilization upon alignment. Addition of blebbistatin, which perturbs myosin motor activity, leads to a reorganization of the cortical networks and to a reduction of contractile motions. We quantified the kinetics of contraction, disassembly and reassembly of myosin networks using spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS). Coarse-grained numerical simulations include bipolar minifilaments that contract and align through specified interactions as basic elements. After assuming that minifilament turnover decreases with increasing contractile stress, the simulations reproduce stress-dependent fiber formation in between focal adhesions above a threshold myosin concentration. The STICS correlation function in simulations matches the function measured in experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness. PMID:25641802

  15. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of T. gondii Motility Induces the Posttranslational Modification of Myosin Light Chain-1 and Inhibits Myosin Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Heaslip, Aoife T.; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Carey, Kimberly L.; Catti, Federica; Warshaw, David M.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Ward, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that enters cells by a process of active penetration. Host cell penetration and parasite motility are driven by a myosin motor complex consisting of four known proteins: TgMyoA, an unconventional Class XIV myosin; TgMLC1, a myosin light chain; and two membrane-associated proteins, TgGAP45 and TgGAP50. Little is known about how the activity of the myosin motor complex is regulated. Here, we show that treatment of parasites with a recently identified small-molecule inhibitor of invasion and motility results in a rapid and irreversible change in the electrophoretic mobility of TgMLC1. While the precise nature of the TgMLC1 modification has not yet been established, it was mapped to the peptide Val46-Arg59. To determine if the TgMLC1 modification is responsible for the motility defect observed in parasites after compound treatment, the activity of myosin motor complexes from control and compound-treated parasites was compared in an in vitro motility assay. TgMyoA motor complexes containing the modified TgMLC1 showed significantly decreased motor activity compared to control complexes. This change in motor activity likely accounts for the motility defects seen in the parasites after compound treatment and provides the first evidence, in any species, that the mechanical activity of Class XIV myosins can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to their associated light chains. PMID:20084115

  16. Mouse Myosin-19 Is a Plus-end-directed, High-duty Ratio Molecular Motor*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zekuan; Ma, Xiao-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Man; Ji, Huan-Hong; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Jie; Luo, Dan; Sun, Yujie; Li, Xiang-dong

    2014-01-01

    Class XIX myosin (Myo19) is a vertebrate-specific unconventional myosin, responsible for the transport of mitochondria. To characterize biochemical properties of Myo19, we prepared recombinant mouse Myo19-truncated constructs containing the motor domain and the IQ motifs using the baculovirus/Sf9 expression system. We identified regulatory light chain (RLC) of smooth muscle/non-muscle myosin-2 as the light chain of Myo19. The actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding velocity of Myo19-truncated constructs were about one-third and one-sixth as those of myosin-5a, respectively. The apparent affinity of Myo19 to actin was about the same as that of myosin-5a. The RLCs bound to Myo19 could be phosphorylated by myosin light chain kinase, but this phosphorylation had little effect on the actin-activated ATPase activity and the actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Using dual fluorescence-labeled actin filaments, we determined that Myo19 is a plus-end-directed molecular motor. We found that, similar to that of the high-duty ratio myosin, such as myosin-5a, ADP release rate was comparable with the maximal actin-activated ATPase activity of Myo19, indicating that ADP release is a rate-limiting step for the ATPase cycle of acto-Myo19. ADP strongly inhibited the actin-activated ATPase activity and actin-gliding activity of Myo19-truncated constructs. Based on the above results, we concluded that Myo19 is a high-duty ratio molecular motor moving to the plus-end of the actin filament. PMID:24825904

  17. Coordinated recruitment of Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors to Rab11 vesicle membranes.

    PubMed

    Pylypenko, Olena; Welz, Tobias; Tittel, Janine; Kollmar, Martin; Chardon, Florian; Malherbe, Gilles; Weiss, Sabine; Michel, Carina Ida Luise; Samol-Wolf, Annette; Grasskamp, Andreas Till; Hume, Alistair; Goud, Bruno; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Titus, Margaret A; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas; Houdusse, Anne; Kerkhoff, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence for a coupling of actin assembly and myosin motor activity in cells. However, mechanisms for recruitment of actin nucleators and motors on specific membrane compartments remain unclear. Here we report how Spir actin nucleators and myosin V motors coordinate their specific membrane recruitment. The myosin V globular tail domain (MyoV-GTD) interacts directly with an evolutionarily conserved Spir sequence motif. We determined crystal structures of MyoVa-GTD bound either to the Spir-2 motif or to Rab11 and show that a Spir-2:MyoVa:Rab11 complex can form. The ternary complex architecture explains how Rab11 vesicles support coordinated F-actin nucleation and myosin force generation for vesicle transport and tethering. New insights are also provided into how myosin activation can be coupled with the generation of actin tracks. Since MyoV binds several Rab GTPases, synchronized nucleator and motor targeting could provide a common mechanism to control force generation and motility in different cellular processes. PMID:27623148

  18. Impacts of Usher Syndrome Type IB Mutations on Human Myosin VIIa Motor Function†

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a human hereditary disorder characterized by profound congenital deafness, retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction. Myosin VIIa has been identified as the responsible gene for USH type 1B, and a number of missense mutations have been identified in the affected families. However, the molecular basis of the dysfunction of USH gene, myosin VIIa, in the affected families is unknown to date. Here we clarified the effects of USH1B mutations on human myosin VIIa motor function for the first time. The missense mutations of USH1B significantly inhibited the actin activation of ATPase activity of myosin VIIa. G25R, R212C, A397D and E450Q mutations abolished the actin-activated ATPase activity completely. P503L mutation increased the basal ATPase activity for 2-3 fold, but reduced the actin-activated ATPase activity to 50% of the wild type. While all the mutations examined, except for R302H, reduced the affinity for actin and the ATP hydrolysis cycling rate, they did not largely decrease the rate of ADP release from acto-myosin, suggesting that the mutations reduce the duty ratio of myosin VIIa. Taken together, the results suggest that the mutations responsible for USH1B cause the complete loss of the actin-activated ATPase activity or the reduction of duty ratio of myosin VIIa. PMID:18700726

  19. New insight into role of myosin motors for activation of RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Sarshad, Aishe A; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2014-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, actin and myosin are emerging as essential regulators of nuclear function. At gene level, they regulate chromatin and modulate RNA polymerase transcription, and at the RNA level, they are involved in the metabolism of ribonucleoprotein complexes. Furthermore, actin and myosin are involved in maintaining the structure of cell nucleus by mediating chromatin movement and by interacting with components of the nuclear lamina. This plethora of functions is now supported by evidence that nuclear actin polymerizes just like the cytoplasmic actin fraction. Based on these considerations, we now hypothesize that the nuclear myosin forms function as actin-based motors. In this chapter, our goal is to start from the knowledge acquired in the cytoplasmic field to explore how nuclear myosin functions in gene transcription. One of the pressing issues discussed here is whether nuclear myosin produces local tension or functions as transporters. Based on two current models reported in the literature, we discuss the topology of the actin-based nuclear myosin 1 motor and how it is believed to facilitate propulsion of the RNA polymerase machinery while maintaining chromatin that is compatible with transcription. These mechanisms will be placed in the context of cell cycle progression. PMID:24952918

  20. Whole genome duplication events in plant evolution reconstructed and predicted using myosin motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The evolution of land plants is characterized by whole genome duplications (WGD), which drove species diversification and evolutionary novelties. Detecting these events is especially difficult if they date back to the origin of the plant kingdom. Established methods for reconstructing WGDs include intra- and inter-genome comparisons, KS age distribution analyses, and phylogenetic tree constructions. Results By analysing 67 completely sequenced plant genomes 775 myosins were identified and manually assembled. Phylogenetic trees of the myosin motor domains revealed orthologous and paralogous relationships and were consistent with recent species trees. Based on the myosin inventories and the phylogenetic trees, we have identified duplications of the entire myosin motor protein family at timings consistent with 23 WGDs, that had been reported before. We also predict 6 WGDs based on further protein family duplications. Notably, the myosin data support the two recently reported WGDs in the common ancestor of all extant angiosperms. We predict single WGDs in the Manihot esculenta and Nicotiana benthamiana lineages, two WGDs for Linum usitatissimum and Phoenix dactylifera, and a triplication or two WGDs for Gossypium raimondii. Our data show another myosin duplication in the ancestor of the angiosperms that could be either the result of a single gene duplication or a remnant of a WGD. Conclusions We have shown that the myosin inventories in angiosperms retain evidence of numerous WGDs that happened throughout plant evolution. In contrast to other protein families, many myosins are still present in extant species. They are closely related and have similar domain architectures, and their phylogenetic grouping follows the genome duplications. Because of its broad taxonomic sampling the dataset provides the basis for reliable future identification of further whole genome duplications. PMID:24053117

  1. Myosin II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M.; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2016-01-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large scale highly coordinated flows of over 100.000 cells in the epiblast. These large scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combined light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression as well as asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localisation and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active Myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of a class specific Myosin inhibitors and gene specific knockdowns show that apical contraction and intercalation are Myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for Myosin I and Myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional Myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  2. The Most Prevalent Freeman-Sheldon Syndrome Mutations in the Embryonic Myosin Motor Share Functional Defects*

    PubMed Central

    Walklate, Jonathan; Vera, Carlos; Bloemink, Marieke J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Leinwand, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    The embryonic myosin isoform is expressed during fetal development and rapidly down-regulated after birth. Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS) is a disease associated with missense mutations in the motor domain of this myosin. It is the most severe form of distal arthrogryposis, leading to overcontraction of the hands, feet, and orofacial muscles and other joints of the body. Availability of human embryonic muscle tissue has been a limiting factor in investigating the properties of this isoform and its mutations. Using a recombinant expression system, we have studied homogeneous samples of human motors for the WT and three of the most common FSS mutants: R672H, R672C, and T178I. Our data suggest that the WT embryonic myosin motor is similar in contractile speed to the slow type I/β cardiac based on the rate constant for ADP release and ADP affinity for actin-myosin. All three FSS mutations show dramatic changes in kinetic properties, most notably the slowing of the apparent ATP hydrolysis step (reduced 5–9-fold), leading to a longer lived detached state and a slowed Vmax of the ATPase (2–35-fold), indicating a slower cycling time. These mutations therefore seriously disrupt myosin function. PMID:26945064

  3. The Most Prevalent Freeman-Sheldon Syndrome Mutations in the Embryonic Myosin Motor Share Functional Defects.

    PubMed

    Walklate, Jonathan; Vera, Carlos; Bloemink, Marieke J; Geeves, Michael A; Leinwand, Leslie

    2016-05-01

    The embryonic myosin isoform is expressed during fetal development and rapidly down-regulated after birth. Freeman-Sheldon syndrome (FSS) is a disease associated with missense mutations in the motor domain of this myosin. It is the most severe form of distal arthrogryposis, leading to overcontraction of the hands, feet, and orofacial muscles and other joints of the body. Availability of human embryonic muscle tissue has been a limiting factor in investigating the properties of this isoform and its mutations. Using a recombinant expression system, we have studied homogeneous samples of human motors for the WT and three of the most common FSS mutants: R672H, R672C, and T178I. Our data suggest that the WT embryonic myosin motor is similar in contractile speed to the slow type I/β cardiac based on the rate constant for ADP release and ADP affinity for actin-myosin. All three FSS mutations show dramatic changes in kinetic properties, most notably the slowing of the apparent ATP hydrolysis step (reduced 5-9-fold), leading to a longer lived detached state and a slowed Vmax of the ATPase (2-35-fold), indicating a slower cycling time. These mutations therefore seriously disrupt myosin function. PMID:26945064

  4. An integrated in vitro and in situ study of kinetics of myosin II from frog skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Elangovan, R; Capitanio, M; Melli, L; Pavone, F S; Lombardi, V; Piazzesi, G

    2012-01-01

    A new efficient protocol for extraction and conservation of myosin II from frog skeletal muscle made it possible to preserve the myosin functionality for a week and apply single molecule techniques to the molecular motor that has been best characterized for its mechanical, structural and energetic parameters in situ. With the in vitro motility assay, we estimated the sliding velocity of actin on frog myosin II (VF) and its modulation by pH, myosin density, temperature (range 4–30°C) and substrate concentration. VF was 8.88 ± 0.26 μm s−1 at 30.6°C and decreased to 1.60 ± 0.09 μm s−1 at 4.5°C. The in vitro mechanical and kinetic parameters were integrated with the in situ parameters of frog muscle myosin working in arrays in each half-sarcomere. By comparing VF with the shortening velocities determined in intact frog muscle fibres under different loads and their dependence on temperature, we found that VF is 40–50% less than the fibre unloaded shortening velocity (V0) at the same temperature and we determined the load that explains the reduced value of VF. With this integrated approach we could define fundamental kinetic steps of the acto-myosin ATPase cycle in situ and their relation with mechanical steps. In particular we found that at 5°C the rate of ADP release calculated using the step size estimated from in situ experiments accounts for the rate of detachment of motors during steady shortening under low loads. PMID:22199170

  5. Modular activation of Rho1 by GPCR signalling imparts polarized myosin II activation during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Stephen; Munjal, Akankshi; Philippe, Jean-Marc; Jha, Ankita; de las Bayonas, Alain Garcia; Saurin, Andrew J; Lecuit, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Polarized cell shape changes during tissue morphogenesis arise by controlling the subcellular distribution of myosin II. For instance, during Drosophila melanogaster gastrulation, apical constriction and cell intercalation are mediated by medial-apical myosin II pulses that power deformations, and polarized accumulation of myosin II that stabilizes these deformations. It remains unclear how tissue-specific factors control different patterns of myosin II activation and the ratchet-like myosin II dynamics. Here we report the function of a common pathway comprising the heterotrimeric G proteins Gα12/13, Gβ13F and Gγ1 in activating and polarizing myosin II during Drosophila gastrulation. Gα12/13 and the Gβ13F/γ1 complex constitute distinct signalling modules, which regulate myosin II dynamics medial-apically and/or junctionally in a tissue-dependent manner. We identify a ubiquitously expressed GPCR called Smog required for cell intercalation and apical constriction. Smog functions with other GPCRs to quantitatively control G proteins, resulting in stepwise activation of myosin II and irreversible cell shape changes. We propose that GPCR and G proteins constitute a general pathway for controlling actomyosin contractility in epithelia and that the activity of this pathway is polarized by tissue-specific regulators. PMID:26780298

  6. The myofilament elasticity and its effect on kinetics of force generation by the myosin motor.

    PubMed

    Piazzesi, Gabriella; Dolfi, Mario; Brunello, Elisabetta; Fusi, Luca; Reconditi, Massimo; Bianco, Pasquale; Linari, Marco; Lombardi, Vincenzo

    2014-06-15

    The half-sarcomere is the functional unit of striated muscle, in which, according to a "linear" mechanical model, myosin motors are parallel force generators with an average strain s acting between the opposing myosin and actin filaments that behave as a series elastic element with compliance Cf. Thus the definition of the mechanism of force generation by myosin motors in muscle requires integration of the crystallographic model of the working stroke with the mechanical constraints provided by the organization of motors in the half-sarcomere. The relation between half-sarcomere compliance and force (Chs-T) during the development of isometric contraction deviates, at low forces, from that predicted by the linear model, indicating the presence of an elastic element in parallel with the myosin motors, which may influence the estimate of s. A working stroke model, kinetically constrained by the early phase of the isotonic velocity transient following a force step, predicts that the rate of quick force recovery following a length step is reduced to the observed value by a Cf of 12.6nm/MPa. With this value of Cf, the fit of Chs-T relation during the isometric force rise gives s=1.8-1.9nm, similar to the values estimated using the linear model. PMID:24631572

  7. Temperature effect on the chemomechanical regulation of substeps within the power stroke of a single Myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenling; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Myosin IIs in the skeletal muscle are highly efficient nanoscale machines evolved in nature. Understanding how they function can not only bring insights into various biological processes but also provide guidelines to engineer synthetic nanoscale motors working in the vicinity of thermal noise. Though it was clearly demonstrated that the behavior of a skeletal muscle fiber, or that of a single myosin was strongly affected by the temperature, how exactly the temperature affects the kinetics of a single myosin is not fully understood. By adapting the newly developed transitional state model, which successfully explained the intriguing motor force regulation during skeletal muscle contraction, here we systematically explain how exactly the power stroke of a single myosin proceeds, with the consideration of the chemomechanical regulation of sub-steps within the stroke. The adapted theory is then utilized to investigate the temperature effect on various aspects of the power stroke. Our analysis suggests that, though swing rates, the isometric force, and the maximal stroke size all strongly vary with the temperature, the temperature can have a very small effect on the releasable elastic energy within the power stroke. PMID:26786569

  8. Molecular genetics of myosin motors in Arabidopsis. Final report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.

    1997-02-01

    The normal growth and development of plant cells depends on the precise organization and distribution of the cellular contents. The basic goal of this investigation was to define a group of the molecules that are involved in organizing and transporting plant cell components. Based largely on studies of animal and fungal cells, one of the molecules thought to be involved in intracellular trafficking in plants is the actin-based motor protein myosin. Therefore, the major aim of this study was to isolate and analyze plant genes encoding myosin proteins. The plant of choice for these experiments was Arabidopsis thaliana, which offers numerous advantages for molecular genetics research.

  9. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. PMID:25637353

  10. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP3R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP3R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP3R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. PMID:25637353

  11. Thermodynamic evidence of non-muscle myosin II-lipid-membrane interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schewkunow, Vitali; Sharma, Karan P.; Diez, Gerold; Klemm, Anna H.; Sharma, Pal C.; Goldmann, Wolfgang H.

    2008-02-08

    A unique feature of protein networks in living cells is that they can generate their own force. Proteins such as non-muscle myosin II are an integral part of the cytoskeleton and have the capacity to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directional movement. Non-muscle myosin II can move actin filaments against each other, and depending on the orientation of the filaments and the way in which they are linked together, it can produce contraction, bending, extension, and stiffening. Our measurements with differential scanning calorimetry showed that non-muscle myosin II inserts into negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Using lipid vesicles made of DMPG/DMPC at a molar ratio of 1:1 at 10 mg/ml in the presence of different non-muscle myosin II concentrations showed a variation of the main phase transition of the lipid vesicle at around 23 deg. C. With increasing concentrations of non-muscle myosin II the thermotropic properties of the lipid vesicle changed, which is indicative of protein-lipid interaction/insertion. We hypothesize that myosin tail binds to acidic phospholipids through an electrostatic interaction using the basic side groups of positive residues; the flexible, amphipathic helix then may partially penetrate into the bilayer to form an anchor. Using the stopped-flow method, we determined the binding affinity of non-muscle myosin II when anchored to lipid vesicles with actin, which was similar to a pure actin-non-muscle myosin II system. Insertion of myosin tail into the hydrophobic region of lipid membranes, a model known as the lever arm mechanism, might explain how its interaction with actin generates cellular movement.

  12. Histone Deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Sadhana A.; Pillai, Vinodkumar B.; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R.; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Gupta, Mahesh P.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor, associate with cardiac sarcomeres and that a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to A-band of sarcomeres and capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of MHC isoforms. By in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin-sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36% compared with their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli independently of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms. PMID:25911107

  13. Histone Deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)-dependent Reversible Lysine Acetylation of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Modulates Their Enzymatic and Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sadhana A; Pillai, Vinodkumar B; Sundaresan, Nagalingam R; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Gupta, Mahesh P

    2015-06-19

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a widespread post-translational modification controlling the activity of proteins in different subcellular compartments. We previously demonstrated that a class II histone deacetylase (HDAC), HDAC4, and a histone acetyltransferase, p300/CREB-binding protein-associated factor, associate with cardiac sarcomeres and that a class I and II HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A, enhances contractile activity of myofilaments. In this study we show that a class I HDAC, HDAC3, is also present at cardiac sarcomeres. By immunohistochemical and electron microscopic analyses, we found that HDAC3 was localized to A-band of sarcomeres and capable of deacetylating myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. The motor domains of both cardiac α- and β-MHC isoforms were found to be reversibly acetylated. Biomechanical studies revealed that lysine acetylation significantly decreased the Km for the actin-activated ATPase activity of MHC isoforms. By in vitro motility assay, we found that lysine acetylation increased the actin-sliding velocity of α-myosin by 20% and β-myosin by 36% compared with their respective non-acetylated isoforms. Moreover, myosin acetylation was found to be sensitive to cardiac stress. During induction of hypertrophy, myosin isoform acetylation increased progressively with duration of stress stimuli independently of isoform shift, suggesting that lysine acetylation of myosin could be an early response of myofilaments to increase contractile performance of the heart. These studies provide the first evidence for localization of HDAC3 at myofilaments and uncover a novel mechanism modulating the motor activity of cardiac MHC isoforms. PMID:25911107

  14. Differential Contributions of Nonmuscle Myosin II Isoforms and Functional Domains to Stress Fiber Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    While is widely acknowledged that nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) enables stress fibers (SFs) to generate traction forces against the extracellular matrix, little is known about how specific NMMII isoforms and functional domains contribute to SF mechanics. Here we combine biophotonic and genetic approaches to address these open questions. First, we suppress the NMMII isoforms MIIA and MIIB and apply femtosecond laser nanosurgery to ablate and investigate the viscoelastic retraction of individual SFs. SF retraction dynamics associated with MIIA and MIIB suppression qualitatively phenocopy our earlier measurements in the setting of Rho kinase (ROCK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibition, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging and photobleaching recovery reveal that MIIA and MIIB are enriched in and more stably localize to ROCK- and MLCK-controlled central and peripheral SFs, respectively. Additional domain-mapping studies surprisingly reveal that deletion of the head domain speeds SF retraction, which we ascribe to reduced drag from actomyosin crosslinking and frictional losses. We propose a model in which ROCK/MIIA and MLCK/MIIB functionally regulate common pools of SFs, with MIIA crosslinking and motor functions jointly contributing to SF retraction dynamics and cellular traction forces. PMID:26336830

  15. Differential Contributions of Nonmuscle Myosin II Isoforms and Functional Domains to Stress Fiber Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    While is widely acknowledged that nonmuscle myosin II (NMMII) enables stress fibers (SFs) to generate traction forces against the extracellular matrix, little is known about how specific NMMII isoforms and functional domains contribute to SF mechanics. Here we combine biophotonic and genetic approaches to address these open questions. First, we suppress the NMMII isoforms MIIA and MIIB and apply femtosecond laser nanosurgery to ablate and investigate the viscoelastic retraction of individual SFs. SF retraction dynamics associated with MIIA and MIIB suppression qualitatively phenocopy our earlier measurements in the setting of Rho kinase (ROCK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibition, respectively. Furthermore, fluorescence imaging and photobleaching recovery reveal that MIIA and MIIB are enriched in and more stably localize to ROCK- and MLCK-controlled central and peripheral SFs, respectively. Additional domain-mapping studies surprisingly reveal that deletion of the head domain speeds SF retraction, which we ascribe to reduced drag from actomyosin crosslinking and frictional losses. We propose a model in which ROCK/MIIA and MLCK/MIIB functionally regulate common pools of SFs, with MIIA crosslinking and motor functions jointly contributing to SF retraction dynamics and cellular traction forces. PMID:26336830

  16. Pharmacological activation of myosin II paralogs to correct cell mechanics defects

    PubMed Central

    Surcel, Alexandra; Ng, Win Pin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ren, Yixin; Avery, Lindsay B.; Krenc, Agata K.; Meyers, David J.; Rock, Ronald S.; Anders, Robert A.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    Current approaches to cancer treatment focus on targeting signal transduction pathways. Here, we develop an alternative system for targeting cell mechanics for the discovery of novel therapeutics. We designed a live-cell, high-throughput chemical screen to identify mechanical modulators. We characterized 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), which enhances the cortical localization of the mechanoenzyme myosin II, independent of myosin heavy-chain phosphorylation, thus increasing cellular cortical tension. To shift cell mechanics, 4-HAP requires myosin II, including its full power stroke, specifically activating human myosin IIB (MYH10) and human myosin IIC (MYH14), but not human myosin IIA (MYH9). We further demonstrated that invasive pancreatic cancer cells are more deformable than normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, a mechanical profile that was partially corrected with 4-HAP, which also decreased the invasion and migration of these cancer cells. Overall, 4-HAP modifies nonmuscle myosin II-based cell mechanics across phylogeny and disease states and provides proof of concept that cell mechanics offer a rich drug target space, allowing for possible corrective modulation of tumor cell behavior. PMID:25605895

  17. Pharmacological activation of myosin II paralogs to correct cell mechanics defects.

    PubMed

    Surcel, Alexandra; Ng, Win Pin; West-Foyle, Hoku; Zhu, Qingfeng; Ren, Yixin; Avery, Lindsay B; Krenc, Agata K; Meyers, David J; Rock, Ronald S; Anders, Robert A; Freel Meyers, Caren L; Robinson, Douglas N

    2015-02-01

    Current approaches to cancer treatment focus on targeting signal transduction pathways. Here, we develop an alternative system for targeting cell mechanics for the discovery of novel therapeutics. We designed a live-cell, high-throughput chemical screen to identify mechanical modulators. We characterized 4-hydroxyacetophenone (4-HAP), which enhances the cortical localization of the mechanoenzyme myosin II, independent of myosin heavy-chain phosphorylation, thus increasing cellular cortical tension. To shift cell mechanics, 4-HAP requires myosin II, including its full power stroke, specifically activating human myosin IIB (MYH10) and human myosin IIC (MYH14), but not human myosin IIA (MYH9). We further demonstrated that invasive pancreatic cancer cells are more deformable than normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, a mechanical profile that was partially corrected with 4-HAP, which also decreased the invasion and migration of these cancer cells. Overall, 4-HAP modifies nonmuscle myosin II-based cell mechanics across phylogeny and disease states and provides proof of concept that cell mechanics offer a rich drug target space, allowing for possible corrective modulation of tumor cell behavior. PMID:25605895

  18. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII) is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa) and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb). Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa) has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa…) and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2) has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular expression of the

  19. Supervillin binding to myosin II and synergism with anillin are required for cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tara C.; Fridy, Peter C.; Li, Yinyin; Basil, Shruti; Arjun, Sneha; Friesen, Ryan M.; Leszyk, John; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Luna, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis, the process by which cytoplasm is apportioned between dividing daughter cells, requires coordination of myosin II function, membrane trafficking, and central spindle organization. Most known regulators act during late cytokinesis; a few, including the myosin II–binding proteins anillin and supervillin, act earlier. Anillin's role in scaffolding the membrane cortex with the central spindle is well established, but the mechanism of supervillin action is relatively uncharacterized. We show here that two regions within supervillin affect cell division: residues 831–1281, which bind central spindle proteins, and residues 1–170, which bind the myosin II heavy chain (MHC) and the long form of myosin light-chain kinase. MHC binding is required to rescue supervillin deficiency, and mutagenesis of this site creates a dominant-negative phenotype. Supervillin concentrates activated and total myosin II at the furrow, and simultaneous knockdown of supervillin and anillin additively increases cell division failure. Knockdown of either protein causes mislocalization of the other, and endogenous anillin increases upon supervillin knockdown. Proteomic identification of interaction partners recovered using a high-affinity green fluorescent protein nanobody suggests that supervillin and anillin regulate the myosin II and actin cortical cytoskeletons through separate pathways. We conclude that supervillin and anillin play complementary roles during vertebrate cytokinesis. PMID:24088567

  20. Does Interaction between the Motor and Regulatory Domains of the Myosin Head Occur during ATPase Cycle? Evidence from Thermal Unfolding Studies on Myosin Subfragment 1

    PubMed Central

    Logvinova, Daria S.; Markov, Denis I.; Nikolaeva, Olga P.; Sluchanko, Nikolai N.; Ushakov, Dmitry S.; Levitsky, Dmitrii I.

