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Sample records for n-acetylcysteine-mediated catalase upregulation

  1. A rapid and transient ROS generation by cadmium triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway in HepG2 cells and this is inhibited through N-acetylcysteine-mediated catalase upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Lim, Sung-Chul . E-mail: sclim@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cadmium (Cd)-induced hepatotoxicity, the role of ROS in this pathway remains unclear. Therefore, we attempted to determine the molecular mechanisms relevant to Cd-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. Cd was found to induce apoptosis in the HepG2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, as confirmed by DNA fragmentation analysis and TUNEL staining. In the early stages, both rapid and transient ROS generation triggered apoptosis via Fas activation and subsequent caspase-8-dependent Bid cleavage, as well as by calpain-mediated mitochondrial Bax cleavage. The timing of Bid activation was coincided with the timing at which the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP) collapsed as well as the cytochrome c (Cyt c) released into the cytosol. Furthermore, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore inhibitors, such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BA), did not block Cd-induced ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment resulted in the complete inhibition of the Cd-induced apoptosis via catalase upregulation and subsequent Fas downregulation. NAC treatment also completely blocked the Cd-induced intracellular ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release, indicating that Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may be regulated indirectly by ROS-mediated signaling pathway. Taken together, a rapid and transient ROS generation by Cd triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway and subsequent mitochondrial pathway. NAC inhibits Cd-induced apoptosis through the blocking of ROS generation as well as the catalase upregulation.

  2. Green tea catechins upregulate superoxide dismutase and catalase in fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuk Man; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen Yu

    2007-05-01

    Chinese Longjing green tea is an excellent source of polyphenol antioxidants. HPLC analysis revealed that Longjing green tea catechin extract (GTC) contained 62% epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), 19% epigallocatechin (EGC), 9% epicatechin gallate (ECG), and 7% epicatechin (EC). Investigating the effect of GTC on the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster, we observed that a 10 mg GTC/mL diet could prolong its 50% survival time by 36% and mean lifespan by 16%. This was consistent with 17% reduction in total body lipid hydroperoxide (LPO) level in GTC-treated flies compared to the control group. Supplementation of 10 mg GTC/mL diet increased the survival time only in wild type Oregon-R-C (OR) but not in two mutant fly lines, SOD(n108)/TM3 (gene for superoxide dismutase (SOD) was knocked out) and Cat(n1)/TM3 (gene for catalase was knocked out), when the flies were challenged with paraquat or hydrogen peroxide. Accordingly, SOD and catalase activities in OR wild type increased by 40 and 19%, respectively. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the genes for copper-zinc containing SOD (CuZnSOD), manganese containing SOD (MnSOD), and catalase were upregulated. It was concluded that prolonging lifespan by GTC in D. melanogaster was influenced, among others, by upregulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. PMID:17440995

  3. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong

    2009-01-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells. PMID:20054488

  4. PprM is necessary for up-regulation of katE1, encoding the major catalase of Deinococcus radiodurans, under unstressed culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jong-Il; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a poly-extremophilic organism, capable of tolerating a wide variety of different stresses, such as gamma/ultraviolet radiation, desiccation, and oxidative stress. PprM, a cold shock protein homolog, is involved in the radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, but its role in the oxidative stress response has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of pprM mutation on catalase gene expression. pprM disruption decreased the mRNA and protein levels of KatE1, which is the major catalase in D. radiodurans, under normal culture conditions. A pprM mutant strain (pprM MT) exhibited decreased catalase activity, and its resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decreased accordingly compared with that of the wild-type strain. We confirmed that RecG helicase negatively regulates katE1 under normal culture conditions. Among katE1 transcriptional regulators, the positive regulator drRRA was not altered in pprM (-), while the negative regulators perR, dtxR, and recG were activated more than 2.5-fold in pprM MT. These findings suggest that PprM is necessary for KatE1 production under normal culture conditions by down-regulation of katE1 negative regulators. PMID:27225459

  5. CATALASE ACTIVITY IN LEPTOSPIRA

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P. J.; Larson, A. D.; Cox, C. D.

    1964-01-01

    Rao, P. J. (University of Illinois, Urbana), A. D. Larson, and C. D. Cox. Catalase activity in Leptospira. J. Bacteriol. 88:1045–1048. 1964.—A number of serotypes of Leptospira were found to possess catalase activity, although considerable variation in activity existed among various serotypes. Catalase activity of L. pomona was reduced by inhibitors commonly employed for arresting catalase activity in other biological systems. Catalase activity was increased three to five times by growing cultures under conditions of oxygen availability; however, aeration had no beneficial effect on total viable cell crop. The relationship of oxygen to metabolism and future studies on virulence of the leptospirae is discussed. PMID:14219017

  6. Short communication: N-Acetylcysteine-mediated modulation of antibiotic susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Liu, L H; Li, X P; Luo, J Y; Zhang, Z; Yan, Z T; Zhang, S D; Li, H S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on antibiotic susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were tested by the agar-based E-test method. The presence of 10mM NAC reduced the MIC of penicillin and ampicillin but enhanced the MIC of erythromycin and ciprofloxacin for all of the strains. In addition, NAC-mediated modulation of MIC of kanamycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin was diverse, depending on the target bacterial pathogen and antibiotic being used. The results suggest that NAC is an important modulator of antibiotic activity against the major bovine mastitis pathogens. PMID:27016837

  7. Bronchiolar epithelial catalase is diminished in smokers with mild COPD.

    PubMed

    Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Fuke, Satoshi; Inomata, Takashi; Kaga, Kichizo; Morikawa, Toshiaki; Odajima, Nao; Adair-Kirk, Tracy; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate bronchiolar catalase expression and its relationship with smoking and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in humans and to determine the dynamic change of bronchiolar catalase expression in response to cigarette smoke in mice. Lung tissue was obtained from 36 subjects undergoing surgery for peripheral tumours, consisting of life-long nonsmokers and smokers with or without COPD. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cigarette smoke exposure for up to 3 months followed by a 28-day cessation period. We quantified bronchiolar catalase mRNA using laser capture microdissection and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. C22 club cells (Clara cells) in culture were exposed to cigarette smoke extract and monitored for viability when catalase expression was decreased by siRNA. Catalase was decreased at mRNA and protein levels in bronchiolar epithelium in smokers with COPD. In mice, bronchiolar catalase is temporarily upregulated at 1 day after cigarette smoke exposure but is downregulated by repeated cigarette smoke exposure, and is not restored long after withdrawal once emphysema is developed. Decreasing catalase expression in C22 cells resulted in greater cigarette smoke extract-induced cell death. Bronchiolar catalase reduction is associated with COPD. Regulation of catalase depends on the duration of cigarette smoke exposure, and plays a critical role for protection against cigarette smoke-induced cell damage. PMID:23100509

  8. Catalase is inhibited by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Krych, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2013-07-01

    Catalases, heme enzymes, which catalyze decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, belong to the antioxidant defense system of the cell. In this work we have shown that catalase from bovine liver is inhibited by flavonoids. The inhibition is, at least partially, due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between catalase and flavonoids. In the presence of some flavonoids the formation of unreactive catalase compound II has been detected. The most potent catalase inhibitors among the tested flavonoids have appeared myricetin, epicatechin gallate and epigallocatechin gallate. The relationship between the degree of enzyme inhibition and molecular structure of flavonoids has been analyzed. PMID:23567286

  9. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  10. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  11. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  12. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in...

  13. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in...

  14. Classical catalase: ancient and modern.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter

    2012-09-15

    This review describes the historical difficulties in devising a kinetically satisfactory mechanism for the classical catalase after its identification as a unique catalytic entity in 1902 and prior to the breakthrough 1947 analysis by Chance and co-workers which led to the identification of peroxide compounds I and II. The role of protons in the formation of these two ferryl complexes is discussed and current problems of inhibitory ligand and hydrogen donor binding at the active site are outlined, especially the multiple roles involving formate or formic acid. A previous mechanism of NADPH-dependent catalase protection against substrate inhibition is defended. A revised model linking the catalytic ('catalatic') action and the one-electron side reactions involving compound II is suggested. And it is concluded that, contrary to an idea proposed in 1963 that eukaryotic catalase might be a 'fossil enzyme', current thinking gives it a central role in the redox protective processes of long term importance for human and other eukaryotic and prokaryotic life. PMID:22326823

  15. Possible involvement of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in N-acetylcysteine-mediated antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Al-Samhari, Marwa M; Al-Rasheed, Nouf M; Al-Rejaie, Salim; Al-Rasheed, Nawal M; Hasan, Iman H; Mahmoud, Ayman M; Dzimiri, Nduna

    2016-03-01

    Advances in depression research have targeted inflammation and oxidative stress to develop novel types of treatment. The JAK/STAT signaling pathway plays pivotal roles in immune and inflammatory responses. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine, a putative precursor of the antioxidant glutathione, in an animal model of depression, with an emphasis on the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. Fluoxetine, a classical antidepressant drug was also under investigation. Male Wistar rats were subjected to forced swimming test and given N-acetylcysteine and fluoxetine immediately after the pre-test session, 5 h later and 1 h before the test session of the forced swimming test. N-acetylcysteine decreased immobility time (P < 0.05), serum corticosterone (P < 0.001), and hydrogen peroxide (P < 0.001), while restored glutathione concentration. Treatment of the rats with N-acetylcysteine produced significant (P < 0.001) down-regulation of STAT3 mRNA expression and protein phosphorylation. On the other hand, N-acetylcysteine significantly (P < 0.001) increased SOCS3 gene expression; however, SOCS3 protein was not changed. In conclusion, our study suggests that modulation of the JAK/STAT pathway might mediate the antidepressant-like effects of N-acetylcysteine. Therefore, depression research may target the JAK/STAT signaling pathway to provide a novel effective therapy. PMID:26643864

  16. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase mimics

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Overproduction of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are increasingly implicated in human disease and aging. ROS are also being explored as important modulating agents in a number of cell signaling pathways. Earlier work has focused on development of small catalytic scavengers of O2−, commonly referred to as superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics. Many of these compounds also have substantial abilities to catalytically scavenge H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Peroxides have been increasingly shown to disrupt cell signaling cascades associated with excessive inflammation associated with a wide variety of human diseases. Early studies with enzymatic scavengers like SOD frequently reported little or no beneficial effect in biologic models unless SOD was combined with catalase or a peroxidase. Increasing attention has been devoted to developing catalase or peroxidase mimetics as a way to treat overt inflammation associated with the pathophysiology of many human disorders. This review will focus on recent development of catalytic scavengers of peroxides and their potential use as therapeutic agents for pulmonary, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. PMID:18948086

  17. Thirty years of heme catalases structural biology.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Adelaida; Loewen, Peter C; Fita, Ignacio; Carpena, Xavi

    2012-09-15

    About thirty years ago the crystal structures of the heme catalases from Penicillium vitale (PVC) and, a few months later, from bovine liver (BLC) were published. Both enzymes were compact tetrameric molecules with subunits that, despite their size differences and the large phylogenetic separation between the two organisms, presented a striking structural similarity for about 460 residues. The high conservation, confirmed in all the subsequent structures determined, suggested a strong pressure to preserve a functional catalase fold, which is almost exclusively found in these mono-functional heme catalases. However, even in the absence of the catalase fold an efficient catalase activity is also found in the heme containing catalase-peroxidase proteins. The structure of these broad substrate range enzymes, reported for the first time less than ten years ago from the halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula marismortui (HmCPx) and from the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei (BpKatG), showed a heme pocket closely related to that of plant peroxidases, though with a number of unique modifications that enable the catalase reaction. Despite the wealth of structural information already available, for both monofunctional catalases and catalase-peroxidases, a number of unanswered major questions require continuing structural research with truly innovative approaches. PMID:22209752

  18. Sirt1 protects against oxidative stress-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis by the bidirectional regulation of catalase expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Wakino, Shu Yoshioka, Kyoko; Tatematsu, Satoru; Hara, Yoshikazu; Minakuchi, Hitoshi; Washida, Naoki; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2008-07-18

    NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase Sirt1 regulates cellular apoptosis. We examined the role of Sirt1 in renal tubular cell apoptosis by using HK-2 cells, proximal tubular cell lines with or without reactive oxygen species (ROS), H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Without any ROS, Sirt1 inhibitors enhanced apoptosis and the expression of ROS scavenger, catalase, and Sirt1 overexpression downregulated catalase. When apoptosis was induced with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Sirt1 was upregulated with the concomitant increase in catalase expression. Sirt1 overexpression rescued H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis through the upregulation of catalase. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced the nuclear accumulation of forkhead transcription factor, FoxO3a and the gene silencing of FoxO3a enhanced H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, endogenous Sirt1 maintains cell survival by regulating catalase expression and by preventing the depletion of ROS required for cell survival. In contrast, excess ROS upregulates Sirt1, which activates FoxO3a and catalase leading to rescuing apoptosis. Thus, Sirt1 constitutes a determinant of renal tubular cell apoptosis by regulating cellular ROS levels.

  19. Fungal catalases: function, phylogenetic origin and structure.

    PubMed

    Hansberg, Wilhelm; Salas-Lizana, Rodolfo; Domínguez, Laura

    2012-09-15

    Most fungi have several monofunctional heme-catalases. Filamentous ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) have two types of large-size subunit catalases (L1 and L2). L2-type are usually induced by different stressors and are extracellular enzymes; those from the L1-type are not inducible and accumulate in asexual spores. L2 catalases are important for growth and the start of cell differentiation, while L1 are required for spore germination. In addition, pezizomycetes have one to four small-size subunit catalases. Yeasts (Saccharomycotina) do not have large-subunit catalases and generally have one peroxisomal and one cytosolic small-subunit catalase. Small-subunit catalases are inhibited by substrate while large-subunit catalases are activated by H(2)O(2). Some small-subunit catalases bind NADPH preventing inhibition by substrate. We present a phylogenetic analysis revealing one or two events of horizontal gene transfers from Actinobacteria to a fungal ancestor before fungal diversification, as the origin of large-size subunit catalases. Other possible horizontal transfers of small- and large-subunit catalases genes were detected and one from bacteria to the fungus Malassezia globosa was analyzed in detail. All L2-type catalases analyzed presented a secretion signal peptide. Mucorales preserved only L2-type catalases, with one containing a secretion signal if two or more are present. Basidiomycetes have only L1-type catalases, all lacking signal peptide. Fungal small-size catalases are related to animal catalases and probably evolved from a common ancestor. However, there are several groups of small-size catalases. In particular, a conserved group of fungal sequences resemble plant catalases, whose phylogenetic origin was traced to a group of bacteria. This group probably has the heme orientation of plant catalases and could in principle bind NADPH. From almost a hundred small-subunit catalases only one fourth has a peroxisomal localization signal and in fact many fungi lack

  20. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H2O2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H2O2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H2O2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H2O2 stress. PMID:26692481

  1. Influence of stabilizers cosolutes on catalase conformation.

    PubMed

    Belluzo, Soledad; Boeris, Valeria; Farruggia, Beatriz; Picó, Guillermo

    2011-12-01

    The effects of sucrose, mannitol and betaine on the thermodynamic stability and the conformational state of the catalase enzyme were analyzed in order to understand the molecular mechanism whereby the solutes stabilized the enzyme. Catalase was selected as the model enzyme because it is used in several biotechnological processes. In the presence of each cosolute, our data have shown that there was a significant increase in the thermal stability of catalase. A minor stabilization in the enzyme secondary structure were induced by these cosolutes, as circular dichroism in the far UV region has demonstrated. Furthermore, our results support the idea that the overall native structure of catalase becomes more rigid, at least in certain surface areas, in the presence of the assayed stabilizers. This last finding can be reasonably explained by the exclusion mechanism of cosolutes from the protein surface which increases the structured water around this area. PMID:21871917

  2. Immobilization of bovine catalase onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study is to achieve carrier-bound immobilization of catalase onto magnetic particles (Fe₃O₄ and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O) to specify the optimum conditions of immobilization. Removal of H2O2 and the properties of immobilized sets were also investigated. To that end, adsorption and then cross-linking methods onto magnetic particles were performed. The optimum immobilization conditions were found for catalase: immobilization time (15 min for Fe₃O₄; 10 min for Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O), the initial enzyme concentration (1 mg/mL), amount of magnetic particles (25 mg), and glutaraldehyde concentration (3%). The activity reaction conditions (optimum temperature, optimum pH, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, and reusability) were characterized. Also kinetic parameters were calculated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The optimum pH values were found to be 7.0, 7.0, and 8.0 for free enzyme, Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalases, and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalases, respectively. All immobilized catalase systems displayed the optimum temperature between 25 and 35°C. Reusability studies showed that Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalase can be used 11 times with 50% loss in original activity, while Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalase lost 67% of activity after the same number of uses. Furthermore, immobilized catalase systems exhibited improved thermal and pH stability. The results transparently indicate that it is possible to have binding between enzyme and magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:23876136

  3. Evolution of Catalases from Bacteria to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Excessive hydrogen peroxide is harmful for almost all cell components, so its rapid and efficient removal is of essential importance for aerobically living organisms. Conversely, hydrogen peroxide acts as a second messenger in signal-transduction pathways. H2O2 is degraded by peroxidases and catalases, the latter being able both to reduce H2O2 to water and to oxidize it to molecular oxygen. Nature has evolved three protein families that are able to catalyze this dismutation at reasonable rates. Two of the protein families are heme enzymes: typical catalases and catalase–peroxidases. Typical catalases comprise the most abundant group found in Eubacteria, Archaeabacteria, Protista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, whereas catalase–peroxidases are not found in plants and animals and exhibit both catalatic and peroxidatic activities. The third group is a minor bacterial protein family with a dimanganese active site called manganese catalases. Although catalyzing the same reaction (2 H2O2 → 2 H2O + O2), the three groups differ significantly in their overall and active-site architecture and the mechanism of reaction. Here, we present an overview of the distribution, phylogeny, structure, and function of these enzymes. Additionally, we report about their physiologic role, response to oxidative stress, and about diseases related to catalase deficiency in humans. PMID:18498226

  4. Increased myocardial catalase in rats fed ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, H. D.; Kino, M.; Hicks, L.; Thorp, K. A.; Abelman, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of chronic intake of dietary ethanol upon catalase, an enzyme capable of metabolizing ethanol, as well as upon myocardial morphology and hemodynamics, were studied in the rat. Ethanol, comprising 36% of dietary calories, administered to rats for 5 weeks, was associated with increased myocardial catalase of 45.9 +/- 3.7 IU/mg protein, compared to 21.0 +/- 1.8 IU/mg protein in pair-fed controls. The enzyme activity remained significantly elevated after 18 weeks of ethanol. Hepatic catalase did not differ in these groups. Parallel cytochemical studies confirmed the increase in myocardial catalase by demonstrating an increase in peroxisomes. Gross and light-microscopic examinations revealed no abnormalities at either 5 or 18 weeks. Remarkably few ultrastructural abnormalities were seen in this material fixed by vascular perfusion. Hemodynamic studies after 5 weeks of ethanol revealed decreased left ventricle systolic pressure and decreased mean arterial pressure but no change in ventricular filling pressure. The possibility of catalase playing a metabolic and potentially protective role in rat myocardium chronically exposed to ethanol is discussed. Images Figure 3 Figure 4-6 Figures 1 and 2 Figures 7 and 8 p[389]-a PMID:474705

  5. Protection of Bacillus pumilus spores by catalases.

    PubMed

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains tested, YjqC was not detected in ATCC 7061 and BG-B79. Furthermore, both catalases were localized in the spore coat layer along with laccase and superoxide dismutase. Although the initial catalase activity in ATCC 7061 spores was higher, it was less stable over time than the SAFR-032 enzyme. We propose that synergistic activity of YjqC and BPUM_1305, along with other coat oxidoreductases, contributes to the enhanced resistance of B. pumilus spores to hydrogen peroxide. We observed that the product of the catalase reaction, gaseous oxygen, forms expanding vesicles on the spore surface, affecting the mechanical integrity of the coat layer, resulting in aggregation of the spores. The accumulation of oxygen gas and aggregations may play a crucial role in limiting further exposure of Bacilli spore surfaces to hydrogen peroxide or other toxic chemicals when water is present. PMID:22752169

  6. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Cláudia S L; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  7. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  8. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Improves Aged and UV-Irradiated Skin by Catalase Induction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Se-Rah; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose homeostasis. Its activation stimulates antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, whose expression is decreased in aged human skin. Here we investigated the expression of PPARα in aged and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin, and whether PPARα activation can modulate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and procollagen through catalase regulation. We found that PPARα mRNA level was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged and photoaged human skin as well as in UV-irradiated skin. A PPARα activator, Wy14643, inhibited UV-induced increase of MMP-1 and decrease of procollagen expression and caused marked increase in catalase expression. Furthermore, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was suppressed by Wy14643 in UV-irradiated and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the PPARα activation-induced upregulation of catalase leads to scavenging of ROS produced due to UV irradiation or aging. PPARα knockdown decreased catalase expression and abolished the beneficial effects of Wy14643. Topical application of Wy14643 on hairless mice restored catalase activity and prevented MMP-13 and inflammatory responses in skin. Our findings indicate that PPARα activation triggers catalase expression and ROS scavenging, thereby protecting skin from UV-induced damage and intrinsic aging. PMID:27611371

  9. cDNA cloning, characterization and expression analysis of the antioxidant enzyme gene, catalase, of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingli; Li, Fuhua; Zhang, Xiaojun; Dong, Bo; Zhang, Jiquan; Xie, Yusu; Xiang, Jianhai

    2008-05-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant protein that protects organisms against various oxidative stresses by eliminating hydrogen peroxide. The full-length catalase cDNA of Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis was cloned from the hepatopancreas using degenerate primers by the method of 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. The cDNA sequence consists of 1892 bp with a 1560 bp open reading frame, encoding 520 amino acids with high identity to invertebrate, vertebrate and even bacterial catalases. The sequence includes the catalytic residues His71, Asn144, and Tyr354. The molecular mass of the predicted protein is 58824.04 Da with an estimated pI of 6.63. Sequence comparison showed that the deduced amino acid sequence of F. chinensis catalase shares 96%, 73%, 71% and 70% identity with that of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, Abalone Haliotis discus hannai, Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri and Human Homo sapiens, respectively. Catalase transcripts were detected in hepatopancreas, hemocytes, lymphoid organ, intestine, ovary, muscle and gill by real-time PCR. The variation of catalase mRNA transcripts in hemocytes and hepatopancreas was also quantified by real-time PCR and the result indicated that the catalase showed up-regulated expression trends in hemocytes at 14 h and in hepatopancreas at 37 h after injection with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). PMID:18353680

  10. Protective Role of Catalase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, James G.; Hassett, Daniel J.; Stewart, Philip S.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; McDermott, Timothy R.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the two known catalases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in protecting planktonic and biofilm cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. Planktonic cultures and biofilms formed by the wild-type strain PAO1 and the katA and katB catalase mutants were compared for their susceptibility to H2O2. Over the course of 1 h, wild-type cell viability decreased steadily in planktonic cells exposed to a single dose of 50 mM H2O2, whereas biofilm cell viability remained at approximately 90% when cells were exposed to a flowing stream of 50 mM H2O2. The katB mutant, lacking the H2O2-inducible catalase KatB, was similar to the wild-type strain with respect to H2O2 resistance. The katA mutant possessed undetectable catalase activity. Planktonic katA mutant cultures were hypersusceptible to a single dose of 50 mM H2O2, while biofilms displayed a 10-fold reduction in the number of culturable cells after a 1-h exposure to 50 mM H2O2. Catalase activity assays, activity stains in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels, and lacZ reporter genes were used to characterize the oxidative stress responses of planktonic cultures and biofilms. Enzyme assays and catalase activity bands in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels showed significant KatB catalase induction occurred in biofilms after a 20-min exposure to H2O2, suggesting that biofilms were capable of a rapid adaptive response to the oxidant. Reporter gene data obtained with a katB::lacZ transcriptional reporter strain confirmed katB induction and that the increase in total cellular catalase activity was attributable to KatB. Biofilms upregulated the reporter in the constant presence of 50 mM H2O2, while planktonic cells were overwhelmed by a single 50 mM dose and were unable to make detectable levels of β-galactosidase. The results of this study demonstrated the following: the constitutively expressed KatA catalase is important for resistance of planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa to H2O2, particularly at high H2O2

  11. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure...

  12. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase...

  14. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure culture... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus...

  15. Growth-Dependent Catalase Localization in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T Reflected by Catalase Activity of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Yoshiko; Takebe, Fumihiko; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotolerant and H2O2-resistant bacterium, Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T, exhibits extraordinary H2O2 resistance and produces catalase not only intracellularly but also extracellularly. The intracellular and extracellular catalases exhibited the same enzymatic characteristics, that is, they exhibited the temperature-dependent activity characteristic of a cold-adapted enzyme, their heat stabilities were similar to those of mesophilic enzymes and very high catalytic intensity. In addition, catalase gene analysis indicated that the bacterium possessed the sole clade 1 catalase gene corresponding to intracellular catalase. Hence, intracellular catalase is secreted into the extracellular space. In addition to intracellular and extracellular catalases, the inner circumference of the cells showed the localization of catalase in the mid-stationary growth phase, which was observed by immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody against the intracellular catalase of the strain. The cells demonstrated higher catalase activity in the mid-stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. The catalase localized in the inner circumference can be dissociated by treatment with Tween 60. Thus, the localized catalase is not tightly bound to the inner circumference of the cells and may play a role in the oxidative defense of the cells under low metabolic state. PMID:24204687

  16. Role of oxyradicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.; Hassan, H.M. )

    1988-01-01

    The antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase, are inactivated upon exposure to ozone. In this study, the mechanism of this inactivation was examined using catalase as a model system. The data show that the inactivation of catalase is dependent on ozone concentration, time of exposure, and pH. Loss of catalase activity is accompanied with loss of the heme spectra. Tiron, desferal-Mn, trolox-c, and pyruvate protect the enzyme against ozone inactivation. SOD is less effective due to its inactivation by ozone. On the other hand, alcohols do not provide significant protection. The data suggest the possible involvement of superoxide radicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone.