    2015-01-01

    Myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) consists of two major structural domains, the motor (or catalytic) domain and the regulatory domain. Functioning of the myosin head as a molecular motor is believed to involve a rotation of the regulatory domain (lever arm) relative to the motor domain during the ATPase cycle. According to predictions, this rotation can be accompanied by an interaction between the motor domain and the C-terminus of the essential light chain (ELC) associated with the regulatory domain. To check this assumption, we applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) combined with temperature dependences of fluorescence to study changes in thermal unfolding and the domain structure of S1, which occur upon formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx that mimic S1 ATPase intermediate states S1**-ADP-Pi and S1*-ATP, respectively. To identify the thermal transitions on the DSC profiles (i.e. to assign them to the structural domains of S1), we compared the DSC data with temperature-induced changes in fluorescence of either tryptophan residues, located only in the motor domain, or recombinant ELC mutants (light chain 1 isoform), which were first fluorescently labeled at different positions in their C-terminal half and then introduced into the S1 regulatory domain. We show that formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx significantly stabilizes not only the motor domain, but also the regulatory domain of the S1 molecule implying interdomain interaction via ELC. This is consistent with the previously proposed concepts and also adds some new interesting details to the molecular mechanism of the myosin ATPase cycle. PMID:26356744

  1. Myosin-II-Mediated Directional Migration of Dictyostelium Cells in Response to Cyclic Stretching of Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Okimura, Chika; Sato, Katsuya; Nakashima, Yuta; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Minami, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to various mechanical stimulations, such as shear flow, osmotic pressure, and hardness of substratum. They must sense the mechanical aspects of their environment and respond appropriately for proper cell function. Cells adhering to substrata must receive and respond to mechanical stimuli from the substrata to decide their shape and/or migrating direction. In response to cyclic stretching of the elastic substratum, intracellular stress fibers in fibroblasts and endothelial, osteosarcoma, and smooth muscle cells are rearranged perpendicular to the stretching direction, and the shape of those cells becomes extended in this new direction. In the case of migrating Dictyostelium cells, cyclic stretching regulates the direction of migration, and not the shape, of the cell. The cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to that of the stretching. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce the directional migration remain unknown. Here, using a microstretching device, we recorded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-myosin-II dynamics in Dictyostelium cells on an elastic substratum under cyclic stretching. Repeated stretching induced myosin II localization equally on both stretching sides in the cells. Although myosin-II-null cells migrated randomly, myosin-II-null cells expressing a variant of myosin II that cannot hydrolyze ATP migrated perpendicular to the stretching. These results indicate that Dictyostelium cells accumulate myosin II at the portion of the cell where a large strain is received and migrate in a direction other than that of the portion where myosin II accumulated. This polarity generation for migration does not require the contraction of actomyosin. PMID:23442953

  2. Three-dimensional Patterns and Redistribution of Myosin II and Actin in Mitotic Dictyostelium Cells

    PubMed Central

    Neujahr, Ralph; Heizer, Christina; Albrecht, Richard; Ecke, Maria; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Weber, Igor; Gerisch, Günther

    1997-01-01

    Myosin II is not essential for cytokinesis in cells of Dictyostelium discoideum that are anchored on a substrate (Neujahr, R., C. Heizer, and G. Gerisch. 1997. J. Cell Sci. 110:123–137), in contrast to its importance for cell division in suspension (DeLozanne, A., and J.A. Spudich. 1987. Science. 236:1086–1091; Knecht, D.A., and W.F. Loomis. 1987. Science. 236: 1081–1085.). These differences have prompted us to investigate the three-dimensional distribution of myosin II in cells dividing under one of three conditions: (a) in shaken suspension, (b) in a fluid layer on a solid substrate surface, and (c) under mechanical stress applied by compressing the cells. Under the first and second conditions outlined above, myosin II does not form patterns that suggest a contractile ring is established in the furrow. Most of the myosin II is concentrated in the regions that flank the furrow on both sides towards the poles of the dividing cell. It is only when cells are compressed that myosin II extensively accumulates in the cleavage furrow, as has been previously described (Fukui, Y., T.J. Lynch, H. Brzeska, and E.D. Korn. 1989. Nature. 341:328–331), i.e., this massive accumulation is a response to the mechanical stress. Evidence is provided that the stress-associated translocation of myosin II to the cell cortex is a result of the dephosphorylation of its heavy chains. F-actin is localized in the dividing cells in a distinctly different pattern from that of myosin II. The F-actin is shown to accumulate primarily in protrusions at the two poles that ultimately form the leading edges of the daughter cells. This distribution changes dynamically as visualized in living cells with a green fluorescent protein–actin fusion. PMID:9412473

  3. Non-muscle myosin-II-B filament regulation of paracellular resistance in cervical epithelial cells is associated with modulation of the cortical acto-myosin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Gorodeski, George

    2007-01-01

    Objective To understand myosin regulation of epithelial permeability. Methods Experimental study, using human cervical epithelial cells CaSki. Endpoints were paracellular permeability (determined in terms of transepithelial electrical resistance); non-muscle myosin-II-B (NMM-II-B) cellular localization; NMM-II-B phosphorylation status; NMM-II-B – actin interaction (determined in-vitro by the immunoprecipitation-immunoreactivity method); and NMM-II-B filamentation (determined in-vitro using purified NMM-II-B filaments in terms of filaments disassembly / assembly ratios. Results Treatment of cells with the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 or with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid decreased the Resistance of the Lateral Intercellular Space (RLIS), and increased phosphorylation of non-muscle myosin-II-B (NMM-II-B) on threonine and serine residues. Y-27632 induced disorganization of the cortical acto-myosin and decreased co-immunoprecipitation of actin with NMM-II-B. Homodimerization assays using NMM-II-B filaments from cells treated with Y-27632 or okadaic acid revealed decreased filamentation compared to control cells. However, okadaic acid blocked Y-27632 decreased filamentation. Treatment with DRB, CK2 inhibitor, induced opposing effects to those of Y-27632 and okadaic acid. Treatment with DRB did not involve modulation of actin depolymerization, suggesting that NMM-II-B regulation of the RLIS was independent of actin polymerization status. Exposure of NMM-II-B filaments to CK2 increased filamentation, regardless of prior treatments in-vivo with Y-27632, okadaic acid, or DRB. Conclusions The results suggest that NMM-II-B filaments are in steady-state equilibrium of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mediated by CK2 and by ROCK-regulated myosin heavy chain phosphatase, respectively. Increased phosphorylation would tend to inhibit assembly of NMM-II-B filaments and lead to decreased actin-myosin interaction, which would tend to decrease the RLIS and increase the

  4. Retrograde Flow and Myosin II Activity within the Leading Cell Edge Deliver F-Actin to the Lamella to Seed the Formation of Graded Polarity Actomyosin II Filament Bundles in Migrating Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tom W.; Vaughan, Andrew N.

    2008-01-01

    In migrating fibroblasts actomyosin II bundles are graded polarity (GP) bundles, a distinct organization to stress fibers. GP bundles are important for powering cell migration, yet have an unknown mechanism of formation. Electron microscopy and the fate of photobleached marks show actin filaments undergoing retrograde flow in filopodia, and the lamellipodium are structurally and dynamically linked with stationary GP bundles within the lamella. An individual filopodium initially protrudes, but then becomes separated from the tip of the lamellipodium and seeds the formation of a new GP bundle within the lamella. In individual live cells expressing both GFP-myosin II and RFP-actin, myosin II puncta localize to the base of an individual filopodium an average 28 s before the filopodium seeds the formation of a new GP bundle. Associated myosin II is stationary with respect to the substratum in new GP bundles. Inhibition of myosin II motor activity in live cells blocks appearance of new GP bundles in the lamella, without inhibition of cell protrusion in the same timescale. We conclude retrograde F-actin flow and myosin II activity within the leading cell edge delivers F-actin to the lamella to seed the formation of new GP bundles. PMID:18799629

  5. The role of myosin-II in force generation of DRG filopodia and lamellipodia

    PubMed Central

    Sayyad, Wasim A.; Amin, Ladan; Fabris, Paolo; Ercolini, Erika; Torre, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating neurons process the mechanical stimulus by exerting the protrusive forces through lamellipodia and filopodia. We used optical tweezers, video imaging and immunocytochemistry to analyze the role of non-muscle myosin-II on the protrusive force exerted by lamellipodia and filopodia from developing growth cones (GCs) of isolated Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG) neurons. When the activity of myosin-II was inhibited by 30 μM Blebbistatin protrusion/retraction cycles of lamellipodia slowed down and during retraction lamellipodia could not lift up axially as in control condition. Inhibition of actin polymerization with 25 nM Cytochalasin-D and of microtubule polymerization with 500 nM Nocodazole slowed down the protrusion/retraction cycles, but only Cytochalasin-D decreased lamellipodia axial motion. The force exerted by lamellipodia treated with Blebbistatin decreased by 50%, but, surprisingly, the force exerted by filopodia increased by 20-50%. The concomitant disruption of microtubules caused by Nocodazole abolished the increase of the force exerted by filopodia treated with Blebbistatin. These results suggest that; i- Myosin-II controls the force exerted by lamellipodia and filopodia; ii- contractions of the actomyosin complex formed by filaments of actin and myosin have an active role in ruffle formation; iii- myosin-II is an essential component of the structural stability of GCs architecture. PMID:25598228

  6. Tropomyosin and Myosin-II Cellular Levels Promote Actomyosin Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Benjamin C.; Sladewski, Thomas E.; Pollard, Luther W.

    2010-01-01

    Myosin-II (Myo2p) and tropomyosin are essential for contractile ring formation and cytokinesis in fission yeast. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to understand how these proteins function at contractile rings. We find that ring assembly is delayed in Myo2p motor and tropomyosin mutants, but occurs prematurely in cells engineered to express two copies of myo2. Thus, the timing of ring assembly responds to changes in Myo2p cellular levels and motor activity, and the emergence of tropomyosin-bound actin filaments. Doubling Myo2p levels suppresses defects in ring assembly associated with a tropomyosin mutant, suggesting a role for tropomyosin in maximizing Myo2p function. Correspondingly, tropomyosin increases Myo2p actin affinity and ATPase activity and promotes Myo2p-driven actin filament gliding in motility assays. Tropomyosin achieves this by favoring the strong actin-bound state of Myo2p. This mode of regulation reflects a role for tropomyosin in specifying and stabilizing actomyosin interactions, which facilitates contractile ring assembly in the fission yeast system. PMID:20110347

  7. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  8. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin. PMID:26246073

  9. Rac-mediated actin remodeling and myosin II are involved in KATP channel trafficking in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Young-Eun; Lim, Ajin; Park, Sun-Hyun; Chang, Sunghoe; Lee, Suk-Ho; Ho, Won-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic sensor activated during metabolic stress and it regulates various enzymes and cellular processes to maintain metabolic homeostasis. We previously reported that activation of AMPK by glucose deprivation (GD) and leptin increases KATP currents by increasing the surface levels of KATP channel proteins in pancreatic β-cells. Here, we show that the signaling mechanisms that mediate actin cytoskeleton remodeling are closely associated with AMPK-induced KATP channel trafficking. Using F-actin staining with Alexa 633-conjugated phalloidin, we observed that dense cortical actin filaments present in INS-1 cells cultured in 11 mM glucose were disrupted by GD or leptin treatment. These changes were blocked by inhibiting AMPK using compound C or siAMPK and mimicked by activating AMPK using AICAR, indicating that cytoskeletal remodeling induced by GD or leptin was mediated by AMPK signaling. AMPK activation led to the activation of Rac GTPase and the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC). AMPK-dependent actin remodeling induced by GD or leptin was abolished by the inhibition of Rac with a Rac inhibitor (NSC23766), siRac1 or siRac2, and by inhibition of myosin II with a myosin ATPase inhibitor (blebbistatin). Immunocytochemistry, surface biotinylation and electrophysiological analyses of KATP channel activity and membrane potentials revealed that AMPK-dependent KATP channel trafficking to the plasma membrane was also inhibited by NSC23766 or blebbistatin. Taken together, these results indicate that AMPK/Rac-dependent cytoskeletal remodeling associated with myosin II motor function promotes the translocation of KATP channels to the plasma membrane in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:26471000

  10. Block the function of nonmuscle myosin II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Chong, Mei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hongkui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Dong

    2015-03-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) is the name given to the multi-subunit protein product of three genes encoding different nonmuscle myosin heavy chains including NM II-A, NM II-B, and NM II-C. Blebbistatin is a small molecule that has been shown to be a relatively specific inhibitor of NM II. Blocking the function of NM II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida at a dose-dependent manner. In situ hybridization analysis with ventricular marker ventricular myosin heavy chain (vmhc) and atrial marker atrial myosin heavy chain (amhc) showed each of the heart contained both distinct atria and ventricle. However, the cardia bifida embryos had highly variable distance between two separate ventricles. We also provided evidence that time window from 12 to 20 h post fertilization (hpf) is necessary and sufficient for cardia bifida formation caused by blebbistatin treatment. Expression of spinster homolog 2 (spns2) was decreased in blebbistatin-treated embryos, suggesting the cardia bifida phenotype caused by NM II inhibition was relevant to precardiac mesoderm migration defects. Through in situ hybridization analysis, we showed that foxa1 was expressed in endoderm of blebbistatin-treated embryos at 24-hpf stage, suggesting the endoderm formation is normal in cardia bifida embryos caused by blebbistatin treatment. In addition, we demonstrated that blebbistatin treatment resulted in morphology alteration of zebrafish cardiomyocytes in vivo and neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes in vitro. PMID:25403653

  11. Myosin VI as a transporter and an anchor: A model for kinetics of the motor under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan, Peiying; Spudich, James; Dunn, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Myosin VI is an actin-based motor that is thought to function both as a transporter and an anchor in vivo. In an earlier study (Altman et al, Cell 2004), inhibition of myosin VI stepping kinetics by load applied using an optical trap was observed at saturating ATP and low ADP concentrations (< 2.5 μM). A simple mechanism whereby the rate of ADP binding increases exponentially with load was proposed. This model predicts that myosin VI functions primarily as an anchor at loads greater than ˜0.5 pN under physiological nucleotide conditions, which is potentially inconsistent with its roles in vivo. Here we present myosin VI stepping data taken at a variety of applied loads and ADP concentrations, and show that the Altman model only holds at low ADP concentrations. At higher, physiologically relevant ADP concentrations under load we observe dwell times that are an order of magnitude smaller than predicted by the Altman model. We present a modified model in which applied load alters the equilibrium between two myosin VI states with different nucleotide affinities. This new kinetic scheme accurately describes myosin VI behavior at various nucleotide conditions under a large range of loads, and explains how the motor is able to carry out its roles in vivo, both as a force-generating transporter and as an anchor.

  12. Multicomponent Analysis of Junctional Movements Regulated by Myosin II Isoforms at the Epithelial Zonula Adherens

    PubMed Central

    Smutny, Michael; Wu, Selwin K.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Mangold, Sabine; Yap, Alpha S.; Hamilton, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    The zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial cells is a site of cell-cell adhesion where cellular forces are exerted and resisted. Increasing evidence indicates that E-cadherin adhesion molecules at the ZA serve to sense force applied on the junctions and coordinate cytoskeletal responses to those forces. Efforts to understand the role that cadherins play in mechanotransduction have been limited by the lack of assays to measure the impact of forces on the ZA. In this study we used 4D imaging of GFP-tagged E-cadherin to analyse the movement of the ZA. Junctions in confluent epithelial monolayers displayed prominent movements oriented orthogonal (perpendicular) to the ZA itself. Two components were identified in these movements: a relatively slow unidirectional (translational) component that could be readily fitted by least-squares regression analysis, upon which were superimposed more rapid oscillatory movements. Myosin IIB was a dominant factor responsible for driving the unilateral translational movements. In contrast, frequency spectrum analysis revealed that depletion of Myosin IIA increased the power of the oscillatory movements. This implies that Myosin IIA may serve to dampen oscillatory movements of the ZA. This extends our recent analysis of Myosin II at the ZA to demonstrate that Myosin IIA and Myosin IIB make distinct contributions to junctional movement at the ZA. PMID:21799860

  13. Characterization of F-Actin Tryptophan Phosphorescence in the Presence and Absence of Tryptophan-Free Myosin Motor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bódis, Emöke; Strambini, Giovanni B.; Gonnelli, Margherita; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Somogyi, Béla

    2004-01-01

    The effect of binding the Trp-free motor domain mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum, rabbit skeletal muscle myosin S1, and tropomyosin on the dynamics and conformation of actin filaments was characterized by an analysis of steady-state tryptophan phosphorescence spectra and phosphorescence decay kinetics over a temperature range of 140–293 K. The binding of the Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum to actin caused red shifts in the phosphorescence spectrum of two internal Trp residues of actin and affected the intrinsic lifetime of each emitter, decreasing by roughly twofold the short phosphorescence lifetime components (τ1 and τ2) and increasing by ∼20% the longest component (τ3). The alteration of actin phosphorescence by the motor protein suggests that i), structural changes occur deep down in the core of actin and that ii), subtle changes in conformation appear also on the surface but in regions distant from the motor domain binding site. When actin formed complexes with skeletal S1, an extra phosphorescence lifetime component appeared (τ4, twice as long as τ3) in the phosphorescence decay that is absent in the isolated proteins. The lack of this extra component in the analogous actin-Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum complex suggests that it should be assigned to Trps in S1 that in the complex attain a more compact local structure. Our data indicated that the binding of tropomyosin to actin filaments had no effect on the structure or flexibility of actin observable by this technique. PMID:15298917

  14. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle–like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle–like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath. PMID:26864628

  15. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-04-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematodeCaenorhabditis eleganshas nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle-like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle-like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath. PMID:26864628

  16. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Newell-Litwa, Karen A; Horwitz, Rick; Lamers, Marcelo L

    2015-12-01

    The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII) acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies. PMID:26542704

  17. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Newell-Litwa, Karen A.; Horwitz, Rick; Lamers, Marcelo L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII) acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies. PMID:26542704

  18. Dual role for myosin II in GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Fulcher, F. Kent; Smith, Bethany T.; Russ, Misty; Patel, Yashomati M.

    2008-10-15

    Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake requires the activation of several signaling pathways to mediate the translocation and fusion of GLUT4 vesicles to the plasma membrane. Our previous studies demonstrated that GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake is a myosin II-dependent process in adipocytes. The experiments described in this report are the first to show a dual role for the myosin IIA isoform specifically in regulating insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. We demonstrate that inhibition of MLCK but not RhoK results in impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Furthermore, our studies show that insulin specifically stimulates the phosphorylation of the RLC associated with the myosin IIA isoform via MLCK. In time course experiments, we determined that GLUT4 translocates to the plasma membrane prior to myosin IIA recruitment. We further show that recruitment of myosin IIA to the plasma membrane requires that myosin IIA be activated via phosphorylation of the RLC by MLCK. Our findings also reveal that myosin II is required for proper GLUT4-vesicle fusion at the plasma membrane. We show that once at the plasma membrane, myosin II is involved in regulating the intrinsic activity of GLUT4 after insulin stimulation. Collectively, our results are the first to reveal that myosin IIA plays a critical role in mediating insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-LI adipocytes, via both GLUT4 vesicle fusion at the plasma membrane and GLUT4 activity.

  19. PTK7 regulates myosin II activity to orient planar polarity in the mammalian auditory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jianyi; Andreeva, Anna; Sipe, Conor W.; Liu, Lixia; Cheng, Amy; Lu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling is a key regulator of epithelial morphogenesis, including neural tube closure and the orientation of inner ear sensory hair cells, and is mediated by a conserved noncanonical Wnt pathway. Ptk7 is a novel vertebrate-specific regulator of PCP, yet the mechanisms by which Ptk7 regulates mammalian epithelial PCP remain poorly understood. Results Here we show that, in the mammalian auditory epithelium, Ptk7 is not required for membrane recruitment of Dishevelled 2; Ptk7 and Frizzled3/Frizzled6 receptors act in parallel and have opposing effects on hair cell PCP. Mosaic analysis identified a requirement of Ptk7 in neighboring supporting cells for hair cell PCP. Ptk7 and the noncanonical Wnt pathway differentially regulate a contractile myosin II network near the apical surface of supporting cells. We provide evidence that this apical myosin II network exerts polarized contractile tension on hair cells to align their PCP, as revealed by asymmetric junctional recruitment of vinculin, a tension-sensitive actin binding protein. In Ptk7 mutants, compromised myosin II activity resulted in loss of planar asymmetry and reduced junctional localization of vinculin. By contrast, vinculin planar asymmetry and stereociliary bundle orientation were restored in Fz3−/−; Ptk7−/− double mutants. Conclusions These findings suggest that PTK7 acts in conjunction with the noncanonical Wnt pathway to orient epithelial PCP through modulation of myosin-II based contractile tension between supporting cells and hair cells. PMID:22560610

  20. Myosin Vc Is a Molecular Motor That Functions in Secretory Granule Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Damon T.; Weigert, Roberto; Grode, Kyle D.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2009-01-01

    Class V myosins are actin-based motor proteins that have critical functions in organelle trafficking. Of the three class V myosins expressed in mammals, relatively little is known about Myo5c except that it is abundant in exocrine tissues. Here we use MCF-7 cells to identify the organelles that Myo5c associates with, image the dynamics of Myo5c in living cells, and test the functions of Myo5c. Endogenous Myo5c localizes to two distinct compartments: small puncta and slender tubules. Myo5c often exhibits a highly polarized distribution toward the leading edge in migrating cells and is clearly distinct from the Myo5a or Myo5b compartments. Imaging with GFP-Myo5c reveals that Myo5c puncta move slowly (∼30 nm/s) and microtubule independently, whereas tubules move rapidly (∼440 nm/s) and microtubule dependently. Myo5c puncta colocalize with secretory granule markers such as chromogranin A and Rab27b, whereas Myo5c tubules are labeled by Rab8a. TIRF imaging indicates that the granules can be triggered to undergo secretion. To test if Myo5c functions in granule trafficking, we used the Myo5c tail as a dominant negative and found that it dramatically perturbs the distribution of granule markers. These results provide the first live-cell imaging of Myo5c and indicate that Myo5c functions in secretory granule trafficking. PMID:19741097

  1. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II–actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca2+-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s–1 per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mm, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40–50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin–actin reaction in which the structural transitions responsible for the myosin working stroke and the release of the hydrolysis products are orthogonal explains the results assuming that Pi and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The rate of ADP release from the conformation at the end of the working stroke is also strain-sensitive, further increasing by one order of magnitude within a few nanometres of negative strain. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and the load during muscle contraction. Key points Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin–actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to

  2. Myosin-II inhibition and soft 2D matrix maximize multinucleation and cellular projections typical of platelet-producing megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae-Won; Swift, Joe; Spinler, Kyle R; Discher, Dennis E

    2011-07-12

    Cell division, membrane rigidity, and strong adhesion to a rigid matrix are all promoted by myosin-II, and so multinucleated cells with distended membranes--typical of megakaryocytes (MKs)--seem predictable for low myosin activity in cells on soft matrices. Paradoxically, myosin mutations lead to defects in MKs and platelets. Here, reversible inhibition of myosin-II is sustained over several cell cycles to produce 3- to 10-fold increases in polyploid MK and a number of other cell types. Even brief inhibition generates highly distensible, proplatelet-like projections that fragment readily under shear, as seen in platelet generation from MKs in vivo. The effects are maximized with collagenous matrices that are soft and 2D, like the perivascular niches in marrow rather than 3D or rigid, like bone. Although multinucleation of other primary hematopoietic lineages helps to generalize a failure-to-fission mechanism, lineage-specific signaling with increased polyploidy proves possible and novel with phospho-regulation of myosin-II heavy chain. Label-free mass spectrometry quantitation of the MK proteome uses a unique proportional peak fingerprint (ProPF) analysis to also show upregulation of the cytoskeletal and adhesion machinery critical to platelet function. Myosin-inhibited MKs generate more platelets in vitro and also in vivo from the marrows of xenografted mice, while agonist stimulation activates platelet spreading and integrin αIIbβ3. Myosin-II thus seems a central, matrix-regulated node for MK-poiesis and platelet generation. PMID:21709232

  3. Invited Review: The Myosins: Exploration of the Development of Our Current Understanding of These Mutations in the Motor

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Leinwand, Leslie; Warshaw, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic (HCM) and dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathies are inherited diseases with a high incidence of death due to electrical abnormalities or outflow tract obstruction. In many of the families afflicted with either disease, causative mutations have been identified in various sarcomeric proteins. In this review, we focus on mutations in the cardiac muscle molecular motor, myosin and its associated light chains. Despite the >300 identified mutations there is still no clear understanding of how these mutations within the same myosin molecule can lead to the dramatically different clinical phenotypes associated with HCM and DCM. Localizing mutations within myosin’s molecular structure provides insight into the potential consequence of these perturbations to key functional domains of the motor. Review of biochemical and biophysical data that characterize the functional capacities of these mutant myosins suggests that mutant myosins with enhanced contractility lead to HCM while those displaying reduced contractility lead to DCM. With gain and loss of function potentially being the primary consequence of a specific mutation, how these functional changes trigger the hypertrophic response and lead to the distinct HCM and DCM phenotypes will be the future investigative challenge. PMID:22821910

  4. The role of vertebrate nonmuscle Myosin II in development and human disease

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuefei; Adelstein, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    Three different genes each located on a different chromosome encode the heavy chains of nonmuscle myosin II in humans and mice. This review explores the functional consequences of the presence of three isoforms during embryonic development and beyond. The roles of the various isoforms in cell division, cell-cell adhesion, blood vessel formation and neuronal cell migration are addressed in animal models and at the cellular level. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of nonmuscle myosin II during cardiac and brain development, and during closure of the neural tube and body wall. Questions addressed include the consequences on organ development, of lowering or ablating a particular isoform as well as the effect of substituting one isoform for another, all in vivo. Finally the roles of the three isoforms in human diseases such as cancer as well as in syndromes affecting a variety of organs in humans are reviewed. PMID:25098841

  5. Intracellular photoactivation of caged cGMP induces myosin II and actin responses in motile cells.

    PubMed

    Pfannes, Eva K B; Anielski, Alexander; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger in eukaryotic cells. It is assumed to regulate the association of myosin II with the cytoskeleton of motile cells. When cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum are exposed to chemoattractants or to increased osmotic stress, intracellular cGMP levels rise, preceding the accumulation of myosin II in the cell cortex. To directly investigate the impact of intracellular cGMP on cytoskeletal dynamics in a living cell, we released cGMP inside the cell by laser-induced photo-cleavage of a caged precursor. With this approach, we could directly show in a live cell experiment that an increase in intracellular cGMP indeed induces myosin II to accumulate in the cortex. Unexpectedly, we observed for the first time that also the amount of filamentous actin in the cell cortex increases upon a rise in the cGMP concentration, independently of cAMP receptor activation and signaling. We discuss our results in the light of recent work on the cGMP signaling pathway and suggest possible links between cGMP signaling and the actin system. PMID:24136144

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of myosin II essential light chains of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites regulates their motility.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Moreno, Raúl; Pérez-Yépez, Eloy-Andrés; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Morales, Fernando O; Meza, Isaura

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites dwell in the human intestine as comensals although under still unclear circumstances become invasive and destroy the host tissues. For these activities, trophozoites relay on remarkable motility provided by the cytoskeleton organization. Amebic actin and some of its actin-associated proteins are well known, while components of the myosin II molecule, although predicted from the E. histolytica genome, need biochemical and functional characterization. Recently, an amebic essential light myosin II chain, named EhMLCI, was identified and reported to be phosphorylated in tyrosines. The phosphorylated form of the protein was associated with the soluble assembly incompetent conformation of the heavy myosin chains, while the non-phosphorylated protein was identified with filamentous heavy chains, organized in an assembly competent conformation. It was postulated that EhMLCI tyrosine phosphorylation could act as a negative regulator of myosin II activity by its phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an expression vector containing an EhMLCI DNA sequence where two tyrosine residues, with strong probability of phosphorylation and fall within the single EF-hand domain that interacts with the N-terminus of myosin II heavy chains, were replaced by phenylalanines. Transfected trophozoites, expressing the mutant MutEhMLCI protein cannot process it, thereby not incorporated into the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles required for myosin II activity, results in motility defective trophozoites. PMID:27318258

  7. Myosin-II repression favors pre/proplatelets but shear activation generates platelets and fails in macrothrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Spinler, Kyle R.; Shin, Jae-Won; Lambert, Michele P.

    2015-01-01

    Megakaryocyte ploidy and the generation of pre/proplatelets are both increased in culture by pharmacologic inhibition of myosin-II, but nonmuscle myosin-IIA (MIIA) mutations paradoxically cause MYH9-related diseases (MYH9-RD) that adversely affect platelets. In marrow, megakaryocytes extend projections into the microcirculation, where shear facilitates fragmentation to large pre/proplatelets, suggesting that fluid stresses and myosin-II activity somehow couple in platelet biogenesis. Here, in bulk shear, plateletlike particles generated from megakaryocytes are maximized at a shear stress typical of that in the microcirculation and after treatment with a myosin-II inhibitor. MIIA activity in static cells is naturally repressed through phosphorylation at Serine-1943, but shear decreases phosphorylation, consistent with MIIA activation and localization to platelet cortex. Micropipette aspiration of cells shows myosin-II accumulates at stressed sites, but its inhibition prevents such mechanoactivation and facilitates generation of CD41+ fragments similar in size to pre/proplatelets. MYH9-RD mutants phenocopy inhibition, revealing a dominant negative effect. MIIA is diffuse in the large platelets of a MYH9-RD patient with macrothrombocytopenia and is also diffuse in normal pre/proplatelets treated with inhibitor that blocks in vitro division to small platelets. The findings explain the large platelets in MYH9-RD and the near-normal thrombocrit of patients. Myosin-II regulation thus controls platelet size and number. PMID:25395423

  8. The Globular Tail Domain of Myosin-5a Functions as a Dimer in Regulating the Motor Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Yao, Lin-Lin; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-06-24

    Myosin-5a contains two heavy chains, which are dimerized via the coiled-coil regions. Thus, myosin-5a comprises two heads and two globular tail domains (GTDs). The GTD is the inhibitory domain that binds to the head and inhibits its motor function. Although the two-headed structure is essential for the processive movement of myosin-5a along actin filaments, little is known about the role of GTD dimerization. Here, we investigated the effect of GTD dimerization on its inhibitory activity. We found that the potent inhibitory activity of the GTD is dependent on its dimerization by the preceding coiled-coil regions, indicating synergistic interactions between the two GTDs and the two heads of myosin-5a. Moreover, we found that alanine mutations of the two conserved basic residues at N-terminal extension of the GTD not only weaken the inhibitory activity of the GTD but also enhance the activation of myosin-5a by its cargo-binding protein melanophilin (Mlph). These results are consistent with the GTD forming a head to head dimer, in which the N-terminal extension of the GTD interacts with the Mlph-binding site in the counterpart GTD. The Mlph-binding site at the GTD-GTD interface must be exposed prior to the binding of Mlph. We therefore propose that the inhibited Myo5a is equilibrated between the folded state, in which the Mlph-binding site is buried, and the preactivated state, in which the Mlph-binding site is exposed, and that Mlph is able to bind to the Myo5a in preactivated state and activates its motor function. PMID:27129208

  9. Myosin VI: an innovative motor that challenged the swinging lever arm hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2010-01-01

    The swinging crossbridge hypothesis states that energy from ATP hydrolysis is transduced to mechanical movement of the myosin head while bound to actin. The light chain-binding region of myosin is thought to act as a lever arm that amplifies movements near the catalytic site. This model has been challenged by findings that myosin VI takes larger steps along actin filaments than early interpretations of its structure seem to allow. We now know that myosin VI does indeed operate by an unusual ~ 180° lever arm swing and achieves its large step size using special structural features in its tail domain. PMID:20094053

  10. Analysis of flexural rigidity of actin filaments propelled by surface adsorbed myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Elina; Persson, Malin; Månsson, Alf

    2013-11-01

    Actin filaments are central components of the cytoskeleton and the contractile machinery of muscle. The filaments are known to exist in a range of conformational states presumably with different flexural rigidity and thereby different persistence lengths. Our results analyze the approaches proposed previously to measure the persistence length from the statistics of the winding paths of actin filaments that are propelled by surface-adsorbed myosin motor fragments in the in vitro motility assay. Our results suggest that the persistence length of heavy meromyosin propelled actin filaments can be estimated with high accuracy and reproducibility using this approach provided that: (1) the in vitro motility assay experiments are designed to prevent bias in filament sliding directions, (2) at least 200 independent filament paths are studied, (3) the ratio between the sliding distance between measurements and the camera pixel-size is between 4 and 12, (4) the sliding distances between measurements is less than 50% of the expected persistence length, and (5) an appropriate cut-off value is chosen to exclude abrupt large angular changes in sliding direction that are complications, e.g., due to the presence of rigor heads. If the above precautions are taken the described method should be a useful routine part of in vitro motility assays thus expanding the amount of information to be gained from these. PMID:24039103

  11. The fraction of myosin motors that participate in isometric contraction of rabbit muscle fibers at near-physiological temperature.

    PubMed

    Tsaturyan, Andrey K; Bershitsky, Sergey Y; Koubassova, Natalia A; Fernandez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Ferenczi, Michael A

    2011-07-20

    The duty ratio, or the part of the working cycle in which a myosin molecule is strongly attached to actin, determines motor processivity and is required to evaluate the force generated by each molecule. In muscle, it is equal to the fraction of myosin heads that are strongly, or stereospecifically, bound to the thin filaments. Estimates of this fraction during isometric contraction based on stiffness measurements or the intensities of the equatorial or meridional x-ray reflections vary significantly. Here, we determined this value using the intensity of the first actin layer line, A1, in the low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns of permeable fibers from rabbit skeletal muscle. We calibrated the A1 intensity by considering that the intensity in the relaxed and rigor states corresponds to 0% and 100% of myosin heads bound to actin, respectively. The fibers maximally activated with Ca(2+) at 4°C were heated to 31-34°C with a Joule temperature jump (T-jump). Rigor and relaxed-state measurements were obtained on the same fibers. The intensity of the inner part of A1 during isometric contraction compared with that in rigor corresponds to 41-43% stereospecifically bound myosin heads at near-physiological temperature, or an average force produced by a head of ~6.3 pN. PMID:21767493

  12. Stereocilia-staircase spacing is influenced by myosin III motors and their cargos espin-1 and espin-like

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Seham; Avenarius, Matthew R.; Grati, M'hamed; Krey, Jocelyn F.; Windsor, Alanna M.; Sousa, Aurea D.; Ballesteros, Angela; Cui, Runjia; Millis, Bryan A.; Salles, Felipe T.; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Jones, Sherri M.; Choi, Dongseok; Dong, Lijin; Raval, Manmeet H.; Yengo, Christopher M.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.; Kachar, Bechara

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells tightly control the dimensions of their stereocilia, which are actin-rich protrusions with graded heights that mediate mechanotransduction in the inner ear. Two members of the myosin-III family, MYO3A and MYO3B, are thought to regulate stereocilia length by transporting cargos that control actin polymerization at stereocilia tips. We show that eliminating espin-1 (ESPN-1), an isoform of ESPN and a myosin-III cargo, dramatically alters the slope of the stereocilia staircase in a subset of hair cells. Furthermore, we show that espin-like (ESPNL), primarily present in developing stereocilia, is also a myosin-III cargo and is essential for normal hearing. ESPN-1 and ESPNL each bind MYO3A and MYO3B, but differentially influence how the two motors function. Consequently, functional properties of different motor-cargo combinations differentially affect molecular transport and the length of actin protrusions. This mechanism is used by hair cells to establish the required range of stereocilia lengths within a single cell. PMID:26926603

  13. Stereocilia-staircase spacing is influenced by myosin III motors and their cargos espin-1 and espin-like.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Seham; Avenarius, Matthew R; Grati, M'hamed; Krey, Jocelyn F; Windsor, Alanna M; Sousa, Aurea D; Ballesteros, Angela; Cui, Runjia; Millis, Bryan A; Salles, Felipe T; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Jones, Sherri M; Choi, Dongseok; Dong, Lijin; Raval, Manmeet H; Yengo, Christopher M; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G; Kachar, Bechara

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells tightly control the dimensions of their stereocilia, which are actin-rich protrusions with graded heights that mediate mechanotransduction in the inner ear. Two members of the myosin-III family, MYO3A and MYO3B, are thought to regulate stereocilia length by transporting cargos that control actin polymerization at stereocilia tips. We show that eliminating espin-1 (ESPN-1), an isoform of ESPN and a myosin-III cargo, dramatically alters the slope of the stereocilia staircase in a subset of hair cells. Furthermore, we show that espin-like (ESPNL), primarily present in developing stereocilia, is also a myosin-III cargo and is essential for normal hearing. ESPN-1 and ESPNL each bind MYO3A and MYO3B, but differentially influence how the two motors function. Consequently, functional properties of different motor-cargo combinations differentially affect molecular transport and the length of actin protrusions. This mechanism is used by hair cells to establish the required range of stereocilia lengths within a single cell. PMID:26926603

  14. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  15. The neck region of the myosin motor domain acts as a lever arm to generate movement.

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, T Q; Abramson, P D; Spudich, J A

    1996-01-01

    The myosin head consists of a globular catalytic domain that binds actin and hydrolyzes ATP and a neck domain that consists of essential and regulatory light chains bound to a long alpha-helical portion of the heavy chain. The swinging neck-level model assumes that a swinging motion of the neck relative to the catalytic domain is the origin of movement. This model predicts that the step size, and consequently the sliding velocity, are linearly related to the length of the neck. We have tested this point by characterizing a series of mutant Dictyostelium myosins that have different neck lengths. The 2xELCBS mutant has an extra binding site for essential light chain. The delta RLCBS mutant myosin has an internal deletion that removes the regulatory light chain binding site. The delta BLCBS mutant lacks both light chain binding sites. Wild-type myosin and these mutant myosins were subjected to the sliding filament in vitro motility assay. As expected, mutants with shorter necks move slower than wild-type myosin in vitro. Most significantly, a mutant with a longer neck moves faster than the wild type, and the sliding velocities of these myosins are linearly related to the neck length, as predicted by the swinging neck-lever model. A simple extrapolation to zero speed predicts that the fulcrum point is in the vicinity of the SH1-SH2 region in the catalytic domain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8633089

  16. Arp2/3 complex-dependent actin networks constrain myosin II function in driving retrograde actin flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Pollard, Thomas D; Forscher, Paul

    2012-06-25

    The Arp2/3 complex nucleates actin filaments to generate networks at the leading edge of motile cells. Nonmuscle myosin II produces contractile forces involved in driving actin network translocation. We inhibited the Arp2/3 complex and/or myosin II with small molecules to investigate their respective functions in neuronal growth cone actin dynamics. Inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex with CK666 reduced barbed end actin assembly site density at the leading edge, disrupted actin veils, and resulted in veil retraction. Strikingly, retrograde actin flow rates increased with Arp2/3 complex inhibition; however, when myosin II activity was blocked, Arp2/3 complex inhibition now resulted in slowing of retrograde actin flow and veils no longer retracted. Retrograde flow rate increases induced by Arp2/3 complex inhibition were independent of Rho kinase activity. These results provide evidence that, although the Arp2/3 complex and myosin II are spatially segregated, actin networks assembled by the Arp2/3 complex can restrict myosin II-dependent contractility with consequent effects on growth cone motility. PMID:22711700

  17. Myosin-II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in 3D by minimizing cell surface curvature

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert A.; Myers, Kenneth A.; Desai, Ravi A.; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S.; Adelstein, Robert; Waterman, Clare M.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We utilized endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin-II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin-II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell surface curvature. Utilizing micro-fabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin-II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between myosin-II regulation by and control of curvature drives cycles of localized cortical myosin-II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration. PMID:25621949

  18. Unipolar distributions of junctional Myosin II identify cell stripe boundaries that drive cell intercalation throughout Drosophila axis extension

    PubMed Central

    Tetley, Robert J; Blanchard, Guy B; Fletcher, Alexander G; Adams, Richard J; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Convergence and extension movements elongate tissues during development. Drosophila germ-band extension (GBE) is one example, which requires active cell rearrangements driven by Myosin II planar polarisation. Here, we develop novel computational methods to analyse the spatiotemporal dynamics of Myosin II during GBE, at the scale of the tissue. We show that initial Myosin II bipolar cell polarization gives way to unipolar enrichment at parasegmental boundaries and two further boundaries within each parasegment, concomitant with a doubling of cell number as the tissue elongates. These boundaries are the primary sites of cell intercalation, behaving as mechanical barriers and providing a mechanism for how cells remain ordered during GBE. Enrichment at parasegment boundaries during GBE is independent of Wingless signaling, suggesting pair-rule gene control. Our results are consistent with recent work showing that a combinatorial code of Toll-like receptors downstream of pair-rule genes contributes to Myosin II polarization via local cell-cell interactions. We propose an updated cell-cell interaction model for Myosin II polarization that we tested in a vertex-based simulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12094.001 PMID:27183005

  19. Actin depolymerisation and crosslinking join forces with myosin II to contract actin coats on fused secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Miklavc, Pika; Ehinger, Konstantin; Sultan, Ayesha; Felder, Tatiana; Paul, Patrick; Gottschalk, Kay-Eberhard; Frick, Manfred

    2015-03-15

    In many secretory cells actin and myosin are specifically recruited to the surface of secretory granules following their fusion with the plasma membrane. Actomyosin-dependent compression of fused granules is essential to promote active extrusion of cargo. However, little is known about molecular mechanisms regulating actin coat formation and contraction. Here, we provide a detailed kinetic analysis of the molecules regulating actin coat contraction on fused lamellar bodies in primary alveolar type II cells. We demonstrate that ROCK1 and myosin light chain kinase 1 (MLCK1, also known as MYLK) translocate to fused lamellar bodies and activate myosin II on actin coats. However, myosin II activity is not sufficient for efficient actin coat contraction. In addition, cofilin-1 and α-actinin translocate to actin coats. ROCK1-dependent regulated actin depolymerisation by cofilin-1 in cooperation with actin crosslinking by α-actinin is essential for complete coat contraction. In summary, our data suggest a complementary role for regulated actin depolymerisation and crosslinking, and myosin II activity, to contract actin coats and drive secretion. PMID:25637593

  20. Myosins and cell dynamics in cellular slime molds.

    PubMed

    Yumura, Shigehiko; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2003-01-01

    Myosin is a mechanochemical transducer and serves as a motor for various motile activities such as cell migration, cytokinesis, maintenance of cell shape, phagocytosis, and morphogenesis. Nonmuscle myosin in vivo does not either stay static at specific subcellular regions or construct highly organized structures, such as sarcomere in skeletal muscle cells. The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is an ideal "model organism" for the investigation of cell movement and cytokinesis. The advantages of this organism prompted researchers to carry out pioneering cell biological, biochemical, and molecular genetic studies on myosin II, which resulted in elucidation of many fundamental features of function and regulation of this most abundant molecular motor. Furthermore, recent molecular biological research has revealed that many unconventional myosins play various functions in vivo. In this article, how myosins are organized and regulated in a dynamic manner in Dictyostelium cells is reviewed and discussed. PMID:12722951

  1. Switching of actin-myosin motors by voltage-induced pH bias in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Kuniyuki; Iwase, Takahiro; Wada, Reito

    2016-08-01

    ATP-driven motor proteins, which function in cell motility and organelle transport, have potential applications as bio-inspired micro-devices; however, their control remains unsatisfactory. Here, we show rapid-velocity control of actin filaments interacting with myosin motors using voltage applied to Pt electrodes in an in vitro motility system, by which immediate increases and decreases in velocity were induced beside the cathode and anode, respectively. Indicator dye revealed pH changes after voltage application, and alternate voltage switching allowed actin filaments to cyclically alter their velocity in response to these changes. This principle provides a basis for on-demand control of not only motor proteins but also pH-sensitive events at a microscopic level. PMID:27210738

  2. Unconventional myosins acting unconventionally

    PubMed Central

    Woolner, Sarah; Bement, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Unconventional myosins are proteins that bind actin filaments in an ATP-regulated manner. Because of their association with membranes, they have traditionally been viewed as motors that function primarily to transport membranous organelles along actin filaments. Recently, however, a wealth of roles for myosins that are not obviously related to organelle transport have been uncovered, including organization of F-actin, mitotic spindle regulation and gene transcription. Furthermore, it has also become apparent that the motor domains of different myosins vary strikingly in their biophysical attributes. We suggest that the assumption that most unconventional myosins function primarily as organelle transporters might be misguided. PMID:19406643

  3. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type II distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  4. Analysis of the Actin–Myosin II System in Fish Epidermal Keratocytes: Mechanism of Cell Body Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Svitkina, Tatyana M.; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.; McQuade, Kyle M.; Borisy, Gary G.

    1997-01-01

    While the protrusive event of cell locomotion is thought to be driven by actin polymerization, the mechanism of forward translocation of the cell body is unclear. To elucidate the mechanism of cell body translocation, we analyzed the supramolecular organization of the actin–myosin II system and the dynamics of myosin II in fish epidermal keratocytes. In lamellipodia, long actin filaments formed dense networks with numerous free ends in a brushlike manner near the leading edge. Shorter actin filaments often formed T junctions with longer filaments in the brushlike area, suggesting that new filaments could be nucleated at sides of preexisting filaments or linked to them immediately after nucleation. The polarity of actin filaments was almost uniform, with barbed ends forward throughout most of the lamellipodia but mixed in arc-shaped filament bundles at the lamellipodial/cell body boundary. Myosin II formed discrete clusters of bipolar minifilaments in lamellipodia that increased in size and density towards the cell body boundary and colocalized with actin in boundary bundles. Time-lapse observation demonstrated that myosin clusters appeared in the lamellipodia and remained stationary with respect to the substratum in locomoting cells, but they exhibited retrograde flow in cells tethered in epithelioid colonies. Consequently, both in locomoting and stationary cells, myosin clusters approached the cell body boundary, where they became compressed and aligned, resulting in the formation of boundary bundles. In locomoting cells, the compression was associated with forward displacement of myosin features. These data are not consistent with either sarcomeric or polarized transport mechanisms of cell body translocation. We propose that the forward translocation of the cell body and retrograde flow in the lamellipodia are both driven by contraction of an actin–myosin network in the lamellipodial/cell body transition zone. PMID:9334344

  5. Contractility parameters of human β-cardiac myosin with the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R403Q show loss of motor function

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Suman; Sommese, Ruth F.; Ujfalusi, Zoltan; Combs, Ariana; Langer, Stephen; Sutton, Shirley; Leinwand, Leslie A.; Geeves, Michael A.; Ruppel, Kathleen M.; Spudich, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most frequently occurring inherited cardiovascular disease. It is caused by mutations in genes encoding the force-generating machinery of the cardiac sarcomere, including human β-cardiac myosin. We present a detailed characterization of the most debated HCM-causing mutation in human β-cardiac myosin, R403Q. Despite numerous studies, most performed with nonhuman or noncardiac myosin, there is no consensus about the mechanism of action of this mutation on the function of the enzyme. We use recombinant human β-cardiac myosin and new methodologies to characterize in vitro contractility parameters of the R403Q myosin compared to wild type. We extend our studies beyond pure actin filaments to include the interaction of myosin with regulated actin filaments containing tropomyosin and troponin. We find that, with pure actin, the intrinsic force generated by R403Q is ~15% lower than that generated by wild type. The unloaded velocity is, however, ~10% higher for R403Q myosin, resulting in a load-dependent velocity curve that has the characteristics of lower contractility at higher external loads compared to wild type. With regulated actin filaments, there is no increase in the unloaded velocity and the contractility of the R403Q myosin is lower than that of wild type at all loads. Unlike that with pure actin, the actin-activated adenosine triphosphatase activity for R403Q myosin with Ca2+-regulated actin filaments is ~30% lower than that for wild type, predicting a lower unloaded duty ratio of the motor. Overall, the contractility parameters studied fit with a loss of human β-cardiac myosin contractility as a result of the R403Q mutation. PMID:26601291

  6. The Effect of Including the C2 Insert of Nonmuscle Myosin II-C on Neuritogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Shekhar; Dey, Sumit K.; Biswas, Arunima; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2013-01-01

    The functional role of the C2 insert of nonmuscle myosin II-C (NM II-C) is poorly understood. Here, we report for the first time that the expression of the C2 insert-containing isoform, NM II-C1C2, is inducible in Neuro-2a cells during differentiation both at mRNA and protein levels. Immunoblot and RT-PCR analysis reveal that expression of NM II-C1C2 peaks between days 3 and 6 of differentiation. Localization of NM II-C1C2 in Neuro-2a cells suggests that the C2 insert-containing isoform is localized in the cytosol and along the neurites, specifically at the adherence point to substratum. Inhibition of endogenous NM II-C1C2 using siRNA decreases the neurite length by 43% compared with control cells treated with nonspecific siRNA. Time lapse image analysis reveals that neurites of C2-siRNA-treated cells have a net negative change in neurite length per minute, leading to a reduction of overall neurite length. During neuritogenesis, NM II-C1C2 can interact and colocalize with β1-integrin in neurites. Altogether, these studies indicate that NM II-C1C2 may be involved in stabilizing neurites by maintaining their structure at adhesion sites. PMID:23355468