  17. Redundancy, phylogeny and differential expression of Histoplasma capsulatum catalases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Clayton H; Klotz, Martin G; York, J Lyndal; Kruft, Volker; McEwen, Joan E

    2002-04-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum produces an extracellular catalase termed M antigen, which is similar to catalase B of Aspergillus and Emericella species. Evidence is presented here for two additional catalase isozymes in H. capsulatum. Catalase A is highly similar to a large-subunit catalase in Aspergillus and Emericella species, while catalase P is a small-subunit catalase protein with greatest similarity to known peroxisomal catalases of animals and Saccharomycotina yeasts. Complete cDNAs for the CATA and CATP genes (encoding catalases A and P, respectively) were isolated. The transcriptional expression of the H. capsulatum CATA, CATB (M antigen) and CATP genes was assessed by Northern blot hybridizations on total RNA. Results at the transcript levels for these genes are shown for three conditions: cell morphology (mycelial versus yeast phase cells), oxidative stress (in response to a challenge with H(2)O(2)) and carbon source (glucose vs glycerol). Collectively, these results demonstrated regulation of CATA by both cell morphology and oxidative stress, but not by carbon source, and regulation of CATB and CATP by carbon source but not cell morphology or oxidative stress. A phylogenetic analysis of presently available catalase sequences and intron residences was done. The results support a model for evolution of eukaryotic monofunctional catalase genes from prokaryotic genes. PMID:11932457

  18. Gold nanoparticles and/or N-acetylcysteine mediate carrageenan-induced inflammation and oxidative stress in a concentration-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Paula, Marcos M S; Petronilho, Fabricia; Vuolo, Francieli; Ferreira, Gabriela K; De Costa, Leandro; Santos, Giulia P; Effting, Pauline S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Dal-Bó, Alexandre G; Frizon, Tiago E; Silveira, Paulo C L; Pinho, Ricardo A

    2015-10-01

    We report the effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in an acute inflammation model induced by carrageenan (CG) and compared this effect with those induced by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) alone and by the synergistic effect of NAC and AuNP together. Male Wistar rats received saline or saline containing CG administered into the pleural cavity, and some rats also received NAC (20 mg/kg) subcutaneously and/or AuNP administered into the pleural cavity immediately after surgery. Four hours later, the rats were sacrificed and pleural exudates obtained for evaluation of cytokine levels and myeloperoxidase activities. Oxidative stress parameters were also evaluated in the lungs. The results demonstrated that the inflammatory process caused by the administration of CG into the pleural cavity resulted in a substantial increase in the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and myeloperoxidase and a reduction in interleukin-10 levels. These levels seem to be reversed after different treatments in animals. Antioxidant enzymes exhibited positive responses after treatment of NAC + AuNP, and all treatments were effective at reducing lipid peroxidation and oxidation of thiol groups induced by CG. These findings suggest that small compounds, such as NAC plus AuNP, may be useful in the treatment of conditions associated with local inflammation. PMID:25917538

  19. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp encoding a putative protein of 505 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.44 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of HvCatalase contained several highly conserved motifs including the heme-ligand signature sequence RLFSYGDTH and the active site signature FXRERIPERVVHAKGXGA. A comparative analysis showed the presence of conserved catalytic amino acids [His(71), Asn(145), and Tyr(354)] in HvCatalase as well. Homology modeling indicated the presence of the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating its catalase mRNA transcription. These results indicated that the HvCatalase gene is involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. PMID:22521743

  20. The Stringent Response Controls Catalases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Is Required for Hydrogen Peroxide and Antibiotic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Khakimova, Malika; Ahlgren, Heather G.; Harrison, Joe J.; English, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human opportunistic pathogen, possesses a number of antioxidant defense enzymes under the control of multiple regulatory systems. We recently reported that inactivation of the P. aeruginosa stringent response (SR), a starvation stress response controlled by the alarmone (p)ppGpp, caused impaired antioxidant defenses and antibiotic tolerance. Since catalases are key antioxidant enzymes in P. aeruginosa, we compared the levels of H2O2 susceptibility and catalase activity in P. aeruginosa wild-type and ΔrelA ΔspoT (ΔSR) mutant cells. We found that the SR was required for optimal catalase activity and mediated H2O2 tolerance during both planktonic and biofilm growth. Upon amino acid starvation, induction of the SR upregulated catalase activity. Full expression of katA and katB also required the SR, and this regulation occurred through both RpoS-independent and RpoS-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, overexpression of katA was sufficient to restore H2O2 tolerance and to partially rescue the antibiotic tolerance of ΔSR cells. All together, these results suggest that the SR regulates catalases and that this is an important mechanism in protecting nutrient-starved and biofilm bacteria from H2O2- and antibiotic-mediated killing. PMID:23457248

  1. Catalase and enumeration of stressed Staphylococcus aureus cells.

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, R S; Martin, S E; Brewer, D G; Ordal, Z J

    1977-01-01

    The effects of catalase on the enumeration of stressed (heated, reduced water activity, or freeze-dried) Staphylococcus aureus cells on several selective media were examined. The addition of catalase greatly increased the enumeration of stressed cells. The beneficial effects of catalase were most pronounced on those media least efficient in enumeration of stressed staphylococci, showing increases in enumeration of up to 1,100-fold. The effects of catalase appear to be due to the reduced ability of stressed cells to repair and form colonies in the absence of an exogenous decomposer of H2O2. Thermally stressed cells were more sensitive to H2O2 than unstressed cells. During recovery, stressed cells overcame the requirement for catalase. These findings implicate H2O2 as a factor in the failure of certain selective media to adequately enumerate stressed cells and demonstrate that the addition of catalase to these media markedly increases their productivity. PMID:879771

  2. Vulnerability of the human airway epithelium to hyperoxia. Constitutive expression of the catalase gene in human bronchial epithelial cells despite oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Yoo, J H; Erzurum, S C; Hay, J G; Lemarchand, P; Crystal, R G

    1994-01-01

    Although catalase is a major intracellular antioxidant, the expression of the human catalase gene appears to be limited in the airway epithelium, making these cells vulnerable to oxidant stress. The basis for this limited gene expression was examined by evaluation of the expression of the endogenous gene in human bronchial epithelial cells in response to hyperoxia. Hyperoxia failed to upregulate endogenous catalase gene expression, in contrast to a marked increase in expression of the heat shock protein gene. Sequence analysis of 1.7 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the human catalase gene showed features of a "house-keeping" gene (no TATA box, high GC content, multiple CCAAT boxes, and transcription start sites). Transfection of human bronchial epithelial cells with fusion genes composed of various lengths of the catalase 5'-flanking region and luciferase as a reporter gene showed low level constitutive promoter activity that did not change after exposure to hyperoxia. Importantly, using a replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing the human catalase cDNA, levels of catalase were significantly increased in human airway epithelial cells and this was associated with increased survival of the cells when exposed to hyperoxia. These observations provide a basis for understanding the sensitivity of the human airway epithelium to oxidant stress and a strategy for protecting the epithelium from such injury. PMID:8282800

  3. Catalase protects HepG2 cells from apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents by accelerating the degradation of p53.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jingxiang; Cederbaum, Arthur I

    2003-02-14

    Oxidants such as H(2)O(2) play a role in the toxicity of certain DNA-damaging agents, a process that often involves the tumor suppressor p53. H(2)O(2) is rapidly degraded by catalase, which protects cells against oxidant injury. To study the effect of catalase on apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents, HepG2 cells were infected with adenovirus containing the cDNA of catalase (Ad-Cat). Forty-eight hours after infection, catalase protein and activity was increased 7-10-fold compared with control cells infected with Ad-LacZ. After treatment with Vp16 or mitomycin C, control cells underwent apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner; however, overexpression of catalase inhibited this apoptosis. Basal levels as well as Vp16- or mitomycin C-stimulated levels of p53 and p21 protein were decreased in the catalase-overexpressing cells as compared with control cells; however, p53 mRNA levels were not decreased by catalase. There was no difference in p53 protein synthesis between catalase-overexpressing cells and control cells. However, pulse-chase experiments indicated that p53 protein degradation was enhanced in the catalase-overexpressing cells. Proteasome inhibitors but not calpeptin prevented the catalase-mediated decrease of p53 content. Whereas Vp16 increased, catalase overexpression decreased the phosphorylation of p53. The protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid did not prevent the catalase-mediated down-regulation of p53 or phosphorylated p53. These results demonstrate that catalase protects HepG2 cells from apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents in association with decreasing p53 phosphorylation; the latter may lead to an acceleration in the degradation of p53 protein by the proteasome complex. This suggests that the level of catalase may play a critical role in cell-induced resistance to the effects of anti-cancer drugs which up-regulate p53. PMID:12468545

  4. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Development of a new biosensor for determination of catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Teke, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is one of the major antioxidant enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of H2O2. The aim of this study was to suggest a new method for the assay of catalase activity. For this purpose, an amperometric biosensor based on glucose oxidase for determination of catalase activity was developed. Immobilization of glucose oxidase was made by a cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde on a Clark-type electrode (dissolved oxygen probe). Optimization and characterization properties of the biosensor were studied and determination of catalase activity in defined conditions was investigated in artificial serum solution. The results were compared with a reference method. PMID:24499365

  6. Catalases are NAD(P)H-dependent tellurite reductases.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Iván L; Arenas, Felipe A; Pérez, José Manuel; Fuentes, Derie E; Araya, Manuel A; Saavedra, Claudia P; Tantaleán, Juan C; Pichuantes, Sergio E; Youderian, Philip A; Vásquez, Claudio C

    2006-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species damage intracellular targets and are implicated in cancer, genetic disease, mutagenesis, and aging. Catalases are among the key enzymatic defenses against one of the most physiologically abundant reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide. The well-studied, heme-dependent catalases accelerate the rate of the dismutation of peroxide to molecular oxygen and water with near kinetic perfection. Many catalases also bind the cofactors NADPH and NADH tenaciously, but, surprisingly, NAD(P)H is not required for their dismutase activity. Although NAD(P)H protects bovine catalase against oxidative damage by its peroxide substrate, the catalytic role of the nicotinamide cofactor in the function of this enzyme has remained a biochemical mystery to date. Anions formed by heavy metal oxides are among the most highly reactive, natural oxidizing agents. Here, we show that a natural isolate of Staphylococcus epidermidis resistant to tellurite detoxifies this anion thanks to a novel activity of its catalase, and that a subset of both bacterial and mammalian catalases carry out the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of soluble tellurite ion (TeO(3)(2-)) to the less toxic, insoluble metal, tellurium (Te(o)), in vitro. An Escherichia coli mutant defective in the KatG catalase/peroxidase is sensitive to tellurite, and expression of the S. epidermidis catalase gene in a heterologous E. coli host confers increased resistance to tellurite as well as to hydrogen peroxide in vivo, arguing that S. epidermidis catalase provides a physiological line of defense against both of these strong oxidizing agents. Kinetic studies reveal that bovine catalase reduces tellurite with a low Michaelis-Menten constant, a result suggesting that tellurite is among the natural substrates of this enzyme. The reduction of tellurite by bovine catalase occurs at the expense of producing the highly reactive superoxide radical. PMID:17183702

  7. High catalase production by Rhizobium radiobacter strain 2-1.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Mami; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Katayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Yoshio; Fuji, Ryujiro

    2008-12-01

    To promote the application of catalase for treating wastewater containing hydrogen peroxide, bacteria exhibiting high catalase activity were screened. A bacterium, designated strain 2-1, with high catalase activity was isolated from the wastewater of a beverage factory that uses hydrogen peroxide. Strain 2-1 was identified as Rhizobium radiobacter (formerly known as Agrobacterium tumefaciens) on the basis of both phenotypic and genotypic characterizations. Although some strains of R. radiobacter are known plant pathogens, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that strain 2-1 has no phytopathogenic factor. Compared with a type strain of R. radiobacter, the specific catalase activity of strain 2-1 was approximately 1000-fold. Moreover, Strain 2-1 grew faster and exhibited considerably higher catalase activity than other microorganisms that have been used for industrial catalase production. Strain 2-1 is harmless to humans and the environment and produces catalase efficiently, suggesting that strain 2-1 is a good resource for the mass production of catalase for the treatment of hydrogen peroxide-containing wastewater. PMID:19134550

  8. Interaction of Nitric Oxide with Catalase: Structural and Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present the structures of bovine catalase in its native form and complexed with ammonia and nitric oxide, obtained by X-ray crystallography. Using the NO generator 1-(N,N-diethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, we were able to generate sufficiently high NO concentrations within the catalase crystals that substantial occupation was observed despite a high dissociation rate. Nitric oxide seems to be slightly bent from the heme normal that may indicate some iron(II) character in the formally ferric catalase. Microspectrophotometric investigations inline with the synchrotron X-ray beam reveal photoreduction of the central heme iron. In the cases of the native and ammonia-complexed catalase, reduction is accompanied by a relaxation phase. This is likely not the case for the catalase NO complex. The kinetics of binding of NO to catalase were investigated using NO photolyzed from N,N′-bis(carboxymethyl)-N,N′-dinitroso-p-phenylenediamine using an assay that combines catalase with myoglobin binding kinetics. The off rate is 1.5 s–1. Implications for catalase function are discussed. PMID:21524057

  9. IS CATALASE ACTIVITY ASSOCIATED WITH MAIZE RESISTANCE TO ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalase activity was measured in various cob tissues during maize ear development because of its role in maintaining reactive oxygen homeostasis during biotic and abiotic stress. Catalase activity was determined in immature and mature embryos, pericarp, and rachis tissues of maize lines that are re...

  10. Genes Important for Catalase Activity in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Baureder, Michael; Hederstedt, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Little in general is known about how heme proteins are assembled from their constituents in cells. The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme and does not depend on it for growth. However, when supplied with heme in the growth medium the cells can synthesize two heme proteins; catalase (KatA) and cytochrome bd (CydAB). To identify novel factors important for catalase biogenesis libraries of E. faecalis gene insertion mutants were generated using two different types of transposons. The libraries of mutants were screened for clones deficient in catalase activity using a colony zymogram staining procedure. Analysis of obtained clones identified, in addition to katA (encoding the catalase enzyme protein), nine genes distributed over five different chromosomal loci. No factors with a dedicated essential role in catalase biogenesis or heme trafficking were revealed, but the results indicate the RNA degradosome (srmB, rnjA), an ABC-type oligopeptide transporter (oppBC), a two-component signal transducer (etaR), and NADH peroxidase (npr) as being important for expression of catalase activity in E. faecalis. It is demonstrated that catalase biogenesis in E. faecalis is independent of the CydABCD proteins and that a conserved proline residue in the N-terminal region of KatA is important for catalase assembly. PMID:22590595

  11. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn(2+) before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO(4). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe(II) /Fe(II) ]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H(2)O(2) to O(2) and H(2)O. The values of k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) for the catalase activity are 200 s(-1) and 2.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H(2)O(2) before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g(ave) = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H(2)O(2) by [Fe(II)/Fe(II)]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  12. Beneficial effect of catalase treatment on growth of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, S M; Kautter, D A

    1976-01-01

    Several common plating media were tested for their ability to support growth of Clostridium perfringens after storage of the plates for 1 to 10 days at 4 and 25 degrees C with and without subsequent addition of catalase. Liver-veal (LV) agar and brain heart infusion (BHI) agar quickly become incapable of supporting growth after storage without added catalase, whereas Shahidi Ferguson perfringens (SFP) agar and Brewer anaerobic (BA) agar were less affected. Plate counts of C. perfringens on untreated LV and BHI agars stored 3 days at 25 degrees C showed a reduction of 98.2%, whereas counts on SFP and BA agars were reduced by 13.6% and 46.2%, respectively. Addition of 1,500 U of beef liver catalase to the surface of the 3-day-old agars before incubation resulted in substantial restoration of their growth-promoting ability. Counts of colonies on LV, GHI, SFP, and BA agars with added catalase were usually 20 to 90% higher than untreated controls. Similar results were obtained using purified catalase, fungal catalase, and horseradish peroxidase. These results suggest that inhibition may be due to peroxide formed during storage and incubation and that additon of catalase provides near optimum conditions for growth of C. perfringens on these media. PMID:185958

  13. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  14. A Laboratory Experiment of the Purification of Catalase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busquets, Montserrat; Franco, Rafael

    1986-01-01

    Describes a simple method for purifying catalase for the study of proteins. Procedures are systematically and diagramatically presented. Also identifies polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, kinetic studies, and apparent molecular weight determination as possible techniques to be used in studying proteins. (ML)

  15. Pseudomonas syringae Catalases Are Collectively Required for Plant Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ming; Block, Anna; Bryan, Crystal D.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 must detoxify plant-produced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in order to survive in its host plant. Candidate enzymes for this detoxification include the monofunctional catalases KatB and KatE and the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatG of DC3000. This study shows that KatG is the major housekeeping catalase of DC3000 and provides protection against menadione-generated endogenous H2O2. In contrast, KatB rapidly and substantially accumulates in response to exogenous H2O2. Furthermore, KatB and KatG have nonredundant roles in detoxifying exogenous H2O2 and are required for full virulence of DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, the nonredundant ability of KatB and KatG to detoxify plant-produced H2O2 is essential for the bacteria to survive in plants. Indeed, a DC3000 catalase triple mutant is severely compromised in its ability to grow in planta, and its growth can be partially rescued by the expression of katB, katE, or katG. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that although KatB and KatG are the major catalases involved in the virulence of DC3000, KatE can also provide some protection in planta. Thus, our results indicate that these catalases are virulence factors for DC3000 and are collectively required for pathogenesis. PMID:22797762

  16. Identification of catalase-like activity from Mycobacterium leprae and the relationship between catalase and isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH).

    PubMed

    Kang, T J; You, J C; Chae, G T

    2001-08-01

    As Mycobacterium leprae proliferate inside macrophages, it has been speculated that catalase encoded by katG may protect the bacilli from deleterious effects of peroxide generated from the macrophage and may also play a crucial role in the survival of M. leprae in vivo. However, unlike that of M. tuberculosis, the katG of M. leprae has been reported to be a pseudogene, implicating that isoniazid, which is activated to a potent tuberculocidal agent by catalase, is unlikely to be of therapeutic benefit to leprosy patients. These results raise a question as to how M. leprae avoids H202-mediated killing inside macrophages. To understand the survival of M. leprae in macrophages, the present study attempted to detect catalase-like activity in M. leprae. Catalase-like activity was found in M. leprae cell lysate by the diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining method with non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An ammonium sulphate precipitation study revealed that the catalase-like activity was precipitable with 80% ammonium sulphate. The effect of isoniazid (INH) on M. leprae growth was also tested by RT-PCR and radiorespirometric assay to examine catalase-like activity in M. leprae, because INH was activated by catalase. It was found that the viability of M. leprae was decreased at a concentration of 20 microg/ml by radiorespirometric assay and it was inhibited at higher concentrations as determined by RT-PCR. These data suggest that a catalase-like activity other than that encoded by katG is present in M. leprae. PMID:11478670

  17. MicroRNA-30b-Mediated Regulation of Catalase Expression in Human ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rashidul; Chun, Eugene; Howell, Jennifer C.; Sengupta, Trisha; Chen, Dan; Kim, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxidative injury to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retinal photoreceptors has been linked to a number of retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated gene expression has been extensively studied at transcriptional levels. Also, the post-transcriptional control of gene expression at the level of translational regulation has been recently reported. However, the microRNA (miRNA/miR)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in human RPE cells has not been thoroughly looked at. Increasing evidence points to a potential role of miRNAs in diverse physiological processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated for the first time in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) that the post-transcriptional control of gene expression via miRNA modulation regulates human catalase, an important and potent component of cell's antioxidant defensive network, which detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) radicals. Exposure to several stress-inducing agents including H2O2 has been reported to alter miRNA expression profile. Here, we demonstrated that a sublethal dose of H2O2 (200 µM) up-regulated the expression of miR-30b, a member of the miR-30 family, which inhibited the expression of endogenous catalase both at the transcript and protein levels. However, antisense (antagomirs) of miR-30b was not only found to suppress the miR-30b mimics-mediated inhibitions, but also to dramatically increase the expression of catalase even under an oxidant environment. Conclusions/Significance We propose that a microRNA antisense approach could enhance cytoprotective mechanisms against oxidative stress by increasing the antioxidant defense system. PMID:22880027

  18. Purification and biosynthesis of cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum L.) catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Kunce, C M; Trelease, R N; Turley, R B

    1988-01-01

    As part of our research on peroxisome biogenesis, catalase was purified from cotyledons of dark-grown cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings and monospecific antibodies were raised in rabbits. Purified catalase appeared as three distinct electrophoretic forms in non-denaturing gels and as a single protein band (with a subunit Mr of 57,000) on silver-stained SDS/polyacrylamide gels. Western blots of crude extracts and isolated peroxisomes from cotton revealed one immunoreactive polypeptide with the same Mr (57,000) as the purified enzyme, indicating that catalase did not undergo any detectable change in Mr during purification. Synthesis in vitro, directed by polyadenylated RNA isolated from either maturing seeds or cotyledons of dark-grown cotton seedlings, revealed a predominant immunoreactive translation product with a subunit Mr of 57,000 and an additional minor immunoreactive product with a subunit Mr of 64000. Labelling studies in vivo revealed newly synthesized monomers of both the 64000- and 57,000-Mr proteins present in the cytosol and incorporation of both proteins into the peroxisome without proteolytic processing. Within the peroxisome, the 57,000-Mr catalase was found as an 11S tetramer; whereas the 64,000-Mr protein was found as a relatively long-lived 20S aggregate (native Mr approx. 600,000-800,000). The results strongly indicate that the 64,000-Mr protein (catalase?) is not a precursor to the 57,000-Mr catalase and that cotton catalase is translated on cytosolic ribosomes without a cleavable transit or signal sequence. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:3134010

  19. CENTRAL REINFORCING EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ARE BLOCKED BY CATALASE INHIBITION

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnikov, Michael Edward; Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have systematically indicated that newborn rats are highly sensitive to ethanol’s positive reinforcing effects. Central administrations of ethanol (25–200 mg %) associated with an olfactory conditioned stimulus (CS) promote subsequent conditioned approach to the CS as evaluated through the newborn’s response to a surrogate nipple scented with the CS. It has been shown that ethanol’s first metabolite, acetaldehyde, exerts significant reinforcing effects in the central nervous system. A significant amount of acetaldehyde is derived from ethanol metabolism via the catalase system. In newborn rats catalase levels are particularly high in several brain structures. The present study tested the effect of catalase inhibition on central ethanol reinforcement. In the first experiment, pups experienced lemon odor either paired or unpaired with intracisternal (i.c.) administrations of 100 mg% ethanol. Half of the animals corresponding to each learning condition were pretreated with i.c. administrations of either physiological saline or a catalase inhibitor (sodium-azide). Catalase inhibition completely suppressed ethanol reinforcement in paired groups without affecting responsiveness to the CS during conditioning or responding by unpaired control groups. A second experiment tested whether these effects were specific to ethanol reinforcement or due instead to general impairment in learning and expression capabilities. Central administration of an endogenous kappa opioid receptor agonist (dynorphin A-13) was employed as an alternative source of reinforcement. Inhibition of the catalase system had no effect on the reinforcing properties of dynorphin. The present results support the hypothesis that ethanol metabolism regulated by the catalase system plays a critical role in determination of ethanol reinforcement in newborn rats. PMID:17980789

  20. Mechanism of inhibition of catalase by nitro and nitroso compounds.

    PubMed

    Titov, V Yu; Petrenko, Yu M; Vanin, A F

    2008-01-01

    Dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiolate ligands and S-nitrosothiols, which are NO and NO+ donors, share the earlier demonstrated ability of nitrite for inhibition of catalase. The efficiency of inhibition sharply (by several orders in concentration of these agents) increases in the presence of chloride, bromide, and thiocyanate. The nitro compounds tested--nitroarginine, nitroglycerol, nitrophenol, and furazolidone--gained the same inhibition ability after incubation with ferrous ions and thiols. This is probably the result of their transformation into DNIC. None of these substances lost the inhibitory effect in the presence of the well known NO scavenger oxyhemoglobin. This fact suggests that NO+ ions rather than neutral NO molecules are responsible for the enzyme inactivation due to nitrosation of its structures. The enhancement of catalase inhibition in the presence of halide ions and thiocyanate might be caused by nitrosyl halide formation. The latter protected nitrosonium ions against hydrolysis, thereby ensuring their transfer to the targets in enzyme molecules. The addition of oxyhemoglobin plus iron chelator o-phenanthroline destroying DNIC sharply attenuated the inhibitory effect of DNIC on catalase. o-Phenanthroline added alone did not influence this effect. Oxyhemoglobin is suggested to scavenge nitrosonium ions released from decomposing DNIC, thereby preventing catalase nitrosation. The mixture of oxyhemoglobin and o-phenanthroline did not affect the inhibitory action of nitrite or S-nitrosothiols on catalase. PMID:18294136

  1. The localization of catalase in the pulmonary alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Davies, P; Drath, D B; Engel, E E; Huber, G L

    1979-02-01

    A combined biochemical and cytochemical study of catalase was performed on alveolar macrophages lavaged from the lungs of adult male rats. Biochemically, catalase activity was present in both a high-speed granule fraction and in the supernatant. The granule-associated activity exhibited latency. Two methods of cell breakage, sonication and homogenization, yielded similar levels and distributions of catalase activity. Catalase activity in whole cells was identified cytochemically by the alkaline diaminobenzidine method and was localized within membrane-lined cytoplasmic granules similar in size to microperoxisomes and associated with cisternae of smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Localization of the reaction product was inhibited by 0.04 M aminotriazole, by cyanide, and by boiling prior to incubation. The cytochemical reaction continued in the absence of exogenous peroxide, but could be prevented by addition of catalase or pyruvate to the peroxide-free medium. Enzyme activity was also localized within a portion of the membrane-bound granules present in the cell fractions used for the biochemical assays. PMID:431040

  2. Identification of two catalases in Azotobacter vinelandii: a KatG homologue and a novel bacterial cytochrome c catalase, CCCAv.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, James R; Page, William J

    2008-02-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii produces two detectable catalases during growth on minimal medium. The heat-labile catalase expressed during exponential growth phase was identified as a KatG homologue by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using a mixed protein sample. The second catalase was heat resistant and had substantial residual activity after treatment at 90 degrees C. This enzyme was purified by anion-exchange and size exclusion chromatography and was found to exhibit strong absorption at 407 nm, which is often indicative of associated heme moieties. The purified protein was fragmented by proteinase K and identified by LC-MS/MS. Some identity was shared with the MauG/bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase (BCCP) protein family, but the enzyme exhibited a strong catalase activity never before observed in this family. Because two putative c-type heme sites (CXXCH) were predicted in the peptide sequence and were demonstrated experimentally, the enzyme was designated a cytochrome c catalase (CCC(Av)). However, the local organization of the CCC(Av) heme motifs differed significantly from that of the BCCPs as the sites were confined to the C-terminal half of the catalase. A possible Ca2+ binding motif, previously described in the BCCPs, is also present in the CCC(Av) peptide sequence. Some instability in the presence of EGTA was observed. Expression of the catalase was abolished in cccA mutants, resulting in a nearly 8,700-fold reduction in peroxide resistance in stationary phase. PMID:18055590

  3. The impact of catalase expression on the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Zandycke, S M; Sohier, P J; Smart, K A

    2002-02-01

    The role of catalase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae replicative lifespan was investigated using a wild-type haploid laboratory yeast W303a, a catalase A mutant, a catalase T mutant and an acatalasaemic mutant. Lifespan analysis was performed in two different environmental conditions. Under repressing conditions, on glucose media, catalase T activity, but not catalase A activity was necessary to assure longevity. However, under derepressing conditions, on ethanol media, both catalases were required for longevity assurance. Although catalase activity and carbon source influence yeast lifespan, the relationship between oxidative defence and replicative senescence is complex. PMID:11744047

  4. Peroxide-inducible catalase in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida protects against exogenous hydrogen peroxide and killing by activated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss L., macrophages.

    PubMed

    Barnes, A C; Bowden, T J; Horne, M T; Ellis, A E

    1999-03-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida expresses a single cytoplasmically located catalase which was found to be inducible by exposure to 20 microM hydrogen peroxide in mid-exponential phase resulting in a 4 fold increase in activity. Subsequent exposure to 2 mM peroxide in late-exponential/early-stationary phase resulted in further induction of catalase activity which increased to 20 fold higher levels than those found in uninduced cultures. Exponentially induced cultures were protected against subsequent exposure to 10 mM peroxide which was lethal to non-induced cultures. Bacteria subjected to induction in mid-exponential and early-stationary phase were resistant to 100 mM peroxide, although viability was greatly reduced. Growth of the bacterium under iron-restricted conditions had no effect on the peroxide induction of catalase. As current evidence indicates, the latter is an iron-co-factored heme catalase, this result suggests that catalase induction has a high priority in the metabolism of iron. Furthermore, exposure to peroxide also induces expression of periplasmic MnSOD. A. salmonicida MT423 was resistant to normal rainbow trout macrophages, but was susceptible to killing by activated macrophages. However, if catalase was induced by prior exposure to 20 microM peroxide during mid-exponential phase, A. salmonicida was resistant to killing by activated macrophages. The ability of A. salmonicida to upregulate periplasmic MnSOD and cytoplasmic catalase production under iron restricted conditions and low level peroxide (conditions expected to exist during the early stages of an infection) may be vital for its ability to withstand attack by phagocytic cells in vivo. PMID:10089155

  5. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression. PMID:22565543

  6. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat{sup b}/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • Et

  7. Recovery of Clostridia on Catalase-Treated Plating Media

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Stanley M.; Kautter, Donald A.