  7. Nonmuscle Myosin II Regulates the Morphogenesis of Metanephric Mesenchyme–Derived Immature Nephrons

    PubMed Central

    Recuenco, Mariam C.; Ohmori, Tomoko; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Taguchi, Atsuhiro; Fujimura, Sayoko; Conti, Mary Anne; Wei, Qize; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The kidney develops from reciprocal interactions between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. The mesenchyme transforms into epithelia and forms complicated nephron structures, whereas the ureteric bud extends its pre-existing epithelial ducts. Although the roles are well established for extracellular stimuli, such as Wnt and Notch, it is unclear how the intracellular cytoskeleton regulates these morphogenetic processes. Myh9 and Myh10 encode nonmuscle myosin II heavy chains, and Myh9 mutations in humans are implicated in congenital kidney diseases and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in adults. Here, we analyzed the roles of Myh9 and Myh10 in the developing kidney. Ureteric bud-specific depletion of Myh9 resulted in no apparent phenotypes, whereas mesenchyme-specific Myh9 deletion caused proximal tubule dilations and renal failure. Mesenchyme-specific Myh9/Myh10 mutant mice died shortly after birth and showed a severe defect in nephron formation. The nascent mutant nephrons failed to form a continuous lumen, which likely resulted from impaired apical constriction of the elongating tubules. In addition, nephron progenitors lacking Myh9/Myh10 or the possible interactor Kif26b were less condensed at midgestation and reduced at birth. Taken together, nonmuscle myosin II regulates the morphogenesis of immature nephrons derived from the metanephric mesenchyme and the maintenance of nephron progenitors. Our data also suggest that Myh9 deletion in mice results in failure to maintain renal tubules but not in glomerulosclerosis. PMID:25168025

  8. Confinement Sensing and Signal Optimization via Piezo1/PKA and Myosin II Pathways.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Chien; Yang, Jessica R; Yankaskas, Christopher L; Wong, Bin Sheng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Pardo-Pastor, Carlos; Serra, Selma A; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Gu, Zhizhan; Wirtz, Denis; Valverde, Miguel A; Yang, Joy T; Zhang, Jin; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-05-17

    Cells adopt distinct signaling pathways to optimize cell locomotion in different physical microenvironments. However, the underlying mechanism that enables cells to sense and respond to physical confinement is unknown. Using microfabricated devices and substrate-printing methods along with FRET-based biosensors, we report that, as cells transition from unconfined to confined spaces, intracellular Ca(2+) level is increased, leading to phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1)-dependent suppression of PKA activity. This Ca(2+) elevation requires Piezo1, a stretch-activated cation channel. Moreover, differential regulation of PKA and cell stiffness in unconfined versus confined cells is abrogated by dual, but not individual, inhibition of Piezo1 and myosin II, indicating that these proteins can independently mediate confinement sensing. Signals activated by Piezo1 and myosin II in response to confinement both feed into a signaling circuit that optimizes cell motility. This study provides a mechanism by which confinement-induced signaling enables cells to sense and adapt to different physical microenvironments. PMID:27160899

  9. Phosphorylation of Nonmuscle myosin II-A regulatory light chain resists Sendai virus fusion with host cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Provas; Saha, Shekhar; Chandra, Sunandini; Das, Alakesh; Dey, Sumit K.; Das, Mahua R.; Sen, Shamik; Sarkar, Debi P.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped viruses enter host cells through membrane fusion and the cells in turn alter their shape to accommodate components of the virus. However, the role of nonmuscle myosin II of the actomyosin complex of host cells in membrane fusion is yet to be understood. Herein, we show that both (−) blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) and small interfering RNA markedly augment fusion of Sendai virus (SeV), with chinese hamster ovary cells and human hepatocarcinoma cells. Inhibition of RLC phosphorylation using inhibitors against ROCK, but not PKC and MRCK, or overexpression of phospho-dead mutant of RLC enhances membrane fusion. SeV infection increases cellular stiffness and myosin light chain phosphorylation at two hour post infection. Taken together, the present investigation strongly indicates that Rho-ROCK-NMII contractility signaling pathway may provide a physical barrier to host cells against viral fusion. PMID:25993465

  10. Phosphorylation of Nonmuscle myosin II-A regulatory light chain resists Sendai virus fusion with host cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Provas; Saha, Shekhar; Chandra, Sunandini; Das, Alakesh; Dey, Sumit K; Das, Mahua R; Sen, Shamik; Sarkar, Debi P; Jana, Siddhartha S

    2015-01-01

    Enveloped viruses enter host cells through membrane fusion and the cells in turn alter their shape to accommodate components of the virus. However, the role of nonmuscle myosin II of the actomyosin complex of host cells in membrane fusion is yet to be understood. Herein, we show that both (-) blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII) and small interfering RNA markedly augment fusion of Sendai virus (SeV), with chinese hamster ovary cells and human hepatocarcinoma cells. Inhibition of RLC phosphorylation using inhibitors against ROCK, but not PKC and MRCK, or overexpression of phospho-dead mutant of RLC enhances membrane fusion. SeV infection increases cellular stiffness and myosin light chain phosphorylation at two hour post infection. Taken together, the present investigation strongly indicates that Rho-ROCK-NMII contractility signaling pathway may provide a physical barrier to host cells against viral fusion. PMID:25993465

  11. Analysis of functional motions in Brownian molecular machines with an efficient block normal mode approach: myosin-II and Ca2+ -ATPase.

    PubMed

    Li, Guohui; Cui, Qiang

    2004-02-01

    The structural flexibilities of two molecular machines, myosin and Ca(2+)-ATPase, have been analyzed with normal mode analysis and discussed in the context of their energy conversion functions. The normal mode analysis with physical intermolecular interactions was made possible by an improved implementation of the block normal mode (BNM) approach. The BNM results clearly illustrated that the large-scale conformational transitions implicated in the functional cycles of the two motor systems can be largely captured with a small number of low-frequency normal modes. Therefore, the results support the idea that structural flexibility is an essential part of the construction principle of molecular motors through evolution. Such a feature is expected to be more prevalent in motor proteins than in simpler systems (e.g., signal transduction proteins) because in the former, large-scale conformational transitions often have to occur before the chemical events (e.g., ATP hydrolysis in myosin and ATP binding/phosphorylation in Ca(2+)-ATPase). This highlights the importance of Brownian motions associated with the protein domains that are involved in the functional transitions; in this sense, Brownian molecular machines is an appropriate description of molecular motors, although the normal mode results do not address the origin of the ratchet effect. The results also suggest that it might be more appropriate to describe functional transitions in some molecular motors as intrinsic elastic motions modulating local structural changes in the active site, which in turn gets stabilized by the subsequent chemical events, in contrast with the conventional idea of local changes somehow getting amplified into larger-scale motions. In the case of myosin, for example, we favor the idea that Brownian motions associated with the flexible converter propagates to the Switch I/II region, where the salt-bridge formation gets stabilized by ATP hydrolysis, in contrast with the textbook notion that

  12. The Autophagy Receptor TAX1BP1 and the Molecular Motor Myosin VI Are Required for Clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium by Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Tumbarello, David A; Manna, Paul T; Allen, Mark; Bycroft, Mark; Arden, Susan D; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy plays a key role during Salmonella infection, by eliminating these pathogens following escape into the cytosol. In this process, selective autophagy receptors, including the myosin VI adaptor proteins optineurin and NDP52, have been shown to recognize cytosolic pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that myosin VI and TAX1BP1 are recruited to ubiquitylated Salmonella and play a key role in xenophagy. The absence of TAX1BP1 causes an accumulation of ubiquitin-positive Salmonella, whereas loss of myosin VI leads to an increase in ubiquitylated and LC3-positive bacteria. Our structural studies demonstrate that the ubiquitin-binding site of TAX1BP1 overlaps with the myosin VI binding site and point mutations in the TAX1BP1 zinc finger domains that affect ubiquitin binding also ablate binding to myosin VI. This mutually exclusive binding and the association of TAX1BP1 with LC3 on the outer limiting membrane of autophagosomes may suggest a molecular mechanism for recruitment of this motor to autophagosomes. The predominant role of TAX1BP1, a paralogue of NDP52, in xenophagy is supported by our evolutionary analysis, which demonstrates that functionally intact NDP52 is missing in Xenopus and mice, whereas TAX1BP1 is expressed in all vertebrates analysed. In summary, this work highlights the importance of TAX1BP1 as a novel autophagy receptor in myosin VI-mediated xenophagy. Our study identifies essential new machinery for the autophagy-dependent clearance of Salmonella typhimurium and suggests modulation of myosin VI motor activity as a potential therapeutic target in cellular immunity. PMID:26451915

  13. The Autophagy Receptor TAX1BP1 and the Molecular Motor Myosin VI Are Required for Clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium by Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tumbarello, David A.; Manna, Paul T.; Allen, Mark; Bycroft, Mark; Arden, Susan D.; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays a key role during Salmonella infection, by eliminating these pathogens following escape into the cytosol. In this process, selective autophagy receptors, including the myosin VI adaptor proteins optineurin and NDP52, have been shown to recognize cytosolic pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that myosin VI and TAX1BP1 are recruited to ubiquitylated Salmonella and play a key role in xenophagy. The absence of TAX1BP1 causes an accumulation of ubiquitin-positive Salmonella, whereas loss of myosin VI leads to an increase in ubiquitylated and LC3-positive bacteria. Our structural studies demonstrate that the ubiquitin-binding site of TAX1BP1 overlaps with the myosin VI binding site and point mutations in the TAX1BP1 zinc finger domains that affect ubiquitin binding also ablate binding to myosin VI. This mutually exclusive binding and the association of TAX1BP1 with LC3 on the outer limiting membrane of autophagosomes may suggest a molecular mechanism for recruitment of this motor to autophagosomes. The predominant role of TAX1BP1, a paralogue of NDP52, in xenophagy is supported by our evolutionary analysis, which demonstrates that functionally intact NDP52 is missing in Xenopus and mice, whereas TAX1BP1 is expressed in all vertebrates analysed. In summary, this work highlights the importance of TAX1BP1 as a novel autophagy receptor in myosin VI-mediated xenophagy. Our study identifies essential new machinery for the autophagy-dependent clearance of Salmonella typhimurium and suggests modulation of myosin VI motor activity as a potential therapeutic target in cellular immunity. PMID:26451915

  14. Association of kinesin and myosin with pigment granules in crustacean chromatophores.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Robert Tew; McNamara, John Campbell

    2006-02-01

    Chromatic adaptation in crustaceans results from the differential distribution of colored pigment granules within their chromatophores consequent to cell signaling by neurosecretory peptides. However, the force transducing, mechanochemical protein motors responsible for granule translocation, and their molecular mechanisms of action, are not well understood. The present study uses immunocytochemical techniques and a motility assay in vitro to demonstrate that protein motors from the kinesin and myosin superfamilies are stably associated with membrane-bounded pigment granules in the red, ovarian chromatophores of the freshwater, palaemonid shrimp, Macrobrachium olfersii. Monoclonal antibodies against conventional kinesin heavy chain, and an anti-myosin whole serum, labeled pigment-containing fragments prepared from homogenates of chromatophores with fully dispersed or aggregated pigments: this finding infers a permanent association between the protein motors and the pigment granules, and suggests that such motors may be regulated while bound to their cargos. The pigment aggregator appears to be a myosin since the anti-myosin whole serum attenuated hormonally triggered pigment aggregation in the motility assay in vitro, and induced pigment hyper-dispersion in some chromatophores. Western blots of the chromatophore-containing, ovarian tissue homogenate demonstrated protein bands consistent with myosin II and myosin XII, either of which may be the pigment aggregator. This study provides the first direct evidence for myosin and kinesin protein motors directly and stably associated with pigment granules in crustacean chromatophores, and may represent the first successful isolation of myosin class XII. PMID:16420248

  15. Myosin II isoform co-assembly and differential regulation in mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Beach, Jordan R; Hammer, John A

    2015-05-15

    Non-muscle myosin 2 (NM2) is a major force-producing, actin-based motor in mammalian non-muscle cells, where it plays important roles in a broad range of fundamental biological processes, including cytokinesis, cell migration, and epithelial barrier function. This breadth of function at the tissue and cellular levels suggests extensive diversity and differential regulation of NM2 bipolar filaments, the major, if not sole, functional form of NM2s in vivo. Previous in vitro, cellular and animal studies indicate that some of this diversity is supported by the existence of multiple NM2 isoforms. Moreover, two recent studies have shown that these isoforms can co-assemble to form heterotypic filaments, further expanding functional diversity. In addition to isoform co-assembly, cells may differentially regulate NM2 function via isoform-specific expression, RLC phosphorylation, MHC phosphorylation or regulation via binding partners. Here, we provide a brief summary of NM2 filament assembly, summarize the recent findings regarding NM2 isoform co-assembly, consider the mechanisms cells might utilize to differentially regulate NM2 isoforms, and review the data available to support these mechanisms. PMID:25655283

  16. SDF-1α stiffens myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells through the activation of RhoA-ROCK-Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong Soon; Stark, Daniel J; Raphael, Robert M; Wen, Jianguo; Su, Jing; Zhou, Xiaobo; Chang, Chung-Che; Zu, Youli

    2015-03-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B lymphocyte malignancy that remains incurable despite extensive research efforts. This is due, in part, to frequent disease recurrences associated with the persistence of myeloma cancer stem cells (mCSCs). Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) play critical roles in supporting mCSCs through genetic or biochemical alterations. Previously, we identified mechanical distinctions between BMSCs isolated from MM patients (mBMSCs) and those present in the BM of healthy individuals (nBMSCs). These properties of mBMSC contributed to their ability to preferentially support mCSCs. To further illustrate mechanisms underlying the differences between mBMSCs and nBMSCs, here we report that (i) mBMSCs express an abnormal, constitutively high level of phosphorylated Myosin II, which leads to stiffer membrane mechanics, (ii) mBMSCs are more sensitive to SDF-1α-induced activation of MYL2 through the G(i./o)-PI3K-RhoA-ROCK-Myosin II signaling pathway, affecting Young's modulus in BMSCs and (iii) activated Myosin II confers increased cell contractile potential, leading to enhanced collagen matrix remodeling and promoting the cell-cell interaction between mCSCs and mBMSCs. Together, our findings suggest that interfering with SDF-1α signaling may serve as a new therapeutic approach for eliminating mCSCs by disrupting their interaction with mBMSCs. PMID:25137150

  17. An optimized micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on the molybdenum blue method and its application in screening natural product inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Kou, Jun-Ping; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-06-01

    Myosin II plays multiple roles in physiological and pathological functions through its ATPase activity. The present study was designed to optimize a micro-assay of myosin II ATPase activity based on molybdenum blue method, using a known myosin II ATPase inhibitor, blebbistatin. Several parameters were observed in the enzymatic reaction procedure, including the concentrations of the substrate (ATP) and calcium chloride, pH, and the reaction and incubation times. The proportion of coloration agent was also investigated. The sensitivity of this assay was compared with the malachite green method and bioluminescence method. Additionally, 20 natural compounds were studied for myosin II ATPase inhibitory activity using the optimized method. Our results showed that ATP at the concentration of 5 mmol·L(-1) and ammonium molybdate : stannous chloride at the ratio of 15 : 1 could greatly improve the sensitivity of this method. The IC50 of blebbistatin obtained by this method was consistent with literature. Compound 8 was screened with inhibitory activity on myosin II ATPase. The optimized method showed similar accuracy, lower detecting limit, and wider linear range, which could be a promising approach to screening myosin II ATPase inhibitors in vitro. PMID:27473959

  18. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C; Schindler, Tony D; Nogales, Eva; Bryant, Zev

    2014-09-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears--speed up, slow down or switch directions--when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport. PMID:25086603

  19. Remote control of myosin and kinesin motors using light-activated gearshifting

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Muneaki; Chen, Lu; Howes, Stuart C.; Schindler, Tony D.; Nogales, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors perform critical force generation and transport functions in eukaryotic cells1,2. Engineered modifications of motor function provide direct tests of protein structure-function relationships and potential tools for controlling cellular processes or for harnessing molecular transport in artificial systems3,4. Here, we report the design and characterization of a panel of cytoskeletal motors that reversibly change gears—speed up, slow down or switch directions—when exposed to blue light. Our genetically encoded structural designs incorporate a photoactive protein domain to enable light-dependent conformational changes in an engineered lever arm. Using in vitro motility assays, we demonstrate robust spatiotemporal control over motor function and characterize the kinetics of the optical gearshifting mechanism. We have used a modular approach to create optical gearshifting motors for both actin-based and microtubule-based transport. PMID:25086603

  20. Myosins, Actin and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kruppa, Antonina J; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-08-01

    Myosin motor proteins working together with the actin cytoskeleton drive a wide range of cellular processes. In this review, we focus on their roles in autophagy - the pathway the cell uses to ensure homeostasis by targeting pathogens, misfolded proteins and damaged organelles for degradation. The actin cytoskeleton regulated by a host of nucleating, anchoring and stabilizing proteins provides the filament network for the delivery of essential membrane vesicles from different cellular compartments to the autophagosome. Actin networks have also been implicated in structurally supporting the expanding phagophore, moving autophagosomes and enabling efficient fusion with the lysosome. Only a few myosins have so far been shown to play a role in autophagy. Non-muscle myosin IIA functions in the early stages delivering membrane for the initial formation of the autophagosome, whereas myosin IC and myosin VI are involved in the final stages providing specific membranes for autophagosome maturation and its fusion with the lysosome. PMID:27146966

  1. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Melkani, Girish C; Bernstein, Sanford I; Geeves, Michael A

    2016-01-22

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25-30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis. PMID:26586917

  2. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II*

    PubMed Central

    Bloemink, Marieke J.; Melkani, Girish C.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Geeves, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25–30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis. PMID:26586917

  3. Role of Nonmuscle Myosin II in Migration of Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sneha; Saha, Shekhar; Roy, Saheli; Das, Madhurima; Jana, Siddhartha S; Ta, Malancha

    2015-09-01

    It is the promise of regeneration and therapeutic applications that has sparked an interest in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Following infusion, MSCs migrate to sites of injury or inflammation by virtue of their homing property. To exert optimal clinical benefits, systemically delivered MSCs need to migrate efficiently and in adequate numbers to pathological areas in vivo. However, underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for MSC migration are still not well understood. The Wharton's jelly (WJ) of the umbilical cord is an attractive source of MSCs for stem cell therapy because of its abundant availability and painless collection. In this study, we attempted to identify the role of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII), if any, in the migration of WJ-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs). Expression of NMII isoforms, NMIIA, and NMIIB was observed both at RNA and protein levels in WJ-MSCs. Inhibition of NMII or its regulator ROCK, by pharmacological inhibitors, resulted in significant reduction in the migration of WJ-MSCs as confirmed by the scratch migration assay and time-lapse microscopy. Next, trying to dissect the role of each NMII isoform in migration of WJ-MSCs, we found that siRNA-mediated downregulation of NMIIA, but not NMIIB expression, led to cells failing to retract their trailing edge and losing cell-cell cohesiveness, while exhibiting a nondirectional migratory pathway. Migration, moreover, is also dependent on optimal affinity adhesion, which would allow rapid attachment and release of cells and, hence, can be influenced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules. We demonstrated that inhibition of NMII and more specifically NMIIA resulted in increased gene expression of ECM and adhesion molecules, which possibly led to stronger adhesions and, hence, decreased migration. Therefore, these data suggest that NMII acts as a regulator of cell migration and adhesion in WJ-MSCs. PMID:25923805

  4. Role of Nonmuscle Myosin II in Migration of Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sneha; Saha, Shekhar; Roy, Saheli; Das, Madhurima; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2015-01-01

    It is the promise of regeneration and therapeutic applications that has sparked an interest in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Following infusion, MSCs migrate to sites of injury or inflammation by virtue of their homing property. To exert optimal clinical benefits, systemically delivered MSCs need to migrate efficiently and in adequate numbers to pathological areas in vivo. However, underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for MSC migration are still not well understood. The Wharton's jelly (WJ) of the umbilical cord is an attractive source of MSCs for stem cell therapy because of its abundant availability and painless collection. In this study, we attempted to identify the role of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII), if any, in the migration of WJ-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs). Expression of NMII isoforms, NMIIA, and NMIIB was observed both at RNA and protein levels in WJ-MSCs. Inhibition of NMII or its regulator ROCK, by pharmacological inhibitors, resulted in significant reduction in the migration of WJ-MSCs as confirmed by the scratch migration assay and time-lapse microscopy. Next, trying to dissect the role of each NMII isoform in migration of WJ-MSCs, we found that siRNA-mediated downregulation of NMIIA, but not NMIIB expression, led to cells failing to retract their trailing edge and losing cell–cell cohesiveness, while exhibiting a nondirectional migratory pathway. Migration, moreover, is also dependent on optimal affinity adhesion, which would allow rapid attachment and release of cells and, hence, can be influenced by extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules. We demonstrated that inhibition of NMII and more specifically NMIIA resulted in increased gene expression of ECM and adhesion molecules, which possibly led to stronger adhesions and, hence, decreased migration. Therefore, these data suggest that NMII acts as a regulator of cell migration and adhesion in WJ-MSCs. PMID:25923805

  5. Conditional Ablation of Nonmuscle Myosin II-B Delineates Heart Defects in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuefei; Takeda, Kazuyo; Singh, Aman; Yu, Zu-Xi; Zerfas, Patricia; Blount, Anthony; Liu, Chengyu; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Schneider, Michael D.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Wei, Qize

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Germline ablation of the cytoskeletal protein nonmuscle myosin II-B (NMII-B) results in embryonic lethality with defects in both the brain and heart. Tissue specific ablation of NMII-B by a Cre-recombinase strategy should avoid embryonic lethality and permit study of the function of NMII-B in adult hearts. Objective To understand the function of NMII-B in adult mouse hearts and to see if the brain defects found in germline ablated mice influence cardiac development. Methods and Results We used a loxP/Cre-recombinase strategy to specifically ablate NMII-B in the brains or hearts of mice. Mice ablated for NMII-B in neural tissues, die between postnatal day 12 and 22 without showing cardiac defects. Mice deficient in NMII-B only in cardiac myocytes (BαMHC/BαMHC mice) do not show brain defects. However BαMHC/BαMHC mice display novel cardiac defects not seen in NMII-B germline ablated mice. Most of the BαMHC/BαMHC mice are born with enlarged cardiac myocytes some of which are multinucleated, reflecting a defect in cytokinesis. Between 6–10 months they develop a cardiomyopathy which includes interstitial fibrosis and infiltration of the myocardium and pericardium with inflammatory cells. Four of five BαMHC/BαMHC hearts develop marked widening of intercalated discs. Conclusion By avoiding the embryonic lethality found in germline-ablated mice we were able to study the function of NMII-B in adult mice and show that absence of NMII-B in cardiac myocytes results in cardiomyopathy in the adult heart. We also define a role for NMII-B in maintaining the integrity of intercalated discs. PMID:19815823

  6. Molecular biological approaches to study myosin functions in cytokinesis of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, T Q; Yumura, S

    2000-04-15

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is amenable to biochemical, cell biological, and molecular genetic analyses, and offers a unique opportunity for multifaceted approaches to dissect the mechanism of cytokinesis. One of the important questions that are currently under investigation using Dictyostelium is to understand how cleavage furrows or contractile rings are assembled in the equatorial region. Contractile rings consist of a number of components including parallel filaments of actin and myosin II. Phenotypic analyses and in vivo localization studies of cells expressing mutant myosin IIs have demonstrated that myosin II's transport to and localization at the equatorial region does not require regulation by phosphorylation of myosin II, specific amino acid sequences of myosin II, or the motor activity of myosin II. Rather, the transport appears to depend on a myosin II-independent flow of cortical cytoskeleton. What drives the flow of cortical cytoskeleton is still elusive. However, a growing number of mutants that affect assembly of contractile rings have been accumulated. Analyses of these mutations, identification of more cytokinesis-specific genes, and information deriving from other experimental systems, should allow us to understand the mechanism of contractile ring formation and other aspects of cytokinesis. PMID:10816252

  7. Phosphorylation of a Myosin Motor by TgCDPK3 Facilitates Rapid Initiation of Motility during Toxoplasma gondii egress

    PubMed Central

    Gaji, Rajshekhar Y.; Johnson, Derrick E.; Treeck, Moritz; Wang, Mu; Hudmon, Andy; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Members of the family of calcium dependent protein kinases (CDPK’s) are abundant in certain pathogenic parasites and absent in mammalian cells making them strong drug target candidates. In the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii TgCDPK3 is important for calcium dependent egress from the host cell. Nonetheless, the specific substrate through which TgCDPK3 exerts its function during egress remains unknown. To close this knowledge gap we applied the proximity-based protein interaction trap BioID and identified 13 proteins that are either near neighbors or direct interactors of TgCDPK3. Among these was Myosin A (TgMyoA), the unconventional motor protein greatly responsible for driving the gliding motility of this parasite, and whose phosphorylation at serine 21 by an unknown kinase was previously shown to be important for motility and egress. Through a non-biased peptide array approach we determined that TgCDPK3 can specifically phosphorylate serines 21 and 743 of TgMyoA in vitro. Complementation of the TgmyoA null mutant, which exhibits a delay in egress, with TgMyoA in which either S21 or S743 is mutated to alanine failed to rescue the egress defect. Similarly, phosphomimetic mutations in the motor protein overcome the need for TgCDPK3. Moreover, extracellular Tgcdpk3 mutant parasites have motility defects that are complemented by expression of S21+S743 phosphomimetic of TgMyoA. Thus, our studies establish that phosphorylation of TgMyoA by TgCDPK3 is responsible for initiation of motility and parasite egress from the host-cell and provides mechanistic insight into how this unique kinase regulates the lytic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii. PMID:26544049

  8. An acto-myosin II constricting ring initiates the fission of activity-dependent bulk endosomes in neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Gormal, Rachel S; Nguyen, Tam H; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Meunier, Frederic A

    2015-01-28

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis allows neurons to internalize large portions of the plasma membrane in response to stimulation. However, whether this critical type of compensatory endocytosis is unique to neurons or also occurs in other excitable cells is currently unknown. Here we used fluorescent 70 kDa dextran to demonstrate that secretagogue-induced bulk endocytosis also occurs in bovine chromaffin cells. The relatively large size of the bulk endosomes found in this model allowed us to investigate how the neck of the budding endosomes constricts to allow efficient recruitment of the fission machinery. Using time-lapse imaging of Lifeact-GFP-transfected chromaffin cells in combination with fluorescent 70 kDa dextran, we detected acto-myosin II rings surrounding dextran-positive budding endosomes. Importantly, these rings were transient and contracted before disappearing, suggesting that they might be involved in restricting the size of the budding endosome neck. Based on the complete recovery of dextran fluorescence after photobleaching, we demonstrated that the actin ring-associated budding endosomes were still connected with the extracellular fluid. In contrast, no such recovery was observed following the constriction and disappearance of the actin rings, suggesting that these structures were pinched-off endosomes. Finally, we showed that the rings were initiated by a circular array of phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate microdomains, and that their constriction was sensitive to both myosin II and dynamin inhibition. The acto-myosin II rings therefore play a key role in constricting the neck of budding bulk endosomes before dynamin-dependent fission from the plasma membrane of neurosecretory cells. PMID:25632116

  9. The Selective Myosin II Inhibitor Blebbistatin Reversibly Eliminates Gastrovascular Flow and Stolon Tip Pulsations in the Colonial Hydroid Podocoryna carnea

    PubMed Central

    Connally, Noah; Anderson, Christopher P.; Bolton, Jules E.; Bolton, Edward W.; Buss, Leo W.

    2015-01-01

    Blebbistatin reversibly disrupted both stolon tip pulsations and gastrovascular flow in the colonial hydroid Podocoryna carnea. Epithelial longitudinal muscles of polyps were unaffected by blebbistatin, as polyps contracted when challenged with a pulse of KCl. Latrunculin B, which sequesters G actin preventing F actin assembly, caused stolons to retract, exposing focal adhesions where the tip epithelial cells adhere to the substratum. These results are consistent with earlier suggestions that non-muscle myosin II provides the motive force for stolon tip pulsations and further suggest that tip oscillations are functionally coupled to hydrorhizal axial muscle contraction. PMID:26605798

  10. Actin age orchestrates myosin-5 and myosin-6 run lengths.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Dennis; Santos, Alicja; Kovar, David R; Rock, Ronald S

    2015-08-01

    Unlike a static and immobile skeleton, the actin cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic network of filamentous actin (F-actin) polymers that continuously turn over. In addition to generating mechanical forces and sensing mechanical deformation, dynamic F-actin networks serve as cellular tracks for myosin motor traffic. However, much of our mechanistic understanding of processive myosins comes from in vitro studies in which motility was studied on pre-assembled and artificially stabilized, static F-actin tracks. In this work, we examine the role of actin dynamics in single-molecule myosin motility using assembling F-actin and two highly processive motors, myosin-5 and myosin-6. These two myosins have distinct functions in the cell and travel in opposite directions along actin filaments [1-3]. Myosin-5 walks toward the barbed ends of F-actin, traveling to sites of actin polymerization at the cell periphery [4]. Myosin-6 walks toward the pointed end of F-actin [5], traveling toward the cell center along older segments of the actin filament. We find that myosin-5 takes 1.3- to 1.5-fold longer runs on ADP•Pi (young) F-actin, whereas myosin-6 takes 1.7- to 3.6-fold longer runs along ADP (old) F-actin. These results suggest that conformational differences between ADP•Pi and ADP F-actin tailor these myosins to walk farther toward their preferred actin filament end. Taken together, these experiments define a new mechanism by which myosin traffic may sort to different F-actin networks depending on filament age. PMID:26190073

  11. Planar polarization of Vangl2 in the vertebrate neural plate is controlled by Wnt and Myosin II signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ossipova, Olga; Kim, Kyeongmi; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate neural tube forms as a result of complex morphogenetic movements, which require the functions of several core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins, including Vangl2 and Prickle. Despite the importance of these proteins for neurulation, their subcellular localization and the mode of action have remained largely unknown. Here we describe the anteroposterior planar cell polarity (AP-PCP) of the cells in the Xenopus neural plate. At the neural midline, the Vangl2 protein is enriched at anterior cell edges and that this localization is directed by Prickle, a Vangl2-interacting protein. Our further analysis is consistent with the model, in which Vangl2 AP-PCP is established in the neural plate as a consequence of Wnt-dependent phosphorylation. Additionally, we uncover feedback regulation of Vangl2 polarity by Myosin II, reiterating a role for mechanical forces in PCP. These observations indicate that both Wnt signaling and Myosin II activity regulate cell polarity and cell behaviors during vertebrate neurulation. PMID:25910938

  12. α-Actinin and fimbrin cooperate with myosin II to organize actomyosin bundles during contractile-ring assembly

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Damien; Ojkic, Nikola; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2012-01-01

    The actomyosin contractile ring assembles through the condensation of a broad band of nodes that forms at the cell equator in fission yeast cytokinesis. The condensation process depends on actin filaments that interconnect nodes. By mutating or titrating actin cross-linkers α-actinin Ain1 and fimbrin Fim1 in live cells, we reveal that both proteins are involved in node condensation. Ain1 and Fim1 stabilize the actin cytoskeleton and modulate node movement, which prevents nodes and linear structures from aggregating into clumps and allows normal ring formation. Our computer simulations modeling actin filaments as semiflexible polymers reproduce the experimental observations and provide a model of how actin cross-linkers work with other proteins to regulate actin-filament orientations inside actin bundles and organize the actin network. As predicted by the simulations, doubling myosin II Myo2 level rescues the node condensation defects caused by Ain1 overexpression. Taken together, our work supports a cooperative process of ring self-organization driven by the interaction between actin filaments and myosin II, which is progressively stabilized by the cross-linking proteins. PMID:22740629

  13. Cell-sized liposome doublets reveal active tension build-up driven by acto-myosin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Caorsi, V; Lemière, J; Campillo, C; Bussonnier, M; Manzi, J; Betz, T; Plastino, J; Carvalho, K; Sykes, C

    2016-07-20

    Cells modulate their shape to fulfill specific functions, mediated by the cell cortex, a thin actin shell bound to the plasma membrane. Myosin motor activity, together with actin dynamics, contributes to cortical tension. Here, we examine the individual contributions of actin polymerization and myosin activity to tension increase with a non-invasive method. Cell-sized liposome doublets are covered with either a stabilized actin cortex of preformed actin filaments, or a dynamic branched actin network polymerizing at the membrane. The addition of myosin II minifilaments in both cases triggers a change in doublet shape that is unambiguously related to a tension increase. Preformed actin filaments allow us to evaluate the effect of myosin alone while, with dynamic actin cortices, we examine the synergy of actin polymerization and myosin motors in driving shape changes. Our assay paves the way for a quantification of tension changes triggered by various actin-associated proteins in a cell-sized system. PMID:27378156

  14. Use of the myosin motor domain as large-affinity tag for the expression and purification of proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Kollmar, Martin

    2006-08-15

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is increasingly be used for the overexpression of proteins. Dictyostelium is amenable to classical and molecular genetic approaches and can easily be grown in large quantities. It contains a variety of chaperones and folding enzymes, and is able to perform all kinds of post-translational protein modifications. Here, new expression vectors are presented that have been designed for the production of proteins in large quantities for biochemical and structural studies. The expression cassettes of the most successful vectors are based on a tandem affinity purification tag consisting of an octahistidine tag followed by the myosin motor domain tag. The myosin motor domain not only strongly enhances the production of fused proteins but is also used for a fast affinity purification step through its ATP-dependent binding to actin. The applicability of the new system has been demonstrated for the expression and purification of subunits of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex from different species. PMID:16516959

  15. Two independent mechanical events in the interaction cycle of skeletal muscle myosin with actin.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, M; Canepari, M; Cacciafesta, P; Lombardi, V; Cicchi, R; Maffei, M; Pavone, F S; Bottinelli, R

    2006-01-01

    During skeletal muscle contraction, regular arrays of actin and myosin filaments slide past each other driven by the cyclic ATP-dependent interaction of the motor protein myosin II (the cross-bridge) with actin. The rate of the cross-bridge cycle and its load-dependence, defining shortening velocity and energy consumption at the molecular level, vary widely among different isoforms of myosin II. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have addressed this question by applying a single-molecule approach to rapidly ( approximately 300 mus) and precisely ( approximately 0.1 nm) detect acto-myosin interactions of two myosin isoforms having large differences in shortening velocity. We show that skeletal myosin propels actin filaments, performing its conformational change (working stroke) in two steps. The first step ( approximately 3.4-5.2 nm) occurs immediately after myosin binding and is followed by a smaller step ( approximately 1.0-1.3 nm), which occurs much faster in the fast myosin isoform than in the slow one, independently of ATP concentration. On the other hand, the rate of the second phase of the working stroke, from development of the latter step to dissociation of the acto-myosin complex, is very similar in the two isoforms and depends linearly on ATP concentration. The finding of a second mechanical event in the working stroke of skeletal muscle myosin provides the molecular basis for a simple model of actomyosin interaction. This model can account for the variation, in different fiber types, of the rate of the cross-bridge cycle and provides a common scheme for the chemo-mechanical transduction within the myosin family. PMID:16371472

  16. Porcine myosin-VI: characterization of a new mammalian unconventional myosin

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned a new mammalian unconventional myosin, porcine myosin-VI from the proximal tubule cell line, LLC-PK1 (CL4). Porcine myosin-VI is highly homologous to Drosophila 95F myosin heavy chain, and together these two myosins comprise a sixth class of myosin motors. Myosin-VI exhibits ATP-sensitive actin-binding activities characteristic of myosins, and it is associated with a calmodulin light chain. Within LLC- PK1 cells, myosin-VI is soluble and does not associate with the major actin-containing domains. Within the kidney, however, myosin-VI is associated with sedimentable structures and specifically locates to the actin- and membrane-rich apical brush border domain of the proximal tubule cells. This motor was not enriched within the glomerulus, capillaries, or distal tubules. Myosin-VI associates with the proximal tubule cytoskeleton in an ATP-sensitive fashion, suggesting that this motor is associated with the actin cytoskeleton within the proximal tubule cells. Given the difference in association of myosin-VI with the apical cytoskeleton between LLC-PK1 cells and adult kidney, it is likely that this cell line does not fully differentiate to form functional proximal tubule cells. Myosin-VI may require the presence of additional elements, only found in vivo in proximal tubule cells, to properly locate to the apical domain. PMID:7929586

  17. Engineering myosins for long-range transport on actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Tony D.; Chen, Lu; Lebel, Paul; Nakamura, Muneaki; Bryant, Zev

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors act as cargo transporters in cells1 and may be harnessed for directed transport applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices2. High processivity — the ability to take many steps along a track before dissociating3 — is often a desirable characteristic because it allows nanoscale motors to transport cargoes over distances of microns in vivo and in vitro. Natural processive myosins4,5 are dimeric and use internal tension to coordinate the detachment cycles of the two heads6–8. Here, we show that processivity can be enhanced in engineered myosins using two non-natural strategies designed to optimize the effectiveness of random, uncoordinated stepping: (i) formation of three-headed and four-headed myosins; and (ii) introduction of flexible elements between heads. We quantify improvements using systematic single-molecule characterization of a panel of engineered motors. To test the modularity of our approach, we design a controllably bidirectional myosin that is robustly processive in both the forward and backward direction, and also produce the fastest processive cytoskeletal motor measured to date, reaching a speed of 10 μm/s. PMID:24240432

  18. Broad disorder and the allosteric mechanism of myosin II regulation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Vileno, Bertrand; Chamoun, Jean; Liang, Hua; Brewer, Paul; Haldeman, Brian D; Facemyer, Kevin C; Salzameda, Bridget; Song, Likai; Li, Hui-Chun; Cremo, Christine R; Fajer, Piotr G

    2011-05-17

    Double electron electron resonance EPR methods was used to measure the effects of the allosteric modulators, phosphorylation, and ATP, on the distances and distance distributions between the two regulatory light chain of myosin (RLC). Three different states of smooth muscle myosin (SMM) were studied: monomers, the short-tailed subfragment heavy meromyosin, and SMM filaments. We reconstituted myosin with nine single cysteine spin-labeled RLC. For all mutants we found a broad distribution of distances that could not be explained by spin-label rotamer diversity. For SMM and heavy meromyosin, several sites showed two heterogeneous populations in the unphosphorylated samples, whereas only one was observed after phosphorylation. The data were consistent with the presence of two coexisting heterogeneous populations of structures in the unphosphorylated samples. The two populations were attributed to an on and off state by comparing data from unphosphorylated and phosphorylated samples. Models of these two states were generated using a rigid body docking approach derived from EM [Wendt T, Taylor D, Trybus KM, Taylor K (2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98:4361-4366] (PNAS, 2001, 98:4361-4366), but our data revealed a new feature of the off-state, which is heterogeneity in the orientation of the two RLC. Our average off-state structure was very similar to the Wendt model reveal a new feature of the off state, which is heterogeneity in the orientations of the two RLC. As found previously in the EM study, our on-state structure was completely different from the off-state structure. The heads are splayed out and there is even more heterogeneity in the orientations of the two RLC. PMID:21536903

  19. Conditional deletion of nonmuscle myosin II-A in mouse tongue epithelium results in squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Anne Conti, Mary; Saleh, Anthony D.; Brinster, Lauren R.; Cheng, Hui; Chen, Zhong; Cornelius, Shaleeka; Liu, Chengyu; Ma, Xuefei; Van Waes, Carter; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the contribution of nonmuscle myosin II-A (NM II-A) to early cardiac development we crossed Myh9 floxed mice and Nkx2.5 cre-recombinase mice. Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early heart (E7.5) and later in the tongue epithelium. Mice homozygous for deletion of NM II-A (ANkx/ANkx) are born at the expected ratio with normal hearts, but consistently develop an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue (32/32 ANkx/ANkx) as early as E17.5. To assess reproducibility a second, independent line of Myh9 floxed mice derived from a different embryonic stem cell clone was tested. This second line also develops SCC indistinguishable from the first (15/15). In ANkx/ANkx mouse tongue epithelium, genetic deletion of NM II-A does not affect stabilization of TP53, unlike a previous report for SCC. We attribute the consistent, early formation of SCC with high penetrance to the role of NM II in maintaining mitotic stability during karyokinesis. PMID:26369831

  20. Revisiting Myosin Families Through Large-scale Sequence Searches Leads to the Discovery of New Myosins.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Shaik Naseer; Meenakshi, Iyer; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins involved in many cellular movements. It is interesting to study the evolutionary patterns and the functional attributes of various types of myosins. Computational search algorithms were performed to identify putative myosin members by phylogenetic analysis, sequence motifs, and coexisting domains. This study is aimed at understanding the distribution and the likely biological functions of myosins encoded in various taxa and available eukaryotic genomes. We report here a phylogenetic analysis of around 4,064 myosin motor domains, built entirely from complete or near-complete myosin repertoires incorporating many unclassified, uncharacterized sequences and new myosin classes, with emphasis on myosins from Fungi, Haptophyta, and other Stramenopiles, Alveolates, and Rhizaria (SAR). The identification of large classes of myosins in Oomycetes, Cellular slime molds, Choanoflagellates, Pelagophytes, Eustigmatophyceae, Fonticula, Eucoccidiorida, and Apicomplexans with novel myosin motif variants that are conserved and thus presumably functional extends our knowledge of this important family of motor proteins. This work provides insights into the distribution and probable function of myosins including newly identified myosin classes. PMID:27597808

  1. Revisiting Myosin Families Through Large-scale Sequence Searches Leads to the Discovery of New Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Shaik Naseer; Meenakshi, Iyer; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins involved in many cellular movements. It is interesting to study the evolutionary patterns and the functional attributes of various types of myosins. Computational search algorithms were performed to identify putative myosin members by phylogenetic analysis, sequence motifs, and coexisting domains. This study is aimed at understanding the distribution and the likely biological functions of myosins encoded in various taxa and available eukaryotic genomes. We report here a phylogenetic analysis of around 4,064 myosin motor domains, built entirely from complete or near-complete myosin repertoires incorporating many unclassified, uncharacterized sequences and new myosin classes, with emphasis on myosins from Fungi, Haptophyta, and other Stramenopiles, Alveolates, and Rhizaria (SAR). The identification of large classes of myosins in Oomycetes, Cellular slime molds, Choanoflagellates, Pelagophytes, Eustigmatophyceae, Fonticula, Eucoccidiorida, and Apicomplexans with novel myosin motif variants that are conserved and thus presumably functional extends our knowledge of this important family of motor proteins. This work provides insights into the distribution and probable function of myosins including newly identified myosin classes. PMID:27597808

  2. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hindman, Bridget; Goeckeler, Zoe; Sierros, Kostas; Wysolmerski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM) in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa), parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa). These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling. PMID:26136073

  3. Actin and non-muscle myosin II facilitate apical exocytosis of tear proteins in rabbit lacrimal acinar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jerdeva, Galina V.; Wu, Kaijin; Yarber, Francie A.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Kalman, Daniel; Schechter, Joel E.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The acinar epithelial cells of the lacrimal gland exocytose the contents of mature secretory vesicles containing tear proteins at their apical membranes in response to secretagogues. Here we use time-lapse confocal fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to investigate the changes in actin filaments located beneath the apical membrane during exocytosis evoked by the muscarinic agonist, carbachol (100 μM). Time-lapse confocal fluorescence microscopy of apical actin filaments in reconstituted rabbit lacrimal acini transduced with replication-deficient adenovirus containing GFP-actin revealed a relatively quiescent apical actin array in resting acini. Carbachol markedly increased apical actin filament turnover and also promoted transient actin assembly around apparent fusion intermediates. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measurements revealed significant (p≤0.05) increases and decreases, respectively, in mobile fraction (Mf) and turnover times (t½) for apical actin filaments in carbachol-stimulated acini relative to untreated acini. The myosin inhibitors, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM, 10 mM, 15 min) and ML-7 (40 μM, 15 min), significantly decreased carbachol-stimulated secretion of bulk protein and the exogenous secretory vesicle marker, syncollin-GFP; these agents also promoted accumulation of actin-coated structures which were enriched, in transduced acini, in syncollin-GFP, confirming their identity as fusion intermediates. Actin-coated fusion intermediates were sized consistent with incorporation of multiple rather than single secretory vesicles; moreover, BDM and ML-7 caused a shift towards formation of multiple secretory vesicle aggregates while significantly increasing the diameter of actin-coated fusion intermediates. Our findings suggest that the increased turnover of apical actin filaments and the interaction of actin with non-muscle myosin II assembled around aggregates of secretory vesicles facilitate

  4. Analysis of the myosins encoded in the recently completed Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Day, I. S.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three types of molecular motors play an important role in the organization, dynamics and transport processes associated with the cytoskeleton. The myosin family of molecular motors move cargo on actin filaments, whereas kinesin and dynein motors move cargo along microtubules. These motors have been highly characterized in non-plant systems and information is becoming available about plant motors. The actin cytoskeleton in plants has been shown to be involved in processes such as transportation, signaling, cell division, cytoplasmic streaming and morphogenesis. The role of myosin in these processes has been established in a few cases but many questions remain to be answered about the number, types and roles of myosins in plants. RESULTS: Using the motor domain of an Arabidopsis myosin we identified 17 myosin sequences in the Arabidopsis genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis myosins with non-plant and plant myosins revealed that all the Arabidopsis myosins and other plant myosins fall into two groups - class VIII and class XI. These groups contain exclusively plant or algal myosins with no animal or fungal myosins. Exon/intron data suggest that the myosins are highly conserved and that some may be a result of gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Plant myosins are unlike myosins from any other organisms except algae. As a percentage of the total gene number, the number of myosins is small overall in Arabidopsis compared with the other sequenced eukaryotic genomes. There are, however, a large number of class XI myosins. The function of each myosin has yet to be determined.

  5. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion-site formation.

    PubMed

    Giannone, Grégory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin J; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P

    2007-02-01

    Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion, and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction, and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  6. Temperature dependent measurements reveal similarities between muscle and non-muscle myosin motility

    PubMed Central

    Yengo, Christopher M.; Takagi, Yasuharu; Sellers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the temperature dependence of muscle and non-muscle myosin (heavy meromyosin, HMM) with in vitro motility and actin-activated ATPase assays. Our results indicate that myosin V (MV) has a temperature dependence that is similar in both ATPase and motility assays. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle myosin (SK), smooth muscle myosin (SM), and non-muscle myosin IIA (NM) have a different temperature dependence in ATPase compared to in vitro motility assays. In the class II myosins we examined (SK, SM, and NM) the rate-limiting step in ATPase assays is thought to be attachment to actin or phosphate release, while for in vitro motility assays it is controversial. In myosin V the rate-limiting step for both in vitro motility and ATPase assays is known to be ADP release. Consequently, in MV the temperature dependence of the ADP release rate constant is similar to the temperature dependence of in vitro motility. Interestingly, the temperature dependence of the ADP release rate constant of SM and NM was shifted toward the in vitro motility temperature dependence. Our results suggest that the rate-limiting step in SK, SM, and NM may shift from attachment-limited in solution to detachment-limited in the in vitro motility assay. Internal strain within the myosin molecule or by neighboring myosin motors may slow ADP release which becomes rate-limiting in the in vitro motility assay. Within this small subset of myosins examined, the in vitro sliding velocity correlates reasonably well with actin-activated ATPase activity, which was suggested by the original study by Barany et al. (Barany 1967). PMID:22930330

  7. Directional Mechanosensing in Myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yubo; Tehver, Riina

    2013-03-01

    Myosin is a family of versatile motor proteins that perform various tasks, such as organelle transport, anchoring and cell deformation. Although the general mechanism of the motors has been fairly well established, details on dynamic aspects like force response of the motor, and force propagation are yet to be fully understood. In this poster, we present the response of the ATP binding region to force exerted on the tail domain in order to test the proposed tension-dependent gating mechanism of myosin VI processive motion. We employed the Self-Organized Polymer model in a computer simulation to explore the effect. Current results show that the ATP binding domain of myosin VI indeed exhibits tension dependence - both structurally and dynamically.

  8. A role for myosin IXb, a motor-RhoGAP chimera, in epithelial wound healing and tight junction regulation.

    PubMed

    Chandhoke, Surjit K; Mooseker, Mark S

    2012-07-01

    Polymorphisms in the gene encoding the heavy chain of myosin IXb (Myo9b) have been linked to several forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Given that Myo9b contains a RhoGTPase-activating protein domain within its tail, it may play key roles in Rho-mediated actin cytoskeletal modifications critical to intestinal barrier function. In wounded monolayers of the intestinal epithelial cell line Caco2(BBe) (BBe), Myo9b localizes to the extreme leading edge of lamellipodia of migrating cells. BBe cells exhibiting loss of Myo9b expression with RNA interference or Myo9b C-terminal dominant-negative (DN) tail-tip expression lack lamellipodia, fail to migrate into the wound, and form stress fiber-like arrays of actin at the free edges of cells facing the wound. These cells also exhibit disruption of tight junction (TJ) protein localization, including ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1. Torsional motility and junctional permeability to dextran are greatly increased in cells expressing DN-tail-tip. Of interest, this effect is propagated to neighboring cells. Consistent with a role for Myo9b in regulating levels of active Rho, localization of both RhoGTP and myosin light chain phosphorylation corresponds to Myo9b-knockdown regions of BBe monolayers. These data reveal critical roles for Myo9b during epithelial wound healing and maintenance of TJ integrity-key functions that may be altered in patients with Myo9b-linked IBD. PMID:22573889

  9. Sds22/PP1 Links Epithelial Integrity and Tumor Suppression via Regulation of Myosin II and JNK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuwei; Scott, Kenneth L.; Kwak, Su-Jin; Chen, Rui; Mardon, Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Loss of epithelial integrity often correlates with the progression of malignant tumors. Sds22, a regulatory subunit of Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1), has recently been linked to regulation of epithelial polarity in Drosophila. However, its role in tumorigenesis remains obscure. Here, using Drosophila imaginal tissue as an in vivo model system, we show that sds22 is a new potential tumor suppressor gene in Drosophila. Without sds22, cells lose epithelial architecture, and become invasive and tumorigenic when combined with Ras overexpression; conversely, sds22 overexpression can largely suppress tumorigenic growth of RasV12scrib−/ − mutant cells. Mechanistically, we show that sds22 prevents cell invasion and metastasis by inhibiting myosin II and JNK activity downstream of PP1. Loss of this inhibition causes cells to lose epithelial organization and promotes cell invasion. Finally, human Sds22 is focally deleted and down-regulated in multiple carcinomas, and this downregulation correlates with tumor progression, suggesting that sds22 inactivation may contribute to tumorigenesis and metastatic potential in human cancers via a similar mechanism. PMID:21399659

  10. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9) and Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Sabbir, Mohammad G; Dillon, Rachelle; Mowat, Michael R A

    2016-01-01

    The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1) gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9), plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype. PMID:26977077

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Signalling Controls Myosin II Planar Polarity to Orchestrate Convergent Extension Movements during Drosophila Tubulogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bunt, Stephanie; Bischoff, Marcus; VijayRaghavan, Krishnaswamy; Skaer, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Most epithelial tubes arise as small buds and elongate by regulated morphogenetic processes including oriented cell division, cell rearrangements, and changes in cell shape. Through live analysis of Drosophila renal tubule morphogenesis we show that tissue elongation results from polarised cell intercalations around the tubule circumference, producing convergent-extension tissue movements. Using genetic techniques, we demonstrate that the vector of cell movement is regulated by localised epidermal growth factor (EGF) signalling from the distally placed tip cell lineage, which sets up a distal-to-proximal gradient of pathway activation to planar polarise cells, without the involvement for PCP gene activity. Time-lapse imaging at subcellular resolution shows that the acquisition of planar polarity leads to asymmetric pulsatile Myosin II accumulation in the basal, proximal cortex of tubule cells, resulting in repeated, transient shortening of their circumferential length. This repeated bias in the polarity of cell contraction allows cells to move relative to each other, leading to a reduction in cell number around the lumen and an increase in tubule length. Physiological analysis demonstrates that animals whose tubules fail to elongate exhibit abnormal excretory function, defective osmoregulation, and lethality. PMID:25460353

  12. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9) and Rac1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Sabbir, Mohammad G.; Dillon, Rachelle; Mowat, Michael R. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1) gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9), plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype. PMID:26977077