    1977-01-01

    Four plating media commonly used for culturing clostridia were tested for their ability to support growth of several Clostridium species after storage of the plates for 1 to 10 days at 4 and 25°C with and without subsequent addition of catalase. Liver-veal (LV) agar and brain heart infusion (BHI) agar rapidly became incapable of supporting growth after storage without added catalase, whereas Shahidi Ferguson perfringens agar base and Brewer anaerobic agar were less affected. Plate counts of vegetative cells of nine of the less fastidious Clostridium species on untreated LV and BHI agars, stored for 3 days at 4°C, were 60 to 90% lower than counts on catalase-treated media. Counts on Shahidi Ferguson perfringens agar base were only 1 to 24% lower on untreated medium with the same species. Addition of 500 U of purified beef liver catalase to the surface of the 3-day-old agars before inoculation resulted in substantial restoration of the ability of the media to support colony formation from vegetative cells except with the most strictly anaerobic species (nonproteolytic C. botulinum types B, E, and F, and C. novyii types A and B). A similar response was obtained with spores of the less fastidious species on catalase-treated media. Our results suggest that inhibition of most Clostridium species on LV and BHI agars may be due to accumulation of peroxide during preparation, storage, and incubation of the media, and also suggest that the presence of glucose in these media is a major factor contributing to their inability to support growth. It is believed that the addition of exogenous catalase prevents the accumulation of peroxide(s), thus allowing colony formation from vegetative cells of the clostridia under what would otherwise be unsuitable cultural conditions. PMID:869526

  8. Improving catalase-based propelled motor endurance by enzyme encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmchen, Juliane; Baeza, Alejandro; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed.Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02459a

  9. Heterogeneity of Catalase in Maturing and Germinated Cotton Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Kunce, Christine M.; Trelease, Richard N.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate possible charge and size heterogeneity of catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv Deltapine 62), extracts of cotyledons from different developmental ages were subjected to nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. Special precautions (e.g. fresh homogenates, reducing media) were necessary to prevent artefacts due to enzyme modification during extraction and storage. When the gels were stained for enzyme activity, two distinct electrophoretic forms of catalase were resolved in extracts of maturing and mature cotton seeds. In germinated seeds, three additional cathodic forms were detected revealing a total of five electrophoretic variants. In green cotyledons, the two anodic forms characteristic of ungerminated seeds were less active; whereas, the most cathodic form was predominant. All forms of catalase were found in isolated glyoxysomes. Corresponding electrophoretic patterns were found on Western blots probed with anticatalase serum; no immunoreactive, catalytically inactive forms were detected. Western blots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels revealed only one immunoreactive (55 kilodaltons) polypeptide in cotton extracts of all developmental ages. Results from isoelectric focusing and Ferguson plots indicate that the electrophoretic variants of catalase are charge isomers with a molecular weight of approximately 230,000. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:16664956

  10. Effects of Peroxisomal Catalase Inhibition on Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Paul A.; Pizzitelli, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes produce hydrogen peroxide as a metabolic by-product of their many oxidase enzymes, but contain catalase that breaks down hydrogen peroxide in order to maintain the organelle’s oxidative balance. It has been previously demonstrated that, as cells age, catalase is increasingly absent from the peroxisome, and resides instead as an unimported tetrameric molecule in the cell cytosol; an alteration that is coincident with increased cellular hydrogen peroxide levels. As this process begins in middle-passage cells, we sought to determine whether peroxisomal hydrogen peroxide could contribute to the oxidative damage observed in mitochondria in late-passage cells. Early-passage human fibroblasts (Hs27) treated with aminotriazole (3-AT), an irreversible catalase inhibitor, demonstrated decreased catalase activity, increased levels of cellular hydrogen peroxide, protein carbonyls, and peroxisomal numbers. This treatment increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels, and decreased the mitochondrial aconitase activity by ∼85% within 24 h. In addition, mitochondria from 3-AT treated cells show a decrease in inner membrane potential. These results demonstrate that peroxisome-derived oxidative imbalance may rapidly impair mitochondrial function, and considering that peroxisomal oxidative imbalance begins to occur in middle-passage cells, supports the hypothesis that peroxisomal oxidant release occurs upstream of, and contributes to, the mitochondrial damage observed in aging cells. PMID:22536190

  11. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. 173.135 Section 173.135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It is a partially purified liquid or powder. Its characterizing enzyme activity is catalase (EC...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It is a partially purified liquid or powder. Its characterizing enzyme activity is catalase (EC...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It is a partially purified liquid or powder. Its characterizing enzyme activity is catalase (EC...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 110, which is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies... enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It is a partially purified liquid or powder. Its characterizing enzyme activity is catalase (EC 1.11.1.6). (b) The ingredient meets the...

  16. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. 173.135 Section 173.135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED...

  17. Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) exhibit NADH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Wiseman, Ben; Deemagarn, Taweewat; Donald, Lynda J; Duckworth, Harry W; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2004-10-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatG) produced by Burkholderia pseudomallei, Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalyze the oxidation of NADH to form NAD+ and either H2O2 or superoxide radical depending on pH. The NADH oxidase reaction requires molecular oxygen, does not require hydrogen peroxide, is not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase, and has a pH optimum of 8.75, clearly differentiating it from the peroxidase and catalase reactions with pH optima of 5.5 and 6.5, respectively, and from the NADH peroxidase-oxidase reaction of horseradish peroxidase. B. pseudomallei KatG has a relatively high affinity for NADH (Km=12 microm), but the oxidase reaction is slow (kcat=0.54 min(-1)) compared with the peroxidase and catalase reactions. The catalase-peroxidases also catalyze the hydrazinolysis of isonicotinic acid hydrazide (INH) in an oxygen- and H2O2-independent reaction, and KatG-dependent radical generation from a mixture of NADH and INH is two to three times faster than the combined rates of separate reactions with NADH and INH alone. The major products from the coupled reaction, identified by high pressure liquid chromatography fractionation and mass spectrometry, are NAD+ and isonicotinoyl-NAD, the activated form of isoniazid that inhibits mycolic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis. Isonicotinoyl-NAD synthesis from a mixture of NAD+ and INH is KatG-dependent and is activated by manganese ion. M. tuberculosis KatG catalyzes isonicotinoyl-NAD formation from NAD+ and INH more efficiently than B. pseudomallei KatG. PMID:15280362

  18. Altered methanol embryopathies in embryo culture with mutant catalase-deficient mice and transgenic mice expressing human catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of methanol (MeOH) in rodents, unlike its acute toxicity in humans, are unclear, but may involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). Embryonic catalase, although expressed at about 5% of maternal activity, may protect the embryo by detoxifying ROS. This hypothesis was investigated in whole embryo culture to remove confounding maternal factors, including metabolism of MeOH by maternal catalase. C57BL/6 (C57) mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Catb/J acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 4 mg/ml MeOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally. MeOH was embryopathic in C57 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed and turning, whereas hCat embryos were protected. Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to C3H WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. MeOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, with reduced anterior neuropore closure and head length only in catalase-deficient embryos. These data suggest that ROS may be involved in the embryopathic mechanism of methanol, and that embryonic catalase activity may be a determinant of teratological risk.

  19. PGC-1α Serine 570 Phosphorylation and GCN5-mediated Acetylation by Angiotensin II Drive Catalase Down-regulation and Vascular Hypertrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Shiqin; Salazar, Gloria; San Martin, Alejandra; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Patrushev, Nikolay; Hilenski, Lula; Nazarewicz, Rafal Robert; Ma, Minhui; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Alexander, R. Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a pleuripotential hormone that is important in the pathophysiology of multiple conditions including aging, cardiovascular and renal diseases, and insulin resistance. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators of Ang II-induced signaling generally and have a well defined role in vascular hypertrophy, which is inhibited by overexpression of catalase, inferring a specific role of H2O2. The molecular mechanisms are understood incompletely. The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a key regulator of energy metabolism and ROS-scavenging enzymes including catalase. We show that Ang II stimulates Akt-dependent PGC-1α serine 570 phosphorylation, which is required for the binding of the histone acetyltransferase GCN5 (general control nonderepressible 5) to PGC-1α and for its lysine acetylation. These sequential post-translational modifications suppress PGC-1α activity and prevent its binding to the catalase promoter through the forkhead box O1 transcription factor, thus decreasing catalase expression. We demonstrate that overexpression of the phosphorylation-defective mutant PGC-1α (S570A) prevents Ang II-induced increases in H2O2 levels and hypertrophy ([3H]leucine incorporation). Knockdown of PGC-1α by small interfering RNA promotes basal and Ang II-stimulated ROS and hypertrophy, which is reversed by polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase. Thus, endogenous PGC-1α is a negative regulator of vascular hypertrophy by up-regulating catalase expression and thus reducing ROS levels. We provide novel mechanistic insights by which Ang II may mediate its ROS-dependent pathophysiologic effects on multiple cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:19940161

  20. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED.

    PubMed

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. PMID:25303172

  1. Direct electrochemistry of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite.

    PubMed

    Dimcheva, Nina; Horozova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The voltammetric studies of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase (PcCAT) adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite, showed direct electron transfer (DET) between its active site and the electrode surface. Analogous tests performed with the commercially available bovine catalase revealed that mammalian enzyme is much less efficient in the DET process. Both catalases were found capable to catalyse the electrooxidation of phenol, but differed in the specifics of catalytic action. At an applied potential of 0.45V the non-linear regression showed the kinetics of the bioelectrochemical oxidation catalysed by the PcCAT obeyed the Hill equation with a binding constant K=0.034±0.002 M(2) (Hill's coefficient n=2.097±0.083, R(2)=0.997), whilst the catalytic action of the bovine catalase was described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with the following parameters: V(max,app)=7.780±0.509 μA, and K(M,app)=0.068±0.070 mol L(-1). The performance of the electrode reaction was affected by the electrode potential, the pH, and temperature. Based on the effect of pH and temperature on the electrode response in presence of phenol a tentative reaction pathway of its bioelectrocatalytic oxidation has been hypothesised. The possible application of these findings in biosensing phenol up to concentration 30 mM at pHs below 7 and in absence of oxidising agents (oxygen or H(2)O(2)) was considered. PMID:23103554

  2. Engineering the proximal heme cavity of catalase-peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jakopitsch, Christa; Regelsberger, Günther; Furtmüller, Paul Georg; Rüker, Florian; Peschek, Günter A; Obinger, Christian

    2002-07-25

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are prokaryotic heme peroxidases with homology to yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and plant ascorbate peroxidases (APXs). KatGs, CCP and APXs contain identical amino acid triads in the heme pocket (distal Arg/Trp/His and proximal His/Trp/Asp), but differ dramatically in their reactivities towards hydrogen peroxide and various one-electron donors. Only KatGs have high catalase activity in addition to a peroxidase activity of broad specificity. Here, we investigated the effect of mutating the conserved proximal triad on KatG catalysis. With the exception of W341F, all variants (H290Q, W341A, D402N, D402E) exhibited a catalase activity <1% of wild-type KatG and spectral properties indicating alterations in heme coordination and spin states. Generally, the peroxidase activity was much less effected by these mutations. Compared with wild-type KatG the W341F variant had a catalase and halogenation activity of about 40% and an even increased overall peroxidase activity. This variant, for the first time, allowed to monitor the hydrogen peroxide mediated transitions of ferric KatG to compound I and back to the resting enzyme. Compound I reduction by aromatic one-electron donors (o-dianisidine, pyrogallol, aniline) was not influenced by exchanging Trp by Phe. The findings are discussed in comparison with the data known from CCP and APX and a reaction mechanism for the multifunctional activity of the W341F variant is suggested. PMID:12121764

  3. Dual targeting of yeast catalase A to peroxisomes and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Ventsislava Y; Drescher, Diane; Kujumdzieva, Anna V; Schmitt, Manfred J

    2004-06-01

    Yeast catalase A (Cta1p) contains two peroxisomal targeting signals (SSNSKF) localized at its C-terminus and within the N-terminal third of the protein, which both can target foreign proteins to peroxisomes. In the present study we demonstrated that Cta1p can also enter mitochondria, although the enzyme lacks a classical mitochondrial import sequence. Cta1p co-targeting was studied in a catalase A null mutant after growth on different carbon sources, and expression of a Cta1p-GFP (green fluorescent protein)-fusion protein or a Cta1p derivative containing either a c-Myc epitope (Cta1p(myc)) or a SKF-extended tag (Cta1p(myc-SKF)). Peroxisomal and mitochondrial co-import of catalase A were tested qualitatively by fluorescence microscopy and functional complementation of a Delta cta1 null mutation, and quantitatively by subcellular fractionation followed by Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Efficient Cta1p import into peroxisomes was observed when cells were cultivated under peroxisome-inducing conditions (i.e. growth on oleate), whereas significant co-import of Cta1p-GFP into mitochondria occurred when cells were grown under respiratory conditions that favour oxygen stress and ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation within this organelle. In particular, when cells were grown on the non-fermentable carbon source raffinose, respiration is maximally enhanced, and catalase A was efficiently targeted to the mitochondrial matrix where it presumably functions as scavenger of H2O2 and mitochondrial-derived ROS. PMID:14998369

  4. Dual targeting of yeast catalase A to peroxisomes and mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Ventsislava Y; Drescher, Diane; Kujumdzieva, Anna V; Schmitt, Manfred J

    2004-01-01

    Yeast catalase A (Cta1p) contains two peroxisomal targeting signals (SSNSKF) localized at its C-terminus and within the N-terminal third of the protein, which both can target foreign proteins to peroxisomes. In the present study we demonstrated that Cta1p can also enter mitochondria, although the enzyme lacks a classical mitochondrial import sequence. Cta1p co-targeting was studied in a catalase A null mutant after growth on different carbon sources, and expression of a Cta1p-GFP (green fluorescent protein)-fusion protein or a Cta1p derivative containing either a c-Myc epitope (Cta1p(myc)) or a SKF-extended tag (Cta1p(myc-SKF)). Peroxisomal and mitochondrial co-import of catalase A were tested qualitatively by fluorescence microscopy and functional complementation of a Delta cta1 null mutation, and quantitatively by subcellular fractionation followed by Western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays. Efficient Cta1p import into peroxisomes was observed when cells were cultivated under peroxisome-inducing conditions (i.e. growth on oleate), whereas significant co-import of Cta1p-GFP into mitochondria occurred when cells were grown under respiratory conditions that favour oxygen stress and ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation within this organelle. In particular, when cells were grown on the non-fermentable carbon source raffinose, respiration is maximally enhanced, and catalase A was efficiently targeted to the mitochondrial matrix where it presumably functions as scavenger of H2O2 and mitochondrial-derived ROS. PMID:14998369

  5. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B.; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A.; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E.; Cohen, Richard A.; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S.; McComb, Mark E.; Bachschmid, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a ‘Tandem Mass Tag’ (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation. PMID:26642319

  6. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Koepke, Jay I.; Wood, Christopher S.; Terlecky, Laura J.; Walton, Paul A.; Terlecky, Stanley R.

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study.

  7. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by shear alone: Characteristics, activity and stability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Nan; Du, Xin-Ying; Xing, Jin-Feng; Ge, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Catalase is a promising therapeutic enzyme; however, it carries risks of inactivation and rapid degradation when it is used in practical bioprocess, such as delivery in vivo. To overcome the issue, we made catalase-only nanoparticles using shear stress alone at a moderate shear rate of 217s(-1) in a coaxial cylinder flow cell. Properties of nanoparticles, including particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential, were characterized. The conformational changes of pre- and post-sheared catalase were determined using spectroscopy techniques. The results indicated that the conformational changes of catalase and reduction in α-helical content caused by shear alone were less significant than that by desolvation method. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by single shear retained over 90% of its initial activity when compared with the native catalase. Catalase nanoparticles lost only 20% of the activity when stored in phosphate buffer solution for 72h at 4°C, whereas native catalase lost 53% under the same condition. Especially, the activity of nanogranulated catalase was decreased only slightly in the simulated intestinal fluid containing α-chymotrypsin during 4h incubation at 37°C, implying that the catalase nanoparticle was more resistant to the degradation of proteases than native catalase molecules. Overall, catalase-only nanoparticles offered a great potential to stabilize enzymes for various pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26318217

  8. Structure–Function Relationships in Fungal Large-Subunit Catalases

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A.; Valdez, V; Rudino-Pinera, E; Horjales, E; Hansberg, W

    2009-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-{gamma}-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics.

  9. Structure-function relationships in fungal large-subunit catalases.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Adelaida; Valdés, Víctor-Julián; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Horjales, Eduardo; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2009-02-13

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H(2)O(2) to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-gamma-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H(2)O(2) concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics. PMID:19109972

  10. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene. Images PMID:1860824

  11. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xianbo; Chen, Jichen; Lin, Chenqiang; Lin, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications. PMID:27579320

  12. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and Km of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications. PMID:27579320

  13. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  14. Plating isolation of various catalase-negative microorganisms from soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labeda, D. P.; Hunt, C. M.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A unique plating procedure was developed that allows isolation, but not enumeration, of representatives of the catalase-negative soil microflora. The numbers recovered, however, are low as compared to the numbers recovered when the modified dilution-to-extinction isolation procedure is used. The latter procedure provides prolonged inoculation in sealed tubes containing a nutritionally rich broth medium over small submerged agar slants. In contrast, the plating procedure utilizes nutritionally minimal media and the shorter incubations mandated by the inherent problems associated with plating.

  15. High Conformational Stability of Secreted Eukaryotic Catalase-peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Zámocký, Marcel; García-Fernández, Queralt; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Jakopitsch, Christa; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio; Obinger, Christian; Carpena, Xavi

    2012-01-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional heme enzymes widely spread in archaea, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes. Here we present the first crystal structure (1.55 Å resolution) of an eukaryotic KatG, the extracellular or secreted enzyme from the phytopathogenic fungus Magnaporthe grisea. The heme cavity of the homodimeric enzyme is similar to prokaryotic KatGs including the unique distal +Met-Tyr-Trp adduct (where the Trp is further modified by peroxidation) and its associated mobile arginine. The structure also revealed several conspicuous peculiarities that are fully conserved in all secreted eukaryotic KatGs. Peculiarities include the wrapping at the dimer interface of the N-terminal elongations from the two subunits and cysteine residues that cross-link the two subunits. Differential scanning calorimetry and temperature- and urea-mediated unfolding followed by UV-visible, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopy combined with site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that secreted eukaryotic KatGs have a significantly higher conformational stability as well as a different unfolding pattern when compared with intracellular eukaryotic and prokaryotic catalase-peroxidases. We discuss these properties with respect to the structure as well as the postulated roles of this metalloenzyme in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22822072

  16. Cytochemical localization of catalase in leaf microbodies (peroxisomes).

    PubMed

    Frederick, S E; Newcomb, E H

    1969-11-01

    Segments of mature tobacco leaves were fixed in glutaraldehyde, incubated in medium containing 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and hydrogen peroxide, and postfixed in osmium tetroxide. Electron microscopic observation of treated tissues revealed pronounced deposition of a highly electron-opaque material in microbodies but not in other organelles. The coarsely granular reaction product is presumably osmium black formed by reaction of oxidized DAB with osmium tetroxide. Reaction of the microbodies with DAB was completely inhibited by 0.02 M 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole and was considerably reduced by 0.01 M potassium cyanide. These results, when considered in light of recent biochemical studies, strongly suggest that catalase is responsible for the reaction. Sharp localization of this enzyme in microbodies establishes that they are identical to the catalase-rich "peroxisomes" recently isolated from leaf cell homogenates. A browning reaction that occurred in leaves during the incubation step was inhibited by cyanide but not by aminotriazole and therefore could not have been caused by the same enzyme. This reaction and a slight deposition of dense material within primary and secondary walls are ascribed to oxidation of DAB by soluble and wall-localized peroxidases. PMID:4981071

  17. Purification and characterization of catalase from marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinhua; Wang, Wei; Hao, Jianhua; Zhu, Xianglin; Sun, Mi

    2014-01-01

    The catalase from marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810 (YS0810CAT) was purified and characterized. Consecutive steps were used to achieve the purified enzyme as follows: ethanol precipitation, DEAE Sepharose ion exchange, Superdex 200 gel filtration, and Resource Q ion exchange. The active enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 57.256 kDa. It showed a Soret peak at 405 nm, indicating the presence of iron protoporphyrin IX. The catalase was not apparently reduced by sodium dithionite but was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, hydroxylamine hydrochloride, and sodium azide. Peroxidase-like activity was not found with the substrate o-phenylenediamine. So the catalase was determined to be a monofunctional catalase. N-terminal amino acid of the catalase analysis gave the sequence SQDPKKCPVTHLTTE, which showed high degree of homology with those of known catalases from bacteria. The analysis of amino acid sequence of the purified catalase by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that it was a new catalase, in spite of its high homology with those of known catalases from other bacteria. The catalase showed high alkali stability and thermostability. PMID:25045672

  18. Catalase degradation in sunflower cotyledons during peroxisome transition from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function. [Helianthus annuus

    SciTech Connect

    Eising, R.; Gerhardt, B.

    1987-06-01

    First order rate constant for the degradation (degradation constants) of catalase in the cotyledons of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were determined by measuring the loss of catalase containing /sup 14/C-labeled heme. During greening of the cotyledons, a period when peroxisomes change from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function, the degradation of glyoxysomal catalase is significantly slower than during all other stages of cotyledon development in light or darkness. The degradation constant during the transition stage of peroxisome function amounts to 0.205 day/sup -1/ in contrast to the constants ranging from 0.304 day/sup -1/ to 0.515 day/sup -1/ during the other developmental stages. Density labeling experiments comprising labeling of catalase with /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and its isopycnic centrifugation on CsCl gradients demonstrated that the determinations of the degradation constants were not substantially affected by reutilization of /sup 14/C-labeled compounds for catalase synthesis. The degradation constants for both glyoxysomal catalase and catalase synthesized during the transition of peroxisome function do not differ. This was shown by labeling the catalases with different isotopes and measuring the isotope ratio during the development of the cotyledons. The results are inconsistent with the concept that an accelerated and selective degradation of glyoxysomes underlies the change in peroxisome function. The data suggest that catalase degradation is at least partially due to an individual turnover of catalase and does not only result from a turnover of the whole peroxisomes.

  19. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus)

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  20. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus).

    PubMed

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  1. Inhibition of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by cationized catalase in mice.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mukai, Sakiko; Ikemura, Mai; Kuramoto, Yukari; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2007-05-14

    To inhibit peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by destroying hydrogen peroxide, ethylenediamine-conjugated catalase (ED-catalase), a cationized derivative, was injected into the peritoneal cavity of mice. ED-catalase had about a 6-fold longer retention time within the cavity than unmodified catalase. Peritoneal dissemination was evaluated after intraperitoneal inoculation of B16-BL6/Luc, a melanoma clone stably expressing firefly luciferase, by measuring luciferase activity. An intraperitoneal injection of ED-catalase just before tumor inoculation significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in peritoneal organs. Catalase was less effective, confirming the importance of the retention of the enzyme within the cavity for the inhibition. ED-catalase injected 3 days after tumor inoculation was also effective in inhibiting tumor growth. A real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that ED-catalase significantly suppressed the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Daily dosing of ED-catalase for 7 days significantly prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. These findings indicate that ED-catalase, which is retained for a long time within the peritoneal cavity, is highly effective in inhibiting the adhesion and proliferation of peritoneally disseminated tumor cells, and in increasing the survival of tumor-bearing mice. PMID:17382424

  2. Inhibition of adhesion and proliferation of peritoneally disseminated tumor cells by pegylated catalase.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Yuki; Kuramoto, Yukari; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide may aggravate the peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by activating the expression of a variety of genes. In this study, we used pegylated catalase (PEG-catalase) to examine whether prolonged retention of catalase activity within the peritoneal cavity is effective in inhibiting peritoneal dissemination in mouse models. Murine B16-BL6 cells or colon 26 cells labeled with firefly luciferase gene were inoculated intraperitoneally into syngeneic mice. Compared with unmodified catalase, PEG-catalase was retained in the peritoneal cavity for a long period after intraperitoneal injection. A single injection of PEG-catalase just before tumor inoculation significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells at 1 and 7 days. The changes in the expression of molecules involved in the metastasis were evaluated by real time quantitative PCR analysis. Inoculation of the tumor cells increased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in the greater omentum, which was inhibited by PEG-catalase. An injection of PEG-catalase at 3 days after tumor inoculation also reduced the number of the tumor cells, suggesting that processes other than the adhesion of tumor cells to peritoneal organs are also inhibited. Daily doses of PEG-catalase significantly prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that intraperitoneal injection of PEG-catalase inhibits the multiple processes of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by scavenging hydrogen peroxide in the peritoneal cavity. PMID:17086358

  3. Catalase activity of different Candida species after exposition to specific antiserum

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Natália R.S.; Unterkircher, Carmelinda S.; Shimizu, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Antisera were developed in rabbits after challenge with intracellular antigens of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. Microorganism catalase has been correlated with virulence, resistance to drugs and immunogenicity. The intracellular catalase is consistently present in strains of Candida and in this paper, the enzyme activity was analysed by PAGE after exposition to antisera. The catalases of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were immunogenic and differed in their binding to specific antibodies raised in rabbits. Tests of cross-reactivity between different Candida species showed that when antiserum from C. albicans immunized rabbit was incubated with intracellular extracts of these three Candida species, the catalases activities were abolished. However, the antisera from C. parapsilosis or C. tropicalis immunized rabbits did not affect the catalase activity of C. albicans; the enzyme of C. albicans was inactivated only by the antiserum to the catalase of own C. albicans. The antiserum to the catalase of C. tropicalis was species-specific and did not cross-react with catalases of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. The activities of Aspergillus niger and bovine catalases were not affected by the antiserum from any Candida immunized rabbits. This report is a preliminary study of specific antisera that react against intracellular catalase of Candida sp. and neutralize the enzymatic activity. Further study is necessary to develop species-specific antibody once differences in the susceptibility of the Candida species to commonly used antifungal drugs make identification to the species level important. PMID:24031174

  4. A Chaperone Function of NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Is Required to Maintain Catalase Activity and for Multiple Stress Responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Guoqiang; Cha, Joon-Yung; Li, Guannan; Chen, She; Li, Zhen; Guo, Jinghua; Zhang, Caiguo; Yang, Yongqing; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Schumaker, Karen S.; Chen, Zhongzhou; Guo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity. PMID:25700484

  5. Overexpression, purification and characterization of a recombinant secretary catalase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xunlong; Feng, Meiqing; Zhao, Yujie; Guo, Xin; Zhou, Pei

    2008-01-01

    A recombinant Bacillus subtilis strain (KN25) was generated for the large-scale preparation of catalase. The B. subtilis katA gene encoding for catalase was cloned into the shuttle vector PRB374, downstream of the constitutively active vegII promoter, followed by transformation of the B. subtilis strain WB600 with the plasmid. The transformant strain, KN25 secretes high levels (3,500 U/ml) of catalase, which facilitates its purification. Three simple purification steps yielded nearly homogeneous catalase, with approximately 70% recovery. The purified recombinant catalase has a specific activity of 34,600 U/mg under optimal conditions, and is more resistant to acidic conditions than bovine liver catalase. PMID:17876537

  6. Comperative study of catalase immobilization on chitosan, magnetic chitosan and chitosan-clay composite beads.

    PubMed

    Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin; Dinçer, Ayşe; Becerik, Seda Çınar

    2013-12-01

    Catalase was immobilized on chitosan and modified chitosan. Studies were carried out on free-immobilized catalase concerning the determination of optimum temperature, pH, thermal, storage stability, reusability, and kinetic parameters. Optimum temperature and pH for free catalase and catalase immobilized were found as 35°C and 7.0, respectively. After 100 times of repeated tests, the immobilized catalases on chitosan-clay and magnetic chitosan maintain over 50% and 60% of the original activity, respectively. The ease of catalase immobilization on low-cost matrices and good stability upon immobilization in the present study make it a suitable product for further use in the food industry. PMID:23687952

  7. Isolation and characterization of catalase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Chaga, G S; Medin, A S; Chaga, S G; Porath, J O