  13. A regulatory motif in nonmuscle myosin II-B regulates its role in migratory front–back polarity

    PubMed Central

    Juanes-Garcia, Alba; Chapman, Jessica R.; Aguilar-Cuenca, Rocio; Delgado-Arevalo, Cristina; Hodges, Jennifer; Whitmore, Leanna A.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we show that the role of nonmuscle myosin II (NMII)-B in front–back migratory cell polarity is controlled by a short stretch of amino acids containing five serines (1935–1941). This motif resides near the junction between the C terminus helical and nonhelical tail domains. Removal of this motif inhibited NMII-B assembly, whereas its insertion into NMII-A endowed an NMII-B–like ability to generate large actomyosin bundles that determine the rear of the cell. Phosphomimetic mutation of the five serines also inhibited NMII-B assembly, rendering it unable to support front–back polarization. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that several of these serines are phosphorylated in live cells. Single-site mutagenesis showed that serine 1935 is a major regulatory site of NMII-B function. These data reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of NMII in polarized migrating cells by identifying a key molecular determinant that confers NMII isoform functional specificity. PMID:25869664

  14. Two-headed binding of a processive myosin to F-actin.

    PubMed

    Walker, M L; Burgess, S A; Sellers, J R; Wang, F; Hammer, J A; Trinick, J; Knight, P J

    2000-06-15

    Myosins are motor proteins in cells. They move along actin by changing shape after making stereospecific interactions with the actin subunits. As these are arranged helically, a succession of steps will follow a helical path. However, if the myosin heads are long enough to span the actin helical repeat (approximately 36 nm), linear motion is possible. Muscle myosin (myosin II) heads are about 16 nm long, which is insufficient to span the repeat. Myosin V, however, has heads of about 31 nm that could span 36 nm and thus allow single two-headed molecules to transport cargo by walking straight. Here we use electron microscopy to show that while working, myosin V spans the helical repeat. The heads are mostly 13 actin subunits apart, with values of 11 or 15 also found. Typically the structure is polar and one head is curved, the other straighter. Single particle processing reveals the polarity of the underlying actin filament, showing that the curved head is the leading one. The shape of the leading head may correspond to the beginning of the working stroke of the motor. We also observe molecules attached by one head in this conformation. PMID:10866203

  15. The unique enzymatic and mechanistic properties of plant myosins.

    PubMed

    Henn, Arnon; Sadot, Einat

    2014-12-01

    Myosins are molecular motors that move along actin-filament tracks. Plants express two main classes of myosins, myosin VIII and myosin XI. Along with their relatively conserved sequence and functions, plant myosins have acquired some unique features. Myosin VIII has the enzymatic characteristics of a tension sensor and/or a tension generator, similar to functions found in other eukaryotes. Interestingly, class XI plant myosins have gained a novel function that consists of propelling the exceptionally rapid cytoplasmic streaming. This specific class includes the fastest known translocating molecular motors, which can reach an extremely high velocity of about 60μms(-1). However, the enzymatic properties and mechanistic basis for these remarkable manifestations are not yet fully understood. Here we review recent progress in understanding the uniqueness of plant myosins, while emphasizing the unanswered questions. PMID:25435181

  16. Neural activity selects myosin IIB and VI with a specific time window in distinct dynamin isoform-mediated synaptic vesicle reuse pathways.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Michikata; Tanifuji, Shota; Ma, Huan; Murakami, Noriko; Mochida, Sumiko

    2015-06-10

    Presynaptic nerve terminals must maintain stable neurotransmissions via synaptic vesicle (SV) resupply despite encountering wide fluctuations in the number and frequency of incoming action potentials (APs). However, the molecular mechanism linking variation in neural activity to SV resupply is unknown. Myosins II and VI are actin-based cytoskeletal motors that drive dendritic actin dynamics and membrane transport, respectively, at brain synapses. Here we combined genetic knockdown or molecular dysfunction and direct physiological measurement of fast synaptic transmission from paired rat superior cervical ganglion neurons in culture to show that myosins IIB and VI work individually in SV reuse pathways, having distinct dependency and time constants with physiological AP frequency. Myosin VI resupplied the readily releasable pool (RRP) with slow kinetics independently of firing rates but acted quickly within 50 ms after AP. Under high-frequency AP firing, myosin IIB resupplied the RRP with fast kinetics in a slower time window of 200 ms. Knockdown of both myosin and dynamin isoforms by mixed siRNA microinjection revealed that myosin IIB-mediated SV resupply follows amphiphysin/dynamin-1-mediated endocytosis, while myosin VI-mediated SV resupply follows dynamin-3-mediated endocytosis. Collectively, our findings show how distinct myosin isoforms work as vesicle motors in appropriate SV reuse pathways associated with specific firing patterns. PMID:26063922

  17. A mechanochemical model for myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehver, Riina; Jack, Amanda; Lowe, Ian

    Myosin VI is a motor protein that transports cellular cargo along actin filaments. This transport takes place as a result of a coordinated mechano-chemical cycle that is controlled by external variables including imposed force and nucleotide concentrations. We present a model that captures the different dynamic pathways that myosin VI can take in response to these variables. The results of our model for experimentally observable quantities, such as the motor velocity or run length, agree with available experimental data, and we can also make predictions beyond the tested regimes. Using the model, we study how myosin VI reacts to its environment and test its operational efficiency.

  18. The RhoA-Rok-Myosin II Pathway is Involved in Extracellular Matrix-Mediated Regulation of Prolactin Signaling in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jyun-Yi; Chen, Meng-Chi; Hsu, Tsai-Ching; Wang, Jen-Hsing; Brackenbury, Lisa; Lin, Ting-Hui; Wu, Yi-Ying; Yang, Zhihong; Streuli, Charles H; Lee, Yi-Ju

    2012-01-01

    In mammary epithelial cells (MECs), prolactin-induced signaling and gene expression requires integrin-mediated cell adhesion to basement membrane (BM). In the absence of proper cell–BM interactions, for example, culturing cells on collagen-coated plastic dishes, signal propagation is substantially impaired. Here we demonstrate that the RhoA-Rok-myosin II pathway accounts for the ineffectiveness of prolactin signaling in MECs cultured on collagen I. Under these culture conditions, the RhoA pathway is activated, leading to downregulation of prolactin receptor expression and reduced prolactin signaling. Enforced activation of RhoA in MECs cultured on BM suppresses prolactin receptor levels, and prevents prolactin-induced Stat5 tyrosine phosphorylation and β-casein expression. Overexpression of dominant negative RhoA in MECs cultured on collagen I, or inhibiting Rok activity, increases prolactin receptor expression, and enhances prolactin signaling. In addition, inhibition of myosin II ATPase activity by blebbistatin also exerts a beneficial effect on prolactin receptor expression and prolactin signaling, suggesting that tension exerted by the collagen substratum, in collaboration with the RhoA-Rok-myosin II pathway, contributes to the failure of prolactin signaling. Furthermore, MECs cultured on laminin-coated plastic have similar morphology and response to prolactin as those cultured on collagen I. They display high levels of RhoA activity and are inefficient in prolactin signaling, stressing the importance of matrix stiffness in signal transduction. Our results reveal that RhoA has a central role in determining the fate decisions of MECs in response to cell–matrix interactions. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 1553–1560, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21678418

  19. CsmA, a Class V Chitin Synthase with a Myosin Motor-like Domain, Is Localized through Direct Interaction with the Actin Cytoskeleton in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Norio; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    One of the essential features of fungal morphogenesis is the polarized synthesis of cell wall components such as chitin. The actin cytoskeleton provides the structural basis for cell polarity in Aspergillus nidulans, as well as in most other eukaryotes. A class V chitin synthase, CsmA, which contains a myosin motor-like domain (MMD), is conserved among most filamentous fungi. The ΔcsmA null mutant showed remarkable abnormalities with respect to cell wall integrity and the establishment of polarity. In this study, we demonstrated that CsmA tagged with 9× HA epitopes localized near actin structures at the hyphal tips and septation sites and that its MMD was able to bind to actin. Characterization of mutants bearing a point mutation or deletion in the MMD suggests that the interaction between the MMD and actin is not only necessary for the proper localization of CsmA, but also for CsmA function. Thus, the finding of a direct interaction between the chitin synthase and the actin cytoskeleton provides new insight into the mechanisms of polarized cell wall synthesis and fungal morphogenesis. PMID:15703213

  20. Dynamics of the coiled-coil unfolding transition of myosin rod probed by dissipation force spectrum.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yukinori; Khatri, Bhavin S; Brockwell, David J; Paci, Emanuele; Kawakami, Masaru

    2010-07-01

    The motor protein myosin II plays a crucial role in muscle contraction. The mechanical properties of its coiled-coil region, the myosin rod, are important for effective force transduction during muscle function. Previous studies have investigated the static elastic response of the myosin rod. However, analogous to the study of macroscopic complex fluids, how myosin will respond to physiological time-dependent loads can only be understood from its viscoelastic response. Here, we apply atomic force microscopy using a magnetically driven oscillating cantilever to measure the dissipative properties of single myosin rods that provide unique dynamical information about the coiled-coil structure as a function of force. We find that the friction constant of the single myosin rod has a highly nontrivial variation with force; in particular, the single-molecule friction constant is reduced dramatically and increases again as it passes through the coiled-uncoiled transition. This is a direct indication of a large free-energy barrier to uncoiling, which may be related to a fine-tuned dynamic mechanosignaling response to large and unexpected physiological loads. Further, from the critical force at which the minimum in friction occurs we determine the asymmetry of the bistable landscape that controls uncoiling of the coiled coil. This work highlights the sensitivity of the dissipative signal in force unfolding to dynamic molecular structure that is hidden to the elastic signal. PMID:20655854

  1. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G.; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  2. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies. PMID:26888436

  3. Dictyostelium Myosin Bipolar Thick Filament Formation: Importance of Charge and Specific Domains of the Myosin Rod

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm) assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF) structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP) “head” is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines. PMID:15492777

  4. Dictyostelium myosin bipolar thick filament formation: importance of charge and specific domains of the myosin rod.

    PubMed

    Hostetter, Daniel; Rice, Sarah; Dean, Sara; Altman, David; McMahon, Peggy M; Sutton, Shirley; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Spudich, James A

    2004-11-01

    Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm) assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF) structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP) "head" is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines. PMID:15492777

  5. The Effects of Extracellular Calcium on Motility, Pseudopod and Uropod Formation, Chemotaxis and the Cortical Localization of Myosin II in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lusche, Daniel F.; Wessels, Deborah; Soll, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular Ca++, a ubiquitous cation in the soluble environment of cells both free living and within the human body, regulates most aspects of amoeboid cell motility, including shape, uropod formation, pseudopod formation, velocity and turning in Dictyostelium discoideum. Hence it affects the efficiency of both basic motile behavior and chemotaxis. Extracellular Ca++ is optimal at 10 mM. A gradient of the chemoattractant cAMP generated in the absence of added Ca++ only affects turning, but in combination with extracellular Ca++, enhances the effects of extracellular Ca++. Potassium, at 40 mM, can substitute for Ca++. Mg++, Mn++, Zn++ and Na+ cannot. Extracellular Ca++, or K+, also induce the cortical localization of myosin II in a polar fashion. The effects of Ca++, K+ or a cAMP gradient do not appear to be similarly mediated by an increase in the general pool of free cytosolic Ca++. These results suggest a model, in which each agent functioning through different signaling systems, converge to affect the cortical localization of myosin II, which in turn effects the behavioral changes leading to efficient cell motility and chemotaxis. PMID:19363786

  6. Identification and functional analysis of the essential and regulatory light chains of the only type II myosin Myo1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jianying; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Dravis, Christopher; Tcheperegine, Serguei E.; Drees, Becky; Bi, Erfei

    2004-01-01

    Cytokinesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves coordination between actomyosin ring contraction and septum formation and/or targeted membrane deposition. We show that Mlc1p, a light chain for Myo2p (type V myosin) and Iqg1p (IQGAP), is the essential light chain for Myo1p, the only type II myosin in S. cerevisiae. However, disruption or reduction of Mlc1p–Myo1p interaction by deleting the Mlc1p binding site on Myo1p or by a point mutation in MLC1, mlc1-93, did not cause any obvious defect in cytokinesis. In contrast, a different point mutation, mlc1-11, displayed defects in cytokinesis and in interactions with Myo2p and Iqg1p. These data suggest that the major function of the Mlc1p–Myo1p interaction is not to regulate Myo1p activity but that Mlc1p may interact with Myo1p, Iqg1p, and Myo2p to coordinate actin ring formation and targeted membrane deposition during cytokinesis. We also identify Mlc2p as the regulatory light chain for Myo1p and demonstrate its role in Myo1p ring disassembly, a function likely conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:15210731

  7. Mesenchymal chemotaxis requires selective inactivation of Myosin II at the leading edge via a non-canonical PLCγ/PKCα pathway

    PubMed Central

    Asokan, Sreeja B.; Johnson, Heath E.; Rahman, Anisur; King, Samantha J.; Rotty, Jeremy D.; Lebedeva, Irina P.; Haugh, Jason M.; Bear, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chemotaxis, migration towards soluble chemical cues, is critical for processes such as wound healing and immune surveillance, and is exhibited by various cell types from rapidly-migrating leukocytes to slow-moving mesenchymal cells. To interrogate the mechanisms involved in mesenchymal chemotaxis, we observed cell migration in microfluidic chambers that generate stable gradients of the chemoattractant PDGF. Surprisingly, we found that pathways implicated in amoeboid chemotaxis, such as PI3K and mTOR signaling, are dispensable for chemotaxis to PDGF. Instead, we find that local inactivation of Myosin IIA, through a non-canonical Ser1/2 phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain, is essential. This site is phosphorylated by PKCα, which is activated by an intracellular gradient of diacylglycerol generated by PLCγ. Using a combination of TIRF imaging and gradients of activators/inhibitors in the microfluidic chambers, we demonstrate that this signaling pathway and subsequent inhibition of Myosin II activity at the leading edge is required for mesenchymal chemotaxis. PMID:25482883

  8. Early stages of energy transduction by myosin: roles of Arg in switch I, of Glu in switch II, and of the salt-bridge between them.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hirofumi; Ohki, Takashi; Mochizuki, Naoki; Morales, Manuel F

    2002-11-26

    On the basis of the crystallographic snapshots of Rayment and his collaborators [Fisher, A. J., Smith, C. A., Thoden, J. B., Smith, R., Sutoh, K., Holden, H. M., & Rayment, I. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 8960-8972], we have understood some basic principles about the early stages of myosin catalysis, namely, ATP is drawn into the active site, over which the cleft closes. Catalyzed hydrolysis occurs, and the first product (orthophosphate) is released from the backdoor of the cleft. In the cleft-closing process, the active site incidentally signals its movement to a particular remote tryptophan residue, Trp-512. In this work, we expand on some of these ideas to rationalize the behavior of a mutated system in action. From the behavior of recombinant myosin systems in which Arg-247 and Glu-470 were substituted in several ways, we draw the conclusions that (i) the force between Arg-247 and gamma-phosphate of ATP may assist in closing the cleft, and incidentally in signaling to the remote Trp, and (ii) in catalysis, Glu-470 is involved in holding the lytic H(2)O (w(1)). We also propose that w(1) and also a second water, w(2), enter into a structure that bridges Glu-470 and the gamma-phosphate of bound ATP, and at the same time positions w(1) for its in-line hydrolytic attack. PMID:12429851

  9. Size and speed of the working stroke of cardiac myosin in situ.

    PubMed

    Caremani, Marco; Pinzauti, Francesca; Reconditi, Massimo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Stienen, Ger J M; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2016-03-29

    The power in the myocardium sarcomere is generated by two bipolar arrays of the motor protein cardiac myosin II extending from the thick filament and pulling the thin, actin-containing filaments from the opposite sides of the sarcomere. Despite the interest in the definition of myosin-based cardiomyopathies, no study has yet been able to determine the mechanokinetic properties of this motor protein in situ. Sarcomere-level mechanics recorded by a striation follower is used in electrically stimulated intact ventricular trabeculae from the rat heart to determine the isotonic velocity transient following a stepwise reduction in force from the isometric peak force TP to a value T(0.8-0.2 TP). The size and the speed of the early rapid shortening (the isotonic working stroke) increase by reducing T from ∼3 nm per half-sarcomere (hs) and 1,000 s(-1) at high load to ∼8 nm⋅hs(-1) and 6,000 s(-1) at low load. Increases in sarcomere length (1.9-2.2 μm) and external [Ca(2+)]o (1-2.5 mM), which produce an increase of TP, do not affect the dependence on T, normalized for TP, of the size and speed of the working stroke. Thus, length- and Ca(2+)-dependent increase of TP and power in the heart can solely be explained by modulation of the number of myosin motors, an emergent property of their array arrangement. The motor working stroke is similar to that of skeletal muscle myosin, whereas its speed is about three times slower. A new powerful tool for investigations and therapies of myosin-based cardiomyopathies is now within our reach. PMID:26984499

  10. Distinct Roles of Myosins in Aspergillus fumigatus Hyphal Growth and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Hilary; Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Richards, Amber D; Asfaw, Yohannes G; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Steinbach, William J

    2016-05-01

    Myosins are a family of actin-based motor proteins found in many organisms and are categorized into classes based on their structures. Class II and V myosins are known to be important for critical cellular processes, including cytokinesis, endocytosis, exocytosis, and organelle trafficking, in the model fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans However, the roles of myosins in the growth and virulence of the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus are unknown. We constructed single- and double-deletion strains of the class II and class V myosins in A. fumigatus and found that while the class II myosin (myoB) is dispensable for growth, the class V myosin (myoE) is required for proper hyphal extension; deletion of myoE resulted in hyperbranching and loss of hyphal polarity. Both myoB and myoE are necessary for proper septation, conidiation, and conidial germination, but only myoB is required for conidial viability. Infection with the ΔmyoE strain in the invertebrate Galleria mellonella model and also in a persistently immunosuppressed murine model of invasive aspergillosis resulted in hypovirulence, while analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) release and cellular infiltration were similar compared to those of the wild-type strain. The ΔmyoE strain showed fungal growth in the murine lung, while the ΔmyoB strain exhibited little fungal burden, most likely due to the reduced conidial viability. These results show, for the first time, the important role these cytoskeletal components play in the growth of and disease caused by a known pathogen, prompting future studies to understand their regulation and potential targeting for novel antifungal therapies. PMID:26953327

  11. Novel Interactome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Myosin Type II Identified by a Modified Integrated Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid (iMYTH) Screen

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Ednalise; Akamine, Pearl; Snider, Jamie; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Gagarinova, Alla; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Minic, Zoran; Phanse, Sadhna; San Antonio, Andrea; Cubano, Luis A.; Rymond, Brian C.; Babu, Mohan; Stagljar, Igor; Rodriguez-Medina, Jose R.

    2016-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin type II (Myo1p) is required for cytokinesis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Loss of Myo1p activity has been associated with growth abnormalities and enhanced sensitivity to osmotic stress, making it an appealing antifungal therapeutic target. The Myo1p tail-only domain was previously reported to have functional activity equivalent to the full-length Myo1p whereas the head-only domain did not. Since Myo1p tail-only constructs are biologically active, the tail domain must have additional functions beyond its previously described role in myosin dimerization or trimerization. The identification of new Myo1p-interacting proteins may shed light on the other functions of the Myo1p tail domain. To identify novel Myo1p-interacting proteins, and determine if Myo1p can serve as a scaffold to recruit proteins to the bud neck during cytokinesis, we used the integrated split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (iMYTH) system. Myo1p was iMYTH-tagged at its C-terminus, and screened against both cDNA and genomic prey libraries to identify interacting proteins. Control experiments showed that the Myo1p-bait construct was appropriately expressed, and that the protein colocalized to the yeast bud neck. Thirty novel Myo1p-interacting proteins were identified by iMYTH. Eight proteins were confirmed by coprecipitation (Ape2, Bzz1, Fba1, Pdi1, Rpl5, Tah11, and Trx2) or mass spectrometry (AP-MS) (Abp1). The novel Myo1p-interacting proteins identified come from a range of different processes, including cellular organization and protein synthesis. Actin assembly/disassembly factors such as the SH3 domain protein Bzz1 and the actin-binding protein Abp1 represent likely Myo1p interactions during cytokinesis. PMID:26921299

  12. Novel Interactome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Myosin Type II Identified by a Modified Integrated Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid (iMYTH) Screen.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Ednalise; Akamine, Pearl; Snider, Jamie; Wong, Victoria; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Gagarinova, Alla; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Minic, Zoran; Phanse, Sadhna; San Antonio, Andrea; Cubano, Luis A; Rymond, Brian C; Babu, Mohan; Stagljar, Igor; Rodriguez-Medina, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin type II (Myo1p) is required for cytokinesis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Loss of Myo1p activity has been associated with growth abnormalities and enhanced sensitivity to osmotic stress, making it an appealing antifungal therapeutic target. The Myo1p tail-only domain was previously reported to have functional activity equivalent to the full-length Myo1p whereas the head-only domain did not. Since Myo1p tail-only constructs are biologically active, the tail domain must have additional functions beyond its previously described role in myosin dimerization or trimerization. The identification of new Myo1p-interacting proteins may shed light on the other functions of the Myo1p tail domain. To identify novel Myo1p-interacting proteins, and determine if Myo1p can serve as a scaffold to recruit proteins to the bud neck during cytokinesis, we used the integrated split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (iMYTH) system. Myo1p was iMYTH-tagged at its C-terminus, and screened against both cDNA and genomic prey libraries to identify interacting proteins. Control experiments showed that the Myo1p-bait construct was appropriately expressed, and that the protein colocalized to the yeast bud neck. Thirty novel Myo1p-interacting proteins were identified by iMYTH. Eight proteins were confirmed by coprecipitation (Ape2, Bzz1, Fba1, Pdi1, Rpl5, Tah11, and Trx2) or mass spectrometry (AP-MS) (Abp1). The novel Myo1p-interacting proteins identified come from a range of different processes, including cellular organization and protein synthesis. Actin assembly/disassembly factors such as the SH3 domain protein Bzz1 and the actin-binding protein Abp1 represent likely Myo1p interactions during cytokinesis. PMID:26921299

  13. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-01

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  14. Stochastic dynamics of small ensembles of non-processive molecular motors: The parallel cluster model

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2013-11-07

    Non-processive molecular motors have to work together in ensembles in order to generate appreciable levels of force or movement. In skeletal muscle, for example, hundreds of myosin II molecules cooperate in thick filaments. In non-muscle cells, by contrast, small groups with few tens of non-muscle myosin II motors contribute to essential cellular processes such as transport, shape changes, or mechanosensing. Here we introduce a detailed and analytically tractable model for this important situation. Using a three-state crossbridge model for the myosin II motor cycle and exploiting the assumptions of fast power stroke kinetics and equal load sharing between motors in equivalent states, we reduce the stochastic reaction network to a one-step master equation for the binding and unbinding dynamics (parallel cluster model) and derive the rules for ensemble movement. We find that for constant external load, ensemble dynamics is strongly shaped by the catch bond character of myosin II, which leads to an increase of the fraction of bound motors under load and thus to firm attachment even for small ensembles. This adaptation to load results in a concave force-velocity relation described by a Hill relation. For external load provided by a linear spring, myosin II ensembles dynamically adjust themselves towards an isometric state with constant average position and load. The dynamics of the ensembles is now determined mainly by the distribution of motors over the different kinds of bound states. For increasing stiffness of the external spring, there is a sharp transition beyond which myosin II can no longer perform the power stroke. Slow unbinding from the pre-power-stroke state protects the ensembles against detachment.

  15. Functions of plant-specific myosin XI: from intracellular motility to plant postures.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Haruko; Tamura, Kentaro; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2015-12-01

    The plant-specific protein motor class myosin XI is known to function in rapid bulk flow of the cytoplasm (cytoplasmic streaming) and in organellar movements. Recent studies unveiled a wide range of physiological functions of myosin XI motors, from intracellular motility to organ movements. Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members of myosin XI class. In vegetative organs, myosins XIk, XI1, and XI2 primarily contribute to dynamics and spatial configurations of endoplasmic reticulum that develops a tubular network in the cell periphery and thick strand-like structures in the inner cell regions. Myosin XI-i forms a nucleocytoplasmic linker and is responsible for nuclear movement and shape. In addition to these intracellular functions, myosin XIf together with myosin XIk is involved in the fundamental nature of plants; the actin-myosin XI cytoskeleton regulates organ straightening to adjust plant posture. PMID:26432645

  16. Structural Basis of Cargo Recognition by Unconventional Myosins in Cellular Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianchao; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-08-01

    Unconventional myosins are a superfamily of actin-based molecular motors playing diverse roles including cellular trafficking, mechanical supports, force sensing and transmission, etc. The variable neck and tail domains of unconventional myosins function to bind to specific cargoes including proteins and lipid vesicles and thus are largely responsible for the diverse cellular functions of myosins in vivo. In addition, the tail regions, together with their cognate cargoes, can regulate activities of the motor heads. This review outlines the advances made in recent years on cargo recognition and cargo binding-induced regulation of the activity of several unconventional myosins including myosin-I, V, VI and X in cellular trafficking. We approach this topic by describing a series of high-resolution structures of the neck and tail domains of these unconventional myosins either alone or in complex with their specific cargoes, and by discussing potential implications of these structural studies on cellular trafficking of these myosin motors. PMID:26842936

  17. Mechanobiology of bone marrow stem cells: from myosin-II forces to compliance of matrix and nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Won; Swift, Joe; Ivanovska, Irena; Spinler, Kyle R.; Buxboim, Amnon; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult stem cells and progenitors are of great interest for their clinical application as well as their potential to reveal deep sensitivities to microenvironmental factors. The bone marrow is a niche for at least two types of stem cells, and the prototype is the hematopoietic stem cell/progenitors (HSC/Ps), which have saved many thousands of patients for several decades now. In bone marrow, HSC/Ps interact functionally with marrow stromal cells that are often referred to as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or derivatives thereof. Myosin and matrix elasticity greatly effect MSC function, and these mechanobiological factors are now being explored with HSC/Ps both in vitro and in vivo. Also emerging is a role for the nucleus as a mechanically sensitive organelle that is semi-permeable to transcription factors which are modified for nuclear entry by cytoplasmic mechanobiological pathways. Since therapies envisioned with induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells generally involve in vitro commitment to an adult stem cell or progenitor, a very deep understanding of stem cell mechanobiology is essential to progress with these multi-potent cells. PMID:23790394

  18. The role of myosin 1c and myosin 1b in surfactant exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kittelberger, Nadine; Breunig, Markus; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Miklavc, Pika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Actin and actin-associated proteins have a pivotal effect on regulated exocytosis in secretory cells and influence pre-fusion as well as post-fusion stages of exocytosis. Actin polymerization on secretory granules during the post-fusion phase (formation of an actin coat) is especially important in cells with large secretory vesicles or poorly soluble secretions. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells secrete hydrophobic lipo-protein surfactant, which does not easily diffuse from fused vesicles. Previous work showed that compression of actin coat is necessary for surfactant extrusion. Here, we investigate the role of class 1 myosins as possible linkers between actin and membranes during exocytosis. Live-cell microscopy showed translocation of fluorescently labeled myosin 1b and myosin 1c to the secretory vesicle membrane after fusion. Myosin 1c translocation was dependent on its pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of myosin 1b and myosin 1c constructs influenced vesicle compression rate, whereas only the inhibition of myosin 1c reduced exocytosis. These findings suggest that class 1 myosins participate in several stages of ATII cell exocytosis and link actin coats to the secretory vesicle membrane to influence vesicle compression. PMID:26940917

  19. The role of myosin 1c and myosin 1b in surfactant exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kittelberger, Nadine; Breunig, Markus; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Miklavc, Pika

    2016-04-15

    Actin and actin-associated proteins have a pivotal effect on regulated exocytosis in secretory cells and influence pre-fusion as well as post-fusion stages of exocytosis. Actin polymerization on secretory granules during the post-fusion phase (formation of an actin coat) is especially important in cells with large secretory vesicles or poorly soluble secretions. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells secrete hydrophobic lipo-protein surfactant, which does not easily diffuse from fused vesicles. Previous work showed that compression of actin coat is necessary for surfactant extrusion. Here, we investigate the role of class 1 myosins as possible linkers between actin and membranes during exocytosis. Live-cell microscopy showed translocation of fluorescently labeled myosin 1b and myosin 1c to the secretory vesicle membrane after fusion. Myosin 1c translocation was dependent on its pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of myosin 1b and myosin 1c constructs influenced vesicle compression rate, whereas only the inhibition of myosin 1c reduced exocytosis. These findings suggest that class 1 myosins participate in several stages of ATII cell exocytosis and link actin coats to the secretory vesicle membrane to influence vesicle compression. PMID:26940917

  20. Structural determinants governing S100A4-induced isoform-selective disassembly of nonmuscle myosin II filaments.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Bence; Kalmár, Lajos; Nyitray, László; Pál, Gábor

    2016-06-01

    The Ca(2+) -binding protein S100A4 interacts with the C terminus of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) causing filament disassembly, which is correlated with an increased metastatic potential of tumor cells. Despite high sequence similarity of the three NMII isoforms, S100A4 discriminates against binding to NMIIB. We searched for structural determinants of this selectivity. Based on paralog scanning using phage display, we identified a single position as major determinant of isoform selectivity. Reciprocal single amino acid replacements showed that at position 1907 (NMIIA numbering), the NMIIA/NMIIC-specific alanine provides about 60-fold higher affinity than the NMIIB-specific asparagine. The structural background of this can be explained in part by a communication between the two consecutive α-helical binding segments. This communication is completely abolished by the Ala-to-Asn substitution. Mutual swapping of the disordered tailpieces only slightly affects the affinity of the NMII chimeras. Interestingly, we found that the tailpiece and position 1907 act in a nonadditive fashion. Finally, we also found that the higher stability of the C-terminal coiled-coil region of NMIIB also discriminates against interaction with S100A4. Our results clearly show that the isoform-selective binding of S100A4 is determined at multiple levels in the structure of the three NMII isoforms and the corresponding functional elements of NMII act synergistically with one another resulting in a complex interaction network. The experimental and in silico results suggest two divergent evolutionary pathways: NMIIA and NMIIB evolved to possess S100A4-dependent and -independent regulations, respectively. PMID:27029887

  1. Distinct Functional Interactions between Actin Isoforms and Nonsarcomeric Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mirco; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Chizhov, Igor; Claus, Peter; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Taft, Manuel H.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments. PMID:23923011

  2. Actin polymerization or myosin contraction: two ways to build up cortical tension for symmetry breaking.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Kevin; Lemière, Joël; Faqir, Fahima; Manzi, John; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie; Betz, Timo; Sykes, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cells use complex biochemical pathways to drive shape changes for polarization and movement. One of these pathways is the self-assembly of actin filaments and myosin motors that together produce the forces and tensions that drive cell shape changes. Whereas the role of actin and myosin motors in cell polarization is clear, the exact mechanism of how the cortex, a thin shell of actin that is underneath the plasma membrane, can drive cell shape changes is still an open question. Here, we address this issue using biomimetic systems: the actin cortex is reconstituted on liposome membranes, in an 'outside geometry'. The actin shell is either grown from an activator of actin polymerization immobilized at the membrane by a biotin-streptavidin link, or built by simple adsorption of biotinylated actin filaments to the membrane, in the presence or absence of myosin motors. We show that tension in the actin network can be induced either by active actin polymerization on the membrane via the Arp2/3 complex or by myosin II filament pulling activity. Symmetry breaking and spontaneous polarization occur above a critical tension that opens up a crack in the actin shell. We show that this critical tension is reached by growing branched networks, nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex, in a concentration window of capping protein that limits actin filament growth and by a sufficient number of motors that pull on actin filaments. Our study provides the groundwork to understanding the physical mechanisms at work during polarization prior to cell shape modifications. PMID:24062578

  3. Association of six YFP-myosin XI-tail fusions with mobile plant cell organelles

    PubMed Central

    Reisen, Daniel; Hanson, Maureen R

    2007-01-01

    Background Myosins are molecular motors that carry cargo on actin filaments in eukaryotic cells. Seventeen myosin genes have been identified in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. The myosin genes can be divided into two plant-specific subfamilies, class VIII with four members and class XI with 13 members. Class XI myosins are related to animal and fungal myosin class V that are responsible for movement of particular vesicles and organelles. Organelle localization of only one of the 13 Arabidopsis myosin XI (myosin XI-6; At MYA2), which is found on peroxisomes, has so far been reported. Little information is available concerning the remaining 12 class XI myosins. Results We investigated 6 of the 13 class XI Arabidopsis myosins. cDNAs corresponding to the tail region of 6 myosin genes were generated and incorporated into a vector to encode YFP-myosin tail fusion proteins lacking the motor domain. Chimeric genes incorporating tail regions of myosin XI-5 (At MYA1), myosin XI-6 (At MYA2), myosin XI-8 (At XI-B), myosin XI-15 (At XI-I), myosin XI-16 (At XI-J) and myosin XI-17 (At XI-K) were expressed transiently. All YFP-myosin-tail fusion proteins were targeted to small organelles ranging in size from 0.5 to 3.0 μm. Despite the absence of a motor domain, the fluorescently-labeled organelles were motile in most cells. Tail cropping experiments demonstrated that the coiled-coil region was required for specific localization and shorter tail regions were inadequate for targeting. Myosin XI-6 (At MYA2), previously reported to localize to peroxisomes by immunofluorescence, labeled both peroxisomes and vesicles when expressed as a YFP-tail fusion. None of the 6 YFP-myosin tail fusions interacted with chloroplasts, and only one YFP-tail fusion appeared to sometimes co-localize with fluorescent proteins targeted to Golgi and mitochondria. Conclusion 6 myosin XI tails, extending from the coiled-coil region to the C-terminus, label specific vesicles and/or organelles when

  4. Tracking UNC-45 Chaperone-Myosin Interaction with a Titin Mechanical Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christian M.; Bujalowski, Paul J.; Ma, Liang; Anderson, John; Epstein, Henry F.; Oberhauser, Andres F.

    2012-01-01

    Myosins are molecular motors that convert chemical energy into mechanical work. Allosterically coupling ATP-binding, hydrolysis, and binding/dissociation to actin filaments requires precise and coordinated structural changes that are achieved by the structurally complex myosin motor domain. UNC-45, a member of the UNC-45/Cro1/She4p family of proteins, acts as a chaperone for myosin and is essential for proper folding and assembly of myosin into muscle thick filaments in vivo. The molecular mechanisms by which UNC-45 interacts with myosin to promote proper folding of the myosin head domain are not known. We have devised a novel approach, to our knowledge, to analyze the interaction of UNC-45 with the myosin motor domain at the single molecule level using atomic force microscopy. By chemically coupling a titin I27 polyprotein to the motor domain of myosin, we introduced a mechanical reporter. In addition, the polyprotein provided a specific attachment point and an unambiguous mechanical fingerprint, facilitating our atomic force microscopy measurements. This approach enabled us to study UNC-45–motor domain interactions. After mechanical unfolding, the motor domain interfered with refolding of the otherwise robust I27 modules, presumably by recruiting them into a misfolded state. In the presence of UNC-45, I27 folding was restored. Our single molecule approach enables the study of UNC-45 chaperone interactions with myosin and their consequences for motor domain folding and misfolding in mechanistic detail. PMID:22824286

  5. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  6. Differential localization of cytoplasmic myosin II isoforms A and B in avian interphase and dividing embryonic and immortalized cardiomyocytes and other cell types in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Jaffredo, T.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Two principal isoforms of cytoplasmic myosin II, A and B (CMIIA and CMIIB), are present in different proportions in different tissues. Isoform-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to avian CMIIA and CMIIB reveal the cellular distributions of these isoforms in interphase and dividing embryonic avian cardiac, intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia cells in primary cell culture. Embryonic cardiomyocytes react with antibodies to CMIIB but not to CMIIA, localize CMIIB in stress-fiber-like-structures during interphase, and markedly concentrate CMIIB in networks in the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. In contrast, cardiac fibroblasts localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks during interphase, and demonstrate slight and independently regulated concentration of CMIIA and CMIIB in networks in their cleavage furrows. V-myc-immortalized cardiomyocytes, an established cell line, have regained the ability to express CMIIA, as well as CMIIB, and localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks in interphase cells and in cleavage furrows in dividing cells. Conversely, some intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia interphase cells express only CMIIA, organized primarily in networks. Of these, intestinal epithelial cells express both CMIIA and CMIIB when they divide, whereas some dividing cells from both spleen and dorsal root ganglia express only CMIIA and concentrate it in their cleavage furrows. These results suggest that within a given tissue, different cell types express different isoforms of CMII, and that cells expressing either CMIIA or CMIIB alone, or simultaneously, can form a cleavage furrow and divide.

  7. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P.; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  8. Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation enhances cardiac β-myosin in vitro motility under load.

    PubMed

    Karabina, Anastasia; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R

    2015-08-15

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and myofibrillar disarray, and often results in sudden cardiac death. Two HCM mutations, N47K and R58Q, are located in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). The RLC mechanically stabilizes the myosin lever arm, which is crucial to myosin's ability to transmit contractile force. The N47K and R58Q mutations have previously been shown to reduce actin filament velocity under load, stemming from a more compliant lever arm (Greenberg, 2010). In contrast, RLC phosphorylation was shown to impart stiffness to the myosin lever arm (Greenberg, 2009). We hypothesized that phosphorylation of the mutant HCM-RLC may mitigate distinct mutation-induced structural and functional abnormalities. In vitro motility assays were utilized to investigate the effects of RLC phosphorylation on the HCM-RLC mutant phenotype in the presence of an α-actinin frictional load. Porcine cardiac β-myosin was depleted of its native RLC and reconstituted with mutant or wild-type human RLC in phosphorylated or non-phosphorylated form. Consistent with previous findings, in the presence of load, myosin bearing the HCM mutations reduced actin sliding velocity compared to WT resulting in 31-41% reductions in force production. Myosin containing phosphorylated RLC (WT or mutant) increased sliding velocity and also restored mutant myosin force production to near WT unphosphorylated values. These results point to RLC phosphorylation as a general mechanism to increase force production of the individual myosin motor and as a potential target to ameliorate the HCM-induced phenotype at the molecular level. PMID:26116789

  9. Four things to know about myosin light chains as reporters for non-muscle myosin-2 dynamics in live cells.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2015-02-01

    The interplay between non-muscle myosins-2 and filamentous actin results in cytoplasmic contractility which is essential for eukaryotic life. Concomitantly, there is tremendous interest in elucidating the physiological function and temporal localization of non-muscle myosin-2 in cells. A commonly used method to study the function and localization of non-muscle myosin-2 is to overexpress a fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged version of the regulatory light chain (RLC) which binds to the myosin-2 heavy chain by mass action. Caveats about this approach include findings from recent studies indicating that the RLC does not bind exclusively to the non-muscle myosin-2 heavy chain. Rather, it can also associate with the myosin heavy chains of several other classes as well as other targets than myosin. In addition, the presence of the FP moiety may compromise myosin's enzymatic and mechanical performance. This and other factors to be discussed in this commentary raise questions about the possible complications in using FP-RLC as a marker for the dynamic localization and regulatory aspects of non-muscle myosin-2 motor functions in cell biological experiments. PMID:25712372

  10. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P

    2015-09-25

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min(-1), respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2'/3'-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μM, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg(2+) ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3-6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  11. On the kinetics that moves Myosin V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; O'Kelly de Galway, Winny

    2015-10-01

    Molecular motor proteins such as Myosin V, Dynein or Kinesin are no ratchets, at least not with a flashing asymmetric potential; the crucial asymmetry is in the dynamical activity. We make that explicit in terms of a simple Markov model, emphasizing the kinetic (and non-thermodynamic) aspects of stochastic transport. The analysis shows the presence of a fluctuation symmetry in that part of the dynamical activity which is antisymmetric under reversal of trailing and leading head of the motor. The direction of the motor motion is determined by it.

  12. Motor Training Promotes Both Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity of Layer II/III Pyramidal Neurons in the Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Yasumasa; Ito, Nana; Yamamoto, Yui; Owada, Yuji; Kamiya, Yoshinori; Mitsushima, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Motor skill training induces structural plasticity at dendritic spines in the primary motor cortex (M1). To further analyze both synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in the layer II/III area of M1, we subjected rats to a rotor rod test and then prepared acute brain slices. Motor skill consistently improved within 2 days of training. Voltage clamp analysis showed significantly higher α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/N-methyl-d-aspartate (AMPA/NMDA) ratios and miniature EPSC amplitudes in 1-day trained rats compared with untrained rats, suggesting increased postsynaptic AMPA receptors in the early phase of motor learning. Compared with untrained controls, 2-days trained rats showed significantly higher miniature EPSC amplitude and frequency. Paired-pulse analysis further demonstrated lower rates in 2-days trained rats, suggesting increased presynaptic glutamate release during the late phase of learning. One-day trained rats showed decreased miniature IPSC frequency and increased paired-pulse analysis of evoked IPSC, suggesting a transient decrease in presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release. Moreover, current clamp analysis revealed lower resting membrane potential, higher spike threshold, and deeper afterhyperpolarization in 1-day trained rats—while 2-days trained rats showed higher membrane potential, suggesting dynamic changes in intrinsic properties. Our present results indicate dynamic changes in glutamatergic, GABAergic, and intrinsic plasticity in M1 layer II/III neurons after the motor training. PMID:27193420

  13. Myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation enhances cardiac β-myosin in vitro motility under load

    PubMed Central

    Karabina, Anastasia; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Moore, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and myofibrillar disarray, and often results in sudden cardiac death. Two HCM mutations, N47K and R58Q, are located in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). The RLC mechanically stabilizes the myosin lever arm, which is crucial to myosin’s ability to transmit contractile force. The N47K and R58Q mutations have previously been shown to reduce actin filament velocity under load, stemming from a more compliant lever arm (Greenberg, 2010). In contrast, RLC phosphorylation was shown to impart stiffness to the myosin lever arm (Greenberg, 2009). We hypothesized that phosphorylation of the mutant HCM-RLC may mitigate distinct mutation-induced structural and functional abnormalities. In vitro motility assays were utilized to investigate the effects of RLC phosphorylation on the HCM-RLC mutant phenotype in the presence of an α-actinin frictional load. Porcine cardiac β-myosin was depleted of its native RLC and reconstituted with mutant or wild-type human RLC in phosphorylated or non-phosphorylated form. Consistent with previous findings, in the presence of load, myosin bearing the HCM mutations reduced actin sliding velocity compared to WT resulting in 31–41% reductions in force production. Myosin containing phosphorylated RLC (WT or mutant) increased sliding velocity and also restored mutant myosin force production to near WT unphosphorylated values. These results point to RLC phosphorylation as a general mechanism to increase force production of the individual myosin motor and as a potential target to ameliorate the HCM-induced phenotype at the molecular level. PMID:26116789

  14. Model of Rho-Mediated Myosin Recruitment to the Cleavage Furrow during Cytokinesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Alexander; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2010-03-01

    The formation and constriction of the contractile ring during cytokinesis, the final step of cell division, depends on the recruitment of motor protein myosin to the cell's equatorial region. During cytokinesis, the myosin attached to the cell's cortex progressively disassembles at the flanking regions and concentrates in the equator [1]. This recruitment depends on myosin motor activity and activation by Rho proteins. Central spindle and astral microtubules establish a spatial pattern of differential Rho activity [2]. We propose a reaction-diffusion model for the dynamics of myosin and Rho proteins during cytokinesis. In the model, the mitotic spindle activates Rho at the equator. Active Rho promotes, in a switch-like manner, myosin assembly into cortical minifilaments. Mechanical stress by cortical myosin causes disassembly of myosin minifilaments and deactivates Rho. Our results explain both the recruitment of myosin to the cleavage furrow and the observed damped myosin oscillations in the cell's flanking regions [1]. Spatial extent, period and decay rate of myosin oscillations are calculated. Various regimes of myosin recruitment are predicted. [1] Zhou & Wang, Mol. Biol. Cell 19:318 (2008) [2] Murthy & Wadsworth, J. Cell Sci. 121:2350 (2008)

  15. Heartbeat control in leeches. II. Fictive motor pattern.

    PubMed

    Wenning, Angela; Hill, Andrew A V; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2004-01-01

    The rhythmic beating of the tube-like hearts in the medicinal leech is driven and coordinated by rhythmic activity in segmental heart motor neurons. The motor neurons are controlled by rhythmic inhibitory input from a network of heart interneurons that compose the heartbeat central pattern generator. In the preceding paper, we described the constriction pattern of the hearts in quiescent intact animals and showed that one heart constricts in a rear-to-front wave (peristaltic coordination mode), while the other heart constricts in near unison over its length (synchronous coordination mode) and that they regularly switch coordination modes. Here we analyze intersegmental and side-to-side-coordination of the fictive motor pattern for heartbeat in denervated nerve cords. We show that the intersegmental phase relations among heart motor neurons in both coordination modes are independent of heartbeat period. This finding enables us to combine data from different experiments to form a detailed analysis of the relative phases, duty cycle, and intraburst spike frequency of the bursts of the segmental heart motor neurons. The fictive motor pattern and the constriction pattern seen in intact leeches closely match in their intersegmental and side-to-side coordination, indicating that sensory feedback is not necessary for properly phased intersegmental coordination. Moreover, the regular switches in coordination mode of the fictive motor pattern mimic those seen in intact animals indicating that these switches likely arise by a central mechanism. PMID:13679405

  16. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin

    PubMed Central

    Wulf, Sarah F.; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H. Lee; Houdusse, Anne M.; Schröder, Rasmus R.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V. PMID:26976594

  17. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin.

    PubMed

    Wulf, Sarah F; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2016-03-29

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V. PMID:26976594

  18. Myosin, Transgelin, and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Léguillette, Renaud; Laviolette, Michel; Bergeron, Celine; Zitouni, Nedjma; Kogut, Paul; Solway, Julian; Kachmar, Linda; Hamid, Qutayba; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Airway smooth muscle (SM) of patients with asthma exhibits a greater velocity of shortening (Vmax) than that of normal subjects, and this is thought to contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. A greater Vmax can result from increased myosin activation. This has been reported in sensitized human airway SM and in models of asthma. A faster Vmax can also result from the expression of specific contractile proteins that promote faster cross-bridge cycling. This possibility has never been addressed in asthma. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that the expression of genes coding for SM contractile proteins is altered in asthmatic airways and contributes to their increased Vmax. Methods: We quantified the expression of several genes that code for SM contractile proteins in mild allergic asthmatic and control human airway endobronchial biopsies. The function of these contractile proteins was tested using the in vitro motility assay. Measurements and Main Results: We observed an increased expression of the fast myosin heavy chain isoform, transgelin, and myosin light chain kinase in patients with asthma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of these genes at the protein level. To address the functional significance of this overexpression, we purified tracheal myosin from the hyperresponsive Fisher rats, which also overexpress the fast myosin heavy chain isoform as compared with the normoresponsive Lewis rats, and found a faster rate of actin filament propulsion. Conversely, transgelin did not alter the rate of actin filament propulsion. Conclusions: Selective overexpression of airway smooth muscle genes in asthmatic airways leads to increased Vmax, thus contributing to the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in asthma. PMID:19011151

  19. Expression, Splicing, and Evolution of the Myosin Gene Family in Plants1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Peremyslov, Valera V.; Mockler, Todd C.; Filichkin, Sergei A.; Fox, Samuel E.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.

    2011-01-01

    Plants possess two myosin classes, VIII and XI. The myosins XI are implicated in organelle transport, filamentous actin organization, and cell and plant growth. Due to the large size of myosin gene families, knowledge of these molecular motors remains patchy. Using deep transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatics, we systematically investigated myosin genes in two model plants, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Brachypodium (Brachypodium distachyon). We improved myosin gene models and found that myosin genes undergo alternative splicing. We experimentally validated the gene models for Arabidopsis myosin XI-K, which plays the principal role in cell interior dynamics, as well as for its Brachypodium ortholog. We showed that the Arabidopsis gene dubbed HDK (for headless derivative of myosin XI-K), which emerged through a partial duplication of the XI-K gene, is developmentally regulated. A gene with similar architecture was also found in Brachypodium. Our analyses revealed two predominant patterns of myosin gene expression, namely pollen/stamen-specific and ubiquitous expression throughout the plant. We also found that several myosins XI can be rhythmically expressed. Phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that the last common ancestor of the angiosperms possessed two myosins VIII and five myosins XI, many of which underwent additional lineage-specific duplications. PMID:21233331

  20. Friction drive of an SAW motor. Part II: analyses.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Takashi; Kurosawa, Minoru Kuribayashi

    2008-09-01

    The mechanics of the friction drive of a surface acoustic wave motor were investigated by means of contact mechanics theory. As a means to control the contact condition, the motor's slider had projections on its frictional surface. Assuming the projection was a rigid circular punch and the slider body was an elastic half-space allowed application of contact mechanics formulae to the analyses of the friction drive. Because the projection contacted the Rayleigh wave vibration, the projection's responses were considered dynamic; thus, the dynamics were also analyzed in the same framework of contact mechanics formulae. Moreover, the analyses were applied to measurements of the projection's displacement to examine the detailed mechanics during the friction drive. We calculated the contact/frictional forces based on the measurement and indicated the necessity of further investigation of the surface acoustic wave motor's friction drive, because the usual friction law was unable to explain the measurement. PMID:18986897

  1. Review: The ATPase mechanism of myosin and actomyosin.

    PubMed

    Geeves, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Myosins are a large family of molecular motors that use the common P-loop, Switch 1 and Switch 2 nucleotide binding motifs to recognize ATP, to create a catalytic site than can efficiently hydrolyze ATP and to communicate the state of the nucleotide pocket to other allosteric binding sites on myosin. The energy of ATP hydrolysis is used to do work against an external load. In this short review I will outline current thinking on the mechanism of ATP hydrolysis and how the energy of ATP hydrolysis is coupled to a series of protein conformational changes that allow a myosin, with the cytoskeleton track actin, to operate as a molecular motor of distinct types; fast movers, processive motors or strain sensors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 483-491, 2016. PMID:27061920

  2. Acute response of airway muscle to extreme temperature includes disruption of actin-myosin interaction.

    PubMed

    Dyrda, Peter; Tazzeo, Tracy; DoHarris, Lindsay; Nilius, Berndt; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Aziz, Tariq; Lukic, Dusan; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-02-01

    Despite the emerging use of bronchial thermoplasty in asthma therapy, the response of airway smooth muscle (ASM) to extreme temperatures is unknown. We investigated the immediate effects of exposing ASM to supraphysiologic temperatures. Isometric contractions were studied in bovine ASM before and after exposure to various thermal loads and/or pharmacologic interventions. Actin-myosin interactions were investigated using a standard in vitro motility assay. We found steep thermal sensitivity for isometric contractions evoked by acetylcholine, with threshold and complete inhibition at less than 50°C and greater than 55°C, respectively. Contractile responses to serotonin or KCl were similarly affected, whereas isometric relaxations evoked by the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosyl-N-acetylpenicillamine or the β-agonist isoproterenol were unaffected. This thermal sensitivity developed within 15 minutes, but did not evolve further over the course of several days (such a rapid time-course rules out heat shock proteins, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis). Although heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRPV2) channels and the calmodulin-dependent (Cam) kinase-II-induced inactivation of myosin light chain kinase are both acutely thermally sensitive, with a temperature producing half-maximal effect (T(1/2)) of 52.5°C, the phenomenon we describe was not prevented by blockers of TRPV2 channels (e.g., ruthenium red, gadolinium, zero-Ca(2+) or zero-Na(+)/zero-Ca(2+) media, and cromakalim) or of Cam kinase-II (e.g., W7, trifluoperazine, and KN-93). However, direct measurements of actin-myosin interactions showed the same steep thermal profile. The functional changes preceded any histologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. We conclude that extreme temperatures (such as those used in bronchial thermoplasty) directly disrupt actin-myosin interactions, likely through a denaturation of the motor protein, leading to an immediate loss of ASM cell function. PMID:20395634