    1992-06-26

    Catalase from a crude preparation of Penicillium chrysogenum was isolated in a single chromatographic step by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) on Cu(II)-Chelating Sepharose Fast Flow. A chromatographically and electrophoretically homogeneous enzyme was obtained in 89% yield. IMAC was found to be superior to ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, size-exclusion and concanavalin A affinity chromatography. Analytical and preparative chromatography gave essentially the same chromatograms. Isoelectric point, molecular weight (by ultracentrifugation), amino acid composition, carbohydrate content and subunit organization were determined. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, KM, and the azide competitor constant, Ki, were calculated and found to be 59 microM and 6.1 microM, respectively. PMID:1639925

  8. Immobilized catalase on CoFoam hydrophilic polyurethane composite.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Palligarnai T; Como, Karin

    2006-02-01

    Catalase from bovine liver was covalently immobilized on hydrophilic polyurethane composite (CoFoam). The activity of the enzyme was assayed in the decomposition of H2O2 at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. The effects of water-to-prepolymer ratio, the addition of a crosslinking agent, and the utilization of a spacer on enzyme activity were examined. The results of immobilization of the enzyme in a large-scale unit are reported. The advantage of the CoFoam composite lies in the low drop in pressure in a packed-bed reactor at fairly large flow rates. For example, at flow rates of 10-12 L/min, the drop in pressure is typically 3 kPa. Enzymes immobilized on CoFoam represent a novel use as catalysts in packed-bed reactors owing to the low drop in pressure. PMID:16484719

  9. Importance of catalase in the adaptive response to hydrogen peroxide: analysis of acatalasaemic Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, S; Inoue, Y; Kimura, A

    1996-01-01

    Controversy about the importance of catalase in the detoxification of H2O2 in human erythrocytes continues. It has been suggested that catalase has no role in the clearance of H2O2 in erythrocytes. In the present study we investigated the role of catalase in the defence mechanism against oxidative stress using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae has two catalases, catalase A and catalase T. We constructed a double mutant (acatalasaemic mutant) unable to produce either catalase A or catalase T, and compared it with wild-type and single-mutant cells. The acatalasaemic mutant cells showed a similar growth rate to wild-type cells under non-oxidative stress conditions, and showed a similar susceptibility to H2O2 stress in the exponential growth phase. The acatalasaemic mutant cells at stationary phase were, however, much more sensitive to H2O2 stress than wild-type and single-mutant cells. Moreover, the ability of acatalasaemic and single-mutant cells to show adaptation to 2 mM H2O2 was distinctly inferior to that of wild-type cells. These results suggest that catalase is not essential for yeast cells under normal conditions, but plays an important role in the acquisition of tolerance to oxidative stress in the adaptive response of these cells. PMID:8947468

  10. Layer-by-layer self-assembly immobilization of catalases on wool fabrics.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Q; Fan, X R; Sun, X J; Huang, P H

    2013-04-01

    A new immobilization strategy of catalases on natural fibers was reported in this paper. Catalase (CAT) from Bacillus subtilis was assembled into multiple layers together with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) on wool fabrics via layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic self-assembly deposition. The mechanism and structural evaluation of LBL electrostatic self-assembly were studied in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface zeta potential, and apparent color depth (K/S). The SEM pictures showed obvious deposits absorbed on the wool surfaces after LBL self-assembly. The surface zeta potential and dyeing depth of CAT/PDDA-assembled wool fabrics presented a regular layer-by-layer alternating trend along with the change of deposited materials, revealing the multilayer structure of the wool fiber immobilized catalases. The V(max) values were found to be 2,500±238 U/mg protein for the free catalase and 1,000±102 U/mg protein for the immobilized catalase. The K(m) value of free catalase (11.25±2.3 mM) was found to be lower than that of the immobilized catalase (222.2±36.5 mM). The immobilized catalase remained high enzymatic activity and showed a measureable amount of reusability, which proved that LBL electrostatic self-assembly deposition is a promising approach to immobilize catalases. PMID:23420488

  11. Prevention of pulmonary metastasis from subcutaneous tumors by binary system-based sustained delivery of catalase.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ikemura, Mai; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mendelsohn, Adam; Miyazaki, Nobuhiko; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2009-07-20

    Catalase delivery can be effective in inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated acceleration of tumor metastasis. Our previous studies have demonstrated that increasing the plasma half-life of catalase by pegylation (PEG-catalase) significantly increases its potency of inhibiting experimental pulmonary metastasis in mice. In the present study, a biodegradable gelatin hydrogel formulation was used to further increase the circulation time of PEG-catalase. Implantation of (111)In-PEG-catalase/hydrogel into subcutaneous tissues maintained the radioactivity in plasma for more than 14 days. Then, the effect of the PEG-catalase/hydrogel on spontaneous pulmonary metastasis of tumor cells was evaluated in mice with subcutaneous tumor of B16-BL6/Luc cells, a murine melanoma cell line stably expressing luciferase. Measuring luciferase activity in the lung revealed that the PEG-catalase/hydrogel significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the pulmonary metastasis compared with PEG-catalase solution. These findings indicate that sustaining catalase activity in the blood circulation achieved by the use of pegylation and gelatin hydrogel can reduce the incidence of tumor cell metastasis. PMID:19361547

  12. Extracellular localization of catalase is associated with the transformed state of malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Britta; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Motz, Manfred; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Oncogenic transformation is dependent on activated membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, the resultant extracellular superoxide anions are also driving the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl pathway, which eliminates NOX-expressing transformed cells through selective apoptosis induction. Tumor progression is dependent on dominant interference with intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through membrane-associated catalase, which decomposes H2O2 and peroxynitrite and oxidizes NO. Particularly, the decomposition of extracellular peroxynitrite strictly requires membrane-associated catalase. We utilized small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of catalase and neutralizing antibodies directed against the enzyme in combination with challenging H2O2 or peroxynitrite to determine activity and localization of catalase in cells from three distinct steps of multistage oncogenesis. Nontransformed cells did not generate extracellular superoxide anions and only showed intracellular catalase activity. Transformed cells showed superoxide anion-dependent intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling in the presence of suboptimal catalase activity in their membrane. Tumor cells exhibited tight control of intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through a high local concentration of membrane-associated catalase. These data demonstrate that translocation of catalase to the outside of the cell membrane is already associated with the transformation step. A strong local increase in the concentration of membrane-associated catalase is achieved during tumor progression and is controlled by tumor cell-derived H2O2 and by transglutaminase. PMID:26140730

  13. Protective effect of coadministered superoxide dismutase and catalase against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshiji; Nishida, Keiji

    2003-08-01

    1. There are conflicting reports as to the protective effect of coadministered native superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase against gastric mucosal lesions in rats with water immersion restraint (WIR) stress. It is unclear how coadministered native SOD and catalase protect against WIR stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions. Therefore, in the present study, we re-examined the protective effect of coadministered native SOD and catalase against gastric mucosal lesions in rats with WIR stress. 2. Gastric mucosal lesions were induced in Wistar rats by 3 h WIR. Rats were injected subcutaneously with a mixture of purified bovine erythrocyte SOD and bovine liver catalase 1 h before the onset of WIR. Ulcer index, serum SOD, catalase and xanthine oxidase (XO), uric acid and gastric mucosal SOD, catalase, XO, myeloperoxidase (MPO; an index of tissue neutrophil infiltration), non-protein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS; an index of lipid peroxidation) were assayed in all rats used. 3. Rats with 3 h WIR showed gastric mucosal lesions. Pre-administration of SOD plus catalase to rats with WIR prevented lesion formation. In the serum of rats with WIR alone, XO activity and uric acid concentration increased, whereas SOD and catalase activities did not change. Pre-administration of SOD plus catalase to rats with WIR did not affect increased serum XO activity and uric acid concentration, but did increase serum SOD and catalase activities. In the gastric mucosa of rats with WIR alone, increases in MPO activity and TBARS concentration and a decrease in NP-SH concentration occurred, whereas XO, SOD and catalase activities did not change. Pre-administration of SOD plus catalase to rats with WIR attenuated the changes in gastric mucosal MPO activity and TBARS and NP-SH concentrations, but did not affect gastric mucosal XO, SOD and catalase activities. Pre-administration of SOD plus catalase (in an inactivated form) to rats with WIR had no effect on

  14. Activity and stability of catalase in nonionic micellar and reverse micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Gebicka, Lidia; Jurgas-Grudzinska, Monika

    2004-01-01

    Catalase activity and stability in the presence of simple micelles of Brij 35 and entrapped in reverse micelles of Brij 30 have been studied. The enzyme retains full activity in aqueous micellar solution of Brij 35. Catalase exhibits "superactivity" in reverse micelles composed of 0.1 M Brij 30 in dodecane, n-heptane or isooctane, and significantly lowers the activity in decaline. The incorporation of catalase into Brij 30 reverse micelles enhances its stability at 50 degrees C. However, the stability of catalase incubated at 37 degrees C in micellar and reverse micellar solutions is lower than that in homogeneous aqueous solution. PMID:15666551

  15. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Kathryn M; Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D; Gutterman, David D; Falck, J R; Campbell, William B

    2011-10-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H(2)O(2) causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H(2)O(2), catalase is used to inactivate H(2)O(2). However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10-50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1-10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (V(max) = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase(-1)·min(-1), respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H(2)O(2) and EETs. PMID:21753077

  16. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  17. Inherited catalase deficiency: is it benign or a factor in various age related disorders?

    PubMed

    Góth, László; Nagy, Teréz

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was - and is still - considered toxic for a wide range of living organisms. Oxidative stress occurs when there is an excess of pro-oxidants over antioxidants and it has been implicated in several diseases. Catalase is involved in hydrogen peroxide catabolism and is important in defense against oxidative stress. Acatalasemia means the inherited near-total deficiency of catalase activity, usually in reference to red cell catalase. Acatalasemia was thought at first to be an asymptotic disorder. In the absence of catalase, neither the Japanese, or Hungarian acatalasemics nor acatalasemic mice had significantly increased blood glutathione peroxidase activity. In animal models, catalase deficient tissues show much slower rates of removal of extracellular hydrogen peroxide. In catalase knock-out mice, a decreased hydrogen peroxide removing capacity and increased reactive oxygen species formation were reported. Hydrogen peroxide may cause methemoglobinemia in patients with catalase deficiency. During anesthesia for a Japanese acatalasemic patient the disinfection with hydrogen peroxide solution caused severe methemoglobinemia. Patients with inherited catalase deficiency, who are treated with uric acid oxidase (rasburicase) may experience very high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and may suffer from methemoglobinemia and hemolysis. The high (18.5%) prevalence of diabetes mellitus in inherited catalase deficient individuals and the earlier (10 years) manifestation of the disease may be attributed to the oxidative damage of oxidant sensitive, insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. Ninety-seven of 114 acatalasemics had diseases related to oxidative stress and aging. The oxidative stress due to catalase deficiency could contribute to the manifestation of diabetes while for the other diseases it may be one of the factors in their causations. In summary, inherited catalase deficiency is associated with clinical features, pathologic laboratory test results

  18. Biochemical and genetic analyses of a catalase from the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, E R; Smith, C J

    1995-01-01

    A single catalase enzyme was produced by the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis when cultures at late log phase were shifted to aerobic conditions. In anaerobic conditions, catalase activity was detected in stationary-phase cultures, indicating that not only oxygen exposure but also starvation may affect the production of this antioxidant enzyme. The purified enzyme showed a peroxidatic activity when pyrogallol was used as an electron donor. It is a hemoprotein containing one heme molecule per holomer and has an estimated molecular weight of 124,000 to 130,000. The catalase gene was cloned by screening a B. fragilis library for complementation of catalase activity in an Escherichia coli catalase mutant (katE katG) strain. The cloned gene, designated katB, encoded a catalase enzyme with electrophoretic mobility identical to that of the purified protein from the B. fragilis parental strain. The nucleotide sequence of katB revealed a 1,461-bp open reading frame for a protein with 486 amino acids and a predicted molecular weight of 55,905. This result was very close to the 60,000 Da determined by denaturing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified catalase and indicates that the native enzyme is composed of two identical subunits. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified catalase obtained by Edman degradation confirmed that it is a product of katB. The amino acid sequence of KatB showed high similarity to Haemophilus influenzae HktE (71.6% identity, 66% nucleotide identity), as well as to gram-positive bacterial and mammalian catalases. No similarities to bacterial catalase-peroxidase-type enzymes were found. The active-site residues, proximal and distal hemebinding ligands, and NADPH-binding residues of the bovine liver catalase-type enzyme were highly conserved in B. fragilis KatB. PMID:7768808

  19. Study of catalase adsorption on two mixed-mode ligands and the mechanism involved therein.

    PubMed

    Shiva Ranjini, S; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    2012-11-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography sorbents n-hexylamine HyperCel™ (HEA) and phenylpropylamine HyperCel™ (PPA) were evaluated for the study of adsorption of catalase from two different sources. Various parameters such as buffer composition, ionic strength and pH were investigated to study the mechanism of interaction of commercially available pre-purified catalase from Bovine liver, purified catalase from black gram (Vigna mungo) and crude extract of black gram containing catalase with these mixed-mode ligands. A simple and economical screening protocol for identifying optimal buffer conditions for adsorption and desorption of catalase was established with micro volumes of the sorbent in batch mode. With HEA HyperCel, it was observed that pre-purified catalase from both bovine liver and black gram was completely retained at pH 7.0, irrespective of the presence or absence of NaCl in the adsorption buffer, whereas the catalase from crude extract of black gram was completely retained only in the presence of 0.2 M salt in the adsorption buffer. The elution of catalase from both the sources was accomplished by lowering the pH to 4.5 in absence of salt. In case of PPA HyperCel, catalase from both the sources was very strongly adsorbed under different buffer conditions studied, and elution did not yield a significant catalase activity. From the screening experiments, it could be concluded that the interaction of catalase with HEA HyperCel could be dominated by hydrophobic forces with minor contributions from ionic interaction and with PPA HyperCel, it could be a combination of different non-covalent interactions acting on different loci on the surface of the protein. PMID:23108613

  20. CATALASE AND SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE OF ROOT-COLONIZING SAPROPHYTIC FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Root-colonizing, saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads of the Pseudomonas putida-P. fluorescens group express similar levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during growth on a sucrose- and amino acid-rich medium. ncreased specific activities of catalase but not sup...

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF CATALASE ACTIVITIES IN A ROOT-CLEANING ISOLATE OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Psuedomonas putida, a saprophytic root-colonizing bacterium, produces multiple forms of catalase Catalase A which increases in specific activity during growth phase and after treatment with H2O2, is located in the and is inhibited by 3-amino-1,2-4-triazole, EDTA, and cyanide, but...

  2. Covalent Immobilization of Catalase onto Regenerated Silk Fibroins via Tyrosinase-Catalyzed Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Qi, Chenglong; Yu, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Jiugang; Cui, Li; Tang, Gengtie; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong

    2015-09-01

    Regenerated silk fibroins could be used as medical scaffolds and carrier materials for enzyme immobilization. In the present work, tyrosinase enzyme was used for enzymatic oxidation of silk fibroins, followed by immobilization of catalase onto the fibroin surfaces through physical adsorption and covalent cross-linking as well. Spectrophotometry, SDS-PAGE, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to examine the efficiency of enzymatic oxidation and catalase immobilization, respectively. The results indicate that tyrosine residues in silk fibroins could be oxidized and converted to the active o-quinones. Incubating silk fibroins with catalase and tyrosinase led to a noticeable change of molecular weight distribution, indicating the occurrence of the cross-links between silk fibroins and catalase molecules. Two different pathways were proposed for the catalase immobilizations, and the method based on grafting of catalase onto the freeze-dried fibroin membrane is more acceptable. The residual enzyme activity for the immobilized catalase exhibited higher than that of the control after repeated washing cycles. Meanwhile, the thermal stability and alkali resistance were also slightly improved as compared to free catalase. The mechanisms of enzymatic immobilization are also concerned. PMID:26189105

  3. Structural analysis of NADPH depleted bovine liver catalase and its inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sugadev, Ragumani; Ponnuswamy, M N; Sekar, K

    2011-01-01

    To study the functional role of NADPH during mammalian catalase inhibition, the X-ray crystal structures of NADPH-depleted bovine liver catalase and its inhibitor complexes, cyanide and azide, determined at 2.8Å resolution. From the complex structures it is observed that subunits with and without an inhibitor/catalytic water molecule are linked by N-terminal domain swapping. Comparing mammalian- and fungal- catalases, we speculate that NADPH-depleted mammalian catalases may function as a domain-swapped dimer of dimers, especially during inactivation by inhibitors like cyanide and azide. We further speculate that in mammalian catalases the N-terminal hinge-loop region and α-helix is the structural element that senses NADPH binding. Although the above arguments are speculative and need further verification, as a whole our studies have opened up a new possibility, viz. that mammalian catalase acts as a domain-swapped dimer of dimers, especially during inhibitor binding. To generalize this concept to the formation of the inactive state in mammalian catalases in the absence of tightly bound NADPH molecules needs further exploration. The present study adds one more intriguing fact to the existing mysteries of mammalian catalases. PMID:21968615

  4. Catalase addition to vitrification solutions maintains goat ovarian preantral follicles stability.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, A A; Faustino, L R; Silva, C M G; Castro, S V; Lobo, C H; Santos, F W; Santos, R R; Campello, C C; Bordignon, V; Figueiredo, J R; Rodrigues, A P R

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether the addition of catalase (20 IU/mL) at different steps of goat ovarian tissue vitrification affects ROS levels, follicular morphology and viability, stromal cell density, apoptosis and the expression of proteins related to DNA-damage signaling (γH2AX) and repair (53BP1). Goat ovarian tissues were analyzed fresh (control) or after vitrification: without catalase (VS-/WS-), with catalase in vitrification solutions (VS+/WS-), with catalase in washing solutions (VS-/WS+) or with catalase in both solutions (VS+/WS+). The vitrification without catalase had higher ROS levels than the control. The catalase, regardless the step of addition, maintained ROS levels similar to the control. There were no difference between treatments regarding follicular viability, stromal cell density and detection of γH2AX and 53BP1. There was no difference in follicular morphology and DNA fragmentation between groups vitrified. In conclusion, catalase addition to vitrification solutions prevents ROS formation in cryopreserved goat ovarian tissues. PMID:24972862

  5. Regulation of catalase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Effects of oxidant stress and exposure to human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H Y; Hassett, D J; Bean, K; Cohen, M S

    1992-09-01

    We studied the effects of oxidant stress on the catalase activity and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is an obligate pathogen of man that evokes a remarkable but ineffective neutrophil response. Gonococci make no superoxide dismutase but express high catalase activity. Gonococcal catalase activity increased threefold when organisms were subjected to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide. This increase in catalase activity was marked by a parallel increase in protein concentration recognized by a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against the purified gonococcal enzyme. Catalase was primarily localized to the gonococcal cytoplasm in the presence or absence of stress; only a single isoenzyme of catalase could be identified. Exposure of gonococci to neutrophil-derived oxidants was accomplished by stimulating neutrophils with phorbol myristate acetate or by using gonococcal Opa variants that interacted with neutrophils with different degrees of efficiency. Gonococci exposed to neutrophils demonstrated a twofold increase in catalase activity in spite of some reduction in viability. Exposure of gonococci to 1.0 mM hydrogen peroxide made the organisms significantly more resistant to higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and to neutrophils than control organisms. These results suggest that catalase is an important defense for N. gonorrhoeae during attack by human neutrophils. The rapid response of this enzyme to hydrogen peroxide should be taken into consideration in studies designed to evaluate the interaction between neutrophils and gonococci. PMID:1522209

  6. Catalase Activity of Psychrophilic Bacteria Grown at 2 and 30 C1

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Hilmer A.; Ishibashi, Sandra T.; Reid, Ann; Ito, June S.

    1963-01-01

    Catalase activity was measured in resting-cell suspensions of psychrophilic bacteria grown at 2 and at 30 C. Enzyme activity decreased in both cell-suspension types as harvest age increased. At comparable physiological age, cells grown at 2 C had more catalase than cells grown at 30 C. PMID:13959237

  7. [Catalase and superoxide dismutase in the cells of strictly anaerobic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Briukhanov, A L; Thauer, R K; Netrusov, A I

    2002-01-01

    Strictly anaerobic microorganisms relating to various physiological groups were screened for catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. All of the investigated anaerobes possessed the SOD activity, necessary for protection against toxic products of oxygen reduction. High specific activities of SOD were found in Acetobacterium woodii and Acetobacterium wieringae. Most of the investigated clostridia and acetogens were catalase-negative. A significant activity of catalase was found in Thermohydrogenium kirishiense, in representatives of the genus Desulfotomaculum, and in several methanogens. Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus had an exceptionally high catalase activity after growth in medium supplemented with hemin. Hemin also produced a strong positive effect on the catalase activity in many other anaerobic microorganisms. In methanogens, the activities of the enzymes of antioxidant defense varied in wide ranges depending on the stage of growth and the energy source. PMID:12138753

  8. Forchlorfenuron detection based on its inhibitory effect towards catalase immobilized on boron nitride substrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Cai, Lijuan; Zhao, Huijie; Tang, Jiaqian; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoya; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-15

    An enzymatic procedure based on a catalase biosensor for the detection of forchlorfenuron (CPPU) has been reported in this work. Catalase was immobilized on boron nitride (BN) sheets dispersed in chitosan by adsorption. The immobilized catalase exhibited direct electron transfer character and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. After introducing CPPU into the H2O2 containing phosphate buffer solution, the catalase-catalyzed H2O2 reduction current decreased. By measuring the current decrease, CPPU can be determined in the range of 0.5-10.0 µM with the detection limit of 0.07 μM. The non-competitive inhibition behavior of CPPU towards catalase was verified by the Lineweaver-Burk plots. Long stability character has been ascribed to this biosensor. Possible use of this biosensor in flow systems is illustrated. The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to CPPU determination in fruits samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25108110

  9. Amelioration of hepatic reperfusion injury by superoxide dismutase and catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, M.G.; Burke, F.; Chaudry, I.H.

    1986-03-05

    Oxygen-derived free radicals have been implicated in reperfusion injury in various tissues. The present study determined if enzymatic scavenging of free radicals could improve recovery of hepatic function following ischemia. Livers from fasted rats were perfused with Krebs-HCO/sub 3/ buffer with substrates for gluconeogenesis for 30 min (control) followed by 60 min warm ischemia and 90 min reperfusion. At the beginning and end of ischemia the liver was flushed with buffered Ringer's with superoxide dismutase + catalase (150,000 U/L each)(SOD) or without additions (Untreated). Bile flow and glucose release were monitored during control and reperfusion periods and tissue sampled at the end of the experiment to determine tissue water and electrolytes. Bile flow and gluconeogenesis were markedly depressed after ischemia in both groups. At the end of 90 min reperfusion bile flow in Untreated and SOD were 23 +/- 6 and 46 +/- 8 ..mu..l/15 min (20% and 41% of control respectively, p < .01). Gluconeogenesis recovered to 83 +/- 4% of control in Untreated vs 103 +/- 6% with SOD (p < .05). Tissue water and electrolytes were not different. These results suggest that generation of oxygen-derived free radicals contributes to functional deficits in the liver following ischemia and that these defects can be attenuated by enzymatic scavenging.

  10. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min). PMID:23827593

  11. Catalase Inhibits Ionizing Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xia; Luo, Hongmei; Vanek, Kenneth N.; LaRue, Amanda C.; Schulte, Bradley A.

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic toxicity is a major cause of mortality in radiation emergency scenarios and a primary side effect concern in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Therefore, there is a critical need for the development of novel and more effective approaches to manage this side effect. Catalase is a potent antioxidant enzyme that coverts hydrogen peroxide into hydrogen and water. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of catalase as a protectant against ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results revealed that catalase treatment markedly inhibits IR-induced apoptosis in murine hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Subsequent colony-forming cell and cobble-stone area-forming cell assays showed that catalase-treated HSPCs can not only survive irradiation-induced apoptosis but also have higher clonogenic capacity, compared with vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, transplantation of catalase-treated irradiated HSPCs results in high levels of multi-lineage and long-term engraftments, whereas vehicle-treated irradiated HSPCs exhibit very limited hematopoiesis reconstituting capacity. Mechanistically, catalase treatment attenuates IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and inhibits reactive oxygen species. Unexpectedly, we found that the radioprotective effect of catalase is associated with activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 abolishes the protective activity of catalase, suggesting that catalase may protect HSPCs against IR-induced toxicity via promoting STAT3 activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which catalase inhibits IR-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in HSPCs. PMID:25603016

  12. Production of IFN-γ and IL-4 Against Intact Catalase and Constructed Catalase Epitopes of Helicobacter pylori From T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Fazeli, Hossein; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Adib, Minoo; Rashidi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent in the developing countries. It causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastrocarcinoma. Treatment with drugs and antibiotics is problematic due to the following reasons: cost, resistance to antibiotics, prolonged treatment and using multiple drugs. Catalase is highly conserved among the Helicobacter species and is important to the survival of the organism. It is expressed in high amounts and is exposed to the surface of this bacterium; therefore it represents a suitable candidate vaccine antigen. Objectives: A suitable approach in H. pylori vaccinology is the administration of epitope based vaccines. Therefore the responses of T-cells (IFN-γ and IL-4 production) against the catalase of H. pylori were determined. Then the quality of the immune responses against intact catalase and three epitopes of catalase were compared. Materials and Methods: In this study, a composition of three epitopes of the H. pylori catalase was selected based on Propred software. The effect of catalase epitopes on T-cells were assayed and immune responses identified. Results: The results of IFN-γ, IL-4 production against antigens, epitopes, and recombinant catalase by T-cells were compared for better understanding of epitope efficiency. Conclusions: The current research demonstrated that epitope sequence stimulates cellular immune responses effectively. In addition, increased safety and potency as well as a reduction in time and cost were advantages of this method. Authors are going to use this sequence as a suitable vaccine candidate for further research on animal models and humans in future. PMID:26862387

  13. Dual gene therapy with extracellular superoxide dismutase and catalase attenuates experimental optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaoping; Hauswirth, William W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To ameliorate experimental optic neuritis by combining scavenging of superoxide by germ line increases in the extracellular superoxide dismutase (ECSOD) and hydrogen peroxide by viral-mediated gene transfer of the human catalase gene. Methods The human catalase gene inserted into recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) was injected into the right eyes of transgenic mice overexpressing human ECSOD and wild-type littermates. Animals were simultaneously sensitized for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and then sacrificed one month later. The effects of antioxidant genes (ECSOD and catalase) on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of myelin area, optic disc area, extent of the cellular infiltrate, cerium derived H2O2 reaction product and extravasation of serum albumin detected by immunogold. Results Combined scavenging of H2O2 and superoxide with ECSOD and catalase suppressed demyelination by 72%, 54% due to catalase, and 19% due to ECSOD. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier was reduced 63% by the combined effects of catalase and ECSOD, 35% due to catalase and 29% due to ECSOD. Conclusions Transgene modulation of antioxidant enzyme defenses against both superoxide and its metabolite H2O2 provide a substantial suppressive effect against EAE in the optic nerve that may be a new therapeutic strategy for suppression of optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis. PMID:17242675

  14. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed. PMID:26116387

  15. Catalase from the white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei: molecular cloning and protein detection.

    PubMed

    Tavares-Sánchez, Olga L; Gómez-Anduro, Gracia A; Felipe-Ortega, Ximena; Islas-Osuna, Maria A; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2004-08-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that plays a very important role in the protection against oxidative damage by breaking down hydrogen peroxide. It is a very highly conserved enzyme that has been identified from numerous species including bacteria, fungi, plants and animals, but the information about catalase in crustaceans is very limited. A cDNA containing the complete coding sequence for catalase from the shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei was sequenced and the mRNA was detected by RT-PCR in selected tissues. Catalase was detected in hepatopancreas crude extracts by Western blot analysis with anti-human catalase polyclonal antibodies. The nucleotide sequence is 1692 bp long, including a 72-bp 5'-UTR, a coding sequence of 1515 bp and a 104-bp 3'-UTR. The deduced amino acid sequence corresponds to 505 amino acids with high identity to invertebrate, vertebrate and even bacterial catalases and contains the catalytic residues His71, Asn144, and Tyr354. The predicted protein has a calculated molecular mass of 57 kDa; which coincides with the size of the subunit (approximately 55 kDa) and the tetrameric protein (approximately 230 kDa) detected in hepatopancreas extracts under native conditions. Catalase mRNA level was higher in hepatopancreas, followed by gills and was not detected in muscle. PMID:15325332

  16. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  17. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation. PMID:26274391

  18. Rapid upregulation of heart antioxidant enzymes during arousal from estivation in the Giant African snail (Achatina fulica).

    PubMed

    Salway, Kurtis D; Tattersall, Glenn J; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2010-11-01

    Estivation is an adaptive response to environments characterized by elevated temperatures and desiccative stress, as may occur during summer dry seasons. Similar to diapause and hibernation, it is characterized by low levels of activity, a drastically suppressed metabolic rate and enhanced stress resistance. We tested the hypothesis that Achatina fulica, a pulmonate land snail, enhances stress resistance during estivation and/or arousal by upregulating intracellular antioxidant defenses in the heart, kidney, hepatopancreas and foot tissues. No statistically significant changes in mitochondrial or cytosolic superoxide dismutase levels or activities, or glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase or catalase activities were associated with estivation in any tissue, however. In contrast, during arousal from estivation, activities of several antioxidant enzymes increased in heart, hepatopancreas and foot. In heart, a rapid increase in MnSOD protein levels was observed that peaked at 2h post arousal, but no such change was observed in CuZnSOD protein levels. Glutathione peroxidase activity was upregulated at 1h post arousal and remained elevated until 8h post arousal in heart tissue. Glutathione peroxidase was also upregulated at 24h post arousal in foot tissue. Glutathione reductase activity was upregulated at 4h post arousal in heart and foot tissues whereas catalase activity showed no changes. Markers of lipid peroxidation and protein damage revealed no significant increases during estivation or arousal. Therefore, antioxidant enzymes may play a role in oxidative stress defense specifically during arousal from estivation in A. fulica. PMID:20621194

  19. Transglutaminase-catalyzed site-specific glycosidation of catalase with aminated dextran.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Aymara; Villalonga, Reynaldo; Di Pierro, Prospero; Pérez, Yunel; Mariniello, Loredana; Gómez, Leissy; Porta, Raffaele

    2006-04-10

    An enzymatic approach, based on a transglutaminase-catalyzed coupling reaction, was investigated to modify bovine liver catalase with an end-group aminated dextran derivative. We demonstrated that catalase activity increased after enzymatic glycosidation and that the conjugate was 3.8-fold more stable to thermal inactivation at 55 degrees C and 2-fold more resistant to proteolytic degradation by trypsin. Moreover, the transglutaminase-mediated modification also improved the pharmacokinetics behavior of catalase, increasing 2.5-fold its plasma half-life time and reducing 3-fold the total clearance after its i.v. administration in rats. PMID:16446004

  20. Recovery of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain in blood and urine cultures from a patient with pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kallstrom, George; Chang, Tom; Albertson, Marc; Morilla, Daniel; Fisher, Mark A; Eberly, Bardwell

    2011-11-01

    This report describes a 60-year-old patient with bilateral nephrolithiasis. A catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain was recovered from both urine and blood cultures. Although rare, isolates of catalase-negative Staphylococcus spp., including Staphylococcus aureus, have been reported. Here, we describe the first report of a catalase-negative S. epidermidis strain. PMID:21900516

  1. Recovery of a Catalase-Negative Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain in Blood and Urine Cultures from a Patient with Pyelonephritis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kallstrom, George; Chang, Tom; Albertson, Marc; Morilla, Daniel; Fisher, Mark A.; Eberly, Bardwell

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a 60-year-old patient with bilateral nephrolithiasis. A catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain was recovered from both urine and blood cultures. Although rare, isolates of catalase-negative Staphylococcus spp., including Staphylococcus aureus, have been reported. Here, we describe the first report of a catalase-negative S. epidermidis strain. PMID:21900516

  2. Development of bone-targeted catalase derivatives for inhibition of bone metastasis of tumor cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunlong; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ikemura, Mai; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2012-02-01

    Removal of hydrogen peroxide by delivering catalase to the vicinity of metastasizing tumor cells is a promising approach for inhibiting tumor metastasis. To inhibit bone metastasis, catalase was conjugated with 3,5-di(ethylamino-2,2-bisphosphono)benzoic acid (Bip), a derivative of bone-seeking bisphosphonates, polyethylene glycol (PEG), or both. Bip-conjugated catalase derivatives, that is, catalase-Bip and PEG-catalase-Bip, exhibited a higher affinity for bone matrix as compared with their counterparts without Bip. The tissue distribution of (111) In-labeled catalase derivatives indicated that the accumulation of radioactivity in bones was increased by conjugation of either Bip or PEG with catalase. An experimental bone metastasis model was developed by injecting male C57BL/6 mice with murine melanoma B16-BL6/Luc cells, which stably express firefly luciferase into left ventricle. Repeated injections of catalase to tumor-bearing mice had no significant effect on the number of melanoma cells in tibiae and femurs, whereas injections of catalase-Bip, PEG-catalase, or PEG-catalase-Bip significantly reduced the number. These results indicate that targeted delivery of catalase to the bones can be achieved by conjugating the enzyme with either Bip or PEG, and this delivery is effective in inhibiting the bone metastasis of tumor cells. PMID:21953593

  3. Occurrence of High Catalase-containing Acinetobacter in Spacecraft Assembly Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, K. B.; Derecho, I.; La Duc, M. T.; Vaishampayan, P.; Venkateswaran, K. J.; Mogul, R.

    2010-04-01

    In summary, the measurement of high catalase specific activity values for spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter strains is potentially the result of adaptation towards the harsh conditions of the clean rooms and assembly process.

  4. Immobilization of catalase on chitosan and amino acid- modified chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin

    2013-08-01

    Bovine liver catalase was covalently immobilized onto amino acid-modified chitosan beads. The beads were characterized with SEM, FTIR, TGA and the effects of immobilization on optimum pH and temperature, thermostability, reusability were evaluated. Immobilized catalase showed the maximal enzyme activity at pH 7.0 at 30°C. The kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax, for immobilized catalase on alanine-chitosan beads and lysine-chitosan beads were estimated to be 25.67 mM, 27 mM and 201.39 μmol H2O2/min, 197.50 μmol H2O2/min, respectively. The activity of the immobilized catalase on Ala-CB and Lys-CB retained 40% of its high initial activity after 100 times of reuse. PMID:23316810

  5. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of catalase with bifendate and analogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Rui; Dou, Huanjing; Li, Hua; Wang, Yi; Pu, Juanjuan; Wang, Ruiyong

    2013-02-01

    The interactions of bifendate (DDB) or analogs (Bicyclol, I, II and III) with catalase are analyzed by spectrophotometric methods. The fluorescence spectra results show the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase is strongly quenched by DDB or analogs with a static quenching procedure. The binding constants are obtained at three temperatures. The thermodynamics parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG) indicate the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions play a major role in the interaction. The results of synchronous fluorescence, UV-vis absorption and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra demonstrate that the microenvironments of Trp residue of catalase are disturbed by the analogs. Thermodynamic results showed that DDB is the strongest quencher and bind to catalase with the highest affinity among five compounds. PMID:23220523

  6. Production, characterization, cloning and sequence analysis of a monofunctional catalase from Serratia marcescens SYBC08.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua-Wei; Cai, Yu-Jie; Liao, Xiang-Ru; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Da-Bing

    2011-04-01

    A monofunctional catalase from Serratia marcescens SYBC08 produced by liquid state fermentation in 7 liter fermenter was isolated and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation (ASP), ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and gel filtration (GF) and characterized. Its sequence was analyzed by LC-MS/MS technique and gene cloning. The highest catalase production (20,289 U · ml(-1)) was achieved after incubation for 40 h. The purified catalase had an estimated molecular mass of 230 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 58 kDa. High specific activity of the catalase (199,584 U · mg(-1) protein) was 3.44 times higher than that of Halomonas sp. Sk1 catalase (57,900 U · mg(-1) protein). The enzyme without peroxidase activity was found to be an atypical electronic spectrum of monofunctional catalase. The apparent K(m) and V(max) were 78 mM and 188, 212 per µM H(2) O(2) µM heme(-1) s(-1), respectivly. The enzyme displayed a broad pH activity range (pH 5.0-11.0), with optimal pH range of 7.0-9.0: It was most active at 20 °C and had 78% activity at 0 °C. Its thermo stability was slightly higher compared to that of commercial catalase from bovine liver. LC-MS/MS analysis confirmed that the deduced amino acid sequence of cloning gene was the catalase sequence from Serratia marcescens SYBC08. The sequence was compared with that of 23 related catalases. Although most of active site residues, NADPH-binding residues, proximal residues of the heme, distal residues of the heme and residues interacting with a water molecule in the enzyme were well conserved in 23 related catalases, weakly conserved residues were found. Its sequence was closely related with that of catalases from pathogenic bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. This result imply that the enzyme with high specific activity plays a significant role in preventing those microorganisms of the family Enterobacteriaceae against hydrogen peroxide resulted in cellular damage. Calalase yield by Serratia

  7. Two divergent catalase genes are differentially regulated during Aspergillus nidulans development and oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, L; Wysong, D; Diamond, R; Aguirre, J

    1997-01-01

    Catalases are ubiquitous hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzymes that are central to the cellular antioxidant response. Of two catalase activities detected in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans, the catA gene encodes the spore-specific catalase A (CatA). Here we characterize a second catalase gene, identified after probing a genomic library with catA, and demonstrate that it encodes catalase B. This gene, designated catB, predicts a 721-amino-acid polypeptide (CatB) showing 78% identity to an Aspergillus fumigatus catalase and 61% identity to Aspergillus niger CatR. Notably, similar levels of identity are found when comparing CatB to Escherichia coli catalase HPII (43%), A. nidulans CatA (40%), and the predicted peptide of a presumed catA homolog from A. fumigatus (38%). In contrast, the last two peptides share a 79% identity. The catalase B activity was barely detectable in asexual spores (conidia), disappeared after germination, and started to accumulate 10 h after spore inoculation, throughout growth and conidiation. The catB mRNA was absent from conidia, and its accumulation correlated with catalase activity, suggesting that catB expression is regulated at the transcription level. In contrast, the high CatA activity found in spores was lost gradually during germination and growth. In addition to its developmental regulation, CatB was induced by H2O2, heat shock, paraquat, or uric acid catabolism but not by osmotic stress. This pattern of regulation and the protective role against H2O2 offered by CatA and CatB, at different stages of the A. nidulans life cycle, suggest that catalase gene redundancy performs the function of satisfying catalase demand at the two different stages of metabolic and genetic regulation represented by growing hyphae versus spores. Alternative H2O2 detoxification pathways in A. nidulans were indicated by the fact that catA/catB double mutants were able to grow in substrates whose catabolism generates H2O2. PMID:9150225

  8. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-02-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed.

  9. Catalase from the silkworm, Bombyx mori: gene sequence, distribution, and overexpression.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Banno, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroshi; Miake, Fumio; Kashige, Nobuhiro; Aso, Yoichi

    2005-04-01

    Living organisms require mechanisms regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion. Catalase is one of the regulatory enzymes and facilitates the degradation of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Biochemical information on an insect catalase is, however, insufficient. Using mRNA from fat body of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, a cDNA encoding a putative catalase was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence comprised 507 residues with more than seventy residues forming a scaffold for a heme cofactor conserved. The sequence showed 71% and 66% identities to those of the Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera catalases, respectively; the catalase from B. mori was estimated to be phylogenetically close to that from A. mellifera. The transcripts of the gene and the catalase activity were distributed in diverse tissues of B. mori, suggesting its ubiquitous nature. Using the gene, a recombinant catalase (rCAT) was functionally overexpressed in a soluble form using Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized. The pH-optimum of rCAT was broad around pH 8.0. More than 80% of the original rCAT activity was retained after incubation in the following conditions: at pH 8-11 and 4 degrees C for 24 h; at pH 7 and temperatures below 50 degrees C for 30 min. The Michaelis constant for hydrogen peroxide was evaluated to be 28 mM at pH 6.5 and 30 degrees C. rCAT was suggested to be a member of the typical catalase family. PMID:15763464

  10. Fluorescence Spectrometry of the Interaction of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Li, Y.; Cai, H.; Li, J.; Miao, J.; Fu, D.; Yang, Q.

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with catalase is investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The results of the fluorescence experiments suggest that MWCNTs quench the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase via a static quenching mechanism. The circular dichroism spectral results reveal the unfolding of catalase with a significant decrease in the α-helix content in the presence of MWCNTs, which indicates that the conformation of catalase is changed in the binding process, thereby remarkably decreasing its activity. The binding constants and the number of binding sites of the MWCNT to the catalase are calculated at different temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS), are calculated using thermodynamic equations. The fact that all negative values of ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS are obtained suggests that the interaction of the MWCNTs with catalase is spontaneous, and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play an important role in the binding process.

  11. Reversible adsorption of catalase onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels.

    PubMed

    Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Uygun, Murat; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2015-05-01

    In this presented study, poly(acrylamide-glycidyl methacrylate) [poly(AAm-GMA)] cryogels were synthesized by cryopolymerization technique at sub-zero temperature. Prepared cryogels were then functionalized with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and chelated with Fe(3+) ions in order produce the metal chelate affinity matrix. Synthesized cryogels were characterized with FTIR, ESEM and EDX analysis, and it was found that the cryogel had sponge like structure with interconnected pores and their pore diameter was about 200 μm. Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels were used for the adsorption of catalase and optimum adsorption conditions were determined by varying the medium pH, initial catalase concentration, temperature and ionic strength. Maximum catalase adsorption onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was found to be 12.99 mg/g cryogel at 25 °C, by using pH 5.0 acetate buffer. Adsorbed catalase was removed from the cryogel by using 1.0M of NaCl solution and desorption yield was found to be 96%. Additionally, reusability profile of the Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was also investigated and it was found that, adsorption capacity of the cryogels didn't decrease significantly at the end of the 40 reuses. Catalase activity studies were also tested and it was demonstrated that desorbed catalase retained 70% of its initial activity. PMID:25746283

  12. The water effect on the kinetic of the bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Seixas, Flavio Augusto Vicente; da Silva, Milene Ribeiro; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Tosqui, Priscilla; Colombo, Marcio Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Catalase is an enzyme that occurs in almost all aerobic organisms. Its main metabolic function is to prevent oxidative damage to tissues induced by hydrogen peroxide which is a strong oxidizing agent. Catalase is very effective in performing this task, since it has the highest turnover rate among all the enzymes. The properties of catalase have been investigated extensively for many years; however, the role of the solvent molecules in the catalytic reaction of this enzyme has not yet been investigated. Therefore, the objective of this work was to investigate the contribution of the solvent molecules on the catalytic reaction of bovine liver catalase with its substrate H2O2 by the osmotic stress method. As a probe for protein structural changes in solution, the differential number of water molecules released during the transition from free to bound form of the enzyme was measured. These assays were correlated with protein structural data provided by the SAXS technique and crystallographic structures of free and CN(-) bonded enzymes. The results showed that the difference in surface accessible area of the crystal structures does not reflect the variation that is observed in solution. Moreover, catalase is not influenced by the solvent during the catalytic reaction, which represents a lower energy barrier to be crossed in the overall energetics of the reaction, a fact that contributes to the high turnover rate of catalase. PMID:21529340

  13. Purification, characterization, and identification of a novel bifunctional catalase-phenol oxidase from Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Sutay Kocabas, Didem; Bakir, Ufuk; Phillips, Simon E V; McPherson, Michael J; Ogel, Zumrut B

    2008-06-01

    A novel bifunctional catalase with an additional phenol oxidase activity was isolated from a thermophilic fungus, Scytalidium thermophilum. This extracellular enzyme was purified ca. 10-fold with 46% yield and was biochemically characterized. The enzyme contains heme and has a molecular weight of 320 kDa with four 80 kDa subunits and an isoelectric point of 5.0. Catalase and phenol oxidase activities were most stable at pH 7.0. The activation energies of catalase and phenol oxidase activities of the enzyme were found to be 2.7 +/- 0.2 and 10.1 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol, respectively. The pure enzyme can oxidize o-diphenols such as catechol, caffeic acid, and L-DOPA in the absence of hydrogen peroxide and the highest oxidase activity is observed against catechol. No activity is detected against tyrosine and common laccase substrates such as ABTS and syringaldazine with the exception of weak activity with p-hydroquinone. Common catechol oxidase inhibitors, salicylhydroxamic acid and p-coumaric acid, inhibit the oxidase activity. Catechol oxidation activity was also detected in three other catalases tested, from Aspergillus niger, human erythrocyte, and bovine liver, suggesting that this dual catalase-phenol oxidase activity may be a common feature of catalases. PMID:18369615

  14. Association of CAT polymorphisms with catalase activity and exposure to environmental oxidative stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Nadif, Rachel; Mintz, Margaret; Jedlicka, Anne; Bertrand, Jean-Pierre; Kleeberger, Steven R.; Kauffmann, Francine

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that catalase activity is modified by CAT single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (–262;–844), and by their interactions with oxidant exposures (coal dusts, smoking), lymphotoxin alpha (LTA, NcoI) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF, -308) in 196 miners. Erythrocyte catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured. The CAT –262 SNP was related to lower catalase activity (104, 87 and 72 k/g hemoglobin for CC, CT and TT respectively, p<0.0001). Regardless of CAT SNPs, the LTA NcoI but not the TNF –308 SNP was associated with catalase activity (p=0.04 and p=0.8). CAT –262 T carriers were less frequent in highly exposed miners (OR=0.39 [0.20 – 0.78], p=0.007). In CAT –262 T carriers only, catalase activity decreased with high dust exposure (p=0.01). Haplotype analyses (combined CAT SNPs) confirm these results. Results show that CAT –262 and LTA NcoI SNPs, and interaction with coal dust exposure, influenced catalase activity. PMID:16298864

  15. Inhibitory effects of a novel Val to Thr mutation on the distal heme of human catalase

    PubMed Central

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    True catalases efficiently breakdown hydrogen peroxide, whereas the catalase-related enzyme allene oxide synthase (cAOS) is completely unreactive and instead metabolizes a fatty acid hydroperoxide. In cAOS a Thr residue adjacent to the distal His restrains reaction with H2O2 (Tosha et al (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281:12610; De Luna et al (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117: 14635) and its mutation to the consensus Val of true catalases permits the interaction. Here we investigated the effects of the reciprocal experiment in which the Val74 of human catalase is mutated to Thr, Ser, Met, Pro, or Ala. The Val74Thr substitution decreased catalatic activity by 3.5-fold and peroxidatic activity by 3-fold. Substitution with Ser had similar negative effects (5- and 3-fold decreases). Met decreased catalatic activity 2-fold and eliminated peroxidatic activity altogether, whereas the Val74Ala substitution was well tolerated. (The Val74Pro protein lacked heme). We conclude that the conserved Val74 of true catalases helps optimize catalysis. There are rare substitutions of Val74 with Ala, Met, or Pro, but not with Ser of Thr, possibly due their hydrogen bonding affecting the conformation of His75, the essential distal heme residue for activity in catalases. PMID:25086217

  16. Inhibitory effects of a novel Val to Thr mutation on the distal heme of human catalase.

    PubMed

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Boeglin, William E; Brash, Alan R

    2014-11-01

    True catalases efficiently breakdown hydrogen peroxide, whereas the catalase-related enzyme allene oxide synthase (cAOS) is completely unreactive and instead metabolizes a fatty acid hydroperoxide. In cAOS a Thr residue adjacent to the distal His restrains reaction with H2O2 (Tosha et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281:12610; De Luna et al. (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117: 14635) and its mutation to the consensus Val of true catalases permits the interaction. Here we investigated the effects of the reciprocal experiment in which the Val74 of human catalase is mutated to Thr, Ser, Met, Pro, or Ala. The Val74Thr substitution decreased catalatic activity by 3.5-fold and peroxidatic activity by 3-fold. Substitution with Ser had similar negative effects (5- and 3-fold decreases). Met decreased catalatic activity 2-fold and eliminated peroxidatic activity altogether, whereas the Val74Ala substitution was well tolerated. (The Val74Pro protein lacked heme). We conclude that the conserved Val74 of true catalases helps optimize catalysis. There are rare substitutions of Val74 with Ala, Met, or Pro, but not with Ser of Thr, possibly due their hydrogen bonding affecting the conformation of His75, the essential distal heme residue for activity in catalases. PMID:25086217

  17. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2–catalase and p53/PIG3–catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively. PMID:22918438

  18. A synthetic superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-207 mitigates radiation dermatitis and promotes wound healing in irradiated rat skin.

    PubMed

    Doctrow, Susan R; Lopez, Argelia; Schock, Ashley M; Duncan, Nathan E; Jourdan, Megan M; Olasz, Edit B; Moulder, John E; Fish, Brian L; Mäder, Marylou; Lazar, Jozef; Lazarova, Zelmira

    2013-04-01

    In the event of a radionuclear attack or nuclear accident, the skin would be the first barrier exposed to radiation, though skin injury can progress over days to years following exposure. Chronic oxidative stress has been implicated as being a potential contributor to the progression of delayed radiation-induced injury to skin and other organs. To examine the causative role of oxidative stress in delayed radiation-induced skin injury, including impaired wound healing, we tested a synthetic superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase mimetic, EUK-207, in a rat model of combined skin irradiation and wound injury. Administered systemically, beginning 48 hours after irradiation, EUK-207 mitigated radiation dermatitis, suppressed indicators of tissue oxidative stress, and enhanced wound healing. Evaluation of gene expression in irradiated skin at 30 days after exposure revealed a significant upregulation of several key genes involved in detoxication of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This gene expression pattern was primarily reversed by EUK-207 therapy. These results demonstrate that oxidative stress has a critical role in the progression of radiation-induced skin injury, and that the injury can be mitigated by appropriate antioxidant compounds administered 48 hours after exposure. PMID:23190879

  19. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Thermo-Alkali-Stable Catalase from Thermus brockianus

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Vicki Sue; Schaller, Kastli Dianne; Apel, William Arnold

    2003-10-01

    A novel thermo-alkali-stable catalase from Thermus brockianus was purified and characterized. The protein was purified from a T. brockianus cell extract in a three-step procedure that resulted in 65-fold purification to a specific activity of 5300 U/mg. The enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 42.5 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE and a total molecular mass measured by gel filtration of 178 kDa. The catalase was active over a temperature range from 30 to 94 C and a pH range from 6 to 10, with optimum activity occurring at 90 C and pH 8. At pH 8, the enzyme was extremely stable at elevated temperatures with half-lives of 330 h at 80 C and 3 h at 90 C. The enzyme also demonstrated excellent stability at 70 C and alkaline pH with measured half-lives of 510 h and 360 h at pHs of 9 and 10, respectively. The enzyme had an unusual pyridine hemochrome spectrum and appears to utilize eight molecules of heme c per tetramer rather than protoheme IX present in the majority of catalases studied to date. The absorption spectrum suggested that the heme iron of the catalase was in a 6-coordinate low spin state rather than the typical 5-coordinate high spin state. A Km of 35.5 mM and a Vmax of 20.3 mM/min·mg protein for hydrogen peroxide was measured, and the enzyme was not inhibited by hydrogen peroxide at concentrations up to 450 mM. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by cyanide and the traditional catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. The enzyme also showed no peroxidase activity to peroxidase substrates o-dianisidine and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), a trait of typical monofunctional catalases. However, unlike traditional monofunctional catalases, the T. brockianus catalase was easily reduced by dithionite, a characteristic of catalase-peroxidases. The above properties indicate that this catalase has potential for applications in industrial bleaching processes to remove residual hydrogen peroxide from process streams.

  20. Pineal proteins upregulate specific antioxidant defense systems in the brain.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Vijay K; Srivastava, R S

    2009-01-01

    The neuroendocrine functions of the pineal affect a wide variety of glandular and nervous system processes. Beside melatonin (MEL), the pineal gland secretes and expresses certain proteins essential for various physiological functions. It has been suggested that the pineal gland may also have an antioxidant role due to secretory product other than MEL. Therefore, the present study was designed to study the effect of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) pineal proteins (PP) on the antioxidant defense system in the brain of female rats. The twenty-four rats were taken in present study and were divided into four groups: control (0 day), control (28 day), vehicle control and buffalo PP. The PP was injected 100 μg/kg BW intraperitoneal (i.p.) daily for 28 days. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR) and reduced glutathione (GSH) concentration and the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the brain tissue were measured to assess the antioxidant systems. These enzymes protect from adverse effects of free radicals and help in amelioration of oxidative stress. Buffalo pineal proteins administration did not cause any effect on brain LPO, whereas GPx, GR and GSH were significantly (p < 0.05) decreased. However, SOD and CAT activities were increased to significant levels than the control in PP treated rats. Our study herein suggested that buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) pineal proteins upregulates specific antioxidant defense systems and can be useful in control of various oxidative stress-induced neuronal diseases. PMID:20357930

  1. Benfotiamine upregulates antioxidative system in activated BV-2 microglia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Ivana; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation and resulting sustained neuroinflammatory reaction are generally associated with neurodegeneration. Activated microglia acquires proinflammatory cellular profile that generates oxidative burst. Their persistent activation exacerbates inflammation, which damages healthy neurons via cytotoxic mediators, such as superoxide radical anion and nitric oxide. In our recent study, we have shown that benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate) possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of benfotiamine on the pro-oxidative component of activity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells were investigated. The activation of microglia was accompanied by upregulation of intracellular antioxidative defense, which was further promoted in the presence of benfotiamine. Namely, activated microglia exposed to non-cytotoxic doses of benfotiamine showed increased levels and activities of hydrogen peroxide- and superoxide-removing enzymes—catalase and glutathione system, and superoxide dismutase. In addition, benfotiamine showed the capacity to directly scavenge superoxide radical anion. As a consequence, benfotiamine suppressed the activation of microglia and provoked a decrease in NO and ·O−2 production and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, benfotiamine might silence pro-oxidative activity of microglia to alleviate/prevent oxidative damage of neighboring CNS cells. PMID:26388737

  2. Vascular oxidative stress upregulates angiotensin II type I receptors via mechanisms involving nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Siddhartha R; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F; Banday, Anees Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The association of oxidative stress with hypertension is well known. However, a causal role of oxidative stress in hypertension is unclear. Vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) upregulation is a prominent contributor to pathogenesis of hypertension. However, the mechanisms causing this upregulation are unknown. Oxidative stress is an important regulator of protein expression via activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). The present study was carried out to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to vascular AT1R upregulation via NFκB in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). HASMC exposed to oxidative stress exhibited a robust increase in AT1R mRNA in HASMC. Furthermore, oxidative stress failed to upregulate AT1Rs in the presence of either an antioxidant catalase or siRNA against p65 subunit of NFκB. To test the role of oxidative stress and NFκB in hypertension, prehypertensive SHR were treated with NFκB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate from 5 weeks to 11-12 weeks of age. At 11-12 weeks of age, SHR exhibited increased NFκB expression, AT1R upregulation and exaggerated Ang II-induced vasoconstriction as compared to age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. PDTC treatment of SHR lowered NFκB expression, normalized AT1R expression and Ang II-induced vasoconstriction. More importantly, PDTC treatment significantly attenuated hypertension development in SHR. In conclusion, vascular oxidative can upregulate AT1R, via mechanisms involving NFκB, and contribute to the development of hypertension. PMID:25198883

  3. Intron loss and gain during evolution of the catalase gene family in angiosperms.

    PubMed Central

    Frugoli, J A; McPeek, M A; Thomas, T L; McClung, C R

    1998-01-01

    Angiosperms (flowering plants), including both monocots and dicots, contain small catalase gene families. In the dicot, Arabidopsis thaliana, two catalase (CAT) genes, CAT1 and CAT3, are tightly linked on chromosome 1 and a third, CAT2, which is more similar to CAT1 than to CAT3, is unlinked on chromosome 4. Comparison of positions and numbers of introns among 13 angiosperm catalase genomic sequences indicates that intron positions are conserved, and suggests that an ancestral catalase gene common to monocots and dicots contained seven introns. Arabidopsis CAT2 has seven introns; both CAT1 and CAT3 have six introns in positions conserved with CAT2, but each has lost a different intron. We suggest the following sequence of events during the evolution of the Arabidopsis catalase gene family. An initial duplication of an ancestral catalase gene gave rise to CAT3 and CAT1. CAT1 then served as the template for a second duplication, yielding CAT2. Intron losses from CAT1 and CAT3 followed these duplications. One subclade of monocot catalases has lost all but the 5'-most and 3'-most introns, which is consistent with a mechanism of intron loss by replacement of an ancestral intron-containing gene with a reverse-transcribed DNA copy of a fully spliced mRNA. Following this event of concerted intron loss, the Oryza sativa (rice, a monocot) CAT1 lineage acquired an intron in a novel position, consistent with a mechanism of intron gain at proto-splice sites. PMID:9584109

  4. Adeno-Associated Viral-Mediated Catalase Expression Suppresses Optic Neuritis in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, John; Qi, Xiaoping; Hauswirth, William W.

    1998-11-01

    Suppression of oxidative injury by viral-mediated transfer of the human catalase gene was tested in the optic nerves of animals with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of primary central nervous system demyelination that has been frequently used as an animal model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS). The optic nerve is a frequent site of involvement common to both EAE and MS. Recombinant adeno-associated virus containing the human gene for catalase was injected over the right optic nerve heads of SJL/J mice that were simultaneously sensitized for EAE. After 1 month, cell-specific catalase activity, evaluated by quantitation of catalase immunogold, was increased approximately 2-fold each in endothelia, oligodendroglia, astrocytes, and axons of the optic nerve. Effects of catalase on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of the myelin sheath area (for demyelination), optic disc area (for optic nerve head swelling), extent of the cellular infiltrate, extravasated serum albumin labeled by immunogold (for blood-brain barrier disruption), and in vivo H2O2 reaction product. Relative to control, contralateral optic nerves injected with the recombinant virus without a therapeutic gene, catalase gene inoculation reduced demyelination by 38%, optic nerve head swelling by 29%, cellular infiltration by 34%, disruption of the blood-brain barrier by 64%, and in vivo levels of H2O2 by 61%. Because the efficacy of potential treatments for MS are usually initially tested in the EAE animal model, this study suggests that catalase gene delivery by using viral vectors may be a therapeutic strategy for suppression of MS.

  5. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and toxicity by a catalase from Mycoplasma iowae.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rachel E; Prassinos, Alexandre J; Osborne, John D; Raviv, Ziv; Balish, Mitchell F

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which degrades H2O2. To test the activity of M. iowae catalase in degrading H2O2, we studied catalase activity and H2O2 accumulation by both M. iowae serovar K strain DK-CPA, whose genome we sequenced, and strains of the H2O2-producing species Mycoplasma gallisepticum engineered to produce M. iowae catalase by transformation with the M. iowae putative catalase gene, katE. H2O2-mediated virulence by M. iowae serovar K and catalase-producing M. gallisepticum transformants were also analyzed using a Caenorhabditis elegans toxicity assay, which has never previously been used in conjunction with mycoplasmas. We found that M. iowae katE encodes an active catalase that, when expressed in M. gallisepticum, reduces both the amount of H2O2 produced and the amount of damage to C. elegans in the presence of glycerol. Therefore, the correlation between the presence of glycerol catabolism genes and the use of H2O2 as a virulence factor by mycoplasmas might not be absolute. PMID:25127127

  6. ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles against vascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ece; Tunc-Sarisozen, Yeliz; Mutlu, Hulya; Shahbazi, Reza; Ucar, Gulberk; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is the favourable idea, whereas it is possible to distribute the therapeutically active drug molecule only to the site of action. For this purpose, in this study, catalase encapsulated poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanoparticles were developed and an endothelial target molecule (anti-ICAM-1) was conjugated to this carrier system in order to decrease the oxidative stress level in the target site. According to the enzymatic activity results, initial catalase activity of nanoparticles was increased from 27.39 U/mg to up to 45.66 U/mg by adding 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA). After 4 h, initial catalase activity was preserved up to 46.98% while free catalase retained less than 4% of its activity in proteolytic environment. Furthermore, FITC labelled anti-ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated nanoparticles (anti-ICAM-1/CatNPs) were rapidly taken up by cultured endothelial cells and concomitantly endothelial cells were resistant to H2O2 induced oxidative impairment. PMID:26471402

  7. Arrhenius activation energy of damage to catalase during spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Joachim; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation of catalase during spray-drying over a range of outlet gas temperatures could be closely represented by the Arrhenius equation. From this an activation energy for damage to the catalase could be calculated. The close fit to Arrhenius suggests that the thermally-induced part of inactivation of the catalase during the complex drying and particle-formation processes takes place at constant temperature. These processes are rapid compared with the residence time of the powder in the collecting vessel of the cyclone where dried catalase is exposed to a constant temperature equal to approximately the drying gas outlet temperature. A lower activation energy after spray drying with the ultrasonic nozzle was found than with the 2-fluid nozzle under otherwise identical spray drying conditions. It is feasible that the ultrasonic nozzle when mounted in the lid of the spray dryer heats up toward the drying gas inlet temperature much more that the air-cooled 2-fluid nozzle. Calculation of the Arrhenius activation energy also showed how the stabilizing efficacy of trehalose and mannitol on the catalase varies in strength across the range of drying gas inlet and outlet temperatures examined. PMID:25940040

  8. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  9. Novel Role of Endogenous Catalase in Macrophage Polarization in Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Park, Ye Seul; Uddin, Md Jamal; Piao, Lingjuan; Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jung Hwa; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are important components of adipose tissue inflammation, which results in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance. Notably, obesity induces a proinflammatory phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophages, and oxidative stress facilitates this switch. Thus, we examined the role of endogenous catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress, in the activity of adipose tissue macrophages in obese mice. Catalase knockout (CKO) exacerbated insulin resistance, amplified oxidative stress, and accelerated macrophage infiltration into epididymal white adipose tissue in mice on normal or high-fat diet. Interestingly, catalase deficiency also enhanced classical macrophage activation (M1) and inflammation but suppressed alternative activation (M2) regardless of diet. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of catalase activity using 3-aminotriazole induced the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages. Finally, the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory responses were observed in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from CKO mice. Taken together, the data indicate that endogenous catalase regulates the polarization of adipose tissue macrophages and thereby inhibits inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:27597806

  10. The oxidation of chiral alcohols catalyzed by catalase in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Magner, E.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1995-04-20

    The catalytic properties of bovine liver catalase have been investigated in organic solvents. In tetrahydrofuran, dioxane, and acetone (all containing 1% to 3% of water), the enzyme breaks down tert-butyl hydroperoxide several fold faster than in pure water. Furthermore, the rate of catalase-catalyzed production of tert-butanol from tert-butyl hydroperoxide increases more than 400-fold upon transition from aqueous buffer to ethanol as the reaction medium. The mechanistic rationale for this striking effect is that in aqueous buffer the rate-limiting step of the enzymatic process involves the reduction of catalase`s compound 1 by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. In ethanol, an additional step in the reaction scheme becomes available in which ethanol, greatly outcompeting the hydroperoxide, is oxidized by compound 1 regenerating the free enzyme. In solvents, such as acetonitrile or tetrahydrofuran, which themselves are not oxidizable by compound 1, catalase catalyzes the oxidation of numerous primary and secondary alcohols with tert-butyl hydroperoxide to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. The enzymatic oxidation of some chiral alcohols (2,3-butanediol, citronellol, and menthol) under these conditions occurs enantioselectively. Examination of the enantioselectivity for the oxidation of 2,3-butanediol in a series of organic solvents reveals a considerable solvent dependence.

  11. Production of catalases by Aspergillus niger isolates as a response to pollutant stress by heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Buckova, M.; Godocikova, J.; Simonovicova, A.; Polek, B.

    2005-04-15

    Isolates of Aspergillus niger, selected from the coal dust of a mine containing arsenic (As; 400 mg/kg) and from the river sediment of mine surroundings (As, 1651 mg/kg, Sb, 362 mg/kg), growing in minimal nitrate medium in the phase of hyphal development and spore formation, exhibited much higher levels of total catalase activity than the same species from the culture collection or a culture adapted to soil contaminated with As (5 mg/L). Electrophoretic resolution of catalases in cell-free extracts revealed three isozymes of catalases and production of individual isozymes was not significantly affected by stress environments. Exogenously added stressors (As{sup 5+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}) at final concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/L and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (20 or 40 m(M)) mostly stimulated production of catalases only in isolates from mines surroundings, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Hg{sup 2+} caused the disappearance of the smallest catalase I. Isolates exhibited a higher tolerance of the toxic effects of heavy metals and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as monitored by growth, than did the strain from the culture collection.

  12. The catalase gene differentiates between some strains of Staphylococcus aureus ssp. anaerobius.

    PubMed

    Musa, N O; Eltom, K; Gessler, F; Böhnel, H; Babiker, A; El Sanousi, S M

    2010-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus ssp anaerobius strain S10 was isolated from an outbreak of sheep abscess disease. Sequence of the catalase gene of this strain showed 99% identity to the catalase gene (katB) sequence of the reference strain (S. aureus ssp. anaerobius strain MVF213) with mismatching of three base pairs. An important substitution located 1036 nucleotides upstream of the initiation codon from "C" in katB to "T" in the catalase gene of strain S10 originated a stop codon. The deduced protein (345 amino acids) is 105 amino acids shorter than that of katB. Partial sequence of the catalase gene of other 8 local isolates in addition to another reference strain (DSM 20714/ATCC 35844) revealed the same mutations in all local (African) strains, whereas the sequence of the reference (European) strain was typical to that of katB. Sequence of the catalase gene of S. aureus ssp. anaerobius strain S10 was deposited in GenBank under accession no. EU281993. PMID:20526831

  13. Enhanced antioxidant defense due to extracellular catalase activity in Syrian hamster during arousal from hibernation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hitomi; Okamoto, Iwao; Hanaya, Toshiharu; Arai, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Tsunetaka; Fukuda, Shigeharu

    2006-08-01

    Mammalian hibernators are considered a natural model for resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injuries, and protective mechanisms against oxidative stress evoked by repeated hibernation-arousal cycles in these animals are increasingly the focus of experimental investigation. Here we show that extracellular catalase activity provides protection against oxidative stress during arousal from hibernation in Syrian hamster. To examine the serum antioxidant defense system, we first assessed the hibernation-arousal state-dependent change in serum attenuation of cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide. Serum obtained from hamsters during arousal from hibernation at a rectal temperature of 32 degrees C, concomitant with the period of increased oxidative stress, attenuated the cytotoxicity four-fold more effectively than serum from cenothermic control hamsters. Serum catalase activity significantly increased during arousal, whereas glutathione peroxidase activity decreased by 50%, compared with cenothermic controls. The cytoprotective effect of purified catalase at the concentration found in serum was also confirmed in a hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity model. Moreover, inhibition of catalase by aminotriazole led to an 80% loss of serum hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity. These results suggest that extracellular catalase is effective for protecting hibernators from oxidative stress evoked by arousal from hibernation. PMID:16807122

  14. Purification and characterization of oxygen-inducible haem catalase from oxygen-tolerant Bifidobacterium asteroides.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kyohei; Maekawa, Itaru; Tanaka, Kunifusa; Ijyuin, Susumu; Shiwa, Yu; Suzuki, Ippei; Niimura, Youichi; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacterium asteroides, originally isolated from honeybee intestine, was found to grow under 20% O(2) conditions in liquid shaking culture using MRS broth. Catalase activity was detected only in cells that were exposed to O(2) and grown in medium containing a haem source, and these cells showed higher viability on exposure to H(2)O(2). Passage through multiple column chromatography steps enabled purification of the active protein, which was identified as a homologue of haem catalase on the basis of its N-terminal sequence. The enzyme is a homodimer composed of a subunit with a molecular mass of 55 kDa, and the absorption spectrum shows the typical profile of bacterial haem catalase. A gene encoding haem catalase, which has an amino acid sequence coinciding with the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified protein, was found in the draft genome sequence data of B. asteroides. Expression of the katA gene was induced in response to O(2) exposure. The haem catalase from B. asteroides shows about 70-80% identity with those from lactobacilli and other lactic acid bacteria, and no homologues were found in other bifidobacterial genomes. PMID:23154971

  15. Characterization of a Facultatively Psychrophilic Bacterium, Vibrio rumoiensis sp. nov., That Exhibits High Catalase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yumoto, Isao; Iwata, Hideaki; Sawabe, Tomoo; Ueno, Keisuke; Ichise, Nobutoshi; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Kawasaki, Kosei

    1999-01-01

    A novel facultatively psychrophilic bacterium, strain S-1, which exhibits extraordinarily high catalase activity was isolated from the drain pool of a fish product processing plant that uses H2O2 as a bleaching and microbicidal agent. The catalase activity of the isolate was 1 or 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of Corynebacterium glutamicum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and five other species tested in this study. The strain seemed to possess only one kind of catalase, according to the results of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell extract. The optimum temperature for catalase activity was about 30°C, which was about 20°C lower than that for bovine catalase activity. Electron microscopic observation revealed that the surface of the microorganism was covered by blebs. Although the isolate was nonflagellated, its taxonomic position on the basis of physiological and biochemical characteristics and analysis of 16S rRNA sequence and DNA-DNA relatedness data indicated that strain S-1 is a new species belonging to the genus Vibrio. Accordingly, we propose the name Vibrio rumoiensis. The type strain is S-1 (FERM P-14531). PMID:9872761

  16. Inhibition of experimental hepatic metastasis by targeted delivery of catalase in mice.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Tamada, Ayumi; Hyoudou, Kenji; Umeyama, Yukari; Takahashi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Kumai, Hitomi; Ishida, Emi; Staud, Frantisek; Yabe, Yoshiyuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2004-01-01

    Bovine liver catalase derivatives possessing diverse tissue distribution properties were synthesized, and their effects on hepatic metastasis of colon carcinoma cells were examined in mice. An intraportal injection of 1 x 10(5) colon 26 cells resulted in the formation of more than 50 metastatic colonies on the surface of the liver at 14 days after injection. An intravenous injection of catalase (CAT; 35000 units/kg of body weight) significantly (P < 0.001) reduced the number of the colonies in the liver. Galactosylated (Gal-), mannosylated (Man-) and succinylated (Suc-) CAT were also tested in the same system. Of these derivatives, Gal-CAT showed the greatest inhibitory effect on hepatic metastasis, and the number of colonies was significantly (P < 0.001) smaller than following treatment with catalase. High activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially MMP-9, were detected in the liver of mice bearing metastatic tumor tissues, which was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by Gal-CAT. These results, combined with our previous finding that Gal-CAT can be efficiently delivered to hepatocytes, indicate that the targeted delivery of catalase to the liver by galactosylation is a promising approach to suppress hepatic metastasis. Decreased MMP activity by catalase delivery seems to be involved in its anti-metastatic effect. PMID:15387371

  17. Characterization of monofunctional catalase KatA from radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Issei; Tamura, Takashi; Sghaier, Haitham; Narumi, Issay; Yamaguchi, Shotaro; Umeda, Koichi; Inagaki, Kenji

    2006-04-01

    Catalase plays a key role in protecting cells against toxic reactive oxygen species. Here we report on the cloning, purification and characterization of a catalase (KatA, DR1998) from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The size of purified D. radiodurans KatA monomer was 65 kDa while gel filtration revealed that the size of the enzyme was 240 kDa, suggesting that KatA formed a homotetramer in solution. Purified KatA displayed a final specific activity of 68,800 U/mg of protein. The catalase activity of KatA was inhibited by sodium azide, sodium cyanide and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. The absorption spectrum of KatA exhibited a Soret band at 408 nm. The position of the spectral peak remained unchanged following reduction of KatA with dithionite. No peroxidase activity was found for KatA. These results demonstrate that D. radiodurans KatA is a typical monofunctional heme-containing catalase. The stability of KatA with respect to H2O2 stress was superior to that of commercially available Aspergillus niger and bovine liver catalases. The relative abundance of KatA in cells in addition to the H2O2 resistance property may play a role in the survival strategy of D. radiodurans against oxidative damage. PMID:16716939

  18. Relationship between uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms and its catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Kenmotsu, K.; Hirota, N.; Naito, M.

    1981-12-01

    The uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms (Shiitake) artifically grown on an oak tree and the uptake in vitro by catalase extracts prepared from mushroom Hay Bacillus and spinach are reported. Mushrooms were exposed to 1.4 mg/Hg/cu m for 11 days. Measurement of total mercury was as previously described (Ogata et al. 1978, 1979). Levels in mushrooms ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 ..mu..g/g at 0.5 days to 4.6 +/- 0.2 ..mu..g/g at 10.5 days and steady-state thereafter. In in vitro studies Hy uptake by mushroom catalase extract was estimated by the perborate method. Uptake was found to parallel catalase activity and was inhibited by potassium cyanide, sodium azide, and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Similar results were obtained with Hay Bacillus and spinach catalase extracts. Results suggest that the level of mercury in the mushroom can be used as an indicator of mercury pollution in the environment. It is also suggested that catalase has an important role in uptake of mercury vapor in the plant. 2 tables (JMT)

  19. A molecular dynamics examination on mutation-induced catalase activity in coral allene oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    De Luna, Phil; Bushnell, Eric A C; Gauld, James W

    2013-11-27

    Coral allene oxide synthase (cAOS) catalyzes the formation of allene oxides from fatty acid hydroperoxides. Interestingly, its active site differs from that of catalase by only a single residue yet is incapable of catalase activity. That is, it is unable to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to molecular oxygen and water. However, the single active-site mutation T66V allows cAOS to exhibit catalase activity. We have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in order to gain insights into the differences in substrate (8R-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic) and H2O2 active site binding between wild-type cAOS and the T66V mutant cAOS. It is observed that in wild-type cAOS the active site Thr66 residue consistently forms a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with H2O2 (catalase substrate) and, importantly, with the aid of His67 helps to pull H2O2 away from the heme Fe center. In contrast, in the T66V-cAOS mutant the H2O2 is much closer to the heme's Fe center and now forms a consistent Fe···O2H2 interaction. In addition, the His67···H2O2 distance shortens considerably, increasing the likelihood of a Cpd I intermediate and hence exhibiting catalase activity. PMID:24164352

  20. Effect of Catalase and Sodium Fluoride on Human Enamel bleached with 35% Carbamide Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Shigli, Anand L; Sharma, Divya S; Thakur, Gagan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the effects of postbleaching antioxidant application fluoridation treatment on the surface morphology and microhardness of human enamel. Materials and methods: Ten freshly extracted human maxillary central incisors were cut at cementoenamel junction. Crown portion was sectioned into six slabs which were divided into five groups: group A – untreated controls; group B – 35% carbamide peroxide (CP); group C – 35% CP and catalase; group D – treatment with 35% CP and 5% sodium fluoride; group E – 35% CP, catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Thirty-five percent carbamide peroxide application included two applications of 30 minutes each at a 5-day interval. After treatment, the slabs were thoroughly washed with water for 10 seconds and stored in artificial saliva at 37°C until the next treatment. Two percent sodium fluoride included application for 5 minutes. Three catalase included application for 3 minutes. Results: After 5 days, groups B and C showed significantly decreased enamel microhardness compared to control. Group D specimens showed relatively less reduction in enamel micro-hardness than group C specimens. There is a marked increase in enamel microhardness in group E specimens. Conclusions: Fluoride take up was comparatively enhanced after catalase application resulting in less demineralization and increased microhardness. How to cite this article: Thakur R, Shigli AL, Sharma DS, Thakur G. Effect of Catalase and Sodium Fluoride on Human Enamel bleached with 35% Carbamide Peroxide. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):12-17. PMID:26124575

  1. Novel Role of Endogenous Catalase in Macrophage Polarization in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are important components of adipose tissue inflammation, which results in metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance. Notably, obesity induces a proinflammatory phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophages, and oxidative stress facilitates this switch. Thus, we examined the role of endogenous catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress, in the activity of adipose tissue macrophages in obese mice. Catalase knockout (CKO) exacerbated insulin resistance, amplified oxidative stress, and accelerated macrophage infiltration into epididymal white adipose tissue in mice on normal or high-fat diet. Interestingly, catalase deficiency also enhanced classical macrophage activation (M1) and inflammation but suppressed alternative activation (M2) regardless of diet. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of catalase activity using 3-aminotriazole induced the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory response in RAW264.7 macrophages. Finally, the same phenotypic switch and inflammatory responses were observed in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages from CKO mice. Taken together, the data indicate that endogenous catalase regulates the polarization of adipose tissue macrophages and thereby inhibits inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:27597806

  2. Moxibustion upregulates hippocampal progranulin expression

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tao; Qi, Li; Li, Ji; Le, Jing-jing; Shao, Lei; Du, Xin; Dong, Jing-cheng

    2016-01-01

    In China, moxibustion is reported to be useful and has few side effects for chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. More recently, the focus has been on the wealth of information supporting stress as a factor in chronic fatigue syndrome, and largely concerns dysregulation in the stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of moxibustion on behavioral symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome rats and examine possible mechanisms. Rats were subjected to a combination of chronic restraint stress and forced swimming to induce chronic fatigue syndrome. The acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zusanli (ST36, bilateral) were simultaneously administered moxibustion. Untreated chronic fatigue syndrome rats and normal rats were used as controls. Results from the forced swimming test, open field test, tail suspension test, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and western blot assay showed that moxibustion treatment decreased mRNA expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus, and adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels in plasma, and markedly increased progranulin mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that moxibustion may relieve the behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, at least in part, by modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulating hippocampal progranulin. PMID:27212922

  3. Moxibustion upregulates hippocampal progranulin expression.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tao; Qi, Li; Li, Ji; Le, Jing-Jing; Shao, Lei; Du, Xin; Dong, Jing-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    In China, moxibustion is reported to be useful and has few side effects for chronic fatigue syndrome, but its mechanisms are largely unknown. More recently, the focus has been on the wealth of information supporting stress as a factor in chronic fatigue syndrome, and largely concerns dysregulation in the stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of moxibustion on behavioral symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome rats and examine possible mechanisms. Rats were subjected to a combination of chronic restraint stress and forced swimming to induce chronic fatigue syndrome. The acupoints Guanyuan (CV4) and Zusanli (ST36, bilateral) were simultaneously administered moxibustion. Untreated chronic fatigue syndrome rats and normal rats were used as controls. Results from the forced swimming test, open field test, tail suspension test, real-time PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and western blot assay showed that moxibustion treatment decreased mRNA expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone in the hypothalamus, and adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels in plasma, and markedly increased progranulin mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that moxibustion may relieve the behavioral symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, at least in part, by modulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulating hippocampal progranulin. PMID:27212922

  4. Insights into the selective binding and toxic mechanism of microcystin to catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuandong; Da, Liangjun

    2014-03-01

    Microcystin is a sort of cyclic nonribosomal peptides produced by cyanobacteria. It is cyanotoxin, which can be very toxic for plants and animals including humans. The present study evaluated the interaction of microcystin and catalase, under physiological conditions by means of fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and enzymatic reactionkinetic techniques. The fluorescence data showed that microcystin could bind to catalase to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure, in which electrostatic interactions played a major role. Energy transfer and fluorescence studies proved the existence of a static binding process. Additionally, as shown by the three-dimensional fluorescence, CD and FT-IR results, microcystin could lead to conformational and microenvironmental changes of the protein, which may affect the physiological functions of catalase. The work provides important insights into the toxicity mechanism of microcystin in vivo.

  5. Synergistic effects between catalase inhibitors and modulators of nitric oxide metabolism on tumor cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2014-10-01

    Inhibitors of catalase (such as ascorbate, methyldopa, salicylic acid and neutralizing antibodies) synergize with modulators of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism (such as arginine, arginase inhibitor, NO synthase-inducing interferons and NO dioxygenase inhibitors) in the singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase. This is followed by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent apoptosis induction. TGF-beta, NADPH oxidase-1, NO synthase, dual oxidase-1 and caspase-9 are characterized as essential catalysts in this process. The FAS receptor and caspase-8 are required for amplification of ROS signaling triggered by individual compounds, but are dispensable when the synergistic effect is established. Our findings explain the antitumor effects of catalase inhibitors and of compounds that target NO metabolism, as well as their synergy. These data may have an impact on epidemiological studies related to secondary plant compounds and open new perspectives for the establishment of novel antitumor drugs and for the improvement of established chemotherapeutics. PMID:25275027

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE AND CATALASE ACTIVITY AND EXPRESSION IN HONEY BEE.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Tatjana V; Purać, Jelena; Orčić, Snežana; Kojić, Danijela; Vujanović, Dragana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Gržetić, Ivan; Ilijević, Konstantin; Šikoparija, Branko; Blagojević, Duško P

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the cellular stress response in honey bees will significantly contribute to their conservation. The aim of this study was to analyze the response of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in honey bees related to the presence of toxic metals in different habitats. Three locations were selected: (i) Tunovo on the mountain Golija, as control area, without industry and large human impact, (ii) Belgrade as urban area, and (iii) Zajača, as mining and industrial zone. Our results showed that the concentrations of lead (Pb) in whole body of bees vary according to habitat, but there was very significant increase of Pb in bees from investigated industrial area. Bees from urban and industrial area had increased expression of both Sod1 and Cat genes, suggesting adaptation to increased oxidative stress. However, in spite increased gene expression, the enzyme activity of catalase was lower in bees from industrial area suggesting inhibitory effect of Pb on catalase. PMID:26314562

  7. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Park, Jeongju; Cho, Jinhan

    2010-09-01

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-AuNP), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-AuNP, which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-AuNP are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-AuNP nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-AuNP induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and AuNP, and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H2O2.

  8. Influence of Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase on Ozone Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Christopher W.; Lee, Dongha; Dodge, Beth-Anne; Hamman, Kristen M.; Robbins, Justin B.; Martin, Scott E.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of ozone at 0.25, 0.40, and 1.00 ppm on Listeria monocytogenes were evaluated in distilled water and phosphate-buffered saline. Differences in sensitivity to ozone were found to exist among the six strains examined. Greater cell death was found following exposure at lower temperatures. Early stationary-phase cells were less sensitive to ozone than mid-exponential- and late stationary-phase cells. Ozonation at 1.00 ppm of cabbage inoculated with L. monocytogenes effectively inactivated all cells after 5 min. The abilities of in vivo catalase and superoxide dismutase to protect the cells from ozone were also examined. Three listerial test strains were inactivated rapidly upon exposure to ozone. Both catalase and superoxide dismutase were found to protect listerial cells from ozone attack, with superoxide dismutase being more important than catalase in this protection. PMID:10742219

  9. Role of the lateral channel in catalase HPII of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sevinc, M. S.; Maté, M. J.; Switala, J.; Fita, I.; Loewen, P. C.

    1999-01-01

    The heme-containing catalase HPII of Escherichia coli consists of a homotetramer in which each subunit contains a core region with the highly conserved catalase tertiary structure, to which are appended N- and C-terminal extensions making it the largest known catalase. HPII does not bind NADPH, a cofactor often found in catalases. In HPII, residues 585-590 of the C-terminal extension protrude into the pocket corresponding to the NADPH binding site in the bovine liver catalase. Despite this difference, residues that define the NADPH pocket in the bovine enzyme appear to be well preserved in HPII. Only two residues that interact ionically with NADPH in the bovine enzyme (Asp212 and His304) differ in HPII (Glu270 and Glu362), but their mutation to the bovine sequence did not promote nucleotide binding. The active-site heme groups are deeply buried inside the molecular structure requiring the movement of substrate and products through long channels. One potential channel is about 30 A in length, approaches the heme active site laterally, and is structurally related to the branched channel associated with the NADPH binding pocket in catalases that bind the dinucleotide. In HPII, the upper branch of this channel is interrupted by the presence of Arg260 ionically bound to Glu270. When Arg260 is replaced by alanine, there is a threefold increase in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Inhibitors of HPII, including azide, cyanide, various sulfhydryl reagents, and alkylhydroxylamine derivatives, are effective at lower concentration on the Ala260 mutant enzyme compared to the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the Ala260 mutant variant of HPII, determined at 2.3 A resolution, revealed a number of local structural changes resulting in the opening of a second branch in the lateral channel, which appears to be used by inhibitors for access to the active site, either as an inlet channel for substrate or an exhaust channel for reaction products. PMID:10091651

  10. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  11. A novel analytical method to evaluate directly catalase activity of microorganisms and mammalian cells by ESR oximetry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2010-09-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) oximetry technique was applied for analysis of catalase activity in the present study. Catalase activity was evaluated by measuring oxygen from the reaction between hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and catalase-positive cells. It was demonstrated that the ESR spectra of spin-label probes, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPOL), 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (4-oxo-TEMPO) and 4-maleimido-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (4-maleimido-TEMPO) in the presence of H(2)O(2) were broadened with the concentrations of catalase. It was possible to make a calibration curve for catalase activity by peak widths of the spectra of each spin-label probe, which are broadened dependently on catalase concentrations. The broadened ESR spectra were also observed when the catalase-positive micro-organisms or the mammalian cells originally from circulating monocytes/macrophages were mixed with TEMPOL and H(2)O(2). Meanwhile, catalase-negative micro-organisms caused no broadening change of ESR spectra. The present study indicates that it is possible to evaluate directly the catalase activity of various micro-organisms and mammalian cells by using an ESR oximetry technique. PMID:20815766

  12. A Eukaryote without Catalase-Containing Microbodies: Neurospora crassa Exhibits a Unique Cellular Distribution of Its Four Catalases†

    PubMed Central

    Schliebs, Wolfgang; Würtz, Christian; Kunau, Wolf-Hubert; Veenhuis, Marten; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter

    2006-01-01

    Microbodies usually house catalase to decompose hydrogen peroxide generated within the organelle by the action of various oxidases. Here we have analyzed whether peroxisomes (i.e., catalase-containing microbodies) exist in Neurospora crassa. Three distinct catalase isoforms were identified by native catalase activity gels under various peroxisome-inducing conditions. Subcellular fractionation by density gradient centrifugation revealed that most of the spectrophotometrically measured activity was present in the light upper fractions, with an additional small peak coinciding with the peak fractions of HEX-1, the marker protein for Woronin bodies, a compartment related to the microbody family. However, neither in-gel assays nor monospecific antibodies generated against the three purified catalases detected the enzymes in any dense organellar fraction. Furthermore, staining of an N. crassa wild-type strain with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and H2O2 did not lead to catalase-dependent reaction products within microbodies. Nonetheless, N. crassa does possess a gene (cat-4) whose product is most similar to the peroxisomal type of monofunctional catalases. This novel protein indeed exhibited catalase activity, but was not localized to microbodies either. We conclude that N. crassa lacks catalase-containing peroxisomes, a characteristic that is probably restricted to a few filamentous fungi that produce little hydrogen peroxide within microbodies. PMID:16963632

  13. Heterologous expression and characterization of a new heme-catalase in Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Tuyishime; Rao, Zhiming; Yang, Taowei; Zhou, Junping; Huang, Genshu; Irene, Komera; Samuel, Niyomukiza

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an inherent consequence to all aerobically living organisms that might lead to the cells being lethal and susceptible to oxidative stress. Bacillus pumilus is characterized by high-resistance oxidative stress that stimulated our interest to investigate the heterologous expression and characterization of heme-catalase as potential biocatalyst. Results indicated that recombinant enzyme significantly exhibited the high catalytic activity of 55,784 U/mg expressed in Bacillus subtilis 168 and 98.097 µmol/min/mg peroxidatic activity, the apparent K m of catalytic activity was 59.6 ± 13 mM with higher turnover rate (K cat = 322.651 × 10(3) s(-1)). The pH dependence of catalatic and peroxidatic activity was pH 7.0 and pH 4.5 respectively with temperature dependence of 40 °C and the recombinant heme-catalase exhibited a strong Fe(2+) preference. It was further revealed that catalase KatX2 improved the resistance oxidative stress of B. subtilis. These findings suggest that this B. pumilus heme-catalase can be considered among the industrially relevant biocatalysts due to its exceptional catalytic rate and high stability and it can be a potential candidate for the improvement of oxidative resistance of industrially produced strains. PMID:27016935

  14. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  15. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in a Stenotrophomonas maltophilia WZ2 resistant to herbicide pollution.

    PubMed

    Lü, Zhenmei; Sang, Liya; Li, Zimu; Min, Hang

    2009-01-01

    Quinclorac bensulfuron-methyl is a mixed herbicide widely used on paddy rice field to effectively control barnyard grass and most broad-leaved grasses and sedges. We analyzed superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities in the quinclorac-highly degrading strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia WZ2 and Gram-negative standard strain Escherichia coli K12 in an attempt to understand antioxidant enzymes in bacteria are produced in response to quinclorac or bensulfuron-methyl, which increases the virulence of the bacteria. MnSOD and two additional catalase isozymes were induced by quinclorac or bensulfuron-methyl in S. maltophilia WZ2, but not in E. coli K12. Quinclorac turned out to be a more sensitive inducer of SOD, whereas bensulfuron-methyl is a more sensitive one of catalase. A mixture of both has effects similar to quinclorac. Results indicate that catalase has a much weakly role in the defense against quinclorac or bensulfuron-methyl induced oxidative stress, whereas SOD could be critical. PMID:18304632

  16. Do Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) protect Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Active Arsenicals?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which can be converted to water and oxygen through the action of catalase. Heterozygous mice of strain B6: 129S7-SodltmlLeb/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspr...

  17. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  18. Immobilized glucose oxidase--catalase and their deactivation in a differential-bed loop reactor.

    PubMed

    Prenosil, J E

    1979-01-01

    Glucose oxidase containing catalase was immobilized with a copolymer of phenylenediamine and glutaraldehyde on pumice and titania carrier to study the enzymatic oxidation of glucose in a differential-bed loop reactor. The reaction rate was found to be first order with respect to the concentration of limiting oxygen substrate, suggesting a strong external mass-transfer resistance for all the flow rates used. The partial pressure of oxygen was varied from 21.3 up to 202.6 kPa. The use of a differential-bed loop reactor for the determination of the active enzyme concentration in the catalyst with negligible internal pore diffusion resistance is shown. Catalyst deactivation was studied, especially with respect to the presence of catalase. It is believed that the hydrogen peroxide formed in the oxidation reaction deactivates catalase first; if an excess of catalase is present, the deactivation of glucose oxidase remains small. The mathematical model subsequently developed adequately describes the experimental results. PMID:427262

  19. Direct evidence for catalase activity of [Ru(V)(edta)(O)](-).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Debabrata; Jaiswal, Namita; Franke, Alicja; van Eldik, Rudi

    2014-12-01

    Reported is the first example of a ruthenium(III) complex, Ru(III)(edta) (edta(4-) = ethylenediaminetetraacetate), that catalyzes the disproportion of H2O2 to O2 and water in resemblance to catalase activity, and shedding light on the possible mechanism of action of the [Ru(V)(edta)(O)](-) formed in the reacting system. PMID:25307989

  20. Protective role of extracellular catalase (KatA) against UVA radiation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Pizarro, Ramón A; Costa, Cristina S

    2014-02-01

    One of the more stressful factors that Pseudomonas aeruginosa must face in nature is solar UVA radiation. In this study, the protective role of KatA catalase in both planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa against UVA radiation was determined by using the wild-type (PAO1) and an isogenic catalase deficient strain (katA). The katA strain was more sensitive than the wild-type, especially in the case of biofilms. Moreover, the wild-type biofilm was more resistant than its planktonic counterpart, but this was not observed in the katA strain. Striking KatA activity was detected in the matrix of katA(+) strains, and to our knowledge, this is the first report of this activity in the matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Provision of bovine catalase or KatA to the matrix of a katA biofilm significantly increased its UVA tolerance, demonstrating that extracellular KatA is essential to optimal defense against UVA in P. aeruginosa biofilms. Efficiency of photocatalytic treatments using TiO2 and UVA was lower in biofilms than in planktonic cells, but KatA and KatB catalases seem not to be responsible for the higher resistance of the sessile cells to this treatment. PMID:24491420

  1. A study of the inhibition of catalase by dipotassium trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K₂[B₃O₃F₄OH].

    PubMed

    Islamovic, Safija; Galic, Borivoj; Milos, Mladen

    2014-10-01

    In the development of boronic acid-based enzyme inhibitors as potential pharmaceutical drugs, dipotassium trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K2[B3O3F4OH] was listed as a promising new therapeutic for treatment of these diseases. The catalase-mediated conversion of hydrogen peroxide, in the presence and absence of K2[B3O3F4OH] was studied. The kinetics conformed to the Michaelis-Menten model. Lineweaver-Burk plots were linear and plotted the family of straight lines intersected on the abscissa indicating non-competitive inhibition of the catalase. It appears that in the absence of inhibitor, catalase operates the best at conditions around pH 7.1 and in the presence of K2[B3O3F4OH] the optimum is around pH 6.2. The uncatalyzed reaction of hydrogen peroxide decomposition generally has a value of activation energy of 75 kJ mole(-1), whereas catalase, in the absence of inhibitor, lowers the value to 11.2 kJ mole(-1), while in the presence 69 mmoles L(-1) of K2[B3O3F4OH] it was 37.8 kJ mole(-1). PMID:24506205

  2. Methanol and acriflavine resistance in Dictyostelium are caused by loss of catalase.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ma Xenia U; Roberts, Catherine; Alexander, Hannah; Stewart, A Michael; Harwood, Adrian; Alexander, Stephen; Insall, Robert H

    2002-01-01

    Various chemicals with harmful effects are not themselves toxic, but are metabolized in vivo to produce toxic products. One example is methanol in Dictyostelium, which is lethal to cells containing the acrA gene, but relatively harmless to acrA mutants. This makes methanol resistance one of the tightest genetic selections in DICTYOSTELIUM: Loss of acrA also confers cross-resistance to unrelated compounds such as acriflavine and thiabendazole. We have used insertional mutagenesis to demonstrate that the acrA locus encodes the peroxisomal catalase A enzyme. Disruption of the catA gene results in parallel resistance to acriflavine. Molecular and biochemical studies of several previously characterized methanol-resistant strains reveal that each lacks catalase activity. One allele, acrA2, contains a 13 bp deletion which introduces a frameshift in the middle of the gene. The involvement of catalase in methanol resistance in Dictyostelium compares with its role in methanol metabolism in yeast and rodents. However, this is the first study to show that catalase is required for the toxicity of acriflavine. Our results imply that acriflavine and thiabendazole are precursors which must be oxidized to generate biologically active species. The catA/acrA gene is also a potentially invaluable negative selectable marker for Dictyostelium molecular genetics. PMID:11782526

  3. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities as biomarkers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin-Nadif, R.; Dusch, M.; Mur, J.M.; Koch, C.; Schmitt, P.

    1996-06-07

    We investigated the role of three blood antioxidant enzyme activities and total antioxidant status (TAS) as biological markers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury (Hg{degrees}) vapors. Twenty-two female workers took part in the study. Blood and urine sampling for biological analyses was performed. The workers were classified into three subgroups according to their creatinine-corrected Hg concentration in urine. Blood antioxidant enzyme activities and TAS were compared between groups with nonparametric distribution-free methods. A significant difference existed in catalase activity and a slight, but not significant, difference existed in Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} superoxide dismutase (Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD) activity between the three groups. No differences were observed in either the glutathione peroxidase activity or the TAS between these groups. Catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities were increased in the groups of workers with higher creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations when compared with the group of lower creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations. Catalase activity was positively correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine, and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activity was slightly correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine. The role of erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities we have measured is in agreement with the hypothesis of the involvement of reactive oxygen species production as an important event in chronic exposure to Hg{degrees} vapors in humans. In spite of the small sample size, results indicate that erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities could be considered as markers of biological effect in workers exposed to Hg{degrees} vapors. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Improved human sperm recovery using superoxide dismutase and catalase supplementation in semen cryopreservation procedure.

    PubMed

    Rossi, T; Mazzilli, F; Delfino, M; Dondero, F

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of ROS scavenger supplementation in human semen samples undergoing cryopreservation procedures.After screening out andrological pathologies, we selected 25 male partners of infertile couples with the following semen profile: volume >/= 2.0 ml, normal viscosity, sperm count >/=20 x 10(6)/ml, straight progressive motility (classes 1 and 2) >/= 40% (Mazzilli, Rossi, Delfino and Nofroni (1999) Andrologia 31: 187-194), atypical forms catalase to the third and both SOD (100 U/ml) and catalase (100 U/ml) were added to the fourth aliquot. Each aliquot was mixed (v/v) with TEST yolk buffer freezing medium (Irvine Scientific) and then frozen at -196 degrees C. The percent recovery of progressive motile and swollen spermatozoa was evaluated after thawing.No significant variation in the recovery of progressive motility was seen in the aliquots with added SOD or catalase alone, compared to the control group. On the other hand, a significant improvement in sperm parameter recovery was seen in the aliquot with both SOD and catalase supplementation; perhaps because of their combined and simultaneous action on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that, in some selected cases, SOD and catalase supplementation can contribute greatly to the prevention of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation by ROS and thus allow good sperm parameter recovery after freezing-thawing procedures. PMID:15256925

  5. The effect of superoxide dismutase mimetic and catalase on the quality of postthawed goat semen.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Mojtaba; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein Nasr

    2015-05-01

    Manganese(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE) is a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent which can convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Supplementation of MnTE to a commercial semen extender can protect sperm from superoxide but not H2O2. Therefore, we proposed that addition of catalase (0.0, 200, or 400 IU/mL) in combination with MnTE (0.1 μM) may further improve the cryopreservation efficiency of goat semen in commercially optimized freezing media such as Andromed. Therefore, ejaculates were obtained from three adult bucks twice a week during the breeding season and diluted with Andromed supplemented with or without MnTE and catalase and were frozen in liquid nitrogen. Sperm parameters and reactive oxygen species contents were evaluated 2 hours after dilution (before freezing) and after freezing/thawing. The results revealed that all the treatments significantly (P ≤ 0.05) improved sperm motility, viability, and membrane integrity after freezing and reduced reactive oxygen species content compared with the control group, but maximum improvement was obtained in MnTE + 400 IU/mL catalase. In addition, supplementation with these antioxidants significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increases the cleavage rate after IVF. In conclusion, the results of present study suggest that addition of antioxidant MnTE or catalase to commercial optimized media, such as Andromed, improves total motility, membrane integrity, and viability of goat semen samples after thawing. But the degree of improvement for these parameters significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher when MnTE and catalase were simultaneously added to the cryopreservation media. PMID:25698161

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of KatB, a manganese catalase from Anabaena PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Subhash Chandra; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2013-11-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play an important role in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in aerobic organisms. Among catalases, haem-containing catalases are ubiquitously distributed and their enzymatic mechanism is very well understood. On the other hand, manganese catalases that contain a bimanganese core in the active site have been less well characterized and their mode of action is not fully understood. The genome of Anabaena PCC 7120 does not show the presence of a haem catalase-like gene; instead, two ORFs encoding manganese catalases (Mn-catalases) are present. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of KatB, one of the two Mn-catalases from Anabaena, are reported. KatB was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as a precipitant and calcium acetate as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house on an Agilent SuperNova system using a microfocus sealed-tube X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K. The tetragonal crystal belonged to space group P4(1)2(1)2 (or enantiomer), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.87, c = 138.86 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis using the Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function suggests the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24192374

  7. Mitochondrial targeting of a catalase transgene product by plasmid liposomes increases radioresistance in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Melendez, J A; Zhang, Xichen; Nie, Suhua; Pearce, Linda; Peterson, James; Franicola, Darcy; Dixon, Tracy; Greenberger, Benjamin A; Komanduri, Paavani; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S

    2009-05-01

    To determine whether increased mitochondrially localized catalase was radioprotective, a human catalase transgene was cloned into a small pSVZeo plasmid and localized to the mitochondria of 32D cl 3 cells by adding the mitochondrial localization sequence of MnSOD (mt-catalase). The cell lines 32D-Cat and 32D-mt-Cat had increased catalase biochemical activity as confirmed by Western blot analysis compared to the 32D cl 3 parent cells. The MnSOD-overexpressing 32D cl 3 cell line, 2C6, had decreased baseline catalase activity that was increased in 2C6-Cat and 2C6-mt-Cat subclonal cell lines. 32D-mt-Cat cells were more radioresistant than 32D-Cat cells, but both were radioresistant relative to 32D cl 3 cells. 2C6-mt-Cat cells but not 2C6-Cat cells were radioresistant compared to 2C6 cells. Intratracheal injection of the mt-catalase-plasmid liposome complex (mt-Cat-PL) but not the catalase-plasmid liposome complex (Cat-PL) increased the resistance of C57BL/6NHsd female mice to 20 Gy thoracic irradiation compared to MnSOD-plasmid liposomes. Thus mitochondrially targeted overexpression of the catalase transgene is radioprotective in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19580494

  8. A novel NADPH:(bound) NADP+ reductase and NADH:(bound) NADP+ transhydrogenase function in bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Gian F; Ferraris, Anna M; Sanna, Paola; Kirkman, Henry N

    2005-02-01

    Many catalases have the shared property of containing bound NADPH and being susceptible to inactivation by their own substrate, H2O2. The presence of additional (unbound) NADPH effectively prevents bovine liver and human erythrocytic catalase from becoming compound II, the reversibly inactivated state of catalase, and NADP+ is known to be generated in the process. The function of the bound NADPH, which is tightly bound in bovine liver catalase, has been unknown. The present study with bovine liver catalase and [14C]NADPH and [14C]NADH revealed that unbound NADPH or NADH are substrates for an internal reductase and transhydrogenase reaction respectively; the unbound NADPH or NADH cause tightly bound NADP+ to become NADPH without becoming tightly bound themselves. This and other results provide insight into the function of tightly bound NADPH. PMID:15456401

  9. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain☆

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids. PMID:26887242

  10. Catalase-Modified Carbon Electrodes: Persuading Oxygen To Accept Four Electrons Rather Than Two.

    PubMed

    Sepunaru, Lior; Laborda, Eduardo; Compton, Richard G

    2016-04-18

    We successfully exploited the natural highly efficient activity of an enzyme (catalase) together with carbon electrodes to produce a hybrid electrode for oxygen reduction, very appropriate for energy transformation. Carbon electrodes, in principle, are cheap but poor oxygen reduction materials, because only two-electron reduction of oxygen occurs at low potentials, whereas four-electron reduction is key for energy-transformation technology. With the immobilization of catalase on the surface, the hydrogen peroxide produced electrochemically is decomposed back to oxygen by the enzyme; the enzyme natural activity on the surface regenerates oxygen, which is further reduced by the carbon electrode with no direct electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode. Near full four-electron reduction of oxygen is realised on a carbon electrode, which is modified with ease by a commercially available enzyme. The value of such enzyme-modified electrode for energy-transformation devices is evident. PMID:26934203

  11. Polymorphisms in the promoter region of catalase gene and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao Feng; Cui, Jing; DeStefano, Anita L; Chazaro, Irmarie; Farrer, Lindsay A; Manolis, Athanasios J; Gavras, Haralambos; Baldwin, Clinton T

    2005-01-01

    Genetic variations that predispose individuals to complex disorders, such as essential hypertension, may be found in gene coding regions, intronic regions or in gene promoter regions. Most studies have focused on gene variations that result in amino acid substitutions because they result in different isoforms of the protein, presumably resulting in differences in protein properties. Less attention has been placed on the role of intronic or promoter mutations. In this report, we examined two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the catalase (CAT) gene prompter region in a cohort of hypertensive Caucasians and African Americans with a Mass Spec based Homogenous MassEXTEND assay. We found an association when a specific combination of the two promoter SNPs was examined in Caucasians. No association was observed in African Americans. Our data suggest that genetic variations in the promoter region of catalase gene influence the susceptibility to essential hypertension. In addition, the genetic factors that contribute to hypertension maybe different between ethnic groups. PMID:15735318

  12. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and cell dimorphism in Candida albicans cells exposed to methanol and different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Romandini, P; Bonotto, C; Bertoloni, G; Beltramini, M; Salvato, B

    1994-05-01

    The combined effects of methanol and different temperatures on Candida albicans were studied. Growth curve, cell morphology, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity levels have been determined. Cell growth in each medium was comparable to 28 degrees C and 37 degrees C. The growth rate was not affected by methanol, in the presence of glucose, while it was much lower in the absence of sugar. Cell dimorphism appeared after thermic stress and it was also dependent on the medium composition. In all media, both SOD and catalase levels were much higher at 37 degrees C. The presence of methanol per se did not affect the enzymatic levels, while the absence of glucose gave higher SOD levels. PMID:8061958

  13. MEASUREMENT OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, CATALASE, AND GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE IN CULTURED CELLS AND TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Weydert, Christine J.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a large number of antioxidants to prevent or repair the damage caused by ROS, as well as to regulate redox-sensitive signaling pathways General protocols are described to measure the antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. The SODs convert superoxide radical into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen, while the catalase and peroxidases convert hydrogen peroxide into water. In this way, two toxic species, superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, are converted to the harmless product water. Western blots, activity gels and activity assays are various methods used to determine protein and activity in both cells and tissue depending on the amount of protein needed for each assay. Other techniques including immunohistochemistry and immunogold can further evaluate the levels of the various antioxidant enzymes in tissue and cells. In general, these assays require 24 to 48 hours to complete. PMID:20057381

  14. Binding of chrysoidine to catalase: spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingjun; Hao, Fang; Li, Jiarong; Chen, Dongliang; Liu, Rutao

    2013-11-01

    Chrysoidine is an industrial azo dye and the presence of chrysoidine in water and food has become an environmental concern due to its negative effects on human beings. In this work, the interactions between chrysoidine and bovine liver catalase (BLC) were explored. Obvious loss in catalytic activity was observed after incubation of BLC with chrysoidine, and the inhibition effect of BLC was found to be of the non-competitive type. No profound conformational change of BLC occurs in the presence of chrysoidine as revealed by UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy studies. Isothermal titration calorimetry results indicate that catalase has two sets of binding sites for chrysoidine. Further, molecular docking simulations show that chrysoidine is located within the bottleneck in the main channel of the substrate to the active site of BLC, which explain the activity inhibition of BLC by chrysoidine. PMID:24001681

  15. Effect of organic solvents on the conformation and interaction of catalase and anticatalase antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Mohd; Younus, Hina

    2006-05-30

    Effect of six organic solvents-methanol, ethanol, propanol, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF), and glycerol on the conformation and interaction of catalase and anticatalase antibodies were studied with the aim of identifying the solvents in which antigen-antibody interactions are strong. The antigen binding activity of the antibodies in the various organic solvents increased in the following order: ethanolCatalase activity was inhibited in DMSO. However, the enzyme was activated in DMF upto about 50% of its concentration. PMID:16677702

  16. Diminishing of aggregation for bovine liver catalase through acidic residues modification.

    PubMed

    Hashemnia, S; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ghourchian, H; Ahmad, F; Hakimelahi, G H; Saboury, A A

    2006-12-15

    The tendency of proteins to aggregate is an important problem in biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry. Because proteins in the aggregated state generally do not have the same biological activity as proteins in the native state. In order to prevent aggregation, it is essential to know the effective parameters in anti-aggregation mechanism. Using a chemical protein modification approach, UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, this study investigates the parameters involved in anti-aggregation mechanism of bovine liver catalase. Our findings clearly indicate that the modified bovine liver catalase provides better protection than the native enzyme against thermal aggregation. It seems that a decrease in hydrophobicity resulting in chemical modification plays an important role in preventing aggregation. PMID:16828155

  17. A Laboratory Experiment Investigating Different Aspects of Catalase Activity in an Inquiry - Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.; Magoun, Mary Ann; Langfur, Meg

    1997-02-01

    The action of the enzyme catalase on aqueous hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen gas is a well-established demonstration (1-3). Catalase is typically obtained by aqueous extraction of a potato, and the potato extract is mixed together with 3% hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen that is produced can be collected over water. Variations on the procedure can demonstrate the dependence of catalytic activity on temperature or the presence of inhibitors (1, 2). The University of Colorado at Denver has used a version of this procedure as a laboratory in its second-semester course for nonmajors. Recently, students have been allowed to expand upon the procedures prescribed in the laboratory handout in an open-ended project format. We explored some of these variations in detail, and the results provided here offer ideas, centered around this laboratory, for open-ended projects that can be used in an inquiry-based approach.

  18. Cytochrome bd oxidase from Escherichia coli displays high catalase activity: an additional defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Forte, Elena; Davletshin, Albert; Mastronicola, Daniela; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2013-07-11

    Cytochrome bd oxygen reductase from Escherichia coli has three hemes, b558, b595 and d. We found that the enzyme, as-prepared or in turnover with O2, rapidly decomposes H2O2 with formation of approximately half a mole of O2 per mole of H2O2. Such catalase activity vanishes upon cytochrome bd reduction, does not compete with the oxygen-reductase activity, is insensitive to NO, CO, antimycin-A and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), but is inhibited by cyanide (Ki ~2.5μM) and azide. The activity, possibly associated with heme-b595, was also observed in catalase-deficient E. coli cells following cytochrome bd over-expression suggesting a protective role against oxidative stress in vivo. PMID:23727202

  19. Differential activation of catalase expression and activity by PPAR agonists: Implications for astrocyte protection in anti-glioma therapy☆

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Hebbar, Sachin; Zhao, Weiling; Moore, Steven A.; Domann, Frederick E.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2013-01-01

    Glioma survival is dismal, in part, due to an imbalance in antioxidant expression and activity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have antineoplastic properties which present new redox-dependent targets for glioma anticancer therapies. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of primary cultures of normal rat astrocytes with PPAR agonists increased the expression of catalase mRNA protein, and enzymatic activity. In contrast, these same agonists had no effect on catalase expression and activity in malignant rat glioma cells. The increase in steady-state catalase mRNA observed in normal rat astrocytes was due, in part, to de novo mRNA synthesis as opposed to increased catalase mRNA stability. Moreover, pioglitazone-mediated induction of catalase activity in normal rat astrocytes was completely blocked by transfection with a PPARγ-dominant negative plasmid. These data suggest that defects in PPAR-mediated signaling and gene expression may represent a block to normal catalase expression and induction in malignant glioma. The ability of PPAR agonists to differentially increase catalase expression and activity in normal astrocytes but not glioma cells suggests that these compounds might represent novel adjuvant therapeutic agents for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:24024139

  20. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Catalase Isozyme Expression in Cotton Seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, RN

    1991-01-01

    We reported previously that expression of the five tetrameric catalase isozymes during postgerminative growth of cotton seedings was a consequence of interactions between two subunits (SU 1 and SU 2) temporally synthesized from two distinct catalase genes. In this study, we focused on the regulation of the expression of these two catalase subunits during the changeover from glyoxysomal to leaf-type peroxisomal metabolism. The steady-state level of glyoxysomal SU 1 protein (present in 12-hour-old seeds) increased through day 3 and then declined linearly through day 6, whereas SU 2 protein (first detected in 24-hour-old seeds) increased continuously through day 6. The time courses for steady-state levels of the mRNAs encoding these two subunits revealed two clearly separated peaks: the first at day 1 (SU 1) and the other at day 4 (SU 2). Accumulation of these mRNAs preceded the accumulation of their corresponding proteins by at least 24 hours, suggesting temporal, pretranslational regulation of synthesis of both subunits. Results from run-on transcriptional assays with isolated nuclei, however, revealed that transcripts encoding both subunits were synthesized together on days 1 through 5. Hence, it appears that the accumulations of SU 1 and SU 2 mRNAs are controlled primarily at the post-transcriptional level, which has not been reported for catalase or any other eukaryotic peroxisomal enzymes. The accumulation of SU 1 mRNA is not light dependent, whereas the accumulation of SU 2 mRNA, which directs synthesis of the predominant subunit comprising the leaf-type peroxisomal isozyme, occurs only after exposure of seedlings to light. PMID:12324611

  1. Cytotoxicity of lawsone and cytoprotective activity of antioxidants in catalase mutant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sauriasari, Rani; Wang, Da-Hong; Takemura, Yoko; Tsutsui, Ken; Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Sano, Kuniaki; Horita, Masako; Wang, Bing-Ling; Ogino, Keiki

    2007-06-01

    Lawsone is an active naphthoquinone derivative isolated from henna (Lawsonia inermis L.), a widely used hair dye. Previous study on the toxicity of lawsone remains unclear since the involvement of oxidative stress and the kind of ROS (reactive oxygen species) involved have not been fully resolved yet. This present study reports the cytotoxic effects of lawsone and henna. We carried out CAT assay (a zone of inhibition test of bacterial growth and colony-forming efficiency test of transformant Escherichia coli strains that express mammalian catalase gene derived from normal catalase mice (Cs(a)) and catalase-deficient mutant mice (Cs(b))), Ames mutagenicity assay and H(2)O(2) generation assay. Lawsone generated H(2)O(2) slightly in phosphate buffer system and was not mutagenic in Ames assay using TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102, both in the absence and presence of metabolic activation. Lawsone exposure inhibited the growth of both Cs(a) and Cs(b) strains in a dose-dependent manner. Mean zone diameter for Cs(a) was 9.75+/-0.96 mm and 12.75+/-1.5 mm for Cs(b). Natural henna leaves did not show toxic effects, whereas two out of four samples of marketed henna products were shown toxicity effects. Catalase abolished zone of inhibition (ZOI) of marketed henna products, eliminated ZOI of lawsone in a dose-dependent manner and low concentration of exogenous MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD eliminated the toxicity. Histidine and DTPA, the metal chelator; BHA and low concentration of capsaicin, the inducer of NADH-quinone reductase, effectively protected Cs(a) and Cs(b) against lawsone in this study. We suggest that lawsone cytotoxicity is probably mediated, at least in part, by the release of O(2)(-), H(2)O(2) and OH(-). PMID:17442476

  2. Impedance spectroscopy and conductometric biosensing for probing catalase reaction with cyanide as ligand and inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bouyahia, Naima; Hamlaoui, Mohamed Larbi; Hnaien, Mouna; Lagarde, Florence; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2011-02-01

    In this work, a new biosensor was prepared through immobilization of bovine liver catalase in a photoreticulated poly (vinyl alcohol) membrane at the surface of a conductometric transducer. This biosensor was used to study the kinetics of catalase-H(2)0(2) reaction and its inhibition by cyanide. Immobilized catalase exhibited a Michaelis-Menten behaviour at low H(2)0(2) concentrations (<100mM) with apparent constant K(M)(app)=84±3mM and maximal initial velocity V(M)(app)=13.4μS min(-1). Inhibition by cyanide was found to be non-competitive and inhibition binding constant K(i) was 13.9±0.3μM. The decrease of the biosensor response by increasing cyanide concentration was linear up to 50μM, with a cyanide detection limit of 6μM. In parallel, electrochemical characteristics of the catalase/PVA biomembrane and its interaction with cyanide were studied by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Addition of the biomembrane onto the gold electrodes induced a significant increase of the interfacial polarization resistance R(P). On the contrary, cyanide binding resulted in a decrease of Rp proportional to KCN concentration in the 4 to 50μM range. Inhibition coefficient I(50) calculated by this powerful label-free and substrate-free technique (24.3μM) was in good agreement with that determined from the substrate-dependent conductometric biosensor (24.9μM). PMID:20813591

  3. Ergot cluster-encoded catalase is required for synthesis of chanoclavine-I in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Kerry E; Coyle, Christine M; Cheng, Johnathan Z; O'Connor, Sarah E; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2011-06-01

    Genes required for ergot alkaloid biosynthesis are clustered in the genomes of several fungi. Several conserved ergot cluster genes have been hypothesized, and in some cases demonstrated, to encode early steps of the pathway shared among fungi that ultimately make different ergot alkaloid end products. The deduced amino acid sequence of one of these conserved genes (easC) indicates a catalase as the product, but a role for a catalase in the ergot alkaloid pathway has not been established. We disrupted easC of Aspergillus fumigatus by homologous recombination with a truncated copy of that gene. The resulting mutant (ΔeasC) failed to produce the ergot alkaloids typically observed in A. fumigatus, including chanoclavine-I, festuclavine, and fumigaclavines B, A, and C. The ΔeasC mutant instead accumulated N-methyl-4-dimethylallyltryptophan (N-Me-DMAT), an intermediate recently shown to accumulate in Claviceps purpurea strains mutated at ccsA (called easE in A. fumigatus) (Lorenz et al. Appl Environ Microbiol 76:1822-1830, 2010). A ΔeasE disruption mutant of A. fumigatus also failed to accumulate chanoclavine-I and downstream ergot alkaloids and, instead, accumulated N-Me-DMAT. Feeding chanoclavine-I to the ΔeasC mutant restored ergot alkaloid production. Complementation of either ΔeasC or ΔeasE mutants with the respective wild-type allele also restored ergot alkaloid production. The easC gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein product displayed in vitro catalase activity with H(2)O(2) but did not act, in isolation, on N-Me-DMAT as substrate. The data indicate that the products of both easC (catalase) and easE (FAD-dependent oxidoreductase) are required for conversion of N-Me-DMAT to chanoclavine-I. PMID:21409592

  4. Optimization of permeabilization process of yeast cells for catalase activity using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Trawczyńska, Ilona; Wójcik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformation processes accompanied by whole yeast cells as biocatalyst are a promising area of food industry. Among the chemical sanitizers currently used in food technology, hydrogen peroxide is a very effective microbicidal and bleaching agent. In this paper, permeabilization has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells aiming at increased intracellular catalase activity for decomposed H2O2. Ethanol, which is non-toxic, biodegradable and easily available, has been used as permeabilization factor. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied in determining the influence of different parameters on permeabilization process. The aim of the study was to find such values of the process parameters that would yield maximum activity of catalase during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The optimum operating conditions for permeabilization process obtained by RSM were as follows: 53% (v/v) of ethanol concentration, temperature of 14.8 °C and treatment time of 40 min. After permeabilization, the activity of catalase increased ca. 40 times and its maximum value equalled to 4711 U/g. PMID:26019618

  5. Spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular simulation studies on the interaction of catalase with copper ion.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Jing, Mingyang; Zhao, Xingchen; Liu, Rutao

    2015-02-01

    In this research, the binding mechanism of Cu(2+) to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking methods. The cellar experiment was firstly carried out to investigate the inhibition effect of catalase. During the fluorescence quenching study, after correcting the inner filter effect (IFE), the fluorescence of BLC was found to be quenched by Cu(2+). The quenching mechanism was determined by fluorescence lifetime measurement, and was confirmed to be the dynamic mode. The secondary structure content of BLC was changed by the addition of Cu(2+), as revealed by UV-vis absorption and CD spectra, which further induces the decrease in BLC activity. Molecular simulation study indicates that Cu(2+) is located between two β-sheets and two random coils of BLC near to the heme group, and interacts with His 74 and Ser 113 residues near a hydrophilic area. The decrease of α-helix and the binding of His 74 are considered to be the major reason for the inhibition of BLC activity caused by Cu(2+). The ITC results indicate that the binding stoichiometry of Cu(2+) to catalase is 11.4. Moreover, the binding of Cu(2+) to BLC destroyed H-bonds, which was confirmed by the CD result. PMID:25618814

  6. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-05-15

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from <10 min to 40 h, reduced immunogenicity, and decreases sensitivity to proteolysis. Because PEG has surface active properties and can induce cell fusion, the authors hypothesized that PEG conjugation could enhance cell binding and association of normally membrane-impermeable enzymes. Incubation of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with /sup 125/I-PEG-catalase or /sup 125/I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species.

  7. Catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase: relationship to enzyme inactivation by H2O2.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ruiz, J; Arnao, M B; Hiner, A N; García-Cánovas, F; Acosta, M

    2001-01-01

    H2O2 is the usual oxidizing substrate of horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C). In the absence in the reaction medium of a one-electron donor substrate, H2O2 is able to act as both oxidizing and reducing substrate. However, under these conditions the enzyme also undergoes a progressive loss of activity. There are several pathways that maintain the activity of the enzyme by recovering the ferric form, one of which is the decomposition of H2O2 to molecular oxygen in a similar way to the action of catalase. This production of oxygen has been kinetically characterized with a Clark-type electrode coupled to an oxygraph. HRP-C exhibits a weak catalase-like activity, the initial reaction rate of which is hyperbolically dependent on the H2O2 concentration, with values for K(2) (affinity of the first intermediate, compound I, for H2O2) and k(3) (apparent rate constant controlling catalase activity) of 4.0 +/- 0.6 mM and 1.78 +/- 0.12 s(-1) respectively. Oxygen production by HRP-C is favoured at pH values greater than approx. 6.5; under similar conditions HRP-C is also much less sensitive to inactivation during incubations with H2O2. We therefore suggest that this pathway is a major protective mechanism of HRP-C against such inactivation. PMID:11171085

  8. katGI and katGII encode two different catalases-peroxidases in Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, M C; Ainsa, J A; Martín, C; García, M J

    1997-11-01

    It has been suggested that catalase-peroxidase plays an important role in several aspects of mycobacterial metabolism and is a virulence factor in the main pathogenic mycobacteria. In this investigation, we studied genes encoding for this protein in the fast-growing opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium fortuitum. Nucleotide sequences of two different catalase-peroxidase genes (katGI and katGII) of M. fortuitum are described. They show only 64% homology at the nucleotide level and 55% identity at the amino acid level, and they are more similar to catalases-peroxidases from different bacteria, including mycobacteria, than to each other. Both proteins were found to be expressed in actively growing M. fortuitum, and both could also be expressed when transformed into Escherichia coli and M. aurum. We detected the presence of a copy of IS6100 in the neighboring region of a katG gene in the M. fortuitum strain in which this element was identified (strain FC1). The influence of each katG gene on isoniazid (isonicotinic acid hydrazide; INH) susceptibility of mycobacteria was checked by using the INH-sensitive M. aurum as the host. Resistance to INH was induced when katGI was transformed into INH-sensitive M. aurum, suggesting that this enzyme contributes to the natural resistance of M. fortuitum to the drug. This is the first report showing two different genes encoding same enzyme activity which are actively expressed within the same mycobacterial strain. PMID:9371430

  9. Purification and characterization of recombinant catalase-peroxidase, which confers isoniazid sensitivity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nagy, J M; Cass, A E; Brown, K A

    1997-12-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis katG gene encodes a dual-function enzyme called catalase-peroxidase, which confers sensitivity in M. tuberculosis to isonicotinic acid hydrazide. We have constructed a system for the high level expression of a recombinant form of this enzyme by amplifying the katG gene from the pYZ56 construct (1) and subcloning into a vector suitable for expression in Escherichia coli. The resulting plasmid, pTBCP, produced the catalase-peroxidase in large quantities, corresponding to 30% of total cell protein. The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity and appears to be a dimer in the native form. Using either hydrogen peroxide or t-butyl hydroperoxide and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) as substrates, kcat and Km values have been obtained for both catalatic and peroxidatic activities, respectively. The availability of significant quantities of an active, folded, recombinant form of M. tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase should thus facilitate future studies of its role in drug activation and antibiotic resistance. PMID:9395452

  10. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. )

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  11. Role of phosphate on stability and catalase mimetic activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ragini; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have been recently shown to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in different experimental model systems. CeNPs (3+) and CeNPs (4+) have been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic activity, respectively. Due to their nanoscale dimension, CeNPs are expected to interact with the components of biologically relevant buffers and medium, which could alter their catalytic properties. We have demonstrated earlier that CeNPs (3+) interact with phosphate and lose the SOD activity. However, very little is known about the interaction of CeNPs (4+) with the phosphate and other anions, predominantly present in biological buffers and their effects on the catalase mimetic-activity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we report that catalase mimetic-activity of CeNPs (4+) is resistant to the phosphate anions, pH changes and composition of cell culture media. Given the abundance of phosphate anions in the biological system, it is likely that internalized CeNPs would be influenced by cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic concentration of phosphate. PMID:26011425

  12. Understanding the role of the catalase/peroxide genes in H2O2 resistance of E. coli serotype O157:H7 biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 defenses against H2O2 include the peroxiredoxin AhpC and three catalases: KatG (catalase-peroxidase), KatE (catalase), and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC, KatG, and KatP are induced by OxyR in exponential phase, while KatE is indu...

  13. Specific Function of the Met-Tyr-Trp Adduct Radical and Residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the Atypical Catalase Reaction of Catalase-Peroxidase KatG*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Khajo, Abdelahad; Jarrett, Sanchez; Suarez, Javier; Levitsky, Yan; Burger, Richard M.; Jarzecki, Andrzej A.; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase activity of the dual-function heme enzyme catalase-peroxidase (KatG) depends on several structural elements, including a unique adduct formed from covalently linked side chains of three conserved amino acids (Met-255, Tyr-229, and Trp-107, Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG numbering) (MYW). Mutagenesis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and optical stopped-flow experiments, along with calculations using density functional theory (DFT) methods revealed the basis of the requirement for a radical on the MYW-adduct, for oxyferrous heme, and for conserved residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the rapid catalase reaction. The participation of an oxyferrous heme intermediate (dioxyheme) throughout the pH range of catalase activity is suggested from our finding that carbon monoxide inhibits the activity at both acidic and alkaline pH. In the presence of H2O2, the MYW-adduct radical is formed normally in KatG[D137S] but this mutant is defective in forming dioxyheme and lacks catalase activity. KatG[R418L] is also catalase deficient but exhibits normal formation of the adduct radical and dioxyheme. Both mutants exhibit a coincidence between MYW-adduct radical persistence and H2O2 consumption as a function of time, and enhanced subunit oligomerization during turnover, suggesting that the two mutations disrupting catalase turnover allow increased migration of the MYW-adduct radical to protein surface residues. DFT calculations showed that an interaction between the side chain of residue Arg-418 and Tyr-229 in the MYW-adduct radical favors reaction of the radical with the adjacent dioxyheme intermediate present throughout turnover in WT KatG. Release of molecular oxygen and regeneration of resting enzyme are thereby catalyzed in the last step of a proposed catalase reaction. PMID:22918833

  14. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal upregulates endogenous antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in rat H9c2 myocardiac cells: protection against overt oxidative and electrophilic injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Li; Xi, Xiaoqing; Zweier, Jay L; Li, Yunbo

    2006-08-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) could upregulate antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in rat H9c2 myocardiac cells, and if the upregulated defenses led to cytoprotection against oxidative and electrophilic injury. Incubation of H9c2 cells with HNE at noncytotoxic concentrations resulted in significant induction of cellular catalase, glutathione (GSH), GSH S-transferase (GST), and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), as determined by enzyme activity and/or protein expression. HNE treatment caused increased mRNA expression of catalase, gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase, GST-A1, and NQO1. Pretreatment of H9c2 cells with HNE led to significant protection against cytotoxicity induced by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. HNE-pretreated cells also exhibited increased resistance to injury elicited by subsequent cytotoxic concentrations of HNE. Taken together, this study demonstrates that several antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes in H9c2 cells are upregulated by HNE and that the increased defenses afford protection against overt oxidative and electrophilic cardiac cell injury. PMID:17015266

  15. Delivery of bioactive macromolecules from microporous polymer matrices: Release and activity profiles of lysozyme, collagenase and catalase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Chang, Hsin-I; Li, Xiongwei; Alpar, Oyar; Coombes, Allan G A

    2009-06-28

    Microporous polycaprolactone (PCL) matrices containing lysozyme, collagenase and catalase respectively with molecular weight covering a wide range from 14.3 to 240kDa were produced by a novel method involving rapid cooling of particle suspensions in dry ice. The enzyme loading efficiency (lysozyme (50%), collagenase (75%) and catalase (90%)) depended on the enzyme molecular weight and the non-solvent used to extract acetone from the hardened matrices. Sustained enzyme release occurred from the PCL matrices over 11 days with retained activity dependent on the particular enzyme used (collagenase 100% activity at 11 days, lysozyme 75-80% at 11 days, catalase 10-20% at 5 days). The present findings confirm the potential of microporous PCL matrices for delivering bioactive macromolecules from implantable/insertable depot-type formulations and tissue engineering scaffolds and recommend catalase as a challenging model protein for evaluating such devices. PMID:19491030

  16. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  17. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of

  18. Purification, cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of a monofunctional catalase, KatP, from Pigmentiphaga sp. DL-8.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Yicheng; Huang, Fei; Fu, Lei; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-04-01

    Catalases are essential components of the cellular equipment used to cope with oxidative stress. The monofunctional catalase KatP was purified from Pigmentiphaga sp. using ammonium sulfate precipitation (ASP), diethylaminoethyl ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The purified catalase formed polymer with an estimated monomer molecular mass of 54kDa, which were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and zymogram analysis. KatP exhibited a specific catalytic activity of 73,000U/mg, which was higher than that of catalase-1 of Comamonas terrigena N3H (55,900U/mg). Seven short tryptic fragments of this catalase were obtained by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS), and the gene, katP, was cloned by PCR amplification and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Based on the complete amino acid sequence, KatP was identified as a clade 3 monofunctional catalase. The specific activities of recombinant KatP for hydrogen peroxide (690,000U/mg) increased 9-fold over that of the parent strain. The Km and Vmax of recombinant KatP were 9.48mM and 81.2mol/minmg, respectively. The optimal pH and temperature for KatP were 7.0 and 37°C, respectively, and the enzyme displayed abroad pH-stable range of 4.0-11.0. The enzyme was inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(2+), and Mn(2+), whereas Fe(3+) and Mg(2+) stimulated KatP enzymatic activity. Interestingly, the catalase activity of recombinant KatP displayed high stability under different temperature and pH conditions, suggesting that KatP is a potential candidate for the production of catalase. PMID:25665507

  19. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    PubMed

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel. PMID:27148658

  20. Cloning, sequence, and phenotypic expression of katA, which encodes the catalase of Lactobacillus sake LTH677.

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, H J; Vogel, R F; Hammes, W P

    1992-01-01

    Lactobacillus sake LTH677 is a strain, isolated from fermented sausage, which forms a heme-dependent catalase. This rare property is highly desirable in sausage fermentation, as it prevents rancidity and discoloration caused by hydrogen peroxide. A gene bank containing MboI fragments of chromosomal DNA from Lactobacillus sake LTH677 in Escherichia coli plasmid pBR328 was constructed. The catalase gene was cloned by heterologous complementation of the Kat- phenotype of E. coli UM2. The catalase structural gene, designated katA, was assigned to a 2.3-kb region by deletion analysis of the originally cloned fragment in plasmid pHK1000. The original chromosomal arrangement was determined by Southern hybridization. Protein analysis revealed that the catalase subunit has a molecular size of 65,000 Da and that the active catalase possesses a hexameric structure. The molecular size of the subunit deduced from the nucleotide sequence was determined to 54,504 Da. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 65,000-Da protein corresponded to the one deduced from the DNA sequence. After recloning of katA in the E. coli-Lactococcus shuttle vector pGKV210, the gene was successfully transferred and phenotypically expressed in Lactobacillus casei, which is naturally deficient in catalase activity. Images PMID:1575485

  1. NADPH binding and control of catalase compound II formation: comparison of bovine, yeast, and Escherichia coli enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Hillar, A; Nicholls, P; Switala, J; Loewen, P C

    1994-01-01

    1. NADPH binds to bovine catalase and to yeast catalases A and T, but not to Escherichia coli catalase HPII. The association was demonstrated using chromatography and fluorimetry. Bound NADPH fluoresces in a similar way to NADPH in solution. 2. Bound NADPH protects bovine and yeast catalases against forming inactive peroxide compound II either via endogenous reductant action or by ferrocyanide reduction during catalytic activity in the presence of slowly generated peroxide. 3. Bound NADPH reduces neither compound I nor compound II of catalase. It apparently reacts with an intermediate formed during the decay of compound I to compound II; this postulated intermediate is an immediate precursor of stable compound II either when the latter is formed by endogenous reductants or when ferrocyanide is used. It represents therefore a new type of hydrogen donor that is not included in the original classification of Keilin and Nicholls [Keilin, D. and Nicholls, P. (1958) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 29, 302-307] 4. A model for NADPH action is presented in which concerted reduction of the ferryl iron and of a neighbouring protein free radical is responsible for the observed NADPH effects. The roles of migrant radical species in mammalian and yeast catalases are compared with similar events in metmyoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase reactions with peroxides. Images Figure 1 PMID:8002960

  2. Layer-by-layer immobilized catalase on electrospun nanofibrous mats protects against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Deng, Hongbing; Cai, Tongjian; Zhan, Yingfei; Wang, Xiankai; Chen, Xuanxuan; Ji, Ailing; Lil, Xueyong

    2014-07-01

    Catalase, a kind of redox enzyme and generally recognized as an efficient agent for protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxicity. The immobilization of catalase was accomplished by depositing the positively charged chitosan and the negatively charged catalase on electrospun cellulose nanofibrous mats through electrospining and layer-by-layer (LBL) techniques. The morphology obtained from Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) indicated that more orderly arranged three-dimension (3D) structure and roughness formed with increasing the number of coating bilayers. Besides, the enzyme-immobilized nanofibrous mats were found with high enzyme loading and activity, moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results further demonstrated the successful immobilization of chitosan and catalase on cellulose nanofibers support. Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide in the Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells with or without pretreatment of nanofibrous mats by MTT assay, LDH activity and Flow cytometric evaluation, and confirmed the pronounced hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity, but pretreatment of immobilized catalase reduced the cytotoxicity and protected cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxic effects which were further demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images. The data pointed toward a role of catalase-immobilized nanofibrous mats in protecting cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular damage and their potential application in biomedical field. PMID:24804555

  3. Two temporally synthesized charge subunits interact to form the five isoforms of cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum) catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, R N; Eising, R

    1990-01-01

    Five charge isoforms of tetrameric catalase were isolated from cotyledons of germinated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings. Denaturing isoelectric focusing of the individual isoforms in polyacrylamide gels indicated that isoforms A (most anodic) and E (most cathodic) consisted of one subunit of different charge, whereas isoforms B, C and D each consisted of a mixture of these two subunits. Thus the five isoforms apparently were formed through combinations of two subunits in different ratios. Labelling cotyledons in vivo with [35S]methionine at three daily intervals in the dark, and translation in vivo of polyadenylated RNA isolated from cotyledons at the same ages, revealed synthesis of two different subunits. One of the subunits was synthesized in cotyledons at all ages studied (days 1-3), whereas the other subunit was detected only at days 2 and 3. This differential expression of two catalase subunits helped explain previous results from this laboratory showing that the two anodic forms (A and B) found in maturing seeds were supplemented with three cathodic forms (C-E) after the seeds germinated. These subunit data also helped clarify our new findings that proteins of isoforms A, B and C (most active isoforms) accumulated in cotyledons of plants kept in the dark for 3 days, then gradually disappeared during the next several days, whereas isoforms D and E (least active isoforms) remained in the cells. This shift in isoform pattern occurred whether seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to continuous light after day 3, although exposure to light enhanced this process. These sequential molecular events were responsible for the characteristic developmental changes (rise and fall) in total catalase activity. We believe that the isoform changeover is physiologically related to the changeover in glyoxysome to leaf-type-peroxisome metabolism. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1695843

  4. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  5. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  6. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324.

    PubMed

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 10(5) U mg(-1) protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (K cat/K m ) of 4.7 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t 1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t 1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  7. Biomimetic Mn-Catalases Based on Dimeric Manganese Complexes in Mesoporous Silica for Potential Antioxidant Agent.

    PubMed

    Escriche-Tur, Luis; Corbella, Montserrat; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Castro, Isabel; Bonneviot, Laurent; Albela, Belén

    2015-11-01

    Two new structural and functional models of the Mn-catalase with formula [{Mn(III)(bpy)(H2O)}(μ-2-MeOC6H4CO2)2(μ-O){Mn(III)(bpy)(X)}]X, where X = NO3 (1) and ClO4 (2) and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction. In both cases, a water molecule and an X ion occupy the monodentate positions. The magnetic properties of these compounds reveal a weak antiferromagnetic behavior (2J = -2.2 cm(-1) for 1 and -0.7 cm(-1) for 2, using the spin Hamiltonian H = -2J S1·S2) and negative zero-field splitting parameter DMn (-4.6 cm(-1) and -3.0 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively). This fact, together with the nearly orthogonal orientation of the Jahn-Teller axes of the Mn(III) ions explain the unusual shape of χMT versus T plot at low temperature. Compound 1 presents a better catalase activity than 2 in CH3CN-H2O media, probably due to a beneficial interaction of the NO3(-) ion with the Mn complex in solution. These compounds were successfully inserted inside two-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica (MCM-41 type) leading to the same hybrid material ([Mn2O]@SiO2), without the X group. The manganese complex occupies approximately half of the available pore volume, keeping the silica's hexagonal array intact. Magnetic measurements of [Mn2O]@SiO2 suggest that most of the dinuclear unit is preserved, as a non-negligible interaction between Mn ions is still observed. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the Mn 3s peak confirms that Mn remains as Mn(III) inside the silica. The catalase activity study of material [Mn2O]@SiO2 reveals that the complex is more active inside the porous silica, probably due to the surface silanolate groups of the pore wall. Moreover, the new material shows catalase activity in water media, while the coordination compounds are not active. PMID:26484833

  8. X-ray diffraction study of Penicillium Vitale catalase in the complex with aminotriazole

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik, A. A.; Grebenko, A. I.; Melik-Adamyan, V. R.

    2011-07-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme catalase from Penicillium vitale in a complex with the inhibitor aminotriazole was solved and refined by protein X-ray crystallography methods. An analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the complex showed that the inhibition of the enzyme occurs as a result of the covalent binding of aminotriazole to the amino-acid residue His64 in the active site of the enzyme. An investigation of the three-dimensional structure of the complex resulted in the amino-acid residues being more precisely identified. The binding sites of saccharide residues and calcium ions in the protein molecule were found.

  9. Activity of Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) in Response to Carbendazim.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R

    2010-01-01

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) is an annual herb, used as a spice and traditionally as medicine. Fenugreek finds its uses in treating hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and disorders of gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular systems. Fenugreek cultivation in India is affected by fungal diseases like root-rot and damping-off and fungicides like carbendazim are used to overcome these infections. Fungicides play both positive and negative role in plants; fungicides protect plants from diseases and also exert oxidative stress simultaneously. This report is on the response of antioxidants, superoxide dismutase and catalase in fenugreek seeds and plants treated to different concentrations of carbendazim. PMID:20582202

  10. Pharmacokinetics and stability properties of catalase modified with water-soluble polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Aymara; Pérez, Yunel; Gómez, Leissy; Ramírez, Hector L; Schacht, Etienne H; Villalonga, Reynaldo

    2006-07-01

    Bovine liver catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) was chemically modified with mannan, carboxymethylcellulose, and carboxymethylchitin. The enzyme retained about 48-97% of the initial specific activity after glycosidation with the polysaccharides. The prepared neoglycoenzyme was 1.9-5.7 fold more stable against the thermal inactivation processes at 55 degrees C, in comparison with the native counterpart. Also, the modified enzyme was more resistant to proteolytic degradation with trypsin. Pharmacokinetics studies revealed higher plasma half-life time for all the enzyme-polymer preparations, but better results were achieved for the enzyme modified with the anionic macromolecules. PMID:16838281