  3. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27220038

  4. Antibodies Covalently Immobilized on Actin Filaments for Fast Myosin Driven Analyte Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saroj; ten Siethoff, Lasse; Persson, Malin; Lard, Mercy; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Linke, Heiner; Månsson, Alf

    2012-01-01

    Biosensors would benefit from further miniaturization, increased detection rate and independence from external pumps and other bulky equipment. Whereas transportation systems built around molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in the latter regard, recent proof-of-principle devices based on the microtubule-kinesin motor system have not matched the speed of existing methods. An attractive solution to overcome this limitation would be the use of myosin driven propulsion of actin filaments which offers motility one order of magnitude faster than the kinesin-microtubule system. Here, we realized a necessary requirement for the use of the actomyosin system in biosensing devices, namely covalent attachment of antibodies to actin filaments using heterobifunctional cross-linkers. We also demonstrated consistent and rapid myosin II driven transport where velocity and the fraction of motile actin filaments was negligibly affected by the presence of antibody-antigen complexes at rather high density (>20 µm−1). The results, however, also demonstrated that it was challenging to consistently achieve high density of functional antibodies along the actin filament, and optimization of the covalent coupling procedure to increase labeling density should be a major focus for future work. Despite the remaining challenges, the reported advances are important steps towards considerably faster nanoseparation than shown for previous molecular motor based devices, and enhanced miniaturization because of high bending flexibility of actin filaments. PMID:23056279

  5. Antibodies covalently immobilized on actin filaments for fast myosin driven analyte transport.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saroj; ten Siethoff, Lasse; Persson, Malin; Lard, Mercy; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Linke, Heiner; Månsson, Alf

    2012-01-01

    Biosensors would benefit from further miniaturization, increased detection rate and independence from external pumps and other bulky equipment. Whereas transportation systems built around molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in the latter regard, recent proof-of-principle devices based on the microtubule-kinesin motor system have not matched the speed of existing methods. An attractive solution to overcome this limitation would be the use of myosin driven propulsion of actin filaments which offers motility one order of magnitude faster than the kinesin-microtubule system. Here, we realized a necessary requirement for the use of the actomyosin system in biosensing devices, namely covalent attachment of antibodies to actin filaments using heterobifunctional cross-linkers. We also demonstrated consistent and rapid myosin II driven transport where velocity and the fraction of motile actin filaments was negligibly affected by the presence of antibody-antigen complexes at rather high density (>20 µm(-1)). The results, however, also demonstrated that it was challenging to consistently achieve high density of functional antibodies along the actin filament, and optimization of the covalent coupling procedure to increase labeling density should be a major focus for future work. Despite the remaining challenges, the reported advances are important steps towards considerably faster nanoseparation than shown for previous molecular motor based devices, and enhanced miniaturization because of high bending flexibility of actin filaments. PMID:23056279

  6. Still and rotating myosin clusters determine cytokinetic ring constriction

    PubMed Central

    Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Kruse, Karsten; Riveline, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinetic ring is essential for separating daughter cells during division. It consists of actin filaments and myosin motors that are generally assumed to organize as sarcomeres similar to skeletal muscles. However, direct evidence is lacking. Here we show that the internal organization and dynamics of rings are different from sarcomeres and distinct in different cell types. Using micro-cavities to orient rings in single focal planes, we find in mammalian cells a transition from a homogeneous distribution to a periodic pattern of myosin clusters at the onset of constriction. In contrast, in fission yeast, myosin clusters rotate prior to and during constriction. Theoretical analysis indicates that both patterns result from acto-myosin self-organization and reveals differences in the respective stresses. These findings suggest distinct functional roles for rings: contraction in mammalian cells and transport in fission yeast. Thus self-organization under different conditions may be a generic feature for regulating morphogenesis in vivo. PMID:27363521

  7. Still and rotating myosin clusters determine cytokinetic ring constriction.

    PubMed

    Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Kruse, Karsten; Riveline, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinetic ring is essential for separating daughter cells during division. It consists of actin filaments and myosin motors that are generally assumed to organize as sarcomeres similar to skeletal muscles. However, direct evidence is lacking. Here we show that the internal organization and dynamics of rings are different from sarcomeres and distinct in different cell types. Using micro-cavities to orient rings in single focal planes, we find in mammalian cells a transition from a homogeneous distribution to a periodic pattern of myosin clusters at the onset of constriction. In contrast, in fission yeast, myosin clusters rotate prior to and during constriction. Theoretical analysis indicates that both patterns result from acto-myosin self-organization and reveals differences in the respective stresses. These findings suggest distinct functional roles for rings: contraction in mammalian cells and transport in fission yeast. Thus self-organization under different conditions may be a generic feature for regulating morphogenesis in vivo. PMID:27363521

  8. Widespread mRNA Association with Cytoskeletal Motor Proteins and Identification and Dynamics of Myosin-Associated mRNAs in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Casolari, Jason M.; Thompson, Michael A.; Salzman, Julia; Champion, Lowry M.; Moerner, W. E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2012-01-01

    Programmed mRNA localization to specific subcellular compartments for localized translation is a fundamental mechanism of post-transcriptional regulation that affects many, and possibly all, mRNAs in eukaryotes. We describe her e a systematic approach to identify the RNA cargoes associated with the cytoskeletal motor proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in combination with live-cell 3D super-localization microscopy of endogenously tagged mRNAs. Our analysis identified widespread association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins, including association of Myo3 with mRNAs encoding key regulators of actin branching and endocytosis such as WASP and WIP. Using conventional fluorescence microscopy and expression of MS2-tagged mRNAs from endogenous loci, we observed a strong bias for actin patch nucleator mRNAs to localize to the cell cortex and the actin patch in a Myo3- and F-actin dependent manner. Use of a double-helix point spread function (DH-PSF) microscope allowed super-localization measurements of single mRNPs at a spatial precision of 25 nm in x and y and 50 nm in z in live cells with 50 ms exposure times, allowing quantitative profiling of mRNP dynamics. The actin patch mRNA exhibited distinct and characteristic diffusion coefficients when compared to a control mRNA. In addition, disruption of F-actin significantly expanded the 3D confinement radius of an actin patch nucleator mRNA, providing a quantitative assessment of the contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to mRNP dynamic localization. Our results provide evidence for specific association of mRNAs with cytoskeletal motor proteins in yeast, suggest that different mRNPs have distinct and characteristic dynamics, and lend insight into the mechanism of actin patch nucleator mRNA localization to actin patches. PMID:22359641

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of a myosin subfragment-1 docking with an actin filament.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tadashi

    2013-09-01

    Myosins are typical molecular motor proteins, which convert the chemical energy of ATP into mechanical work. The fundamental mechanism of this energy conversion is still unknown. To explain the experimental results observed in molecular motors, Masuda has proposed a theory called the "Driven by Detachment (DbD)" mechanism for the working principle of myosins. Based on this theory, the energy used during the power stroke of the myosins originates from the attractive force between a detached myosin head and an actin filament, and does not directly arise from the energy of ATP. According to this theory, every step in the myosin working process may be reproduced by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, except for the ATP hydrolysis step. Therefore, MD simulations were conducted to reproduce the docking process of a myosin subfragment-1 (S1) against an actin filament. A myosin S1 directed toward the barbed end of an actin filament was placed at three different positions by shifting it away from the filament axis. After 30 ns of MD simulations, in three cases out of ten trials on average, the myosin made a close contact with two actin monomers by changing the positions and the orientation of both the myosin and the actin as predicted in previous studies. Once the docking was achieved, the distance between the myosin and the actin showed smaller fluctuations, indicating that the docking is stable over time. If the docking was not achieved, the myosin moved randomly around the initial position or moved away from the actin filament. MD simulations thus successfully reproduced the docking of a myosin S1 with an actin filament. By extending the similar MD simulations to the other steps of the myosin working process, the validity of the DbD theory may be computationally demonstrated. PMID:23791790

  10. Phosphate and ADP differently inhibit coordinated smooth muscle myosin groups.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B; Mackey, Michael C; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-01

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo--suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state. PMID:25650929

  11. Human Rehabilitation Techniques. Disability Analyses: Motor Disabilities. Volume II, Part A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, C.; And Others

    Volume II, Section A of a six-volume final report (which covers the findings of a research project on policy and technology related to rehabilitation of disabled individuals) presents a review of literature on three types of motor disabilities--stroke, spinal cord injury, and cerebral palsy. Individual chapters on each disability cover the…

  12. Delta II Geotail -- 1st Stage and Solid Motor Booster Erection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Geotail mission's goal was to investigate the structure and dynamics of the geomagnetic tail that extends on the nightside of the Earth. The launch date was July 24, 1992. This video shows the Delta II on the pad, being prepared for the launch. The first stage and the solid motor booster are shown being moved into place on the rocket.

  13. In vitro receptor autoradiography reveals angiotensin II (Ang II) binding associated with sensory and motor components of the vagus

    SciTech Connect

    Diz, D.I.; Barnes, K.L.; Ferrario, C.M.

    1986-03-05

    Specific, high affinity Ang II binding in the dog's dorsal medulla is concentrated in the area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmnX). More recently Ang II binding sites were observed where bundles of vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla 6 mm rostral to obex and in the nodose ganglia and peripheral vagal nerves. Since Ang II binding in the nTS and dmnX overlies the distribution of vagal afferent fibers and efferent neurons, the effects of nodose ganglionectomy and cervical vagotomy on Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla were studied in rats and dogs using autoradiography after incubation of 14 ..mu..m coronal sections with 0.4 nM /sup 125/I-Ang II. Nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of 1 ..mu..M unlabeled Ang II. Two weeks after unilateral nodose ganglionectomy Ang II binding sites were absent ipsilaterally in the region where vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla. In the nTS and dmnX, binding near obex was reduced, while more rostrally these nuclei were almost completely devoid of Ang II binding on the denervated side. After cervical vagotomy, the loss of binding was restricted to the ipsilateral dmnX. These data are the first to reveal that Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla requires an intact vagal system.

  14. Roles for kinesin and myosin during cytokinesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hepler, Peter K; Valster, Aline; Molchan, Tasha; Vos, Jan W

    2002-01-01

    Cytokinesis in higher plants involves the phragmoplast, a complex cytoplasmic structure that consists of microtubules (MTs), microfilaments (MFs) and membrane elements. Both MTs and MFs are essential for cell plate formation, although it is not clear which motor proteins are involved. Some candidate processes for motor proteins include transport of Golgi vesicles to the plane of the cell plate and the spatiotemporal organization of the cytoskeletal elements in order to achieve proper deposition and alignment of the cell plate. We have focused on the kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP) and, more broadly, on myosins. Using an antibody that constitutively activates KCBP, we find that this MT motor, which is minus-end directed, contributes to the organization of the spindle and phragmoplast MTs. It does not participate in vesicle transport; rather, because of the orientation of the phragmoplast MTs, it is supposed that plus-end kinesins fill this role. Myosins, on the other hand, based on their inhibition with 2,3-butanedione monoxime and 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulphonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine (ML-7), are associated with the process of post-mitotic spindle/phragmoplast alignment and with late lateral expansion of the cell plate. They are also not the principal motors involved in vesicle transport. PMID:12079671

  15. Hold on tightly, let go lightly: myosin functions at adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Joshua C.; Bement, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Adherens junctions, the sites of cadherin-dependent cell–cell adhesion, are also important for dynamic tension sensing, force transduction and signalling. Different myosin motors contribute to adherens junction assembly and versatility in distinct ways. PMID:20596044

  16. Leveraging the membrane-cytoskeleton interface with myosin-1

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Russell E.; Tyska, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Class 1 myosins are small motor proteins with the ability to simultaneously bind to actin filaments and cellular membranes. Given their ability to generate mechanical force, and their high prevalence in many cell types, these molecules are well positioned to carry out a number of important biological functions at the interface of membrane and the actin cytoskeleton. Indeed, recent studies implicate these motors in endocytosis, exocytosis, release of extracellular vesicles, and the regulation of tension between membrane and the cytoskeleton. Many class 1 myosins also exhibit a load-dependent mechano-chemical cycle that enables them to maintain tension for long periods of time without hydrolyzing ATP. These properties put myosins-1 in a unique position to regulate dynamic membrane-cytoskeleton interactions and respond to physical forces during these events. PMID:20471271

  17. Modeling Hand-Over-Hand and Inchworm Steps in Myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, Amanda; Lowe, Ian; Tehver, Riina

    Myosin VI is a molecular motor protein that moves along actin filaments to transport cargo within a cell. There is much experimental evidence that the myosin VI dimer moves ``hand-over-hand'' along actin; however, recent experiments suggest that the protein can also move via an ``inchworm'' mechanism. We created a mechanochemical kinetic model to predict myosin VI's behavior under different ATP, ADP, and force conditions, taking these alternative mechanisms into account. Our model's calculations agree well with experimental results and can also be used to predict myosin VI's behavior outside experimentally tested regimes, such as under forward force. We also predict an optimized motor function for the protein around physiological (-2 pN) load and anchoring under -3 pN load. By using our model to predict myosin VI's response to environmental change, we can gain insight into the behavior of a protein that can be difficult to observe experimentally.

  18. Expansion and concatenation of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Fenix, Aidan M.; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A.; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, nonmuscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks), but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non–mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-Fs/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found that NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II–based contractile systems are assembled. PMID:26960797

  19. In vitro and in vivo single myosin step-sizes in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Sun, Xiaojing; Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin

    2015-12-01

    Myosin in muscle transduces ATP free energy into the mechanical work of moving actin. It has a motor domain transducer containing ATP and actin binding sites, and, mechanical elements coupling motor impulse to the myosin filament backbone providing transduction/mechanical-coupling. The mechanical coupler is a lever-arm stabilized by bound essential and regulatory light chains. The lever-arm rotates cyclically to impel bound filamentous actin. Linear actin displacement due to lever-arm rotation is the myosin step-size. A high-throughput quantum dot labeled actin in vitro motility assay (Qdot assay) measures motor step-size in the context of an ensemble of actomyosin interactions. The ensemble context imposes a constant velocity constraint for myosins interacting with one actin filament. In a cardiac myosin producing multiple step-sizes, a "second characterization" is step-frequency that adjusts longer step-size to lower frequency maintaining a linear actin velocity identical to that from a shorter step-size and higher frequency actomyosin cycle. The step-frequency characteristic involves and integrates myosin enzyme kinetics, mechanical strain, and other ensemble affected characteristics. The high-throughput Qdot assay suits a new paradigm calling for wide surveillance of the vast number of disease or aging relevant myosin isoforms that contrasts with the alternative model calling for exhaustive research on a tiny subset myosin forms. The zebrafish embryo assay (Z assay) performs single myosin step-size and step-frequency assaying in vivo combining single myosin mechanical and whole muscle physiological characterizations in one model organism. The Qdot and Z assays cover "bottom-up" and "top-down" assaying of myosin characteristics. PMID:26728749

  20. Direct Measurements of Local Coupling between Myosin Molecules Are Consistent with a Model of Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Sam; Kad, Neil M.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contracts due to ATP-dependent interactions of myosin motors with thin filaments composed of the proteins actin, troponin, and tropomyosin. Contraction is initiated when calcium binds to troponin, which changes conformation and displaces tropomyosin, a filamentous protein that wraps around the actin filament, thereby exposing myosin binding sites on actin. Myosin motors interact with each other indirectly via tropomyosin, since myosin binding to actin locally displaces tropomyosin and thereby facilitates binding of nearby myosin. Defining and modeling this local coupling between myosin motors is an open problem in muscle modeling and, more broadly, a requirement to understanding the connection between muscle contraction at the molecular and macro scale. It is challenging to directly observe this coupling, and such measurements have only recently been made. Analysis of these data suggests that two myosin heads are required to activate the thin filament. This result contrasts with a theoretical model, which reproduces several indirect measurements of coupling between myosin, that assumes a single myosin head can activate the thin filament. To understand this apparent discrepancy, we incorporated the model into stochastic simulations of the experiments, which generated simulated data that were then analyzed identically to the experimental measurements. By varying a single parameter, good agreement between simulation and experiment was established. The conclusion that two myosin molecules are required to activate the thin filament arises from an assumption, made during data analysis, that the intensity of the fluorescent tags attached to myosin varies depending on experimental condition. We provide an alternative explanation that reconciles theory and experiment without assuming that the intensity of the fluorescent tags varies. PMID:26536123

  1. Cucurbitacin I elicits the formation of actin/phospho-myosin II co-aggregates by stimulation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and inhibition of LIM-kinase.

    PubMed

    Sari-Hassoun, Meryem; Clement, Marie-Jeanne; Hamdi, Imane; Bollot, Guillaume; Bauvais, Cyril; Joshi, Vandana; Toma, Flavio; Burgo, Andrea; Cailleret, Michel; Rosales-Hernández, Martha Cecilia; Macias Pérez, Martha Edith; Chabane-Sari, Daoudi; Curmi, Patrick A

    2016-02-15

    Cucurbitacins are cytotoxic triterpenoid sterols isolated from plants. One of their earliest cellular effect is the aggregation of actin associated with blockage of cell migration and division that eventually lead to apoptosis. We unravel here that cucurbitacin I actually induces the co-aggregation of actin with phospho-myosin II. This co-aggregation most probably results from the stimulation of the Rho/ROCK pathway and the direct inhibition of the LIMKinase. We further provide data that suggest that the formation of these co-aggregates is independent of a putative pro-oxidant status of cucurbitacin I. The results help to understand the impact of cucurbitacins on signal transduction and actin dynamics and open novel perspectives to use it as drug candidates for cancer research. PMID:26707799

  2. A Perspective on the Role of Myosins as Mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Michael J; Arpağ, Göker; Tüzel, Erkan; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-06-21

    Cells are dynamic systems that generate and respond to forces over a range of spatial and temporal scales, spanning from single molecules to tissues. Substantial progress has been made in recent years in identifying the molecules and pathways responsible for sensing and transducing mechanical signals to short-term cellular responses and longer-term changes in gene expression, cell identity, and tissue development. In this perspective article, we focus on myosin motors, as they not only function as the primary force generators in well-studied mechanobiological processes, but also act as key mechanosensors in diverse functions including intracellular transport, signaling, cell migration, muscle contraction, and sensory perception. We discuss how the biochemical and mechanical properties of different myosin isoforms are tuned to fulfill these roles in an array of cellular processes, and we highlight the underappreciated diversity of mechanosensing properties within the myosin superfamily. In particular, we use modeling and simulations to make predictions regarding how diversity in force sensing affects the lifetime of the actomyosin bond, the myosin power output, and the ability of myosin to respond to a perturbation in force for several nonprocessive myosin isoforms. PMID:27332116

  3. Engineering myosins for long-range transport on actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Tony D; Chen, Lu; Lebel, Paul; Nakamura, Muneaki; Bryant, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors act as cargo transporters in cells and may be harnessed for directed transport applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. High processivity, the ability to take many steps along a track before dissociating, is often a desirable characteristic because it allows nanoscale motors to transport cargoes over distances on the scale of micrometres, in vivo and in vitro. Natural processive myosins are dimeric and use internal tension to coordinate the detachment cycles of the two heads. Here, we show that processivity can be enhanced in engineered myosins using two non-natural strategies designed to optimize the effectiveness of random, uncoordinated stepping: (1) the formation of three-headed and four-headed myosins and (2) the introduction of flexible elements between heads. We quantify improvements using systematic single-molecule characterization of a panel of engineered motors. To test the modularity of our approach, we design a controllably bidirectional myosin that is robustly processive in both forward and backward directions, and also produce the fastest processive cytoskeletal motor measured so far, reaching a speed of 10 µm s(-1). PMID:24240432

  4. Engineering myosins for long-range transport on actin filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Tony D.; Chen, Lu; Lebel, Paul; Nakamura, Muneaki; Bryant, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors act as cargo transporters in cells and may be harnessed for directed transport applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. High processivity, the ability to take many steps along a track before dissociating, is often a desirable characteristic because it allows nanoscale motors to transport cargoes over distances on the scale of micrometres, in vivo and in vitro. Natural processive myosins are dimeric and use internal tension to coordinate the detachment cycles of the two heads. Here, we show that processivity can be enhanced in engineered myosins using two non-natural strategies designed to optimize the effectiveness of random, uncoordinated stepping: (1) the formation of three-headed and four-headed myosins and (2) the introduction of flexible elements between heads. We quantify improvements using systematic single-molecule characterization of a panel of engineered motors. To test the modularity of our approach, we design a controllably bidirectional myosin that is robustly processive in both forward and backward directions, and also produce the fastest processive cytoskeletal motor measured so far, reaching a speed of 10 µm s-1.

  5. Molecular Modulation of Actomyosin Function by Cardiac Myosin-Binding Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Previs, Michael J.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Warshaw, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C is a key regulator of cardiac contractility and is capable of both activating the thin filament to initiate actomyosin motion generation and governing maximal sliding velocities. While MyBP-C’s C-terminus localizes the molecule within the sarcomere the N-terminus appears to confer regulatory function by binding to the myosin motor domain and/or actin. Literature pertaining to how MyBP-C binding to the myosin motor domain and or actin leads to MyBP-C’s dual modulatory roles that can impact actomyosin interactions are discussed. PMID:24407948

  6. Myosin V is a biological Brownian machine

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Keisuke; Iwaki, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Myosin V is a vesicle transporter that unidirectionally walks along cytoskeletal actin filaments by converting the chemical energy of ATP into mechanical work. Recently, it was found that myosin V force generation is a composition of two processes: a lever-arm swing, which involves a conformational change in the myosin molecule, and a Brownian search-and-catch, which involves a diffusive “search” by the motor domain that is followed by an asymmetric “catch” in the forward actin target such that Brownian motion is rectified. Here we developed a system that combines optical tweezers with DNA nano-material to show that the Brownian search-and-catch mechanism is the energetically dominant process at near stall force, providing 13 kBT of work compared to just 3 kBT by the lever-arm swing. Our result significantly reconsiders the lever-arm swinging model, which assumes the swing dominantly produces work (>10 kBT), and sheds light on the Brownian search-and-catch as a driving process. PMID:27493501

  7. Molecular motor efficiency is maximized in the presence of both power-stroke and rectification through feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R. K.; Parrondo, J. M. R.; Linke, H.; Johansson, J.

    2015-06-01

    We present a model for a feedback-controlled ratchet consisting of a Brownian particle and a moving, finite barrier that is shifted by an external agent depending on the position of the particle. By modifying the value of a single parameter of the feedback protocol, the model can act either as a pure rectifier, a power-stroke (PS) motor, or a combination of both. Interestingly, in certain situations the motor reaches a maximum efficiency for an intermediate value of that parameter, i.e., for a combination of the information ratchet and the PS mechanisms. We relate our results to the biological motors kinesin, myosin II, and myosin V, finding that these motors operate in a regime of length scales and forces where the efficiency is maximized for a combination of rectification and PS mechanisms.

  8. Analysis of the interactions between Rab GTPases and class V myosins.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Goud, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins that are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as membrane transport, muscle contraction, and cell division. Humans have over 40 myosins that can be placed into 18 classes, the malfunctioning of a number of which can lead to disease. There are three members of the human class V myosin family, myosins Va, Vb, and Vc. People lacking functional myosin Va suffer from a rare autosomal recessive disease called Griscelli's Syndrome type I (GS1) that is characterized by severe neurological defects and partial albinism. Mutations in the myosin Vb gene lead to an epithelial disorder called microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) that is often fatal in infants. The class V myosins have been implicated in the transport of diverse cargoes such as melanosomes in pigment cells, synaptic vesicles in neurons, RNA transcripts in a variety of cell types, and organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. The Rab GTPases play a critical role in recruiting class V myosins to their cargo. We recently published a study in which we used the yeast two-hybrid system to systematically test myosin Va for its ability to interact with each member of the human Rab GTPase family. We present here a detailed description of this yeast two-hybrid "living chip" assay. Furthermore, we present a protocol for validating positive interactions obtained from this screen by coimmunoprecipitation. PMID:25800833

  9. A Myo6 Mutation Destroys Coordination between the Myosin Heads, Revealing New Functions of Myosin VI in the Stereocilia of Mammalian Inner Ear Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Amiel A.; Song, Lin; Ron, Uri; Tan, Joshua T.; Shitrit, Alina Starovolsky; Fuchs, Helmut; Hasson, Tama; Ben-Tal, Nir; Sweeney, H. Lee; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Steel, Karen P.; Avraham, Karen B.

    2008-01-01

    Myosin VI, found in organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans, is essential for auditory and vestibular function in mammals, since genetic mutations lead to hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction in both humans and mice. Here, we show that a missense mutation in this molecular motor in an ENU-generated mouse model, Tailchaser, disrupts myosin VI function. Structural changes in the Tailchaser hair bundles include mislocalization of the kinocilia and branching of stereocilia. Transfection of GFP-labeled myosin VI into epithelial cells and delivery of endocytic vesicles to the early endosome revealed that the mutant phenotype displays disrupted motor function. The actin-activated ATPase rates measured for the D179Y mutation are decreased, and indicate loss of coordination of the myosin VI heads or ‘gating’ in the dimer form. Proper coordination is required for walking processively along, or anchoring to, actin filaments, and is apparently destroyed by the proximity of the mutation to the nucleotide-binding pocket. This loss of myosin VI function may not allow myosin VI to transport its cargoes appropriately at the base and within the stereocilia, or to anchor the membrane of stereocilia to actin filaments via its cargos, both of which lead to structural changes in the stereocilia of myosin VI–impaired hair cells, and ultimately leading to deafness. PMID:18833301

  10. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, James R. Thirumurugan, Kavitha; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hammer, John A.; Knight, Peter J.

    2008-04-25

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins.