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Sample records for n-acetylcysteine-mediated catalase upregulation

  1. A rapid and transient ROS generation by cadmium triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway in HepG2 cells and this is inhibited through N-acetylcysteine-mediated catalase upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seon-Hee; Lim, Sung-Chul . E-mail: sclim@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-05-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cadmium (Cd)-induced hepatotoxicity, the role of ROS in this pathway remains unclear. Therefore, we attempted to determine the molecular mechanisms relevant to Cd-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. Cd was found to induce apoptosis in the HepG2 cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, as confirmed by DNA fragmentation analysis and TUNEL staining. In the early stages, both rapid and transient ROS generation triggered apoptosis via Fas activation and subsequent caspase-8-dependent Bid cleavage, as well as by calpain-mediated mitochondrial Bax cleavage. The timing of Bid activation was coincided with the timing at which the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP) collapsed as well as the cytochrome c (Cyt c) released into the cytosol. Furthermore, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore inhibitors, such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BA), did not block Cd-induced ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment resulted in the complete inhibition of the Cd-induced apoptosis via catalase upregulation and subsequent Fas downregulation. NAC treatment also completely blocked the Cd-induced intracellular ROS generation, MMP collapse and Cyt c release, indicating that Cd-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may be regulated indirectly by ROS-mediated signaling pathway. Taken together, a rapid and transient ROS generation by Cd triggers apoptosis via caspase-dependent pathway and subsequent mitochondrial pathway. NAC inhibits Cd-induced apoptosis through the blocking of ROS generation as well as the catalase upregulation.

  2. Catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of vasoprotective proteins in venous tissue.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Floeren, Melanie; Kumpf, Stephanie; Both, Charlotte; Peter, Bärbel; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Kojda, Georg

    2011-11-01

    Physical activity induces favourable changes of arterial gene expression and protein activity, although little is known about its effect in venous tissue. Although our understanding of the initiating molecular signals is still incomplete, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered a key event. This study sought to investigate the effects of two different training protocols on the expression of eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) in venous and lung tissue and to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms. C57Bl/6 mice underwent voluntary exercise or forced physical activity. Changes of vascular mRNA and protein levels and activity of eNOS, ecSOD and catalase were determined in aorta, heart, lung and vena cava. Both training protocols similarly increased relative heart weight and resulted in up-regulation of aortic and myocardial eNOS. In striking contrast, eNOS expression in vena cava and lung remained unchanged. Likewise, exercise up-regulated ecSOD in the aorta and in left ventricular tissue but remained unchanged in lung tissue. Catalase expression in lung tissue and vena cava of exercised mice exceeded that in aorta by 6.9- and 10-fold, respectively, suggesting a lack of stimulatory effects of hydrogen peroxide. In accordance, treatment of mice with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole for 6 weeks resulted in significant up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD in vena cava. These data suggest that physiological venous catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD. Furthermore, therapeutic inhibition of vascular catalase might improve pulmonary rehabilitation. PMID:21129156

  3. CATALASE ACTIVITY IN LEPTOSPIRA

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P. J.; Larson, A. D.; Cox, C. D.

    1964-01-01

    Rao, P. J. (University of Illinois, Urbana), A. D. Larson, and C. D. Cox. Catalase activity in Leptospira. J. Bacteriol. 88:1045–1048. 1964.—A number of serotypes of Leptospira were found to possess catalase activity, although considerable variation in activity existed among various serotypes. Catalase activity of L. pomona was reduced by inhibitors commonly employed for arresting catalase activity in other biological systems. Catalase activity was increased three to five times by growing cultures under conditions of oxygen availability; however, aeration had no beneficial effect on total viable cell crop. The relationship of oxygen to metabolism and future studies on virulence of the leptospirae is discussed. PMID:14219017

  4. Short communication: N-Acetylcysteine-mediated modulation of antibiotic susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Liu, L H; Li, X P; Luo, J Y; Zhang, Z; Yan, Z T; Zhang, S D; Li, H S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on antibiotic susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were tested by the agar-based E-test method. The presence of 10mM NAC reduced the MIC of penicillin and ampicillin but enhanced the MIC of erythromycin and ciprofloxacin for all of the strains. In addition, NAC-mediated modulation of MIC of kanamycin, tetracycline, and vancomycin was diverse, depending on the target bacterial pathogen and antibiotic being used. The results suggest that NAC is an important modulator of antibiotic activity against the major bovine mastitis pathogens. PMID:27016837

  5. Bronchiolar epithelial catalase is diminished in smokers with mild COPD.

    PubMed

    Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Fuke, Satoshi; Inomata, Takashi; Kaga, Kichizo; Morikawa, Toshiaki; Odajima, Nao; Adair-Kirk, Tracy; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate bronchiolar catalase expression and its relationship with smoking and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in humans and to determine the dynamic change of bronchiolar catalase expression in response to cigarette smoke in mice. Lung tissue was obtained from 36 subjects undergoing surgery for peripheral tumours, consisting of life-long nonsmokers and smokers with or without COPD. Male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to cigarette smoke exposure for up to 3 months followed by a 28-day cessation period. We quantified bronchiolar catalase mRNA using laser capture microdissection and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. C22 club cells (Clara cells) in culture were exposed to cigarette smoke extract and monitored for viability when catalase expression was decreased by siRNA. Catalase was decreased at mRNA and protein levels in bronchiolar epithelium in smokers with COPD. In mice, bronchiolar catalase is temporarily upregulated at 1 day after cigarette smoke exposure but is downregulated by repeated cigarette smoke exposure, and is not restored long after withdrawal once emphysema is developed. Decreasing catalase expression in C22 cells resulted in greater cigarette smoke extract-induced cell death. Bronchiolar catalase reduction is associated with COPD. Regulation of catalase depends on the duration of cigarette smoke exposure, and plays a critical role for protection against cigarette smoke-induced cell damage. PMID:23100509

  6. Multiple catalases in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, P C; Switala, J

    1987-01-01

    Vegetative cells of Bacillus subtilis in logarithmic growth phase produced one catalase, labeled catalase 1, with a nondenatured molecular weight of 205,000. As growth progressed, other activity bands with slower electrophoretic mobilities on polyacrylamide gels appeared, including a series of bands with a common nondenatured molecular weight of 261,000, collectively labeled catalase 2, and a minor band, with a molecular weight of 387,000, labeled catalase 3. Purified spores contained only catalase 2, and it was not produced in spo0A- or spo0F-containing mutants. Strains deficient in catalase 1 or catalase 2 or both were selected after mutagenesis. Sensitivities of the two main catalases to NaCN, NaN3, hydroxylamine, and temperature were similar, but the apparent Kms for H2O2 differed, being 36.6 and 64.4 mM, respectively, for catalase 1 and catalase 2. The levels of catalase 1 increased 15-fold during growth into stationary phase and could be increased 30-fold by the addition of H2O2 to the medium. Catalase 2, which was not affected by H2O2, appeared only after the cells had reached stationary phase, and the maximum levels were only half of the basal level of catalase 1. Images PMID:3112125

  7. The active center of catalase.

    PubMed

    Fita, I; Rossmann, M G

    1985-09-01

    The refined structure of beef liver catalase (I. Fita, A. M. Silva, M. R. N. Murthy & M. G. Rossmann, unpublished results) is here examined with regard to possible catalytic mechanisms. The distal side of the deeply buried heme pocket is connected with the surface of the molecule by one (or possibly two) channel. The electron density representing the heme group, in each of the two crystallographically independent subunits, is consistent with degradation of the porphyrin rings. The heme group appears to be buckled, reflecting the high content of bile pigment in liver catalase. The spatial organization on the proximal side (where the fifth ligand of the iron is located) shows an elaborate network of interactions. The distal side contains the substrate pocket. The limited space in this region severely constrains possible substrate positions and orientations. The N delta atom of the essential His74 residue hydrogen bonds with O gamma of Ser113, which in turn hydrogen bonds to a water molecule associated with the propionic carbonylic group of pyrrole III. These interactions are also visible in the refined structure of Penicillium vitale catalase (B. K. Vainshtein, W. R. Melik-Adamyan, V. V. Barynin, A. A. Vagin, A. I. Grebenko, V. V. Borisov, K. S. Bartels, I. Fita, & M. G. Rossmann, unpublished results). Model building suggests a pathway for a catalase mechanism (compound I formation, as well as catalatic and peroxidatic reactions). There are some similarities in compound I formation of catalase and cytochrome c peroxidase. PMID:4046038

  8. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  9. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  10. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  11. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  12. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  13. Possible involvement of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in N-acetylcysteine-mediated antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Al-Samhari, Marwa M; Al-Rasheed, Nouf M; Al-Rejaie, Salim; Al-Rasheed, Nawal M; Hasan, Iman H; Mahmoud, Ayman M; Dzimiri, Nduna

    2016-03-01

    Advances in depression research have targeted inflammation and oxidative stress to develop novel types of treatment. The JAK/STAT signaling pathway plays pivotal roles in immune and inflammatory responses. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine, a putative precursor of the antioxidant glutathione, in an animal model of depression, with an emphasis on the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. Fluoxetine, a classical antidepressant drug was also under investigation. Male Wistar rats were subjected to forced swimming test and given N-acetylcysteine and fluoxetine immediately after the pre-test session, 5 h later and 1 h before the test session of the forced swimming test. N-acetylcysteine decreased immobility time (P < 0.05), serum corticosterone (P < 0.001), and hydrogen peroxide (P < 0.001), while restored glutathione concentration. Treatment of the rats with N-acetylcysteine produced significant (P < 0.001) down-regulation of STAT3 mRNA expression and protein phosphorylation. On the other hand, N-acetylcysteine significantly (P < 0.001) increased SOCS3 gene expression; however, SOCS3 protein was not changed. In conclusion, our study suggests that modulation of the JAK/STAT pathway might mediate the antidepressant-like effects of N-acetylcysteine. Therefore, depression research may target the JAK/STAT signaling pathway to provide a novel effective therapy. PMID:26643864

  14. Classical catalase: ancient and modern.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter

    2012-09-15

    This review describes the historical difficulties in devising a kinetically satisfactory mechanism for the classical catalase after its identification as a unique catalytic entity in 1902 and prior to the breakthrough 1947 analysis by Chance and co-workers which led to the identification of peroxide compounds I and II. The role of protons in the formation of these two ferryl complexes is discussed and current problems of inhibitory ligand and hydrogen donor binding at the active site are outlined, especially the multiple roles involving formate or formic acid. A previous mechanism of NADPH-dependent catalase protection against substrate inhibition is defended. A revised model linking the catalytic ('catalatic') action and the one-electron side reactions involving compound II is suggested. And it is concluded that, contrary to an idea proposed in 1963 that eukaryotic catalase might be a 'fossil enzyme', current thinking gives it a central role in the redox protective processes of long term importance for human and other eukaryotic and prokaryotic life. PMID:22326823

  15. Factors affecting production of catalase by Bacteroides.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, T D; Wagner, D L; Veltri, B J; Gregory, E M

    1978-01-01

    Several variables affected the production of catalase by members of the "Bacteroides fragilis group" of anaerobic bacteria. Both media yielded higher catalase levels than the respective agar media. Addition of hemin to media after autoclave sterilization, rather than before, significantly increased production of catalase. Both of these variables could be related to the available hemin concentration present in the medium being tested. Significantly higher amounts of hemin were required for catalase production than were required for growth. For catalase production by B. fragilis ATCC 25285, 1 microgram of hemin per ml was required. Of the various media tested, the use of chopped meat broth resulted in the highest levels of catalase production (up to 50 to 60 U of catalase per mg of protein). Of the various species and DNA homology groups tested, strains of B. fragilis and Bacteroides distasonis were catalase positive. Strains of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides ovatus, and Bacteroides eggerthi possessed variable catalase activity. Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides uniformis, and DNA homology groups "3452A" and "subsp. a" were catalase negative. A catalase well test, in which equal volumes of 3% H2O2 and chopped meat culture are mixed, is described and recommended for routine catalase tests. PMID:730827

  16. Thirty years of heme catalases structural biology.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Adelaida; Loewen, Peter C; Fita, Ignacio; Carpena, Xavi

    2012-09-15

    About thirty years ago the crystal structures of the heme catalases from Penicillium vitale (PVC) and, a few months later, from bovine liver (BLC) were published. Both enzymes were compact tetrameric molecules with subunits that, despite their size differences and the large phylogenetic separation between the two organisms, presented a striking structural similarity for about 460 residues. The high conservation, confirmed in all the subsequent structures determined, suggested a strong pressure to preserve a functional catalase fold, which is almost exclusively found in these mono-functional heme catalases. However, even in the absence of the catalase fold an efficient catalase activity is also found in the heme containing catalase-peroxidase proteins. The structure of these broad substrate range enzymes, reported for the first time less than ten years ago from the halophilic archaebacterium Haloarcula marismortui (HmCPx) and from the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei (BpKatG), showed a heme pocket closely related to that of plant peroxidases, though with a number of unique modifications that enable the catalase reaction. Despite the wealth of structural information already available, for both monofunctional catalases and catalase-peroxidases, a number of unanswered major questions require continuing structural research with truly innovative approaches. PMID:22209752

  17. Sirt1 protects against oxidative stress-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis by the bidirectional regulation of catalase expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Wakino, Shu Yoshioka, Kyoko; Tatematsu, Satoru; Hara, Yoshikazu; Minakuchi, Hitoshi; Washida, Naoki; Tokuyama, Hirobumi; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2008-07-18

    NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase Sirt1 regulates cellular apoptosis. We examined the role of Sirt1 in renal tubular cell apoptosis by using HK-2 cells, proximal tubular cell lines with or without reactive oxygen species (ROS), H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Without any ROS, Sirt1 inhibitors enhanced apoptosis and the expression of ROS scavenger, catalase, and Sirt1 overexpression downregulated catalase. When apoptosis was induced with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Sirt1 was upregulated with the concomitant increase in catalase expression. Sirt1 overexpression rescued H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis through the upregulation of catalase. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced the nuclear accumulation of forkhead transcription factor, FoxO3a and the gene silencing of FoxO3a enhanced H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, endogenous Sirt1 maintains cell survival by regulating catalase expression and by preventing the depletion of ROS required for cell survival. In contrast, excess ROS upregulates Sirt1, which activates FoxO3a and catalase leading to rescuing apoptosis. Thus, Sirt1 constitutes a determinant of renal tubular cell apoptosis by regulating cellular ROS levels.

  18. Evolution of catalases from bacteria to humans.

    PubMed

    Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2008-09-01

    Excessive hydrogen peroxide is harmful for almost all cell components, so its rapid and efficient removal is of essential importance for aerobically living organisms. Conversely, hydrogen peroxide acts as a second messenger in signal-transduction pathways. H(2)O(2) is degraded by peroxidases and catalases, the latter being able both to reduce H(2)O(2) to water and to oxidize it to molecular oxygen. Nature has evolved three protein families that are able to catalyze this dismutation at reasonable rates. Two of the protein families are heme enzymes: typical catalases and catalase-peroxidases. Typical catalases comprise the most abundant group found in Eubacteria, Archaeabacteria, Protista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, whereas catalase-peroxidases are not found in plants and animals and exhibit both catalatic and peroxidatic activities. The third group is a minor bacterial protein family with a dimanganese active site called manganese catalases. Although catalyzing the same reaction (2 H(2)O(2)--> 2 H(2)O+ O(2)), the three groups differ significantly in their overall and active-site architecture and the mechanism of reaction. Here, we present an overview of the distribution, phylogeny, structure, and function of these enzymes. Additionally, we report about their physiologic role, response to oxidative stress, and about diseases related to catalase deficiency in humans. PMID:18498226

  19. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H2O2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H2O2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H2O2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H2O2 stress. PMID:26692481

  20. Characterization of Catalase from Psychrotolerant Psychrobacter piscatorii T-3 Exhibiting High Catalase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Hideyuki; Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Matsuyma, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2012-01-01

    A psychrotolerant bacterium, strain T-3 (identified as Psychrobacter piscatorii), that exhibited an extraordinarily high catalase activity was isolated from the drain pool of a plant that uses H2O2 as a bleaching agent. Its cell extract exhibited a catalase activity (19,700 Umg protein?1) that was higher than that of Micrococcus luteus used for industrial catalase production. Catalase was approximately 10% of the total proteins in the cell extract of the strain. The catalase (PktA) was purified homogeneously by only two purification steps, anion exchange and hydrophobic chromatographies. The purified catalase exhibited higher catalytic efficiency and higher sensitivity of activity at high temperatures than M. luteus catalase. The deduced amino acid sequence showed the highest homology with catalase of Psycrobacter cryohalolentis, a psychrotolelant bacterium obtained from Siberian permafrost. These findings suggest that the characteristics of the PktA molecule reflected the taxonomic relationship of the isolate as well as the environmental conditions (low temperatures and high concentrations of H2O2) under which the bacterium survives. Strain T-3 efficiently produces a catalase (PktA) at a higher rate than Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans, which produces a very strong activity of catalase (EktA) at a moderate rate, in order to adapt to high concentration of H2O2. PMID:22408420

  1. Mechanisms of oxidant generation by catalase

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Diane E.; Shakarjian, Michael; Kim, Hong Duck; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Vetrano, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme catalase converts solar radiation into reactive oxidant species (ROS). In this study, we report that several bacterial catalases (hydroperoxidases, HP), including Escherichia coli HP-I and HP-II also generate reactive oxidants in response to ultraviolet B light (UVB). HP-I and HP-II are identical except for the presence of NADPH. We found that only one of the catalases, HPI, produces oxidants in response to UVB light, indicating a potential role for the nucleotide in ROS production. This prompts us to speculate that NADPH may act as a cofactor regulating ROS generation by mammalian catalases. Structural analysis of the NADPH domains of several mammalian catalases revealed that the nucleotide is bound in a constrained conformation and that UVB irradiation induces NADPH oxidation and positional changes. Biochemical and kinetic analysis indicate that ROS formation by the enzyme is enhanced by oxidation of the cofactor. Conformational changes following absorption of UVB light by catalase NADPH have the potential to facilitate ROS production by the enzyme. PMID:20716293

  2. Increased myocardial catalase in rats fed ethanol.

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, H. D.; Kino, M.; Hicks, L.; Thorp, K. A.; Abelman, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of chronic intake of dietary ethanol upon catalase, an enzyme capable of metabolizing ethanol, as well as upon myocardial morphology and hemodynamics, were studied in the rat. Ethanol, comprising 36% of dietary calories, administered to rats for 5 weeks, was associated with increased myocardial catalase of 45.9 +/- 3.7 IU/mg protein, compared to 21.0 +/- 1.8 IU/mg protein in pair-fed controls. The enzyme activity remained significantly elevated after 18 weeks of ethanol. Hepatic catalase did not differ in these groups. Parallel cytochemical studies confirmed the increase in myocardial catalase by demonstrating an increase in peroxisomes. Gross and light-microscopic examinations revealed no abnormalities at either 5 or 18 weeks. Remarkably few ultrastructural abnormalities were seen in this material fixed by vascular perfusion. Hemodynamic studies after 5 weeks of ethanol revealed decreased left ventricle systolic pressure and decreased mean arterial pressure but no change in ventricular filling pressure. The possibility of catalase playing a metabolic and potentially protective role in rat myocardium chronically exposed to ethanol is discussed. Images Figure 3 Figure 4-6 Figures 1 and 2 Figures 7 and 8 p[389]-a PMID:474705

  3. Evolution of Catalases from Bacteria to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Excessive hydrogen peroxide is harmful for almost all cell components, so its rapid and efficient removal is of essential importance for aerobically living organisms. Conversely, hydrogen peroxide acts as a second messenger in signal-transduction pathways. H2O2 is degraded by peroxidases and catalases, the latter being able both to reduce H2O2 to water and to oxidize it to molecular oxygen. Nature has evolved three protein families that are able to catalyze this dismutation at reasonable rates. Two of the protein families are heme enzymes: typical catalases and catalase–peroxidases. Typical catalases comprise the most abundant group found in Eubacteria, Archaeabacteria, Protista, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, whereas catalase–peroxidases are not found in plants and animals and exhibit both catalatic and peroxidatic activities. The third group is a minor bacterial protein family with a dimanganese active site called manganese catalases. Although catalyzing the same reaction (2 H2O2 → 2 H2O + O2), the three groups differ significantly in their overall and active-site architecture and the mechanism of reaction. Here, we present an overview of the distribution, phylogeny, structure, and function of these enzymes. Additionally, we report about their physiologic role, response to oxidative stress, and about diseases related to catalase deficiency in humans. PMID:18498226

  4. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Cláudia S. L.; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  5. Catalases Induction in High Virulence Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus under Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Stress.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Cláudia S L; Ikuyo, Yoriko; Shinya, Ryoji; Mota, Manuel; Hasegawa, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Considered an EPPO A2 quarantine pest, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is the causal agent of the pine wilt disease and the most devastating plant parasitic nematode attacking coniferous trees in the world. In the early stages of invasion, this nematode has to manage host defence mechanisms, such as strong oxidative stress. Only successful, virulent nematodes are able to tolerate the basal plant defences, and furthermore migrate and proliferate inside of the host tree. In this work, our main objective was to understand to what extent B. xylophilus catalases are involved in their tolerance to oxidative stress and virulence, using as oxidant agent the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). After 24 hours of exposure, high virulence isolates of B. xylophilus could withstand higher H2O2 concentrations in comparison with low virulence B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus, corroborating our observation of Bxy-ctl-1 and Bxy-ctl-2 catalase up-regulation under the same experimental conditions. Both catalases are expressed throughout the nematode intestine. In addition, transgenic strains of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing B. xylophilus catalases were constructed and evaluated for survival under similar conditions as previously. Our results suggest that catalases of high virulence B. xylophilus were crucial for nematode survival under prolonged exposure to in vitro oxidative stress, highlighting their adaptive response, which could contribute to their success in host conditions. PMID:25894519

  6. Discovery of Catalases in Members of the Chlamydiales Order

    PubMed Central

    Rusconi, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Catalase is an important virulence factor for survival in macrophages and other phagocytic cells. In Chlamydiaceae, no catalase had been described so far. With the sequencing and annotation of the full genomes of Chlamydia-related bacteria, the presence of different catalase-encoding genes has been documented. However, their distribution in the Chlamydiales order and the functionality of these catalases remain unknown. Phylogeny of chlamydial catalases was inferred using MrBayes, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony algorithms, allowing the description of three clade 3 and two clade 2 catalases. Only monofunctional catalases were found (no catalase-peroxidase or Mn-catalase). All presented a conserved catalytic domain and tertiary structure. Enzymatic activity of cloned chlamydial catalases was assessed by measuring hydrogen peroxide degradation. The catalases are enzymatically active with different efficiencies. The catalase of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae is the least efficient of all (its catalytic activity was 2 logs lower than that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Based on the phylogenetic analysis, we hypothesize that an ancestral class 2 catalase probably was present in the common ancestor of all current Chlamydiales but was retained only in Criblamydia sequanensis and Neochlamydia hartmannellae. The catalases of class 3, present in Estrella lausannensis and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, probably were acquired by lateral gene transfer from Rhizobiales, whereas for Waddlia chondrophila they likely originated from Legionellales or Actinomycetales. The acquisition of catalases on several occasions in the Chlamydiales suggests the importance of this enzyme for the bacteria in their host environment. PMID:23729651

  7. Non-heme manganese catalase – the ‘other’ catalase

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-heme manganese catalases are widely distributed over microbial life and represent an environmentally important alternative to heme-containing catalases in antioxidant defense. Manganese catalases contain a binuclear manganese complex as their catalytic active site rather than a heme, and cycle between Mn2(II,II) and Mn2(III,III) states during turnover. X-ray crystallography has revealed the key structural elements of the binuclear manganese active site complex that can serve as the starting point for computational studies on the protein. Four manganese catalase enzymes have been isolated and characterized, and the enzyme appears to have a broad phylogenetic distribution including both bacteria and archae. More than 100 manganese catalase genes have been annotated in genomic databases, although the assignment of many of these putative manganese catalases needs to be experimentally verified. Iron limitation, exposure to low levels of peroxide stress, thermostability and cyanide resistance may provide the biological and environmental context for the occurrence of manganese catalases. PMID:22198285

  8. Protective Role of Catalase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, James G.; Hassett, Daniel J.; Stewart, Philip S.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; McDermott, Timothy R.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the two known catalases in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in protecting planktonic and biofilm cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. Planktonic cultures and biofilms formed by the wild-type strain PAO1 and the katA and katB catalase mutants were compared for their susceptibility to H2O2. Over the course of 1 h, wild-type cell viability decreased steadily in planktonic cells exposed to a single dose of 50 mM H2O2, whereas biofilm cell viability remained at approximately 90% when cells were exposed to a flowing stream of 50 mM H2O2. The katB mutant, lacking the H2O2-inducible catalase KatB, was similar to the wild-type strain with respect to H2O2 resistance. The katA mutant possessed undetectable catalase activity. Planktonic katA mutant cultures were hypersusceptible to a single dose of 50 mM H2O2, while biofilms displayed a 10-fold reduction in the number of culturable cells after a 1-h exposure to 50 mM H2O2. Catalase activity assays, activity stains in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels, and lacZ reporter genes were used to characterize the oxidative stress responses of planktonic cultures and biofilms. Enzyme assays and catalase activity bands in nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels showed significant KatB catalase induction occurred in biofilms after a 20-min exposure to H2O2, suggesting that biofilms were capable of a rapid adaptive response to the oxidant. Reporter gene data obtained with a katB::lacZ transcriptional reporter strain confirmed katB induction and that the increase in total cellular catalase activity was attributable to KatB. Biofilms upregulated the reporter in the constant presence of 50 mM H2O2, while planktonic cells were overwhelmed by a single 50 mM dose and were unable to make detectable levels of β-galactosidase. The results of this study demonstrated the following: the constitutively expressed KatA catalase is important for resistance of planktonic and biofilm P. aeruginosa to H2O2, particularly at high H2O2 concentrations; KatB is induced in both planktonic and biofilm cells in response to H2O2 insult, but plays a relatively small role in biofilm resistance; and KatB is important to either planktonic cells or biofilm cells for acquired antioxidant resistance when initial levels of H2O2 are sublethal. PMID:10508094

  9. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are available from the National Academy Press, 2101... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase...

  10. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Bacterial catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus by a pure...

  11. Growth-Dependent Catalase Localization in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T Reflected by Catalase Activity of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Yoshiko; Takebe, Fumihiko; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotolerant and H2O2-resistant bacterium, Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T, exhibits extraordinary H2O2 resistance and produces catalase not only intracellularly but also extracellularly. The intracellular and extracellular catalases exhibited the same enzymatic characteristics, that is, they exhibited the temperature-dependent activity characteristic of a cold-adapted enzyme, their heat stabilities were similar to those of mesophilic enzymes and very high catalytic intensity. In addition, catalase gene analysis indicated that the bacterium possessed the sole clade 1 catalase gene corresponding to intracellular catalase. Hence, intracellular catalase is secreted into the extracellular space. In addition to intracellular and extracellular catalases, the inner circumference of the cells showed the localization of catalase in the mid-stationary growth phase, which was observed by immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody against the intracellular catalase of the strain. The cells demonstrated higher catalase activity in the mid-stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. The catalase localized in the inner circumference can be dissociated by treatment with Tween 60. Thus, the localized catalase is not tightly bound to the inner circumference of the cells and may play a role in the oxidative defense of the cells under low metabolic state. PMID:24204687

  12. Probing the binding of flavonoids to catalase by molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingfeng; Zhang, Xia; Li, Daojin; Jin, Jing

    2007-10-01

    The binding of flavonoids (quercetin and myricetin) to catalase was investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) techniques under physiological conditions. The binding parameters and binding mode between flavonoids and catalase were determined, and the results of synchronous fluorescence spectra and CD indicated a conformational change of catalase with addition of flavonoids. The effect of both Cu 2+ and vitamin C on the binding constant of flavonoid-catalase was also examined. The experiment data show that the difference of the structure characteristics of quercetin and myricetin has a significant effect on their binding affinity for catalase.

  13. [Spectral properties of the prosthetic group of Penicillium vitale catalase].

    PubMed

    Mironenko, N I; Demchenko, A P; Dertiar', R G; Gulyi, M F

    1978-01-01

    Differences in the absorption spectrum of the Penicillum vitale catalase in the visible region as compared to the absorption spectrum for catalase of animal origin are established to be due to the prosthetic group of the enzyme. A molecule of P. vitale catalase is determined to contain 0.051 +/- 0.0003% of iron. It corresponds to two iron atoms per enzyme molecule and to a twice as low content of iron as in a molecule of the bovine liver catalase. An assumption is advanced that the P. vitale catalase contains two hemin groups located in two protein subunits. PMID:664035

  14. Role of oxyradicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.; Hassan, H.M. )

    1988-01-01

    The antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase, are inactivated upon exposure to ozone. In this study, the mechanism of this inactivation was examined using catalase as a model system. The data show that the inactivation of catalase is dependent on ozone concentration, time of exposure, and pH. Loss of catalase activity is accompanied with loss of the heme spectra. Tiron, desferal-Mn, trolox-c, and pyruvate protect the enzyme against ozone inactivation. SOD is less effective due to its inactivation by ozone. On the other hand, alcohols do not provide significant protection. The data suggest the possible involvement of superoxide radicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone.

  15. Manganese Oxidation State Assignment for Manganese Catalase.

    PubMed

    Beal, Nathan J; O'Malley, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation state assignment of the manganese ions present in the superoxidized manganese (III/IV) catalase active site is determined by comparing experimental and broken symmetry density functional theory calculated (14)N, (17)O, and (1)H hyperfine couplings. Experimental results have been interpreted to indicate that the substrate water is coordinated to the Mn(III) ion. However, by calculating hyperfine couplings for both scenarios we show that water is coordinated to the Mn(IV) ion and that the assigned oxidation states of the two manganese ions present in the site are the opposite of that previously proposed based on experimental measurements alone. PMID:27007277

  16. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase from Hydra vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3’- and 5’- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp encoding a putative protein of 505 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.44 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of HvCatalase contained several highly conserved motifs including the heme-ligand signature sequence RLFSYGDTH and the active site signature FXRERIPERVVHAKGXGA. A comparative analysis showed the presence of conserved catalytic amino acids [His(71), Asn(145), and Tyr(354)] in HvCatalase as well. Homology modeling indicated the presence of the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating its catalase mRNA transcription. These results indicated that the HvCatalase gene is involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure. PMID:22521743

  17. A study of the catalase monomer produced by lyophilization.

    PubMed

    Sichak, S P; Dounce, A L

    1987-09-11

    Lyophilization of Dounce and Mourtzikos beef liver catalase (Prep. Biochem. 11 (1981) 501-523) under specified conditions produced conformationally altered but not completely denatured catalase monomer which retained both significant catalatic activity and peroxidatic activity towards ethanol. The same lyophilization procedure used with Sigma Co. catalase produced a mixture of conformationally altered catalase monomer and conformationally altered tetramer which showed still higher catalatic and peroxidatic activities; this was attributed to the presence of the altered tetramer. The catalase monomer obtained by the use of Dounce and Mourtzikos catalase is completely reducible by dithionite, as shown by the two-banded spectrum of the reduced material, but apparently retains enough of its native conformation to show some enzymatic activity, since the fully denatured monomer shows no catalatic or peroxidatic activity towards ethanol. The conformationally altered catalase tetramer, which shows more enzymatic activity than the monomer, evidently retains a higher proportion of its native conformation than the monomer, but still appears to be fully reducible with dithionite. Horseradish peroxidase after reduction with dithionite shows spectral bands at positions close to those of reduced lyophilized catalase, but the relative band heights and contours are different. A possible explanation for the observed differences in lyophilization products depending on the starting material (Sigma Co. catalase versus catalase of Dounce and Mourtzikos) is presented. PMID:3620501

  18. Comparison of beef liver and Penicillium vitale catalases.

    PubMed

    Melik-Adamyan, W R; Barynin, V V; Vagin, A A; Borisov, V V; Vainshtein, B K; Fita, I; Murthy, M R; Rossmann, M G

    1986-03-01

    The structures of Penicillium vitale and beef liver catalase have been determined to atomic resolution. Both catalases are tetrameric proteins with deeply buried heme groups. The amino acid sequence of beef liver catalase is known and contains (at least) 506 amino acid residues. Although the sequence of P. vitale catalase has not yet been determined chemically, 670 residues have been built into the 2 A resolution electron density map and have been given tentative assignments. A large portion of each catalase molecule (91% of residues in beef liver catalase and 68% of residues in P. vitale catalase) shows structural homology. The root-mean-square deviation between 458 equivalenced C alpha atoms is 1.17 A. The dissimilar parts include a small fragment of the N-terminal arm and an additional "flavodoxin-like" domain at the carboxy end of the polypeptide chain of P. vitale catalase. In contrast, beef liver catalase contains one bound NADP molecule per subunit in a position equivalent to the chain region, leading to the flavodoxin-like domain, of P. vitale catalase. The position and orientation of the buried heme group in the two catalases, relative to the mutually perpendicular molecular dyad axes, are identical within experimental error. A mostly hydrophobic channel leads to the buried heme group. The surface opening to the channel differs due to the different disposition of the amino-terminal arm and the presence of the additional flavodoxin-like domain in P. vitale catalase. Possible functional implications of these comparisons are discussed. PMID:3712444

  19. Characterization of a Heme-Dependent Catalase from Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus†

    PubMed Central

    Shima, Seigo; Sordel-Klippert, Melanie; Brioukhanov, Andrei; Netrusov, Alexander; Linder, Dietmar; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    2001-01-01

    Recently it was reported that methanogens of the genus Methanobrevibacter exhibit catalase activity. This was surprising, since Methanobrevibacter species belong to the order Methanobacteriales, which are known not to contain cytochromes and to lack the ability to synthesize heme. We report here that Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus strains AZ and DH1 contained catalase activity only when the growth medium was supplemented with hemin. The heme catalase was purified and characterized, and the encoding gene was cloned. The amino acid sequence of the catalase from the methanogens is most similar to that of Methanosarcina barkeri. PMID:11425719

  20. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial function in insulin resistant muscle cells: effect of catalase overexpression.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marina R; Sampaio, Igor H; Teodoro, Bruno G; Sousa, Thais A; Zoppi, Claudio C; Queiroz, André L; Passos, Madla A; Alberici, Luciane C; Teixeira, Felipe R; Manfiolli, Adriana O; Batista, Thiago M; Cappelli, Ana Paula Gameiro; Reis, Rosana I; Frasson, Danúbia; Kettelhut, Isis C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Carneiro, Everardo M; Curi, Rui; Silveira, Leonardo R

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial redox state plays a central role in the link between mitochondrial overloading and insulin resistance. However, the mechanism by which the ROS induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells is not completely understood. We examined the association between mitochondrial function and H2O2 production in insulin resistant cells. Our hypothesis is that the low mitochondrial oxygen consumption leads to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with reduced PGC1α transcription and low content of phosphorylated CREB. The cells were transfected with either the encoded sequence for catalase overexpression or the specific siRNA for catalase inhibition. After transfection, myotubes were incubated with palmitic acid (500μM) and the insulin response, as well as mitochondrial function and fatty acid metabolism, was determined. The low mitochondrial oxygen consumption led to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with β-oxidation of fatty acids. Rotenone was observed to reduce the ratio of ROS production. The elevated H2O2 production markedly decreased the PGC1α transcription, an effect that was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Akt and CREB. The catalase transfection prevented the reduction in the phosphorylated level of Akt and upregulated the levels of phosphorylated CREB. The mitochondrial function was elevated and H2O2 production reduced, thus increasing the insulin sensitivity. The catalase overexpression improved mitochondrial respiration protecting the cells from fatty acid-induced, insulin resistance. This effect indicates that control of hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial respiration preventing the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism associated with CREB phosphorylation and β-oxidation of fatty acids. PMID:23643711

  2. Active involvement of catalase during hemolytic crises of favism.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, G F; Rolfo, M; Arena, S; Mangerini, R; Meloni, G F; Ferraris, A M

    1996-08-01

    The endemic occurrence of favism in certain Mediterranean regions provided an investigative opportunity for testing in vivo the validity of claims as to the role of catalase in protecting human erythrocytes against peroxidative injury. Reduced activity of catalase was found in the erythrocytes of six boys who were deficient in erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and who were studied while suffering hemolysis after ingesting fava beans. Activity of catalase was further reduced when their red blood cells were incubated with aminotriazole. In contrast, minimal reduction of catalase activity was found, both with and without incubation with aminotriazole, in erythrocytes of a G6PD-deficient boy who had ingested fava beans 7 days earlier and in erythrocytes of seven G6PD-deficient men with a past history of favism. These results confirmed earlier studies in vitro indicating that catalase is a major disposer of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes and, like the glutathione peroxidase/reductase pathway, is dependent on the availability of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). The effect of divicine on purified catalase and on the catalase of intact G6PD-deficient erythrocytes was similar to the previously demonstrated effect on catalase of a known system for generating hydrogen peroxide. This effect of divicine strengthens earlier arguments that divicine is the toxic peroxidative component of fava beans. PMID:8704218

  3. IS CATALASE ACTIVITY ASSOCIATED WITH MAIZE RESISTANCE TO ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalase activity was measured in various cob tissues during maize ear development because of its role in maintaining reactive oxygen homeostasis during biotic and abiotic stress. Catalase activity was determined in immature and mature embryos, pericarp, and rachis tissues of maize lines that are re...

  4. The effect of alcohol and hydrogen peroxide on liver hepcidin gene expression in mice lacking antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase-1 or catalase.

    PubMed

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee; Lu, Sizhao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1(-/-)) and catalase (catalase(-/-)) knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1(-/-) displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase(-/-) compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase(-/-) and wild-type, but not gpx-1(-/-), mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase(-/-) and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Gpx-1(-/-) mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase(-/-) mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1(-/-) mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1(-/-) mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH. PMID:25955433

  5. Characterization and spectral properties of Proteus mirabilis PR catalase.

    PubMed

    Jouve, H M; Gaillard, J; Pelmont, J

    1984-10-01

    Purified catalase from a peroxide-resistant mutant (PR) of Proteus mirabilis displayed great similarities with the bovine liver catalase on the basis of its amino acid composition, content in prosthetic groups, and spectroscopic data. The bacterial enzyme was found to have 2.6 +/- 0.2 mol of protoheme IX per tetramer, with an equivalent amount of titrable iron atoms. The optical absorption of P. mirabilis PR catalase in the presence of various anionic species (cyanide, azide, formate) was examined. The dissociation constant of the formate-enzyme complex was determined as 60 +/- 2 mM at pH 7.5. Inhibition and spectral shifts induced by some thiol compounds were very similar to those reported with mammalian catalase. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra (at 9 GHz and 6 K) of bacterial catalase and its various complexes were reported. Two major different rhombic high-spin ferric signals could be seen in the g = 6 region, using either the pure enzyme or the cell crude extract. The balance between the two rhombic forms was reversibly altered by pH. Various changes in rhombicity were also observed after binding with anionic ligands. The EPR spectrum (at 40 K) of nitrosyl ferrous catalase was very similar to reported data with horse liver catalase. PMID:6095975

  6. Beneficial effect of catalase treatment on growth of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Harmon, S M; Kautter, D A

    1976-09-01

    Several common plating media were tested for their ability to support growth of Clostridium perfringens after storage of the plates for 1 to 10 days at 4 and 25 degrees C with and without subsequent addition of catalase. Liver-veal (LV) agar and brain heart infusion (BHI) agar quickly become incapable of supporting growth after storage without added catalase, whereas Shahidi Ferguson perfringens (SFP) agar and Brewer anaerobic (BA) agar were less affected. Plate counts of C. perfringens on untreated LV and BHI agars stored 3 days at 25 degrees C showed a reduction of 98.2%, whereas counts on SFP and BA agars were reduced by 13.6% and 46.2%, respectively. Addition of 1,500 U of beef liver catalase to the surface of the 3-day-old agars before incubation resulted in substantial restoration of their growth-promoting ability. Counts of colonies on LV, GHI, SFP, and BA agars with added catalase were usually 20 to 90% higher than untreated controls. Similar results were obtained using purified catalase, fungal catalase, and horseradish peroxidase. These results suggest that inhibition may be due to peroxide formed during storage and incubation and that additon of catalase provides near optimum conditions for growth of C. perfringens on these media. PMID:185958

  7. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Siddhesh S; Holmes-Hampton, Gregory P; Bagaria, Ashima; Kumaran, Desigan; Tichy, Shane E; Gheyi, Tarun; Zheng, Xiaojing; Bain, Kevin; Groshong, Chris; Emtage, Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Lindahl, Paul A; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-01-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn2+ before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO4. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [FeII/FeII]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H2O2 to O2 and H2O. The values of kcat and kcat/Km for the catalase activity are 200 s−1 and 2.4 × 104 M−1 s−1, respectively. [FeII/FeII]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H2O2 before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with gave = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H2O2 by [FeII/FeII]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS. PMID:21998098

  8. Investigating the active centre of the Scytalidium thermophilum catalase.

    PubMed

    Yuzugullu, Yonca; Trinh, Chi H; Fairhurst, Lucy; Ogel, Zumrut B; McPherson, Michael J; Pearson, Arwen R

    2013-04-01

    Almost all monofunctional haem catalases contain a highly conserved core containing the active site, which is connected to the exterior of the enzyme by three channels. These channels have been identified as potential routes for substrate flow and product release. To further investigate the role of these molecular channels, a series of mutants of Scytalidium thermophilum catalase were generated. The three-dimensional structures of four catalase variants, N155A, V123A, V123C and V123T, have been determined at resolutions of 2.25, 1.93, 1.9 and 1.7 Å, respectively. The V123C variant contains a new covalent bond between the S atom of Cys123 and the imidazole ring of the essential His82. This variant enzyme has only residual catalase activity and contains haem b instead of the normal haem d. The H82A variant demonstrates low catalase and phenol oxidase activities (0.2 and 20% of those of recombinant wild-type catalase-phenol oxidase, respectively). The N155A and N155H variants exhibit 4.5 and 3% of the wild-type catalase activity and contain haem d, showing that Asn155 is essential for catalysis but is not required for the conversion of haem b to haem d. Structural analysis suggests that the cause of the effect of these mutations on catalysis is the disruption of the ability of dioxygen substrates to efficiently access the active site. Additional mutants have been characterized biochemically to further probe the roles of the different channels. Introducing smaller or polar side chains in place of Val123 reduces the catalase activity. The F160V, F161V and F168V mutants show a marked decrease in catalase activity but have a much lower effect on the phenol oxidase activity, despite containing substoichiometric amounts of haem. PMID:23545640

  9. Catalase, Peroxidase, and Polyphenoloxidase Activities during Rice Leaf Senescence 1

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Manoranjan; Mishra, Dinabandhu

    1976-01-01

    The activities of catalase, peroxidase, and polyphenoloxidase were studied in attached and detached rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Ratna) leaves. Catalase activity decreased while peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase activities increased during senescence of both attached and detached rice leaves. Kinetic (5 μm) and benzimidazole (1 mm), which are known to delay the senescence of detached rice leaves, retarded the decrease of catalase activity during detached leaf senescence. On the other hand, these chemicals accelerated the increase of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase activities over the water control. Total phenolics accumulated in detached and darkened rice leaves, but in attached leaf senescence in light no accumulation of phenolics was observed. PMID:16659474

  10. Catalase Enhances Growth and Biofilm Production of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Warren L; Dybvig, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae causes chronic respiratory disease in humans. Factors thought to be important for colonization include the ability of the mycoplasma to form a biofilm on epithelial surfaces and the production of hydrogen peroxide to damage host tissue. Almost all of the mycoplasmas, including M. pneumoniae, lack superoxide dismutase and catalase and a balance should exist between peroxide production and growth. We show here that the addition of catalase to cultures enhanced the formation of biofilms and altered the structure. The incorporation of catalase in agar increased the number of colony-forming units detected and hence could improve the clinical diagnosis of mycoplasmal diseases. PMID:25894997

  11. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    PubMed Central

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. Catalase<-->Abeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro. PMID:10567208

  12. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  13. A Laboratory Experiment of the Purification of Catalase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busquets, Montserrat; Franco, Rafael

    1986-01-01

    Describes a simple method for purifying catalase for the study of proteins. Procedures are systematically and diagramatically presented. Also identifies polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, kinetic studies, and apparent molecular weight determination as possible techniques to be used in studying proteins. (ML)

  14. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from... fermentation process may be safely used in destroying and removing hydrogen peroxide used in the manufacture...

  15. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.135 Catalase derived from... fermentation process may be safely used in destroying and removing hydrogen peroxide used in the manufacture...

  16. Catalases as biocatalysts in technical applications: current state and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-04-01

    Catalases represent a class of enzymes which has found its place among industrially relevant biocatalysts due to their exceptional catalytic rate and high stability. Textile bleaching prior to the dyeing process is the main application and has been performed on a large scale for the past few decades. Their limited substrate scope has not prevented the development of various other catalase-based applications. Newly developed approaches continue to exploit their excellent catalytic potential to degrade hydrogen peroxide while (per)oxidase activity of catalases is opening a new range of possibilities as well. This review provides an overview of applications that involve heme-containing catalases that have been demonstrated in recent years. PMID:25761626

  17. MicroRNA-30b-Mediated Regulation of Catalase Expression in Human ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rashidul; Chun, Eugene; Howell, Jennifer C.; Sengupta, Trisha; Chen, Dan; Kim, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxidative injury to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retinal photoreceptors has been linked to a number of retinal diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated gene expression has been extensively studied at transcriptional levels. Also, the post-transcriptional control of gene expression at the level of translational regulation has been recently reported. However, the microRNA (miRNA/miR)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation in human RPE cells has not been thoroughly looked at. Increasing evidence points to a potential role of miRNAs in diverse physiological processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrated for the first time in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) that the post-transcriptional control of gene expression via miRNA modulation regulates human catalase, an important and potent component of cell's antioxidant defensive network, which detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) radicals. Exposure to several stress-inducing agents including H2O2 has been reported to alter miRNA expression profile. Here, we demonstrated that a sublethal dose of H2O2 (200 µM) up-regulated the expression of miR-30b, a member of the miR-30 family, which inhibited the expression of endogenous catalase both at the transcript and protein levels. However, antisense (antagomirs) of miR-30b was not only found to suppress the miR-30b mimics-mediated inhibitions, but also to dramatically increase the expression of catalase even under an oxidant environment. Conclusions/Significance We propose that a microRNA antisense approach could enhance cytoprotective mechanisms against oxidative stress by increasing the antioxidant defense system. PMID:22880027

  18. The NADPH binding site on beef liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Fita, I; Rossmann, M G

    1985-03-01

    Beef liver and human erythrocyte catalases (EC 1.11.1.6) bind NADP tenaciously [Kirkman, H. N. & Gaetani, G. F. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 4343-4348]. The position of NADP on beef liver catalase corresponds to the carboxyl-terminal polypeptide hinge in Penicillium vitale fungal catalase, which connects the common catalase structure to the additional flavodoxin-like domain. In contrast to nearly all other known structures of protein-bound NADP, NAD, and FAD, the NADP molecule of beef liver catalase is folded into a right-handed helix and bound, in part, in the vicinity of the carboxyl end of two alpha-helices. A water molecule (W7) occupies a pseudosubstrate site close to the C4 position of the nicotinamide and is hydrogen bonded to His-304. Although the NADP and heme groups approach each other to within 13.7 A, there is no direct interaction. The function of the NADP remains a mystery. PMID:3856839

  19. Kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition by catalase: hydroxylic solvent effects.

    PubMed

    Raducan, Adina; Cantemir, Anca Ruxandra; Puiu, Mihaela; Oancea, Dumitru

    2012-11-01

    The effect of water-alcohol (methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethane-1,2-diol and propane-1,2,3-triol) binary mixtures on the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the presence of bovine liver catalase is investigated. In all solvents, the activity of catalase is smaller than in water. The results are discussed on the basis of a simple kinetic model. The kinetic constants for product formation through enzyme-substrate complex decomposition and for inactivation of catalase are estimated. The organic solvents are characterized by several physical properties: dielectric constant (D), hydrophobicity (log P), concentration of hydroxyl groups ([OH]), polarizability (α), Kamlet-Taft parameter (β) and Kosower parameter (Z). The relationships between the initial rate, kinetic constants and medium properties are analyzed by linear and multiple linear regression. PMID:22565543

  20. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat{sup b}/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • EtOH developmental toxicity involves reactive oxygen species formation.

  1. Recovery of clostridia on catalase-treated plating media.

    PubMed

    Harmon, S M; Kautter, D A

    1977-04-01

    Four plating media commonly used for culturing clostridia were tested for their ability to support growth of several Clostridium species after storage of the plates for 1 to 10 days at 4 and 25 degrees C with and without subsequent addition of catalase. Liver-veal (LV) agar and brain heart infusion (BHI) agar rapidly became incapable of supporting growth after storage without added catalase, whereas Shahidi Ferguson perfringens agar base and Brewer anaerobic agar were less affected. Plate counts of vegetative cells of nine of the less fastidious Clostridium species on untreated LV and BHI agars, stored for 3 days at 4 degrees C, were 60 to 90% lower than counts on catalase-treated media. Counts on Shahidi Ferguson perfringens agar base were only 1 to 24% lower on untreated medium with the same species. Addition of 500 U of purified beef liver catalase to the surface of the 3-day-old agars before inoculation resulted in substantial restoration of the ability of the media to support colony formation from vegetative cells except with the most strictly anaerobic species (nonproteolytic C. botulinum types B, E, and F, and C. novyii types A and B). A similar response was obtained with spores of the less fastidious species on catalase-treated media. Our results suggest that inhibition of most Clostridium species on LV and BHI agars may be due to accumulation of peroxide during preparation, storage, and incubation of the media, and also suggest that the presence of glucose in these media is a major factor contributing to their inability to support growth. It is believed that the addition of exogenous catalase prevents the accumulation of peroxide(s), thus allowing colony formation from vegetative cells of the clostridia under what would otherwise be unsuitable cultural conditions. PMID:869526

  2. Protandim attenuates intimal hyperplasia in human saphenous veins cultured ex vivo via a catalase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Joddar, Binata; Reen, Rashmeet K; Firstenberg, Michael S; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; McCord, Joe M; Zweier, Jay L; Gooch, Keith J

    2011-03-15

    Human saphenous veins (HSVs) are widely used for bypass grafts despite their relatively low long-term patency. To evaluate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling in intima hyperplasia (IH), an early stage pathology of vein-graft disease, and to explore the potential therapeutic effects of up-regulating endogenous antioxidant enzymes, we studied segments of HSV cultured ex vivo in an established ex vivo model of HSV IH. Results showed that HSV cultured ex vivo exhibit an ~3-fold increase in proliferation and ~3.6-fold increase in intimal area relative to freshly isolated HSV. Treatment of HSV during culture with Protandim, a nutritional supplement known to activate Nrf2 and increase the expression of antioxidant enzymes in several in vitro and in vivo models, blocks IH and reduces cellular proliferation to that of freshly isolated HSV. Protandim treatment increased the activity of SOD, HO-1, and catalase 3-, 7-, and 12-fold, respectively, and decreased the levels of superoxide (O(2)(•-)) and the lipid peroxidation product 4-HNE. Blocking catalase activity by cotreating with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole abrogated the protective effect of Protandim on IH and proliferation. In conclusion, these results suggest that ROS-sensitive signaling mediates the observed IH in cultured HSV and that up-regulation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes can have a protective effect. PMID:21167278

  3. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. 173.135 Section 173.135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  5. 21 CFR 173.135 - Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catalase derived from Micrococcus lysodeikticus. 173.135 Section 173.135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION...

  6. The catalase activity of Nalpha-acetyl-microperoxidase-8.

    PubMed

    Jeng, W-Y; Tsai, Y-H; Chuang, W-J

    2004-09-01

    Nalpha-Acetylated microperoxidase-8 (Ac-MP-8) is a water soluble, ferric heme model for peroxidases. We report here that Ac-MP-8 catalyzes catalase-type reaction in addition to peroxidase-type and cytochrome P450-type reactions. The catalase activity of Ac-MP-8 was determined by the Clark oxygen electrode, which measures the production of oxygen in solution. The Km and kcat of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) catalyzed by Ac-MP-8 are 40.9 mm and 4.1 per s, respectively. The specificity constant (kcat/Km) of Ac-MP-8 in catalase-type reaction of H2O2 is 100.2,/m/s, which is 5- to 12- and 50- to 100-fold less than those of MPs in cytochrome P450-type reaction of aniline/H2O2 and peroxidase-type reaction of o-methoxyphenol/H2O2, respectively. These results indicate that Ac-MP-8 can catalyze three different types of reactions, and the relative catalytic specificities of Ac-MP-8 with a histidyl ligand exhibit the following orders: peroxidase-type > cytochrome P450-type > catalase-type reactions. Comparisons of the enzyme activities of Ac-MP-8 suggest that the fifth ligands of hemoproteins influence the ratio of the three types of reactions. PMID:15317500

  7. Improving catalase-based propelled motor endurance by enzyme encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmchen, Juliane; Baeza, Alejandro; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, Maria

    2014-07-01

    Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed.Biocatalytic propulsion is expected to play an important role in the future of micromotors as it might drastically increase the number of available fuelling reactions. However, most of the enzyme-propelled micromotors so far reported still rely on the degradation of peroxide by catalase, in spite of being vulnerable to relatively high peroxide concentrations. To overcome this limitation, herein we present a strategy to encapsulate the catalase and to graft the resulting enzyme capsules on motor particles. Significant improvement of the stability in the presence of peroxide and other aggressive agents has been observed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02459a

  8. Development of lyophilization cycle and effect of excipients on the stability of catalase during lyophilization

    PubMed Central

    Lale, Shantanu V; Goyal, Monu; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of the present study was to screen excipients such as amino acids and non-aqueous solvents for their stabilizing effect on catalase, a model protein, for lyophilization. The present study also includes optimization of lyophilization cycle for catalase formulations, which is essential from the commercial point of view, since lyophilization is an extremely costly process. Materials and Methods: Activity of catalase was determined using catalase activity assay. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to determine eutectic melting temperature of the frozen catalase solution, which is essential for the optimization of lyophilization cycle. Results: When catalase was lyophilized without excipients, it was found that about 65-78% of the initial activity of catalase was lost during the lyophilization process in a concentration dependent manner. The maximum stability of catalase during lyophilization was observed at pH 7.0. Amino acids like alanine, glycine, lysine, serine and 4-hydroxy proline showed strong stabilizing effect on catalase during lyophilization by protecting catalase activity above 95%, whereas valine and cysteine hydrochloride showed destabilizing effect on catalase. Non-aqueous solvents such as dimethyl formamide, dimethyl sulphoxide, polyethylene glycol (PEG) 200, PEG 400, PEG 600 and ethylene glycol also showed destabilizing effect on catalase during lyophilization. Conclusions: In order to prevent loss of catalase activity during lyophilization of catalase, use of amino acids like alanine, glycine, lysine, serine and 4-hydroxy proline in optimum concentration is highly advisable. PMID:23071946

  9. Crystallization and preliminary structural results of catalase from human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maté, M J; Ortiz-Lombardía, M; Marina, A; Fita, I

    1999-05-01

    Catalase (hydrogen peroxide:hydrogen peroxide oxidoreductase, E.C. 1. 11.1.6) is present in most aerobic prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Despite a large number of studies on catalases, the only mammalian catalase structure available is that from beef liver, in which about 50% of the haem groups are degraded to bile pigments. Three different crystal forms of human erythrocyte catalase were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG as precipitant. Monoclinic crystals, with space group P21 and unit-cell parameters a = 102.9, b = 140.0, c = 173.6 A and beta = 103.2 degrees, require NADP(H) in the crystallization solution. Two types of hexagonal packing, with unit-cell parameters of either a = b = 86. 9, c = 255.5 A or a = b = 90.0, c = 521.2 A, were obtained under identical crystallization conditions in the absence of NADP(H). Only one diffraction data set could be collected: this was obtained from the hexagonal crystals with the smaller c axis using synchrotron radiation, with resolution to 2.65 A. A molecular-replacement solution, determined using a modified beef-liver catalase model as a search structure, corresponds to space group P6422 and contains a single subunit in the asymmetric unit, with an estimated solvent volume of about 50%. The packing determined suggests how minor rearrangements might allow the transition between both hexagonal crystal forms and provides an explanation for the anisotropic character of the corresponding diffractions. PMID:10216308

  10. Altered methanol embryopathies in embryo culture with mutant catalase-deficient mice and transgenic mice expressing human catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of methanol (MeOH) in rodents, unlike its acute toxicity in humans, are unclear, but may involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). Embryonic catalase, although expressed at about 5% of maternal activity, may protect the embryo by detoxifying ROS. This hypothesis was investigated in whole embryo culture to remove confounding maternal factors, including metabolism of MeOH by maternal catalase. C57BL/6 (C57) mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Catb/J acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 4 mg/ml MeOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally. MeOH was embryopathic in C57 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed and turning, whereas hCat embryos were protected. Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to C3H WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. MeOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, with reduced anterior neuropore closure and head length only in catalase-deficient embryos. These data suggest that ROS may be involved in the embryopathic mechanism of methanol, and that embryonic catalase activity may be a determinant of teratological risk.

  11. Direct electrochemistry of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite.

    PubMed

    Dimcheva, Nina; Horozova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The voltammetric studies of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase (PcCAT) adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite, showed direct electron transfer (DET) between its active site and the electrode surface. Analogous tests performed with the commercially available bovine catalase revealed that mammalian enzyme is much less efficient in the DET process. Both catalases were found capable to catalyse the electrooxidation of phenol, but differed in the specifics of catalytic action. At an applied potential of 0.45V the non-linear regression showed the kinetics of the bioelectrochemical oxidation catalysed by the PcCAT obeyed the Hill equation with a binding constant K=0.034±0.002 M(2) (Hill's coefficient n=2.097±0.083, R(2)=0.997), whilst the catalytic action of the bovine catalase was described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with the following parameters: V(max,app)=7.780±0.509 μA, and K(M,app)=0.068±0.070 mol L(-1). The performance of the electrode reaction was affected by the electrode potential, the pH, and temperature. Based on the effect of pH and temperature on the electrode response in presence of phenol a tentative reaction pathway of its bioelectrocatalytic oxidation has been hypothesised. The possible application of these findings in biosensing phenol up to concentration 30 mM at pHs below 7 and in absence of oxidising agents (oxygen or H(2)O(2)) was considered. PMID:23103554

  12. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat(b)/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug=GD 1), exposed for 24h to 2 or 4mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p<0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p<0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p<0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown-rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p<0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. PMID:26074427

  13. The chemical modification of beef liver catalase. V. Ethoxyformylation of histidine and tyrosine residues of catalase with diethylpyrocarbonate.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Anan, F K

    1976-08-01

    In order to elucidate the possible roles of histidine and tyrosine residues of catalase [EC 1.11.1.6] in maintaining the quaternary structure and catalatic activity, diethylpyrocarbonate modification experiments were carried out. A method for the estimation of N-ethoxyformyl (EF)-His at pH 5--7 and of O-ethoxyformyl (EF)-Tyr in alkaline solution by measuring A 242 nm (ximM = 3.2) and A278 nm (ximM = 1.16), respectively, was developed. The formation of EF-His and EF-Tyr was an electrophilic reaction and was dependent on pH, exhibiting pK values of 6.8 and 9.9, respectively. The maximal yield of EF-His at pH 6.0 was 49% of the total histidine content, but no inactivation nor unfolding of the enzyme was observed. The formation of 12 EF-Tyr residues per mole of catalase at pH 8.1 did not cause any inactivation, but the formation of 8 more EF-Tyr residues at pH 8.9 resulted in both inactivation and unfolding. Nearly complete inactivation and partial splitting of catalase were observed when 43-46 EF-Tyr residues per mole were produced at pH 10.0. More EF-His residues were formed by the reaction of diethyl pyrocarbonate with cyanoethylated (CE)-catalase monomer (subunit) than with CE-catalase tetramer. The CE-catalase tetramer and monomer were extensively O-ethoxyformylated, reaching 100% EF-Tyr formation. These results indicate that a half of the histidine residues may lie outside the protein core and that three-quarters of the tyrosine residues are probably in the protein core of the enzyme. The production of 2--3 EF-Tyr residues per mole of the monomer by ethoxyformylation at pH 7.0 was accompanied by a decrease in the magnitude of the Soret peak. A possible interaction of those tyrosine residues with porphyrin of the heme group is discussed. PMID:12142

  14. Progeric effects of catalase inactivation in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Koepke, Jay I.; Wood, Christopher S.; Terlecky, Laura J.; Walton, Paul A.; Terlecky, Stanley R.

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes generate hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, as part of their normal metabolism. A number of pathological situations exist in which the organelle's capacity to degrade the potentially toxic oxidant is compromised. It is the peroxidase, catalase, which largely determines the functional antioxidant capacity of the organelle, and it is this enzyme that is affected in aging, in certain diseases, and in response to exposure to specific chemical agents. To more tightly control the enzymatic activity of peroxisomal catalase and carefully document the effects of its impaired action on human cells, we employed the inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. We show that by chronically reducing catalase activity to approximately 38% of normal, cells respond in a dramatic manner, displaying a cascade of accelerated aging reactions. Hydrogen peroxide and related reactive oxygen species are produced, protein and DNA are oxidatively damaged, import into peroxisomes and organelle biogenesis is corrupted, and matrix metalloproteinases are hyper-secreted from cells. In addition, mitochondria are functionally impaired, losing their ability to maintain a membrane potential and synthesize reactive oxygen species themselves. These latter results suggest an important redox-regulated connection between the two organelle systems, a topic of considerable interest for future study.

  15. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B.; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A.; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E.; Cohen, Richard A.; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S.; McComb, Mark E.; Bachschmid, Markus M.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a ‘Tandem Mass Tag’ (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation. PMID:26642319

  16. Structure–Function Relationships in Fungal Large-Subunit Catalases

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A.; Valdez, V; Rudino-Pinera, E; Horjales, E; Hansberg, W

    2009-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-{gamma}-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics.

  17. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene. Images PMID:1860824

  18. Differential Accumulation of Salicylic Acid and Salicylic Acid-Sensitive Catalase in Different Rice Tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z.; Iyer, S.; Caplan, A.; Klessig, D. F.; Fan, B.

    1997-01-01

    We previously proposed that salicylic acid (SA)-sensitive catalases serve as biological targets of SA in plant defense responses. To further examine the role of SA-sensitive catalases, we have analyzed the relationship between SA levels and SA sensitivity of catalases in different rice (Oryza sativa) tissues. We show here that, whereas rice shoots contain extremely high levels of free SA, as previously reported (I. Raskin, H. Skubatz, W. Tang, B.J.D. Meeuse [1990] Ann Bot 66: 369-373; P. Silverman, M. Seskar, D. Kanter, P. Schweizer, J.-P. Metraux, I. Raskin [1995] Plant Physiol 108: 633-639), rice roots and cell-suspension cultures have very low SA levels. Catalases from different rice tissues also exhibit differences in sensitivity to SA. Catalase from rice shoots is insensitive to SA, but roots and cell-suspension cultures contain SA-sensitive catalase. The difference in SA sensitivity of catalases from these different tissues correlates with the tissue-specific expression of two catalase genes, CatA and CatB, which encode highly distinctive catalase proteins. CatA, which encodes a catalase with relatively low sequence homology to the tobacco SA-sensitive catalases, is expressed at high levels exclusively in the shoots. On the other hand, in roots and cell-suspension cultures, with northern analysis we detected expression of only the CatB gene, which encodes a catalase with higher sequence homology to tobacco catalases. The role of catalases in mediating some of the SA-induced responses is discussed in light of these results and the recently defined mechanisms of catalase inhibition by SA. PMID:12223699

  19. Properties of a catalase from a peroxide-resistant mutant of Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jouve, H M; Lasauniere, C; Pelmont, J

    1983-11-01

    A catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) from Proteus mirabilis PR, a mutant with strong resistance to hydrogen peroxide, was purified to homogeneity and compared with catalase from wild-type P. mirabilis. In crude extracts from the mutant, catalase was present as two different entities called A and B, that could be resolved by ion-exchange chromatography. The B form was transformed into A. The pure catalase preparation contained the A form only. This catalase was not found to be different from the wild-type enzyme, considering its molecular weight, subunit composition, isoelectric pH, and reactivity to specific antibodies. Partial proteolytic cleavage of the two bacterial enzymes with four different proteases proceeded at the same rate and produced identical patterns. However, pure catalase from the mutant had a specific activity against H2O2 of 2.7 X 10(7) M-1 X s-1, and its purity index (A406/A280) was 1.12. These values were higher than previously determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the mutant catalase was more stable to heat. The results suggest that the purified catalase (A form) differs from the wild-type enzyme and appears to be a more efficient catalase against H2O2. Both enzymes were found to be much more resistant than beef liver catalase to the classically used catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. PMID:6365291

  20. A comparison of two catalase preparations used to examine vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Hart, T K; Pino, R M

    1985-05-01

    Beef liver catalase has been used as a tracer in cytochemical studies of vascular permeability. The use of Sigma catalase C-40 and C-100 preparations in capillary permeability studies of the ileojejunum and choriocapillaris was examined. Catalase C-40 is restricted by the fenestrated capillaries of the ileojejunum in contrast to their permeability to C-100. The choriocapillaris restricts both catalase preparations. Sephadex G-200 chromatography of plasma samples incubated with catalase C-40, or from C-40-injected animals, demonstrated an increase in the molecular weight of the tracer. No increase in molecular weight was evident for catalase C-100. The isoelectric point of both preparations was 5.4-5.7. These findings indicate that Sigma catalase C-100 is the preferred preparation for use in vascular permeability studies. PMID:3999995

  1. Magnetic circular dichroism studies of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Browett, W R; Stillman, M J

    1979-04-25

    Absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of beef liver catalase at pH 5.0 and 6.9, and its complexes with NaF, KCNO, NaCNS, NaN3 and NaCN, have been measured between 250 nm and 700 nm at room temperature. The pH 6.9 native catalase MCD shows the presence of several additional transitions not resolved in the absorption spectrum. While these bands can be seen in the spectra of all the derivatives, with the exception of the cyanide, their relative intensities changes considerably between complexes. Of special interest in the MCD of ferric hemes is the signal intensity at about 400 nm and 620 nm. The data indicate that the MCD intensity at 620 nm increases as the high spin iron porphyrin fraction increases, reaching a maximum with the fluoride complex. The 430 nm band intensity increases as the proportion of low spin iron increases, reaching a maximum with the cyanide complex. The MCD spectra also indicate clearly the existence of spin mixtures in the complexes with CNO-, CNS-, and N3-, where both the 430 nm and 620 nm bands have appreciable intensity. It is significant that despite almost identical absorption spectra the CNS- complex has higher fraction of low spin iron than either the CNO- or the N3- species. The differences between the pH 5 and 6.9 MCD spectra of the native catalase suggest that the environment of the heme centre is sensitive to protonation. PMID:36920

  2. EPR spectroscopy and catalase activity of manganese-bound DNA-binding protein from nutrient starved cells.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Joshua Allen; Hendrich, Michael P

    2010-06-01

    DNA-binding proteins from nutrient-starved cells (DPS) protect cells from oxidative stress by removing H(2)O(2) and iron. A new class of DPS-like proteins has recently been identified, with DPS-like protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus (SsDPS) being the best characterized to date. SsDPS protects cells from oxidative stress and is upregulated in response to H(2)O(2) but also in response to iron depletion. The ferroxidase active site of SsDPS is structurally similar to the active sites of manganese catalase and rat liver arginase. The present work shows that the ferroxidase center in SsDPS binds two Mn(2+) ions with K (D) = (1/K (1) K (2))(1/2) = 48(3) microM. The binding constant of the second Mn(2+) is significantly higher than that of the first, inducing dinuclear Mn(II) cluster formation for all but the lowest concentrations of added Mn(2+). In competition experiments, equimolar amounts of Fe(2+) were unable to displace the bound manganese. EPR spectroscopy of the Mn(2) (2+) cluster showed signals comparable to those of other characterized dimanganese clusters. The exchange coupling for the cluster was determined, J = -1.4(3) cm(-1) (H = -2JS (1) S (2)), and is within the range expected for a mu(1,1)-carboxylato bridge between the manganese ions. Manganese-bound SsDPS showed catalase activity at a rate 10-100 times slower than for manganese catalases. EPR spectra of SsDPS after addition of H(2)O(2) showed the appearance of an intermediate in the reaction with H(2)O(2). PMID:20221652

  3. A new PANI biosensor based on catalase for cyanide determination.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Hakkı Mevlüt; Aydin, Tuba

    2016-03-01

    Cyanide is one of the most widespread of compounds measured in environmental analysis due to their toxic effects on environment and health. We report a highly sensitive, reliable, selective amperometric sensor for determination of cyanide, using a polyaniline conductive polymer. The enzyme catalase was immobilized by electropolymerization. The steps during the immobilization were controlled by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Optimum pH, temperature, aniline concentration, enzyme concentration, and the number of scans obtained during electropolymerization, were investigated. In addition, the cyanide present in artificial waste water samples was determined. In the characterization studies of the biosensor, some parameters such as reproducibility and storage stability, were analyzed. PMID:25386729

  4. Plating isolation of various catalase-negative microorganisms from soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labeda, D. P.; Hunt, C. M.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A unique plating procedure was developed that allows isolation, but not enumeration, of representatives of the catalase-negative soil microflora. The numbers recovered, however, are low as compared to the numbers recovered when the modified dilution-to-extinction isolation procedure is used. The latter procedure provides prolonged inoculation in sealed tubes containing a nutritionally rich broth medium over small submerged agar slants. In contrast, the plating procedure utilizes nutritionally minimal media and the shorter incubations mandated by the inherent problems associated with plating.

  5. Autophagic programmed cell death by selective catalase degradation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Wan, Fengyi; Dutta, Sudeshna; Welsh, Sarah; Liu, ZhiHua; Freundt, Eric; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Lenardo, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Autophagy plays a central role in regulating important cellular functions such as cell survival during starvation and control of infectious pathogens. Recently, it has been shown that autophagy can induce cells to die; however, the mechanism of the autophagic cell death program is unclear. We now show that caspase inhibition leading to cell death by means of autophagy involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, membrane lipid oxidation, and loss of plasma membrane integrity. Inhibition of autophagy by chemical compounds or knocking down the expression of key autophagy proteins such as ATG7, ATG8, and receptor interacting protein (RIP) blocks ROS accumulation and cell death. The cause of abnormal ROS accumulation is the selective autophagic degradation of the major enzymatic ROS scavenger, catalase. Caspase inhibition directly induces catalase degradation and ROS accumulation, which can be blocked by autophagy inhibitors. These findings unveil a molecular mechanism for the role of autophagy in cell death and provide insight into the complex relationship between ROS and nonapoptotic programmed cell death. PMID:16547133

  6. Temperature dependence in the absorption spectra of beef liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Browett, W R; Stillman, M J

    1984-06-01

    The spin characteristics of the ferric heme groups in native beef liver catalase, and in the complexes formed by reaction with fluoride, cyanide, azide, thiocyanate, and cyanate ions have been studied using absorption spectroscopy over the temperature range of 4-285 K. The azide, isothiocyanate, and isocyanate complexes of catalase are considered to be high-spin ferric heme complexes at room temperature, but undergo a thermal spin change below 300 K. The temperature dependence of these absorption spectra, however, cannot be analyzed in terms of simple Boltzmann distributions between two S = 1/2 and S = 5/2 spin states. The data show that these spin changes occur over a very narrow temperature range, but do not result in the formation of completely, low-spin complexes. The data also suggest that the thermal spin changes that occur below the glassing temperature of the solvent are dependent upon the conformational changes which take place within the protein itself with a change in temperature, and which directly affect the environment of the heme group. PMID:6743763

  7. Structure of orthorhombic crystals of beef liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Ko, T P; Day, J; Malkin, A J; McPherson, A

    1999-08-01

    The growth mechanisms and physical properties of the orthorhombic crystal form of beef liver catalase were investigated using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was observed that the crystals grow in the <001> direction by an unusual progression of sequential two-dimensional nuclei of half unit-cell layers corresponding to the 'bottoms' and 'tops' of unit cells. These were easily discriminated by their alternating asymmetric shapes and their strong growth-rate anisotropy. This pattern has not previously been observed with other macromolecular crystals. Orthorhombic beef liver catalase crystals exhibit an extremely high defect density and incorporate great numbers of misoriented microcrystals, revealed intact by etching experiments, which may explain their marginal diffraction properties. To facilitate interpretation of AFM results in terms of intermolecular interactions, the structure of the orthorhombic crystals, having an entire tetramer of the enzyme as the asymmetric unit, was solved by molecular replacement using a model derived from a trigonal crystal form. It was subsequently refined by conventional techniques. Although the packing of molecules in the two unit cells was substantially different, with very few exceptions no significant differences in the molecular structures were observed. In addition, no statistically significant deviation from ideal 222 molecular symmetry appeared within the tetramer. The packing of molecules in the crystal revealed by X-ray analysis explained in a satisfying way the process of crystal growth revealed by AFM. PMID:10417406

  8. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus).

    PubMed

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  9. Nanoparticle-mediated catalase delivery protects human neurons from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Singhal, A; Morris, V B; Labhasetwar, V; Ghorpade, A

    2013-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases and brain injury involve reactive oxygen species and implicate oxidative stress in disease mechanisms. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation due to mitochondrial superoxide leakage perpetuates oxidative stress in neuronal injury. Catalase, an H2O2-degrading enzyme, thus remains an important antioxidant therapy target. However, catalase therapy is restricted by its labile nature and inadequate delivery. Here, a nanotechnology approach was evaluated using catalase-loaded, poly(lactic co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) in human neuronal protection against oxidative damage. This study showed highly efficient catalase encapsulation capable of retaining ~99% enzymatic activity. NPs released catalase rapidly, and antioxidant activity was sustained for over a month. NP uptake in human neurons was rapid and nontoxic. Although human neurons were highly sensitive to H2O2, NP-mediated catalase delivery successfully protected cultured neurons from H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Catalase-loaded NPs significantly reduced H2O2-induced protein oxidation, DNA damage, mitochondrial membrane transition pore opening and loss of cell membrane integrity and restored neuronal morphology, neurite network and microtubule-associated protein-2 levels. Further, catalase-loaded NPs improved neuronal recovery from H2O2 pre-exposure better than free catalase, suggesting possible applications in ameliorating stroke-relevant oxidative stress. Brain targeting of catalase-loaded NPs may find wide therapeutic applications for oxidative stress-associated acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24201802

  10. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus)

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  11. Catalase activity of different Candida species after exposition to specific antiserum

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaka, Natália R.S.; Unterkircher, Carmelinda S.; Shimizu, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Antisera were developed in rabbits after challenge with intracellular antigens of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis. Microorganism catalase has been correlated with virulence, resistance to drugs and immunogenicity. The intracellular catalase is consistently present in strains of Candida and in this paper, the enzyme activity was analysed by PAGE after exposition to antisera. The catalases of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were immunogenic and differed in their binding to specific antibodies raised in rabbits. Tests of cross-reactivity between different Candida species showed that when antiserum from C. albicans immunized rabbit was incubated with intracellular extracts of these three Candida species, the catalases activities were abolished. However, the antisera from C. parapsilosis or C. tropicalis immunized rabbits did not affect the catalase activity of C. albicans; the enzyme of C. albicans was inactivated only by the antiserum to the catalase of own C. albicans. The antiserum to the catalase of C. tropicalis was species-specific and did not cross-react with catalases of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. The activities of Aspergillus niger and bovine catalases were not affected by the antiserum from any Candida immunized rabbits. This report is a preliminary study of specific antisera that react against intracellular catalase of Candida sp. and neutralize the enzymatic activity. Further study is necessary to develop species-specific antibody once differences in the susceptibility of the Candida species to commonly used antifungal drugs make identification to the species level important. PMID:24031174

  12. Catalase degradation in sunflower cotyledons during peroxisome transition from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function. [Helianthus annuus

    SciTech Connect

    Eising, R.; Gerhardt, B.

    1987-06-01

    First order rate constant for the degradation (degradation constants) of catalase in the cotyledons of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were determined by measuring the loss of catalase containing /sup 14/C-labeled heme. During greening of the cotyledons, a period when peroxisomes change from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function, the degradation of glyoxysomal catalase is significantly slower than during all other stages of cotyledon development in light or darkness. The degradation constant during the transition stage of peroxisome function amounts to 0.205 day/sup -1/ in contrast to the constants ranging from 0.304 day/sup -1/ to 0.515 day/sup -1/ during the other developmental stages. Density labeling experiments comprising labeling of catalase with /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and its isopycnic centrifugation on CsCl gradients demonstrated that the determinations of the degradation constants were not substantially affected by reutilization of /sup 14/C-labeled compounds for catalase synthesis. The degradation constants for both glyoxysomal catalase and catalase synthesized during the transition of peroxisome function do not differ. This was shown by labeling the catalases with different isotopes and measuring the isotope ratio during the development of the cotyledons. The results are inconsistent with the concept that an accelerated and selective degradation of glyoxysomes underlies the change in peroxisome function. The data suggest that catalase degradation is at least partially due to an individual turnover of catalase and does not only result from a turnover of the whole peroxisomes.

  13. Endothelin-1 stimulates catalase activity through the PKCδ mediated phosphorylation of Serine 167

    PubMed Central

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Hou, Yali; Kangath, Archana; Pardo, Daniel; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates catalase activity in endothelial cells and lambs with acute increases in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), without altering gene expression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Exposing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) to ET-1 increased catalase activity and decreased cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. These changes correlated with an increase in serine phosphorylated catalase. Using the inhibitory peptide δV1.1, this phosphorylation was shown to be PKCδ dependent. Mass spectrometry identified serine167 as the phosphorylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a phospho-mimic (S167D) catalase. Activity assays using recombinant protein purified from E.coli or transiently transfected COS-7 cells, demonstrated that S167D-catalase had an increased ability to degrade H2O2 compared to the wildtype enzyme. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we were able to verify that pS167 catalase levels are modulated in lambs with acute increases in PBF in the presence and absence of the ET receptor antagonist, tezosentan. S167 is being located on the dimeric interface suggesting it could be involved in regulating the formation of catalase tetramers. To evaluate this possibility we utilized analytical gel-filtration to examine the multimeric structure of recombinant wildtype- and S167D-catalase. We found that recombinant wildtype catalase was present as a mixture of monomers and dimers while S167D catalase was primarily tetrameric. Further, the incubation of wildtype catalase with PKCδ was sufficient to convert wildtype catalase into a tetrameric structure. In conclusion, this is the first report indicating that the phosphorylation of catalase regulates its multimeric structure and activity. PMID:24211614

  14. Catalase-negative peroxisomes: transient appearance in rat hepatocytes during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, I.; Novikoff, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Using light microscopy enzyme cytochemistry to localize catalase activity in peroxisomes, a population of peroxisome-negative hepatocytes was detected in livers of rats during liver regeneration induced by two-thirds partial hepatectomy. However, examination by electron microscopy revealed that this population of hepatocytes contained peroxisomes with a delimiting membrane and a nucleoid, but no cytochemically demonstrable catalase activity within their matrix. Regenerating livers 6, 18, 24, 36, 48 and 72 hours, and 1 week after partial hepatectomy showed hepatocytes without catalase activity. However, their numbers varied, with the most numerous appearing at 24 hours after partial hepatectomy. Mitosis of catalase-negative hepatocytes were seen along with mitosis of hepatocytes containing the normal complement of catalase-positive peroxisomes. The catalase-negative hepatocytes did not show evidence of apoptosis or necrotic cell death. Lysosomal acid phosphatase activity and bile canalicular ATPase activity were present in hepatocytes with catalase-negative peroxisomes. Another population of hepatocytes with a small number of catalase-positive peroxisomes appeared and were more numerous at 36 hours after partial hepatectomy; ultrastructurally, these hepatocytes contained both catalase-negative peroxisomes, which appeared to undergo dissolution, and catalase-positive peroxisomes, which were smaller in size. After complete restoration of the liver, all hepatocytes displayed essentially uniform numbers of catalase-positive peroxisomes. These studies indicated that during liver regeneration there is a transient loss of catalase in peroxisomes of some hepatocytes. These cells proliferate and with time acquire new catalase-positive peroxisomes. The observations are discussed in relation to peroxisome biogenesis, hepatocellular carcinogenesis, and oxidative stress during liver regeneration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7887449

  15. Differential developmental expression and cell type specificity of Dictyostelium catalases and their response to oxidative stress and UV-light.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M X; Foote, C; van Es, S; Devreotes, P N; Alexander, S; Alexander, H

    2000-07-24

    Cells of Dictyostelium discoideum are highly resistant to DNA damaging agents such as UV-light, gamma-radiation and chemicals. The genes encoding nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER) enzymes are rapidly upregulated in response to UV-irradiation and DNA-damaging chemicals, suggesting that this is at least partially responsible for the resistance of this organism to these agents. Although Dictyostelium is also unusually resistant to high concentrations of H(2)O(2), little is known about the response of this organism to oxidative stress. To determine if transcriptional upregulation is a common mechanism for responding to DNA-damaging agents, we have studied the Dictyostelium catalase and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase antioxidant enzymes. We show that there are two catalase genes and that each is differentially regulated both temporally and spatially during multicellular development. The catA gene is expressed throughout growth and development and its corresponding enzyme is maintained at a steady level. In contrast, the catB gene encodes a larger protein and is only expressed during the final stages of morphogenesis. Cell type fractionation showed that the CatB enzyme is exclusively localized to the prespore cells and the CatA enzyme is found exclusively in the prestalk cells. Each enzyme has a different subcellular localization. The unique developmental timing and cell type distribution suggest that the role for catB in cell differentiation is to protect the dormant spores from oxidative damage. We found that exposure to H(2)O(2) does not result in the induction of the catalase, superoxide dismutase, NER or BER mRNAs. A mutant with greatly reduced levels of catA mRNA and enzyme has greatly increased sensitivity to H(2)O(2) but normal sensitivity to UV. These results indicate that the natural resistance to oxidative stress is not due to an ability to rapidly raise the level of antioxidant or DNA repair enzymes and that the response to UV-light is independent from the response to reactive oxygen compounds. PMID:11004503

  16. A Chaperone Function of NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 Is Required to Maintain Catalase Activity and for Multiple Stress Responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Guoqiang; Cha, Joon-Yung; Li, Guannan; Chen, She; Li, Zhen; Guo, Jinghua; Zhang, Caiguo; Yang, Yongqing; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Schumaker, Karen S.; Chen, Zhongzhou; Guo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity. PMID:25700484

  17. A method for molecular analysis of catalase gene diversity in seawater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ji, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Cui; Dai, Fangqun; Zhu, Jiancheng; Sun, Mi

    2013-12-01

    Catalase plays an important role in the metabolism of marine bacteria and has potential impact on the marine environment. Four PCR primers were designed to amplify the catalase gene fragments in marine bacteria by applying metagenomic DNA from Yellow Sea surface water as the template. Of the four reproducible target PCR products, the longest one with 900bp were chosen for catalase gene library construction by the T-vector and the white Escherichia coli colonies in the library was screened through restriction-digesting the reamplified insert fragments by the selected restriction endonuclease MboI, and then the bands of the resulting products were displayed in the agarose gel by electrophoresis. The unique restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) pattern was selected and the corresponding catalase gene fragments were sequenced, which verified that every unique RFLP pattern represented one type of catalase. This PCR-RFLP method above was established to investigate the bacterial catalase diversity in seawater. PMID:24426153

  18. Gut Catalase-Positive Bacteria Cross-Protect Adjacent Bifidobacteria from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Eva; Peirotén, Ángela; Landete, José María; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria isolated from infant gut and breast milk exhibited different abilities to grow under microaerobic conditions, alone or in the presence of added catalase. In the present study, we demonstrated that some Bifidobacterium strains unable to grow under microaerobic conditions were cross-protected on solid media from oxidative stress by adjacent colonies of gut catalase-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis or Escherichia coli, but not by a catalase-deficient E. coli. The results of this study support the possible contribution of catalase-positive bacteria to the establishment of certain bifidobacteria in non-anaerobic human niches of the infant gastrointestinal tract or mammary gland. PMID:26040451

  19. Gut Catalase-Positive Bacteria Cross-Protect Adjacent Bifidobacteria from Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Eva; Peirotén, Ángela; Landete, José María; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria isolated from infant gut and breast milk exhibited different abilities to grow under microaerobic conditions, alone or in the presence of added catalase. In the present study, we demonstrated that some Bifidobacterium strains unable to grow under microaerobic conditions were cross-protected on solid media from oxidative stress by adjacent colonies of gut catalase-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis or Escherichia coli, but not by a catalase-deficient E. coli. The results of this study support the possible contribution of catalase-positive bacteria to the establishment of certain bifidobacteria in non-anaerobic human niches of the infant gastrointestinal tract or mammary gland. PMID:26040451

  20. Layer-by-layer self-assembly immobilization of catalases on wool fabrics.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Wang, Q; Fan, X R; Sun, X J; Huang, P H

    2013-04-01

    A new immobilization strategy of catalases on natural fibers was reported in this paper. Catalase (CAT) from Bacillus subtilis was assembled into multiple layers together with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) on wool fabrics via layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic self-assembly deposition. The mechanism and structural evaluation of LBL electrostatic self-assembly were studied in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface zeta potential, and apparent color depth (K/S). The SEM pictures showed obvious deposits absorbed on the wool surfaces after LBL self-assembly. The surface zeta potential and dyeing depth of CAT/PDDA-assembled wool fabrics presented a regular layer-by-layer alternating trend along with the change of deposited materials, revealing the multilayer structure of the wool fiber immobilized catalases. The V(max) values were found to be 2,500±238 U/mg protein for the free catalase and 1,000±102 U/mg protein for the immobilized catalase. The K(m) value of free catalase (11.25±2.3 mM) was found to be lower than that of the immobilized catalase (222.2±36.5 mM). The immobilized catalase remained high enzymatic activity and showed a measureable amount of reusability, which proved that LBL electrostatic self-assembly deposition is a promising approach to immobilize catalases. PMID:23420488

  1. Study of catalase adsorption on two mixed-mode ligands and the mechanism involved therein.

    PubMed

    Shiva Ranjini, S; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    2012-11-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography sorbents n-hexylamine HyperCel™ (HEA) and phenylpropylamine HyperCel™ (PPA) were evaluated for the study of adsorption of catalase from two different sources. Various parameters such as buffer composition, ionic strength and pH were investigated to study the mechanism of interaction of commercially available pre-purified catalase from Bovine liver, purified catalase from black gram (Vigna mungo) and crude extract of black gram containing catalase with these mixed-mode ligands. A simple and economical screening protocol for identifying optimal buffer conditions for adsorption and desorption of catalase was established with micro volumes of the sorbent in batch mode. With HEA HyperCel, it was observed that pre-purified catalase from both bovine liver and black gram was completely retained at pH 7.0, irrespective of the presence or absence of NaCl in the adsorption buffer, whereas the catalase from crude extract of black gram was completely retained only in the presence of 0.2 M salt in the adsorption buffer. The elution of catalase from both the sources was accomplished by lowering the pH to 4.5 in absence of salt. In case of PPA HyperCel, catalase from both the sources was very strongly adsorbed under different buffer conditions studied, and elution did not yield a significant catalase activity. From the screening experiments, it could be concluded that the interaction of catalase with HEA HyperCel could be dominated by hydrophobic forces with minor contributions from ionic interaction and with PPA HyperCel, it could be a combination of different non-covalent interactions acting on different loci on the surface of the protein. PMID:23108613

  2. Biochemical and genetic analyses of a catalase from the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, E R; Smith, C J

    1995-01-01

    A single catalase enzyme was produced by the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis when cultures at late log phase were shifted to aerobic conditions. In anaerobic conditions, catalase activity was detected in stationary-phase cultures, indicating that not only oxygen exposure but also starvation may affect the production of this antioxidant enzyme. The purified enzyme showed a peroxidatic activity when pyrogallol was used as an electron donor. It is a hemoprotein containing one heme molecule per holomer and has an estimated molecular weight of 124,000 to 130,000. The catalase gene was cloned by screening a B. fragilis library for complementation of catalase activity in an Escherichia coli catalase mutant (katE katG) strain. The cloned gene, designated katB, encoded a catalase enzyme with electrophoretic mobility identical to that of the purified protein from the B. fragilis parental strain. The nucleotide sequence of katB revealed a 1,461-bp open reading frame for a protein with 486 amino acids and a predicted molecular weight of 55,905. This result was very close to the 60,000 Da determined by denaturing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified catalase and indicates that the native enzyme is composed of two identical subunits. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified catalase obtained by Edman degradation confirmed that it is a product of katB. The amino acid sequence of KatB showed high similarity to Haemophilus influenzae HktE (71.6% identity, 66% nucleotide identity), as well as to gram-positive bacterial and mammalian catalases. No similarities to bacterial catalase-peroxidase-type enzymes were found. The active-site residues, proximal and distal hemebinding ligands, and NADPH-binding residues of the bovine liver catalase-type enzyme were highly conserved in B. fragilis KatB. PMID:7768808

  3. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  4. Inhibition of Catalase by Tea Catechins in Free and Cellular State: A Biophysical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sandip; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Tea flavonoids bind to variety of enzymes and inhibit their activities. In the present study, binding and inhibition of catalase activity by catechins with respect to their structure-affinity relationship has been elucidated. Fluorimetrically determined binding constants for (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with catalase were observed to be 2.27×106 M−1 and 1.66×106 M−1, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters evidence exothermic and spontaneous interaction between catechins and catalase. Major forces of interaction are suggested to be through hydrogen bonding along with electrostatic contributions and conformational changes. Distinct loss of α-helical structure of catalase by interaction with EGCG was captured in circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Gallated catechins demonstrated higher binding constants and inhibition efficacy than non-gallated catechins. EGCG exhibited maximum inhibition of pure catalase. It also inhibited cellular catalase in K562 cancer cells with significant increase in cellular ROS and suppression of cell viability (IC50 54.5 µM). These results decipher the molecular mechanism by which tea catechins interact with catalase and highlight the potential of gallated catechin like EGCG as an anticancer drug. EGCG may have other non-specific targets in the cell, but its anticancer property is mainly defined by ROS accumulation due to catalase inhibition. PMID:25025898

  5. Molecular Characterization of a Catalase-Negative Staphylococcus aureus Blood Culture Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Steven; Jureen, Roland; Lin, Raymond T. P.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a catalase-negative methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolate collected from a blood culture. Sequencing through the gene encoding catalase, katA, demonstrated a 2-bp insertion. The resulting frameshift mutation generates a protein that has lost 26 amino acids (aa) at its C-terminal domain. PMID:26354811

  6. Structural analysis of NADPH depleted bovine liver catalase and its inhibitor complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sugadev, Ragumani; Ponnuswamy, M.N.; Sekar, K.

    2011-01-01

    To study the functional role of NADPH during mammalian catalase inhibition, the X-ray crystal structures of NADPH-depleted bovine liver catalase and its inhibitor complexes, cyanide and azide, determined at 2.8Å resolution. From the complex structures it is observed that subunits with and without an inhibitor/catalytic water molecule are linked by N-terminal domain swapping. Comparing mammalian- and fungal- catalases, we speculate that NADPH-depleted mammalian catalases may function as a domain-swapped dimer of dimers, especially during inactivation by inhibitors like cyanide and azide. We further speculate that in mammalian catalases the N-terminal hinge-loop region and α-helix is the structural element that senses NADPH binding. Although the above arguments are speculative and need further verification, as a whole our studies have opened up a new possibility, viz. that mammalian catalase acts as a domain-swapped dimer of dimers, especially during inhibitor binding. To generalize this concept to the formation of the inactive state in mammalian catalases in the absence of tightly bound NADPH molecules needs further exploration. The present study adds one more intriguing fact to the existing mysteries of mammalian catalases. PMID:21968615

  7. Structural analysis of NADPH depleted bovine liver catalase and its inhibitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sugadev, Ragumani; Ponnuswamy, M N; Sekar, K

    2011-01-01

    To study the functional role of NADPH during mammalian catalase inhibition, the X-ray crystal structures of NADPH-depleted bovine liver catalase and its inhibitor complexes, cyanide and azide, determined at 2.8Å resolution. From the complex structures it is observed that subunits with and without an inhibitor/catalytic water molecule are linked by N-terminal domain swapping. Comparing mammalian- and fungal- catalases, we speculate that NADPH-depleted mammalian catalases may function as a domain-swapped dimer of dimers, especially during inactivation by inhibitors like cyanide and azide. We further speculate that in mammalian catalases the N-terminal hinge-loop region and α-helix is the structural element that senses NADPH binding. Although the above arguments are speculative and need further verification, as a whole our studies have opened up a new possibility, viz. that mammalian catalase acts as a domain-swapped dimer of dimers, especially during inhibitor binding. To generalize this concept to the formation of the inactive state in mammalian catalases in the absence of tightly bound NADPH molecules needs further exploration. The present study adds one more intriguing fact to the existing mysteries of mammalian catalases. PMID:21968615

  8. Covalent Immobilization of Catalase onto Regenerated Silk Fibroins via Tyrosinase-Catalyzed Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Qi, Chenglong; Yu, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Jiugang; Cui, Li; Tang, Gengtie; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong

    2015-09-01

    Regenerated silk fibroins could be used as medical scaffolds and carrier materials for enzyme immobilization. In the present work, tyrosinase enzyme was used for enzymatic oxidation of silk fibroins, followed by immobilization of catalase onto the fibroin surfaces through physical adsorption and covalent cross-linking as well. Spectrophotometry, SDS-PAGE, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to examine the efficiency of enzymatic oxidation and catalase immobilization, respectively. The results indicate that tyrosine residues in silk fibroins could be oxidized and converted to the active o-quinones. Incubating silk fibroins with catalase and tyrosinase led to a noticeable change of molecular weight distribution, indicating the occurrence of the cross-links between silk fibroins and catalase molecules. Two different pathways were proposed for the catalase immobilizations, and the method based on grafting of catalase onto the freeze-dried fibroin membrane is more acceptable. The residual enzyme activity for the immobilized catalase exhibited higher than that of the control after repeated washing cycles. Meanwhile, the thermal stability and alkali resistance were also slightly improved as compared to free catalase. The mechanisms of enzymatic immobilization are also concerned. PMID:26189105

  9. Catalase depression in malignant liver from chickens with myeloblastosis and Marek's disease.

    PubMed

    Williams-Smith, D L; Payne, L N; Wyard, S J

    1984-09-01

    In rapidly frozen livers from chickens affected with myeloblastosis and Marek's disease and from unaffected control birds there exists a strong correlation between catalase activity and catalase Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal intensities. The diseased chickens had activities and signals reduced to as little as 10% of control values. There were no changes in the EPR parameters in diseased liver and the data support the hypothesis that the lowering in activity is due to lowered catalase levels rather than to catalase inhibition. The rate of transformation of catalase to catalase-formate in liver was studied by freeze-clamping liver in anaesthetised chickens, then warming to 37 degrees for 1 or 2 minutes anaerobiosis, and then refreezing. The only difference of significance in this transformation between diseased and normal livers was the greater percentage of total catalase present as catalase-formate (approximately + 15%) in aerobic diseased liver, which may indicate a lowered production of hydrogen peroxide, relative to formate, in these livers. The rate of transformation was far faster in chickens (t1/2 less than 1 min) than in the rat (t1/2 = 7.7 min). PMID:6087870

  10. Catalase Activity of Psychrophilic Bacteria Grown at 2 and 30 C1

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Hilmer A.; Ishibashi, Sandra T.; Reid, Ann; Ito, June S.

    1963-01-01

    Catalase activity was measured in resting-cell suspensions of psychrophilic bacteria grown at 2 and at 30 C. Enzyme activity decreased in both cell-suspension types as harvest age increased. At comparable physiological age, cells grown at 2 C had more catalase than cells grown at 30 C. PMID:13959237

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF CATALASE ACTIVITIES IN A ROOT-CLEANING ISOLATE OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Psuedomonas putida, a saprophytic root-colonizing bacterium, produces multiple forms of catalase Catalase A which increases in specific activity during growth phase and after treatment with H2O2, is located in the and is inhibited by 3-amino-1,2-4-triazole, EDTA, and cyanide, but...

  12. CATALASE AND SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE OF ROOT-COLONIZING SAPROPHYTIC FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Root-colonizing, saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads of the Pseudomonas putida-P. fluorescens group express similar levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during growth on a sucrose- and amino acid-rich medium. ncreased specific activities of catalase but not sup...

  13. Forchlorfenuron detection based on its inhibitory effect towards catalase immobilized on boron nitride substrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Cai, Lijuan; Zhao, Huijie; Tang, Jiaqian; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoya; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-15

    An enzymatic procedure based on a catalase biosensor for the detection of forchlorfenuron (CPPU) has been reported in this work. Catalase was immobilized on boron nitride (BN) sheets dispersed in chitosan by adsorption. The immobilized catalase exhibited direct electron transfer character and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. After introducing CPPU into the H2O2 containing phosphate buffer solution, the catalase-catalyzed H2O2 reduction current decreased. By measuring the current decrease, CPPU can be determined in the range of 0.5-10.0 µM with the detection limit of 0.07 μM. The non-competitive inhibition behavior of CPPU towards catalase was verified by the Lineweaver-Burk plots. Long stability character has been ascribed to this biosensor. Possible use of this biosensor in flow systems is illustrated. The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to CPPU determination in fruits samples with satisfactory results. PMID:25108110

  14. [The catalase inhibitor aminotriazole alleviates acute alcoholic liver injury].

    PubMed

    Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Liang, Tian-Cai; Yang, Qing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Li

    2015-02-25

    In this study, the effects of catalase (CAT) inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) on alcohol-induced acute liver injury were investigated to explore the potential roles of CAT in alcoholic liver injury. Acute liver injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of alcohol in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and various doses of ATZ (100-400 mg/kg) or vehicle were administered intraperitoneally at 30 min before alcohol exposure. After 24 h of alcohol exposure, the levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in plasma were determined. The degree of hepatic histopathological abnormality was observed by HE staining. The activity of hepatic CAT, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in liver tissue were measured by corresponding kits. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma were determined by ELISA method. The results showed that treatment with ATZ dose-dependently suppressed the elevation of ALT, AST and LDH levels induced by alcohol exposure, and that ATZ alleviated alcohol-induced histopathological alterations. Furthermore, ATZ inhibited the activity of CAT, reduced hepatic levels of H₂O₂and MDA in alcohol exposed rats. ATZ also decreased the levels of plasma TNF-α and IL-6 in rats with alcohol exposure. These results indicated that ATZ attenuated alcohol-induced acute liver injury in rats, suggesting that CAT might play important pathological roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:25672632

  15. Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Genotypes in Pediatric Migraine Patients.

    PubMed

    Saygi, Semra; Erol, İlknur; Alehan, Füsun; Yalçın, Yaprak Yılmaz; Kubat, Gözde; Ataç, Fatma Belgin

    2015-10-01

    This study compared superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) alleles in 97 consecutive children and adolescents with migraine to 96 healthy children and adolescents. Isolated genomic DNA was used as a template for SOD1 (35 A/C), SOD2 16 C/T, and CAT2 [(-262 C/T) and (-21 A/T)] allele genotyping. The SOD2 16 C/T genotype and C allele frequency differed significantly between controls and migraine (P = .047; P = .038). CAT -21 AA genotype and A allele frequency were significantly higher in both migraine with aura patients (P = .013; P = .004) and migraine without aura patients (P = .003; P = .001) compared to controls. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of differences in SOD and CAT genotypes between pediatric migraine patients and age-matched controls. Further studies on the functional implications of these genetic variants on neural antioxidant capacity and the use of antioxidant modulators for migraine treatment are warranted. PMID:25818327

  16. A Review on Direct Electrochemistry of Catalase for Electrochemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Periasamy Arun; Yogeswaran, Umasankar; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Catalase (CAT) is a heme enzyme with a Fe(III/II) prosthetic group at its redox centre. CAT is present in almost all aerobic living organisms, where it catalyzes the disproportionation of H2O2 into oxygen and water without forming free radicals. In order to study this catalytic mechanism in detail, the direct electrochemistry of CAT has been investigated at various modified electrode surfaces with and without nanomaterials. The results show that CAT immobilized on nanomaterial modified electrodes shows excellent catalytic activity, high sensitivity and the lowest detection limit for H2O2 determination. In the presence of nanomaterials, the direct electron transfer between the heme group of the enzyme and the electrode surface improved significantly. Moreover, the immobilized CAT is highly biocompatible and remains extremely stable within the nanomaterial matrices. This review discusses about the versatile approaches carried out in CAT immobilization for direct electrochemistry and electrochemical sensor development aimed as efficient H2O2 determination. The benefits of immobilizing CAT in nanomaterial matrices have also been highlighted. PMID:22573989

  17. Blood catalase and haematocrit values in a breeding colony of Dutch-belted rabbits.

    PubMed

    Foote, R H; Hare, E

    2001-04-01

    Rabbit seminal plasma catalase is much higher than in the semen of other mammals, and differences appear to be inherited. Because of the scarcity of information on rabbit blood catalase and haematocrit in Dutch-belted rabbits, an investigation of possible effects of gender, age and genetics on these variables was undertaken. There were 191 rabbits sampled at 2-3 months, 130 at 12 months and 61 at 18-24 months of age. There was no age effect on the haematocrit values and on blood catalase activity. At 12 months of age males had an average haematocrit value of 44% compared with 40% for females (P < 0.05). Corresponding average catalase values were 431 and 356 units/ml of blood (P < 0.05). Also catalase was measured in the semen and blood of 34 males, and males differed in both their blood and semen catalase activity (P < 0.05). The correlation between the two traits was r = 0.44. Heritability (h2) estimates, based on 231 rabbits were 0.40 for blood catalase activity, and 0.26 for haematocrit. The genetic correlation between the two variables was 0.83 (P < 0.05). These studies are consistent with the literature in that female rabbits have a slightly lower haematocrit value than males, and this is associated with a lower catalase activity. This appears to be the first report of a study that compares rabbit blood catalase in males and females of different ages. Preliminary evidence that differences may have a heritable basis is consistent with previous studies on rabbit semen catalase. PMID:11315162

  18. Production of IFN-γ and IL-4 Against Intact Catalase and Constructed Catalase Epitopes of Helicobacter pylori From T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian Safaei, Hajieh; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Nasr Esfahani, Bahram; Fazeli, Hossein; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Adib, Minoo; Rashidi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent in the developing countries. It causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastrocarcinoma. Treatment with drugs and antibiotics is problematic due to the following reasons: cost, resistance to antibiotics, prolonged treatment and using multiple drugs. Catalase is highly conserved among the Helicobacter species and is important to the survival of the organism. It is expressed in high amounts and is exposed to the surface of this bacterium; therefore it represents a suitable candidate vaccine antigen. Objectives: A suitable approach in H. pylori vaccinology is the administration of epitope based vaccines. Therefore the responses of T-cells (IFN-γ and IL-4 production) against the catalase of H. pylori were determined. Then the quality of the immune responses against intact catalase and three epitopes of catalase were compared. Materials and Methods: In this study, a composition of three epitopes of the H. pylori catalase was selected based on Propred software. The effect of catalase epitopes on T-cells were assayed and immune responses identified. Results: The results of IFN-γ, IL-4 production against antigens, epitopes, and recombinant catalase by T-cells were compared for better understanding of epitope efficiency. Conclusions: The current research demonstrated that epitope sequence stimulates cellular immune responses effectively. In addition, increased safety and potency as well as a reduction in time and cost were advantages of this method. Authors are going to use this sequence as a suitable vaccine candidate for further research on animal models and humans in future. PMID:26862387

  19. Catalase characterization and implication in bleaching of a symbiotic sea anemone.

    PubMed

    Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Sabourault, Cécile; Richier, Sophie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola

    2007-01-15

    Symbiotic cnidarians are marine invertebrates harboring photosynthesizing microalgae (named zooxanthellae), which produce great amounts of oxygen and free radicals upon illumination. Studying antioxidative balance is then crucial to understanding how symbiotic cnidarians cope with ROS production. In particular, it is suspected that oxidative stress triggers cnidarian bleaching, i.e., the expulsion of zooxanthellae from the animal host, responsible for symbiotic cnidarian mass mortality worldwide. This study therefore investigates catalase antioxidant enzymes and their role in bleaching of the temperate symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Using specific separation of animal tissues (ectoderm and endoderm) from the symbionts (zooxanthellae), spectrophotometric assays and native PAGE revealed both tissue-specific and activity pattern distribution of two catalase electrophoretypes, E1 and E2. E1, expressed in all three tissues, presents high sensitivity to the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) and elevated temperatures. The ectodermal E1 form is responsible for 67% of total catalase activity. The E2 form, expressed only within zooxanthellae and their host endodermal cells, displays low sensitivity to ATZ and relative thermostability. We further cloned an ectodermal catalase, which shares 68% identity with mammalian monofunctional catalases. Last, 6 days of exposure of whole sea anemones to ATZ (0.5 mM) led to effective catalase inhibition and initiated symbiont expulsion. This demonstrates the crucial role of this enzyme in cnidarian bleaching, a phenomenon responsible for worldwide climate-change-induced mass mortalities, with catastrophic consequences for marine biodiversity. PMID:17189829

  20. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    PubMed

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed. PMID:26116387

  1. Structure of the heme d of Penicillium vitale and Escherichia coli catalases.

    PubMed

    Murshudov, G N; Grebenko, A I; Barynin, V; Dauter, Z; Wilson, K S; Vainshtein, B K; Melik-Adamyan, W; Bravo, J; Ferrán, J M; Ferrer, J C; Switala, J; Loewen, P C; Fita, I

    1996-04-12

    A heme d prosthetic group with the configuration of a cis-hydroxychlorin gamma-spirolactone has been found in the crystal structures of Penicillium vitale catalase and Escherichia coli catalase hydroperoxidase II (HPII). The absolute stereochemistry of the two heme d chiral carbon atoms has been shown to be identical. For both catalases the heme d is rotated 180 degrees about the axis defined by the alpha-gamma-meso carbon atoms, with respect to the orientation found for heme b in beef liver catalase. Only six residues in the heme pocket, preserved in P. vitale and HPII, differ from those found in the bovine catalase. In the crystal structure of the inactive N201H variant of HPII catalase the prosthetic group remains as heme b, although its orientation is the same as in the wild type enzyme. These structural results confirm the observation that heme d is formed from protoheme in the interior of the catalase molecule through a self-catalyzed reaction. PMID:8621527

  2. Maternally transmitted milk containing recombinant human catalase provides protection against oxidation for mouse offspring during lactation.

    PubMed

    He, Zuyong; Yu, Shengli; Mei, Gui; Zheng, Min; Wang, Meili; Dai, Yunping; Tang, Bo; Li, Ning

    2008-10-15

    Catalase plays an important role in protecting organisms against oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) by degrading surplus hydrogen peroxide. Addition of exogenous catalase can alleviate injuries caused by ROS. Thus, production of human catalase through genetic engineering will meet the increasing therapeutic demand for this enzyme. In this study, we successfully expressed the recombinant gene in mouse mammary gland, and biologically active human catalase was secreted into the milk of the transgenic mice. The peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS) within the catalase gene had no significant negative effect on the secretion of the recombinant protein. Intake of the transgenic milk by the pups was found to decrease lipid peroxidation, increase the total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity in the brain, and enhance the total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) of brain, liver, and serum. To our knowledge, this is the first example of efficient production of biologically active human catalase in the milk of transgenic animals. Our study suggests that scaled-up production in transgenic farm animals would yield sufficient human catalase for biomedical research and clinical therapies. PMID:18722522

  3. Purification of catalase from pea leaf peroxisomes: identification of five different isoforms.

    PubMed

    Corpas, F J; Palma, J M; Sandalio, L M; López-Huertas, E; Romero-Puertas, M C; Barroso, J B; Del Río, L A

    1999-12-01

    Catalase activity was analyzed in seven organs of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants: leaves, seeds, flowers, shoots, whole fruits, pods and roots. Leaves showed the highest activity followed by whole fruits and flowers. Catalase was purified from pea leaf peroxisomes. These organelles were isolated from leaves by differential and sucrose density-gradient centrifugation, and catalase was purified by two steps involving anion exchange and hydrophobic chromatography using a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography system. Pure catalase had a specific activity of 953 mmol H2O2 min(-1) mg(-1) protein and was purified 1000-fold, with a yield of about 19 microg enzyme per kg of pea leaves. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot showed that the pea catalase was composed of subunits of 57 kDa. Ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of the enzyme showed two absorption maxima at 252 and 400 nm with molar extinction coefficients of 2.14 x 10(6) and 7.56 x 10(6) M(-1) cm(-1), respectively. By isoelectric focusing (pH 5-7), five different isoforms were identified and designated as CAT1-5, with isoelectric points of 6.41, 6.36, 6.16, 6.13 and 6.09, respectively. All the catalase isoforms contained a subunit of 57 kDa. Post-embedment, EM immunogold labelling of catalase showed a uniform distribution of the enzyme inside the matrix and core of pea leaf peroxisomes. PMID:10694065

  4. Immunolocalization of hypochlorite-induced, catalase-bound free radical formation in mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Marcelo G.; Siraki, Arno G.; Atanassov, Boyko S.; Mason., Ronald P.

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of oxidants as mediators of signal transduction has renewed the interest of investigators in oxidant production and metabolism. In particular, H2O2 has been demonstrated to play pivotal roles in mediating cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Intracellular concentrations of H2O2 are modulated by its rate of production and its rate of decomposition by catalase and peroxidases. In inflammation and infection some of the H2O2 is converted to hypochlorous acid, a key mediator of the host immune response against pathogens. In vivo HOCl production is mediated by myeloperoxidase, which uses excess H2O2 to oxidize Cl−. Mashino and Fridovich (1988) observed that a high excess of HOCl over catalase inactivated the enzyme by mechanisms that remain unclear. The potential relevance of this as an alternative mechanism for catalase activity control and its potential impact on H2O2-mediated signaling and HOCl-production compelled us to explore in depth the HOCl-mediated catalase inactivation pathways. Here, we demonstrate that HOCl induces formation of catalase protein radicals and carbonyls, which are temporally correlated with catalase aggregation. Hypochlorite-induced catalase aggregation and free radical formation that paralleled the enzyme loss of function in vitro were also detected in mouse hepatocytes treated with the oxidant. Interestingly, the novel immunospin-trapping technique was applied to image radical production in the cells. Indeed, in HOCl-treated hepatocytes, catalase and protein-DMPO nitrone adducts were colocalized in the cells’ peroxisomes. In contrast, when hepatocytes from catalase-knockout mice were treated with hypochlorous acid, there was extensive production of free radicals in the plasma membrane. Because free radicals are short-lived species with fundamental roles in biology, the possibility of their detection and localization to cell compartments is expected to open new and stimulating research venues in the interface of chemistry, biology and medicine. PMID:17275685

  5. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  6. The regulation of catalase activity by PPAR ? is affected by ?-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Yakunin, Eugenia; Kisos, Haya; Kulik, Willem; Grigoletto, Jessica; Wanders, Ronald J A; Sharon, Ronit

    2014-01-01

    Objective While evidence for oxidative injury is frequently detected in brains of humans affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) and in relevant animal models, there is uncertainty regarding its cause. We tested the potential role of catalase in the oxidative injury that characterizes PD. Methods Utilizing brains of A53T ?-Syn and ntg mice, and cultured cells, we analyzed catalase activity and expression, and performed biochemical analyses of peroxisomal metabolites. Results Lower catalase expression and lower activity levels were detected in A53T ?-Syn brains and ?-Syn-expressing cells. The effect on catalase activity was independent of disease progression, represented by mouse age and ?-Syn mutation, suggesting a potential physiological function for ?-Syn. Notably, catalase activity and expression were unaffected in brains of mice modeling Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, we found that ?-Syn expression downregulate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)?, which controls catalase transcription. Importantly, activation of either PPAR?2, PPAR? or retinoic X receptor eliminated the inhibiting effect of ?-Syn on catalase activity. In addition, activation of these nuclear receptors enhanced the accumulation of soluble ?-Syn oligomers, resulting in a positive association between the degree of soluble ?-Syn oligomers and catalase activity. Of note, a comprehensive biochemical analysis of specific peroxisomal metabolites indicated no signs of dysfunction in specific peroxisomal activities in brains of A53T ?-Syn mice. Interpretation Our results suggest that ?-Syn expression may interfere with the complex and overlapping network of nuclear receptors transcription activation. In result, catalase activity is affected through mechanisms involved in the regulation of soluble ?-Syn oligomers. PMID:25356396

  7. Involvement of oxidative stress in hydroquinone-induced cytotoxicity in catalase-deficient Escherichia coli mutants.

    PubMed

    Horita, Masako; Wang, Da-Hong; Tsutsui, Ken; Sano, Kuniaki; Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Kira, Shohei

    2005-10-01

    Hydroquinone is a benzene-derived metabolite. To clarify whether the reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in hydroquinone-induced cytotoxicity, we constructed transformants of Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains that express mammalian catalase gene derived from catalase mutant mice (Cs(b), Cs(c)) and the wild-type (Cs(a)) using a catalase-deficient E. coli UM255 as a recipient. Specific catalase activities of these tester strains were in order of Cs(a) > Cs(c) > Cs(b) > UM255, and their susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) showed UM255 > Cs(b) > Cs(c) > Cs(a). We found that hydroquinone exposure reduced the survival of catalase-deficient E. coli mutants in a dose-dependent manner significantly, especially in the strains with lower catalase activities. Hydroquinone toxicity was also confirmed using zone of inhibition test, in which UM255 was the most susceptible, showing the largest zone of growth inhibition, followed by Cs(b), Cs(c) and Cs(a). Furthermore, we found that hydroquinone-induced cell damage was inhibited by the pretreatment of catalase, ascorbic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and augmented by superoxide dismutase (both CuZnSOD and MnSOD). The present results suggest that H2O2 is probably involved in hydroquinone-induced cytotoxicity in catalase-deficient E. coli mutants and catalase plays an important role in protection of the cells against hydroquinone toxicity. PMID:16298729

  8. Structural and functional changes in catalase induced by near-UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Zigman, S; Reddan, J; Schultz, J B; McDaniel, T

    1996-06-01

    Part one of this study shows that exposure of purified beef liver catalase in buffered solutions to BL lamps that provide a mixture of 99% UVA and 1% UVB (to be labeled UVA) alters its chemistry and enzymatic activity. Thus, its spectral absorbance lost detail, it aggregated and exhibited a lower isoelectric point and its enzymatic activity was substantially reduced. These photochemically induced changes were increased by irradiation in phosphate buffer or in physiological medium (minimal essential medium) containing riboflavin and tryptophan. Neither alpha-tocopherol nor deferoxamine were protective against these UVA-induced changes in pure catalase. We further investigated the effect of UVA radiation on the activity of catalase in cultured lens epithelial cells and the protective effects of antioxidants. Cultured lens epithelial cells of rabbits and squirrels were exposed to near-UV radiation with representation in the UVA region of 99% and 1% UVB. Catalase assays were done on homogenate supernatants of cells kept dark or UV exposed. In some instances, cells were cultured in medium containing alpha-tocopherol or deferoxamine prior to UV radiation. Comparisons were made between UV-exposed lens cell catalase activity when exposure was done with or without the antioxidants. The UVA radiation was strongly inhibitory to both rabbit and squirrel lens epithelial cell catalase activities. The range of fluxes of near UV radiation was compatible with that which could reach the lens from the sunlit environment. Catalase inactivation was lessened in cells preincubated with alpha-tocopherol and deferoxamine. This suggests that both singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical formation may be involved in near-UV damage to lens epithelial cell catalase. Such inhibition of catalase by near-UV would enhance H2O2 toxicity and stimulate SH oxidation so as to damage the lens. PMID:8992503

  9. Biochemical and Developmental Characterization of Multiple Forms of Catalase in Tobacco Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Havir, Evelyn A.; McHale, Neil A.

    1987-01-01

    Leaf extracts of both Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris contain multiple forms of catalase (H2O2:H2O2 oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.6) which are separable at different pH values by chromatofocusing columns. Marked changes in distribution of these catalases occur during seedling development and leaf maturation. The form of catalase eluting first (peak 1) was predominant during early seedling growth and present at all stages of development. Two more acidic forms (peaks 2 and 3) appeared later and comprised 29% of the total activity by 11 days postgermination. Mature leaves of N. tabacum contained peak 1 catalase, but peaks 2 and 3 represented 62% of the total activity. No interconversion of peaks 1, 2, and 3 was detected. The three forms of catalase differed in thermal stability with peak 1 > peak 2 ≫ peak 3. For N. sylvestris, t½ at 55°C was 31.5 and 3.0 min for peaks 1 and 3, respectively, and for N. tabacum, t½ was 41.5 and 3.2 min, respectively. All forms of catalase in tobacco show peroxidatic (measured as ethanol to acetaldehyde conversion) as well as catalatic activities. However, for both Nicotiana species the ratio peroxidatic/catalatic activity is at least 30-fold higher in peak 3 than in peaks 1 and 2. Chromatofocusing of extracts from spinach leaves separated at least four peaks of catalase activity, one of which had a 10-fold higher ratio of peroxidatic/catalatic activity than the others. Short-term growth (5 days) of tobacco seedlings under atmospheric conditions suppressing photorespiration (1% CO2/21% O2) reduced total catalase activity and caused a decline in peak 1 catalase and a substantial increase in the activity of peaks 2 and 3 relative to air-grown seedlings at the same stage. PMID:16665461

  10. Recovery of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain in blood and urine cultures from a patient with pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Kallstrom, George; Chang, Tom; Albertson, Marc; Morilla, Daniel; Fisher, Mark A; Eberly, Bardwell

    2011-11-01

    This report describes a 60-year-old patient with bilateral nephrolithiasis. A catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain was recovered from both urine and blood cultures. Although rare, isolates of catalase-negative Staphylococcus spp., including Staphylococcus aureus, have been reported. Here, we describe the first report of a catalase-negative S. epidermidis strain. PMID:21900516

  11. Recovery of a Catalase-Negative Staphylococcus epidermidis Strain in Blood and Urine Cultures from a Patient with Pyelonephritis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kallstrom, George; Chang, Tom; Albertson, Marc; Morilla, Daniel; Fisher, Mark A.; Eberly, Bardwell

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a 60-year-old patient with bilateral nephrolithiasis. A catalase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strain was recovered from both urine and blood cultures. Although rare, isolates of catalase-negative Staphylococcus spp., including Staphylococcus aureus, have been reported. Here, we describe the first report of a catalase-negative S. epidermidis strain. PMID:21900516

  12. An Oxyferrous Heme/Protein-based Radical Intermediate Is Catalytically Competent in the Catalase Reaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Catalase-Peroxidase (KatG)*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Javier; Ranguelova, Kalina; Jarzecki, Andrzej A.; Manzerova, Julia; Krymov, Vladimir; Zhao, Xiangbo; Yu, Shengwei; Metlitsky, Leonid; Gerfen, Gary J.; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    A mechanism accounting for the robust catalase activity in catalase-peroxidases (KatG) presents a new challenge in heme protein enzymology. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, KatG is the sole catalase and is also responsible for peroxidative activation of isoniazid, an anti-tuberculosis pro-drug. Here, optical stopped-flow spectrophotometry, rapid freeze-quench EPR spectroscopy both at the X-band and at the D-band, and mutagenesis are used to identify catalase reaction intermediates in M. tuberculosis KatG. In the presence of millimolar H2O2 at neutral pH, oxyferrous heme is formed within milliseconds from ferric (resting) KatG, whereas at pH 8.5, low spin ferric heme is formed. Using rapid freeze-quench EPR at X-band under both of these conditions, a narrow doublet radical signal with an 11 G principal hyperfine splitting was detected within the first milliseconds of turnover. The radical and the unique heme intermediates persist in wild-type KatG only during the time course of turnover of excess H2O2 (1000-fold or more). Mutation of Met255, Tyr229, or Trp107, which have covalently linked side chains in a unique distal side adduct (MYW) in wild-type KatG, abolishes this radical and the catalase activity. The D-band EPR spectrum of the radical exhibits a rhombic g tensor with dual gx values (2.00550 and 2.00606) and unique gy (2.00344) and gz values (2.00186) similar to but not typical of native tyrosyl radicals. Density functional theory calculations based on a model of an MYW adduct radical built from x-ray coordinates predict experimentally observed hyperfine interactions and a shift in g values away from the native tyrosyl radical. A catalytic role for an MYW adduct radical in the catalase mechanism of KatG is proposed. PMID:19139099

  13. Immobilization of catalase on chitosan and amino acid- modified chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Ba?ak, Esra; Aydemir, Tlin

    2013-08-01

    Bovine liver catalase was covalently immobilized onto amino acid-modified chitosan beads. The beads were characterized with SEM, FTIR, TGA and the effects of immobilization on optimum pH and temperature, thermostability, reusability were evaluated. Immobilized catalase showed the maximal enzyme activity at pH 7.0 at 30C. The kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax, for immobilized catalase on alanine-chitosan beads and lysine-chitosan beads were estimated to be 25.67 mM, 27 mM and 201.39 ?mol H2O2/min, 197.50 ?mol H2O2/min, respectively. The activity of the immobilized catalase on Ala-CB and Lys-CB retained 40% of its high initial activity after 100 times of reuse. PMID:23316810

  14. Occurrence of High Catalase-containing Acinetobacter in Spacecraft Assembly Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, K. B.; Derecho, I.; La Duc, M. T.; Vaishampayan, P.; Venkateswaran, K. J.; Mogul, R.

    2010-04-01

    In summary, the measurement of high catalase specific activity values for spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter strains is potentially the result of adaptation towards the harsh conditions of the clean rooms and assembly process.

  15. Purification, crystallization and phase determination of the DR1998 haem b catalase from Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Patrícia T.; Miranda, Cecília S.; Santos, Sandra P.; Carita, João N.; Frazão, Carlos; Romão, Célia V.

    2014-01-01

    The protective mechanisms of Deinococcus radiodurans against primary reactive oxygen species involve nonenzymatic scavengers and a powerful enzymatic antioxidant system including catalases, peroxidases and superoxide dismutases that prevents oxidative damage. Catalase is an enzyme that is responsible for the conversion of H2O2 to O2 and H2O, protecting the organism from the oxidative effect of H2O2. This study reports the purification and crystallization of the DR1998 catalase from D. radiodurans. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 97.33, b = 311.88, c = 145.63 Å, suggesting that they contain four molecules per asymmetric unit. The initial phases were determined by molecular replacement and the obtained solution shows the typical catalase quaternary structure. A preliminary model of the protein structure has been built and refinement is currently in progress. PMID:24817732

  16. An ultrastructural study of glomerular permeability in aminonucleoside nephrosis using catalase as a tracer protein.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, M A; Cotran, R S; Karnovsky, M J

    1970-12-01

    Beef liver catalase (mol wt 240,000) was injected intravenously into normal rats and rats made nephrotic with aminonucleoside of puromycin. The localization of the tracer in the kidneys was then studied by ultrastructural cytochemistry, 3 min-12 hr after injection. Passage of catalase into the urinary space in normal rats was restricted by the basement membrane and by the epithelial slit pore. Nephrotic glomeruli showed extensive fusion of foot processes and formation of pockets and vacuoles in the fused epithelium; within 3 min after injection, catalase appeared in basal pockets, epithelial vacuoles, and the urinary space. Residual slit pores and close junctions in fused epithelium were impermeable to catalase. These studies indicate that alteration of the epithelial cells and basement membrane is responsible for protein leakage in aminonucleoside nephrosis. PMID:5511569

  17. A Simple Method for Demonstrating Enzyme Kinetics Using Catalase from Beef Liver Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kristin A.

    2000-11-01

    This paper describes a simple visual method of demonstrating enzyme kinetics using beef liver catalase. A catalase solution is obtained by homogenizing beef liver in a phosphate buffer. In the demonstration, filter paper is saturated with beef liver extract and placed into a solution of hydrogen peroxide. The catalase in the extract decomposes the hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. Oxygen forms on the filter paper, and the filter paper rises to the top of the beaker. Catalase activity is measured by timing the rise of the enzyme-soaked filter paper to the top of beakers containing different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. The data are plotted as a Lineweaver-Burk double-reciprocal plot, and the Km and Vmax for the reaction are calculated.

  18. Purification, crystallization and phase determination of the DR1998 haem b catalase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Borges, Patrícia T; Miranda, Cecília S; Santos, Sandra P; Carita, João N; Frazão, Carlos; Romão, Célia V

    2014-05-01

    The protective mechanisms of Deinococcus radiodurans against primary reactive oxygen species involve nonenzymatic scavengers and a powerful enzymatic antioxidant system including catalases, peroxidases and superoxide dismutases that prevents oxidative damage. Catalase is an enzyme that is responsible for the conversion of H2O2 to O2 and H2O, protecting the organism from the oxidative effect of H2O2. This study reports the purification and crystallization of the DR1998 catalase from D. radiodurans. The crystals diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 97.33, b = 311.88, c = 145.63 Å, suggesting that they contain four molecules per asymmetric unit. The initial phases were determined by molecular replacement and the obtained solution shows the typical catalase quaternary structure. A preliminary model of the protein structure has been built and refinement is currently in progress. PMID:24817732

  19. Production, characterization, cloning and sequence analysis of a monofunctional catalase from Serratia marcescens SYBC08.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hua-Wei; Cai, Yu-Jie; Liao, Xiang-Ru; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Da-Bing

    2011-04-01

    A monofunctional catalase from Serratia marcescens SYBC08 produced by liquid state fermentation in 7 liter fermenter was isolated and purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation (ASP), ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and gel filtration (GF) and characterized. Its sequence was analyzed by LC-MS/MS technique and gene cloning. The highest catalase production (20,289 U · ml(-1)) was achieved after incubation for 40 h. The purified catalase had an estimated molecular mass of 230 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 58 kDa. High specific activity of the catalase (199,584 U · mg(-1) protein) was 3.44 times higher than that of Halomonas sp. Sk1 catalase (57,900 U · mg(-1) protein). The enzyme without peroxidase activity was found to be an atypical electronic spectrum of monofunctional catalase. The apparent K(m) and V(max) were 78 mM and 188, 212 per µM H(2) O(2) µM heme(-1) s(-1), respectivly. The enzyme displayed a broad pH activity range (pH 5.0-11.0), with optimal pH range of 7.0-9.0: It was most active at 20 °C and had 78% activity at 0 °C. Its thermo stability was slightly higher compared to that of commercial catalase from bovine liver. LC-MS/MS analysis confirmed that the deduced amino acid sequence of cloning gene was the catalase sequence from Serratia marcescens SYBC08. The sequence was compared with that of 23 related catalases. Although most of active site residues, NADPH-binding residues, proximal residues of the heme, distal residues of the heme and residues interacting with a water molecule in the enzyme were well conserved in 23 related catalases, weakly conserved residues were found. Its sequence was closely related with that of catalases from pathogenic bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. This result imply that the enzyme with high specific activity plays a significant role in preventing those microorganisms of the family Enterobacteriaceae against hydrogen peroxide resulted in cellular damage. Calalase yield by Serratia marcescens SYBC08 has potential industrial application in scavenging hydrogen peroxide. PMID:21077118

  20. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-02-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed.

  1. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CYANIDE-RESISTANT AND AZIDE-RESISTANT CATALASE OF LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM.

    PubMed

    JOHNSTON, M A; DELWICHE, E A

    1965-08-01

    Johnston, M. A. (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.), and E. A. Delwiche. Isolation and characterization of the cyanide-resistant and azide-resistant catalase of Lactobacillus plantarum. J. Bacteriol. 90:352-356. 1965.-Lactobacillus plantarum T-1403-5 has been shown to possess a very active cyanide- and azide-resistant catalase. By means of fractional ammonium sulfate precipitation, removal of nucleic acids with protamine sulfate, adsorption on calcium phosphate gel, and pH gradient chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose, the catalase "activity" was purified approximately 14-fold. The purified enzyme preparation was insensitive to the heme poisons cyanide and azide, the metal chelating agents ethylenediaminetetraacetate and o-phenanthroline, and the sulfhydryl binding agent p-chloromercuribenzoate. The purified enzyme moved at a uniform rate in the electrophoretic field (isoelectric point, pH 4.7). The ultraviolet-light absorption spectrum was negative for heme-iron components, and fluorescence measurements yielded negative results with regard to flavin components. Acriflavin and Atabrine had no effect on enzyme activity. The nonheme catalase displayed a much broader pH range of activity than the heme-iron catalase of a control culture of Escherichia coli and the azide-sensitive catalase developed by L. plantarum NZ48 when grown in the presence of preformed hematin. The nonheme catalase was more resistant to heat inactivation. No retention of the enzyme on a chromatographic column could be obtained with Sephadex 200, nor could the enzyme be separated from crystalline beef-liver catalase by the gel filtration technique. Sedimentation was obtained in a centrifugal field of 144,000 x g for 12 hr. PMID:14329447

  2. Benfotiamine upregulates antioxidative system in activated BV-2 microglia cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Iva; Savic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Ivana; Pekovic, Sanja; Nedeljkovic, Nadezda; Lavrnja, Irena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic microglial activation and resulting sustained neuroinflammatory reaction are generally associated with neurodegeneration. Activated microglia acquires proinflammatory cellular profile that generates oxidative burst. Their persistent activation exacerbates inflammation, which damages healthy neurons via cytotoxic mediators, such as superoxide radical anion and nitric oxide. In our recent study, we have shown that benfotiamine (S-benzoylthiamine O-monophosphate) possesses anti-inflammatory effects. Here, the effects of benfotiamine on the pro-oxidative component of activity of LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells were investigated. The activation of microglia was accompanied by upregulation of intracellular antioxidative defense, which was further promoted in the presence of benfotiamine. Namely, activated microglia exposed to non-cytotoxic doses of benfotiamine showed increased levels and activities of hydrogen peroxide- and superoxide-removing enzymes—catalase and glutathione system, and superoxide dismutase. In addition, benfotiamine showed the capacity to directly scavenge superoxide radical anion. As a consequence, benfotiamine suppressed the activation of microglia and provoked a decrease in NO and ·O−2 production and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, benfotiamine might silence pro-oxidative activity of microglia to alleviate/prevent oxidative damage of neighboring CNS cells. PMID:26388737

  3. Redundant Catalases Detoxify Phagocyte Reactive Oxygen and Facilitate Histoplasma capsulatum Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Eric D.; Smolnycki, Katherine A.; Youseff, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is a respiratory pathogen that infects phagocytic cells. The mechanisms allowing Histoplasma to overcome toxic reactive oxygen molecules produced by the innate immune system are an integral part of Histoplasma's ability to survive during infection. To probe the contribution of Histoplasma catalases in oxidative stress defense, we created and analyzed the virulence defects of mutants lacking CatB and CatP, which are responsible for extracellular and intracellular catalase activities, respectively. Both CatB and CatP protected Histoplasma from peroxide challenge in vitro and from antimicrobial reactive oxygen produced by human neutrophils and activated macrophages. Optimal protection required both catalases, as the survival of a double mutant lacking both CatB and CatP was lower than that of single-catalase-deficient cells. Although CatB contributed to reactive oxygen species defenses in vitro, CatB was dispensable for lung infection and extrapulmonary dissemination in vivo. Loss of CatB from a strain also lacking superoxide dismutase (Sod3) did not further reduce the survival of Histoplasma yeasts. Nevertheless, some catalase function was required for pathogenesis since simultaneous loss of both CatB and CatP attenuated Histoplasma virulence in vivo. These results demonstrate that Histoplasma's dual catalases comprise a system that enables Histoplasma to efficiently overcome the reactive oxygen produced by the innate immune system. PMID:23589579

  4. Purification, characterization, and identification of a novel bifunctional catalase-phenol oxidase from Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Sutay Kocabas, Didem; Bakir, Ufuk; Phillips, Simon E V; McPherson, Michael J; Ogel, Zumrut B

    2008-06-01

    A novel bifunctional catalase with an additional phenol oxidase activity was isolated from a thermophilic fungus, Scytalidium thermophilum. This extracellular enzyme was purified ca. 10-fold with 46% yield and was biochemically characterized. The enzyme contains heme and has a molecular weight of 320 kDa with four 80 kDa subunits and an isoelectric point of 5.0. Catalase and phenol oxidase activities were most stable at pH 7.0. The activation energies of catalase and phenol oxidase activities of the enzyme were found to be 2.7 +/- 0.2 and 10.1 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol, respectively. The pure enzyme can oxidize o-diphenols such as catechol, caffeic acid, and L-DOPA in the absence of hydrogen peroxide and the highest oxidase activity is observed against catechol. No activity is detected against tyrosine and common laccase substrates such as ABTS and syringaldazine with the exception of weak activity with p-hydroquinone. Common catechol oxidase inhibitors, salicylhydroxamic acid and p-coumaric acid, inhibit the oxidase activity. Catechol oxidation activity was also detected in three other catalases tested, from Aspergillus niger, human erythrocyte, and bovine liver, suggesting that this dual catalase-phenol oxidase activity may be a common feature of catalases. PMID:18369615

  5. Not so monofunctional--a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-03-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 400 mg/L. Heat treatment of disrupted cells at 60 °C for 1 h resulted in enzyme preparation of high purity; hence, no chromatography steps are needed for large-scale production. Except for catalyzing the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide, TfuCat was also found to catalyze oxidations of phenolic compounds. The catalase activity was comparable to other described catalases while peroxidase activity was quite remarkable with a k obs of nearly 1000 s(-1) for catechol. Site directed mutagenesis was used to alter the ratio of peroxidase/catalase activity. Resistance to inhibition by classic catalase inhibitors and an apparent melting temperature of 74 °C classifies this enzyme as a robust biocatalyst. As such, it could compete with other commercially available catalases while the relatively high peroxidase activity also offers new biocatalytic possibilities. PMID:25227535

  6. Reversible adsorption of catalase onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels.

    PubMed

    Aktaş Uygun, Deniz; Uygun, Murat; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2015-05-01

    In this presented study, poly(acrylamide-glycidyl methacrylate) [poly(AAm-GMA)] cryogels were synthesized by cryopolymerization technique at sub-zero temperature. Prepared cryogels were then functionalized with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) and chelated with Fe(3+) ions in order produce the metal chelate affinity matrix. Synthesized cryogels were characterized with FTIR, ESEM and EDX analysis, and it was found that the cryogel had sponge like structure with interconnected pores and their pore diameter was about 200 μm. Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogels were used for the adsorption of catalase and optimum adsorption conditions were determined by varying the medium pH, initial catalase concentration, temperature and ionic strength. Maximum catalase adsorption onto Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was found to be 12.99 mg/g cryogel at 25 °C, by using pH 5.0 acetate buffer. Adsorbed catalase was removed from the cryogel by using 1.0M of NaCl solution and desorption yield was found to be 96%. Additionally, reusability profile of the Fe(3+) chelated poly(AAm-GMA)-IDA cryogel was also investigated and it was found that, adsorption capacity of the cryogels didn't decrease significantly at the end of the 40 reuses. Catalase activity studies were also tested and it was demonstrated that desorbed catalase retained 70% of its initial activity. PMID:25746283

  7. Fluorescence Spectrometry of the Interaction of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.; Li, Y.; Cai, H.; Li, J.; Miao, J.; Fu, D.; Yang, Q.

    2014-11-01

    The interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with catalase is investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The results of the fluorescence experiments suggest that MWCNTs quench the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase via a static quenching mechanism. The circular dichroism spectral results reveal the unfolding of catalase with a significant decrease in the α-helix content in the presence of MWCNTs, which indicates that the conformation of catalase is changed in the binding process, thereby remarkably decreasing its activity. The binding constants and the number of binding sites of the MWCNT to the catalase are calculated at different temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS), are calculated using thermodynamic equations. The fact that all negative values of ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS are obtained suggests that the interaction of the MWCNTs with catalase is spontaneous, and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play an important role in the binding process.

  8. Protecting Peroxidase Activity of Multilayer Enzyme-Polyion Films Using Outer Catalase Layers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haiyun; Rusling, James F.; Hu, Naifei

    2008-01-01

    Films constructed layer-by-layer on electrodes with architecture {protein/hyaluronic acid (HA)}n containing myoglobin (Mb) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were protected against protein damage by H2O2 by using outer catalase layers. Peroxidase activity for substrate oxidation requires activation by H2O2, but {protein/HA}n films without outer catalase layers are damaged slowly and irreversibly by H2O2. The rate and extent of damage were decreased dramatically by adding outer catalase layers to decompose H2O2. Comparative studies suggest that protection results from catalase decomposing a fraction of the H2O2 as it enters the film, rather than by an in-film diffusion barrier. The outer catalase layers controlled the rate of H2O2 entry into inner regions of the film, and biased the system to favor electrocatalytic peroxide reduction over enzyme damage. Catalase-protected {protein/HA}n films had an increased linear concentration range for H2O2 detection. This approach offers an effective way to protect biosensors from damage by H2O2. PMID:18052272

  9. Inhibitory effects of a novel Val to Thr mutation on the distal heme of human catalase

    PubMed Central

    Mashhadi, Zahra; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    True catalases efficiently breakdown hydrogen peroxide, whereas the catalase-related enzyme allene oxide synthase (cAOS) is completely unreactive and instead metabolizes a fatty acid hydroperoxide. In cAOS a Thr residue adjacent to the distal His restrains reaction with H2O2 (Tosha et al (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281:12610; De Luna et al (2013) J. Phys. Chem. B 117: 14635) and its mutation to the consensus Val of true catalases permits the interaction. Here we investigated the effects of the reciprocal experiment in which the Val74 of human catalase is mutated to Thr, Ser, Met, Pro, or Ala. The Val74Thr substitution decreased catalatic activity by 3.5-fold and peroxidatic activity by 3-fold. Substitution with Ser had similar negative effects (5- and 3-fold decreases). Met decreased catalatic activity 2-fold and eliminated peroxidatic activity altogether, whereas the Val74Ala substitution was well tolerated. (The Val74Pro protein lacked heme). We conclude that the conserved Val74 of true catalases helps optimize catalysis. There are rare substitutions of Val74 with Ala, Met, or Pro, but not with Ser of Thr, possibly due their hydrogen bonding affecting the conformation of His75, the essential distal heme residue for activity in catalases. PMID:25086217

  10. A synthetic superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic EUK-207 mitigates radiation dermatitis and promotes wound healing in irradiated rat skin.

    PubMed

    Doctrow, Susan R; Lopez, Argelia; Schock, Ashley M; Duncan, Nathan E; Jourdan, Megan M; Olasz, Edit B; Moulder, John E; Fish, Brian L; Mäder, Marylou; Lazar, Jozef; Lazarova, Zelmira

    2013-04-01

    In the event of a radionuclear attack or nuclear accident, the skin would be the first barrier exposed to radiation, though skin injury can progress over days to years following exposure. Chronic oxidative stress has been implicated as being a potential contributor to the progression of delayed radiation-induced injury to skin and other organs. To examine the causative role of oxidative stress in delayed radiation-induced skin injury, including impaired wound healing, we tested a synthetic superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase mimetic, EUK-207, in a rat model of combined skin irradiation and wound injury. Administered systemically, beginning 48 hours after irradiation, EUK-207 mitigated radiation dermatitis, suppressed indicators of tissue oxidative stress, and enhanced wound healing. Evaluation of gene expression in irradiated skin at 30 days after exposure revealed a significant upregulation of several key genes involved in detoxication of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. This gene expression pattern was primarily reversed by EUK-207 therapy. These results demonstrate that oxidative stress has a critical role in the progression of radiation-induced skin injury, and that the injury can be mitigated by appropriate antioxidant compounds administered 48 hours after exposure. PMID:23190879

  11. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Thermo-Alkali-Stable Catalase from Thermus brockianus

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Vicki Sue; Schaller, Kastli Dianne; Apel, William Arnold

    2003-10-01

    A novel thermo-alkali-stable catalase from Thermus brockianus was purified and characterized. The protein was purified from a T. brockianus cell extract in a three-step procedure that resulted in 65-fold purification to a specific activity of 5300 U/mg. The enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 42.5 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE and a total molecular mass measured by gel filtration of 178 kDa. The catalase was active over a temperature range from 30 to 94 C and a pH range from 6 to 10, with optimum activity occurring at 90 C and pH 8. At pH 8, the enzyme was extremely stable at elevated temperatures with half-lives of 330 h at 80 C and 3 h at 90 C. The enzyme also demonstrated excellent stability at 70 C and alkaline pH with measured half-lives of 510 h and 360 h at pHs of 9 and 10, respectively. The enzyme had an unusual pyridine hemochrome spectrum and appears to utilize eight molecules of heme c per tetramer rather than protoheme IX present in the majority of catalases studied to date. The absorption spectrum suggested that the heme iron of the catalase was in a 6-coordinate low spin state rather than the typical 5-coordinate high spin state. A Km of 35.5 mM and a Vmax of 20.3 mM/min·mg protein for hydrogen peroxide was measured, and the enzyme was not inhibited by hydrogen peroxide at concentrations up to 450 mM. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by cyanide and the traditional catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. The enzyme also showed no peroxidase activity to peroxidase substrates o-dianisidine and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), a trait of typical monofunctional catalases. However, unlike traditional monofunctional catalases, the T. brockianus catalase was easily reduced by dithionite, a characteristic of catalase-peroxidases. The above properties indicate that this catalase has potential for applications in industrial bleaching processes to remove residual hydrogen peroxide from process streams.

  12. Restoring catalase activity in Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius leads to loss of pathogenicity for lambs

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Ricardo; Díez, Rosa M.; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Orden, José A.; Martínez-Pulgarín, Susana

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius, a microaerophilic and catalase-negative bacterium, is the etiological agent of abscess disease, a specific chronic condition of sheep and goats, which is characterized by formation of necrotic lesions that are located typically in superficial lymph nodes. We constructed an isogenic mutant of S. aureus subsp. anaerobius (RDKA84) that carried a repaired and functional catalase gene from S. aureus ATCC 12600, to investigate whether the lack of catalase in S. aureus subsp. anaerobius plays a role in its physiological and pathogenic characteristics. The catalase activity had no apparent influence on the in vitro growth characteristics of RDKA84, which, like the wild-type, did not grow on aerobically incubated agar plates. Restoration of catalase activity in RDKA84 substantially increased resistance to H2O2 when analyzed in a death assay. The intracellular survival rates of the catalase-positive mutant RDKA84 in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) isolated from adult sheep were significantly higher than those of the wild-type, while no differences were found with PMN isolated from lambs. RDKA84 showed significantly lower survival rates in murine macrophages (J774A.1 cells) than the wild-type strains did, whereas, in bovine mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T), no differences in intracellular survival were observed. Interestingly, the virulence for lambs, the natural host for abscess disease, of the catalase-positive mutant RDKA84 was reduced dramatically in comparison with wild-type S. aureus subsp. anaerobius in two experimental models of infection. PMID:20167202

  13. Reduction of Hydrogen Peroxide Accumulation and Toxicity by a Catalase from Mycoplasma iowae

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Rachel E.; Prassinos, Alexandre J.; Osborne, John D.; Raviv, Ziv; Balish, Mitchell F.

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma iowae is a well-established avian pathogen that can infect and damage many sites throughout the body. One potential mediator of cellular damage by mycoplasmas is the production of H2O2 via a glycerol catabolic pathway whose genes are widespread amongst many mycoplasma species. Previous sequencing of M. iowae serovar I strain 695 revealed the presence of not only genes for H2O2 production through glycerol catabolism but also the first documented mycoplasma gene for catalase, which degrades H2O2. To test the activity of M. iowae catalase in degrading H2O2, we studied catalase activity and H2O2 accumulation by both M. iowae serovar K strain DK-CPA, whose genome we sequenced, and strains of the H2O2-producing species Mycoplasma gallisepticum engineered to produce M. iowae catalase by transformation with the M. iowae putative catalase gene, katE. H2O2-mediated virulence by M. iowae serovar K and catalase-producing M. gallisepticum transformants were also analyzed using a Caenorhabditis elegans toxicity assay, which has never previously been used in conjunction with mycoplasmas. We found that M. iowae katE encodes an active catalase that, when expressed in M. gallisepticum, reduces both the amount of H2O2 produced and the amount of damage to C. elegans in the presence of glycerol. Therefore, the correlation between the presence of glycerol catabolism genes and the use of H2O2 as a virulence factor by mycoplasmas might not be absolute. PMID:25127127

  14. Two Cytoplasmic Effectors of Phytophthora sojae Regulate Plant Cell Death via Interactions with Plant Catalases1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meixiang; Li, Qi; Liu, Tingli; Liu, Li; Shen, Danyu; Zhu, Ye; Liu, Peihan; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora sojae, secrete an arsenal of host cytoplasmic effectors to promote infection. We have shown previously that P. sojae PsCRN63 (for crinkling- and necrosis-inducing proteins) induces programmed cell death (PCD) while PsCRN115 blocks PCD in planta; however, they are jointly required for full pathogenesis. Here, we find that PsCRN63 alone or PsCRN63 and PsCRN115 together might suppress the immune responses of Nicotiana benthamiana and demonstrate that these two cytoplasmic effectors interact with catalases from N. benthamiana and soybean (Glycine max). Transient expression of PsCRN63 increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation, whereas PsCRN115 suppresses this process. Transient overexpression of NbCAT1 (for N. benthamiana CATALASE1) or GmCAT1 specifically alleviates PsCRN63-induced PCD. Suppression of the PsCRN63-induced PCD by PsCRN115 is compromised when catalases are silenced in N. benthamiana. Interestingly, the NbCAT1 is recruited into the plant nucleus in the presence of PsCRN63 or PsCRN115; NbCAT1 and GmCAT1 are destabilized when PsCRN63 is coexpressed, and PsCRN115 inhibits the processes. Thus, PsCRN63/115 manipulates plant PCD through interfering with catalases and perturbing H2O2 homeostasis. Furthermore, silencing of catalase genes enhances susceptibility to Phytophthora capsici, indicating that catalases are essential for plant resistance. Taken together, we suggest that P. sojae secretes these two effectors to regulate plant PCD and H2O2 homeostasis through direct interaction with catalases and, therefore, overcome host immune responses. PMID:25424308

  15. Adeno-associated viral-mediated catalase expression suppresses optic neuritis in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Guy, J; Qi, X; Hauswirth, W W

    1998-11-10

    Suppression of oxidative injury by viral-mediated transfer of the human catalase gene was tested in the optic nerves of animals with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of primary central nervous system demyelination that has been frequently used as an animal model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS). The optic nerve is a frequent site of involvement common to both EAE and MS. Recombinant adeno-associated virus containing the human gene for catalase was injected over the right optic nerve heads of SJL/J mice that were simultaneously sensitized for EAE. After 1 month, cell-specific catalase activity, evaluated by quantitation of catalase immunogold, was increased approximately 2-fold each in endothelia, oligodendroglia, astrocytes, and axons of the optic nerve. Effects of catalase on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of the myelin sheath area (for demyelination), optic disc area (for optic nerve head swelling), extent of the cellular infiltrate, extravasated serum albumin labeled by immunogold (for blood-brain barrier disruption), and in vivo H2O2 reaction product. Relative to control, contralateral optic nerves injected with the recombinant virus without a therapeutic gene, catalase gene inoculation reduced demyelination by 38%, optic nerve head swelling by 29%, cellular infiltration by 34%, disruption of the blood-brain barrier by 64%, and in vivo levels of H2O2 by 61%. Because the efficacy of potential treatments for MS are usually initially tested in the EAE animal model, this study suggests that catalase gene delivery by using viral vectors may be a therapeutic strategy for suppression of MS. PMID:9811889

  16. Adeno-Associated Viral-Mediated Catalase Expression Suppresses Optic Neuritis in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, John; Qi, Xiaoping; Hauswirth, William W.

    1998-11-01

    Suppression of oxidative injury by viral-mediated transfer of the human catalase gene was tested in the optic nerves of animals with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder of primary central nervous system demyelination that has been frequently used as an animal model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS). The optic nerve is a frequent site of involvement common to both EAE and MS. Recombinant adeno-associated virus containing the human gene for catalase was injected over the right optic nerve heads of SJL/J mice that were simultaneously sensitized for EAE. After 1 month, cell-specific catalase activity, evaluated by quantitation of catalase immunogold, was increased approximately 2-fold each in endothelia, oligodendroglia, astrocytes, and axons of the optic nerve. Effects of catalase on the histologic lesions of EAE were measured by computerized analysis of the myelin sheath area (for demyelination), optic disc area (for optic nerve head swelling), extent of the cellular infiltrate, extravasated serum albumin labeled by immunogold (for blood-brain barrier disruption), and in vivo H2O2 reaction product. Relative to control, contralateral optic nerves injected with the recombinant virus without a therapeutic gene, catalase gene inoculation reduced demyelination by 38%, optic nerve head swelling by 29%, cellular infiltration by 34%, disruption of the blood-brain barrier by 64%, and in vivo levels of H2O2 by 61%. Because the efficacy of potential treatments for MS are usually initially tested in the EAE animal model, this study suggests that catalase gene delivery by using viral vectors may be a therapeutic strategy for suppression of MS.

  17. Survival and fertility rate of cooled dromedary camel spermatozoa supplemented with catalase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Medan, Mohamed Sabry; Absy, Gamal; Zeidan, Alaa Elsayed; Khalil, Medhat Hussein; Khalifa, Hesham Hussein; Abdel-Salaam, Atef Mahrous; Abdel-Khalek, Tarek Mohammad

    2008-02-01

    The present study was planned to study the effects of addition of different concentrations of catalase enzyme (0, 250, 500 and 1,000 IU/ml) to cooled dromedary camel semen extended with tris-yolk-fructose extender on semen quality during storage at 5 C for up to 5 days. Conception rates of she-camels artificially inseminated with whole fresh or extended cooled dromedary camel semen with or without 500 IU/ml catalase enzyme were also estimated. The results showed that addition of catalase enzyme at concentrations of 250 or 500 IU/ml to extended cooled dromedary camel semen significantly increased (P<0.01) the percentage of sperm motility and significantly decreased (P<0.01) the percentages of dead spermatozoa, sperm abnormalities and acrosomal damage. The highest (P<0.01) percentage of sperm motility was recorded with extended cooled dromedary camel semen supplemented with catalase enzyme at a concentration of 500 IU/ml, and the lowest (P<0.01) value was recorded with catalase enzyme at a concentration of 1000 IU/ml. On the other hand, the lowest (P<0.01) percentages of dead spermatozoa, sperm abnormalities and acrosomal damage of spermatozoa were recorded with extended cooled dromedary camel semen supplemented with 500 IU/ml, and the highest (P<0.01) values were recorded with catalase enzyme at a concentration of 1,000 IU/ml. Advancement of the storage time at 5 C significantly decreased (P<0.01) the percentage of sperm motility and significantly increased (P<0.01) the percentages of dead spermatozoa, sperm abnormalities and acrosomal damage of spermatozoa. Moreover, the conception rates of she-camels artificially inseminated with whole fresh, extended cooled dromedary camel semen free-catalase enzyme and extended cooled dromedary camel semen supplemented with catalase enzyme at a concentration of 500 IU/ml were 46.15, 22.22 and 37.50%, respectively. In conclusion, the results show that addition of catalase enzyme at a concentration of 500 IU/ml to semen extender can be used as an agent for prolongation of dromedary camel sperm cell survival during storage at 5 C. PMID:18094528

  18. UV-resistant Acinetobacter sp. isolates from Andean wetlands display high catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Di Capua, Cecilia; Bortolotti, Ana; Farías, María Eugenia; Cortez, Néstor

    2011-04-01

    Andean wetlands are characterized by their extreme environmental conditions such as high UV radiation, elevated heavy metal content and salinity. We present here the first study on UV tolerance and antioxidant defense of four Acinetobacter strains: Ver3, Ver5 and Ver7, isolated from Lake Verde, and N40 from Lake Negra, both lakes located 4400 m above sea level. All four isolates displayed higher UV resistance compared with collection strains, with Ver3 and Ver7 being the most tolerant strains not only to UV radiation but also to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and methyl viologen (MV) challenges. A single superoxide dismutase band with similar activity was detected in all studied strains, whereas different electrophoretic pattern and activity levels were observed for catalase. Ver3 and Ver7 displayed 5-15 times higher catalase activity levels than the control strains. Analysis of the response of antioxidant enzymes to UV and oxidative challenges revealed a significant increase in Ver7 catalase activity after H(2)O(2) and MV exposure. Incubation of Ver7 cultures with a catalase inhibitor resulted in a significant decrease of tolerance against UV radiation. We conclude that the high catalase activity displayed by Ver7 isolate could play an important role in UV tolerance. PMID:21276048

  19. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  20. Effect of Catalase and Sodium Fluoride on Human Enamel bleached with 35% Carbamide Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Shigli, Anand L; Sharma, Divya S; Thakur, Gagan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To evaluate the effects of postbleaching antioxidant application fluoridation treatment on the surface morphology and microhardness of human enamel. Materials and methods: Ten freshly extracted human maxillary central incisors were cut at cementoenamel junction. Crown portion was sectioned into six slabs which were divided into five groups: group A – untreated controls; group B – 35% carbamide peroxide (CP); group C – 35% CP and catalase; group D – treatment with 35% CP and 5% sodium fluoride; group E – 35% CP, catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Thirty-five percent carbamide peroxide application included two applications of 30 minutes each at a 5-day interval. After treatment, the slabs were thoroughly washed with water for 10 seconds and stored in artificial saliva at 37°C until the next treatment. Two percent sodium fluoride included application for 5 minutes. Three catalase included application for 3 minutes. Results: After 5 days, groups B and C showed significantly decreased enamel microhardness compared to control. Group D specimens showed relatively less reduction in enamel micro-hardness than group C specimens. There is a marked increase in enamel microhardness in group E specimens. Conclusions: Fluoride take up was comparatively enhanced after catalase application resulting in less demineralization and increased microhardness. How to cite this article: Thakur R, Shigli AL, Sharma DS, Thakur G. Effect of Catalase and Sodium Fluoride on Human Enamel bleached with 35% Carbamide Peroxide. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(1):12-17. PMID:26124575

  1. Relationship between uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms and its catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Kenmotsu, K.; Hirota, N.; Naito, M.

    1981-12-01

    The uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms (Shiitake) artifically grown on an oak tree and the uptake in vitro by catalase extracts prepared from mushroom Hay Bacillus and spinach are reported. Mushrooms were exposed to 1.4 mg/Hg/cu m for 11 days. Measurement of total mercury was as previously described (Ogata et al. 1978, 1979). Levels in mushrooms ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 ..mu..g/g at 0.5 days to 4.6 +/- 0.2 ..mu..g/g at 10.5 days and steady-state thereafter. In in vitro studies Hy uptake by mushroom catalase extract was estimated by the perborate method. Uptake was found to parallel catalase activity and was inhibited by potassium cyanide, sodium azide, and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Similar results were obtained with Hay Bacillus and spinach catalase extracts. Results suggest that the level of mercury in the mushroom can be used as an indicator of mercury pollution in the environment. It is also suggested that catalase has an important role in uptake of mercury vapor in the plant. 2 tables (JMT)

  2. Production of catalases by Aspergillus niger isolates as a response to pollutant stress by heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Buckova, M.; Godocikova, J.; Simonovicova, A.; Polek, B.

    2005-04-15

    Isolates of Aspergillus niger, selected from the coal dust of a mine containing arsenic (As; 400 mg/kg) and from the river sediment of mine surroundings (As, 1651 mg/kg, Sb, 362 mg/kg), growing in minimal nitrate medium in the phase of hyphal development and spore formation, exhibited much higher levels of total catalase activity than the same species from the culture collection or a culture adapted to soil contaminated with As (5 mg/L). Electrophoretic resolution of catalases in cell-free extracts revealed three isozymes of catalases and production of individual isozymes was not significantly affected by stress environments. Exogenously added stressors (As{sup 5+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}) at final concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/L and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (20 or 40 m(M)) mostly stimulated production of catalases only in isolates from mines surroundings, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Hg{sup 2+} caused the disappearance of the smallest catalase I. Isolates exhibited a higher tolerance of the toxic effects of heavy metals and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as monitored by growth, than did the strain from the culture collection.

  3. The oxidation of chiral alcohols catalyzed by catalase in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Magner, E.; Klibanov, A.M.

    1995-04-20

    The catalytic properties of bovine liver catalase have been investigated in organic solvents. In tetrahydrofuran, dioxane, and acetone (all containing 1% to 3% of water), the enzyme breaks down tert-butyl hydroperoxide several fold faster than in pure water. Furthermore, the rate of catalase-catalyzed production of tert-butanol from tert-butyl hydroperoxide increases more than 400-fold upon transition from aqueous buffer to ethanol as the reaction medium. The mechanistic rationale for this striking effect is that in aqueous buffer the rate-limiting step of the enzymatic process involves the reduction of catalase`s compound 1 by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. In ethanol, an additional step in the reaction scheme becomes available in which ethanol, greatly outcompeting the hydroperoxide, is oxidized by compound 1 regenerating the free enzyme. In solvents, such as acetonitrile or tetrahydrofuran, which themselves are not oxidizable by compound 1, catalase catalyzes the oxidation of numerous primary and secondary alcohols with tert-butyl hydroperoxide to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones. The enzymatic oxidation of some chiral alcohols (2,3-butanediol, citronellol, and menthol) under these conditions occurs enantioselectively. Examination of the enantioselectivity for the oxidation of 2,3-butanediol in a series of organic solvents reveals a considerable solvent dependence.

  4. Steady-state kinetics of the catalase reaction in the presence of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Y; Yamazaki, I

    1983-08-01

    Under carefully controlled experimental conditions, the Michaelis constant for H2O2 was measured to be 1.39 and 1.29 M in the reactions of beef erythrocyte and liver catalases, respectively. These values remained unchanged at temperatures between 1 and 26 degrees C. The turnover number of the Michaelis complex was about 2.25 X 10(7) s-1 for either enzyme at 26 degrees C. The cyanide inhibition in the catalase reaction has been reported to be noncompetitive in spite of the fact that cyanide and H2O2 compete for the same site on the catalase molecule. At high concentrations of H2O2, however, the inhibition became clearly competitive. The existence of the Michaelis complex and the anomalous features of cyanide inhibition were clearly accounted for on the basis of simple kinetic models. At H2O2 concentrations below 100 mM, the catalase reaction obeyed first order kinetics with respect to H2O2 and its apparent second order rate constant was measured to be 7.6 X 10(6) and 7.9 X 10(6) M-1 . S-1 for erythrocyte and liver catalases, respectively. PMID:6630165

  5. Three-dimensional structure of catalase from Micrococcus lysodeikticus at 1.5 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Murshudov, G N; Melik-Adamyan, W R; Grebenko, A I; Barynin, V V; Vagin, A A; Vainshtein, B K; Dauter, Z; Wilson, K S

    1992-11-01

    The three-dimensional crystal structure of catalase from Micrococcus lysodeikticus has been solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and refined at 1.5 A resolution. The subunit of the tetrameric molecule of 222 symmetry consists of a single polypeptide chain of about 500 amino acid residues and one haem group. The crystals belong to space group P4(2)2(1)2 with unit cell parameters a = b = 106.7 A, c = 106.3 A, and there is one subunit of the tetramer per asymmetric unit. The amino acid sequence has been tentatively determined by computer graphics model building and comparison with the known three-dimensional structure of beef liver catalase and sequences of several other catalases. The atomic model has been refined by Hendrickson and Konnert's least-squares minimisation against 94,315 reflections between 8 A and 1.5 A. The final model consists of 3,977 non-hydrogen atoms of the protein and haem group, 426 water molecules and one sulphate ion. The secondary and tertiary structures of the bacterial catalase have been analyzed and a comparison with the structure of beef liver catalase has been made. PMID:1426241

  6. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. PMID:26772884

  7. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-11

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC. PMID:24887508

  8. Metabolic Damage and Premature Thymus Aging Caused by Stromal Catalase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Ann V; Venables, Thomas; Shi, Jianjun; Farr, Andrew; van Remmen, Holly; Szweda, Luke; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rabinovitch, Peter; Petrie, Howard T

    2015-08-18

    T lymphocytes are essential mediators of immunity that are produced by the thymus in proportion to its size. The thymus atrophies rapidly with age, resulting in progressive diminution of new T cell production. This decreased output is compensated by duplication of existing T cells, but it results in gradual dominance by memory T cells and decreased ability to respond to new pathogens or vaccines. Here, we show that accelerated and irreversible thymic atrophy results from stromal deficiency in the reducing enzyme catalase, leading to increased damage by hydrogen peroxide generated by aerobic metabolism. Genetic complementation of catalase in stromal cells diminished atrophy, as did chemical antioxidants, thus providing a mechanistic link between antioxidants, metabolism, and normal immune function. We propose that irreversible thymic atrophy represents a conventional aging process that is accelerated by stromal catalase deficiency in the context of an intensely anabolic (lymphoid) environment. PMID:26257169

  9. Insights into the selective binding and toxic mechanism of microcystin to catalase.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuandong; Da, Liangjun

    2014-01-01

    Microcystin is a sort of cyclic nonribosomal peptides produced by cyanobacteria. It is cyanotoxin, which can be very toxic for plants and animals including humans. The present study evaluated the interaction of microcystin and catalase, under physiological conditions by means of fluorescence, three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and enzymatic reactionkinetic techniques. The fluorescence data showed that microcystin could bind to catalase to form a complex. The binding process was a spontaneous molecular interaction procedure, in which electrostatic interactions played a major role. Energy transfer and fluorescence studies proved the existence of a static binding process. Additionally, as shown by the three-dimensional fluorescence, CD and FT-IR results, microcystin could lead to conformational and microenvironmental changes of the protein, which may affect the physiological functions of catalase. The work provides important insights into the toxicity mechanism of microcystin in vivo. PMID:24247095

  10. Enzymatic exploration of catalase from a nanoparticle producing and biodecolorizing algae Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Xu, Fangxin; Zhang, Xia; Ye, Chiming

    2015-05-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis (SXM) was found to produce nanoparticles (NPs) under aerobic condition. The oxidoreductase enzymatic activities including of catalase, manganese peroxidase, laccase, NADH dehydrogenase, flavin reductase, azoreductase and Fe reductase are first investigated. Catalase showed the greatest enzymatic activity among all oxidoreductases in SXM, which with strong activities in multiple substrates of ABTS, guaiacol and 2,6-DMP. The optimum temperature, pH, concentrations of H2O2 and 2,6-DMP for this enzyme were found to be 65 °C, pH 4.0, 128.7 mM and 10 mM, respectively. Finally, from the kinetic parameters and structure simulation of catalase, implied that SXM would potentially apply in bioremediation, microbe fuel cells (MFCs) and nano-biotechnology based on its distinguished enzymatic system. PMID:25306444

  11. Synergistic effects between catalase inhibitors and modulators of nitric oxide metabolism on tumor cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2014-10-01

    Inhibitors of catalase (such as ascorbate, methyldopa, salicylic acid and neutralizing antibodies) synergize with modulators of nitric oxide (NO) metabolism (such as arginine, arginase inhibitor, NO synthase-inducing interferons and NO dioxygenase inhibitors) in the singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase. This is followed by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent apoptosis induction. TGF-beta, NADPH oxidase-1, NO synthase, dual oxidase-1 and caspase-9 are characterized as essential catalysts in this process. The FAS receptor and caspase-8 are required for amplification of ROS signaling triggered by individual compounds, but are dispensable when the synergistic effect is established. Our findings explain the antitumor effects of catalase inhibitors and of compounds that target NO metabolism, as well as their synergy. These data may have an impact on epidemiological studies related to secondary plant compounds and open new perspectives for the establishment of novel antitumor drugs and for the improvement of established chemotherapeutics. PMID:25275027

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE AND CATALASE ACTIVITY AND EXPRESSION IN HONEY BEE.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Tatjana V; Purać, Jelena; Orčić, Snežana; Kojić, Danijela; Vujanović, Dragana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Gržetić, Ivan; Ilijević, Konstantin; Šikoparija, Branko; Blagojević, Duško P

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the cellular stress response in honey bees will significantly contribute to their conservation. The aim of this study was to analyze the response of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in honey bees related to the presence of toxic metals in different habitats. Three locations were selected: (i) Tunovo on the mountain Golija, as control area, without industry and large human impact, (ii) Belgrade as urban area, and (iii) Zajača, as mining and industrial zone. Our results showed that the concentrations of lead (Pb) in whole body of bees vary according to habitat, but there was very significant increase of Pb in bees from investigated industrial area. Bees from urban and industrial area had increased expression of both Sod1 and Cat genes, suggesting adaptation to increased oxidative stress. However, in spite increased gene expression, the enzyme activity of catalase was lower in bees from industrial area suggesting inhibitory effect of Pb on catalase. PMID:26314562

  13. Catalase overexpression reduces UVB-induced apoptosis in a human xeroderma pigmentosum reconstructed epidermis.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, H R; Ged, C; Bouadjar, B; de Verneuil, H; Taïeb, A

    2008-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type C (XPC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that occurs due to inactivation of the XPC protein, an important DNA damage recognition protein involved in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER). This defect, which prevents removal of a wide array of direct and indirect DNA lesions, is associated with a decrease in catalase activity. To test the hypothesis of a novel photoprotective approach, we irradiated epidermis reconstructed with XPC human keratinocytes sustainably overexpressing lentivirus-mediated catalase enzyme. Following UVB irradiation, there was a marked decrease in sunburn cell formation, caspase-3 activation and p53 accumulation in human XPC-reconstructed epidermis overexpressing catalase. Moreover, XPC-reconstructed epidermis was more resistant to UVB-induced apoptosis than normal reconstructed epidermis. While not correcting the gene defect, indirect gene therapy using antioxidant enzymes may be of help in limiting photosensitivity in XPC and probably in other monogenic/polygenic photosensitive disorders characterized by ROS accumulation. PMID:18202716

  14. The use of beef liver catalase as a protein tracer for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, M A; Fahimi, H D

    1969-08-01

    Beef liver catalase was injected intravenously into mice, and its distribution in the kidney, myocardium, and liver was studied with the electron microscope. A specific and relatively sensitive method was developed for its ultrastructural localization, based on the peroxidatic activity of catalase and employing a modified Graham and Karnovsky incubation medium. The main features of the medium were a higher concentration of diaminobenzidine, barium peroxide as the source of peroxide, and pH of 8.5. Ultrastructurally, the enzyme was seen to permeate the endothelial fenestrae and basement membranes of tubular and glomerular capillaries of the kidney. The urinary space and tubular lumina contained no reaction product. In the myocardial capillaries, the tracer filled the pinocytotic vesicles but did not diffuse across the intercellular clefts of the endothelium. In liver, uptake of catalase was seen both in hepatocytes and in Kupffer cells. PMID:4183077

  15. Effects of ionic and zwitterionic surfactants on the stabilization of bovine catalase.

    PubMed

    Spreti, N; Bartoletti, A; Di Profio, P; Germani, R; Savelli, G

    1995-01-01

    The activity and stability of beef liver catalase have been investigated in the presence of different ionic and zwitterionic surfactants. All cationic and zwitterionic surfactants used in this work have no effect on the initial activity of catalase, but several of them allow the enzyme to retain a high residual activity for longer periods of time than those observed in the absence of any additives. However, the interactions between surfactants and catalase appear to be very peculiar, and certain zwitterionic surfactants have been found to remarkably slow down enzyme degradation, with the enzyme completely preserving its activity after several weeks at temperatures of up to 30 degrees C. This effect is probably due to an interaction between the surfactant and the intersubunit region of the protein; this interaction could stabilize the quaternary structure of the enzyme. PMID:7765984

  16. Three-dimensional structure of catalase from Penicillium vitale at 2.0 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Vainshtein, B K; Melik-Adamyan, W R; Barynin, V V; Vagin, A A; Grebenko, A I; Borisov, V V; Bartels, K S; Fita, I; Rossmann, M G

    1986-03-01

    The three-dimensional structure analysis of crystalline fungal catalase from Penicillium vitale has been extended to 2.0 A resolution. The crystals belong to space group P3(1)21, with the unit cell parameters of a = b = 144.4 A and c = 133.8 A. The asymmetric unit contains half a tetrameric molecule of 222 symmetry. Each subunit is a single polypeptide chain of approximately 670 amino acid residues and binds one heme group. The amino acid sequence has been tentatively determined by computer graphics model building (using the FRODO system) and comparison with the known sequence of beef liver catalase. The atomic model has been refined by the Hendrickson & Konnert (1981) restrained least-squares program against 68,000 reflections between 5 A and 2 A resolution. The final R-factor is 0.31 after 24 refinement cycles. The secondary and tertiary structure of the catalase has been analyzed. PMID:3712443

  17. Role of the lateral channel in catalase HPII of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sevinc, M. S.; Maté, M. J.; Switala, J.; Fita, I.; Loewen, P. C.

    1999-01-01

    The heme-containing catalase HPII of Escherichia coli consists of a homotetramer in which each subunit contains a core region with the highly conserved catalase tertiary structure, to which are appended N- and C-terminal extensions making it the largest known catalase. HPII does not bind NADPH, a cofactor often found in catalases. In HPII, residues 585-590 of the C-terminal extension protrude into the pocket corresponding to the NADPH binding site in the bovine liver catalase. Despite this difference, residues that define the NADPH pocket in the bovine enzyme appear to be well preserved in HPII. Only two residues that interact ionically with NADPH in the bovine enzyme (Asp212 and His304) differ in HPII (Glu270 and Glu362), but their mutation to the bovine sequence did not promote nucleotide binding. The active-site heme groups are deeply buried inside the molecular structure requiring the movement of substrate and products through long channels. One potential channel is about 30 A in length, approaches the heme active site laterally, and is structurally related to the branched channel associated with the NADPH binding pocket in catalases that bind the dinucleotide. In HPII, the upper branch of this channel is interrupted by the presence of Arg260 ionically bound to Glu270. When Arg260 is replaced by alanine, there is a threefold increase in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Inhibitors of HPII, including azide, cyanide, various sulfhydryl reagents, and alkylhydroxylamine derivatives, are effective at lower concentration on the Ala260 mutant enzyme compared to the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the Ala260 mutant variant of HPII, determined at 2.3 A resolution, revealed a number of local structural changes resulting in the opening of a second branch in the lateral channel, which appears to be used by inhibitors for access to the active site, either as an inlet channel for substrate or an exhaust channel for reaction products. PMID:10091651

  18. A Salt-Inducible Mn-Catalase (KatB) Protects Cyanobacterium from Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Dhiman; Banerjee, Manisha; Bihani, Subhash C; Ballal, Anand

    2016-02-01

    Catalases, enzymes that detoxify H2O2, are widely distributed in all phyla, including cyanobacteria. Unlike the heme-containing catalases, the physiological roles of Mn-catalases remain inadequately characterized. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena, pretreatment of cells with NaCl resulted in unusually enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress. On exposure to H2O2, the NaCl-treated Anabaena showed reduced formation of reactive oxygen species, peroxides, and oxidized proteins than the control cells (i.e. not treated with NaCl) exposed to H2O2. This protective effect correlated well with the substantial increase in production of KatB, a Mn-catalase. Addition of NaCl did not safeguard the katB mutant from H2O2, suggesting that KatB was indeed responsible for detoxifying the externally added H2O2. Moreover, Anabaena deficient in KatB was susceptible to oxidative effects of salinity stress. The katB gene was strongly induced in response to osmotic stress or desiccation. Promoter-gfp analysis showed katB to be expressed only in the vegetative cells but not in heterocysts. Biochemically, KatB was an efficient, robust catalase that remained active in the presence of high concentrations of NaCl. Our findings unravel the role of Mn-catalase in acclimatization to salt/oxidative stress and demonstrate that the oxidative stress resistance of an organism can be enhanced by a simple compound such as NaCl. PMID:26645454

  19. Crystal structure of Proteus mirabilis PR catalase with and without bound NADPH.

    PubMed

    Gouet, P; Jouve, H M; Dideberg, O

    1995-06-23

    A catalase from a peroxide resistant mutant of Proteus mirabilis binds NADPH tightly. Interestingly, this enzyme can be stripped of NADPH without loss of the catalatic activity. It is the only known non-mammalian catalase able to bind NADPH. The structure without cofactor was solved by molecular replacement using the structure of beef liver catalase as a model. The structure was refined to an R-factor of 19.3% in the range 8 to 2.2 A resolution. According to the sequence, a methionine sulphone was positioned in the haem active site. This oxidized form of methionine is particular to Proteus mirabilis catalase and likely to produce some steric hindrance in the active site. Two important water molecules are positioned in the haem distal site. These two water molecules are not located in the structure of beef liver catalase, but are supposed to account for the catalytic mechanism. The liganded form was obtained by soaking crystals of the unliganded form into an NADPH solution. The structure was refined to an R-factor of 15.9% in the range of 8 to 3.1 A resolution using the unliganded structure as a model. The NADPH was clearly located in the electron density map with the same conformation as in beef liver catalase. The NADPH binding induces slight structural changes. However, the imidazole ring of a histidine residue (His284) rotates about 50 degrees to accommodate the cofactor. The electron transfer from NADPH to the haem molecule was examined and several pathways are proposed. PMID:7791219

  20. Generation 9 polyamidoamine dendrimer encapsulated platinum nanoparticle mimics catalase size, shape, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yincong; Li, Tianfu; Tian, Wende; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2013-04-30

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) encapsulated platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and used as catalase mimics. Acetylated generation 9 (Ac-G9) PAMAM dendrimer with a molecular size around 10 nm was used as a template to synthesize platinum nanoparticles. The feeding molar ratio of Pt(4+) and Ac-G9 is 2048, and the synthesized platinum nanoparticle (Ac-G9/Pt NP) has an average size of 3.3 nm. Ac-G9/Pt NP has a similar molecular size and globular shape with catalase (~11 nm). The catalytic activity of Ac-G9/Pt NP on the decomposition of H2O2 is approaching that of catalase at 37 °C. Ac-G9/Pt NP shows differential response to the changes of pH and temperature compared with catalase, which can be explained by different catalytic mechanisms of Ac-G9/Pt NP and catalase. Ac-G9/Pt NP also shows horseradish peroxidase activity and is able to scavenge free radicals such as di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH). Furthermore, Ac-G9/Pt NP shows excellent biocompatibility on different cell lines and can down-regulate H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells. These results suggest that dendrimers are promising mimics of proteins with different sizes and Ac-G9/Pt NP can be used as an alternative candidate of catalase to decrease oxidation stress in cells. PMID:23544351

  1. Superoxide anion production and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed Central

    Akporiaye, E T; Baca, O G

    1983-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii was examined for superoxide anion (O2-) production and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. The organism generated O2- at pH 4.5 but not at pH 7.4. The rickettsia displayed superoxide dismutase activity distinguishable from that of the host cell (L-929 mouse fibroblast). Catalase activity was maximal at pH 7.0 and diminished at pH 4.5. These enzymes may account, in part, for the ability of this obligate intracellular parasite to survive within phagocytes. PMID:6300038

  2. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  3. Data supporting the spectrophotometric method for the estimation of catalase activity

    PubMed Central

    Hadwan, Mahmoud Hussein; Abed, Hussein Najm

    2015-01-01

    Here we provide raw and processed data and methods for the estimation of catalase activities. The method for presenting a simple and accurate colorimetric assay for catalase activities is described. This method is based on the reaction of undecomposed hydrogen peroxide with ammonium molybdate to produce a yellowish color, which has a maximum absorbance at 374 nm. The method is characterized by adding a correction factor to exclude the interference that arises from the presence of amino acids and proteins in serum. The assay acts to keep out the interferences that arose from measurement of absorbance at unsuitable wavelengths. PMID:26862558

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of human catalase.

    PubMed

    Nagem, R A; Martins, E A; Gonçalves, V M; Aparício, R; Polikarpov, I

    1999-09-01

    The enzyme catalase (H(2)O(2)-H(2)O(2) oxidoredutase; E.C. 11.1.6) was purified from haemolysate of human placenta and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion technique. Synchrotron-radiation diffraction data have been collected to 1.76 A resolution. The enzyme crystallized in the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell dimensions a = 83.6, b = 139.4, c = 227.5 A. A molecular-replacement solution of the structure has been obtained using beef liver catalase (PDB code 4blc) as a search model. PMID:10489464

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of negatively stained catalase on a silicon wafer.

    PubMed

    Furuno, T; Ulmer, K M; Sasabe, H

    1992-03-01

    A high-resolution scanning electron microscope capable of 7 A spatial resolution at 30-kV accelerating voltage was used to observe negatively stained protein molecules. Thin platelet crystals, densely packed monolayers, and low-density deposits of beef liver catalase were prepared on the surface of silicon wafers and negatively stained with phosphotungstic acid. The tetrameric structure of the catalase molecule was observed for the first time by scanning electron microscopy on the surface of the smooth silicon wafer. PMID:1591412

  6. Data supporting the spectrophotometric method for the estimation of catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Hadwan, Mahmoud Hussein; Abed, Hussein Najm

    2016-03-01

    Here we provide raw and processed data and methods for the estimation of catalase activities. The method for presenting a simple and accurate colorimetric assay for catalase activities is described. This method is based on the reaction of undecomposed hydrogen peroxide with ammonium molybdate to produce a yellowish color, which has a maximum absorbance at 374 nm. The method is characterized by adding a correction factor to exclude the interference that arises from the presence of amino acids and proteins in serum. The assay acts to keep out the interferences that arose from measurement of absorbance at unsuitable wavelengths. PMID:26862558

  7. A Eukaryote without Catalase-Containing Microbodies: Neurospora crassa Exhibits a Unique Cellular Distribution of Its Four Catalases†

    PubMed Central

    Schliebs, Wolfgang; Würtz, Christian; Kunau, Wolf-Hubert; Veenhuis, Marten; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter

    2006-01-01

    Microbodies usually house catalase to decompose hydrogen peroxide generated within the organelle by the action of various oxidases. Here we have analyzed whether peroxisomes (i.e., catalase-containing microbodies) exist in Neurospora crassa. Three distinct catalase isoforms were identified by native catalase activity gels under various peroxisome-inducing conditions. Subcellular fractionation by density gradient centrifugation revealed that most of the spectrophotometrically measured activity was present in the light upper fractions, with an additional small peak coinciding with the peak fractions of HEX-1, the marker protein for Woronin bodies, a compartment related to the microbody family. However, neither in-gel assays nor monospecific antibodies generated against the three purified catalases detected the enzymes in any dense organellar fraction. Furthermore, staining of an N. crassa wild-type strain with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and H2O2 did not lead to catalase-dependent reaction products within microbodies. Nonetheless, N. crassa does possess a gene (cat-4) whose product is most similar to the peroxisomal type of monofunctional catalases. This novel protein indeed exhibited catalase activity, but was not localized to microbodies either. We conclude that N. crassa lacks catalase-containing peroxisomes, a characteristic that is probably restricted to a few filamentous fungi that produce little hydrogen peroxide within microbodies. PMID:16963632

  8. Bioefficacy of Graviola leaf extracts in scavenging free radicals and upregulating antioxidant genes.

    PubMed

    Son, Yu-Ra; Choi, Eun-Hye; Kim, Goon-Tae; Park, Tae-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2016-02-17

    The aims of this study were to determine bioactive components of Graviola leaf extracts and to examine the radical scavenging capacity, gene expression and transcription factors of antioxidant enzymes. Rutin, kaempferol-rutinoside, and vitamin U were identified from the steaming and 50% EtOH extracts of Graviola leaves. Graviola leaf extracts effectively scavenged peroxy and nitrogen radicals. 50% EtOH of Graviola leaves provided a 1-2.9 times higher trolox equivalent than the steaming extract. It also had a higher VCEAC. Graviola leaf extracts reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% EtOH extract of Graviola leaves upregulated SOD1 and Nrf2, but catalase and HMOX1 were not altered by the 50% EtOH extract of Graviola leaves. PMID:26674326

  9. KatB, a cyanobacterial Mn-catalase with unique active site configuration: Implications for enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Subhash C; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Manganese catalases (Mn-catalases), a class of H2O2 detoxifying proteins, are structurally and mechanistically distinct from the commonly occurring catalases, which contain heme. Active site of Mn-catalases can serve as template for the synthesis of catalase mimetics for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress related disorders. However, unlike the heme catalases, structural aspects of Mn-catalases remain inadequately explored. The genome of the ancient cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, shows the presence of two Mn-catalases, KatA and KatB. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of KatB. The KatB protein (with a C-terminal his-tag) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. On the addition of Mn(2+) to the E. coli growth medium, a substantial increase in production of the soluble KatB protein was observed. The purified KatB protein was an efficient catalase, which was relatively insensitive to inhibition by azide. Crystal structure of KatB showed a hexameric assembly with four-helix bundle fold, characteristic of the Ferritin-like superfamily. With canonical Glu4His2 coordination geometry and two terminal water ligands, the KatB active site was distinctly different from that of other Mn-catalases. Interestingly, the KatB active site closely resembled the active sites of ruberythrin/bacterioferritin, bi-iron members of the Ferritin-like superfamily. The KatB crystal structure provided fundamental insights into the evolutionary relationship within the Ferritin-like superfamily and further showed that Mn-catalases can be sub-divided into two groups, each with a distinct active site configuration. PMID:26826576

  10. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  11. Protective role of extracellular catalase (KatA) against UVA radiation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Pizarro, Ramón A; Costa, Cristina S

    2014-02-01

    One of the more stressful factors that Pseudomonas aeruginosa must face in nature is solar UVA radiation. In this study, the protective role of KatA catalase in both planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa against UVA radiation was determined by using the wild-type (PAO1) and an isogenic catalase deficient strain (katA). The katA strain was more sensitive than the wild-type, especially in the case of biofilms. Moreover, the wild-type biofilm was more resistant than its planktonic counterpart, but this was not observed in the katA strain. Striking KatA activity was detected in the matrix of katA(+) strains, and to our knowledge, this is the first report of this activity in the matrix of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Provision of bovine catalase or KatA to the matrix of a katA biofilm significantly increased its UVA tolerance, demonstrating that extracellular KatA is essential to optimal defense against UVA in P. aeruginosa biofilms. Efficiency of photocatalytic treatments using TiO2 and UVA was lower in biofilms than in planktonic cells, but KatA and KatB catalases seem not to be responsible for the higher resistance of the sessile cells to this treatment. PMID:24491420

  12. Distribution of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase activities among Treponema pallidum and other spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, F E; Barbieri, J T; Corin, R E; Grigas, K E; Cox, C D

    1981-01-01

    Representative members of Spirochaetales were surveyed for their content of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and peroxidase activities. Only Leptospira exhibited peroxidase activity. Obligately anaerobic cultivable Treponema and Spirochaeta possessed no SOD or peroxidative capabilities. Upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Spirochaeta aurantia, Borrelia hermsi, and five Leptospira biflexa serovars showed SOD activity associated with one electrophoretic band which was inhibited by H2O2, suggesting that they were iron-containing dismutases. These spirochetes could be distinguished by differences in relative mobilities of their SODs. SOD activity, but not catalase activity, was induced aerobically in S. aurantia. All Leptospira interrogans serovars and two L. biflexa serovars lacked significant SOD activity. These SOD-deficient strains of Leptospira, with one exception, possessed high levels of catalase activity. The Nichols strain of virulent Treponema pallidum possessed SOD and catalase activities, but lacked peroxidase activity. The SOD in T. pallidum exhibited two electrophoretic bands containing copper and zinc, and its relative mobility was identical to that of purified rabbit SOD. Immunization of sheep with purified rabbit SOD resulted in antiserum which inhibited both rabbit SOD and T. pallidum SOD assayed by spectrophotometric analysis or activity staining following polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In agarose gel diffusion, precipitin lines of identity were observed between purified rabbit SOD and cell extracts of T. pallidum. These data indicated that the SOD activity detected in T. pallidum was host derived. Images PMID:7024127

  13. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  14. Induction and inactivation of catalase and superoxide dismutase of Escherichia coli by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.; Hassan, H.M.

    1987-09-01

    Oxyradicals have been implicated in ozone (O/sub 3/) toxicity and in other oxidant stress. In this study, we investigated the effects of O/sub 3/ on the biosynthesis of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase in Escherichia coli to determine their role in the defense against ozone toxicity. Inhibition of growth and loss of viability were observed in cultures exposed to ozone. Results also showed an increase in the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase in cultures exposed to ozone, which was shown to be due to true induction rather than activation of preexisting apoproteins. Cessation of O/sub 3/ exposure resulted in 30 min of continual high rate of catalase biosynthesis followed by a gradual decrease in the level of the enzyme approaching that of control cultures. This decrease was attributed to a concomitant cessation of de novo enzyme synthesis and dilution of preexisting enzyme by cellular growth. Ozonation of cell-free extracts showed that superoxide dismutase and catalase are subject to oxidative inactivation by ozone. In vivo induction of these enzymes may represent an adaptive response evolved to protect cells against ozone toxicity.

  15. Cytochemical detection of catalase with 3,3'-diaminobenzidine. A quantitative reinvestigation of the optimal conditions.

    PubMed

    LeHir, M; Herzog, V; Fahimi, H D

    1979-11-01

    The influence of various parameters of fixation and incubation upon the oxidation of DAB by catalase have been analyzed. Crystalline beef liver catalase was fixed with different concentrations of glutaraldehyde and peroxidatic activity was determined spectrophotometrically using DAB as hydrogen donor. Although aldehyde fixation appeared to be important in elicitation of the peroxidatic activity of catalase, the final pigment production after 60 min incubation was optimal with the lowest concentration of glutaraldehyde (1%), after the shortest fixation period (30 min), and at the lowest temperature (5 degrees C) tested. Similarly cytochemical studies with rat kidney sections incubated for 10 min confirmed that the staining of peroxisomes in proximal tubules was strongest after the "mildest" fixation conditions. The pH and the temperature of incubation were closely interrelated, so that at room temperature (25 degrees C) the maximal pigment production was obtained at pH 10.5, but incubation at 45 degrees C gave the strongest staining at pH 8.5. The production of pigment increased with higher DAB concentrations which required larger amounts of H2O2 in the incubation medium. Cytochemical studies on renal peroxisomes were in agreement with these biochemical findings. The observations indicate that there are several options for the localization of catalase depending on the fixation and incubation conditions. Hence, these conditions should be selected according to the tissue and the purpose of the study. Examples for such selective applications are presented. PMID:521315

  16. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, p<0.05) suggested the stimulation of the antioxidant enzyme biosynthesis within several hours after exposure at doses of 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy; the putative enzyme inactivation could also occur (due to the injuries on the hydrogen bonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  17. A study of the inhibition of catalase by dipotassium trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K₂[B₃O₃F₄OH].

    PubMed

    Islamovic, Safija; Galic, Borivoj; Milos, Mladen

    2014-10-01

    In the development of boronic acid-based enzyme inhibitors as potential pharmaceutical drugs, dipotassium trioxohydroxytetrafluorotriborate K2[B3O3F4OH] was listed as a promising new therapeutic for treatment of these diseases. The catalase-mediated conversion of hydrogen peroxide, in the presence and absence of K2[B3O3F4OH] was studied. The kinetics conformed to the Michaelis-Menten model. Lineweaver-Burk plots were linear and plotted the family of straight lines intersected on the abscissa indicating non-competitive inhibition of the catalase. It appears that in the absence of inhibitor, catalase operates the best at conditions around pH 7.1 and in the presence of K2[B3O3F4OH] the optimum is around pH 6.2. The uncatalyzed reaction of hydrogen peroxide decomposition generally has a value of activation energy of 75 kJ mole(-1), whereas catalase, in the absence of inhibitor, lowers the value to 11.2 kJ mole(-1), while in the presence 69 mmoles L(-1) of K2[B3O3F4OH] it was 37.8 kJ mole(-1). PMID:24506205

  18. Do Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) protect Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Active Arsenicals?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which can be converted to water and oxygen through the action of catalase. Heterozygous mice of strain B6: 129S7-SodltmlLeb/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspr...

  19. The Serum Levels of Malondialdehyde, Vitamin E and Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in Psoriasis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ireddy, Shankargouda; Itagi, Inderraj; Kumar H., Siddesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a common skin disease which is characterized by increased epidermal proliferation and dermal inflammation affecting 0.1-3% of general population. Most of the psoriasis patients are young or middle aged adults, although no age exempted. The oxidative stress develops due to imbalance in oxidants and antioxidants, which was proposed to have role in psoriasis. Aims and Objectives: The presented research work was planned to evaluate oxidative stress by measuring serum malondialdehyde (MDA) as oxidant and serum vitamin E, erythrocyte catalase (CAT) activity as antioxidants in psoriasis patients. Materials and Methods: Total 90 clinically diagnosed psoriasis patients of age group of 20 to 60 years and without any drug therapy for preceding two months and 90 matched healthy controls were included in the presented study. The severity of psoriasis was determined by PASI score. The fasting blood sample collected and accessed for serum MDA, serum vitamin E and erythrocyte catalase activity. Results: The study results were compiled and statistical analysis was done using students t-test. Our results showed significantly increased levels of serum MDA (p<0.001) and significantly decreased serum vitamin E (p<0.001) as well as erythrocyte catalase activity (p<0.001) in psoriasis patients as compared to controls. Conclusion: The presented study concluded the oxidative stress in psoriasis, indicated by increased serum MDA and decreased Vitamin E, erythrocyte catalase activity. Our study also supports the possibility of involvement of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:25584212

  20. Endothelin-1 upregulates MCAM in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Mangahas, Catherine R; dela Cruz, Gelo V; Schneider, Robert J; Jamal, Sumayah

    2004-12-01

    Melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) is a cell-surface adhesion molecule expressed on over 70% of metastatic melanoma cells but not expressed in normal melanocytes invivo. Protein levels of MCAM correlate with aggressive invasive behavior of melanoma cells in vitro and invivo. Here we demonstrate that endothelin-1 (ET-1) upregulates MCAM protein in primary human melanocytes. MCAM upregulation by ET-1 occurs irrespective of degree of melanocyte pigmentation and is dose-responsive. The drug BQ788 is an endothelin-B (ET(B)) receptor antagonist and inhibits upregulation of MCAM by ET-1. In addition, endothelin-3 (ET-3) and N-succinyl-[Glu9, Ala11, 15]-ET-1-1620, both selective ET(B) agonists, are potent upregulators of MCAM. These demonstrate a critical role for the ET(B) receptor in the upregulation of MCAM by ET-1 and related isoforms. MCAM mRNA abundance is also increased by ET-1 stimulation, thus the mechanism of MCAM protein upregulation may occur at the level of transcription. Our previous studies have demonstrated that ET-1 downregulates E-cadherin in melanocytes and melanoma cells. Since E-cadherin is a melanoma invasion suppressor, and MCAM is a melanoma invasion promoter, ET-1 may promote melanoma invasion and metastasis through the regulation of adhesion molecule expression. PMID:15610525

  1. Photosynthetic electron flow affects H2O2 signaling by inactivation of catalase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ning; Beck, Christoph F; Lemaire, Stphane D; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2008-11-01

    A specific signaling role for H(2)O(2) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was demonstrated by the definition of a promoter that specifically responded to this ROS. Expression of a nuclear-encoded reporter gene driven by this promoter was shown to depend not only on the level of exogenously added H(2)O(2) but also on light. In the dark, the induction of the reporter gene by H(2)O(2) was much lower than in the light. This lower induction was correlated with an accelerated disappearance of H(2)O(2) from the culture medium in the dark. Due to a light-induced reduction in catalase activity, H(2)O(2) levels in the light remained higher. Photosynthetic electron transport mediated the light-controlled down-regulation of the catalase activity since it was prevented by 3-(3'4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosystem II. In the presence of light and DCMU, expression of the reporter gene was low while the addition of aminotriazole, a catalase inhibitor, led to a higher induction of the reporter gene by H(2)O(2) in the dark. The role of photosynthetic electron transport and thioredoxin in this regulation was investigated by using mutants deficient in photosynthetic electron flow and by studying the correlation between NADP-malate dehydrogenase and catalase activities. It is proposed that, contrary to expectations, a controlled down-regulation of catalase activity occurs upon a shift of cells from dark to light. This down-regulation apparently is necessary to maintain a certain level of H(2)O(2) required to activate H(2)O(2)-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:18781324

  2. The effect of superoxide dismutase mimetic and catalase on the quality of postthawed goat semen.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Mojtaba; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Hosseini, Sayyed Morteza; Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein Nasr

    2015-05-01

    Manganese(III) meso-tetrakis(N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin chloride (MnTE) is a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent which can convert superoxide to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Supplementation of MnTE to a commercial semen extender can protect sperm from superoxide but not H2O2. Therefore, we proposed that addition of catalase (0.0, 200, or 400 IU/mL) in combination with MnTE (0.1 μM) may further improve the cryopreservation efficiency of goat semen in commercially optimized freezing media such as Andromed. Therefore, ejaculates were obtained from three adult bucks twice a week during the breeding season and diluted with Andromed supplemented with or without MnTE and catalase and were frozen in liquid nitrogen. Sperm parameters and reactive oxygen species contents were evaluated 2 hours after dilution (before freezing) and after freezing/thawing. The results revealed that all the treatments significantly (P ≤ 0.05) improved sperm motility, viability, and membrane integrity after freezing and reduced reactive oxygen species content compared with the control group, but maximum improvement was obtained in MnTE + 400 IU/mL catalase. In addition, supplementation with these antioxidants significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increases the cleavage rate after IVF. In conclusion, the results of present study suggest that addition of antioxidant MnTE or catalase to commercial optimized media, such as Andromed, improves total motility, membrane integrity, and viability of goat semen samples after thawing. But the degree of improvement for these parameters significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher when MnTE and catalase were simultaneously added to the cryopreservation media. PMID:25698161

  3. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities as biomarkers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin-Nadif, R.; Dusch, M.; Mur, J.M.; Koch, C.; Schmitt, P.

    1996-06-07

    We investigated the role of three blood antioxidant enzyme activities and total antioxidant status (TAS) as biological markers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury (Hg{degrees}) vapors. Twenty-two female workers took part in the study. Blood and urine sampling for biological analyses was performed. The workers were classified into three subgroups according to their creatinine-corrected Hg concentration in urine. Blood antioxidant enzyme activities and TAS were compared between groups with nonparametric distribution-free methods. A significant difference existed in catalase activity and a slight, but not significant, difference existed in Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} superoxide dismutase (Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD) activity between the three groups. No differences were observed in either the glutathione peroxidase activity or the TAS between these groups. Catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities were increased in the groups of workers with higher creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations when compared with the group of lower creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations. Catalase activity was positively correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine, and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activity was slightly correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine. The role of erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities we have measured is in agreement with the hypothesis of the involvement of reactive oxygen species production as an important event in chronic exposure to Hg{degrees} vapors in humans. In spite of the small sample size, results indicate that erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities could be considered as markers of biological effect in workers exposed to Hg{degrees} vapors. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The structures of Micrococcus lysodeikticus catalase, its ferryl intermediate (compound II) and NADPH complex.

    PubMed

    Murshudov, Garib N; Grebenko, Albina I; Brannigan, James A; Antson, Alfred A; Barynin, Vladimir V; Dodson, Guy G; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wilson, Keith S; Melik-Adamyan, William R

    2002-12-01

    The crystal structure of the bacterial catalase from Micrococcus lysodeikticus has been refined using the gene-derived sequence both at 0.88 A resolution using data recorded at 110 K and at 1.5 A resolution with room-temperature data. The atomic resolution structure has been refined with individual anisotropic atomic thermal parameters. This has revealed the geometry of the haem and surrounding protein, including many of the H atoms, with unprecedented accuracy and has characterized functionally important hydrogen-bond interactions in the active site. The positions of the H atoms are consistent with the enzymatic mechanism previously suggested for beef liver catalase. The structure reveals that a 25 A long channel leading to the haem is filled by partially occupied water molecules, suggesting an inherent facile access to the active site. In addition, the structures of the ferryl intermediate of the catalase, the so-called compound II, at 1.96 A resolution and the catalase complex with NADPH at 1.83 A resolution have been determined. Comparison of compound II and the resting state of the enzyme shows that the binding of the O atom to the iron (bond length 1.87 A) is associated with increased haem bending and is accompanied by a distal movement of the iron and the side chain of the proximal tyrosine. Finally, the structure of the NADPH complex shows that the cofactor is bound to the molecule in an equivalent position to that found in beef liver catalase, but that only the adenine part of NADPH is visible in the present structure. PMID:12454454

  5. Crystallization and preliminary structural analysis of catalase A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Berthet, S; Nykyri, L M; Bravo, J; Mate, M J; Berthet-Colominas, C; Alzari, P M; Koller, F; Fita, I

    1997-02-01

    Yeast peroxisomal catalase A, obtained at high yields by over expression of the C-terminally modified gene from a 2 mu-plasmid, has been crystallized in a form suitable for high resolution X-ray diffraction studies. Brownish crystals with bipyrimidal morphology and reaching ca. 0.8 mm in size were produced by the hanging drop method using ammonium sulphate as precipitant. These crystals diffract better than 2.0 A resolution and belong to the hexagonal space group P6(1)22 with unit cell parameters a = b = 184.3 A and c = 305.5 A. An X-ray data set with 76% completeness at 3.2 A resolution was collected in a rotating anode generator using mirrors to improve the collimation of the beam. An initial solution was obtained by molecular replacement only when using a beef liver catalase tetramer model in which fragments with no sequence homology had been omitted, about 150 residues per subunit. In the structure found a single molecule of catalase A (a tetramer with accurate 222 molecular symmetry) is located in the asymmetric unit of the crystal with an estimated solvent content of about 61%. The preliminary analysis of the structure confirms the absence of a carboxy terminal domain as the one found in the catalase from Penicillium vitalae, the only other fungal catalase structure available. The NADPH binding site appears to be involved in crystal contacts, suggesting that heterogeneity in the occupancy of the nucleotide can be a major difficulty during crystallization. PMID:9041655

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of KatB, a manganese catalase from Anabaena PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Bihani, Subhash Chandra; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play an important role in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in aerobic organisms. Among catalases, haem-containing catalases are ubiquitously distributed and their enzymatic mechanism is very well understood. On the other hand, manganese catalases that contain a bimanganese core in the active site have been less well characterized and their mode of action is not fully understood. The genome of Anabaena PCC 7120 does not show the presence of a haem catalase-like gene; instead, two ORFs encoding manganese catalases (Mn-catalases) are present. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of KatB, one of the two Mn-catalases from Anabaena, are reported. KatB was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as a precipitant and calcium acetate as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house on an Agilent SuperNova system using a microfocus sealed-tube X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K. The tetragonal crystal belonged to space group P41212 (or enantiomer), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.87, c = 138.86 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis using the Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function suggests the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24192374

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of KatB, a manganese catalase from Anabaena PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Subhash Chandra; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2013-11-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play an important role in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in aerobic organisms. Among catalases, haem-containing catalases are ubiquitously distributed and their enzymatic mechanism is very well understood. On the other hand, manganese catalases that contain a bimanganese core in the active site have been less well characterized and their mode of action is not fully understood. The genome of Anabaena PCC 7120 does not show the presence of a haem catalase-like gene; instead, two ORFs encoding manganese catalases (Mn-catalases) are present. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of KatB, one of the two Mn-catalases from Anabaena, are reported. KatB was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as a precipitant and calcium acetate as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house on an Agilent SuperNova system using a microfocus sealed-tube X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K. The tetragonal crystal belonged to space group P4(1)2(1)2 (or enantiomer), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.87, c = 138.86 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis using the Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function suggests the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24192374

  8. A Catalase-related Hemoprotein in Coral Is Specialized for Synthesis of Short-chain Aldehydes: DISCOVERY OF P450-TYPE HYDROPEROXIDE LYASE ACTIVITY IN A CATALASE.

    PubMed

    Teder, Tarvi; Lõhelaid, Helike; Boeglin, William E; Calcutt, Wade M; Brash, Alan R; Samel, Nigulas

    2015-08-01

    In corals a catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein transforms arachidonic acid to the allene oxide 8R,9-epoxy-5,9,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid from which arise cyclopentenones such as the prostanoid-related clavulones. Recently we cloned two catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein genes (a and b) from the coral Capnella imbricata, form a being an allene oxide synthase and form b giving uncharacterized polar products (Lõhelaid, H., Teder, T., Tõldsepp, K., Ekins, M., and Samel, N. (2014) PloS ONE 9, e89215). Here, using HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and NMR methods, we identify a novel activity of fusion protein b, establishing its role in cleaving the lipoxygenase product 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid into the short-chain aldehydes (5Z)-8-oxo-octenoic acid and (3Z,6Z)-dodecadienal; these primary products readily isomerize in an aqueous medium to the corresponding 6E- and 2E,6Z derivatives. This type of enzymatic cleavage, splitting the carbon chain within the conjugated diene of the hydroperoxide substrate, is known only in plant cytochrome P450 hydroperoxide lyases. In mechanistic studies using (18)O-labeled substrate and incubations in H2(18)O, we established synthesis of the C8-oxo acid and C12 aldehyde with the retention of the hydroperoxy oxygens, consistent with synthesis of a short-lived hemiacetal intermediate that breaks down spontaneously into the two aldehydes. Taken together with our initial studies indicating differing gene regulation of the allene oxide synthase and the newly identified catalase-related hydroperoxide lyase and given the role of aldehydes in plant defense, this work uncovers a potential pathway in coral stress signaling and a novel enzymatic activity in the animal kingdom. PMID:26100625

  9. Molecular cloning, characterization, and the response of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase to PBDE-47 and -209 from the freshwater bivalve Anodonta woodiana.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xichao; Huang, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Dongxian; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Shipeng; Wang, Xiying; Zhang, Qingyuan; Guo, Lianghong

    2016-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers-47 (PBDE-47) and -209 are significant components of total PBDEs in water and can catalyze the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the organisms. Anti-oxidant enzymes play an important role in scavenging the high level of ROS. In the current study, two full-length cDNAs of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSODs) and catalase (CAT) were isolated from freshwater bivalve Anodonta woodiana by rapid amplification of cDNA ends approach and respectively named as AwSOD and AwCAT. The nucleotide sequence of AwSOD cDNA had an open reading frame (ORF) of 465 bp encoding a polypeptide of 155 amino acids in which signature 1 GKHGFHVHEFGDNT and signature 2 GNAGARSACGVI of SODs were observed. Deduced amino acid sequence of AwSOD showed a significant similarity with that of CuZnSODs. AwCAT had an ORF 1536 bp encoding a polypeptide of 512 amino acids which contains a conserved catalytic site motif, and a proximal heme-ligand signature motif of CATs. The time-course expressions of AwSOD and AwCAT in hepatopancreas were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Expressions of AwSOD and AwCAT showed a significant up-regulation in groups at a low concentration treatment of PBDE-47, a biphasic pattern in groups with a high concentration treatment. Administration of PBDE-209 could result in an up-regulation of AwSOD and AwCAT expressions with time- and dose-dependent matter. These results indicate that up-regulations of AwSOD and AwCAT expression of hepatopancreas of freshwater bivalve A. woodiana contribute to eliminate oxidative stress derived from PBDE-47 and -209 treated. PMID:26915310

  10. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids. PMID:26887242

  11. Novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene of a catalase-negative Staphylococcus aureus strain☆

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Jaime; Alarcón, Pedro; Benadof, Dona; Ulloa, Soledad; Fasce, Rodrigo; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Araya, Pamela; Parra, Bárbara; Olivares, Berta; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of a rare catalase-negative strain of Staphylococcus aureus in Chile. This new variant was isolated from blood and synovial tissue samples of a pediatric patient. Sequencing analysis revealed that this catalase-negative strain is related to ST10 strain, which has earlier been described in relation to S. aureus carriers. Interestingly, sequence analysis of the catalase gene katA revealed presence of a novel nonsense mutation that causes premature translational truncation of the C-terminus of the enzyme leading to a loss of 222 amino acids. Our study suggests that loss of catalase activity in this rare catalase-negative Chilean strain is due to this novel nonsense mutation in the katA gene, which truncates the enzyme to just 283 amino acids. PMID:26887242

  12. Protective effects of catalase on retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baihua; Tang, Luosheng

    2011-11-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury causes profound tissue damage, especially retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. The aims of the study were to investigate whether catalase (CAT) has a neuroprotective effect on RGC after I/R injury in rats, and to determine the possible antioxidant mechanism. Wistar female rats were randonmized into four groups: normal control group (Control group), retinal I/R with vehicle group (I/R with vehicle group), retinal I/R with AAV-CAT group (I/R with AAV-CAT group), and normal retina with AAV-CAT group (normal with AAV-CAT group). One eye of each rat was pretreated with recombinant adeno-associated virus containing catalase gene (I/R with AAV-CAT group or normal with AAV-CAT group) and recombinant adeno-associated virus containing GFP gene (I/R with vehicle group) by intravitreal injection 21 days before initiation of I/R injury. Retinal I/R injury was induced by elevating intraocular pressure to 100mmHg for 1h. The number of RGC and inner plexiform layer (IPL) thickness were measured by fluorogold retrograde labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining at 6h, 24h, 72 h and 5d after injury. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the number of RGC, IPL thickness, malondialdehyde(MDA), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), CAT activity and nitrotyrosine were measured by fluorescence staining, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis at 5 days after injury. Electroretinographic (ERG) evaluation was also used. Pretreatment of AAV-CAT significantly decreased the levels of H(2)O(2), MDA, 8-OHdG and nitrotyrosine, increased the catalase activity, and prevented the reduction of a- and b- waves in the I/R with AAV-CAT group compare with the I/R with vehicle group (p<0.01). Catalase attenuated the I/R-induced damage of RGC and IPL and retinal function. Therefore, catalase can protect the rat retina from I/R-induced injury by enhancing the antioxidative ability and reducing oxidative stress, which suggests that catalase may be relevant for the neuroprotection of inner retina from I/R-related diseases. PMID:21824472

  13. MEASUREMENT OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE, CATALASE, AND GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE IN CULTURED CELLS AND TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Weydert, Christine J.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a large number of antioxidants to prevent or repair the damage caused by ROS, as well as to regulate redox-sensitive signaling pathways General protocols are described to measure the antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. The SODs convert superoxide radical into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen, while the catalase and peroxidases convert hydrogen peroxide into water. In this way, two toxic species, superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, are converted to the harmless product water. Western blots, activity gels and activity assays are various methods used to determine protein and activity in both cells and tissue depending on the amount of protein needed for each assay. Other techniques including immunohistochemistry and immunogold can further evaluate the levels of the various antioxidant enzymes in tissue and cells. In general, these assays require 24 to 48 hours to complete. PMID:20057381

  14. Investigation of lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in magnetic fluid treated mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, M. L. L.; Silva, L. P.; Freitas, J. L.; Azevedo, R. B.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Homem de Bittencourt, P. I.; Curi, R.; Buske, N.; Morais, P. C.

    2003-05-01

    The increasing interest in magnetic fluids (MFs) for biomedical applications demands a deeper knowledge of their effects in biological systems. To evaluate the in vivo response of a MF sample based on magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by a precoating double layer of dodecanoic acid plus ethoxylated polyalcohol (MFDE), the inflammation-related oxidative stress and antioxidant tissue response were both addressed in this study. MFDE sample was intraperitoneally administrated to mice at three different doses. The lipid peroxidation and the antioxidant defense induced in the liver and spleen were evaluated, respectively, by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and catalase activity, 1, 14, and 28 days after MFDE treatment. The liver and spleen responded with a huge increase in TBARS after MFDE treatment. We observed that oxidative changes as well as the variations in the liver catalase activity were time and MFDE-dose dependent.

  15. Catalase-Modified Carbon Electrodes: Persuading Oxygen To Accept Four Electrons Rather Than Two.

    PubMed

    Sepunaru, Lior; Laborda, Eduardo; Compton, Richard G

    2016-04-18

    We successfully exploited the natural highly efficient activity of an enzyme (catalase) together with carbon electrodes to produce a hybrid electrode for oxygen reduction, very appropriate for energy transformation. Carbon electrodes, in principle, are cheap but poor oxygen reduction materials, because only two-electron reduction of oxygen occurs at low potentials, whereas four-electron reduction is key for energy-transformation technology. With the immobilization of catalase on the surface, the hydrogen peroxide produced electrochemically is decomposed back to oxygen by the enzyme; the enzyme natural activity on the surface regenerates oxygen, which is further reduced by the carbon electrode with no direct electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode. Near full four-electron reduction of oxygen is realised on a carbon electrode, which is modified with ease by a commercially available enzyme. The value of such enzyme-modified electrode for energy-transformation devices is evident. PMID:26934203

  16. Hydrogen peroxide determination in pharmaceutical formulations and cosmetics using a new catalase biosensor.

    PubMed

    Campanella, L; Roversi, R; Sammartino, M P; Tomassetti, M

    1998-10-01

    The possibility of evaluating the content of hydrogen peroxide in several authentic matrices, such as cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations, was studied. A new catalase biosensor fabricated using an amperometric gas-diffusion oxygen sensor as electrochemical transducer and the catalase enzyme immobilized in kappa-carrageenan gel and capable of operating in both aqueous and non aqueous solvents was developed and tested for this purpose. Creams, emulsions and disinfectant solutions were analysed. To this end, a preliminary check was needed to establish the best conditions to analyse these matrices; the choice of solvent was one of the most important points studied. The solvents considered included dioxane, water-dioxane mixtures, water saturated chloroform and aqueous solutions. The different solubility properties of the matrices analysed were taken into account. PMID:9863948

  17. pH dependency of kinetic parameters and reaction mechanism of beef liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Makino, N; Anan, F K

    1979-02-01

    The pH-dependence of the kinetic parameters in H2O2 decomposition by beef liver catalase was investigated. At pH 7.0, the ternary complex (ESS) decomposition rate was about 100 times faster than ESS formation (42 microM H2O2), and the value of the Michaelis constant was 0.025 M. From ethanol competition experiments, two different proton dissociation constants of the enzyme (pKe1 = 5.0, pKes2 = 5.9) were obtained for the binding of first and second H2O2 molecules. Another pKa value (pKes1) of 4.2 was obtained from the pH dependence of overall rate constant (ko). The reaction mechanism of catalase was discussed in relation to these ionizable groups. PMID:33977

  18. Mn-catalase (Alr0998) protects the photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120 from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Manisha; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Role of the non-haem, manganese catalase (Mn-catalase) in oxidative stress tolerance is unknown in cyanobacteria. The ORF alr0998 from the Anabaena PCC7120, which encodes a putative Mn-catalase, was constitutively overexpressed in Anabaena PCC7120 to generate a recombinant strain, AnKat(+). The Alr0998 protein could be immunodetected in AnKat(+) cells and zymographic analysis showed a distinct thermostable catalase activity in the cytosol of AnKat(+) cells but not in the wild-type Anabaena PCC7120. The observed catalase activity was insensitive to inhibition by azide indicating that Alr0998 protein is indeed a Mn-catalase. In response to oxidative stress, the AnKat(+) showed reduced levels of intracellular ROS which was also corroborated by decreased production of an oxidative stress-inducible 2-Cys-Prx protein. Treatment of wild-type Anabaena PCC7120 with H(2)O(2) caused (i) RNA degradation in vivo, (ii) severe reduction of photosynthetic pigments and CO(2) fixation, (iii) fragmentation and lysis of filaments and (iv) loss of viability. In contrast, the AnKat(+) strain was protected from all the aforesaid deleterious effect under oxidative stress. This is the first report on protection of an organism from oxidative stress by overexpression of a Mn-catalase. PMID:22897147

  19. Changes in the activity of amylase, peroxidase and catalase in beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) during dormancy and growth.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, Roghoyeh; Korori, Soudabeh A A; Etemad, V

    2005-01-01

    Activities of peroxidase, amylase and catalase were analyzed on beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) during one year to determine relationship between these enzymes with the period of dormancy and growing season. Results showed that amylase activity was high but catalase and peroxidase activities were low during the growing season. Peroxidase and catalase activities increased from July to November whereas amylase activity started to decrease at the same time, which means that the plants were prepared themselves to be dormant and the hardening was happened. The peroxidase maximum activity was in November, which is an important sign of dormancy and completing hardening in plant. The dormancy released from February along with decrease of catalase activity. At the beginning of growing season, correlation between amylase and catalase was increased. Amylase activity also increased gradually. No significant correlation between amylase-catalase and amylase-peroxidase activities was found at the period of dormancy. In our study, we found that the seasonal activity of enzymes such as peroxidase, catalase, and amylase, also correlation between these enzymes could be an important factor for the detection the period of dormancy and growing season. PMID:16196205

  20. Differential activation of catalase expression and activity by PPAR agonists: implications for astrocyte protection in anti-glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Nicholas K H; Hebbar, Sachin; Zhao, Weiling; Moore, Steven A; Domann, Frederick E; Robbins, Mike E

    2013-01-01

    Glioma survival is dismal, in part, due to an imbalance in antioxidant expression and activity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have antineoplastic properties which present new redox-dependent targets for glioma anticancer therapies. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of primary cultures of normal rat astrocytes with PPAR agonists increased the expression of catalase mRNA protein, and enzymatic activity. In contrast, these same agonists had no effect on catalase expression and activity in malignant rat glioma cells. The increase in steady-state catalase mRNA observed in normal rat astrocytes was due, in part, to de novo mRNA synthesis as opposed to increased catalase mRNA stability. Moreover, pioglitazone-mediated induction of catalase activity in normal rat astrocytes was completely blocked by transfection with a PPAR?-dominant negative plasmid. These data suggest that defects in PPAR-mediated signaling and gene expression may represent a block to normal catalase expression and induction in malignant glioma. The ability of PPAR agonists to differentially increase catalase expression and activity in normal astrocytes but not glioma cells suggests that these compounds might represent novel adjuvant therapeutic agents for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:24024139

  1. Differential activation of catalase expression and activity by PPAR agonists: Implications for astrocyte protection in anti-glioma therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Hebbar, Sachin; Zhao, Weiling; Moore, Steven A.; Domann, Frederick E.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2013-01-01

    Glioma survival is dismal, in part, due to an imbalance in antioxidant expression and activity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) agonists have antineoplastic properties which present new redox-dependent targets for glioma anticancer therapies. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of primary cultures of normal rat astrocytes with PPAR agonists increased the expression of catalase mRNA protein, and enzymatic activity. In contrast, these same agonists had no effect on catalase expression and activity in malignant rat glioma cells. The increase in steady-state catalase mRNA observed in normal rat astrocytes was due, in part, to de novo mRNA synthesis as opposed to increased catalase mRNA stability. Moreover, pioglitazone-mediated induction of catalase activity in normal rat astrocytes was completely blocked by transfection with a PPAR?-dominant negative plasmid. These data suggest that defects in PPAR-mediated signaling and gene expression may represent a block to normal catalase expression and induction in malignant glioma. The ability of PPAR agonists to differentially increase catalase expression and activity in normal astrocytes but not glioma cells suggests that these compounds might represent novel adjuvant therapeutic agents for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:24024139

  2. Cytotoxicity of lawsone and cytoprotective activity of antioxidants in catalase mutant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sauriasari, Rani; Wang, Da-Hong; Takemura, Yoko; Tsutsui, Ken; Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Sano, Kuniaki; Horita, Masako; Wang, Bing-Ling; Ogino, Keiki

    2007-06-01

    Lawsone is an active naphthoquinone derivative isolated from henna (Lawsonia inermis L.), a widely used hair dye. Previous study on the toxicity of lawsone remains unclear since the involvement of oxidative stress and the kind of ROS (reactive oxygen species) involved have not been fully resolved yet. This present study reports the cytotoxic effects of lawsone and henna. We carried out CAT assay (a zone of inhibition test of bacterial growth and colony-forming efficiency test of transformant Escherichia coli strains that express mammalian catalase gene derived from normal catalase mice (Cs(a)) and catalase-deficient mutant mice (Cs(b))), Ames mutagenicity assay and H(2)O(2) generation assay. Lawsone generated H(2)O(2) slightly in phosphate buffer system and was not mutagenic in Ames assay using TA 98, TA 100 and TA 102, both in the absence and presence of metabolic activation. Lawsone exposure inhibited the growth of both Cs(a) and Cs(b) strains in a dose-dependent manner. Mean zone diameter for Cs(a) was 9.75+/-0.96 mm and 12.75+/-1.5 mm for Cs(b). Natural henna leaves did not show toxic effects, whereas two out of four samples of marketed henna products were shown toxicity effects. Catalase abolished zone of inhibition (ZOI) of marketed henna products, eliminated ZOI of lawsone in a dose-dependent manner and low concentration of exogenous MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD eliminated the toxicity. Histidine and DTPA, the metal chelator; BHA and low concentration of capsaicin, the inducer of NADH-quinone reductase, effectively protected Cs(a) and Cs(b) against lawsone in this study. We suggest that lawsone cytotoxicity is probably mediated, at least in part, by the release of O(2)(-), H(2)O(2) and OH(-). PMID:17442476

  3. Relative-residue surface-accessibility patterns reveal myoglobin and catalase similarity.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, V B; Osguthorpe, D J

    1991-11-18

    A novel sliding-window search method using relative-residue surface-accessibility patterns identified extensive, but unsuspected, structural similarity over a 3-helix region in the C-terminus of the evolutionarily unrelated proteins sperm-whale myoglobin and beef liver catalase. This clear example of structural similarity between non-homologous proteins highlights the importance of relative-residue surface-accessibility patterns in understanding the local folded structure in proteins. PMID:1959649

  4. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    PubMed

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis. PMID:24142360

  5. Ectopic expression of catalase in Drosophila mitochondria increases stress resistance but not longevity.

    PubMed

    Mockett, Robin J; Bayne, Anne Cécile V; Kwong, Linda K; Orr, William C; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2003-01-15

    The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that the rate of mitochondrial oxidant production governs the aging process of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Catalase, an antioxidative enzyme expressed in the cytosol and peroxisomes of Drosophila, was targetted ectopically to the mitochondrial matrix by fusion of a leader peptide derived from ornithine aminotransferase with its N-terminus. The presence of the transgene encoding this fusion protein was associated with moderate (35 +/- 13%) increases in total catalase activity in most lines, and measurable levels of catalase activity in the mitochondria (30-140 U/mg protein). There was no impact on the life span of the flies at 25 degrees C, even in an exceptional line with a 149% increase in total catalase activity, and there was a small decrease in longevity at 29 degrees C. There were no compensatory changes in the rate of metabolism or physical activity, or in the levels of other major antioxidants, suggesting that the aging process was largely unaffected. Resistance to exogenous hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, and cold stress was enhanced, but there was no appreciable effect on resistance to hyperoxia. The results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial antioxidant levels in the resistance to oxidative stress at the organismal level, and illustrate that different effects on aging and stress resistance may ensue from a single treatment. The main inferences drawn are that: (i) levels of stress resistance may neither be a cause nor a reliable indicator of the rate of aging, and (ii) bolstering antioxidant levels in Drosophila may not delay or slow down the aging process. PMID:12521602

  6. Homocysteine enhances endothelial apoptosis via upregulation of Fas-mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Suhara, Toshimitsu; Fukuo, Keisuke; Yasuda, Osamu; Tsubakimoto, Maki; Takemura, Yukihiro; Kawamoto, Hidenobu; Yokoi, Toyohiko; Mogi, Masaki; Kaimoto, Taeko; Ogihara, Toshio

    2004-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, the underlying mechanism of endothelial cell injury in hyperhomocysteinemia has not been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effect of homocysteine (Hcy) on Fas-mediated apoptosis in endothelial cells. Hcy-induced upregulation of Fas in endothelial cells (ECs) in a dose-dependent manner. At the same time, Hcy increased intracellular peroxide in ECs. Hcy-induced Fas expression was inhibited by the treatment with catalase. Hcy increased NF-kappaB DNA binding activity, and adenovirus-mediated transfection of a Ikappa-B mutant (Ikappa-B mt) gene inhibited Hcy-induced Fas expression. ECs were sensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis when exposed to Hcy. Under these condition, Ikappa-B mt protected ECs from Fas-mediated apoptosis. In addition, Hcy inhibited expression of the caspase-8 inhibitor FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP). Adenovirus-mediated transfection of constitutively active Akt gene abolished the Hcy-mediated downregulation of FLIP. These data suggest that upregulation of Fas expression and downregulation of FLIP is a mechanism through which Hcy induces EC apoptosis. PMID:15117910

  7. Understanding the role of the catalase/peroxide genes in H2O2 resistance of E. coli serotype O157:H7 biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 defenses against H2O2 include the peroxiredoxin AhpC and three catalases: KatG (catalase-peroxidase), KatE (catalase), and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC, KatG, and KatP are induced by OxyR in exponential phase, while KatE is indu...

  8. Probing the two-domain structure of homodimeric prokaryotic and eukaryotic catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Srijib; Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are ancestral bifunctional heme peroxidases found in archaeons, bacteria and lower eukaryotes. In contrast to homologous cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APx) homodimeric KatGs have a two-domain monomeric structure with a catalytic N-terminal heme domain and a C-terminal domain of high sequence and structural similarity but without obvious function. Nevertheless, without its C-terminal counterpart the N-terminal domain exhibits neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Except some hybrid-type proteins all other members of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily lack this C-terminal domain. In order to probe the role of the two-domain monomeric structure for conformational and thermal stability urea and temperature-dependent unfolding experiments were performed by using UV-Vis-, electronic circular dichroism- and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Recombinant prokaryotic (cyanobacterial KatG from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803) and eukaryotic (fungal KatG from Magnaporthe grisea) were investigated. The obtained data demonstrate that the conformational and thermal stability of bifunctional KatGs is significantly lower compared to homologous monofunctional peroxidases. The N- and C-terminal domains do not unfold independently. Differences between the cyanobacterial and the fungal enzyme are relatively small. Data will be discussed with respect to known structure and function of KatG, CcP and APx. PMID:20654740

  9. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Halaban, R; Moellmann, G

    1990-01-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase (monophenol monooxygenase; monophenol, L-dopa:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1), and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmented (Blt/Blt) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). We show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.6) (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, we conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. Our studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the Blt mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation. Images PMID:1693779

  10. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  11. Prevalence of Catalase (-21 A/T) Gene Variant in South Indian (Tamil) Population

    PubMed Central

    Lourdhu Mary, A.; Nithya, K.; Isabel, W.

    2014-01-01

    Catalase, an endogenous antioxidant enzyme, is responsible for regulating reactive species levels. Several epidemiologic studies have suggested that single nucleotide polymorphism in catalase gene may be associated with many diseases. The genotype of CAT (-21 A/T) point mutation in promoter region of catalase gene was determined by polymerase chain based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in the DNA of 100 healthy volunteers. The frequency of CAT (-21 A/T) gene polymorphism AA, AT, and TT genotypes was found to be 7, 23, and 70 percent, respectively. The mutant “T” allele frequency was found to be 0.82 among the south Indian (Tamil) population. Chi square analysis showed that the study population lies within the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The wild type genotype (AA) was found to be very low (7%) and the mutant genotype (AT/TT) was found to be more prevalent (93%) among the south Indian population. This suggests that the high prevalence of mutant genotype may increase the susceptibility to oxidative stress associated diseases. PMID:25057503

  12. An ultrastructural study of glomerular permeability using catalase and peroxidase as tracer proteins.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, M A; Karnovsky, M J; Fahimi, H D; Cotran, R S

    1970-12-01

    Mice were injected intravenously with beef liver catalase (mol wt 240,000) and very small doses of horseradish peroxidase (mol wt 40,000) and the site of localization of these enzymes in the kidney was studied by ultrastructural cytochemistry. 1 min after injection, catalase was present in glomerular capillary lumina and there was minimal permeation of the basement membrane. After 5-180 min, staining of the basement membrane increased progressively but was usually less than that in capillary lumina. At all time intervals the inner (sub-endothelial) layer of the basement membrane contained more reaction product than the lamina densa and the outer (subepithelial) layer. Catalase permeated the entire thickness of the basement membrane and extended up to the slit pore but not beyond the level of the slit diaphragm and was not seen in the urinary space or tubular lumina. Horseradish peroxidase permeated the whole thickness of the basement membrane within 2 min after injection; however, gradients of staining from the inner to outer layers of the basement membrane were frequently seen. The findings with both enzymes indicate that (a) the basement membrane restricts the passage of proteins over a wide range of molecular size with increasing impediment for larger molecules and (b) the slit pore functions as an additional barrier for molecules that cross the basement membrane. PMID:5511568

  13. Optimization of permeabilization process of yeast cells for catalase activity using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Trawczyńska, Ilona; Wójcik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformation processes accompanied by whole yeast cells as biocatalyst are a promising area of food industry. Among the chemical sanitizers currently used in food technology, hydrogen peroxide is a very effective microbicidal and bleaching agent. In this paper, permeabilization has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells aiming at increased intracellular catalase activity for decomposed H2O2. Ethanol, which is non-toxic, biodegradable and easily available, has been used as permeabilization factor. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied in determining the influence of different parameters on permeabilization process. The aim of the study was to find such values of the process parameters that would yield maximum activity of catalase during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The optimum operating conditions for permeabilization process obtained by RSM were as follows: 53% (v/v) of ethanol concentration, temperature of 14.8 °C and treatment time of 40 min. After permeabilization, the activity of catalase increased ca. 40 times and its maximum value equalled to 4711 U/g. PMID:26019618

  14. katGI and katGII encode two different catalases-peroxidases in Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed Central

    Menndez, M C; Ainsa, J A; Martn, C; Garca, M J

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that catalase-peroxidase plays an important role in several aspects of mycobacterial metabolism and is a virulence factor in the main pathogenic mycobacteria. In this investigation, we studied genes encoding for this protein in the fast-growing opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium fortuitum. Nucleotide sequences of two different catalase-peroxidase genes (katGI and katGII) of M. fortuitum are described. They show only 64% homology at the nucleotide level and 55% identity at the amino acid level, and they are more similar to catalases-peroxidases from different bacteria, including mycobacteria, than to each other. Both proteins were found to be expressed in actively growing M. fortuitum, and both could also be expressed when transformed into Escherichia coli and M. aurum. We detected the presence of a copy of IS6100 in the neighboring region of a katG gene in the M. fortuitum strain in which this element was identified (strain FC1). The influence of each katG gene on isoniazid (isonicotinic acid hydrazide; INH) susceptibility of mycobacteria was checked by using the INH-sensitive M. aurum as the host. Resistance to INH was induced when katGI was transformed into INH-sensitive M. aurum, suggesting that this enzyme contributes to the natural resistance of M. fortuitum to the drug. This is the first report showing two different genes encoding same enzyme activity which are actively expressed within the same mycobacterial strain. PMID:9371430

  15. Spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular simulation studies on the interaction of catalase with copper ion.

    PubMed

    Hao, Fang; Jing, Mingyang; Zhao, Xingchen; Liu, Rutao

    2015-02-01

    In this research, the binding mechanism of Cu(2+) to bovine liver catalase (BLC) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking methods. The cellar experiment was firstly carried out to investigate the inhibition effect of catalase. During the fluorescence quenching study, after correcting the inner filter effect (IFE), the fluorescence of BLC was found to be quenched by Cu(2+). The quenching mechanism was determined by fluorescence lifetime measurement, and was confirmed to be the dynamic mode. The secondary structure content of BLC was changed by the addition of Cu(2+), as revealed by UV-vis absorption and CD spectra, which further induces the decrease in BLC activity. Molecular simulation study indicates that Cu(2+) is located between two β-sheets and two random coils of BLC near to the heme group, and interacts with His 74 and Ser 113 residues near a hydrophilic area. The decrease of α-helix and the binding of His 74 are considered to be the major reason for the inhibition of BLC activity caused by Cu(2+). The ITC results indicate that the binding stoichiometry of Cu(2+) to catalase is 11.4. Moreover, the binding of Cu(2+) to BLC destroyed H-bonds, which was confirmed by the CD result. PMID:25618814

  16. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. )

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  17. Role of. pi. -cation radicals in the enzymatic cycles of peroxidases, catalases, and nitrite and sulfite reductases

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, L K; Chang, C K; Davis, M S; Fajer, J

    1980-01-01

    Charge iterative extended Hueckel calculations, and magnetic and optical results on porphyrins, chlorins, and isobacteriochlorins (1) suggest that the catalytic cycles of the enzymes horseradish peroxidase, catalase, Neurospora crassa catalase, and nitrite and sulfite reductases proceed via ..pi..-cation radicals of their prosthetic groups; (2) offer distinguishing features for the optical and magnetic spectra of these radicals, pertinent to their detection as enzymatic intermediates; (3) reconcile the seemingly contradictory optical and NMR data on Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase; and (4) predict that the axial ligation of the heme differs for horseradish peroxidase and catalase.

  18. Different behaviour of normal and neoplastic cells cultured in vitro in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Liotti, F S; Bodo, M; Menghini, A R; Guerrieri, P; Mariucci, G; Bruschelli, G

    1987-09-15

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts and hepatocytes were studied in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase in order to establish whether these enzymes had the capacity to favour cell multiplication as previously shown for in vitro tumour ascites cells (ATP C+). The results indicate that, unlike ATP C+ cells, both fibroblasts and hepatocytes are inhibited in their multiplication by superoxide dismutase. Similar effects are exerted on hepatocytes by catalase, whereas the multiplication of fibroblasts is favoured by high doses of this enzyme. Enzyme determinations revealed high levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase in hepatocytes, whereas both enzymes were poor in fibroblasts and ATP C+. PMID:3040600

  19. Beneficial effects of catalase or pyruvate in a most-probable-number technique for the detection of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Brewer, D G; Martin, S E; Ordal, Z J

    1977-12-01

    The effects of the addition of catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) or pyruvate on the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in Trypticase soy broth with 10% NaCl were examined using a most-probable-number technique. Addition of catalase or pyruvate to the broth increased enumeration of all heat-stressed S. aureus strains tested. Increases were also observed with nonstressed cells. Catalase and pyruvate were similarly effective when added to Trypticase soy broth-10% NaCl in enumerating staphylococci naturally present in low-temperature-rendered ground-beef samples. PMID:339836

  20. Structure of catalase HPII from Escherichia coli at 1.9 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Bravo, J; Mate, M J; Schneider, T; Switala, J; Wilson, K; Loewen, P C; Fita, I

    1999-02-01

    Catalase HPII from Escherichia coli, a homotetramer of subunits with 753 residues, is the largest known catalase. The structure of native HPII has been refined at 1.9 A resolution using X-ray synchrotron data collected from crystals flash-cooled with liquid nitrogen. The crystallographic agreement factors R and R(free) are respectively 16.6% and 21.0%. The asymmetric unit of the crystal contains a whole molecule that shows accurate 222-point group symmetry. The structure of the central part of the HPII subunit gives a root mean square deviation of 1.5 A for 477 equivalencies with beef liver catalase. Most of the additional 276 residues of HPII are located in either an extended N-terminal arm or in a C-terminal domain organized with a flavodoxin-like topology. A small number of mostly hydrophilic interactions stabilize the relative orientation between the C-terminal domain and the core of the enzyme. The heme component of HPII is a cis-hydroxychlorin gamma-spirolactone in an orientation that is flipped 180 degrees with respect to the orientation of the heme found in beef liver catalase. The proximal ligand of the heme is Tyr415 which is joined by a covalent bond between its Cbeta atom and the Ndelta atom of His392. Over 2,700 well-defined solvent molecules have been identified filling a complex network of cavities and channels formed inside the molecule. Two channels lead close to the distal side heme pocket of each subunit suggesting separate inlet and exhaust functions. The longest channel, that begins in an adjacent subunit, is over 50 A in length, and the second channel is about 30 A in length. A third channel reaching the heme proximal side may provide access for the substrate needed to catalyze the heme modification and His-Tyr bond formation. HPII does not bind NADPH and the equivalent region to the NADPH binding pocket of bovine catalase, partially occluded in HPII by residues 585-590, corresponds to the entrance to the second channel. The heme distal pocket contains two solvent molecules, and the one closer to the iron atom appears to exhibit high mobility or low occupancy compatible with weak coordination. PMID:10022351

  1. Transgelin Up-Regulation in Obstructive Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, Fani; Prakoura, Niki; Kaltsa, Garyfallia; Politis, Panagiotis; Arvaniti, Elena; Kaltezioti, Valeria; Psarras, Stelios; Pagakis, Stamatis; Katsimboulas, Michalis; Abed, Ahmed; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Charonis, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is a complex and multifactorial process, affecting the structure and compromising the function of several organs. Among those, renal fibrosis is an important pathological change, eventually leading to renal failure. Proteomic analysis of the renal parenchyma in the well-established rat model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO model) suggested that transgelin was up-regulated during the development of fibrosis. Transgelin up-regulation was confirmed both at the protein and at the mRNA level. It was observed that at early stages of fibrosis transgelin was mainly expressed in the interstitial compartment and, more specifically, in cells surrounding the glomeruli. Subsequently, it was confirmed that transgelin expressing cells were activated fibroblasts, based on their extensive co-expression of α-SMA and their complete lack of co-distribution with markers of other cell types (endothelial, epithelial and cells of the immune system). These periglomerular fibroblasts exhibited staining for transgelin mainly cytoplasmic but occasionally nuclear as well. In addition, transgelin expression in periglomerular fibroblasts was absent in renal fibrosis developed in a hypertensive model, compared to the UUO model. Promoter analysis indicated that there are several conserved motifs for transcription factor binding. Among those, Kruppel-like factor 6 was found to be up-regulated in transgelin positive periglomerular activated fibroblasts, suggesting a possible involvement in the mechanism of transgelin up-regulation. These data strongly suggest that transgelin is up-regulated in the obstructive nephropathy and could be used as a novel marker for renal fibrosis in the future. PMID:23840546

  2. Specific Function of the Met-Tyr-Trp Adduct Radical and Residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the Atypical Catalase Reaction of Catalase-Peroxidase KatG*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiangbo; Khajo, Abdelahad; Jarrett, Sanchez; Suarez, Javier; Levitsky, Yan; Burger, Richard M.; Jarzecki, Andrzej A.; Magliozzo, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase activity of the dual-function heme enzyme catalase-peroxidase (KatG) depends on several structural elements, including a unique adduct formed from covalently linked side chains of three conserved amino acids (Met-255, Tyr-229, and Trp-107, Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG numbering) (MYW). Mutagenesis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and optical stopped-flow experiments, along with calculations using density functional theory (DFT) methods revealed the basis of the requirement for a radical on the MYW-adduct, for oxyferrous heme, and for conserved residues Arg-418 and Asp-137 in the rapid catalase reaction. The participation of an oxyferrous heme intermediate (dioxyheme) throughout the pH range of catalase activity is suggested from our finding that carbon monoxide inhibits the activity at both acidic and alkaline pH. In the presence of H2O2, the MYW-adduct radical is formed normally in KatG[D137S] but this mutant is defective in forming dioxyheme and lacks catalase activity. KatG[R418L] is also catalase deficient but exhibits normal formation of the adduct radical and dioxyheme. Both mutants exhibit a coincidence between MYW-adduct radical persistence and H2O2 consumption as a function of time, and enhanced subunit oligomerization during turnover, suggesting that the two mutations disrupting catalase turnover allow increased migration of the MYW-adduct radical to protein surface residues. DFT calculations showed that an interaction between the side chain of residue Arg-418 and Tyr-229 in the MYW-adduct radical favors reaction of the radical with the adjacent dioxyheme intermediate present throughout turnover in WT KatG. Release of molecular oxygen and regeneration of resting enzyme are thereby catalyzed in the last step of a proposed catalase reaction. PMID:22918833

  3. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat ?=?339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat ?=?20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 . A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase. PMID:25663126

  4. Delivery of bioactive macromolecules from microporous polymer matrices: Release and activity profiles of lysozyme, collagenase and catalase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Chang, Hsin-I; Li, Xiongwei; Alpar, Oyar; Coombes, Allan G A

    2009-06-28

    Microporous polycaprolactone (PCL) matrices containing lysozyme, collagenase and catalase respectively with molecular weight covering a wide range from 14.3 to 240kDa were produced by a novel method involving rapid cooling of particle suspensions in dry ice. The enzyme loading efficiency (lysozyme (50%), collagenase (75%) and catalase (90%)) depended on the enzyme molecular weight and the non-solvent used to extract acetone from the hardened matrices. Sustained enzyme release occurred from the PCL matrices over 11 days with retained activity dependent on the particular enzyme used (collagenase 100% activity at 11 days, lysozyme 75-80% at 11 days, catalase 10-20% at 5 days). The present findings confirm the potential of microporous PCL matrices for delivering bioactive macromolecules from implantable/insertable depot-type formulations and tissue engineering scaffolds and recommend catalase as a challenging model protein for evaluating such devices. PMID:19491030

  5. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of NO metabolism and direct catalase inhibitors. The latter aspect is explicitely studied for the interaction between catalase inhibiting acetylsalicylic acid and an NO donor. It is also shown that hybrid molecules like NO-aspirin utilize this synergistic potential. Our data open novel approaches for rational tumor therapy based on specific ROS signaling and its control in tumor cells. PMID:26342455

  6. Increasing the endogenous NO level causes catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis signaling specifically in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells generate extracellular superoxide anions and are protected against intercellular apoptosis-inducing HOCl- and NO/peroxynitrite signaling through the expression of membrane-associated catalase. This enzyme decomposes H2O2 and thus prevents HOCl synthesis. It efficiently interferes with NO/peroxynitrite signaling through oxidation of NO and decomposition of peroxynitrite. The regulatory potential of catalase at the crosspoint of ROS and RNS chemical biology, as well as its high local concentration on the outside of the cell membrane of tumor cells, establish tight control of intercellular signaling and thus prevent tumor cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of catalase or its inactivation by singlet oxygen reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite are connected with catalase in multiple and meaningful ways, as (i) NO can be oxidated by compound I of catalase, (ii) NO can reversibly inhibit catalase, (iii) peroxynitrite can be decomposed by catalase and (iv) the interaction between peroxynitrite and H2O2 leads to the generation of singlet oxygen that inactivates catalase. Therefore, modulation of the concentration of free NO through addition of arginine, inhibition of arginase, induction of NOS expression or inhibition of NO dioxygenase triggers an autoamplificatory biochemical cascade that is based on initial formation of singlet oxygen, amplification of superoxide anion/H2O2 and NO generation through singlet oxygen dependent stimulation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8. Finally, singlet oxygen is generated at sufficiently high concentration to inactivate protective catalase and to reactivate intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. This regulatory network allows to establish several pathways for synergistic interactions, like the combination of modulators of NO metabolism with enhancers of superoxide anion generation, modulators of NO metabolism that act at different targets and between modulators of NO metabolism and direct catalase inhibitors. The latter aspect is explicitely studied for the interaction between catalase inhibiting acetylsalicylic acid and an NO donor. It is also shown that hybrid molecules like NO-aspirin utilize this synergistic potential. Our data open novel approaches for rational tumor therapy based on specific ROS signaling and its control in tumor cells. PMID:26342455

  7. Purification, cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of a monofunctional catalase, KatP, from Pigmentiphaga sp. DL-8.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Yicheng; Huang, Fei; Fu, Lei; Huang, Yan; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-04-01

    Catalases are essential components of the cellular equipment used to cope with oxidative stress. The monofunctional catalase KatP was purified from Pigmentiphaga sp. using ammonium sulfate precipitation (ASP), diethylaminoethyl ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The purified catalase formed polymer with an estimated monomer molecular mass of 54kDa, which were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and zymogram analysis. KatP exhibited a specific catalytic activity of 73,000U/mg, which was higher than that of catalase-1 of Comamonas terrigena N3H (55,900U/mg). Seven short tryptic fragments of this catalase were obtained by electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF MS/MS), and the gene, katP, was cloned by PCR amplification and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Based on the complete amino acid sequence, KatP was identified as a clade 3 monofunctional catalase. The specific activities of recombinant KatP for hydrogen peroxide (690,000U/mg) increased 9-fold over that of the parent strain. The Km and Vmax of recombinant KatP were 9.48mM and 81.2mol/minmg, respectively. The optimal pH and temperature for KatP were 7.0 and 37°C, respectively, and the enzyme displayed abroad pH-stable range of 4.0-11.0. The enzyme was inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(2+), and Mn(2+), whereas Fe(3+) and Mg(2+) stimulated KatP enzymatic activity. Interestingly, the catalase activity of recombinant KatP displayed high stability under different temperature and pH conditions, suggesting that KatP is a potential candidate for the production of catalase. PMID:25665507

  8. A comprehensive evaluation of catalase-like activity of different classes of redox-active therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Maia, Clarissa G C; Weitner, Tin; Carballal, Sebastián; Sampaio, Romulo S; Lieb, Dominik; Ghazaryan, Robert; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Radi, Rafael; Reboucas, Julio S; Spasojevic, Ivan; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2015-09-01

    Because of the increased insight into the biological role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under physiological and pathological conditions and the role it presumably plays in the action of natural and synthetic redox-active drugs, there is a need to accurately define the type and magnitude of reactions that may occur with this intriguing and key species of redoxome. Historically, and frequently incorrectly, the impact of catalase-like activity has been assigned to play a major role in the action of many redox-active drugs, mostly SOD mimics and peroxynitrite scavengers, and in particular MnTBAP(3-) and Mn salen derivatives. The advantage of one redox-active compound over another has often been assigned to the differences in catalase-like activity. Our studies provide substantial evidence that Mn(III) N-alkylpyridylporphyrins couple with H2O2 in actions other than catalase-related. Herein we have assessed the catalase-like activities of different classes of compounds: Mn porphyrins (MnPs), Fe porphyrins (FePs), Mn(III) salen (EUK-8), and Mn(II) cyclic polyamines (SOD-active M40403 and SOD-inactive M40404). Nitroxide (tempol), nitrone (NXY-059), ebselen, and MnCl2, which have not been reported as catalase mimics, were used as negative controls, while catalase enzyme was a positive control. The dismutation of H2O2 to O2 and H2O was followed via measuring oxygen evolved with a Clark oxygen electrode at 25°C. The catalase enzyme was found to have kcat(H2O2)=1.5×10(6)M(-1) s(-1). The yield of dismutation, i.e., the maximal amount of O2 evolved, was assessed also. The magnitude of the yield reflects an interplay between the kcat(H2O2) and the stability of compounds toward H2O2-driven oxidative degradation, and is thus an accurate measure of the efficacy of a catalyst. The kcat(H2O2) values for 12 cationic Mn(III) N-substituted (alkyl and alkoxyalkyl) pyridylporphyrin-based SOD mimics and Mn(III) N,N'-dialkylimidazolium porphyrin, MnTDE-2-ImP(5+), ranged from 23 to 88M(-1) s(-1). The analogous Fe(III) N-alkylpyridylporphyrins showed ~10-fold higher activity than the corresponding MnPs, but the values of kcat(H2O2) are still ~4 orders of magnitude lower than that of the enzyme. While the kcat(H2O2) values for Fe ethyl and n-octyl analogs were 803.5 and 368.4M(-1) s(-1), respectively, the FePs are more prone to H2O2-driven oxidative degradation, therefore allowing for similar yields in H2O2 dismutation as analogous MnPs. The kcat(H2O2) values are dependent on the electron deficiency of the metal site as it controls the peroxide binding in the first step of the dismutation process. SOD-like activities depend on electron deficiency of the metal site also, as it controls the first step of O2(●-) dismutation. In turn, the kcat(O2(●-)) parallels the kcat(H2O2). Therefore, the electron-rich anionic non-SOD mimic MnTBAP(3-) has essentially very low catalase-like activity, kcat(H2O2)=5.8M(-1) s(-1). The catalase-like activities of Mn(III) and Fe(III) porphyrins are at most, 0.0004 and 0.05% of the enzyme activity, respectively. The kcat(H2O2) values of 8.2 and 6.5M(-1) s(-1) were determined for electron-rich Mn(II) cyclic polyamine-based compounds, M40403 and M40404, respectively. The EUK-8, with modest SOD-like activity, has only slightly higher kcat(H2O2)=13.5M(-1) s(-1). The biological relevance of kcat(H2O2) of MnTE-2-PyP(5+), MnTDE-2-ImP(5+), MnTBAP(3-), FeTE-2-PyP(5+), M40403, M40404, and Mn salen was evaluated in wild-type and peroxidase/catalase-deficient E. coli. PMID:26026699

  9. Catalase and superoxide dismutase-2 enhance survival and protect ovaries during overwintering diapause in the mosquito Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Cheolho; Denlinger, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Lifespan extension and stress resistance are two important features of diapause that are essential for successful overwintering. We present several lines of evidence suggesting that genes encoding two antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase-2, are critical in generating these characteristics during diapause in overwintering adults of the mosquito Culex pipiens. Expression of both catalase and sod-2 was dramatically higher in young diapausing females than in their nondiapausing counterparts at the same age. Suppression of catalase, but not sod-2, resulted in increased damage to the ovaries, as evidenced by signs of apoptosis in ovarian follicle cells. Adult survival time was shortened when levels of either catalase or sod-2 were suppressed using RNAi. Together these results imply that these two antioxidants are particularly important in promoting survival in diapausing females, while elevation of catalase also contributes to protection of the ovaries. In addition, RNAi directed against forkhead transcription factor (foxo), a gene thought to be upstream of the genes encoding these antioxidants, resulted in suppression of both catalase and sod-2. The linkage with FOXO suggests that the genes encoding these two antioxidants are components of an important gene network regulated by this transcription factor. PMID:21277308

  10. NADPH binding and control of catalase compound II formation: comparison of bovine, yeast, and Escherichia coli enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Hillar, A; Nicholls, P; Switala, J; Loewen, P C

    1994-01-01

    1. NADPH binds to bovine catalase and to yeast catalases A and T, but not to Escherichia coli catalase HPII. The association was demonstrated using chromatography and fluorimetry. Bound NADPH fluoresces in a similar way to NADPH in solution. 2. Bound NADPH protects bovine and yeast catalases against forming inactive peroxide compound II either via endogenous reductant action or by ferrocyanide reduction during catalytic activity in the presence of slowly generated peroxide. 3. Bound NADPH reduces neither compound I nor compound II of catalase. It apparently reacts with an intermediate formed during the decay of compound I to compound II; this postulated intermediate is an immediate precursor of stable compound II either when the latter is formed by endogenous reductants or when ferrocyanide is used. It represents therefore a new type of hydrogen donor that is not included in the original classification of Keilin and Nicholls [Keilin, D. and Nicholls, P. (1958) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 29, 302-307] 4. A model for NADPH action is presented in which concerted reduction of the ferryl iron and of a neighbouring protein free radical is responsible for the observed NADPH effects. The roles of migrant radical species in mammalian and yeast catalases are compared with similar events in metmyoglobin and cytochrome c peroxidase reactions with peroxides. Images Figure 1 PMID:8002960

  11. Catalase overexpression in mammary cancer cells leads to a less aggressive phenotype and an altered response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Glorieux, Christophe; Dejeans, Nicolas; Sid, Brice; Beck, Raphaël; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Verrax, Julien

    2011-11-15

    Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) are naturally produced as a consequence of aerobic metabolism, cells have developed a sophisticated set of antioxidant molecules to prevent the toxic accumulation of these species. However, compared with normal cells, malignant cells often exhibit increased levels of intracellular ROS and altered levels of antioxidant molecules. The resulting endogenous oxidative stress favors tumor growth by promoting genetic instability, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. In this context, we assessed the influence of catalase overexpression on the sensitivity of breast cancer cells towards various anticancer treatments. Our data show that catalase overexpression in MCF-7 cells leads to a 7-fold increase in catalase activity but provokes a 40% decrease in the expression of both glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin II. Interestingly, proliferation and migration capacities of MCF-7 cells were impaired by the overexpression of catalase, as compared to parental cells. Regarding their sensitivity to anticancer treatments, we observed that cells overexpressing catalase were more sensitive to paclitaxel, etoposide and arsenic trioxide. However, no effect was observed on the cytotoxic response to ionizing radiations, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin or doxorubicin. Finally, we observed that catalase overexpression protects cancer cells against the pro-oxidant combination of ascorbate and menadione, suggesting that changes in the expression of antioxidant enzymes could be a mechanism of resistance of cancer cells towards redox-based chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21689642

  12. Expression and purification of soluble bio-active rice plant catalase-A from recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ray, Mamata; Mishra, Panchanand; Das, Priyanka; Sabat, Surendra Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Catalase in plants is a heme-coordinated tetrameric protein that primarily disproportionates hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. It plays an important role in maintaining cellular concentration of hydrogen peroxide to a level, necessary for all aspects of normal plant growth and development. Except for its recombinant expression in transgenic plants and insect cell line, the protein is yet to be synthesized in its bio-active form in prokaryotic expression system. Attempts made in past for recombinant expression of plant catalase in Escherichia coli consistently resulted in formation of insoluble and inactive aggregates of inclusion body. Here we have shown the specific requirement of a thioredoxin fusion partner, the involvement of trigger factor protein and the low temperature treatment during induction period for synthesis of completely solubilized rice plant catalase-A in recombinant E. coli. Furthermore, the bacteria required the supplementation of δ-aminolevulinic acid to produce bio-active recombinant rice catalase-A. The molecular and biochemical properties of the purified recombinant protein showed the characteristic features of a typical mono-functional plant catalase. These results attest to the usefulness of the present protocol for production of plant catalase using E. coli as heterologous expression system. PMID:21978604

  13. Upregulation of intracellular antioxidant enzymes in brain and heart during estivation in the African lungfish Protopterus dolloi.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Salway, Kurtis D; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Chew, Shit F; Warren, Sarah A; Ballantyne, James S; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2010-03-01

    The African slender lungfish, Protopterus dolloi, is highly adapted to withstand periods of drought by secreting a mucous cocoon and estivating for periods of months to years. Estivation is similar to the diapause and hibernation of other animal species in that it is characterized by negligible activity and a profoundly depressed metabolic rate. As is typically observed in quiescent states, estivating P. dolloi are resistant to environmental stresses. We tested the hypothesis that P. dolloi enhances stress resistance during estivation by upregulating intracellular antioxidant defences in brain and heart tissues. We found that most of the major intracellular antioxidant enzymes, including the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, cytosolic superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, were upregulated in brain tissue of lungfish that had estivated for 60 days. Several of these enzymes were also elevated in heart tissue of estivators. These changes were not due to food deprivation, as they did not occur in a group of fish that were deprived of food but maintained in water for the same period of time. We found little evidence of tissue oxidative damage in estivators. Products of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal adducts) and oxidative protein damage (carbonylation) were similar in estivating and control lungfish. However, protein nitrotyrosine levels were elevated in brain tissue of estivators. Taken together, these data indicate that estivating P. dolloi have enhanced oxidative stress resistance in brain and heart due to a significant upregulation of intracellular antioxidant capacity. PMID:19888582

  14. Genome-wide Screening of Regulators of Catalase Expression: ROLE OF A TRANSCRIPTION COMPLEX AND HISTONE AND tRNA MODIFICATION COMPLEXES ON ADAPTATION TO STRESS.

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Encinar Del Dedo, Javier; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental cues, the mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1-driven signaling cascade activates hundreds of genes to induce a robust anti-stress cellular response in fission yeast. Thus, upon stress imposition Sty1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus where it up-regulates transcription through the Atf1 transcription factor. Several regulators of transcription and translation have been identified as important to mount an integral response to oxidative stress, such as the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyl transferase or Elongator complexes, respectively. With the aim of identifying new regulators of this massive gene expression program, we have used a GFP-based protein reporter and screened a fission yeast deletion collection using flow cytometry. We find that the levels of catalase fused to GFP, both before and after a threat of peroxides, are altered in hundreds of strains lacking components of chromatin modifiers, transcription complexes, and modulators of translation. Thus, the transcription elongation complex Paf1, the histone methylase Set1-COMPASS, and the translation-related Trm112 dimers are all involved in full expression of Ctt1-GFP and in wild-type tolerance to peroxides. PMID:26567340

  15. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  16. Voltammetric measurements at the surface of cotton: absorption and catalase reactivity of a dinuclear manganese complex.

    PubMed

    Marken, Frank; Taylor, James E; Bonné, Michael J; Helton, Matthew E; Parry, Matthew L; McKee, Vickie

    2007-02-13

    Voltammetric measurements at the surface of cotton fabric were conducted after impregnating the surface of the textile with graphite flakes. The resulting conducting surface contact was connected to a conventional basal plane pyrolytic graphite substrate electrode and employed both in stagnant solution and in rotating disc voltammetry mode. Diffusion through the immobilized cotton sample (inter-fiber) is probed with the aqueous Fe(CN)6(4-/3-) redox system. With a small amount of platinum immobilized at the cotton surface, catalase reactivity toward hydrogen peroxide was observed and used to further quantify the diffusion (intra- and inter-fiber) into the reactive zone at the graphite-cotton interface. A well-known catalase model system, the dinuclear manganese metal complex [Mn(IV)2(micro-O)3L2](PF6)2 (with L=1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane), is investigated in aqueous 0.1 M carbonate buffer at pH 9.8 in contact with cotton fabric. Absorption of the metal complex is monitored and quantified by voltammetric methods. A Langmurian binding constant of approximately K=2x103 M-1 was determined. Voltammetric measurements of the adsorbed metal complex reveal strong absorption and chemically irreversible reduction characteristics similar to those observed in solution. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide, catalyst coverage dependent anodic catalase activity was observed approximately following the rate law rate=k[catalyst]surface[H2O2]solution and with k=3x104 dm3 s-1 mol-1. The catalyst reactivity was modified by the presence of cotton. PMID:17279720

  17. Stability of glucose oxidase and catalase adsorbed on variously activated 13X zeolite.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, P G; Vaccari, A; Ricci, G; Poli, G; Ruggeri, O

    1982-10-01

    The use of 13X zeolite (0.1-0.4-mm granules), treated with 2N and 0.01N HCI, 0.01M citric acid, 0.1M citric-phosphate buffer (pH 3.6), and in untreated form to adsorb glucose oxidase of fungal origin and microbial catalase was examined. Physicochemical analysis of the support demonstrated that its crystalline structure, greatly altered by the HCl and buffer, could be partially maintained with citric acid. The specific adsorption of the enzymes increased with decreasing pH and proved to be considerable for all the supports. The stability with storage at 25 degrees C is strictly correlated with the titrable acidity of the activated zeolite expressed as meq NaOH/g and with pH value of the activation solution. It proved to be lower than 55 h for both enzymes if adsorbed on zeolite treated with 2N HCl, and 15-fold and 30-fold higher for glucose oxidase and catalase adsorbed, respectively, on zeolite treated with the 0.1M citric-phosphate buffer and 0.01M citric acid. The specific adsorption of glucose oxidase and catalase was, respectively, 1840 U/g at pH 3.0 and 6910 U/g at pH 5.0. Their half-life at 25 degrees C with storage at pH 3.5 for the former and at pH 5.0 for the latter was 800 and 1560 h vs. 40 and 110 h for the corresponding free enzymes. PMID:18546124

  18. Targeted Overexpression of Mitochondrial Catalase Prevents Radiation-Induced Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Vipan K.; Allen, Barrett D.; Tran, Katherine K.; Chmielewski, Nicole N.; Craver, Brianna M.; Martirosian, Vahan; Morganti, Josh M.; Rosi, Susanna; Vlkolinsky, Roman; Acharya, Munjal M.; Nelson, Gregory A.; Allen, Antiño R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Radiation-induced disruption of mitochondrial function can elevate oxidative stress and contribute to the metabolic perturbations believed to compromise the functionality of the central nervous system. To clarify the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in mediating the adverse effects of radiation in the brain, we analyzed transgenic (mitochondrial catalase [MCAT]) mice that overexpress human catalase localized to the mitochondria. Results: Compared with wild-type (WT) controls, overexpression of the MCAT transgene significantly decreased cognitive dysfunction after proton irradiation. Significant improvements in behavioral performance found on novel object recognition and object recognition in place tasks were associated with a preservation of neuronal morphology. While the architecture of hippocampal CA1 neurons was significantly compromised in irradiated WT mice, the same neurons in MCAT mice did not exhibit extensive and significant radiation-induced reductions in dendritic complexity. Irradiated neurons from MCAT mice maintained dendritic branching and length compared with WT mice. Protected neuronal morphology in irradiated MCAT mice was also associated with a stabilization of radiation-induced variations in long-term potentiation. Stabilized synaptic activity in MCAT mice coincided with an altered composition of the synaptic AMPA receptor subunits GluR1/2. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that neurocognitive sequelae associated with radiation exposure can be reduced by overexpression of MCAT, operating through a mechanism involving the preservation of neuronal morphology. Conclusion: Our article documents the neuroprotective properties of reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species through the targeted overexpression of catalase and how this ameliorates the adverse effects of proton irradiation in the brain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 78–91. PMID:24949841

  19. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Catalase Is Strongly Associated with Ovarian Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Saed, Mohammed G.; Abusamaan, Mohammed S.; Dyson, Gregory; Diamond, Michael P.; Saed, Ghassan M.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecologic cancers. Recent evidence demonstrates an association between enzymatic activity altering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with human cancer susceptibility. We sought to evaluate the association of SNPs in key oxidant and antioxidant enzymes with increased risk and survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Individuals (n = 143) recruited were divided into controls, (n = 94): healthy volunteers, (n = 18), high-risk BRCA1/2 negative (n = 53), high-risk BRCA1/2 positive (n = 23) and ovarian cancer cases (n = 49). DNA was subjected to TaqMan SNP genotype analysis for selected oxidant and antioxidant enzymes. Of the seven selected SNP studied, no association with ovarian cancer risk (Pearson Chi-square) was found. However, a catalase SNP was identified as a predictor of ovarian cancer survival by the Cox regression model. The presence of this SNP was associated with a higher likelihood of death (hazard ratio (HR) of 3.68 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.149–11.836)) for ovarian cancer patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated a significant median overall survival difference (108 versus 60 months, p<0.05) for those without the catalase SNP as compared to those with the SNP. Additionally, age at diagnosis greater than the median was found to be a significant predictor of death (HR of 2.78 (95% CI: 1.022–7.578)). This study indicates a strong association with the catalase SNP and survival of ovarian cancer patients, and thus may serve as a prognosticator. PMID:26301412

  20. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  1. E. coli HPII catalase interaction with high spin ligands: formate and fluoride as active site probes.

    PubMed

    Maj, M; Loewen, P; Nicholls, P

    1998-05-19

    E. coli catalase (HPII) wild type and mutant enzymes (heme dcis-containing) were examined (i) to study the role of a distal haem cavity residue, asparagine-201, in high spin ligand binding and (ii) to compare the differences in this binding between heme d and protoheme enzymes such as that from beef liver (BLC). High spin fluoride complexes were formed by all three HPII catalases examined, wild type (201 asn) and 201gln and 201asp mutants, but with a lower fluoride affinity than that of BLC. The binding of fluoride was pH-dependent, indicating that a proton is bound as well as a fluoride anion. HPII 201glu and 201 asp mutants showed lower affinities for fluoride than did wild type, unlike their reactions with cyanide which are essentially independent of the nature of residue 201. The equilibria and rates of fluoride and formate binding to BLC were reexamined. The rates of reaction with formate were similar to those reported previously. Dissociation rates for fluoride-catalase are higher than for formate suggesting that the latter may be bound differently. High spin complexes between formate and all three HPII forms showed a substantially higher affinity than that of BLC for HPII wild type and progressively lower affinities for the two mutants. As with fluoride the reactions were pH-dependent, indicating that a proton is bound together with the formate anion (or that undissociated formic acid is the ligand). The known structures of the heme groups and heme pockets involved are discussed. Formate may be bound by secondary H-bounds within the heme pocket in both heme dcis and protoheme enzymes. The nature of the heme pocket and the heme access channel may be more important than the chemical nature of the prosthetic group in controlling both high spin ligand interactions and reactions with the substrate hydrogen peroxide. PMID:9659382

  2. Two temporally synthesized charge subunits interact to form the five isoforms of cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum) catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, R N; Eising, R

    1990-01-01

    Five charge isoforms of tetrameric catalase were isolated from cotyledons of germinated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings. Denaturing isoelectric focusing of the individual isoforms in polyacrylamide gels indicated that isoforms A (most anodic) and E (most cathodic) consisted of one subunit of different charge, whereas isoforms B, C and D each consisted of a mixture of these two subunits. Thus the five isoforms apparently were formed through combinations of two subunits in different ratios. Labelling cotyledons in vivo with [35S]methionine at three daily intervals in the dark, and translation in vivo of polyadenylated RNA isolated from cotyledons at the same ages, revealed synthesis of two different subunits. One of the subunits was synthesized in cotyledons at all ages studied (days 1-3), whereas the other subunit was detected only at days 2 and 3. This differential expression of two catalase subunits helped explain previous results from this laboratory showing that the two anodic forms (A and B) found in maturing seeds were supplemented with three cathodic forms (C-E) after the seeds germinated. These subunit data also helped clarify our new findings that proteins of isoforms A, B and C (most active isoforms) accumulated in cotyledons of plants kept in the dark for 3 days, then gradually disappeared during the next several days, whereas isoforms D and E (least active isoforms) remained in the cells. This shift in isoform pattern occurred whether seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to continuous light after day 3, although exposure to light enhanced this process. These sequential molecular events were responsible for the characteristic developmental changes (rise and fall) in total catalase activity. We believe that the isoform changeover is physiologically related to the changeover in glyoxysome to leaf-type-peroxisome metabolism. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1695843

  3. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324.

    PubMed

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 10(5) U mg(-1) protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (K cat/K m ) of 4.7 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t 1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t 1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  4. Pharmacokinetics and stability properties of catalase modified with water-soluble polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Aymara; Prez, Yunel; Gmez, Leissy; Ramrez, Hector L; Schacht, Etienne H; Villalonga, Reynaldo

    2006-07-01

    Bovine liver catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) was chemically modified with mannan, carboxymethylcellulose, and carboxymethylchitin. The enzyme retained about 48-97% of the initial specific activity after glycosidation with the polysaccharides. The prepared neoglycoenzyme was 1.9-5.7 fold more stable against the thermal inactivation processes at 55 degrees C, in comparison with the native counterpart. Also, the modified enzyme was more resistant to proteolytic degradation with trypsin. Pharmacokinetics studies revealed higher plasma half-life time for all the enzyme-polymer preparations, but better results were achieved for the enzyme modified with the anionic macromolecules. PMID:16838281

  5. Dynamics of the reaction glucose-catalase-glucose oxidase-hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Číp, M.; Schreiberová, L.; Schreiber, I.

    2011-12-01

    Glucose-catalase-glucose oxidase-hydrogen peroxide reaction is one of the few known enzymatic systems studied in vitro in the field of nonlinear chemical dynamics. This reaction belongs to the family of oscillatory enzymatic reactions, which form a natural basis of oscillations in biological systems. A parametric study of dependence on mixing, temperature and initial concentrations of components in a batch stirred reactor was carried out. A newly proposed mathematical model of the reaction conforms to the obtained experimental data. Results of our experiments and simulations hint at further directions of research of non-linear dynamics in this reaction.

  6. Biomimetic Mn-Catalases Based on Dimeric Manganese Complexes in Mesoporous Silica for Potential Antioxidant Agent.

    PubMed

    Escriche-Tur, Luis; Corbella, Montserrat; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Castro, Isabel; Bonneviot, Laurent; Albela, Belén

    2015-11-01

    Two new structural and functional models of the Mn-catalase with formula [{Mn(III)(bpy)(H2O)}(μ-2-MeOC6H4CO2)2(μ-O){Mn(III)(bpy)(X)}]X, where X = NO3 (1) and ClO4 (2) and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction. In both cases, a water molecule and an X ion occupy the monodentate positions. The magnetic properties of these compounds reveal a weak antiferromagnetic behavior (2J = -2.2 cm(-1) for 1 and -0.7 cm(-1) for 2, using the spin Hamiltonian H = -2J S1·S2) and negative zero-field splitting parameter DMn (-4.6 cm(-1) and -3.0 cm(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively). This fact, together with the nearly orthogonal orientation of the Jahn-Teller axes of the Mn(III) ions explain the unusual shape of χMT versus T plot at low temperature. Compound 1 presents a better catalase activity than 2 in CH3CN-H2O media, probably due to a beneficial interaction of the NO3(-) ion with the Mn complex in solution. These compounds were successfully inserted inside two-dimensional hexagonal mesoporous silica (MCM-41 type) leading to the same hybrid material ([Mn2O]@SiO2), without the X group. The manganese complex occupies approximately half of the available pore volume, keeping the silica's hexagonal array intact. Magnetic measurements of [Mn2O]@SiO2 suggest that most of the dinuclear unit is preserved, as a non-negligible interaction between Mn ions is still observed. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the Mn 3s peak confirms that Mn remains as Mn(III) inside the silica. The catalase activity study of material [Mn2O]@SiO2 reveals that the complex is more active inside the porous silica, probably due to the surface silanolate groups of the pore wall. Moreover, the new material shows catalase activity in water media, while the coordination compounds are not active. PMID:26484833

  7. X-ray diffraction study of Penicillium Vitale catalase in the complex with aminotriazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovik, A. A.; Grebenko, A. I.; Melik-Adamyan, V. R.

    2011-07-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme catalase from Penicillium vitale in a complex with the inhibitor aminotriazole was solved and refined by protein X-ray crystallography methods. An analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the complex showed that the inhibition of the enzyme occurs as a result of the covalent binding of aminotriazole to the amino-acid residue His64 in the active site of the enzyme. An investigation of the three-dimensional structure of the complex resulted in the amino-acid residues being more precisely identified. The binding sites of saccharide residues and calcium ions in the protein molecule were found.

  8. X-ray diffraction study of Penicillium Vitale catalase in the complex with aminotriazole

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik, A. A.; Grebenko, A. I.; Melik-Adamyan, V. R.

    2011-07-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme catalase from Penicillium vitale in a complex with the inhibitor aminotriazole was solved and refined by protein X-ray crystallography methods. An analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the complex showed that the inhibition of the enzyme occurs as a result of the covalent binding of aminotriazole to the amino-acid residue His64 in the active site of the enzyme. An investigation of the three-dimensional structure of the complex resulted in the amino-acid residues being more precisely identified. The binding sites of saccharide residues and calcium ions in the protein molecule were found.

  9. Epigenetic Silencing of the Key Antioxidant Enzyme Catalase in Karyotypically Abnormal Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Konki, Mikko; Pasumarthy, Kalyan; Malonzo, Maia; Sainio, Annele; Valensisi, Cristina; Söderström, Mirva; Emani, Maheswara Reddy; Stubb, Aki; Närvä, Elisa; Ghimire, Bishwa; Laiho, Asta; Järveläinen, Hannu; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Hawkins, R. David; Lund, Riikka J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenomic regulation is likely to be important in the maintenance of genomic integrity of human pluripotent stem cells, however, the mechanisms are unknown. We explored the epigenomes and transcriptomes of human pluripotent stem cells before and after spontaneous transformation to abnormal karyotypes and in correlation to cancer cells. Our results reveal epigenetic silencing of Catalase, a key regulator of oxidative stress and DNA damage control in abnormal cells. Our findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms associated with spontaneous transformation of human pluripotent stem cells towards malignant fate. The same mechanisms may control the genomic stability of cells in somatic tissues. PMID:26911679

  10. Ability of recombinant human catalase to suppress inflammation of the murine lung induced by influenza A.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xunlong; Shi, Zhihui; Huang, Hai; Zhu, Hongguang; Zhou, Pei; Zhu, Haiyan; Ju, Dianwen

    2014-06-01

    Influenza A virus pandemics and emerging antiviral resistance highlight the urgent need for novel generic pharmacological strategies that reduce both viral replication and inflammation of the lung. We have previously investigated the therapeutic efficacy of recombinant human catalase (rhCAT) against viral pneumonia in mice, but the protection mechanisms involved were not explored. In the present study, we have performed a more in-depth analysis covering survival, lung inflammation, immune cell responses, production of cytokines, and inflammation signaling pathways in mice. Male imprinting control region mice were infected intranasally with high pathogenicity (H1N1) influenza A virus followed by treatment with recombinant human catalase. The administration of rhCAT resulted in a significant reduction in inflammatory cell infiltration (e.g., macrophages and neutrophils), inflammatory cytokine levels (e.g., IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ), the level of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 chemokine and the mRNA levels of toll-like receptors TLR-4, TLR-7, and NF-κB, as well as partially maintaining the activity of the antioxidant enzymes system. These findings indicated that rhCAT might play a key protective role in viral pneumonia of mice via suppression of inflammatory immune responses. PMID:24385240

  11. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Catalase Gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Zheng, Xingfei; Diao, Ying; Wang, Youwei; Zhou, Mingquan; Hu, Zhongli

    2015-11-01

    Rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) assay was established to achieve the complete cDNA sequence of a catalase gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera. The obtained full-length cDNA was 1666 bp in size and contained a 1476-bp open reading frame. The 3D structural model of NnCAT was constructed by homology modeling. The putative NnCAT possessed all the main characteristic amino acid residues and motifs of catalase (CAT) protein family, and the phylogenetic analysis revealed that NnCAT grouped together with high plants. Moreover, recombinant NnCAT showed the CAT activity (758 U/mg) at room temperature, holding high activity during temperature range of 20-50 °C, then the optimal pH of recombinant protein was assessed from pH 4 to pH 11. Additionally, real-time PCR assay demonstrated that NnCAT mRNA was expressed in various tissues of N. nucifera, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest level in the root, and mRNA level of NnCAT was significantly augmented in response to short-time mechanical wounding. Different expression pattern of NnCAT gene suggested that NnCAT probably played a defensive role in the initial stages of oxidative stress, regulating the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by extracellular stimuli such as short-time mechanical wounding. PMID:26299377

  12. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme. PMID:24846734

  13. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and. alpha. -tocopherol content of stored potato tubers. [Solanum tuberosum L

    SciTech Connect

    Spychalla, J.P.; Desborough, S.L. )

    1990-11-01

    Activated oxygen or oxygen free radical mediated damage to plants has been established or implicated in many plant stress situations. The extent of activated oxygen damage to potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers during low temperature storage and long-term storage is not known. Quantitation of oxygen free radical mediated damage in plant tissues is difficult. However, it is comparatively easy to quantitate endogenous antioxidants, which detoxify potentially damaging forms of activated oxygen. Three tuber antioxidants, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol were assayed from four potato cultivars stored at 3{degree}C and 9{degree}C for 40 weeks. Tubers stored at 3{degree}C demonstrated increased superoxide dismutase activities (up to 72%) compared to tubers stored at 9{degree}C. Time dependent increases in the levels of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and {alpha}-tocopherol occurred during the course of the 40 week storage. The possible relationship between these increases in antioxidants and the rate of activated oxygen production in the tubers is discussed.

  14. Characterization of glutathione reductase and catalase in the fronds of two Pteris ferns upon arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kertulis-Tartar, Gina M; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2009-10-01

    To better understand the mechanisms of plant tolerance to high concentration of arsenic, we characterized two antioxidant enzymes, glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT), in the fronds of Pteris vittata, an arsenic-hyperaccumulating fern, and Pteris ensiformis, an arsenic-sensitive fern. The induction, activation and apparent kinetics of GR and CAT in the plants upon arsenic exposure were investigated. Under arsenic exposure (sodium arsenate), CAT activity in P. vittata was increased by 1.5-fold, but GR activity was unchanged. Further, GR was not inhibited or activated by the arsenic in assays. No significant differences in K(m) and V(max) values of GR or CAT were observed between the two ferns. However, CAT activity in P. vittata was activated by 200 microM arsenate up to 300% compared to the control. Similar but much smaller increases were observed for P. ensiformis and purified bovine liver catalase (133% and 120%, respectively). This research reports, for the first time, the activation of CAT by arsenic in P. vittata. The increased CAT activities may allow P. vittata to more efficiently mediate arsenic-induced stress by preparing the fern for the impeding production of reactive oxygen species resulting from arsenate reduction to arsenite in the fronds. PMID:19574057

  15. Effect of freezing on the activity of catalase in apple flesh tissue.

    PubMed

    Gong, Y; Toivonen, P M; Wiersma, P A; Lu, C; Lau, O L

    2000-11-01

    Catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) activity was measured in flesh tissue of six apple cultivars (Malus domestica Borkh. cvs. Braeburn, Gala, Jonagold, McIntosh, Red Delicious, and Spartan). Activity of CAT was determined for fresh and frozen tissue of the same fruit. Freezing resulted in reductions of 50 to 90% in CAT activity compared with the activity measured in crude extracts from fresh tissues. The rate of freezing had an impact on the level of reduction of CAT activity, with slower freezing procedures leading to greater losses in activity. Six additives to the extraction buffer were tested to evaluate their potential to reduce the inactivation of CAT from frozen tissue, but only EDTA and Tween 20 showed any benefit. However, EDTA and Tween 20 provided only partial recovery in CAT activity. In contrast, crude extracts prepared from fresh tissue showed no appreciable loss in CAT activity after frozen storage for two weeks at -80 degrees C. Gel electrophoresis and immunological analysis indicated that the loss in CAT activity from tissue freezing could be attributed to loss of both the tetrameric CAT enzyme structure and total CAT protein. The implications of using freezing to preserve apple tissue samples prior to catalase activity analysis is discussed. PMID:11087515

  16. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  17. Activity, peroxide compound formation, and heme d synthesis in Escherichia coli HPII catalase.

    PubMed

    Obinger, C; Maj, M; Nicholls, P; Loewen, P

    1997-06-01

    Wild-type Escherichia coli HPII catalase (heme d containing) has 15% the activity of beef liver enzyme per heme. The rate constant for compound I formation with H2O2 is 1.3 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). HPII compound I reacts with H2O2 to form O2 with a rate constant of 1.8 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). Forty percent of HPII hemes are in the compound I state during turnover. Compound I is reduced by ethanol and formate at rates of 5 and 13 M(-1) s(-1) (pH 7.0), respectively. Incubation of HPII compound I with ferrocyanide and ascorbate does not form a compound II species. Mutation of His128 to alanine or asparagine gives inactive protoheme proteins. Mutation of Asn201 gives partially active heme d forms. Asn201Ala has 24%, Asn201Asp 10%, and Asn201Gln 0.4% of wild-type activity. Asn201His contains protoheme when isolated and converts this via protoheme compound I to a heme d species. Both distal heme cavity residues His128 and Asn201 are implicated in catalytic activity, compound I formation, and in situ heme d biosynthesis. HPII Asn201, like the corresponding residue in protoheme catalases, may promote H+ transfer to His128 imidazole, facilitating (i) peroxide anion binding to heme and (ii) stabilization of a transition state for heterolytic cleavage of the O-O bond. PMID:9185614

  18. Isonicotinic Acid Hydrazide Conversion to Isonicotinyl-NAD by Catalase-peroxidases*

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Ben; Carpena, Xavi; Feliz, Miguel; Donald, Lynda J.; Pons, Miquel; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the pro-drug isoniazid (INH) as an anti-tubercular drug in Mycobacterium tuberculosis involves its conversion to isonicotinyl-NAD, a reaction that requires the catalase-peroxidase KatG. This report shows that the reaction proceeds in the absence of KatG at a slow rate in a mixture of INH, NAD+, Mn2+, and O2, and that the inclusion of KatG increases the rate by >7 times. Superoxide, generated by either Mn2+- or KatG-catalyzed reduction of O2, is an essential intermediate in the reaction. Elimination of the peroxidatic process by mutation slows the rate of reaction by 60% revealing that the peroxidatic process enhances, but is not essential for isonicotinyl-NAD formation. The isonicotinyl-NAD•+ radical is identified as a reaction intermediate, and its reduction by superoxide is proposed. Binding sites for INH and its co-substrate, NAD+, are identified for the first time in crystal complexes of Burkholderia pseudomallei catalase-peroxidase with INH and NAD+ grown by co-crystallization. The best defined INH binding sites were identified, one in each subunit, on the opposite side of the protein from the entrance to the heme cavity in a funnel-shaped channel. The NAD+ binding site is ∼20 Å from the entrance to the heme cavity and involves interactions primarily with the AMP portion of the molecule in agreement with the NMR saturation transfer difference results. PMID:20554537

  19. Iron deficiency upregulates Egr1 expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Min; Lee, Sun Bok; Prywes, Ron; Vulpe, Christopher D

    2015-07-01

    Iron-deficient anemia is a prevalent disease among humans. We searched for genes regulated by iron deficiency and its regulated mechanism. cDNA microarrays were performed using Hepa1c1c7 cells treated with 100 μM desferrioxamine (DFO), an iron chelator. Early growth response 1 (Egr1) was upregulated with at least 20-fold increase within 4 h and lasted for 24 h, which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. This activation was not seen by ferric ammonium citrate (FAC). DFO increased the transcriptional activity of Egr1-luc (-604 to +160) and serum response element (SRE)-luc reporters by 2.7-folds. In addition, cycloheximide lowered DFO-induced Egr1 mRNA levels. The upregulation of Egr1 by DFO was accompanied by sustained ERK signals along with phosphorylation of Elk-1. The ERK inhibitor (PD98059) prevented the DFO-induced Egr1 mRNAs. Overexpression of Elk-1 mutant (pElk-1S383A) decreased Egr1 reporter activity. DFO lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and increased caspase 3/7 activity and cell death. DFO-induced iron deficiency upregulates Egr1 in part through transcriptional activation via ERK and Elk-1 signals, which may be important in the regulation of cell death in hepatoma cells. Our study demonstrated that iron depletion controlled the expression of Egr1, which might contribute to decisions about cellular fate in response to iron deficiency. PMID:25981695

  20. Uncaria tomentosa extracts protect human erythrocyte catalase against damage induced by 2,4-D-Na and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Bors, Milena; Gulewicz, Krzysztof; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2012-06-01

    The effect of ethanolic and aqueous extracts from leaves and bark of Uncaria tomentosa was studied, with particular attention to catalase activity (CAT - EC. 1.11.1.6). We observed that all tested extracts, at a concentration of 250 μg/mL were not toxic to erythrocyte catalase because they did not decreased its activity. Additionally, we investigated the protective effect of extracts on changes in CAT activity in the erythrocytes incubated with sodium salt of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D-Na) and its metabolites i.e., 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and catechol. Previous investigations showed that these chemicals decreased activity of erythrocyte catalase (Bukowska et al., 2000; Bukowska and Kowalska, 2004). The erythrocytes were divided into two portions. The first portion was incubated for 1 and 5h at 37°C with 2,4-D-Na, 2,4-DCP and catechol, and second portion was preincubated with extracts for 10 min and then incubated with xenobiotics for 1 and 5h. CAT activity was measured in the first and second portion of the erythrocytes. We found a protective effect of the extracts from U. tomentosa on the activity of catalase incubated with xenobiotics studied. Probably, phenolic compounds contained in U. tomentosa scavenged free radicals, and therefore protected active center (containing -SH groups) of catalase. PMID:22426356

  1. [Activity of catalase after administration of some ADH and MEOS inhibitors: in vitro investigation in rat liver homogenates].

    PubMed

    Dawidek-Pietryka, Katarzyna; Dudka, Jarosław; Jagiełło-Wójtowicz, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    In the first pass methanol biotransformation three enzymatic systems: alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), microsomal alcohol oxidising system (MEOS) linked with cytochrome P-450 and catalase are involved. Because of the toxicity of methanol, which is directly caused by its toxic metabolites, the major task in clinical toxicology is to inhibit each of these enzymes to protect human life. The aim of this investigation was to check the influence of some effective inhibitors of ADH and MEOS: 4-methylpyrazole, cimetidine, EDTA and 1,10-phenantroline on the activity of catalase with methanol as a substrate and the comparison with 3-amino-1,2,4-triasole. Catalase activity in rat hepatic homogenates was measured spectrophotometrically in vitro at physiological pH 7.4 and temp. 37 degrees C, assaying the degree of methanol oxidation according to Handler and Thurman. The quantity of arising formaldehyde was measured according with the method of Nash. Our results have shown that catalase activity was inhibited to different extents by all investigated compounds at concentrations of 10(-3) mol/l, 2 x 10(-4) mol/l, 10(-4) mol/l, 2 x 10(-5) mol/l, 10(-5) mol/l. 1,10-Phenantroline was found to be a highly effective inhibitor in comparison with aminotriasole. 4-Methylpyrazole, EDTA, 1,10-phenantroline and aminotriasole are catalase competitive inhibitors and cimetidine is non-competitive inhibitor. 4-Methylpyrazole has shown higher affinity to the enzyme than aminotriasole. PMID:15052735

  2. Cold adapted features of Vibrio salmonicida catalase: characterisation and comparison to the mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Moe, Elin; Jouve, Hélène Marie; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2006-10-01

    The gene encoding catalase from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Vibrio salmonicida LFI1238 was identified, cloned and expressed in the catalase-deficient Escherichia coli UM2. Recombinant catalase from V. salmonicida (VSC) was purified to apparent homogeneity as a tetramer with a molecular mass of 235 kDa. VSC contained 67% heme b and 25% protoporphyrin IX. VSC was able to bind NADPH, react with cyanide and form compounds I and II as other monofunctional small subunit heme catalases. Amino acid sequence alignment of VSC and catalase from the mesophilic Proteus mirabilis (PMC) revealed 71% identity. As for cold adapted enzymes in general, VSC possessed a lower temperature optimum and higher catalytic efficiency (k (cat)/K (m)) compared to PMC. VSC have higher affinity for hydrogen peroxide (apparent K (m)) at all temperatures. For VSC the turnover rate (k (cat)) is slightly lower while the catalytic efficiency is slightly higher compared to PMC over the temperature range measured, except at 4 degrees C. Moreover, the catalytic efficiency of VSC and PMC is almost temperature independent, except at 4 degrees C where PMC has a twofold lower efficiency compared to VSC. This may indicate that VSC has evolved to maintain a high efficiency at low temperatures. PMID:16609813

  3. Immunohistochemical localization and biochemical changes in catalase and superoxide dismutase during metamorphosis in the olfactory system of frog Microhyla ornata.

    PubMed

    Gaupale, Tekchand C; Londhe, Jayant; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Subhedar, N K; Bhargava, Shobha

    2012-02-01

    Amphibian metamorphosis is characterized by rapid tissue remodeling and drastic changes in the body structure and function. Like other organs, olfactory system also undergoes a dramatic rearrangement as the animal experiences transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitat. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to play an important role during anuran metamorphosis and role of antioxidant enzymes like catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are believed to play a major role in these processes. Therefore, we hypothesize that antioxidant enzymes in the olfactory system may undergo changes that reflect metamorphic processes. Immunohistochemical study revealed the presence of catalase and SOD in the olfactory receptor neurons and also granular reaction in olfactory epithelium of medial diverticulum during metamorphosis. Catalase and SOD immunoreactivity were seen in the epithelium of lateral diverticulum, vomeronasal organ as metamorphosis proceeds and in the apical lining of olfactory epithelium of adult frog. Biochemical study showed that catalase activity gradually increases in the olfactory system from metamorphic stage 40-46 and adult, while SOD activity decreases from stage 40 to 46 and increases in adult. Thus, the localization and relative levels of catalase and SOD during metamorphosis in the olfactory system suggests that these enzymes may be involved in protection from oxidative damage. PMID:22134050

  4. A factor converting viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae to a culturable state in eukaryotic cells is a human catalase

    PubMed Central

    Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Hamabata, Takashi; Takeda, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    In our previous work, we demonstrated that viable but nonculturable (VBNC) Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 were converted to culturable by coculture with eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, we isolated a factor converting VBNC V. cholerae to culturable (FCVC) from a eukaryotic cell line, HT-29. In this study, we purified FCVC by successive column chromatographies comprising UNO Q-6 anion exchange, Bio-Scale CHT2-1 hydroxyapatite, and Superdex 200 10/300 GL. Homogeneity of the purified FCVC was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE. Nano-LC MS/MS analysis showed that the purified FCVC was a human catalase. An experiment of RNAi knockdown of catalase mRNA from HT-29 cells and treatment of the purified FCVC with a catalase inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole confirmed that the FCVC was a catalase. A possible role of the catalase in converting a VBNC V. cholerae to a culturable state in the human intestine is discussed. PMID:25974870

  5. Evidence for separate substrate binding sites for hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) in the oxidation of ethanol by catalase

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaster, E.G.; Nagasawa,ss H.T.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation of ethanol by purified bovine liver catalase (Sigma, C-40) can be supported by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or by CHP. The time course of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported reaction (using glucose/glucose oxidase as the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ source) was linear for at least one hr, whereas the rate of acetaldehyde formation in the CHP (4.2 mM) supported reaction decreased with time. When catalase was exposed o CHP for 5 min before the addition of ethanol, the rate of CHP supported ethanol oxidation was reduced by more than 90% compared to incubations where the addition of ethanol preceded that of CHP. In the CHP inhibited state, the peroxidative activity of catalase was not restored by further addition of CHP or ethanol; however, addition of fresh catalase yielded its expected activity. Significantly, the CHP inhibited enzyme was equally effective as the untreated enzyme in catalyzing (a) the oxidation of ethanol in the presence H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ supported peroxidative activity as well as catalytic activity by CHP inhibited catalase points to separate binding sites for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and CHP in this reaction. Alternatively, CHP may bind adjacent to a common peroxide active site, thereby sterically impeding the binding of CHP - but not of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ - to this active site.

  6. Protective effects of PEP-1-Catalase on stress-induced cellular toxicity and MPTP-induced Parkinsons disease

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Seon Ae; Kim, Dae Won; Shin, Min Jea; Ahn, Eun Hee; Chung, Seok Young; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Jo, Hyo Sang; Jeon, Su-Jeong; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2015-01-01

    Parkinsons disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disability caused by a decrease of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Although the etiology of PD is not clear, oxidative stress is believed to lead to PD. Catalase is antioxidant enzyme which plays an active role in cells as a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. Thus, we investigated whether PEP-1-Catalase protects against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) induced SH-SY5Y neuronal cell death and in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-trtrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced PD animal model. PEP-1-Catalase transduced into SH-SY5Y cells significantly protecting them against MPP+-induced death by decreasing ROS and regulating cellular survival signals including Akt, Bax, Bcl-2, and p38. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that transduced PEP-1-Catalase markedly protected against neuronal cell death in the SN in the PD animal model. Our results indicate that PEP-1-Catalase may have potential as a therapeutic agent for PD and other oxidative stress related diseases. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(7): 395-400] PMID:25322954

  7. Ultraviolet Light B-Mediated Inhibition of Skin Catalase Activity Promotes Gr-1+CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Nicholas J.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Burns, Erin M.; Schick, Jonathan S.; Riggenbach, Judith A.; Mace, Thomas A.; Bill, Matthew A.; Young, Gregory S.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Lesinski, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence and mortality are higher in men compared to women, but the causes of this sex discrepancy remain largely unknown. Ultraviolet light exposure induces cutaneous inflammation and neutralizes cutaneous antioxidants. Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells are heterogeneous bone marrow-derived cells that promote inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Reduced activity of catalase, an antioxidant present within skin, has been associated with skin carcinogenesis. We utilized the outbred, immune competent Skh-1 hairless mouse model of ultraviolet light B (UVB)-induced inflammation and non-melanoma skin cancer to further define sex discrepancies in UVB-induced inflammation. Our results demonstrated that male skin had relatively lower baseline catalase activity, which was inhibited following acute UVB exposure in both sexes. Further analysis revealed that skin catalase activity inversely correlated with splenic Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cell percentage. Acute UVB exposure induced Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cell skin infiltration, which was inhibited to a greater extent in males by topical catalase treatment. In chronic UVB studies, we demonstrated that the percentage of splenic Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells was 55% higher in male tumor-bearing mice compared to their female counterparts. Together, our findings indicate that lower skin catalase activity in male mice may at least in part contribute to increased UVB-induced Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells and subsequent skin carcinogenesis. PMID:22030957

  8. The conformer nature of the multiple forms of beef liver catalase as obtained by biochemical and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. A model for the quaternary structure of the beef liver catalase molecule.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, G; Stöckel, P; Heidrich, H G

    1978-08-01

    Two of the five multiple forms of beef liver catalase have been extensively studied using biochemical and biophysical analysis techniques. The two molecules, cat I and cat V, have different isoelectric points (pH 6.55 and 5.6), different surface charges (25.8 and 32.7 elementary charges) and display different numbers of primary amino groups on their surfaces. The numbers of tyrosine residues on the surfaces of the two molecules are also different (16 and 10 at pH 10). Since the two forms of catalase can be interconverted, the described changes may be caused by conformational changes of the four protein subunits within the molecule. This mobility of the polypeptide chains is also demonstrated by the different absorption spectra below 390 nm. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, the radii and the volumes of the two catalase forms were shown to be different (cat 1 is smaller than cat V). All five multiple forms of beef liver catalase are concormers of the molecule. A model for the quaternary sturcture of the beef liver catalase are conformers of the molecule. A model for the quaternary structure of the beef liver catalase molecule is suggested. It consists of a regular configuration of four prolate rotational ellipsoids (semiaxes: a = 52 A, b = c = 21 A) in close contact in which the nearest neighbour subunits are shifted by 37 A parallel to each other. Thus the height of the complete molecule is 141 A and the diameter 94 A. PMID:711156

  9. Reaction of E. coli catalase HPII with cyanide as ligand and as inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Maj, M; Nicholls, P; Obinger, C; Hillar, A; Loewen, P C

    1996-12-01

    Cyanide forms an inhibitory complex with the haem d-containing E. coli catalase HPII, spectrally similar to the cyanide complex of beef liver enzyme but with absorption bands shifted 90 nm towards the red end of the spectrum. Both the Kd and Ki values are approximately 7 microM in the wild-type enzyme. The cyanide reaction is slow, with a bimolecular 'on' constant approx. 2000 x smaller than that of eukaryotic enzyme, and an 'off' constant diminished by a similar amount. Catalases with a mutated distal histidine (H128) fail to bind cyanide at cyanide concentrations below 50 mM. Catalases with a mutated distal asparagine (N201) show only small changes in cyanide affinity from the wild type. The major fraction of HPII N201A has a Kd approximately 40 microM, and a minor fraction has a lower cyanide affinity; the major fraction of HPII N201Q has a Kd approximately 15 microM. The Kd and Ki for HPII N201D is approximately 8 microM, essentially identical with that of the wild type but N201D appears to bind cyanide somewhat more rapidly than does wild-type enzyme. The HPII mutant N201H can be obtained in both haem d and protohaem forms; it exhibits two types of cyanide binding behaviour. In its protohaem form it binds cyanide poorly (Kd > or = 0.25 mM). After peroxide treatment converts t into haem d or a closely related species it binds cyanide with a much higher affinity (Kd approximately 15 microM). Cyanide binding to HPII requires a distal histidine to provide hydrogen-bonding stability, but not a distal asparagine. Rates of cyanide binding and release are controlled by haem group accessibility through the channel leading to the outside. In HPII N201H channel opening may depend upon oxidation of the haem from the starting protohaem to the final haem d form. PMID:8980649

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a cold-adapted catalase from Vibrio salmonicida

    SciTech Connect

    Riise, Ellen Kristin; Lorentzen, Marit Sjo; Helland, Ronny; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2006-01-01

    Monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals of a His-tagged form of V. salmonicida catalase without cofactor diffract X-rays to 1.96 Å. Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) catalyses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen. Recombinant Vibrio salmonicida catalase (VSC) possesses typical cold-adapted features, with higher catalytic efficiency, lower thermal stability and a lower temperature optimum than its mesophilic counterpart from Proteus mirabilis. Crystals of VSC were produced by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as precipitant. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.15, b = 217.76, c = 99.28 Å, β = 110.48°. Data were collected to 1.96 Å and a molecular-replacement solution was found with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  11. Neisseria gonorrhoeae catalase is not required for experimental genital tract infection despite the induction of a localized neutrophil response.

    PubMed

    Soler-García, Angel A; Jerse, Ann E

    2007-05-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae produces several antioxidant defenses, including high levels of catalase, which may facilitate the persistence during an inflammatory response via neutralization of H2O2 produced by phagocytes. In vivo testing of the role of catalase in gonococcal survival is critical since several physiological factors impact interactions between N. gonorrhoeae and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). Here we assessed the importance of gonococcal catalase in a surrogate model of female genital tract infection. Female BALB/c mice were treated with 17-beta estradiol to promote susceptibility to N. gonorrhoeae and inoculated intravaginally with wild-type gonococci or a catalase (kat) deletion mutant. A localized PMN influx occurred in an average of 43 and 81% of mice infected with wild-type or kat mutant gonococci, respectively, and PMNs associated with numerous wild-type or catalase-deficient bacteria were observed in vaginal smears. The combined results of six experiments showed a significant difference in the number of days wild-type bacteria were recovered compared to the catalase-deficient gonococci. However, there was much variability between experiments, and we found no correlation between PMN influx, colonization load, and clearance of wild-type or kat mutant bacteria. Estradiol treatment did not impair bacterial uptake, the luminol-dependent chemiluminescence response, or the killing capacity of isolated murine PMNs against N. gonorrhoeae or Staphylococcus aureus. Our data suggest N. gonorrhoeae is not significantly challenged by H2O2 produced by PMNs in the murine lower genital tract; alternatively, redundant defense mechanisms may protect the gonococcus from reactive oxygen species during infection. PMID:17296753

  12. [Use of cadmium hydroxide gel for isolation of extracellular catalases from Penicillium piceum and characterization of purified enzymes].

    PubMed

    Eremin, A N; Moroz, I V; Mikhaĭlova, R V

    2008-01-01

    We optimized the conditions for isolation of extracellular catalases from Penicillium piceum F-648 and P. piceum A3 by means of volume chromatography with cadmium hydroxide gel. Our study showed that 55-57 mg wet gel are sufficient for the maximum sorption of catalase from 1 ml of culture fluid. This gel was formed in 1 ml 70 mM Cd(NO3)2 after addition of NaOH (Cd(NO3)2/NaOH molar ratio 1:2.2). The eluting solution contained 50 mM NaH2PO4 (pH 7.0), 5.0 mM dithiothreitol, and 0.3% sodium cholate and was potent in desorbing catalase from the gel. Subsequent ultrafiltration of the eluate on the membrane with a retention limit of 50 kDa allowed us to concentrate and purify the sample from low-molecular-weight protein impurities. NH4Cl (1.0 M) containing 0.3% sodium cholate was used to wash the sample from low-molecular-weight aromatic metabolites. Purified catalases included 33-34% antiparallel beta-structures and 9% alpha-spirals. Under optimal conditions in the medium of 10 mM phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.0) at 30 degrees C, catalases from P. piceum F-648 were characterized by the following parameters: K(M), 158.8 mM; catalytic constant, 2.83 x 10(6) s(-1); enzyme inactivation rate constant in H2O2 decomposition, 3.5 x 10(-2) s(-1); and constant of the interaction between catalase complex I and second molecule of H2O2, 1.8 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). PMID:19145972

  13. Intracellular antioxidant enzymes are not globally upregulated during hibernation in the major oxidative tissues of the 13-lined ground squirrel Spermophilus tridecemlineatus.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Peters, Craig W; Staples, James F; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Hibernating mammals exhibit oxidative stress resistance in brain, liver and other tissues. In many animals, cellular oxidative stress resistance is associated with enhanced expression of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Intracellular antioxidant capacity may be upregulated during hibernation to protect against oxidative damage associated with the ischemia-reperfusion that occurs during transitions between torpor and arousal. We tested the hypothesis that the 13-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), upregulates intracellular antioxidant enzymes in major oxidative tissues during hibernation. The two major intracellular isoforms of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD and CuZnSOD), which catalyze the first step in superoxide detoxification, were quantified in heart, brain and liver tissue using immunodetection and an in-gel activity assay. However, no differences in SOD protein expression or activity were found between active and hibernating squirrels. Measurements of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, which catalyze hydrogen peroxide removal, were not broadly upregulated during hibernation. The activity of catalase, which catalyzes an alternative hydrogen peroxide detoxification pathway, was higher in heart and brain of torpid squirrels, but lower in liver. Taken together, these data do not support the hypothesis that hibernation is associated with enhanced oxidative stress resistance due to an upregulation of intracellular antioxidant enzymes in the major oxidative tissues. PMID:18948223

  14. Sixty years from discovery to solution: crystal structure of bovine liver catalase form III

    SciTech Connect

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J.

    2012-03-27

    The crystallization and structural characterization of bovine liver catalase (BLC) has been intensively studied for decades. Forms I and II of BLC have previously been fully characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Form III has previously been analyzed by electron microscopy, but owing to the thinness of this crystal form an X-ray crystal structure had not been determined. Here, the crystal structure of form III of BLC is presented in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 173.7, c = 186.3 {angstrom}. The asymmetric unit is composed of the biological tetramer, which is packed in a tetrahedron motif with three other BLC tetramers. This higher resolution structure has allowed an assessment of the previously published electron-microscopy studies.

  15. Predominant Catalase-negative Soil Bacteria. II. Occurrence and Characterization of Actinomyces humiferus, sp. N1

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, William E.; Casida, L. E.

    1969-01-01

    A microorganism resembling an Actinomyces species was found to be a numerically predominant inhabitant of various organically rich soils. This organism forms a hyphal-like structure with true branching that fragments into gram-positive diphtheroid and coccoid elements. Its cells ferment carbohydrates and contain both lysine and ornithine as the major basic amino acids of the cell wall. It is catalase-negative, microaerophilic to aerobic, and sensitive to lysozyme, and it is dependent on an organic nitrogen source and incubation at 30 C for optimum growth. Based on these characteristics, a new species, Actinomyces humiferus, is proposed. The ecological and medical implications of a large soil population of this microorganism are discussed. Images PMID:5803624

  16. Compounds I of catalase and horse radish peroxidase: pi-cation radicals.

    PubMed

    Dolphin, D; Forman, A; Borg, D C; Fajer, J; Felton, R H

    1971-03-01

    Two-electron oxidation of cobaltous octaethylporphyrin [Co(II)(Et)(8)P] yields a stable pi-cation radical [Co(III)(Et)(8)P](2+.), the optical spectrum of which exhibits spectral changes dependent upon the nature of the counterion. Comparison of these spectra with those of Compounds I of horseradish peroxidase and catalase leads us to propose that these Compounds I contain a pi-cation radical of the heme prosthetic group. This proposal explains the oxidation level, optical spectra, and stability of the primary compounds without recourse to properties such as stoichiometric mixtures of special porphyrins, stable Fe(V) porphyrins, or unique conformers of heme porphyrins. Explanations are advanced to account for the missing electron spin resonance signal of Compound I of horseradish peroxidase. PMID:5276770

  17. Molecular interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole with catalase reveals a potentially toxic mechanism of the inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yue; Zou, Luyi; Huang, Ming; Zong, Wansong

    2014-12-01

    2-Mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) is widely utilized as a corrosion inhibitor, copper-plating brightener and rubber accelerator. The residue of MBI in the environment possesses a potential risk to human health. In this work, the toxic interaction of MBI with the important antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) was investigated using spectroscopic and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. MBI can spontaneously bind with CAT with one binding site through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces to form MBI-CAT complex. The molecular docking study revealed that MBI bound into the CAT interface of chains B and C, which led to some conformational and microenvironmental changes of CAT and further resulted in the inhibition of CAT activity. This present study provides direct evidence at a molecular level to show that exposure to MBI could induce changes in the structure and function of the enzyme CAT. PMID:25463673

  18. Lack of effect of deferoxamine, dimethyl sulfoxide, and catalase on monocrotaline pyrrole pulmonary injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bruner, L.H.; Johnson, K.; Carpenter, L.J.; Roth, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP) is a reactive metabolite of the pyrrolizidine alkaloid monocrotaline. MCTP given intravenously to rats causes pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy. Lesions in lungs after MCTP treatment contain macrophages and neutrophils, which may contribute to the damage by generation of reactive oxygen metabolites. Rats were treated with MCTP and agents known to protect against oxygen radical-mediated damage in acute models of neutrophil-dependent lung injury. Rats received MCTP and deferoxamine mesylate (DF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or polyethylene glycol-coupled catalase (PEG-CAT). MCTP/vehicle-treated controls developed lung injury manifested as increased lung weight, release of lactate dehydrogenase into the airway, and sequestration of SVI-labeled bovine serum albumin in the lungs. Cotreatment of rats with DF, DMSO, or PEG-CAT did not protect against the injury due to MCTP. These results suggest that toxic oxygen metabolites do not play an important role in the pathogenesis of MCTP-induced pulmonary injury.

  19. Catalase-positive microperoxisomes in rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscle fiber types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Bain, James L. W.; Ellis, Stanley

    1988-01-01

    The size, distribution, and content of catalase-reactive microperoxisomes were investigated cytochemically in three types of muscle fibers from the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of male rats. Muscle fibers were classified on the basis of the mitochondrial content and distribution, the Z-band widths, and the size and shape of myofibrils as the slow-twitch oxidative (SO), the fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and the fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) fibers. It was found that both the EDL and soleus SO fibers possessed the largest microperoxisomes. A comparison of microperoxisome number per muscle fiber area or the microperoxisome area per fiber area revealed following ranking, starting from the largest number and the area-ratio values: soleus SO, EDL SO, EDL FOG, and EDL FG.

  20. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities after heat injury of listeria monocytogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmier, A.W.; Martin, S.E.

    1988-02-01

    Four strains of Listeria monocytogenes were examined for catalase (CA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The two strains having the highest CA activities (LCDC and Scott A) also possessed the highest SOD activities. The CA activity of heated cell extracts of all four strains examined decreased sharply between 55 and 60/sup 0/C. SOD was more heat labile than CA. Two L. monocytogenes strains demonstrated a decline in SOD activity after heat treatment at 45/sup 0/C, whereas the other two strains demonstrated a decline at 50/sup 0/C. Sublethal heating of the cells at 55/sup 0/C resulted in increased sensitivity to 5.5% NaCl. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide was added to suspensions of L. monocytogenes; strains producing the highest CA levels showed the greatest H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ resistance.

  1. Data regarding M1 muscarinic receptor-mediated modulation of hepatic catalase activity in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Urrunaga, Nathalie H; Ahmad, Daniel; Khurana, Sandeep

    2016-03-01

    We recently demonstrated the role of M1 muscarinic receptors (M1R) in modulating oxidative stress in liver and hepatocytes (Urrunaga et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide data regarding the effect of a novel M1R agonist, VU0357017 (Lebois et al., 2010) [2], on H2O2-mediated hepatocyte injury, the effect of an M1R antagonist VU0255035 (Sheffler et al., 2009) [3] on catalase and super oxide dismutase (SOD) activities in H2O2-treated hepatocytes in vitro, and finally, the effect of M1R ablation on hepatic catalase activity in acetaminophen (APAP)-treated mice. PMID:26862589

  2. Novel Synthetic SOD/Catalase Mimetics Can Mitigate Capillary Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Caused by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Vorotnikova, Ekaterina; Rosenthal, Rosalind A.; Tries, Mark; Doctrow, Susan R.; Braunhut, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the endothelial cells of the microvasculature of the lung and kidney are damaged by exposure to ionizing radiation, and this sustained endothelial cell injury is involved in the early and late radiation effects observed in these tissues. It is well accepted that ionizing radiation causes the generation of reactive oxygen species during exposure that results in damage to DNA and cellular organelles. It is more controversial, however, whether additional biochemical events or long-lived radicals occur and persist postirradiation that amplify and initiate new forms of cellular damage. Two families of Eukarion (EUK) compounds have been synthesized that possess superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and peroxidase activities. The Mn porphyrins are available orally whereas the salen Mn complexes are administered by injection. In the present study we have examined the ability of these SOD/catalase mimetics to prevent apoptosis of endothelial cells when administered 1 h postirradiation (mitigation). A range of salen Mn complex (EUK-189 and EUK-207) and Mn porphyrins (EUK-418, -423, -425, -450, -451, -452, -453) were used to treat endothelial cells 1 h after the cells received 2–20 Gy ionizing radiation in vitro. Two lead compounds, EUK-207 at a dose of 30 μM and EUK-451 at a dose of 10 μM, exhibited low toxicity and mitigated radiation-induced apoptosis. Future animal studies will test whether these compounds protect when administered after radiation exposure as would be done after a radiological accident or a terrorism event. PMID:20518654

  3. A gas-phase amplified quartz crystal microbalance immunosensor based on catalase modified immunoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2015-02-21

    A novel signal amplification strategy for quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based on catalytic gas generation was developed to construct an ultrasensitive immunosensor for the detection of proteins (immunoglobulin G, IgG, used as a model). A catalase modified immunoparticle was prepared to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex with the IgG and anti-IgG antibodies that were immobilized on the QCM sensor. The amount of immunoparticles on the sensor surface was thus controlled by the IgG concentration. Then H2O2 was added and catalyzed by catalase for oxygen generation. The generated oxygen replaced some of the liquid on the sensor surface, leading to the change in the shear modulus of the immunocomplex layer and the apparent viscosity and density of the liquid layer. Due to the ultrasensitive response of QCM to these changes, a significant frequency shift related to the IgG concentration was achieved. Different parameters, including the flow cell structure, operation temperature, immunoparticle concentration, and H2O2 concentration were optimized to achieve steady and efficient frequency shifts. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed gas-phase amplified QCM sensor could achieve up to 72 times improvement of detection sensitivity compared to the label-free sensor as a control, in the concentration range of 0.1-3.0 μg mL(-1). The detection limit was also reduced from 236 ng mL(-1) to 51.0 ng mL(-1) at the 3Sblank level. PMID:25519742

  4. Elimination of hydrogen peroxide by Haemophilus somnus, a catalase-negative pathogen of cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Sample, A K; Czuprynski, C J

    1991-01-01

    Haemophilus somnus is a catalase-negative, gram-negative pathogen of cattle which is refractory to killing by bovine neutrophils. In this report, we showed that H. somnus rapidly inhibited Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of bovine neutrophils costimulated with opsonized zymosan or phorbol myristate acetate. We have postulated that this inhibition resulted in part from H. somnus preventing the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) during the oxidative burst. In support of this hypothesis, we have demonstrated that when stimulated with viable H. somnus, bovine neutrophils accumulate lower levels of H2O2 than did neutrophils stimulated with heat-killed H. somnus or opsonized zymosan. We have presented evidence that four separate strains of H. somnus, despite being catalase negative by conventional criteria, removed H2O2 from solution. Viable cells of H. somnus were required for the removal of H2O2 from solution; little or no activity was observed when suspensions of heat-killed, formalin-killed, or sonicated cells of H. somnus were incubated with H2O2. In addition, the elimination of H2O2 occurred only in the presence of carbon sources that could be utilized by H. somnus, indicating that elimination of H2O2 was an energy-dependent process. The amount of H2O2 that could be eliminated by 10(7) cells of H. somnus was greater than 10 nmol, an amount comparable to that produced by a similar number of stimulated bovine neutrophils. Thus, we suggest that the ability of H. somnus to remove H2O2 from solution may be an important virulence mechanism that contributes to the survival of the organism following ingestion by bovine neutrophils. PMID:1646767

  5. Novel synthetic SOD/catalase mimetics can mitigate capillary endothelial cell apoptosis caused by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Vorotnikova, Ekaterina; Rosenthal, Rosalind A; Tries, Mark; Doctrow, Susan R; Braunhut, Susan J

    2010-06-01

    Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the endothelial cells of the microvasculature of the lung and kidney are damaged by exposure to ionizing radiation, and this sustained endothelial cell injury is involved in the early and late radiation effects observed in these tissues. It is well accepted that ionizing radiation causes the generation of reactive oxygen species during exposure that results in damage to DNA and cellular organelles. It is more controversial, however, whether additional biochemical events or long-lived radicals occur and persist postirradiation that amplify and initiate new forms of cellular damage. Two families of Eukarion (EUK) compounds have been synthesized that possess superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and peroxidase activities. The Mn porphyrins are available orally whereas the salen Mn complexes are administered by injection. In the present study we have examined the ability of these SOD/catalase mimetics to prevent apoptosis of endothelial cells when administered 1 h postirradiation (mitigation). A range of salen Mn complex (EUK-189 and EUK-207) and Mn porphyrins (EUK-418, -423, -425, -450, -451, -452, -453) were used to treat endothelial cells 1 h after the cells received 2-20 Gy ionizing radiation in vitro. Two lead compounds, EUK-207 at a dose of 30 microM and EUK-451 at a dose of 10 microM, exhibited low toxicity and mitigated radiation-induced apoptosis. Future animal studies will test whether these compounds protect when administered after radiation exposure as would be done after a radiological accident or a terrorism event. PMID:20518654

  6. Resonance Raman investigation of cyanide ligated beef liver and Aspergillus niger catalases.

    PubMed

    al-Mustafa, J; Sykora, M; Kincaid, J R

    1995-05-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the properties of cyanide-bound beef liver catalase (BLC) and Aspergillus niger catalase (ANC) in the pH range 4.9-11.5. Evidence has been obtained for the binding of cyanide to both BLC and ANC in two binding geometries. The first conformer, exhibiting the nu[Fe-CN] stretching mode at a higher frequency than the delta[Fe-C-N] bending mode, exists as an essentially linear Fe-C-N linkage. For both BLC-CN and ANC-CN, the nu[Fe-CN] and delta[Fe-C-N] frequencies of this conformer were practically identical and observed at approximately 434 and approximately 413 cm-1, respectively. The second conformer exhibits a nu[Fe-CN] mode at lower frequency than the delta[Fe-C-N] mode, and is thus characteristic of a bent Fe-C-N linkage. The nu[Fe-CN] and delta[Fe-C-N] modes were identified at 349 and 445 cm-1, respectively, for BLC-CN, and at 350 and 456 cm-1, respectively, for ANC-CN. The two conformers persist in the pH range 4.9-11.5. Furthermore, upon raising the pH to 11.5, the nu[Fe-CN] mode of the linear conformer of BLC-CN downshifts to 429 cm-1 while that of the bent conformer remains unchanged. The observed pH-dependent shift is attributed to the deprotonation of a distal-side amino acid residue, probably a distal histidine. The Fe-C-N axial vibrations of the two conformers identified for ANC-CN did not show any significant pH-dependent shifts, indicating a more stable hydrogen bonding interaction relative to BLC-CN. PMID:7737979

  7. Hypoxia Up-Regulates Galectin-3 in Mammary Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Rita; Gomes, Catarina; de Matos, Augusto J.; Reis, Celso A.; Rutteman, Gerard R.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment encompasses several stressful conditions for cancer cells such as hypoxia, oxidative stress and pH alterations. Galectin-3, a well-studied member of the beta-galactoside-binding animal family of lectins has been implicated in multiple steps of metastasis as cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion, promotion of angiogenesis, cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. However, both its aberrantly up- and down-regulated expression was observed in several types of cancer. Thus, the mechanisms that regulate galectin-3 expression in neoplastic settings are not clear. In order to demonstrate the putative role of hypoxia in regulating galectin-3 expression in canine mammary tumors (CMT), in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. In malignant CMT cells, hypoxia was observed to induce expression of galectin-3, a phenomenon that was almost completely prevented by catalase treatment of CMT-U27 cells. Increased galectin-3 expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Under hypoxic conditions the expression of galectin-3 shifts from a predominant nuclear location to cytoplasmic and membrane expressions. In in vivo studies, galectin-3 was overexpressed in hypoxic areas of primary tumors and well-established metastases. Tumor hypoxia thus up-regulates the expression of galectin-3, which may in turn increase tumor aggressiveness. PMID:26222311

  8. Toward "stable-on-the-table" enzymes: improving key properties of catalase by covalent conjugation with poly(acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Caterina M; Cole, Kyle S; Benson, Kyle R; Ward, Jessamyn R; Bassett, Kayla M; Zhang, Yiren; Zore, Omkar V; Stromer, Bobbi; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Kumar, Challa V

    2014-08-20

    Several key properties of catalase such as thermal stability, resistance to protease degradation, and resistance to ascorbate inhibition were improved, while retaining its structure and activity, by conjugation to poly(acrylic acid) (PAA, Mw 8000) via carbodiimide chemistry where the amine groups on the protein are appended to the carboxyl groups of the polymer. Catalase conjugation was examined at three different pH values (pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0) and at three distinct mole ratios (1:100, 1:500, and 1:1000) of catalase to PAA at each reaction pH. The corresponding products are labeled as Cat-PAA(x)-y, where x is the protein to polymer mole ratio and y is the pH used for the synthesis. The coupling reaction consumed about 60-70% of the primary amines on the catalase; all samples were completely water-soluble and formed nanogels, as evidenced by gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated substantial retention of protein secondary structure for all samples, which increased to 100% with increasing pH of the synthesis and polymer mole fraction. Soret CD bands of all samples indicated loss of ∼50% of band intensities, independent of the reaction pH. Catalytic activities of the conjugates increased with increasing synthesis pH, where 55-80% and 90-100% activity was retained for all samples synthesized at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0, respectively, and the Km or Vmax values of Cat-PAA(100)-7 did not differ significantly from those of the free enzyme. All conjugates synthesized at pH 7.0 were thermally stable even when heated to ∼85-90 °C, while native catalase denatured between 55 and 65 °C. All conjugates retained 40-90% of their original activities even after storing for 10 weeks at 8 °C, while unmodified catalase lost all of its activity within 2 weeks, under similar storage conditions. Interestingly, PAA surrounding catalase limited access to the enzyme from large molecules like proteases and significantly increased resistance to trypsin digestion compared to unmodified catalase. Similarly, negatively charged PAA surrounding the catalase in these conjugates protected the enzyme against inhibition by negatively charged inhibitors such as ascorbate. While Cat-PAA(100)-7 did not show any inhibition by ascorbate in the presence of 270 μM ascorbate, unmodified catalase lost ∼70% of its activity under similar conditions. This simple, facile, and rational methodology produced thermostable, storable catalase that is also protected from protease digestion and ascorbate inhibition and most likely prevented the dissociation of the multimer. Using synthetic polymers to protect and improve enzyme properties could be an attractive approach for making "Stable-on-the-Table" enzymes, as a viable alternative to protein engineering. PMID:25046001

  9. Hesperidin protects against cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity by upregulation of PPARγ and abrogation of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ayman M

    2014-09-01

    The most important reason for the non-approval and withdrawal of drugs by the Food and Drug Administration is hepatotoxicity. Therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effects of hesperidin against cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats. The rats received a single intraperitoneal dose of CYP of 200 mg/kg body mass, followed by treatment with hesperidin, orally, at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for 11 consecutive days. CYP induced hepatic damage, as evidenced by the significantly elevated levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines, serum transaminases, liver lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide. As a consequence, there was reduced glutathione content, and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, were markedly reduced. In addition, CYP administration induced a considerable downregulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and upregulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA expression. Hesperidin, in a dose-dependent manner, rejuvenated the altered markers to an almost normal state. In conclusion, hesperidin showed a potent protective effect against CYP-induced oxidative stress and inflammation leading to hepatotoxicity. The study suggests that hesperidin exerts its protective effect against CYP-induced hepatotoxicity through upregulation of hepatic PPARγ expression and abrogation of inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:25079140

  10. AGEs-Induced IL-6 Synthesis Precedes RAGE Up-Regulation in HEK 293 Cells: An Alternative Inflammatory Mechanism?

    PubMed

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Geicu, Ovidiu Ionut; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can activate the inflammatory pathways involved in diabetic nephropathy. Understanding these molecular pathways could contribute to therapeutic strategies for diabetes complications. We evaluated the modulation of inflammatory and oxidative markers, as well as the protective mechanisms employed by human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293) upon exposure to 200 μg/mL bovine serum albumine (BSA) or AGEs-BSA for 12, 24 and 48 h. The mRNA and protein expression levels of AGEs receptor (RAGE) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) 27, 60 and 70, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and the expression levels of eight cytokines were analysed. Cell damage via oxidative mechanisms was evaluated by glutathione and malondialdehyde levels. The data revealed two different time scale responses. First, the up-regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6), HSP 27 and high catalase activity were detected as early as 12 h after exposure to AGEs-BSA, while the second response, after 24 h, consisted of NF-κB p65, RAGE, HSP 70 and inflammatory cytokine up-regulation, glutathione depletion, malondialdehyde increase and the activation of antioxidant enzymes. IL-6 might be important in the early ignition of inflammatory responses, while the cellular redox imbalance, RAGE activation and NF-κB p65 increased expression further enhance inflammatory signals in HEK 293 cells. PMID:26307981

  11. AGEs-Induced IL-6 Synthesis Precedes RAGE Up-Regulation in HEK 293 Cells: An Alternative Inflammatory Mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Geicu, Ovidiu Ionut; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can activate the inflammatory pathways involved in diabetic nephropathy. Understanding these molecular pathways could contribute to therapeutic strategies for diabetes complications. We evaluated the modulation of inflammatory and oxidative markers, as well as the protective mechanisms employed by human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293) upon exposure to 200 μg/mL bovine serum albumine (BSA) or AGEs–BSA for 12, 24 and 48 h. The mRNA and protein expression levels of AGEs receptor (RAGE) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) 27, 60 and 70, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and the expression levels of eight cytokines were analysed. Cell damage via oxidative mechanisms was evaluated by glutathione and malondialdehyde levels. The data revealed two different time scale responses. First, the up-regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6), HSP 27 and high catalase activity were detected as early as 12 h after exposure to AGEs–BSA, while the second response, after 24 h, consisted of NF-κB p65, RAGE, HSP 70 and inflammatory cytokine up-regulation, glutathione depletion, malondialdehyde increase and the activation of antioxidant enzymes. IL-6 might be important in the early ignition of inflammatory responses, while the cellular redox imbalance, RAGE activation and NF-κB p65 increased expression further enhance inflammatory signals in HEK 293 cells. PMID:26307981

  12. Periodical bubble formation and the oscillatory change in dissolved oxygen concentration in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Satoshi

    2006-06-01

    The relationship between the periodical bubble forming and the oscillatory change in the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system was studied. Photographs of the bubbles and the responses from the DO electrode indicated that large bubbles were generated periodically, and that the DO profile depended on the geometrical relationship between the electrode and the bubbles. PMID:16772694

  13. Function and stationary-phase induction of periplasmic copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and catalase/peroxidase in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, S; Steinman, H M

    1995-01-01

    Although cytosolic superoxide dismutases (SODs) are widely distributed among bacteria, only a small number of species contain a periplasmic SOD. One of these is Caulobacter crescentus, which has a copper-zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) in the periplasm and an iron SOD (FeSOD) in the cytosol. The function of periplasmic CuZnSOD was studied by characterizing a mutant of C. crescentus with an insertionally inactivated CuZnSOD gene. Wild-type and mutant strains showed identical tolerance to intracellular superoxide. However, in response to extracellular superoxide, the presence of periplasmic CuZnSOD increased survival by as much as 20-fold. This is the first demonstration that periplasmic SOD defends against external superoxide of environmental origin. This result has implications for those bacterial pathogens that contain a CuZnSOD. C. crescentus was shown to contain a single catalase/peroxidase which, like Escherichia coli KatG catalase/peroxidase, is present in both the periplasmic and cytoplasmic fractions. The growth stage dependence of C. crescentus catalase/peroxidase and SOD activity was studied. Although FeSOD activity was identical in exponential- and stationary-phase cultures, CuZnSOD was induced nearly 4-fold in stationary phase and the catalase/peroxidase was induced nearly 100-fold. Induction of antioxidant enzymes in the periplasm of C. crescentus appears to be an important attribute of the stationary-phase response and may be a useful tool for studying its regulation. PMID:7592345

  14. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β0 or β+) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β0 and β+ groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  15. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β (0) or β (+)) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0-130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β (0) and β (+) groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  16. Horizontal gene transfer confers adaptive advantages to phytopathogenic fungi: a case study of catalase-peroxidase in Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the exchange and stable integration of genetic material between different evolutionary lineages, is widely observed in fungi. We hypothesize that successful stabilization of HGT elements provides adaptive advantages (e.g., virulence). Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are ...

  17. The induction of human superoxide dismutase and catalase in vivo: a fundamentally new approach to antioxidant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Sally K; Bose, Swapan K; Grunwald, Gary K; Myhill, Paul; McCord, Joe M

    2006-01-15

    A composition consisting of extracts of five widely studied medicinal plants (Protandim) was administered to healthy human subjects ranging in age from 20 to 78 years. Individual ingredients were selected on the basis of published findings of induction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and/or catalase in rodents in vivo, combined with evidence of decreasing lipid peroxidation. Each ingredient was present at a dosage sufficiently low to avoid any accompanying unwanted pharmacological effects. Blood was analyzed before supplementation and after 30 and 120 days of supplementation (675 mg/day). Erythrocytes were assayed for SOD and catalase, and plasma was assayed for lipid peroxidation products as thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS), as well as uric acid, C-reactive protein, and cholesterol (total, LDL, and HDL). Before supplementation, TBARS showed a strong age-dependent increase. After 30 days of supplementation, TBARS declined by an average of 40% (p = 0.0001) and the age-dependent increase was eliminated. By 120 days, erythrocyte SOD increased by 30% (p < 0.01) and catalase by 54% (p < 0.002). We conclude that modest induction of the catalytic antioxidants SOD and catalase may be a much more effective approach than supplementation with antioxidants (such as vitamins C and E) that can, at best, stoichiometrically scavenge a very small fraction of total oxidant production. PMID:16413416

  18. Two inducers of plant defense responses, 2,6-dichloroisonicotinec acid and salicylic acid, inhibit catalase activity in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Conrath, U; Chen, Z; Ricigliano, J R; Klessig, D F

    1995-01-01

    2,6-Dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) and salicylic acid (SA) are potent inducers of plant defense responses including the synthesis of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins and the development of enhanced disease resistance. A soluble SA-binding protein has been purified from tobacco with an affinity and specificity of binding that suggest it is a SA receptor. Recently, this protein has been shown to be a catalase whose enzymatic activity is inhibited by SA binding. We have proposed that the resulting increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species plays a role in the induction of defense responses such as PR protein gene expression. Here we report that INA, like SA, binds the SA-binding protein/catalase and inhibits its enzymatic activity. In fact, the dose-response curves for inhibition of catalase by these two compounds are similar. Furthermore, the ability of both INA analogues and SA derivatives to bind and inhibit tobacco catalase correlates with their biological activity to induce PR-1 gene expression and enhance resistance to tobacco mosaic virus. Comparison of the structures of INA, SA, and their analogues reveals several common features that appear to be important for biological activity. Thus, these results not only suggest that INA and SA share the same mechanism of action that involves binding and inhibition of catalase but also further indicate an important role for reactive oxygen species in the induction of certain plant defense responses. This is supported by the demonstration that INA-mediated PR-1 gene activation is suppressed by antioxidants. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:11607566

  19. Isolation of a novel peroxisomal catalase gene from sugarcane, which is responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Su, Yachun; Guo, Jinlong; Ling, Hui; Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Liping; Allan, Andrew C; Que, Youxiong

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an iron porphyrin enzyme, which serves as an efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to avoid oxidative damage. In sugarcane, the enzymatic activity of catalase in a variety (Yacheng05-179) resistant to the smut pathogen Sporisorium scitamineum was always higher than that of the susceptible variety (Liucheng03-182), suggesting that catalase activity may have a positive correlation with smut resistance in sugarcane. To understand the function of catalase at the molecular level, a cDNA sequence of ScCAT1 (GenBank Accession No. KF664183), was isolated from sugarcane infected by S. scitamineum. ScCAT1 was predicted to encode 492 amino acid residues, and its deduced amino acid sequence shared a high degree of homology with other plant catalases. Enhanced growth of ScCAT1 in recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta cells under the stresses of CuCl2, CdCl2 and NaCl indicated its high tolerance. Q-PCR results showed that ScCAT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in the bud, whereas expression was moderate in stem epidermis and stem pith. Different kinds of stresses, including S. scitamineum challenge, plant hormones (SA, MeJA and ABA) treatments, oxidative (H2O2) stress, heavy metal (CuCl2) and hyper-osmotic (PEG and NaCl) stresses, triggered a significant induction of ScCAT1. The ScCAT1 protein appeared to localize in plasma membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, histochemical assays using DAB and trypan blue staining, as well as conductivity measurement, indicated that ScCAT1 may confer the sugarcane immunity. In conclusion, the positive response of ScCAT1 to biotic and abiotic stresses suggests that ScCAT1 is involved in protection of sugarcane against reactive oxidant-related environmental stimuli. PMID:24392135

  20. Effect of periplasmic expression of recombinant mouse interleukin-4 on hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh Aghdam, Elnaz; Mahmoudi Azar, Lena; Barzegari, Abolfazl; Karimi, Farrokh; Mesbahfar, Majid; Samadi, Naser; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2012-12-15

    Oxidative stress occurs as a result of imbalance between generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This kind of stress was rarely discussed in connection with foreign protein production in Escherichia coli. Relation between cytoplasmic recombinant protein expression with H(2)O(2) concentration and catalase activity variation was already reported. The periplasmic space of E. coli has different oxidative environment in relative to cytoplasm and there are some benefits in periplasmic expression of recombinant proteins. In this study, hydrogen peroxide concentration and catalase activity following periplasmic expression of mouse IL-4 were measured in E. coli. After construction of pET2mIL4 plasmid, the expression of recombinant mouse interleukin-4 (mIL-4) was confirmed. Then, the H(2)O(2) concentration and catalase activity variation in the cells were studied in exponential and stationary phases at various ODs and were compared to those of wild type cells and empty vector transformed cells. It was revealed that empty vector introduction and periplasmic recombinant protein expression increased significantly the H(2)O(2) concentration of the cells. However, the H(2)O(2) concentration in mIL-4 expressing cells was significantly higher than its concentration in empty vector transformed cells, demonstrating more effects of recombinant mIL-4 expression on H(2)O(2) elevation. Likewise, although catalase activity was reduced in foreign DNA introduced cells, it was more lowered following expression of recombinant proteins. Correlation between H(2)O(2) concentration elevation and catalase activity reduction with cell growth depletion is also demonstrated. It was also found that recombinant protein expression results in cell size increase. PMID:23000065

  1. Further studies on O sub 2 -resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelitch, I. )

    1990-02-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M{sub 4} progeny of an O{sub 2}-resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O{sub 2} has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M{sub 3} mutant produced M{sub 4} progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F{sub 1} progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M{sub 3} mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO{sub 2} as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO{sub 2}-free 21% O{sub 2} and 36% less in CO{sub 2}-free 42% O{sub 2} compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less {sup 14}CO{sub 2} per (1-{sup 14}C)glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O{sub 2} where the stoichiometry of CO{sub 2} release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  2. Isolation of a Novel Peroxisomal Catalase Gene from Sugarcane, Which Is Responsive to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Liping; Allan, Andrew C.; Que, Youxiong

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an iron porphyrin enzyme, which serves as an efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to avoid oxidative damage. In sugarcane, the enzymatic activity of catalase in a variety (Yacheng05–179) resistant to the smut pathogen Sporisorium scitamineum was always higher than that of the susceptible variety (Liucheng03–182), suggesting that catalase activity may have a positive correlation with smut resistance in sugarcane. To understand the function of catalase at the molecular level, a cDNA sequence of ScCAT1 (GenBank Accession No. KF664183), was isolated from sugarcane infected by S. scitamineum. ScCAT1 was predicted to encode 492 amino acid residues, and its deduced amino acid sequence shared a high degree of homology with other plant catalases. Enhanced growth of ScCAT1 in recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta cells under the stresses of CuCl2, CdCl2 and NaCl indicated its high tolerance. Q-PCR results showed that ScCAT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in the bud, whereas expression was moderate in stem epidermis and stem pith. Different kinds of stresses, including S. scitamineum challenge, plant hormones (SA, MeJA and ABA) treatments, oxidative (H2O2) stress, heavy metal (CuCl2) and hyper-osmotic (PEG and NaCl) stresses, triggered a significant induction of ScCAT1. The ScCAT1 protein appeared to localize in plasma membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, histochemical assays using DAB and trypan blue staining, as well as conductivity measurement, indicated that ScCAT1 may confer the sugarcane immunity. In conclusion, the positive response of ScCAT1 to biotic and abiotic stresses suggests that ScCAT1 is involved in protection of sugarcane against reactive oxidant-related environmental stimuli. PMID:24392135

  3. Failure of catalase to protect against aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced mouse lung tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Guindon, Katherine A.; Foley, Julie F.; Maronpot, Robert R.; Massey, Thomas E.

    2008-03-01

    The carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) induces 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in mouse lung, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT). G {yields} T transversion mutation in K-ras, an early event in AFB{sub 1}-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis, is thought to result from AFB{sub 1}-8,9-exo-epoxide binding to DNA to form AFB{sub 1}-N{sup 7}-guanine, but may also result from formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, oxidative DNA damage may be important in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether PEG-CAT would prevent AFB{sub 1} tumorigenicity. Mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed following treatment of female A/J mice with 300 kU/kg PEG-CAT ip and/or 50 mg/kg AFB{sub 1}. Mice were killed 7 months post-treatment and tumors greater than 1 mm in diameter were excised. Unexpectedly, the mean number of tumors per mouse in the PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} group (8.81 {+-} 3.64, n = 47) was greater than that of the group treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (7.05 {+-} 3.45, n = 42) (P < 0.05). The tumors obtained from mice treated with PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} were larger than those from mice treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in K-ras exon 1 mutation spectrum or in the histological diagnosis of tumors between AFB{sub 1} and PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} groups (P > 0.05). In vitro incubation with mouse liver catalase (CAT) resulted in conversion of [{sup 3}H]AFB{sub 1} into a DNA-binding species, a possible explanation for the results observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that PEG-CAT is not protective against AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity in mouse lung despite preventing DNA oxidation.

  4. Cytoophidium assembly reflects upregulation of IMPDH activity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Chun; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Pai, Li-Mei; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Ding, Shih-Torng; Liu, Ji-Long; Sung, Li-Ying

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytidine triphosphate synthase (CTPS) and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) (both of which have two isoforms) can form fiber-like subcellular structures termed ‘cytoophidia’ under certain circumstances in mammalian cells. Although it has been shown that filamentation of CTPS downregulates its activity by disturbing conformational changes, the activity of IMPDH within cytoophidia is still unclear. Most previous IMPDH cytoophidium studies were performed under conditions involving inhibitors that impair GTP synthesis. Here, we show that IMPDH forms cytoophidia without inhibition of GTP synthesis. First, we find that an elevated intracellular CTP concentration or treatment with 3′-deazauridine, a CTPS inhibitor, promotes IMPDH cytoophidium formation and increases the intracellular GTP pool size. Moreover, restriction of cell growth triggers the disassembly of IMPDH cytoophidia, implying that their presence is correlated with active cell metabolism. Finally, we show that the presence of IMPDH cytoophidia in mouse pancreatic islet cells might correlate with nutrient uptake in the animal. Collectively, our findings reveal that formation of IMPDH cytoophidia reflects upregulation of purine nucleotide synthesis, suggesting that the IMPDH cytoophidium plays a role distinct from that of the CTPS cytoophidium in controlling intracellular nucleotide homeostasis. PMID:26303200

  5. Analysis of Oxidative Stress Status, Catalase and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Polymorphisms in Egyptian Vitiligo Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehaney, Dina A.; Darwish, Hebatallah A.; Hegazy, Rehab A.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Tawdy, Amira M.; Gawdat, Heba I.; El-Sawalhi, Maha M.

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmentation disorder of the skin. Oxidative stress is implicated as one of the probable events involved in vitiligo pathogenesis possibly contributing to melanocyte destruction. Evidence indicates that certain genes including those involved in oxidative stress and melanin synthesis are crucial for development of vitiligo. This study evaluates the oxidative stress status, the role of catalase (CAT) and catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) gene polymorphisms in the etiology of generalized vitiligo in Egyptians. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as well as CAT exon 9 T/C and COMT 158 G/A polymorphisms were determined in 89 patients and 90 age and sex-matched controls. Our results showed significantly lower TAC along with higher MDA levels in vitiligo patients compared with controls. Meanwhile, genotype and allele distributions of CAT and COMT polymorphisms in cases were not significantly different from those of controls. Moreover, we found no association between both polymorphisms and vitiligo susceptibility. In conclusion, the enhanced oxidative stress with the lack of association between CAT and COMT polymorphisms and susceptibility to vitiligo in our patients suggest that mutations in other genes related to the oxidative pathway might contribute to the etiology of generalized vitiligo in Egyptian population. PMID:24915010

  6. Melanocortin 1 receptor agonist protects podocytes through catalase and RhoA activation.

    PubMed

    Elvin, Johannes; Buvall, Lisa; Lindskog Jonsson, Annika; Granqvist, Anna; Lassén, Emelie; Bergwall, Lovisa; Nyström, Jenny; Haraldsson, Börje

    2016-05-01

    Drugs containing adrenocorticotropic hormone have been used as therapy for patients with nephrotic syndrome. We have previously shown that adrenocorticotropic hormone and a selective agonist for the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) exert beneficial actions in experimental membranous nephropathy with reduced proteinuria, reduced oxidative stress, and improved glomerular morphology and function. Our hypothesis is that MC1R activation in podocytes elicits beneficial effects by promoting stress fibers and maintaining podocyte viability. To test the hypothesis, we cultured podocytes and used highly specific agonists for MC1R. Podocytes were subjected to the nephrotic-inducing agent puromycin aminonucleoside, and downstream effects of MC1R activation on podocyte survival, antioxidant defense, and cytoskeleton dynamics were studied. To increase the response and enhance intracellular signals, podocytes were transduced to overexpress MC1R. We showed that puromycin promotes MC1R expression in podocytes and that activation of MC1R promotes an increase of catalase activity and reduces oxidative stress, which results in the dephosphorylation of p190RhoGAP and formation of stress fibers through RhoA. In addition, MC1R agonists protect against apoptosis. Together, these mechanisms protect the podocyte against puromycin. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that selective MC1R-activating agonists protect podocytes and may therefore be useful to treat patients with nephrotic syndromes commonly considered as podocytopathies. PMID:26887829

  7. Antioxidant effects of black rice extract through the induction of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Chiang, An-Na; Wu, Hua-Lin; Yeh, Hung-I; Chu, Chi-Shuen; Lin, Hui-Chiao; Lee, Wei-Chin

    2006-08-01

    Our ex vivo study revealed that BRE had significantly stronger ability to inhibit LDL oxidation than white rice extract (WRE). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether black rice extract (BRE) supplementation might ameliorate oxidative stress and enhance antioxidant enzyme activities in HepG2 cells and in C57BL/6 mice. In the cellular study, superoxide anions (O2*-) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the BRE group were significantly suppressed. The BRE group also showed significant increases in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities by 161.6% and 73.4%, respectively. The major components responsible for the free-radical-scavenging and antioxidative properties might be cyanidin-3-O-glucoside chloride and peonidin-3-O-glucuside chloride. In the animal study, male C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups (control, BRE, and WRE). Plasma HDL-cholesterol was significantly higher, and thiobarbituric, acid-reactive substances were significantly lower in the BRE group, whereas plasma levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride were not affected by BRE supplementation. Increased hepatic SOD and CAT activities were observed in BRE-treated mice as compared to the control mice. However, no changes were detected for the protein expression of antioxidant enzymes by Western blot analysis. Our data suggest that antioxidative effects exerted by BRE are mediated through decreases in free-radical generation as well as increases in SOD and CAT activities both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:17120934

  8. Kinetic properties and storage stability of catalase immobilized on to florisil.

    PubMed

    Ozyilmaz, Gul; Tukel, S Seyhan; Alptekin, Ozlem

    2007-02-01

    The covalent immobilization of bovine liver catalase (CAT) on to florisil via glutaraldehyde was investigated. Optimum immobilization pH and temperature were determined as pH 6.0, 10 degrees C respectively, while the amount of initial CAT per g of carrier and immobilization time was determined as 5 mg g(-1) and 120 min, respectively. The Vmax values for free and immobilized CAT were found to be 1.7 x 10(5) and 2.0 x 10(4) micromol H2O2 min(-1) mg protein(-1), respectively, whereas KM values were 33.3 mM and 1722.0 mM respectively. Operational stability was determined by using a stirred batch-type column reactor. Immobilized CAT retained about 40% of its initial activity after 50 uses. It showed higher storage stability than free CAT at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C. Its storage stability increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) from 0 to 20% of the medium. The highest storage stability was obtained in 20% RH, however, further increase in RH from 40 to 100% significantly decreased the storage stability. PMID:17385339

  9. Effect of cyprodinil and fludioxonil pesticides on bovine liver catalase activity

    PubMed Central

    Karadag, Hasan; Ozhan, Fadil

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated if the use of the pesticides cyprodinil and fludioxonil produced an inhibitory effect on the bovine liver catalase (CAT) activity. It was documented that the activity of the enzyme decreased with increasing concentrations of cyprodinil and fludioxonil from 0 to 500 ppm. At pesticide concentrations of 250 and 500 ppm, the activity of CAT remained unchanged and passed to a steady state. The exposure to cyprodinil in concentrations of 10, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ppm, led to a decrease in the per cent of the CAT enzyme activity calculated as 45.4, 68.0, 73.0, 77.8 and 77.4, respectively. Similarly, the exposure to fludioxonil in concentrations of 10, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ppm, produced the following percentage decrease in the CAT enzyme activity: 20.0, 30.8, 42.8, 46.3 and 45.9, respectively. Cyprodinil inhibited CAT competitively, whereas the mechanism of fludioxonil inhibition over the enzyme was non-competitive. PMID:26740786

  10. Spin Trapping Investigation of Peroxide- and Isoniazid-Induced Radicals in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Catalase-Peroxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Suarez, Javier; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    A new approach, the immuno-spin trapping assay, used a novel rabbit polyclonal anti-DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) antiserum to detect protein radical-derived DMPO nitrone adducts in the hemoprotein Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG). This work demonstrates that the formation of protein nitrone adducts is dependent on the concentrations of tert-BuOOH and DMPO as shown by Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We have also detected protein-protein cross-links formed during turnover of Mtb KatG driven by tert-butyl peroxide (tert-BuOOH) or enzymatic generation of hydrogen peroxide. DMPO inhibits this dimerization due to its ability to trap the amino acid radicals responsible for the cross-linkage. Chemical modifications by tyrosine and tryptophan blockage suggest that tyrosine residues are one site of formation of the dimers. The presence of the tuberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) also prevented cross-linking as a result of its competition for the protein radical. Protein-DMPO nitrone adducts were also generated by a continuous flux of hydrogen peroxide. These findings demonstrated that the protein-based radicals were formed not only during Mtb KatG turnover with alkyl peroxides but also in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the formation of protein-DMPO nitrone adducts was accelerated in the presence of isoniazid. PMID:18831539

  11. Association of Catalase and Glutathione Peroxidase 1 Polymorphisms with Chronic Hepatitis C Outcome.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vanessa C S D; Carmo, Rodrigo F; Vasconcelos, Luydson R S; Aroucha, Dayse C B L; Pereira, Leila M M B; Moura, Patrícia; Cavalcanti, Maria S M

    2016-05-01

    The hepatic damage caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the host immune response and viral regulatory factors. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) are antioxidant enzymes located in the peroxisomes and mitochondria, respectively, and are responsible for the control of intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels. Polymorphisms in CAT (C-262T) and GPX1 (Pro198Leu) are correlated with serum levels and enzyme activity. This study aimed to investigate the association of genetic polymorphisms of CAT C-262T (rs1001179) and GPX1 Pro198Leu (rs1050450) with different stages of liver fibrosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study included 445 patients with chronic hepatitis C, of whom 139 patients had mild fibrosis (F0-F1), 200 had moderate/severe fibrosis (F2-F4), and 106 had HCC. Genotyping of SNPs was performed by real-time PCR using TaqMan probes. The Pro/Pro genotype of GPX1 was significantly associated with fibrosis severity, HCC, Child Pugh score, and BCLC staging. Additionally, patients carrying both CT+TT genotypes in the CAT gene and the Pro/Pro genotype in the GPX1 gene had higher risk for developing moderate/severe fibrosis or HCC (p = 0.009, OR 2.40 and p = 0.002, OR 3.56, respectively). CAT and GPX1 polymorphisms may be implicated in the severity of liver fibrosis and HCC caused by HCV. PMID:26990426

  12. Endothelial targeting of liposomes encapsulating SOD/catalase mimetic EUK-134 alleviates acute pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Melissa D; Greineder, Colin F; Hood, Elizabeth D; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2014-03-10

    Production of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the vascular endothelium is a common pathogenic pathway in many dangerous conditions, including acute lung injury, ischemia-reperfusion, and inflammation. Ineffective delivery of antioxidants to the endothelium limits their utility for management of these conditions. In this study, we devised a novel translational antioxidant intervention targeted to the vascular endothelium using PEG-liposomes loaded with EUK-134 (EUK), a potent superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetic. EUK loaded into antibody-coated liposomes (size 197.8±4.5 nm diameter, PDI 0.179±0.066) exerted partial activity in the intact carrier, while full activity was recovered upon liposome disruption. For targeting we used antibodies (Abs) to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1). Both streptavidin-biotin and SATA/SMCC conjugation chemistries provided binding of 125-150 Ab molecules per liposome. Ab/EUK/liposomes, but not IgG/EUK/liposomes: i) bound to endothelial cells and inhibited cytokine-induced inflammatory activation in vitro; and, ii) accumulated in lungs after intravascular injection, providing >60% protection against pulmonary edema in endotoxin-challenged mice (vs <6% protection afforded by IgG/liposome/EUK counterpart). Since the design elements of this drug delivery system are already in clinical use (PEG-liposomes, antibodies, SATA/SMCC conjugation), it is an attractive candidate for translational interventions using antioxidant molecules such as EUK and other clinically acceptable drugs. PMID:24412573

  13. Study on the interaction of catalase with pesticides by flow injection chemiluminescence and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xijuan; Wang, Zhuming; Chen, Donghua; Luo, Kai; Xiong, Xunyu; Song, Zhenghua

    2014-08-01

    The interaction mechanisms of catalase (CAT) with pesticides (including organophosphates: disulfoton, isofenphos-methyl, malathion, isocarbophos, dimethoate, dipterex, methamidophos and acephate; carbamates: carbaryl and methomyl; pyrethroids: fenvalerate and deltamethrin) were first investigated by flow injection (FI) chemiluminescence (CL) analysis and molecular docking. By homemade FI-CL model of lg[(I0-I)/I]=lgK+nlg[D], it was found that the binding processes of pesticides to CAT were spontaneous with the apparent binding constants K of 10(3)-10(5) L mol(-1) and the numbers of binding sites about 1.0. The binding abilities of pesticides to CAT followed the order: fenvalerate>deltamethrin>disulfoton>isofenphos-methyl>carbaryl>malathion>isocarbophos>dimethoate>dipterex>acephate>methomyl>methamidophos, which was generally similar to the order of determination sensitivity of pesticides. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that CAT bound with hydrophobic pesticides by hydrophobic interaction force, and with hydrophilic pesticides by hydrogen bond and van der Waals force. The pesticides to CAT molecular docking study showed that pesticides could enter into the cavity locating among the four subdomains of CAT, giving the specific amino acid residues and hydrogen bonds involved in CAT-pesticides interaction. It was also found that the lgK values of pesticides to CAT increased regularly with increasing lgP, Mr, MR and MV, suggesting that the hydrophobicity and steric property of pesticide played essential roles in its binding to CAT. PMID:24875908

  14. A simple method to measure effective catalase activities: optimization, validation, and application in green coffee.

    PubMed

    Montavon, Philippe; Kukic, Koraljka Rade; Bortlik, Karlheinz

    2007-01-15

    Oxidative metabolism in coffee cherries during maturation appears to be regulated by the timely expression of redox enzymes such as catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and polyphenoloxidase (PPO). Among these enzymes, CAT is suspected to contribute significantly in setting the redox status of the healthy cherry and the processed bean. The initial redox status of the green bean might further control the nature and dynamics of reactions induced by roasting and eventually quality aspects of the end product. In this respect, Arabica (Coffea arabica) and Robusta (Coffea canephora) typically differ by their cup coffee flavor profiles. We developed an assay that allowed us to screen numerous green coffee samples for effective CAT activities. The proposed assay, which monitors CAT activities by online oxygen sensing in green coffee crude suspensions incubated with H2O2, seeks to integrate potential effects of endogenous inhibitors and activators. After optimization and validation of the assay, 23 Arabicas, 23 Robustas, and 8 Arabustas were analyzed. Nearly all Arabicas (22 of 23) harbored high CAT activity levels, whereas all Robustas harbored low ones. Arabustas performed like Arabicas of the lower CAT activity range. The traditional spectrophotometric assay did not reveal these specificities. Because of its simplicity, our assay might be valuable for assessing effective CAT activities in various plant tissues. PMID:17141173

  15. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  16. Flavonoid-induced conversion of catalase to its inactive form--Compound II.

    PubMed

    Krych, J; Gebicki, J L; Gebicka, L

    2014-11-01

    Flavonoids (FlaOHs), plant polyphenols, are ubiquitous components of human diet and are known as antioxidants. However, their prooxidant activity has also been reported. We have recently found that FlaOHs inhibit catalase, the heme enzyme which catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and molecular oxygen. The catalytic cycle proceeds with the formation of the intermediate, Compound I (Cpd I), an oxoferryl porphyrin π-cation radical, the two-electron oxidation product of a heme group. Under conditions of low H2O2 fluxes and in the presence of an appropriate substrate, Cpd I can undergo one-electron reduction to inactive Compound II (Cpd II), oxoferryl derivative without radical site. Here we show that in vitro, under low fluxes of H2O2, FlaOHs reduce Cpd I to inactive Cpd II. Measurable amounts of Cpd II can be formed even in the presence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) at concentration comparable with the investigated FlaOHs. Possible mechanisms of electron transfer from FlaOH molecule to the heme are discussed. PMID:25111015

  17. Multifrequency EPR Studies of Manganese Catalases Provide a Complete Description of Proteinaceous Nitrogen Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Stich, Troy A.; Whittaker, James W.; Britt, R. David

    2012-01-01

    Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is employed at two very different excitation frequencies, 9.77 and 30.67 GHz, in the study of the nitrogen coordination environment of the Mn(III)Mn(IV) state of the dimanganese-containing catalases from Lactobacillus plantarum and Thermus thermophilus. Consistent with previous studies, the lower-frequency results reveal one unique histidine nitrogen-Mn cluster interaction. For the first time, a second, more strongly hyperfine-coupled 14N atom is unambiguously observed through the use of higher frequency/higher field EPR spectroscopy. The low excitation frequency spectral features are rationalized as arising from the interaction of a histidine nitrogen that is bound to the Mn(IV) ion, while the higher excitation frequency features are attributed to the histidine nitrogen bound to the Mn(III) ion. These results allow for the computation of intrinsic hyperfine coupling constants, which range from 2.2 to 2.9 MHz, for sp2-hybridized nitrogens coordinating equatorially to high-valent Mn ions. The relevance of these findings is discussed in the context of recent results from analogous higher frequency EPR studies of the Mn cluster in photosystem II and other exchange-coupled transition metal-containing systems. PMID:20055466

  18. Potential toxicity of sarafloxacin to catalase: Spectroscopic, ITC and molecular docking descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhaozhen; Liu, Rutao; Yang, Bingjun

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between sarafloxacin and catalase (CAT) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking method. After deducting the inner filter effect, the fluorescence of CAT was quenched regularly by different concentrations of sarafloxacin. The quenching mechanism was studied by lifetime measurement, and it was proved to be mostly due to static quenching. The formation of sarafloxacin-CAT complex alters the micro-environment of amide moieties and tryptophan (Trp) residues, reduces the α-helix content of the enzyme, changes the peripheral substituents on the porphyrin ring of heme and leads to the inhibition of the enzyme activity. Molecular docking study reveals that sarafloxacin is located between two α-helix of CAT near to Trp 182 and Trp 185 residues, which supports the experimental results and helps to have a more clear understanding about the interaction mechanism. The change in the relative position of His 74 to heme induced by the variation of secondary structure is considered to be the major reason for the reduction of CAT activity. Moreover, sarafloxacin binds into a hydrophobic area of CAT mainly through hydrophobic interactions, which is consistent with the ITC analysis.

  19. Structure and heme environment of beef liver catalase at 2.5 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, T J; Murthy, M R; Sicignano, A; Tanaka, N; Musick, W D; Rossmann, M G

    1981-01-01

    Most of the amino acid side chains of beef liver catalase were clearly identifiable in the 2.5 A resolution electron-density map, and the results are in good agreement with the sequence [Schroeder, W. A., Shelton, J. R., Shelton, J. B., Roberson, B. & Apell, G. (1969) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 131, 653-655]. The tertiary structure of one subunit consists of a large antiparallel beta-pleated sheet domain with helical insertions, followed by a smaller domain containing four alpha-helices. The heme group is buried at least 20 A below the molecular surface and is accessible by a channel lined with hydrophobic residues. The proximal ligand is tyrosine-357, while histidine-74 and asparagine-147 re the important residues on the distal side of the heme. The inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, which has been shown to covalently bond to histidine-74, can be built into the heme cavity with its N(2) atom coordinated to the heme iron. PMID:6946424

  20. Nanospherical Brush as Catalase Container for Enhancing the Detection Sensitivity of Competitive Plasmonic ELISA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Rui; Xu, Hengyi; Lai, Weihua; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-02-01

    Plasmonic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (pELISA) based on catalase (CAT)-mediated gold nanoparticle growth shows great potential for the determination of disease-related biomarkers at ultralow concentrations by using sandwich formats. However, the relatively low sensitivity of this strategy using competitive formats limits its adoption for hapten detection. Herein, we present an improved competitive pELISA for ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA), where silica nanoparticles carrying poly(acrylic acid) brushes (SiO2@PAA) were used to decrease the affinity of competing antigens to anti-OTA monoclonal antibodies and amplify the signal as a "CAT container" (SiO2@PAA@CAT). The developed competitive pELISA exhibits extremely high sensitivity for OTA with detection limits of 10(-18) and 5 × 10(-20) g/mL by the naked eye and microplate reader, respectively. These values are at least 7 orders of magnitude lower than that of competitive CAT-based pELISA (10(-11) g/mL by the naked eye) and 8 orders of magnitude lower than that of horseradish peroxidase-based conventional ELISA (10(-11) g/mL by the microplate reader), respectively. Reliability and robustness of the proposed method were evaluated using actual agricultural products and human serum samples. This study demonstrated the potential of this modified method in practical applications involving the ultrasensitive detection of mycotoxins or other haptens. PMID:26719076

  1. Involvement of catalase in the protective benefits of metformin in mice with oxidative liver injury.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Liu, Mingwei; Ai, Qing; Lin, Ling; Wu, Kunwei; Deng, Xinyu; Jing, Yuping; Jia, Mengying; Wan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-01

    Metformin is a commonly used anti-diabetic drug with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent hypoglycemic activities. Recent studies have revealed its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. In the present study, the anti-oxidative potential of metformin and its potential mechanisms were investigated in a mouse model with carbon tetrachloride (CCl₂)-induced severe oxidative liver injury. Our results showed that treatment with metformin significantly attenuated CCl₂-induced elevation of serum aminotransferases and hepatic histological abnormalities. The alleviated liver injury was associated with decreased hepatic contents of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, metformin treatment dose-dependently enhanced the activities of catalase (CAT) and decreased CCl₄-induced elevation of hepatic H₂O₂ levels, but it had no obvious effects on the protein level of CAT. We also found that metformin increased the level of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but treatment with AMPK activator AICAR had no obvious effects on CAT activity. A molecular docking analysis indicated that metformin might interact with CAT via hydrogen bonds. These data suggested that metformin effectively alleviated CCl₄-induced oxidative liver injury in mice and these hepatoprotective effects might be associated with CAT. PMID:24717679

  2. Structure and heme environment of beef liver catalase at 2.5 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Reid, T J; Murthy, M R; Sicignano, A; Tanaka, N; Musick, W D; Rossmann, M G

    1981-08-01

    Most of the amino acid side chains of beef liver catalase were clearly identifiable in the 2.5 A resolution electron-density map, and the results are in good agreement with the sequence [Schroeder, W. A., Shelton, J. R., Shelton, J. B., Roberson, B. & Apell, G. (1969) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 131, 653-655]. The tertiary structure of one subunit consists of a large antiparallel beta-pleated sheet domain with helical insertions, followed by a smaller domain containing four alpha-helices. The heme group is buried at least 20 A below the molecular surface and is accessible by a channel lined with hydrophobic residues. The proximal ligand is tyrosine-357, while histidine-74 and asparagine-147 re the important residues on the distal side of the heme. The inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, which has been shown to covalently bond to histidine-74, can be built into the heme cavity with its N(2) atom coordinated to the heme iron. PMID:6946424

  3. Evidence for heme pi cation radical species in compound I of horseradish peroxidase and catalase.

    PubMed

    Browlett, W R; Stillman, M J

    1981-07-24

    Magnetic circular dichroism spectra are reported for the compound I species of beef liver catalase (hydrogen-peroxide: hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.6) and horseradish peroxidase (donor: hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.7) and the pi cation radical derivatives of porphyrins that have been suggested as models of the electronic configuration of the heme in the compound I species of these enzymes. Comparison of the magnetic circular dichroism spectra of the compound I species with the spectra of [Co(octaethylporphyrin)]2Br and [Co(octaethylporphyrin)]2ClO4 indicates that in both the intermediate enzyme species the heme has been oxidized to a pi cation radical. While there is a clear distinction between the magnetic circular dichroism spectra of the 2A2u porphyrin [Co(III)octaethylporphyrin]2ClO4, and the 2A1u porphyrin, [Co(III)octaethylporphyrin]2Br, such specific differences are not observed in the spectra of the two enzymes. Analysis of our data suggests that the ground states in the two enzymes are far more similar than the ground states in the two model porphyrins. PMID:7272312

  4. Selenium affects the expression of GPx4 and catalase in the liver of chicken.

    PubMed

    Zoidis, E; Pappas, A C; Georgiou, C A; Komaitis, Epsilon; Feggeros, K

    2010-03-01

    A total of 128 chickens (Gallus gallus, broilers) were used to investigate the effect of organic selenium (Se) in expression of catalase (CAT) and phospholipid hydroperoxidase 4 (GPx4) genes. There were 4 replicates of 4 dietary treatments: T1 (basal diet with no added Se), T2 (T1 with 0.15 ppm Se added), T3 (T1 with 0.3 ppm Se) and T4 (T1 with 3.0 ppm Se). At 4th and 6th week, 2 chickens per replicate pen were sacrificed for whole blood and liver sample collections. Samples were analyzed for total Se by ICP-MS and gene expression by RT-PCR. Dietary supplementation with organic Se (Se-yeast) readily elevated its concentration in the tissues. GPx4 mRNA levels, pooled for both ages, of chickens fed T3 and T4 diets were significantly reduced compared to those fed diet T1 by 47% and 77% respectively, while that of T2 did not differ. Liver CAT mRNA levels at 4th week were significantly decreased as Se supplementation increased, while at 6th week, were not significantly affected by Se. The study showed that liver GPx4 mRNA levels could be down-regulated by excess of Se. It is possible that reserves built by excess of Se meet antioxidant requirements and no additional GPx4 transcription is necessary. PMID:19961950

  5. Catalasic activity in fish liver: improvement of the UV to visible analytic method.

    PubMed

    Paris-Palacios, Séverine; Delahaut, Laurence; Carreras, Alexis; Thomas, Marielle; Biagianti-Risbourg, Sylvie

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidative defenses and more especially catalasic activity (CAT) are studied in a large range of scientific research thematics. In environmental sciences, the problematic of oxidative stress is of great interest as pollutants can induce perturbations of redox homeostasis. Consequently, changes in antioxidative defenses levels in fish tissues and particularly in liver are used as potential biomarkers of pollution. In most studies, the CAT was assayed by following during 5 min the consumption of H2O2 in cytosolic buffered extracts at 240 nm (UV-method). This study proposed a development of this method in the visible, using permanganate and a 525-nm detection, which was more accurate, sensitive, and rapid. Moreover, the hepatic CAT of six different fish species [a cyclidae (Nimbochromis linni), 3 cyprinidae (Brachydanio rerio, Rutilus rutilus, Cyprinus carpio), an anguillidae (Anguilla anguilla), and a percidae (Perca fluviatilus)] was evaluated with the two protocols (UV- and KMnO4-method). The results but also the thermal optimum of the reaction and the interest of CAT as biomarker in ecotoxicology were discussed. PMID:23224832

  6. Oxidation of phenolic compounds by the bifunctional catalase-phenol oxidase (CATPO) from Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Koclar Avci, Gulden; Coruh, Nursen; Bolukbasi, Ufuk; Ogel, Zumrut B

    2013-01-01

    The thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum produces a novel bifunctional catalase with an additional phenol oxidase activity (CATPO); however, its phenol oxidation spectrum is not known. Here, 14 phenolic compounds were selected as substrates, among which (+)-catechin, catechol, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid yielded distinct oxidation products examined by reversed-phase HPLC chromatography method. Characterization of the products by LC-ESI/MS and UV-vis spectroscopy suggests the formation of dimers of dehydrocatechin type B (hydrophilic) and type A (hydrophobic), as well as oligomers, namely, a trimer and tetramer from (+)-catechin, the formation of a dimer and oligomer of catechol, a dimer from caffeic acid with a caffeicin-like structure, as well as trimeric and tetrameric derivatives, and a single major product from chlorogenic acid suggested to be a dimer. Based on the results, CATPO oxidizes phenolic compounds ranging from simple phenols to polyphenols but all having an ortho-diphenolic structure in common. The enzyme also appears to have stereoselectivity due to the oxidation of (+)-catechin, but not that of epicatechin. It is suggested that CATPO may contribute to the antioxidant mechanism of the fungus and may be of value for future food and biotechnology applications where such a bifunctional activity would be desirable. PMID:22370948

  7. Identification of lactic acid bacteria and Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci isolated from naturally fermented sausage (sucuk).

    PubMed

    Kaban, G; Kaya, M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the study was to identify lactic acid bacteria and Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci isolated from Turkish dry fermented sausage (sucuk) produced by 7 different manufacturers without using starter culture. A total of 129 isolates of lactic acid bacteria were identified phenotypically. Lactobacillus plantarum was the dominant species (45.7%) followed by L. curvatus (10.9%) and L. fermentum (9.3%). Pediococcus isolates were identified as P. pentosaceus and P. acidilactici. All the isolates of gram-positive and catalase-positive cocci (123 isolates) were classified as Staphylococcus except for 1 isolate assigned to Kocuria rosea. The species isolated most often were S. xylosus (41.5%) and S. saprophyticus (28.5%). Four isolates were identified as S. equorum (3.3%), 1 isolate was assigned to S. carnosus (0.8%). PMID:19019118

  8. Catalase activity, serum trace element and heavy metal concentrations, and vitamin A, D and E levels in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kolusari, A; Kurdoglu, M; Yildizhan, R; Adali, E; Edirne, T; Cebi, A; Demir, H; Yoruk, I H

    2008-01-01

    Catalase (antioxidant enzyme) activity in erythrocytes and serum levels of trace elements (copper, iron, zinc), heavy metals (cadmium, cobalt) and vitamins A (retinol), D (cholecalciferol) and E (alpha-tocopherol) were measured in 145 subjects comprising 47 pre-eclamptic pregnant women (PE), 48 healthy pregnant women (HP) and 50 healthy non-pregnant controls (NP). Catalase, vitamins A, D and E and levels of cobalt were significantly lower in the PE group compared with the HP and NP groups, whereas levels of copper, iron and cadmium were significantly higher in the PE group than in the HP and NP groups. Levels of zinc were significantly lower in both the PE and HP groups compared with the NP group. This assessment of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in pregnant women could be useful in the early identification of pre-eclampsia and antioxidant supplementation in the early weeks of gestation might be useful. PMID:19094444

  9. The alteration of intracellular enzymes. III. The effect of temperature on the kinetics of altered and unaltered yeast catalase.

    PubMed

    FRASER, M J; KAPLAN, J G

    1955-03-20

    1. The very large increase in catalase activity (Euler effect) which follows treatment of yeast cells with CHCl(3), UV and n-propanol is accompanied by highly significant changes in kinetic properties. With respect to the enzymatic decomposition of H(2)O(2), the thermodynamic constants of the activation process micro, DeltaHdouble dagger, DeltaSdouble dagger, DeltaFdouble dagger, decrease, following treatment of the intracellular enzyme, by 4.5 kcal., 4.5 kcal., 10.1 e.u. and 1.7 kcal., respectively, all these differences being significant at the 1 per cent level. 2. Similar differences exist between the untreated, intracellular enzyme on the one hand, and the extracted yeast and crystalline beef liver catalases on the other. Significant differences in these thermodynamic constants do not exist among the treated intracellular, extracted yeast, and crystalline liver catalases. 3. These data provide unequivocal confirmation of the phenomenon of enzyme alteration reported previously, and confirm previous evidence that the extracted and crystalline enzymes have also undergone enzyme alteration and have properties which are identical with, or very similar to, those of the catalase altered in situ. 4. With respect to the process of heat destruction of catalase, the greatly diminished stability to heat of the altered enzymes, previously reported, has been confirmed. The thermodynamic constants of activation of this process have likewise changed following alteration, in the case of micro, DeltaHdouble dagger, and DeltaSdouble dagger an increase of 20.6 kcal., 20.6 kcal., and 70 e.u., respectively, and of DeltaFdouble dagger a decrease of 2.8 kcal. 5. All these data have been shown to be consistent with, and in some cases predictable from, the interfacial hypothesis, which states that the unaltered catalase exists within the cell adsorbed to some interface, in a partially, but reversibly, unfolded configuration of relatively low specificity; enzyme alteration consists, in the case of catalase, of desorbing the enzyme from the interface into its rolled-up, soluble, highly specific configuration. While the interfacial hypothesis has successfully withstood this experimental attack, the present data do not provide its unequivocal proof, since they are consistent with any hypothesis of alteration in which the unaltered, intracellular enzyme is in a relatively disordered state by comparison to the altered enzyme. While evidence of an interfacial process in enzyme alteration has been adduced previously, critical proof of the interfacial hypothesis awaits creation of a model system, in which most of the aspects of intracellular alteration can be reproduced. 6. Certain of the changes in kinetic properties following alteration of the intracellular enzyme, such as increased activity and the modified energies and entropies of activation of both enzyme-substrate system and heat destruction of the catalase itself, might be explained by a decrease (two orders of magnitude) in the effective hydrogen ion concentration, allowing the intracellular enzyme to be brought to the same pH as the extracellular medium. If such a pH change does, in fact, occur, it is necessary to invoke the interfacial hypothesis to explain why the unaltered, intracellular enzyme is in equilibrium with a medium whose pH is approximately 2 units lower than that of the cytoplasm itself. 7. It is concluded that kinetic data of this kind may be used to shed light on the structure of a soluble, cytoplasmic enzyme, not attached to any of the formed elements within the cell, yet organized within it in a condition of relatively low structural specificity; further, that information obtained exclusively from a study of the kinetics of the extracted or crystalline enzymes may not, in the case of this enzyme, at least, be extrapolated to the same enzyme within the intact cell. PMID:14354151

  10. Dynamics of erythrocyte count, hemoglobin, and catalase activity in rat blood in hypokinesia, muscular activity and restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneyeva, G. V.; Potapovich, G. M.; Voloshko, N. A.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted to prove that muscular exertion (in this instance swimming) of different duration and intensity, as well as hypodynamia, result in an increase of hemoglobin and number of red blood cells in peripheral blood rats. Catalase activity increased with an increase in the duration of swimming, but only up to 6 hr; with 7-9 hr of swimming as well as in hypodynamia, catalase activity decreased. It was also observed that under hypodynamia as well as in 3, 5 and 6 hr exertion (swimming) the color index of blood decreased. Pressure chamber treatment (for 8 min each day for one week), alternating a 2 min negative pressure up to 35 mm Hg with 1 min positive pressure, increased the erythrocyte count and hemoglobin content.

  11. The use of glucose oxidase and catalase for the enzymatic reduction of the potential ethanol content in wine.

    PubMed

    Röcker, Jessica; Schmitt, Matthias; Pasch, Ludwig; Ebert, Kristin; Grossmann, Manfred

    2016-11-01

    Due to the increase of sugar levels in wine grapes as one of the impacts of climate change, alcohol reduction in wines becomes a major focus of interest. This study combines the use of glucose oxidase and catalase activities with the aim of rapid conversion of glucose into non-fermentable gluconic acid. The H2O2 hydrolysing activity of purified catalase is necessary in order to stabilize glucose oxidase activity. After establishing the adequate enzyme ratio, the procedure was applied in large-scale trials (16L- and 220L-scale) of which one was conducted in a winery under industrial wine making conditions. Both enzyme activity and wine flavour were clearly influenced by the obligatory aeration in the different trials. With the enzyme treatment an alcohol reduction of 2%vol. was achieved after 30h of aeration. However the enzyme treated wines were significantly more acidic and less typical. PMID:27211694

  12. Caloric restriction or catalase inactivation extends yeast chronological lifespan by inducing H2O2 and superoxide dismutase activity

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Ana; Weinberger, Martin; Silva, Alexandra; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Almeida, Bruno; Leão, Cecília; Costa, Vítor; Rodrigues, Fernando; Burhans, William C.; Ludovico, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The free radical theory of aging posits oxidative damage to macromolecules as a primary determinant of lifespan. Recent studies challenge this theory by demonstrating that in some cases, longevity is enhanced by inactivation of oxidative stress defenses or is correlated with increased, rather than decreased reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage. Here we show that, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, caloric restriction or inactivation of catalases extends chronological lifespan by inducing elevated levels of the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide, which activate superoxide dismutases that inhibit the accumulation of superoxide anions. Increased hydrogen peroxide in catalase-deficient cells extends chronological lifespan despite parallel increases in oxidative damage. These findings establish a role for hormesis effects of hydrogen peroxide in promoting longevity that have broad implications for understanding aging and age-related diseases. PMID:20696905

  13. Combination of heterogeneous catalase and superoxide dismutase protects Bifidobacterium longum strain NCC2705 from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Feng, Xiujuan; Khaskheli, Gul Bahar; Chen, Lili; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2014-09-01

    Bifidobacteria are generally sensitive to oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). To improve oxidative-stress tolerance, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene from Streptococcus thermophilus (StSodA) and the heme-dependent catalase (KAT) gene from Lactobacillus plantarum (LpKatL) were heterologously expressed in Bifidobacterium longum strain NCC2705. Three types of strain NCC2705 transformants were obtained: with transgenic SOD expression, with transgenic KAT expression, and with coexpression of the two genes. Intracellular expression of the genes and their functional role in oxidative-stress resistance were evaluated. In response to oxidative stress, B. longum NCC2705/pDP401-LpKatL (expressing LpKatL) and NCC2705/pDP-Kat-Sod (coexpressing LpKatL and StSodA) rapidly degraded exogenous H2O2 and the peroxides generated as a byproduct of aerobic cultivation, preventing oxidative damage to DNA and RNA. Individual expression of StSodA or LpKatL both improved B. longum NCC2705 cell viability. Survival rate of strain NCC2705 was further improved by combining SOD and KAT expression. The two enzymes played complementary roles in ROS-scavenging pathways, and coexpression led to a synergistic beneficial effect under conditions of intensified oxidative stress. Our results illustrate that heterogeneous expression of heme-dependent KAT and Mn(2+)-dependent SOD is functional in the B. longum oxidative-stress response, and synergistic protection is achieved when their expressions are combined. PMID:24903816

  14. Transcriptional inhibition of the Catalase gene in phosphine-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Fanhua; Wang, Yuejin

    2015-10-01

    Phosphine (PH3) is a toxic substance to pest insects and is therefore commonly used in pest control. The oxidative damage induced by PH3 is considered to be one of the primary mechanisms of its toxicity in pest insects; however, the precise mode of PH3 action in this process is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the responses of several oxidative biomarkers and two of the main antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), after fumigation treatment with PH3 in Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. The results showed that larvae exposed to sub-lethal levels of PH3 (0.028 mg/L) exhibited lower aerobic respiration rates and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Furthermore, unlike SOD, the activity and expression of CAT and its encoding gene were downregulated by PH3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Finally, the responses of six potential transcription factors of PH3 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction to explore the regulation mechanism of DmCAT by PH3. There were no significant effects of PH3 on three nuclear factor-kappa B homologs (DORSAL, DIF, and RELISH) or two activator protein-1 genes (JUN and FOS), while dramatic inhibition of DNA replication-related element factor (DREF) expression was observed after fumigation with PH3, suggesting that PH3 could inhibit the expression of DmCAT via the DRE/DREF system. These results confirmed that PH3 induces oxidative stress and targets CAT by downregulating its encoding gene in Drosophila. Our results provide new insight into the signal transduction mechanism between PH3 and its target genes. PMID:26453223

  15. Mutation of Arabidopsis CATALASE2 results in hyponastic leaves by changes of auxin levels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Yuan, Hong-Mei; Hu, Ye-Qin; Li, Jing; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and H2 O2 play vital roles in plant development and environmental responses; however, it is unclear whether and how H2 O2 modulates auxin levels. Here, we investigate this question using cat2-1 mutant, which exhibits reduced catalase activity and accumulates high levels of H2 O2 under photorespiratory conditions. At a light intensity of 150 μmol m(-2) s(-1) , the mutant exhibited up-curled leaves that have increased H2 O2 contents and decreased auxin levels. At low light intensities (30 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), the leaves of the mutant were normal, but exhibited reduced H2 O2 contents and elevated auxin levels. These findings suggest that H2 O2 modulates auxin levels. When auxin was directly applied to cat2-1 leaves, the up-curled leaves curled downwards. In addition, transformation of cat2-1 plants with pCAT2:iaaM, which increases auxin levels, rescued the hyponastic leaf phenotype. Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that the transcription of auxin synthesis-related genes and of genes that regulate leaf curvature is suppressed in cat2-1. Furthermore, application of glutathione rescued the up-curled leaves of cat2-1 and increased auxin levels, but did not change H2 O2 levels. Thus, the hyponastic leaves of cat2-1 reveal crosstalk between H2 O2 and auxin signalling that is mediated by changes in glutathione redox status. PMID:23738953

  16. Targeted delivery and improved therapeutic potential of catalase by chemical modification: combination with superoxide dismutase derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Y; Nishikawa, M; Tamada, A; Takakura, Y; Hashida, M

    1999-05-01

    Four types of bovine liver catalase (CAT) derivatives, succinylated (Suc-CAT), galactosylated (Gal-CAT), mannosylated (Man-CAT), and polyethylene glycol conjugate (PEG-CAT), were synthesized and their pharmacokinetics and therapeutic potential in a hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury model were studied in mice. About 90% of the CAT enzymatic activity was retained after chemical modification. Biodistribution studies showed that 111indium (111In)-Gal-CAT accumulated selectively in the liver parenchymal cells as 111In-CAT, whereas an increased amount of 111In-Suc-CAT and 111In-Man-CAT was delivered to liver nonparenchymal cells. 111In-PEG-CAT exhibited prolonged retention in plasma. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the hepatic uptake clearances of 111In-Suc-CAT, 111In-Gal-CAT, and 111In-Man-CAT were much greater than that of 111In-CAT, whereas that of 111In-PEG-CAT was very small. In the ischemia/reperfusion injury model, in which hepatic injury was induced by occlusion of the portal vein for 30 min followed by 1 h reperfusion, the elevation of plasma glutamic pyruvic transaminase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase levels was slightly inhibited by treatment with native CAT or Gal-CAT. PEG-CAT was less potent. In contrast, Suc-CAT and Man-CAT effectively suppressed the increase in plasma glutamic pyruvic transaminase and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase. Coinjection of mannosylated superoxide dismutase marginally improved the inhibitory effects of CAT derivatives. These results demonstrate that targeted CAT delivery to liver nonparenchymal cells via chemical modification is a promising approach to prevent hepatic injuries caused by reactive oxygen species. The potential usefulness of combining of CAT and superoxide dismutase derivatives is also demonstrated. PMID:10215702

  17. Combined effects of water temperature and copper ion concentration on catalase activity in Crassostrea ariakensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Jiahui; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    A central composite experimental design and response surface method were used to investigate the combined effects of water temperature (18-34°C) and copper ion concentration (0.1-1.5 mg/L) on the catalase (CAT) activity in the digestive gland of Crassostrea ariakensis. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.01), the quadratic effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.05), the linear effects of copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the quadratic effects of copper ion concentration were significant ( P<0.05). Additionally, the synergistic effects of temperature and copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the effect of temperature was greater than that of copper ion concentration. A model equation of CAT enzyme activity in the digestive gland of C. ariakensis toward the two factors of interest was established, with R 2, Adj. R 2 and Pred. R 2 values as high as 0.943 7, 0.887 3 and 0.838 5, respectively. These findings suggested that the goodness of fit to experimental data and predictive capability of the model were satisfactory, and could be practically applied for prediction under the conditions of the study. Overall, the results suggest that the simultaneous variation of temperature and copper ion concentration alters the activity of the antioxidant enzyme CAT by modulating active oxygen species metabolism, which may be utilized as a biomarker to detect the effects of copper pollution.

  18. Bioaccumulation of fullerene (C60) and corresponding catalase elevation in Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiafan; Wages, Mike; Yu, Shuangying; Maul, Jonathan D; Mayer, Greg; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Cobb, George P

    2014-05-01

    Fullerene (C(60)), with its unique physical properties and nanometer size, has been mass-produced for many applications in recent decades. The increased likelihood of direct release into the environment has raised interest in understanding both the environmental fate and corresponding biological effects of fullerenes to living organisms. Because few studies have emphasized fullerene uptake and resulting biochemical responses by living organisms, a toxicity screening test and a 28-d bioaccumulation test for Lumbriculus variegatus were performed. No mortality was observed in the range of 0.05 mg C(60) /kg dry sediment to 11.33 mg C(60) /kg dry sediment. A biota-sediment accumulation factor of micron-sized fullerene agglomerates (µ-C(60)) was 0.032 ± 0.008 at day 28, which is relatively low compared with pyrene (1.62 ± 0.22). Catalase (CAT) activity, an oxidative stress indicator, was elevated significantly on day 14 for L. variegatus exposed to µ-C(60) (p = 0.034). This peak CAT activity corresponded to the highest body residues observed in the present study, 199 ± 80 µg C(60) /kg dry weight sediment. Additionally, smaller C(60) agglomerate size increased bioaccumulation potential in L. variegatus. The relationship between C(60) body residue and the increased CAT activity followed a linear regression. All results suggest that C(60) has a lower bioaccumulation potential than pyrene but a higher potential to induce oxidative stress in L. variegatus. PMID:24477927

  19. Biophysical perspective of the binding of ester-functionalized gemini surfactants with catalase.

    PubMed

    Akram, Mohd; Bhat, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Anwar, Sana; Ahmad, Ajaz; Kabir-Ud-Din

    2016-07-01

    Interaction of surfactants with biomacromolecules is an essential subject of biophysical chemistry to address their diverse applications in industry, biomedical, and cosmetic domains. In this context, we have examined the binding interactions of three ester-functionalized surfactants (m-E2-m) with bovine liver catalase (BLC, 10μM) by employing a multi-technique approach. The m-E2-m geminis quench fluorescence intensity of BLC through static procedure. The binding ability of concerned gemini surfactants was found to be in the order 12-E2-12 (Kb=2.3×10(2))>16-E2-16 (Kb=1.1×10(2))>14-E2-14 (Kb=1.0×10(2)). Quenching efficacy, as determined by Ksv values, were observed as 12-E2-12 (3.0×10(2))>16-E2-16 (1.4×10(2))>14-E2-14 (1.0×10(2)). The negative ΔG°b values (12-E2-12 (-13.48kJ/mol)>16-E2-16 (-11.65kJ/mol)>14-E2-14 (-11.41kJ/mol)) indicate spontaneous nature of m-E2-m-BLC interactions. UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and micropolarity (F1/F3) assessments indicate conformational changes in BLC upon m-E2-m combination. ITC confirms the stability of BLC upon gemini combination. Docking provides support to fluorescence results by presenting the localization site of m-E2-m surfactants near to aromatic residues (mainly Tyr, Trp and Phe). Moreover, since surfactant-protein interactions have essential miscellaneous implications, therefore, this study can be significant for industrial and biomedical realms. PMID:27060016

  20. Manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase gene polymorphisms and clinical outcomes in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Kidir, Veysel; Uz, Efkan; Yigit, Ayse; Altuntas, Atila; Yigit, Barbaros; Inal, Salih; Uz, Ebru; Sezer, Mehmet Tugrul; Yilmaz, H Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential association of single gene polymorphisms of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and catalase (CAT) with clinical outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI). Materials and methods Ninety AKI patients and 101 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Determination of MnSOD rs4880, GPX1 rs1050450 and CAT rs769217 polymorphisms was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification. The duration of hospitalization of AKI patients, dialysis and intensive care requirements, sepsis, oliguria and in-hospital mortality rates were assessed. Results The MnSOD, GPX1 and CAT genotypes and allele frequencies of AKI patients did not differ significantly from those of healthy controls. In patients with a T allele in the ninth exon of the CAT gene, intensive care requirements were greater than those of patients with the CC genotype (p = 0.04). In addition, sepsis and in-hospital mortality were observed significantly more frequently in patients with a T allele in the ninth exon of the CAT gene (p = 0.03). Logistic regression analysis determined that bearing a T allele was the primary determinant of intensive care requirements and in-hospital mortality, independent of patient age, gender, presence of diabetes and dialysis requirements (OR 6.10, 95% CI 1.34-27.81, p = 0.02 and OR 10.25, 95% CI 1.13-92.80, p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion Among AKI patients in the Turkish population, hospital morbidity and mortality were found to be more frequent in patients bearing a T allele of the rs769217 polymorphism of the CAT gene. PMID:26787049

  1. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the heme environment in beef liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Lanir, A; Schejter, A

    1976-06-15

    The effect of high-spin heme iron in beef liver catalase on the longitudinal and transverse proton relaxation rates of the solvent has been used to probe the environment of the paramagnetic center. The longitudinal proton relaxation rates were measured as a function of temperature (5-31 degrees C), frequency (5-100 MHz), and pH. T1p was found to be pH independent in the range 6-11, indicating that no significant difference occurs in the heme surrounding within this pH range. The ligands formate and acetate, which preserve the spin state of the heme iron upon ligation, displace a water molecule from the sixth coordination position. This reaction is pH independent, while the binding measured by optical spectroscopy is pH dependent. The electron methanol and ethanol essentially do not change the proton relaxation rates. The temperature and frequency dependencies indicate that the relaxation times are governed by the electronic relaxation time of the high-spin ferric iron tau s. Tau s, which was found to be frequency independent, could not be determined from the T1p/T2p ratio, but only from the frequency dependence of the longitudinal relaxation rate at low frequencies. The results of the least-squares fit of the data to the theory indicate that there is one iron-bound rapidly exchanging water molecule. For the Fe3+ ion it was determined that tau s = 7 x 10(-11) s. PMID:945745

  2. Simultaneous and sequential co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and catalase onto florisil.

    PubMed

    Ozyilmaz, Gul; Tukel, S Seyhan

    2007-06-01

    The co-immobilization of Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase (GOD) with bovine liver catalase (CAT) onto florisil (magnesium silicate-based porous carrier) was investigated to improve the catalytic efficiency of GOD against H2O2 inactivation. The effect of the amount of bound CAT on the GOD activity was also studied for 12 different initial combinations of GOD and CAT, using simultaneous and sequential coupling. The sequentially co-immobilized GOD-CAT showed a higher efficiency than the simultaneously co-immobilized GOD-CAT in terms of the GOD activity and economic costs. The highest activity was shown by the sequentially co-immobilized GOD-CAT when the initial amounts of GOD and CAT were 10 mg and 5 mg per gram of carrier. The optimum pH, buffer concentration, and temperature for GOD activity for the same co-immobilized GOD-CAT sample were then determined as pH 6.5, 50 mM, and 30 degrees C, respectively. When compared with the individually immobilized GOD, the catalytic activity of the co-immobilized GOD-CAT was 70% higher, plus the reusability was more than two-fold. The storage stability of the co-immobilized GOD-CAT was also found to be higher than that of the free form at both 5 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The increased GOD activity and reusability resulting from the co-immobilization process may have been due to CAT protecting GOD from inactivation by H2O2 and supplying additional O2 to the reaction system. PMID:18050914

  3. Evaluation of a rapid method for measurement of catalase activity in cooked beef and sausage.

    PubMed

    Davis, C E; Cyrus, S

    1998-02-01

    Catalase (CAT) activity in ground beef and pork was determined on samples cooked from 60 to 71.1 degrees C. One-gram samples of ground round (4% fat), hamburger (24% fat), and commercial pork sausage (38%fat) were cooked in a controlled-temperature waterbath at 65, 68.3 and 71 degrees C. Chilled samples were immersed in direct contact with the cooking water; the test samples were removed every 15 s and immediately immersed in an ice-water bath (O to 1 degrees C) to quick-chill the samples to prevent temperature over-run. Samples retained high (HMB value 20+, over range) CAT activity through 90, 60, and 45 s at 65, 68.3, and 71 degrees C, respectively, before showing rapid activity decreases. Four USDA-FSIS approved meat patty heating processes (66.1 degrees C, 41 s; 67.2 degrees C, 26 s; 68.3 degrees C, 16 s; and 69.4 degrees C, 10 s) were analyzed for CAT activity in meat frozen prior to cooking was slightly lower (P < 0.05) than in degrees C meat. CAT activity decreased (P < 0.05) among meat treated at 66.1 degrees C for 41 s, at 67.2 degrees C for 26 s, and at 68.3 degrees C for 16 s, but the treatment at 68.3 degrees C for 16 s was not different (P < 0.05) from that at 69.4 degrees C for 10 s. These results show this rapid (20 to 25 min) CAT activity test could be used to establish activity values at specific end-point temperatures for model heat-processed ground beef or sausage products and may be useful to USDA FSIS process inspectors and food processors in quality assurance and HACCP (hazard analysis critical control points) programs for thermal input verification. PMID:9708292

  4. Effects of sodium nitroprusside on mouse erythrocyte catalase activity and malondialdehyde status.

    PubMed

    Sani, Mamane; Sebai, Hichem; Refinetti, Roberto; Mondal, Mohan; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha; Boughattas, Naceur A; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2016-07-01

    There is controversy about the anti- or pro-oxidative effects of the nitric oxide (NO)-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Hence, the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) and the status of malondialdehyde (MDA) were investigated after a 2.5 mg/kg dose of SNP had been i.p. administered to different and comparable groups of mice (n =  48). The drug was administered at two different circadian times (1 and 13 h after light onset [HALO]). There were, irrespectively of sampling time, no significant differences in the means of CAT activity and MDA status between control and SNP-treated groups, no matter the treatment time. However, CAT activity was significantly (Student's t-test, p < 0.001) increased 1 h following SNP administration at 1 HALO, whereas the significant (p < 0.001) increase in the enzyme activity was found only 3 h after injection at 13 HALO. The drug dosing either at 1 or 13 HALO resulted in no significant differences of MDA status between control and treated groups regardless to the sampling time. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) detected a significant (F0.05(7,88)= 5.3; p < 0.0006) interaction between sampling time and treatment in mice injected at 1 HALO, suggesting the influence of treatment on sampling-time-related changes in CAT activity. However, ANOVA validated no interaction between the two factors in mice treated at 13 HALO, illustrating that the sampling-time differences in enzyme activity were greater. Furthermore, two-way ANOVA revealed no interaction in the variation of MDA status in animals treated either at 1 or 13 HALO. This study indicates that SNP significantly affected the anti-oxidant system. PMID:26738972

  5. Two-dimensional HYSCORE spectroscopy of superoxidized manganese catalase: a model for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Coates, Christopher S; Milikisiyants, Sergey; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Whittaker, Mei M; Whittaker, James W; Lakshmi, K V

    2015-04-16

    The solar water-splitting protein complex, photosystem II (PSII), catalyzes one of the most energetically demanding reactions in Nature by using light energy to drive a catalyst capable of oxidizing water. The water oxidation reaction takes place at the tetra-nuclear manganese calcium-oxo (Mn4Ca-oxo) cluster at the heart of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII. Previous studies have determined the magnetic interactions between the paramagnetic Mn4Ca-oxo cluster and its environment in the S2 state of the OEC. The assignments for the electron-nuclear magnetic interactions that were observed in these studies were facilitated by the use of synthetic dimanganese di-?-oxo complexes. However, there is an immense need to understand the effects of the protein environment on the coordination geometry of the Mn4Ca-oxo cluster in the OEC of PSII. In the present study, we use a proteinaceous model system to examine the protein ligands that are coordinated to the dimanganese catalytic center of manganese catalase from Lactobacillus plantarum. We utilize two-dimensional hyperfine sublevel correlation (2D HYSCORE) spectroscopy to detect the weak magnetic interactions of the paramagnetic dinuclear manganese catalytic center of superoxidized manganese catalase with the nitrogen and proton atoms of the surrounding protein environment. We obtain a complete set of hyperfine interaction parameters for the protons of a water molecule that is directly coordinated to the dinuclear manganese center. We also obtain a complete set of hyperfine and quadrupolar interaction parameters for two histidine ligands as well as a coordinated azide ligand, in azide-treated superoxidized manganese catalase. On the basis of the values of the hyperfine interaction parameters of the dimanganese model, manganese catalase, and those of the S2 state of the OEC of PSII, for the first time, we discuss the impact of a proteinaceous environment on the coordination geometry of multinuclear manganese clusters. PMID:25731604

  6. Cj1386 is an ankyrin-containing protein involved in heme trafficking to catalase in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Flint, Annika; Sun, Yi-Qian; Stintzi, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a microaerophilic bacterium, is the most frequent cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni is exposed to harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during its own normal metabolic processes and during infection from the host immune system and from host intestinal microbiota. These ROS will damage DNA and proteins and cause peroxidation of lipids. Consequently, identifying ROS defense mechanisms is important for understanding how Campylobacter survives this environmental stress during infection. Construction of a ΔCj1386 isogenic deletion mutant and phenotypic assays led to its discovery as a novel oxidative stress defense gene. The ΔCj1386 mutant has an increased sensitivity toward hydrogen peroxide. The Cj1386 gene is located directly downstream from katA (catalase) in the C. jejuni genome. A ΔkatAΔ Cj1386 double deletion mutant was constructed and exhibited a sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide similar to that seen in the ΔCj1386 and ΔkatA single deletion mutants. This observation suggests that Cj1386 may be involved in the same detoxification pathway as catalase. Despite identical KatA abundances, catalase activity assays showed that the ΔCj1386 mutant had a reduced catalase activity relative to that of wild-type C. jejuni. Heme quantification of KatA protein from the ΔCj1386 mutant revealed a significant decrease in heme concentration. This indicates an important role for Cj1386 in heme trafficking to KatA within C. jejuni. Interestingly, the ΔCj1386 mutant had a reduced ability to colonize the ceca of chicks and was outcompeted by the wild-type strain for colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of neonate piglets. These results indicate an important role for Cj1386 in Campylobacter colonization and pathogenesis. PMID:22081390

  7. Catalase Expression Is Modulated by Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin and Influences the Formation of Free Radicals in Staphylococcus aureus Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hougaard, Anni B; Paulander, Wilhelm; Skibsted, Leif H; Ingmer, Hanne; Andersen, Mogens L

    2015-09-01

    Detection of free radicals in biological systems is challenging due to their short half-lives. We have applied electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy combined with spin traps using the probes PBN (N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone) and DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) to assess free radical formation in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus treated with a bactericidal antibiotic, vancomycin or ciprofloxacin. While we were unable to detect ESR signals in bacterial cells, hydroxyl radicals were observed in the supernatant of bacterial cell cultures. Surprisingly, the strongest signal was detected in broth medium without bacterial cells present and it was mitigated by iron chelation or by addition of catalase, which catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. This suggests that the signal originates from hydroxyl radicals formed by the Fenton reaction, in which iron is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide. Previously, hydroxyl radicals have been proposed to be generated within bacterial cells in response to bactericidal antibiotics. We found that when S. aureus was exposed to vancomycin or ciprofloxacin, hydroxyl radical formation in the broth was indeed increased compared to the level seen with untreated bacterial cells. However, S. aureus cells express catalase, and the antibiotic-mediated increase in hydroxyl radical formation was correlated with reduced katA expression and catalase activity in the presence of either antibiotic. Therefore, our results show that in S. aureus, bactericidal antibiotics modulate catalase expression, which in turn influences the formation of free radicals in the surrounding broth medium. If similar regulation is found in other bacterial species, it might explain why bactericidal antibiotics are perceived as inducing formation of free radicals. PMID:26150471

  8. Catalase Expression Is Modulated by Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin and Influences the Formation of Free Radicals in Staphylococcus aureus Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Hougaard, Anni B.; Paulander, Wilhelm; Skibsted, Leif H.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of free radicals in biological systems is challenging due to their short half-lives. We have applied electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy combined with spin traps using the probes PBN (N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone) and DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) to assess free radical formation in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus treated with a bactericidal antibiotic, vancomycin or ciprofloxacin. While we were unable to detect ESR signals in bacterial cells, hydroxyl radicals were observed in the supernatant of bacterial cell cultures. Surprisingly, the strongest signal was detected in broth medium without bacterial cells present and it was mitigated by iron chelation or by addition of catalase, which catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. This suggests that the signal originates from hydroxyl radicals formed by the Fenton reaction, in which iron is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide. Previously, hydroxyl radicals have been proposed to be generated within bacterial cells in response to bactericidal antibiotics. We found that when S. aureus was exposed to vancomycin or ciprofloxacin, hydroxyl radical formation in the broth was indeed increased compared to the level seen with untreated bacterial cells. However, S. aureus cells express catalase, and the antibiotic-mediated increase in hydroxyl radical formation was correlated with reduced katA expression and catalase activity in the presence of either antibiotic. Therefore, our results show that in S. aureus, bactericidal antibiotics modulate catalase expression, which in turn influences the formation of free radicals in the surrounding broth medium. If similar regulation is found in other bacterial species, it might explain why bactericidal antibiotics are perceived as inducing formation of free radicals. PMID:26150471

  9. Catalase expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells is mainly controlled by PI3K/Akt/mTor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Glorieux, Christophe; Auquier, Julien; Dejeans, Nicolas; Sid, Brice; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand, Luc; Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2014-05-15

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes mainly the transformation of hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. Although catalase is frequently down-regulated in tumors the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Few transcription factors have been reported to directly bind the human catalase promoter. Among them FoxO3a has been proposed as a positive regulator of catalase expression. Therefore, we decided to study the role of the transcription factor FoxO3a and the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway, which regulates FoxO3a, in the expression of catalase. To this end, we developed an experimental model of mammary breast MCF-7 cancer cells that acquire resistance to oxidative stress, the so-called Resox cells, in which catalase is overexpressed as compared with MCF-7 parental cell line. In Resox cells, Akt expression is decreased but its phosphorylation is enhanced when compared with MCF-7 cells. A similar profile is observed for FoxO3a, with less total protein but more phosphorylated FoxO3a in Resox cells, correlating with its higher Akt activity. The modulation of FoxO3a expression by knockdown and overexpression strategies did not affect catalase expression, neither in MCF-7 nor in Resox cells. Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR by LY295002 and rapamycin, respectively, decreases the phosphorylation of downstream targets (i.e. GSK3β and p70S6K) and leads to an increase of catalase expression only in MCF-7 but not in Resox cells. In conclusion, FoxO3a does not appear to play a critical role in the regulation of catalase expression in both cancer cells. Only MCF-7 cells are sensitive and dependent on PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling. PMID:24630930

  10. The Catalase –262C/T Promoter Polymorphism and Diabetic Complications in Caucasians with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Kátia Gonçalves; Canani, Luís Henrique; Gross, Jorge Luiz; Tschiedel, Balduíno; Souto, Kátia Elisabete Pires; Roisenberg, Israel

    2006-01-01

    Catalase is a central antioxidant enzyme constituting the primary defense against oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether the functional –262C/T polymorphism in the promoter of catalase gene is associated with the presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), diabetic nephropathy (DN) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) in 520 Caucasian-Brazilians with type 2 diabetes. The –262C/T polymorphism was also examined in 100 Caucasian blood donors. Patients underwent a clinical and laboratory evaluation consisting of a questionnaire, physical examination, assessment of diabetic complications and laboratory tests. Genotype analysis was performed using the polymerase chain reaction followed by digestion with restriction enzyme. The genotype and allele frequencies of the –262C/T polymorphism in patients with type 2 diabetes were very similar to those of blood donors (T allele frequency = 0.20 and 0.18, respectively). Likewise, there were no differences in either genotype or allele frequencies between type 2 diabetic patients with or without DR, DN or IHD. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis that the –262C/T polymorphism is related to the development of DR, DN or IHD in patients with type 2 diabetes. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the role of catalase gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. PMID:17264407

  11. Enhanced hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced anxiety in mice over-expressing human catalase in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Reid H J; Johnson, Lance A; Zuloaga, Damian G; Limoli, Charles L; Raber, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a modulatory role in synaptic plasticity and signaling pathways. Mitochondria (MT), a major source of ROS because of their involvement in energy metabolism, are important for brain function. MT-generated ROS are proposed to be responsible for a significant proportion of OS and are associated with developmental abnormalities and aspects of cellular aging. The role of ROS and MT function in cognition of healthy individuals is relatively understudied. In this study, we characterized behavioral and cognitive performance of 5- to 6-month-old mice over-expressing mitochondrial catalase (MCAT). MCAT mice showed enhancements in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory in the water maze and contextual fear conditioning, and reduced measures of anxiety in the elevated zero maze. Catalase activity was elevated in MCAT mice in all brain regions examined. Measures of oxidative stress (glutathione, protein carbonyl content, lipid peroxidation, and 8-hydroxyguanine) did not significantly differ between the groups. The lack of differences in these markers of oxidative stress suggests that the differences observed in this study may be due to altered redox signaling. Catalase over-expression might be sufficient to enhance cognition and reduce measures of anxiety even in the absence of alteration in levels of OS. PMID:23383735

  12. Retroviral-mediated correction of DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells is associated with recovery of catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Quilliet, X; Chevallier-Lagente, O; Zeng, L; Calvayrac, R; Mezzina, M; Sarasin, A; Vuillaume, M

    1997-12-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare inherited disease associated with photosensitivity, a very high susceptibility to develop neoplasm on sun-exposed skin and neurological abnormalities for some patients. We previously reported that diploid cell lines established from XP skin biopsies present an abnormal low level of catalase activity, which is involved in the defense against oxygen free radicals. This biochemical dysfunction, probably involved in the skin cancer formation, has been difficult to be directly related to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect in XP. In this paper we report that the retroviral-mediated transduction of XP diploid cells by the XPC and XPD/ERCC2 cDNAs fully and stably corrects the NER defect in terms of survival and unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The catalase activity in transduced cells was recovered up to normal levels only in cells transduced with repair genes correcting the repair defect. These results imply that: (i) the reduced catalase activity in XP, which might result from cellular depletion of its NADPH cofactor, is directly related to impaired DNA repair, and (ii) this depletion might be one of the multiple cellular consequences of XP inborn defect. PMID:9506892

  13. Immobilisation of catalase on the surface of biodegradable starch-based polymers as a way to change its surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Costa, S A; Reis, R L

    2004-04-01

    In this study, a specific enzyme catalase was immobilised onto the surface of two different biodegradable materials, starch cellulose acetate (SCA) and starch polycrapolactone (SPCL) blends. This immobilisation was achieved by several different routes, mainly by covalent binding and an adsorption method using as activation agents epichlorohydrin, cyanogen bromide (CNBr), and aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The effect of the coupling pH of the enzyme-support reaction was determined in terms of activity recovery (%). The catalase immobilised on SCA showed higher activity recovery (%) for all the methods used as compared with results obtained with SPCL. The immobilisation process using epichlorohydrin as an activation agent and polyethylenimine as a spacer-arm enhanced the stability and the half-lives at pH 7.0, 30 degrees C, for immobilised catalase on both SCA and SPCL. The half-lives were respectively, 1162 and 870 h compared with other treatments and free enzyme (480 h). The free glycerol present in the immobilisation medium was also a factor that contributed toward the better performance regarding the long-term stability at 30 degrees C and neutral pH. The extension of the morphological modifications on the surface of the materials was observed by scanning electron microscopy. In general, the results indicated that the chemical modification with epichlorohydrin could provide a simple and rather efficient technique to modify the starch-based materials' surface that might be useful in several biomedical applications. PMID:15332596

  14. Manganese L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of manganese catalase from Lactobacillus plantarum and mixed valence manganese complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, M.M.; Chen, J.; George, S.J.

    1996-01-10

    The first Mn L-edge absorption spectra of a Mn metalloprotein are presented in this paper. Both reduced and superoxidized Mn catalase have been examined by fluorescence-detected soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and their Mn L-edge spectra are dramatically different. The spectrum of reduced Mn(II)Mn(II) catalase has been interpreted by ligand field atomic multiplet calculations and by comparison to model compound spectra. The analysis finds a 10 Dq value of nearly 1.1 eV, consistent with coordination by predominately nitrogen and oxygen donor ligands. For interpretation of mixed valence Mn spectra, an empirical simulation procedure based on the addition of homovalent model compound spectra has been developed and was tested on a variety of Mn complexes and superoxidized Mn catalase. This routine was also used to determine the oxidation state composition of the Mn in [Ba{sub 8}Na{sub 2}ClMn{sub 16}(OH){sub 8}(CO{sub 3}){sub 4}L{sub 8}] .53 H{sub 2}O (L=1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropane-N,N,N`N`-tetraacetic acid). 27 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Semenogelin I expression in myeloma cells can be upregulated pharmacologically

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yana; Wang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Jian; Farmer, Benjamin; Lim, Seah H

    2008-01-01

    Semenogelin (SEMG) I is a Cancer-Testis (CT) antigen that we have found to be expressed in myeloma cells. In this study, we set out to determine whether the expression of SEMG I could be upregulated pharmacologically. We found that SEMG I expression in myeloma cells can be upregulated by 5-azacytidine, IL-4 and IL-6. The mechanisms of SEMG I gene upregulation by 5-azacytidine is unclear since there was no correlation between the methylation of the single CpG dinucleotide at position -11 and SEMG I expression. Both IL-4 and IL-6 appeared to enhance SEMG I expression through increasing its promoter function. PMID:18468680

  16. Androgen Receptor Upregulation Mediates Radioresistance after Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Spratt, Daniel E; Evans, Michael J; Davis, Brian J; Doran, Michael G; Lee, Man Xia; Shah, Neel; Wongvipat, John; Carnazza, Kathryn E; Klee, George G; Polkinghorn, William; Tindall, Donald J; Lewis, Jason S; Sawyers, Charles L

    2015-11-15

    Clinical trials have established the benefit of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) combined with radiotherapy in prostate cancer. ADT sensitizes prostate cancer to radiotherapy-induced death at least in part through inhibition of DNA repair machinery, but for unknown reasons, adjuvant ADT provides further survival benefits. Here, we show that androgen receptor (AR) expression and activity are durably upregulated following radiotherapy in multiple human prostate cancer models in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the degree of AR upregulation correlates with survival in vitro and time to tumor progression in animal models. We also provide evidence of AR pathway upregulation, measured by a rise in serum levels of AR-regulated hK2 protein, in nearly 20% of patients after radiotherapy. Furthermore, these men were three-fold more likely to experience subsequent biochemical failure. Collectively, these data demonstrate that radiotherapy can upregulate AR signaling after therapy to an extent that negatively affects disease progression and/or survival. PMID:26432404

  17. Circadian (about 24-hour) variation in malondialdehyde content and catalase activity of mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Mamane; Sebai, Hichem; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha; Boughattas, Naceur A; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a part of normal metabolism that may cause biological molecule damage leading to the formation of several specific metabolites that include aldehydes of variable chains, such as malondialdehyde (MDA). These biological effects are controlled in vivo by a wide spectrum of enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense mechanisms among which catalase (CAT) is considered as an important regulator of oxidative stress. The present study aimed to investigate the possible relationship between the temporal patterns of the formation of MDA and the activity of CAT in the erythrocytes of mice. Twenty-four-hour studies were performed on male Swiss albino mice, 12 weeks old, synchronized to a 12:12 light: dark cycle for 3 weeks. Different and comparable groups of animals (n = 10) were sacrificed at an interval of 4 hours (1, 5, 9, 13, 17, and 21 hours after light onset (HALO)). The levels of erythrocyte MDA concentration and CAT activity both significantly (analysis of variance: F = 6.4, P < 0.002) varied according to the time of sampling under non-stressed conditions. The characteristics of the waveform describing the temporal patterns differed between the two studied variables, e.g. MDA content showing one peak (≅21 HALO) and CAT activity showing three peaks (≅9, 17, and 21 HALO). Cosinor analysis revealed a significant (adjusted Cosinor: P ≤ 0.018) circadian (τ ≅ 24 hours) rhythm in MDA level and no statistically significant rhythmicity in CAT activity. The differences and the absence of correlation between the curve patterns of erythrocyte MDA content and CAT activity under physiological conditions are hypothesized to explain that variation in lipid peroxidation may depend on several factors. Moreover, the identification of peak/trough levels of MDA accumulation in erythrocytes may reflect the degree of oxidative stress in these blood cells. In addition, the observed significant time-of-day effect suggests that, in both clinical and scientific settings, appropriate comparison of MDA production and CAT activity levels can only be achieved on data obtained at the same time of day. PMID:25142617

  18. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel up-regulated secretory protein in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun A; Lee, Yangsoon; Jung, Dawoon E; Park, Kyung Hwa; Park, Jeong Youp; Gang, Jingu; Jeon, Sun Bok; Park, Eui Chul; Kim, Young-Gun; Lee, Bogman; Liu, Qing; Zeng, Wen; Yeramilli, Subramanyam; Lee, Soojin; Koh, Sang Seok; Song, Si Young

    2009-05-01

    The identification of novel tumor-specific proteins or antigens is of great importance for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in pancreatic cancer. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we identified a broad spectrum of differentially expressed pancreatic cancer-related genes. Of these, we selected an overexpressed expressed sequence taq and cloned a 721-bp full-length cDNA with an open reading frame of 196 amino acids. This novel gene was localized on the Homo sapiens 16p13.3 chromosomal locus, and its nucleotide sequence matched the Homo sapiens similar to common salivary protein 1 (LOC124220). We named the gene pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor. The pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor was secreted into the culture medium of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor-overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary cells, had an apparent molecular mass of approximately 25 kDa, and was N-glycosylated. The induction of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor in Chinese hamster ovary cells increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion ability in vitro. Subcutaneous injection of mice with Chinese hamster ovary/pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor cells resulted in 3.8-fold greater tumor sizes compared to Chinese hamster ovary/mock cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting with antirecombinant human pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor antibodies confirmed that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor was highly expressed in six of eight pancreatic cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical staining of human pancreatic cancer tissues also showed pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor overexpression in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Transfection with pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor-specific small-interfering RNA reduced cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro. Treatment with antirecombinant human pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor in vitro and in vivo reduced proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenic ability. Collectively, our results suggest that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor is a novel secretory protein involved in pancreatic cancer progression and might be a potential target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19302292

  19. In silico prediction and characterization of 3D structure and binding properties of catalase from the commercially important crab, Scylla serrata.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Kumar, Sunil; Farmer, Rohit; Tripathy, Niraj Kanti; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2011-06-01

    The enzyme catalase breaks down H(2)O(2), a potentially harmful oxidant, to H(2)O and O(2). Besides oxidase activity, the enzyme also exhibits peroxidase activity. Therefore, it plays an important role in maintaining health and regulating pathophysiology of the organisms. However, 3D structure of this important enzyme in invertebrates particularly in crabs is not yet available. Therefore, an attempt has been made to predict the structure of the crab catalase and to envisage its catalytic interaction with H(2)O(2). A three dimensional model of crab catalase was constructed using the NADPH binding site on Beef Liver catalase from Bos taurus (PDBID: 7CAT) as template by comparative modeling approach. Backbone conformation of the modeled structure by PROCHECK revealed that more than 98% of the residues fell in the allowed regions, ERRAT results confirmed good quality of modeled structure and VERIFY3D profile was satisfying. Molecular docking has been used to know the binding modes of hydrogen peroxide with the crab catalase protein. The receptor structures used for docking were derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of homology modeled structure. The docking results showed that the three important determinant residues Arg68, Val70 and Arg108 in catalase were binding with H(2)O(2) as they had strong hydrogen bonding contacts with the substrate. Our analysis provides insight into the structural properties of crab catalase and defines its active sites for binding with substrate. These data are important for further studies of catalase of invertebrates in general and that of crabs in particular. PMID:21541840

  20. A simple method for examination of polymorphisms of catalase exon 9: rs769217 in Hungarian microcytic anemia and beta-thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Teréz; Csordás, Melinda; Kósa, Zsuzsanna; Góth, László

    2012-09-15

    Catalase decreases the high, toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide but it lets the physiological, low concentrations in the cells mainly for signaling purposes. Its decreased activity may contribute to development of several pathological conditions. Catalase mutations occur frequently in exon 9, these were examined with different, complicated and costly methods. The aim of the current study was to evaluate a method for screening of polymorphisms in catalase exon 9. We used the slab gel electrophoresis of PCR amplicons without denaturation and silver staining for visualization of the DNA bands. We detected extra DNA bands in the 400-800 bp region of the catalase exon 9. Their single stranded nature was proved with nucleotide sequence analyses, comparison with the standard SSCP, staining with Sybr Green II and Sybr Green I, ethidium bromide, no digestion with RFLP (BstX I), and digestion with plant nuclease. We used this method for examination of polymorphisms of catalase exon 9 in microcytic anemia and beta-thalassemia patients. The lowest blood catalase activities were detected in microcytic anemia and beta-thalassemia patients with the TT genotypes of the C111T polymorphism. This method was sensitive for detection of G113A acatalasemia mutation, but poorly detected C37T and G5A acatalasemia mutations. PMID:22286031

  1. Two-dimensional crystallization of catalase on a monolayer film of poly(1-benzyl-L-histidine) spread at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Furuno, T; Toyoshima, C; Sasabe, H

    1993-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystals of beef liver catalase were prepared by adsorption to a film of synthetic polypeptide, poly(1-benzyl-L-histidine) (PBLH), spread at the air/water interface. The crystallization experiments were carried out in the pH range of 4.8-6.4 for catalase solutions at low concentration (10 micrograms/ml). The pH-dependence suggested an electrostatic interaction in the binding of catalase to the PBLH film. At lower pH, small crystals were formed at a low binding rate, and at higher pH the binding was rapid and densely-packed 2D arrays with poor crystallinity were formed. To stimulate crystal growth, a thermal treatment was applied. One-shot heating of the interfacial catalase-PBLH film to 35-40 degrees C was remarkably effective to form larger 2D crystals. The structure of catalase 2D crystals has been analyzed by Fourier filtering of the transmission electron micrographs. The crystal form is a new one, containing four catalase molecules in the unit cell with lattice parameters of alpha = 187 A, b = 225 A and gamma = 92.8 degrees. PMID:8448195

  2. Cytochrome P450-type Hydroxylation and Epoxidation in a Tyrosine-liganded Hemoprotein, Catalase-related Allene Oxide Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of hemoproteins to catalyze epoxidation or hydroxylation reactions is usually associated with a cysteine as the proximal ligand to the heme, as in cytochrome P450 or nitric oxide synthase. Catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from the coral Plexaura homomalla, like catalase itself, has tyrosine as the proximal heme ligand. Its natural reaction is to convert 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (8R-HPETE) to an allene epoxide, a reaction activated by the ferric heme, forming product via the FeIV–OH intermediate, Compound II. Here we oxidized cAOS to Compound I (FeV=O) using the oxygen donor iodosylbenzene and investigated the catalytic competence of the enzyme. 8R-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (8R-HETE), the hydroxy analog of the natural substrate, normally unreactive with cAOS, was thereby epoxidized stereospecifically on the 9,10 double bond to form 8R-hydroxy-9R,10R-trans-epoxy-eicosa-5Z,11Z,14Z-trienoic acid as the predominant product; the turnover was 1/s using 100 μm iodosylbenzene. The enantiomer, 8S-HETE, was epoxidized stereospecifically, although with less regiospecificity, and was hydroxylated on the 13- and 16-carbons. Arachidonic acid was converted to two major products, 8R-HETE and 8R,9S-eicosatrienoic acid (8R,9S-EET), plus other chiral monoepoxides and bis-allylic 10S-HETE. Linoleic acid was epoxidized, whereas stearic acid was not metabolized. We conclude that when cAOS is charged with an oxygen donor, it can act as a stereospecific monooxygenase. Our results indicate that in the tyrosine-liganded cAOS, a catalase-related hemoprotein in which a polyunsaturated fatty acid can enter the active site, the enzyme has the potential to mimic the activities of typical P450 epoxygenases and some capabilities of P450 hydroxylases. PMID:22628547

  3. Formation of a tyrosyl radical intermediate in Proteus mirabilis catalase by directed mutagenesis and consequences for nucleotide reactivity.

    PubMed

    Andreoletti, P; Gambarelli, S; Sainz, G; Stojanoff, V; White, C; Desfonds, G; Gagnon, J; Gaillard, J; Jouve, H M

    2001-11-13

    Proteus mirabilis catalase (PMC) belongs to the family of NADPH binding catalases. The function of NADPH in these enzymes is still a matter of debate. This study presents the effects of two independent phenylalanine mutations (F194 and F215), located between NADPH and heme in the PMC structure. The phenylalanines were replaced with tyrosines which we predicted could carry radicals in a NADPH-heme electron transfer. The X-ray crystal structures of the two mutants indicated that neither the binding site of NADPH nor the immediate environment of the residues was affected by the mutations. Measurements using H2O2 as a substrate confirmed that the variants were as active as the native enzyme. With equivalent amounts of peroxoacetic acid, wild-type PMC, F215Y PMC, and beef liver catalase (BLC) formed a stable compound I, while the F194Y PMC variant produced a compound I which was rapidly transformed into compound II and a tyrosyl radical. EPR studies showed that this radical, generated by the oxidation of Y194, was not related to the previously observed radical in BLC, located on Y369. In the presence of excess NADPH, compound I was reduced to a resting enzyme (k(obs) = 1.7 min(-1)) in a two-electron process. This was independent of the enzyme's origin and did not require any thus far identified tyrosyl radicals. Conversely, the presence of a tyrosyl radical in F194Y PMC greatly enhanced the oxidation of reduced beta-nicotinamide mononucleotide under a steady-state H2O2 flow with observable compound II. This process could involve a one-electron reduction of compound I via Y194. PMID:11695923

  4. Bacterioferritin A Modulates Catalase A (KatA) Activity and Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ju-Fang; Ochsner, Urs A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Nanayakkara, Vagira K.; Howell, Michael L.; Johnson, Zaiga; Posey, James E.; Vasil, Michael L.; Monaco, John J.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    We have cloned a 3.6-kb genomic DNA fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa harboring the rpoA, rplQ, katA, and bfrA genes. These loci are predicted to encode, respectively, (i) the ? subunit of RNA polymerase; (ii) the L17 ribosomal protein; (iii) the major catalase, KatA; and (iv) one of two iron storage proteins called bacterioferritin A (BfrA; cytochrome b1 or b557). Our goal was to determine the contributions of KatA and BfrA to the resistance of P. aeruginosa to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). When provided on a multicopy plasmid, the P. aeruginosa katA gene complemented a catalase-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. The katA gene was found to contain two translational start codons encoding a heteromultimer of ?160 to 170 kDa and having an apparent Km for H2O2 of 44.7 mM. Isogenic katA and bfrA mutants were hypersusceptible to H2O2, while a katA bfrA double mutant demonstrated the greatest sensitivity. The katA and katA bfrA mutants possessed no detectable catalase activity. Interestingly, a bfrA mutant expressed only ?47% the KatA activity of wild-type organisms, despite possessing wild-type katA transcription and translation. Plasmids harboring bfrA genes encoding BfrA altered at critical amino acids essential for ferroxidase activity could not restore wild-type catalase activity in the bfrA mutant. RNase protection assays revealed that katA and bfrA are on different transcripts, the levels of which are increased by both iron and H2O2. Mass spectrometry analysis of whole cells revealed no significant difference in total cellular iron levels in the bfrA, katA, and katA bfrA mutants relative to wild-type bacteria. Our results suggest that P. aeruginosa BfrA may be required as one source of iron for the heme prosthetic group of KatA and thus for protection against H2O2. PMID:10368148

  5. Antioxidant pathways are up-regulated during biological nitrogen fixation to prevent ROS-induced nitrogenase inhibition in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Nogueira, Eduardo M.; Guedes, Helma V.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Câmara, Fernando; Baldani, Jose I.; Martins, Orlando B.

    2010-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, an endophyte isolated from sugarcane, is a strict aerobe that fixates N2. This process is catalyzed by nitrogenase and requires copious amounts of ATP. Nitrogenase activity is extremely sensitive to inhibition by oxygen and reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the elevated oxidative metabolic rates required to sustain biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) may favor an increased production of ROS. Here, we explored this paradox and observed that ROS levels are, in fact, decreased in nitrogen-fixing cells due to the up-regulation of transcript levels of six ROS-detoxifying genes. A cluster analyses based on common expression patterns revealed the existence of a stable cluster with 99.8% similarity made up of the genes encoding the α-subunit of nitrogenase Mo–Fe protein (nifD), superoxide dismutase (sodA) and catalase type E (katE). Finally, nitrogenase activity was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by paraquat, a redox cycler that increases cellular ROS levels. Our data revealed that ROS can strongly inhibit nitrogenase activity, and G. diazotrophicus alters its redox metabolism during BNF by increasing antioxidant transcript levels resulting in a lower ROS generation. We suggest that careful controlled ROS production during this critical phase is an adaptive mechanism to allow nitrogen fixation. PMID:20697694

  6. Egg yolk peptides up-regulate glutathione synthesis and antioxidant enzyme activities in a porcine model of intestinal oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Young, Denise; Fan, Ming Z; Mine, Yoshinori

    2010-07-14

    Long-term oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal tract can lead to the development of chronic intestinal disorders. Many food-derived antioxidants are effective in vitro, but the variable reports of in vivo efficacy and the pro-oxidant nature of some antioxidants necessitate alternative strategies for the reduction of in vivo oxidative stress. Compounds that up-regulate the production of endogenous antioxidants such as glutathione (GSH) and antioxidant enzymes provide novel approaches for the restoration of redox homeostatis. Egg yolk peptides (EYP) prepared from Alcalase and protease N digestion of delipidated egg yolk proteins were found to exhibit antioxidative stress properties. The effect of EYP supplementation was examined in a hydrogen peroxide-induced human colon cell line and in an animal model of intestinal oxidative stress. EYP significantly reduced the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-8, in Caco-2 cells. In piglets given intraperitoneal infusions of hydrogen peroxide, EYP treatment increased GSH and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase mRNA expression and activity, significantly increased antioxidant enzyme activities, in particular catalase and glutathione S-transferase activities, and reduced protein and lipid oxidation in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon. Furthermore, EYP boosted the systemic antioxidant status in blood by increasing the GSH concentration in red blood cells. These results suggest that EYP supplementation is a novel strategy for the reduction of intestinal oxidative stress. PMID:20540508

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 upregulated by Ginkgo biloba extract: potential protection against ethanol-induced oxidative liver damage.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ping; Li, Ke; Song, Fangfang; Zhou, Shaoliang; Sun, Xiufa; Zhang, Xiping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Liu, Liegang

    2007-08-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and HO-1 induction is suggested to protect hepatocytes from ethanol hepatotoxicity. Here, we present the data to explore the hepatoprotective effect and underlying mechanism(s) of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGB), a naturally occurring HO-1 inducer, against ethanol-induced oxidative damage. Ethanol-fed (2.4 g/kg) male rats were pretreated by EGB (48 or 96 mg/kg) for 90 days. Liver damage was evaluated by histopathology and serum aminotransferase assay. Hepatic redox parameters were measured by spectrophotometry. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression was determined by RT-PCR and flow cytometry on mRNA and protein level, respectively. Our results showed that EGB, especially at high dose, ameliorated ethanol-induced macrovesicular steatosis and parenchymatous degeneration in hepatocytes, and decreased serum aminotransferases level. Furthermore, EGB reduced ethanol-derived glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation, and inhibited the inactivation of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase, although EGB itself had no influence on such parameters. Importantly, EGB induced hepatic microsomal HO-1 on mRNA, protein expression and enzymatic activity, which is paralleled to the EGB-derived hepatoprotective effect. Hence, HO-1 upregulation by EGB may enhance the antioxidative capacity against the ethanol-induced oxidative stress and maintain the cellular redox balance. PMID:17467134

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits the invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through upregulation of cytokeratin-1.

    PubMed

    Blanckaert, Vincent; Kerviel, Vincent; Lépinay, Alexandra; Joubert-Durigneux, Vanessa; Hondermarck, Hubert; Chénais, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), the main member of the omega-3 essential fatty acid family, has been shown to reduce the invasion of the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but the mechanism involved remains unclear. In the present study, a proteomic approach was used to define changes in protein expression induced by DHA. Proteins from crude membrane preparations of MDA-MB-231 cells treated with 100 µM DHA were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and differentially expressed proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The main changes observed were the upregulation of Keratin, type Ⅱ cytoskeletal 1 (KRT1), catalase and lamin-A/C. Immunocytochemistry analyses confirmed the increase in KRT1 induced by DHA. Furthermore, in vitro invasion assays showed that siRNA against KRT1 was able to reverse the DHA-induced inhibition of breast cancer cell invasion. In conclusion, KRT1 is involved in the anti-invasive activity of DHA in breast cancer cells. PMID:25825023

  9. Molecular mechanism of detectable catalase-containing particles, peroxisomes, in fibroblasts from a PEX2-defective patient.

    PubMed

    Shimozawa, N; Zhang, Z; Imamura, A; Suzuki, Y; Fujiki, Y; Tsukamoto, T; Osumi, T; Aubourg, P; Wanders, R J; Kondo, N

    2000-02-01

    Patients with peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) can be identified by detection of peroxisomes in their fibroblasts, by means of immunocytochemical staining using an anti-catalase antibody. We report here data on three PBD patients with newly identified mutations (del550C and del642G) in the PEX2 gene which encodes a 35-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein containing two membrane-spanning and a C-terminal cysteine-rich region. Some of the fibroblasts from the patient with the del642G mutation contained numerous catalase-containing particles, whereas no fibroblasts containing such particles were found in the patient with the del550C mutation. We confirmed that the del642G mutation caused a partial defect in peroxisome synthesis and import by expression of the mutated PEX2 into PEX2-defective CHO mutant cells. We propose that the two putative membrane-spanning segments in Pex2p are important domains for peroxisome assembly and import and that a defect in one of these domains severely affects PBD patients. Furthermore, a defect in the C-terminal portion of Pex2p exposed to the cytosol containing a RING finger motif caused the mild phenotype, residual enzyme activities, and mosaic detectable peroxisomes in fibroblasts from the patient. PMID:10652207

  10. Purification and Characterization of an Iron Superoxide Dismutase and a Catalase from the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Wagner G.; Pacheco, Isabel; Liu, Ming-Yih; Teixeira, Miguel; Xavier, António V.; LeGall, Jean

    2000-01-01

    The iron-containing superoxide dismutase (FeSOD; EC 1.15.1.1) and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) enzymes constitutively expressed by the strictly anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio gigas were purified and characterized. The FeSOD, isolated as a homodimer of 22-kDa subunits, has a specific activity of 1,900 U/mg and exhibits an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum characteristic of high-spin ferric iron in a rhombically distorted ligand field. Like other FeSODs from different organisms, D. gigas FeSOD is sensitive to H2O2 and azide but not to cyanide. The N-terminal amino acid sequence shows a high degree of homology with other SODs from different sources. On the other hand, D. gigas catalase has an estimated molecular mass of 186 ± 8 kDa, consisting of three subunits of 61 kDa, and shows no peroxidase activity. This enzyme is very sensitive to H2O2 and cyanide and only slightly sensitive to sulfide. The native enzyme contains one heme per molecule and exhibits a characteristic high-spin ferric-heme EPR spectrum (gy,x = 6.4, 5.4); it has a specific activity of 4,200 U/mg, which is unusually low for this class of enzyme. The importance of these two enzymes in the context of oxygen utilization by this anaerobic organism is discussed. PMID:10633116

  11. The effect of some factors of polluted environment on catalase responses and resistance of microbial isolates against toxic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Polek, Bystrík; Godočíková, Jana

    2012-10-01

    The properties of bacterial isolates from polluted environments which are characterized by increased levels of oxidative stress do not reflect only the level of contaminants, but also arise as a consequence of many permanently changed conditions. The survival rate of Comamonas terrigena N3H isolates from an environment with elevated levels of H(2)O(2) is correlated with stimulation of catalase. The response of bacterial catalase to the effect of phenol in exogenous conditions was affected by the presence of an additional contaminant, Cd(2+). An isolate of Aspergillus niger selected from river sediment containing 363 mg/kg As, 93 mg/kg Sb at pH 5.2-4.8 grew on Czapek-Dox agar ~1.6 times faster than an isolate of the same species from coal dust sediment with approximately the same level of pollution (400 mg/kg As) but somewhat lower pH (3.3-2.8). It also exhibited differences in the microscopic characteristics of its mycelial structures. Both isolates exhibited a higher tolerance to the exogenic toxic effects of metals (As(5+), Cd(2+), and Cu(2+) at 5, 25, or 50 mg/L) than a control culture, but the differences in tolerance between them were only slight. These laboratory results suggest that there are complicated relationships which may exist in the "in situ" environment. PMID:22706798

  12. Effect of compatible and noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Sepasi Tehrani, H; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ghourchian, H; Ahmad, F; Kiany, A; Atri, M S; Ariaeenejad, Sh; Kavousi, K; Saboury, A A

    2013-12-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the disproportionation of H2O2 into harmless water and molecular oxygen. Due to various applications of the enzyme in different sectors of industry as well as medicine, the enhancement of stability of the enzyme is important. Effect of various classes of compatible as well as noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity, disaggregation, and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase have been investigated. Compatible osmolytes, proline, xylitol, and valine destabilize the denatured form of the enzyme and, therefore, increase its disaggregation and thermal stability. The increase in the thermal stability is accompanied with a slight increase of activity in comparison to the native enzyme at 25 °C. On the other hand, histidine, a noncompatible osmolyte stabilizes the denatured form of the protein and hence causes an overall decrease in the thermal stability and enzymatic activity of the enzyme. Chemometric results have confirmed the experimental results and have provided insight into the distribution and number of mole fraction components for the intermediates. The increase in melting temperature (Tm) and enzymatic rate could be further amplified by the intrinsic effect of temperature enhancement on the enzymatic activity for the industrial purposes. PMID:23249140

  13. A genetic approach to study H2O2 scavenging in fission yeast--distinct roles of peroxiredoxin and catalase.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Esther; García-Santamarina, Sarela; Calvo, Isabel A; Carmona, Mercè; Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-04-01

    The main peroxiredoxin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Tpx1, is important to sustain aerobic growth, and cells lacking this protein are only able to grow on solid plates under anaerobic conditions. We have found that deletion of the gene coding for thioredoxin reductase, trr1, is a suppressor of the sensitivity to aerobic growth of Δtpx1 cells, so that cells lacking both proteins are able to grow on solid plates in the presence of oxygen. We have investigated this suppression effect, and determined that it depends on the presence of catalase, which is constitutively expressed in Δtrr1 cells in a transcription factor Pap1-dependent manner. A complete characterization of the repertoire of hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities in fission yeast suggests that Tpx1 is the only enzyme with sufficient sensitivity for peroxides and cellular abundance as to control the low levels produced during aerobic growth, catalase being the next barrier of detoxification when the steady-state levels of peroxides are increased in Δtpx1 cells. Gpx1, the only glutathione peroxidase encoded by the S. pombe genome, only has a minor secondary role when extracellular peroxides are added. Our study proposes non-overlapping roles for the different hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities of this eukaryotic organism. PMID:24521463

  14. Specific binding and inhibition of 6-benzylaminopurine to catalase: multiple spectroscopic methods combined with molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Lu, Yanni; Jing, Longyun; Cai, Lijuan; Zhu, Xinfeng; Xie, Ju; Hu, Xiaoya

    2014-04-01

    6-Benzylaminopurine (6-BA) is a kind of cytokinin which could regulate the activities of the antioxidant defense system of plants. In this work, its interaction with and inhibition of beef liver catalase have been systematically investigated using spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetric and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching of beef liver catalase (BLC) by 6-BA is due to the formation of 6-BA-BLC complex. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions play major roles in stabilizing the complex. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant, binding constant, the corresponding thermodynamic parameters and binding numbers were measured. The results of UV-vis absorption, three-dimensional fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results demonstrate that the binding of 6-BA results in the micro-environment change around tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) residues of BLC. The BLC-mediated conversion of H2O2 to H2O and O2, in the presence and absence of 6-BA, was also studied. Lineweaver-Burk plot indicates a noncompetitive type of inhibition. Molecular docking study was used to find the binding sites. PMID:24412785

  15. Rapid activation of catalase followed by citrate efflux effectively improves aluminum tolerance in the roots of chick pea (Cicer arietinum).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manorma; Sharma, Vinay; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath

    2016-05-01

    The present study demonstrates the comparative response of two contrasting genotypes (aluminum (Al) tolerant and Al sensitive) of chick pea (Cicer arietinum) against Al stress. The Al-tolerant genotype (RSG 974) showed lesser inhibition of root growth as well as lower oxidative damages, measured in terms of the accumulation of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation compared to the Al-sensitive genotype (RSG 945). The accumulation of Al by roots of both genotypes was almost equal at 96 and 144 h after Al treatment; however, it was higher in Al-tolerant than Al-sensitive genotype at 48 h after Al treatment. Further, the Al-mediated induction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly higher in Al-tolerant than Al-sensitive genotype. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was almost similar in both genotypes. Al treatment promptly activated catalase activity in Al-tolerant genotype, and it was remarkably higher than that of Al-sensitive genotype. As another important Al detoxification mechanism, citrate efflux was almost equal in both genotypes except at 1000 μM Al treatment for 96 and 144 h. Further, citrate carrier and anion channel inhibitor experiment confirmed the contribution of citrate efflux in conferring Al tolerance in Al-tolerant genotype. Based on the available data, the present study concludes that rapid activation of catalase (also SOD) activity followed by citrate efflux effectively improves Al tolerance in chick pea. PMID:26615604

  16. Selective peracetic acid determination in the presence of hydrogen peroxide using a label free enzymatic method based on catalase.

    PubMed

    Galbán, Javier; Sanz, Vanesa; de Marcos, Susana

    2010-11-01

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is selectively determined in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by using the self-indicating UV-Vis molecular absorption properties of catalase. The PAA reacts with the protein giving an intermediate (Cat-I) which is reduced back by the amino acid core surrounding the heme group. Since the original form of the enzyme and the Cat-I have different UV-Vis absorption properties, the absorbance changes can be used for PAA determination. The H(2)O(2)/catalase reaction is extremely fast so that neither Cat-I compound nor kinetic interferences are observed. The method permits PAA determination in the 5 × 10(-7) to 1.5 × 10(-5) M range, the reproducibility being between 1% and 10%. Using this method, PAA has been successfully determined in water samples treated with commercial PAA/H(2)O(2) biocides. A theoretical study has also been carried out for obtaining a mathematical model able to analytically describe the process. PMID:20824427

  17. Upregulation of NAD(P)H oxidase 1 in hypoxia activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 via increase in reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Parag; Weissmann, Norbert; Grimminger, Friedrich; Hegel, Cornelia; Bader, Lucius; Rose, Frank; Fink, Ludger; Ghofrani, Hossein A; Schermuly, Ralph T; Schmidt, Harald H H W; Seeger, Werner; Hänze, Jörg

    2004-05-15

    Hypoxia sensing and related signaling events, including activation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), represent key features in cell physiology and lung function. Using cultured A549 cells, we investigated the role of NAD(P)H oxidase 1 (Nox1), suggested to be a subunit of a low-output NAD(P)H oxidase complex, in hypoxia signaling. Nox1 expression was detected on both the mRNA and protein levels. Upregulation of Nox1 mRNA and protein occurred during hypoxia, accompanied by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. A549 cells, which were transfected with a Nox1 expression vector, revealed an increase in ROS generation accompanied by activation of HIF-1-dependent target gene expression (heme oxygenase 1 mRNA, hypoxia-responsive-element reporter gene activity). In A549 cells stably overexpressing Nox1, accumulation of HIF-1alpha in normoxia and an additional increase in hypoxia were noted. Interference with ROS metabolism by the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and catalase inhibited HIF-1 induction. This suggests that H2O2 links Nox1 and HIF-1 activation. We conclude that hypoxic upregulation of Nox1 and subsequently augmented ROS generation may activate HIF-1-dependent pathways. PMID:15110393

  18. Lactate Up-Regulates the Expression of Lactate Oxidation Complex-Related Genes in Left Ventricular Cardiac Tissue of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; da Cunha, Telma Fatima; Bechara, Luiz Roberto Grassmann; Fortunato, Rodrigo Soares; Bozi, Luiz Henrique Marchesi; Coelho, Marcele de Almeida; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza; Brum, Patricia Chakur

    2015-01-01

    Background Besides its role as a fuel source in intermediary metabolism, lactate has been considered a signaling molecule modulating lactate-sensitive genes involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Even though the flux of lactate is significantly high in the heart, its role on regulation of cardiac genes regulating lactate oxidation has not been clarified yet. We tested the hypothesis that lactate would increase cardiac levels of reactive oxygen species and up-regulate the expression of genes related to lactate oxidation complex. Methods/Principal Findings Isolated hearts from male adult Wistar rats were perfused with control, lactate or acetate (20mM) added Krebs-Henseleit solution during 120 min in modified Langendorff apparatus. Reactive oxygen species (O2●-/H2O2) levels, and NADH and NADPH oxidase activities (in enriched microsomal or plasmatic membranes, respectively) were evaluated by fluorimetry while SOD and catalase activities were evaluated by spectrophotometry. mRNA levels of lactate oxidation complex and energetic enzymes MCT1, MCT4, HK, LDH, PDH, CS, PGC1α and COXIV were quantified by real time RT-PCR. Mitochondrial DNA levels were also evaluated. Hemodynamic parameters were acquired during the experiment. The key findings of this work were that lactate elevated cardiac NADH oxidase activity but not NADPH activity. This response was associated with increased cardiac O2●-/H2O2 levels and up-regulation of MCT1, MCT4, LDH and PGC1α with no changes in HK, PDH, CS, COXIV mRNA levels and mitochondrial DNA levels. Lactate increased NRF-2 nuclear expression and SOD activity probably as counter-regulatory responses to increased O2●-/H2O2. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for lactate-induced up-regulation of lactate oxidation complex associated with increased NADH oxidase activity and cardiac O2●-/H2O2 driving to an anti-oxidant response. These results unveil lactate as an important signaling molecule regulating components of the lactate oxidation complex in cardiac muscle. PMID:25996919

  19. Covalent immobilization of catalase onto spacer-arm attached modified florisil: characterization and application to batch and plug-flow type reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, Ozlem; Tükel, S Seyhan; Yildirim, Deniz; Alagöz, Dilek

    2011-12-10

    Catalase was covalently immobilized onto florisil via glutaraldehyde (GA) and glutaraldehyde+6-amino hexanoic acid (6-AHA) (as a spacer arm). Immobilizations of catalase onto modified supports were optimized to improve the efficiency of the overall immobilization procedures. The V(max) values of catalase immobilized via glutaraldehyde (CIG) and catalase immobilized via glutaraldehyde+6-amino hexanoic acid (CIG-6-AHA) were about 0.6 and 3.4% of free catalase, respectively. The usage of 6-AHA as a spacer arm caused about 40 folds increase in catalytic efficiency of CIG-6-AHA (8.3 × 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹) as compared to that of CIG (2.1 × 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹). CIG and CIG-6-AHA retained 67 and 35% of their initial activities at 5 °C and 71 and 18% of their initial activities, respectively at room temperature at the end of 6 days. Operational stabilities of CIG and CIG-6-AHA were investigated in batch and plug-flow type reactors. The highest total amount of decomposed hydrogen peroxide (TAD-H₂O₂) was determined as 219.5 μmol for CIG-6-AHA in plug-flow type reactor. PMID:22142730

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 is Upregulated in Copper-Deficient Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copper deficiency inactivates Cu/Zn-SOD and promotes accumulation of reactive oxygen species. This process likely impairs nitric oxide (NO)-mediated relaxation as well as triggers vascular inflammation. The current study was designed to determine whether COX-2 expression and activity are upregulated...

  1. Nutraceutical up-regulation of serotonin paradoxically induces compulsive behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of diet in either the etiology or treatment of complex mental disorder is highly controversial in psychiatry. However, physiological mechanisms by which diet can influence brain chemistry – particularly that of serotonin – are well established. Here we show that dietary up-regulation of br...

  2. Upregulation of Interleukin-33 in obstructive renal injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Chang, Ya-Jen; Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Tzu-Hsien; Chen, Shang-Der; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Yang, Jenq-Lin

    2016-05-13

    Interstitial fibrosis and loss of parenchymal tubular cells are the common outcomes of progressive renal diseases. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have been known contributing to the damage of tubular cells and fibrosis responses after renal injury. Interleukin (IL)-33 is a tissue-derived nucleus alarmin that drives inflammatory responses. The regulation and function of IL-33 in renal injury, however, is not well understood. To investigate the involvement of cytokines in the pathogenesis of renal injury and fibrosis, we performed the mouse renal injury model induced by unilateral urinary obstruction (UUO) and analyze the differentially upregulated genes between the obstructed and the contralateral unobstructed kidneys using RNA sequencing (RNAseq). Our RNAseq data identified IL33 and its receptor ST2 were upregulated in the UUO kidney. Quantitative analysis confirmed that transcripts of IL33 and ST2 were upregulated in the obstructed kidneys. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that IL-33 was upregulated in Vimentin- and alpha-SMA-positive interstitial cells. By using genetically knockout mice, deletion of IL33 reduced UUO-induced renal fibrosis. Moreover, in combination with BrdU labeling technique, we observed that the numbers of proliferating tubular epithelial cells were increased in the UUO kidneys from IL33-or ST2-deficient mice compared to wild type mice. Collectively, our study demonstrated the upregulation of IL-33/ST2 signaling in the obstructed kidney may promote tubular cell injury and interstitial fibrosis. IL-33 may serve as a biomarker to detect renal injury and that IL-33/ST2 signaling may represent a novel target for treating renal diseases. PMID:27067050

  3. Coordination modes of tyrosinate-ligated catalase-type heme enzymes: magnetic circular dichroism studies of Plexaura homomalla allene oxide synthase, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein-2744c, and bovine liver catalase in their ferric and ferrous states.

    PubMed

    Bandara, D M Indika; Sono, Masanori; Bruce, Grant S; Brash, Alan R; Dawson, John H

    2011-12-01

    Bovine liver catalase (BLC), catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from Plexaura homomalla, and a recently isolated protein from the cattle pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-2744c (MAP)) are all tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes whose crystal structures have been reported. cAOS and MAP have low (<20%) sequence similarity to, and significantly different catalytic functions from, BLC. cAOS transforms 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid to an allene epoxide, whereas the MAP protein is a putative organic peroxide-dependent peroxidase. To elucidate factors influencing the functions of these and related heme proteins, we have investigated the heme iron coordination properties of these tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes in their ferric and ferrous states using magnetic circular dichroism and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The MAP protein shows remarkable spectral similarities to cAOS and BLC in its native Fe(III) state, but clear differences from ferric proximal heme ligand His93Tyr Mb (myoglobin) mutant, which may be attributed to the presence of an Arg(+)-N(ω)-H···¯O-Tyr (proximal heme axial ligand) hydrogen bond in the first three heme proteins. Furthermore, the spectra of Fe(III)-CN¯, Fe(III)-NO, Fe(II)-NO (except for five-coordinate MAP), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-O(2) states of cAOS and MAP, but not H93Y Mb, are also similar to the corresponding six-coordinate complexes of BLC, suggesting that a tyrosinate (Tyr-O¯) is the heme axial ligand trans to the bound ligands in these complexes. The Arg(+)-N(ω)-H to ¯O-Tyr hydrogen bond would be expected to modulate the donor properties of the proximal tyrosinate oxyanion and, combined with the subtle differences in the catalytic site structures, affect the activities of cAOS, MAP and BLC. PMID:22104301

  4. Piper betle shows antioxidant activities, inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation and increases activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the focus on finding chemotherapeutic agents have recently shifted to natural products. Piper betle is a medicinal plant with various biological activities. However, not much data is available on the anti-cancer effects of P. betle on breast cancer. Due to the current interest in the potential effects of antioxidants from natural products in breast cancer treatment, we investigated the antioxidant activities of the leaves of P. betle and its inhibitory effect on the proliferation of the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Methods The leaves of P. betle were extracted with solvents of varying polarities (water, methanol, ethyl acetate and hexane) and their phenolic and flavonoid content were determined using colorimetric assays. Phenolic composition was characterized using HPLC. Antioxidant activities were measured using FRAP, DPPH, superoxide anion, nitric oxide and hyroxyl radical scavenging assays. Biological activities of the extracts were analysed using MTT assay and antioxidant enzyme (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) assays in MCF-7 cells. Results Overall, the ethyl acetate extract showed the highest ferric reducing activity and radical scavenging activities against DPPH, superoxide anion and nitric oxide radicals. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolics towards the antioxidant activities. HPLC analyses revealed the presence of catechin, morin and quercetin in the leaves. The ethyl acetate extract also showed the highest inhibitory effect against the proliferation of MCF-7 cells (IC50=65 μg/ml). Treatment of MCF-7 cells with the plant extract increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase. Conclusions Ethyl acetate is the optimal solvent for the extraction of compounds with antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. The increased activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the treated cells could alter the antioxidant defense system, potentially contributing towards the anti-proliferative effect. There is great potential for the ethyl acetate extract of P. betle leaf as a source of natural antioxidants and to be developed as therapeutics in cancer treatment. PMID:23153283

  5. Spectroscopic and kinetic investigation of the reactions of peroxyacetic acid with Burkholderia pseudomallei catalase-peroxidase, KatG.

    PubMed

    Ivancich, Anabella; Donald, Lynda J; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Wiseman, Ben; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C

    2013-10-15

    Catalase-peroxidases or KatGs can utilize organic peroxyacids and peroxides instead of hydrogen peroxide to generate the high-valent ferryl-oxo intermediates involved in the catalase and peroxidase reactions. In the absence of peroxidatic one-electron donors, the ferryl intermediates generated with a low excess (10-fold) of peroxyacetic acid (PAA) slowly decay to the ferric resting state after several minutes, a reaction that is demonstrated in this work by both stopped-flow UV-vis absorption measurements and EPR spectroscopic characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei KatG (BpKatG). EPR spectroscopy showed that the [Fe(IV)═O Trp330(•+)], [Fe(IV)═O Trp139(•)], and [Fe(IV)═O Trp153(•)] intermediates of the peroxidase-like cycle of BpKatG ( Colin, J. Wiseman, B. Switala, J. Loewen, P. C. Ivancich, A. ( 2009 ) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131 , 8557 - 8563 ), formed with a low excess of PAA at low temperature, are also generated with a high excess (1000-fold) of PAA at room temperature. However, under high excess conditions, there is a rapid conversion to a persistent [Fe(IV)═O] intermediate. Analysis of tryptic peptides of BpKatG by mass spectrometry before and after treatment with PAA showed that specific tryptophan (including W330, W139, and W153), methionine (including Met264 of the M-Y-W adduct), and cysteine residues are either modified with one, two, or three oxygen atoms or could not be identified in the spectrum because of other undetermined modifications. It was concluded that these oxidized residues were the source of electrons used to reduce the excess of PAA to acetic acid and return the enzyme to the ferric state. Treatment of BpKatG with PAA also caused a loss of catalase activity towards certain substrates, consistent with oxidative disruption of the M-Y-W adduct, and a loss of peroxidase activity, consistent with accumulation of the [Fe(IV)═O] intermediate and the oxidative modification of the W330, W139, and W153. PAA, but not H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide, also caused subunit cross-linking. PMID:24044787

  6. Three-phase partitioning as a rapid and easy method for the purification and recovery of catalase from sweet potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed

    Duman, Yonca Avcı; Kaya, Erdem

    2013-07-01

    Three-phase partitioning (TPP) was used to purify and recover catalase from potato crude extract. The method consists of ammonium sulfate saturation, t-butanol addition, and adjustment of pH, respectively. The best catalase recovery (262 %) and 14.1-fold purification were seen in the interfacial phase in the presence of 40 % (w/v) ammonium sulfate saturation with 1.0:1.0 crude extract/t-butanol ratio (v/v) at pH 7 in a single step. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the enzyme showed comparatively purification and protein molecular weight was nearly found to be 56 kDa. This study shows that TPP is a simple, economical, and quick method for the recovering of catalase and can be used for the purification process. PMID:23640263

  7. Effects of the kinematic viscosity and surface tension on the bubble take-off period in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Satoshi; Iida, Yoshinori

    2009-06-01

    The effect of kinematic viscosity and surface tension of the solution was investigated by adding catalase, glucose oxidase, or glucose on the bubble movement in a catalase-hydrogen peroxide system. The kinematic viscosity was measured using a Cannon-Fenske kinematic viscometer. The surface tension of the solution was measured by the Wilhelmy method using a self-made apparatus. The effects of the hole diameter/cell wall thickness, catalase concentration, glucose concentration, and glucose oxidase concentration on the kinematic viscosity, surface tension, and bubble take-off period were investigated. With our system, the effects of the changes in the solution materiality on the bubble take-off period were proven to be very small in comparison to the change in the oxygen-producing rate. PMID:19250805

  8. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds. PMID:25653236

  9. In vitro and in vivo inhibitory effects of some fungicides on catalase produced and purified from white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Kavakçıoğlu, Berna; Tarhan, Leman

    2014-10-01

    In this study, in vitro and in vivo effects of some commonly used fungicides, antibiotics, and various chemicals on isolated and purified catalase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium were investigated. The catalase was purified 129.10-fold by using 60% ammonium sulfate and 60% ethanol precipitations, DEAE-cellulose anion exchange and Sephacryl-S-200 gel filtration chromatographies from P. chrysosporium growth in carbon- and nitrogen-limited medium for 12 days. The molecular weight of native purified catalase from P. chrysosporium was found to be 290 ± 10 kDa, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE results indicated that enzyme consisted of four apparently identical subunits, with a molecular weight of 72.5 ± 2.5 kDa. Kinetic characterization studies showed that optimum pH and temperature, Km and Vmax values of the purified catalase which were stable in basic region and at comparatively high temperatures were 7.5, 30°C, 289.86 mM, and 250,000 U/mg, respectively. The activity of purified catalase from P. chrysosporium was significantly inhibited by dithiothreitol (DTT), 2-mercaptoethanol, iodoacetamide, EDTA, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). It was found that while antibiotics had no inhibitory effects, 45 ppm benomyl, 144 ppm captan, and 47.5 ppm chlorothalonil caused 14.52, 10.82, and 38.86% inhibition of purified catalase, respectively. The inhibition types of these three fungicides were found to be non-competitive inhibition with the Ki values of 1.158, 0.638, and 0.145 mM and IC50 values of 0.573, 0.158, 0.010 mM, respectively. The results of in vivo experiments also showed that benomyl, captan and chlorothalonil caused 15.25, 1.96, and 36.70% activity decreases after 24-h treatments compared to that of the control. PMID:24079700

  10. Purification, biochemical characterization, and implications of an alkali-tolerant catalase from the spacecraft-associated and oxidation-resistant Acinetobacter gyllenbergii 2P01AA.

    PubMed

    Muster, N; Derecho, I; Dallal, F; Alvarez, R; McCoy, K B; Mogul, R

    2015-04-01

    Herein, we report on the purification, characterization, and sequencing of catalase from Acinetobacter gyllenbergii 2P01AA, an extremely oxidation-resistant bacterium that was isolated from the Mars Phoenix spacecraft assembly facility. The Acinetobacter are dominant members of the microbial communities that inhabit spacecraft assembly facilities and consequently may serve as forward contaminants that could impact the integrity of future life-detection missions. Catalase was purified by using a 3-step chromatographic procedure, where mass spectrometry provided respective subunit and intact masses of 57.8 and 234.6 kDa, which were consistent with a small-subunit tetrameric catalase. Kinetics revealed an extreme pH stability with no loss in activity between pH 5 and 11.5 and provided respective kcat/Km and kcat values of ∼10(7) s(-1) M(-1) and 10(6) s(-1), which are among the highest reported for bacterial catalases. The amino acid sequence was deduced by in-depth peptide mapping, and structural homology suggested that the catalases from differing strains of A. gyllenbergii differ only at residues near the subunit interfaces, which may impact catalytic stability. Together, the kinetic, alkali-tolerant, and halotolerant properties of the catalase from A. gyllenbergii 2P01AA are significant, as they are consistent with molecular adaptations toward the alkaline, low-humidity, and potentially oxidizing conditions of spacecraft assembly facilities. Therefore, these results support the hypothesis that the selective pressures of the assembly facilities impact the microbial communities at the molecular level, which may have broad implications for future life-detection missions. PMID:25826195

  11. Polymer-Induced Heteronucleation for Protein Single Crystal Growth: Structural Elucidation of Bovine Liver Catalase and Concanavalin A Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Foroughi, Leila M.; Kang, You-Na; Matzger, Adam J.

    2012-05-09

    Obtaining single crystals for X-ray diffraction remains a major bottleneck in structural biology; when existing crystal growth methods fail to yield suitable crystals, often the target rather than the crystallization approach is reconsidered. Here we demonstrate that polymer-induced heteronucleation, a powerful technique that has been used for small molecule crystallization form discovery, can be applied to protein crystallization by optimizing the heteronucleant composition and crystallization formats for crystallizing a wide range of protein targets. Applying these advances to two benchmark proteins resulted in dramatically increased crystal size, enabling structure determination, for a half century old form of bovine liver catalase (BLC) that had previously only been characterized by electron microscopy, and the discovery of two new forms of concanavalin A (conA) from the Jack bean and accompanying structural elucidation of one of these forms.

  12. Cloning, expression and physiological analysis of broccoli catalase gene and Chinese cabbage ascorbate peroxidase gene under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Huang, Ho-Chang; Lin, Ching-Yun

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this work were to clone the catalase (CAT) gene from broccoli (Brassica oleracea) and the ascorbate peroxidase (APX) gene from Chinese cabbage and measure the regulation of CAT and APX gene expressions under heat-stress conditions. Different genotypes responded differently to heat stress according to their various antioxidant enzymes and physiological parameters. CAT and APX gene expression profiles were well matched with the data for CAT and APX enzyme activities in the broccoli and Chinese cabbage plants, respectively. Full-length of the CAT and APX cDNA were 1,768 and 1,070 bp, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis of CAT and APX indicated that plant CATs and APXs diverged into two major clusters. PMID:20352229

  13. Hydrogen peroxide-dependent conversion of nitrite to nitrate as a crucial feature of bovine milk catalase.

    PubMed

    Silanikove, Nissim; Shapiro, Fira; Silanikove, Mayan; Merin, Uzi; Leitner, Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    The enzyme catalase is well-known to catalyze the disintegration of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen; however, this study shows that its main function in bovine milk is oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. This process depends on hydrogen peroxide, of which the main source appears to be hydrogen peroxide formation that is coupled to the conversion of purines--xanthine in the present study--to uric acid by milk xanthine oxidase. However, additional secondary sources of hydrogen peroxide appear to be important during the relatively long storage of milk in the gland cistern. This paper demonstrates that the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate is necessary to prevent accumulation of free radicals and oxidative products during storage of milk in the gland and during the unavoidable delay between milking and pasteurization in dairy plants. Recommendations for minimizing the deterioration in milk quality during commercial storage are presented. PMID:19722711

  14. Effect of N+ Beam Exposure on Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activities and Induction of Mn-SOD in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dao-jun; Chen, Ruo-lei; Shao, Chun-lin; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2000-10-01

    Though bacteria of the radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans have a high resistance to the lethal and mutagenic effects of many DNA-damaging agents, the mechanisms involved in the response of these bacteria to oxidative stress are poorly understood. In this report, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities produced by these bacteria were measured, and the change of SOD and CAT activities by 20 keV N+ beam exposure was examined. Their activities were increased by N+ beam exposure from 8×1014 ions/cm2 to 6×1015 ions/cm2. The treatment of H2O2 and [CHCl3 +CH3CH2OH] and the measurement of absorption spectrum showed that the increase in SOD activity was resulted from inducible activities of Mn-SOD in D. radiodurans AS1.633 by N+ beam exposure. These results suggested that this bacteria possess inducible defense mechanisms against the deleterious effects of oxidization.

  15. Direct methods in protein electron crystallography--beef liver catalase in its fully hydrated form at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Dorset, D L; Gilmore, C J

    1999-05-01

    The crystal structure of beef liver catalase was determined ab initio in projection to 9 A resolution using electron diffraction data at room temperature from hydrated specimens maintained in an environmental chamber in the electron microscope. A conservative combination of symbolic addition with maximum entropy and likelihood led to a model with a Patterson correlation coefficient C = 0.89 to the observed data. This independent solution could then be compared favorably to a previous 23 A analysis of electron micrographs from frozen hydrated preparations. Prediction of the higher-resolution structure by extension of the lower-resolution image-based phase basis set also gave a good match to the direct-methods solution, particularly for the most intense reflections. PMID:10360325

  16. Electrospun regenerated cellulose nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization method for catalase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Feng, Quan; Hou, Dayin; Zhao, Yong; Xu, Tao; Menkhaus, Todd J; Fong, Hao

    2014-12-10

    In this study, an electrospun regenerated cellulose (RC) nanofibrous membrane with fiber diameters of ∼200-400 nm was prepared first; subsequently, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and acrylic acid (AA) were selected as the monomers for surface grafting of polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Thereafter, four nanofibrous membranes (i.e., RC, RC-poly(HEMA), RC-poly(DMAEMA), and RC-poly(AA)) were explored as innovative supports for immobilization of an enzyme of bovine liver catalase (CAT). The amount/capacity, activity, stability, and reusability of immobilized catalase were evaluated, and the kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) for immobilized and free catalase were determined. The results indicated that the respective amounts/capacities of immobilized catalase on RC-poly(HEMA) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) nanofibrous membranes reached 78 ± 3.5 and 67 ± 2.7 mg g(-1), which were considerably higher than the previously reported values. Meanwhile, compared to that of free CAT (i.e., 18 days), the half-life periods of RC-CAT, RC-poly(HEMA)-CAT, RC-poly(DMAEMA)-CAT, and RC-poly(AA)-CAT were 49, 58, 56, and 60 days, respectively, indicating that the storage stability of immobilized catalase was also significantly improved. Furthermore, the immobilized catalase exhibited substantially higher resistance to temperature variation (tested from 5 to 70 °C) and lower degree of sensitivity to pH value (tested from 4.0 and 10.0) than the free catalase. In particular, according to the kinetic parameters of Vmax and Km, the nanofibrous membranes of RC-poly(HEMA) (i.e., 5102 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 44.89 mM) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) (i.e., 4651 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 46.98 mM) had the most satisfactory biocompatibility with immobilized catalase. It was therefore concluded that the electrospun RC nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with 3-dimensional nanolayers of polymer chains/brushes would be suitable/ideal as efficient supports for high-density and reusable enzyme immobilization. PMID:25396286

  17. A note concerning acetate activation of peroxidative activity of catalases using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Baker, Warren L; Key, Christopher; Lonergan, Greg T

    2005-01-01

    Beef liver catalases showed peroxidative activity using 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid as the electron donor and hydrogen peroxide as the acceptor at a pH of 5. This activity was not observed at pH 7. The reaction depended on acetate concentration, although succinate and propionate could partly replace the acetate as a catalyst. Other haem proteins also catalyzed a peroxidative effect. The reaction using syringaldazine or the coupling between dimethylaminobenzoic acid and 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone was less effective and less sensitive. Evidence is presented that the reaction is associated with a conformational change of the catalase. PMID:15932252

  18. Oxygen-Dependent Regulation of the Expression of the Catalase Gene katA of Lactobacillus sakei LTH677

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Christian; Schmidt, Gudrun; Fischer, Marc; Oellers, Katja; Hammes, Walter P.

    1998-01-01

    The catalase gene katA of Lactobacillus sakei LTH677 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli UM2, Lactobacillus casei LK1, and Lactobacillus curvatus LTH1432. The last host is a catalase-deficient plasmid-cured derivative of a starter organism used in meat fermentation. The regulation of katA expression was found to be the same in L. sakei LTH677 and the recombinant strains. The addition of H2O2 to anaerobic cultures, as well as a switch to aerobic conditions, resulted in a strong increase in KatA activity. The expression was investigated in more detail with L. sakei LTH677 and L. curvatus LTH4002. The recombinant strain LTH4002 did not accumulate H2O2 under glucose-limited aerobic conditions and remained viable in the stationary phase. Under inductive conditions, the katA-specific mRNA and the apoenzyme were synthesized de novo. Deletion derivatives of the katA promoter were produced, and the regulatory response was investigated by fusion to the β-glucuronidase reporter gene gusA and expression in L. sakei LTH677. The fact that gene expression was subject to induction was confirmed at the level of transcription and protein synthesis. A small putative regulatory sequence of at least 25 bp was identified located upstream of the −35 site. Competition experiments performed with L. sakei LTH677 harboring the fusion constructs consisting of the katA promoter and gusA revealed that an activator protein is involved in the transcriptional induction of katA. PMID:9546173

  19. Molecular, technological and safety characterization of Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci from slightly fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Martín, B; Garriga, M; Hugas, M; Bover-Cid, S; Veciana-Nogués, M T; Aymerich, T

    2006-03-15

    The population of Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci from slightly fermented sausages was characterized at species and strain level by molecular techniques and some technological and hygienic aspects were also considered. Staphylococcus xylosus was the predominant species (80.8%) followed by Staphylococcus warneri (8.3%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (5.8%) Staphylococcus carnosus (4.6%), and Kocuria varians (0.4%). Proteolytic activity was observed in 23% of the isolates. The species with the highest percentage of proteolytic strains was S. warneri. Lipolytic activity was found in 45.8% of the isolates and S. xylosus was the species with the highest percentage of lipolytic isolates. Biogenic amine production was not widely distributed (only 14.6% of the isolates). Tyramine was the most intense amine produced, although by only 4.6% of the isolates. Phenylethylamine was more frequently detected (10.8% of isolates) but at lower levels. Some strains also produced putrescine (3.3%), cadaverine (2.9%), histamine (1.3%) and tryptamine (0.4%). All isolates were susceptible to linezolid and vancomicin and over 70% were resistant to penicillin G, ampicillin and sulphonamides. Most of the mecA+ strains (only 4.6% of isolates) also displayed resistance to multiple antibiotics. A reduced enterotoxigenic potential was found. Only 3.3% of isolates showed staphylococcal enterotoxins genes, all identified as entC gene. The combination of RAPD-PCR and plasmid profiling allowed the discrimination of 208 different profiles among the 240 Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci characterized, indicating a great genetic variability. PMID:16297478

  20. Covalent conjugation of tetrameric bovine liver catalase to liposome membranes for stabilization of the enzyme tertiary and quaternary structures.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto; Sakamoto, Hideyuki; Shirakami, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tetrameric bovine liver catalase (BLC) is unstable because of its dissociation into subunits at low enzyme concentrations and the conformational change of the subunits at high temperatures. In this work, for stabilization of BLC, the enzyme was covalently conjugated with liposome membranes composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), cholesterol and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-glutaryl (NGPE). The NGPE, which was responsible for the BLC/membrane coupling, was altered from 0.05 to 0.2 in its liposomal mole fraction f(G). The catalase-conjugated liposome (CCL) with f(G) of 0.15 showed the maximum number of the conjugated BLC molecules of 28 per liposome. The reactivity of CCLs to H(2)O(2) was as high as that of free BLC at 25 degrees C in Tris-HCl buffer of pH 7.4. Among the CCLs, the catalyst with f(G) of 0.15 was the most stable at 55 degrees C in its enzyme activity in the buffer because the appropriate number of BLC/liposome covalent bonding prevented the dissociation-induced enzyme deactivation. Furthermore, the CCL showed much higher stability at 55 degrees C than the free BLC/enzyme-free liposome mixture and free BLC at the low BLC concentration of 340ng/mL. This was because BLC in the CCL was located in the vicinity of the host membrane regardless of the catalyst concentration, which could induce the effective stabilization effect of the membrane on the enzyme tertiary structure as indicated by the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence analysis. The results obtained demonstrate the high structural stability of BLC in the CCL system, which was derived from the covalent bonding and interaction between BLC and liposomes. PMID:19131221

  1. Methylmercury-mediated inhibition of 3H-D-aspartate transport in cultured astrocytes is reversed by the antioxidant catalase.

    PubMed

    Allen, J W; Mutkus, L A; Aschner, M

    2001-05-25

    Astrocytes are essential for removal of glutamate from the extracellular space in the central nervous system. The neurotoxic heavy metal methylmercury potently and specifically inhibits the transport of glutamate in cultured astrocytes by an unknown mechanism. Glutamate transport in astrocytes is also inhibited by reactive oxygen species. A glutamate-induced transporter current is inhibited both by reactive oxygen species and thiol oxidizing agents. These observations suggest that oxidation of the transporter might mediate methylmercury-induced inhibition of glutamate transport. In the present study, we examined the ability of thiol reducing or oxidizing agents to inhibit transport of 3H-D-aspartate, a glutamate analog, in primary cultures of neonatal rat astrocytes. To assess if methylmercury-mediated inhibition of 3H-aspartate transport was due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species, we tested the ability of Trolox, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN), or catalase to attenuate the methylmercury-induced inhibition of aspartate uptake. Neither the thiol reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT), nor the thiol oxidizing agent 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic) acid (DTNB) had any effect on 3H-aspartate transport suggesting that the thiol redox state does not alter transporter function. In contrast, the antioxidant catalase (1000 U/ml) significantly attenuated methylmercury-induced inhibition of 3H-aspartate uptake, suggesting that excess reactive oxygen species, specifically H2O2, inhibit the function of an astrocytic excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1). Prolonged exposure (6 h) to inhibitors of glutamate transport significantly decreased EAAT1 mRNA levels suggesting that transporter expression is related to function. This study suggests that methylmercury-induced overproduction of H2O2 is a mechanism for inhibition of glutamate transport and transporter expression in cultured astrocytes. PMID:11376598

  2. Upregulation of ATM in sclerosing adenosis of the breast.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R A; Kairouz, R; Watters, D; Lavin, M F; Kearsley, J H; Lee, C S

    1998-01-01

    The gene mutated in ataxia telangiectasia (ATM) has an established tumour suppressor role in breast cancer. ATM appears to be expressed in most normal cells, including breast epithelium, where it has been postulated to have a nuclear role in cell cycle regulation following DNA damage. However, ATM is not upregulated after DNA damage. In this study, we demonstrate an absence of immunohistologically detectable levels of ATM in the normally quiescent myoepithelial cells that line normal breast ducts. This contrasts dramatically with the significant expression of ATM in the proliferative myoepithelium of sclerosing adenosis (n = 7). This upregulation of ATM suggests that ATM expression is coupled to the proliferative status of the myoepithelium. Our results also indicate that there are factors other than ATM gene mutations that can dramatically influence ATM expression in the breast and that these factors should be considered for their possible implications in carcinogenesis. PMID:9893751

  3. Iron upregulates melanogenesis in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wolkow, Natalie; Li, Yafeng; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Song, Ying; Alekseev, Oleg; Iacovelli, Jared; Song, Delu; Lee, Jennifer C.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our studies was to examine the relationship between iron and melanogenesis in retinal pigment epithelial cells, as prior observations had suggested that iron may promote melanogenesis. This relationship has potential clinical importance, as both iron overload and hyperpigmentation are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Human fetal retinal pigment epithelial cells and ARPE-19 cells were treated with iron in the form of ferric ammonium citrate, after which quantitative RT-PCR and electron microscopy were performed. Melanogenesis genes tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein 1, Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome 3, premelanosome protein and dopachrome tautomerase were upregulated, as was the melanogenesis-controlling transcription factor, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Iron-treated cells had increased pigmentation and melanosome number. Multiple transcription factors upstream of MITF were upregulated by iron. PMID:25277027

  4. Upregulating endogenous genes by an RNA-programmable artificial transactivator

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    To promote expression of endogenous genes ad libitum, we developed a novel, programmable transcription factor prototype. Kept together via an MS2 coat protein/RNA interface, it includes a fixed, polypeptidic transactivating domain and a variable RNA domain that recognizes the desired gene. Thanks to this device, we specifically upregulated five genes, in cell lines and primary cultures of murine pallial precursors. Gene upregulation was small, however sufficient to robustly inhibit neuronal differentiation. The transactivator interacted with target gene chromatin via its RNA cofactor. Its activity was restricted to cells in which the target gene is normally transcribed. Our device might be useful for specific applications. However for this purpose, it will require an improvement of its transactivation power as well as a better characterization of its target specificity and mechanism of action. PMID:26152305

  5. Uromodulin Upregulates TRPV5 by Impairing Caveolin-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Matthias T.F.; Wu, Xue-Ru; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-01-01

    Uromodulin (UMOD) is synthesized in the thick ascending limb and secreted into urine as the most abundant protein. Association studies in humans suggest protective effects of UMOD against calcium-containing kidney stones. Mice carrying mutations of Umod found in human uromodulin-associated kidney disease (UAKD) and Umod deficient mice exhibit hypercalciuria. The mechanism for UMOD regulation of urinary Ca2+ excretion is incompletely understood. We examined if UMOD regulates TRPV5 and TRPV6, channels critical for renal transcellular Ca2+ reabsorption. Coexpression with UMOD increased whole-cell TRPV5 current density in HEK293 cells. In biotinylation studies UMOD increased TRPV5 cell-surface abundance. Extracellular application of purified UMOD upregulated TRPV5 current density within physiological relevant concentration ranges. UMOD exerted a similar effect on TRPV6. TRPV5 undergoes constitutive caveolin-mediated endocytosis. UMOD had no effect on TRPV5 in a caveolin-1 deficient cell line. Expression of recombinant caveolin-1 in these cells restored the ability of UMOD to upregulate TRPV5. Secretion of UAKD-mutant UMOD was markedly reduced and coexpression of mutant UMOD with TRPV5 failed to increase its current. Immunofluorescent studies demonstrated lower TRPV5 expression in Umod−/− mice compared to wild-type. UMOD upregulates TRPV5 by acting from extracellular and by decreasing endocytosis of TRPV5. The stimulation of Ca2+ reabsorption via TRPV5 by UMOD may contribute to protection against kidney stone formation. PMID:23466996

  6. Ryanodine receptor-2 upregulation and nicotine-mediated plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ziviani, Elena; Lippi, Giordano; Bano, Daniele; Munarriz, Eliana; Guiducci, Stefania; Zoli, Michele; Young, Kenneth W; Nicotera, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine, the major psychoactive component of cigarette smoke, modulates neuronal activity to produce Ca2+-dependent changes in gene transcription. However, the downstream targets that underlie the long-term effects of nicotine on neuronal function, and hence behaviour, remain to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that nicotine administration to mice upregulates levels of the type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2), a Ca2+-release channel present on the endoplasmic reticulum, in a number of brain areas associated with cognition and addiction, notably the cortex and ventral midbrain. Nicotine-mediated RyR2 upregulation was driven by CREB, and caused a long-lasting reinforcement of Ca2+ signalling via the process of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. RyR2 upregulation was itself required for long-term phosphorylation of CREB in a positive-feedback signalling loop. We further demonstrate that inhibition of RyR-activation in vivo abolishes sensitization to nicotine-induced habituated locomotion, a well-characterised model for onset of drug dependence. Our findings, therefore, indicate that gene-dependent reprogramming of Ca2+ signalling is involved in nicotine-induced behavioural changes. PMID:21113126

  7. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling☆

    PubMed Central

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2.) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  8. Coexpressed Catalase Protects Chimeric Antigen Receptor–Redirected T Cells as well as Bystander Cells from Oxidative Stress–Induced Loss of Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mukhopadhyay, Madhura; Witt, Kristina; Lladser, Alvaro; Chmielewski, Markus; Riet, Tobias; Abken, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients by adoptive T cell therapy has yielded promising results. In solid tumors, however, T cells encounter a hostile environment, in particular with increased inflammatory activity as a hallmark of the tumor milieu that goes along with abundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) that substantially impair antitumor activity. We present a strategy to render antitumor T cells more resilient toward ROS by coexpressing catalase along with a tumor specific chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) to increase their antioxidative capacity by metabolizing H2O2. In fact, T cells engineered with a bicistronic vector that concurrently expresses catalase, along with the CAR coexpressing catalase (CAR-CAT), performed superior over CAR T cells as they showed increased levels of intracellular catalase and had a reduced oxidative state with less ROS accumulation in both the basal state and upon activation while maintaining their antitumor activity despite high H2O2 levels. Moreover, CAR-CAT T cells exerted a substantial bystander protection of nontransfected immune effector cells as measured by CD3ζ chain expression in bystander T cells even in the presence of high H2O2 concentrations. Bystander NK cells, otherwise ROS sensitive, efficiently eliminate their K562 target cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress when admixed with CAR-CAT T cells. This approach represents a novel means for protecting tumor-infiltrating cells from tumor-associated oxidative stress–mediated repression. PMID:26673145

  9. A natural xanthone increases catalase activity but decreases NF-kappa B and lipid peroxidation in U-937 and HepG2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Binay K; Zaidi, Adeel H; Gupta, Pankaj; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Raviprakash, Nune; Mahali, Sidhartha K; Manna, Sunil K

    2015-10-01

    Mangiferin, a C-glycosyl xanthone, has shown anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumorigenic activities. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism for the antioxidant property of mangiferin. Considering the role of nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) in inflammation and tumorigenesis, we hypothesized that modulating its activity will be a viable therapeutic target in regulating the redox-sensitive ailments. Our results show that mangiferin blocks several inducers, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lypopolysaccharide (LPS), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) mediated NF-κB activation via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation. In silico docking studies predicted strong binding energy of mangiferin to the active site of catalase (-9.13 kcal/mol), but not with other oxidases such as myeloperoxidase, glutathione peroxidase, or inducible nitric oxide synthase. Mangiferin increased activity of catalase by 44%, but had no effect on myeloperoxidase activity in vitro. Fluorescence spectroscopy further revealed the binding of mangiferin to catalase at the single site with binding constant and binding affinity of 3.1×10(-7) M(-1) and 1.046 respectively. Mangiferin also inhibits TNF-induced lipid peroxidation and thereby protects apoptosis. Hence, mangiferin with its ability to inhibit NF-κB and increase the catalase activity may prove to be a potent therapeutic. PMID:26209362

  10. Oxidation of tryptophan-P-1 and P-2 by beef liver catalase-H2O2 intermediate: comparison with horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Yagi, M

    1979-01-01

    Tryptophan-p-1 (trp-p-1) and p-2, which have high mutagenic and carcinogenic potential, are oxidized by catalase- and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-H2O2 intermediates with optimum pH 5.9 (0.2 M-acetate) in catalase and pH 5.0 (0.2 M-acetate), 8.0 (0.01 M-phosphate) in HRP. The rate constants (k4) of the oxidation in the catalase at pH 5.9 (0.2 M-acetate) were 2965 M-1 x sec-1 for trp-p-1 and 576 M-1 x sec-1 for trp-p-2. In the case of HRP, 1894 M-1 x sec-1, (pH 5.0, 0.2 M-acetate) for trp-p-1 and 705 M-1 x sec-1 (pH 8.0, 0.001 M-phosphate) for trp-p-2 under each optimum condition. The oxidation products of trp-p-1 and p-2 by catalase or HRP lost completely their mutagenic potential in the mutation assay. PMID:399746

  11. Effect of vitamin C and lipoic acid on streptozotocin-induced diabetes gene expression: mRNA and protein expressions of Cu-Zn SOD and catalase.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Gökhan; Yilmaz, Okkes; Güray, Tülin

    2008-02-01

    The involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus has been confirmed by numerous studies. In this study, the expression of two antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase which are involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species was studied in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat liver tissues. The enzyme assays showed a significant decrease in both enzymes activities compared to control animals. The RT-PCR and Western-blot analysis results demonstrated that this decrease in activity is regulated at the level of gene expression, as both catalase and Cu-Zn SOD mRNA and protein expressions were also suppressed. Supplementing the animals with vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant increased both SOD and catalase activities with no change in both mRNA and protein expressions suggesting a role of post-translational modification. However, even though mRNA expressions of both catalase and Cu-Zn SOD were not changed, the protein levels increased in parallel to activities in the case of another antioxidant, alpha-lipoic acid. An increase in the rate of translation, without changing the rate of transcription indicates a translational effect of lipoic acid in changing the activities of antioxidant enzymes to prevent the oxidative damage in diabetes. PMID:18008141

  12. Modulatory effect of pineapple peel extract on lipid peroxidation, catalase activity and hepatic biomarker levels in blood plasma of alcohol-induced oxidative stressed rats

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, OY; Erukainure, OL; Ajiboye, JA; Adejobi, RO; Owolabi, FO; Kosoko, SB

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the ability of the methanolic extract of pineapple peel to modulate alcohol-induced lipid peroxidation, changes in catalase activities and hepatic biochemical marker levels in blood plasma. Methods Oxidative stress was induced by oral administration of ethanol (20% w/v) at a dosage of 5 mL/kg bw in rats. After 28 days of treatment, the rats were fasted overnight and sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Blood was collected with a 2 mL syringe by cardiac puncture and was centrifuged at 3 000 rpm for 10 min. The plasma was analyzed to evaluate malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase activity, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations. Results Administration of alcohol caused a drastic increase (87.74%) in MDA level compared with the control. Pineapple peel extract significantly reduced the MDA level by 60.16% at 2.5 mL/kg bw. Rats fed alcohol only had the highest catalase activity, treatment with pineapple peel extract at 2.5 mL/kg bw however, reduced the activity. Increased AST, ALP and ALT activities were observed in rats fed alcohol only respectively, treatment with pineapple peel extract drastically reduced their activities. Conclusions The positive modulation of lipid peroxidation, catalase activities as well as hepatic biomarker levels of blood plasma by the methanolic extract of pineapple peels under alcohol-induced oxidative stress is an indication of its protective ability in the management of alcohol-induced toxicity. PMID:23569717

  13. Role of superoxide dismutase and catalase as determinants of pathogenicity of Nocardia asteroides: importance in resistance to microbicidal activities of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Beaman, B L; Black, C M; Doughty, F; Beaman, L

    1985-01-01

    The roles of nocardial superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in the resistance of Nocardia asteroides to the microbicidal properties of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were determined in vitro. The neutrophils killed ca. 80% of the cells of the less virulent N. asteroides 10905 and ca. 50% of the log phase of the more virulent N. asteroides GUH-2 after 180 min of incubation. These phagocytes were not able to kill early-stationary-phase cells of strain GUH-2 that contained 10 times more intracytoplasmic catalase than log-phase cells of the same culture. However, the polymorphonuclear leukocytes were able to kill more than 50% of the cells of early-stationary-phase strain GUH-2 after treatment with purified antibody specific for surface-associated SOD. No killing was observed when the bacteria were treated with normal rabbit immunoglobulin G or with serum obtained from rabbits immunized against whole nocardial cells (containing little or no activity against SOD). These phagocytes killed more than 99% of Listeria monocytogenes used as a control. Chlorpromazine-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes killed L. monocytogenes (70%) but they were not able to kill antibody-treated cells of N. asteroides GUH-2. Exogenously added SOD partially protected strain 10905, which lacked surface-associated enzyme, but it had no effect on the killing of strain GUH-2, which already possessed significant amounts of surface-bound SOD. In contrast, catalase added to the nocardiae provided almost complete protection to the log-phase cells of strain GUH-2, but strain 10905 was only partially protected. SOD combined with catalase had additive activity which completely protected the cells of strain 10905. A mutant of N. asteroides GUH-2 (SCII-C) is more virulent during the log phase than is the parental strain. This mutant contained at least 7 times more catalase at this stage of growth than did the parent. No other differences between these two strains were observed during the log phase. In sharp contrast to those of the parent, log-phase cells of this high-catalase mutant were not killed by polymorphonuclear phagocytes. These data indicate a role for both SOD and catalase in the resistance of Nocardia spp. to human neutrophils, and they represent at least two factors associated with virulence. PMID:3880721

  14. Purification and characterization of a mycelial catalase from Scedosporium boydii, a useful tool for specific antibody detection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mina, Sara; Marot-Leblond, Agnès; Cimon, Bernard; Fleury, Maxime J J; Larcher, Gérald; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Robert, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is an opportunistic filamentous fungus which may be responsible for a wide variety of infections in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. This fungus belongs to the Scedosporium apiospermum species complex, which usually ranks second among the filamentous fungi colonizing the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and may lead to allergic bronchopulmonary mycoses, sensitization, or respiratory infections. Upon microbial infection, host phagocytic cells release reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide, as part of the antimicrobial response. Catalases are known to protect pathogens against ROS by detoxification of the hydrogen peroxide. Here, we investigated the catalase equipment of Scedosporium boydii, one of the major pathogenic species in the S. apiospermum species complex. Three catalases were identified, and the mycelial catalase A1 was purified to homogeneity by a three-step chromatographic process. This enzyme is a monofunctional tetrameric protein of 460 kDa, consisting of four 82-kDa glycosylated subunits. The potential usefulness of this enzyme in serodiagnosis of S. apiospermum infections was then investigated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using 64 serum samples from CF patients. Whatever the species involved in the S. apiospermum complex, sera from infected patients were clearly differentiated from sera from patients with an Aspergillus fumigatus infection or those from CF patients without clinical and biological signs of a fungal infection and without any fungus recovered from sputum samples. These results suggest that catalase A1 is a good candidate for the development of an immunoassay for serodiagnosis of infections caused by the S. apiospermum complex in patients with CF. PMID:25355796

  15. Purification and Characterization of a Mycelial Catalase from Scedosporium boydii, a Useful Tool for Specific Antibody Detection in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Sara; Cimon, Bernard; Larcher, Gérald; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Robert, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is an opportunistic filamentous fungus which may be responsible for a wide variety of infections in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. This fungus belongs to the Scedosporium apiospermum species complex, which usually ranks second among the filamentous fungi colonizing the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and may lead to allergic bronchopulmonary mycoses, sensitization, or respiratory infections. Upon microbial infection, host phagocytic cells release reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydrogen peroxide, as part of the antimicrobial response. Catalases are known to protect pathogens against ROS by detoxification of the hydrogen peroxide. Here, we investigated the catalase equipment of Scedosporium boydii, one of the major pathogenic species in the S. apiospermum species complex. Three catalases were identified, and the mycelial catalase A1 was purified to homogeneity by a three-step chromatographic process. This enzyme is a monofunctional tetrameric protein of 460 kDa, consisting of four 82-kDa glycosylated subunits. The potential usefulness of this enzyme in serodiagnosis of S. apiospermum infections was then investigated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using 64 serum samples from CF patients. Whatever the species involved in the S. apiospermum complex, sera from infected patients were clearly differentiated from sera from patients with an Aspergillus fumigatus infection or those from CF patients without clinical and biological signs of a fungal infection and without any fungus recovered from sputum samples. These results suggest that catalase A1 is a good candidate for the development of an immunoassay for serodiagnosis of infections caused by the S. apiospermum complex in patients with CF. PMID:25355796

  16. Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide signaling in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells via a reduction in catalase activity: role of protein kinase Cδ

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sud, Neetu; Fonseca, Fabio V.; Hou, Yali

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that acute increases in shear stress can stimulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity through increased PI3 kinase/Akt signaling and phosphorylation of Ser1177. However, the mechanism by which shear stress activates this pathway has not been adequately resolved nor has the potential role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) been evaluated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if shear-mediated increases in ROS play a role in stimulating Ser1177 phosphorylation and NO signaling in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) exposed to acute increases in shear stress. Our initial studies demonstrated that although shear stress did not increase superoxide levels in PAEC, there was an increase in H2O2 levels. The increases in H2O2 were associated with a decrease in catalase activity but not protein levels. In addition, we found that acute shear stress caused an increase in eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 phosphorylation and a decrease in phosphorylation at Thr495. We also found that the overexpression of catalase significantly attenuated the shear-mediated increases in H2O2, phospho-Ser1177 eNOS, and NO generation. Further investigation identified a decrease in PKCδ activity in response to shear stress, and the overexpression of PKCδ attenuated the shear-mediated decrease in Thr495 phosphorylation and the increase in NO generation, and this led to increased eNOS uncoupling. PKCδ overexpression also attenuated Ser1177 phosphorylation through a posttranslational increase in catalase activity, mediated via a serine phosphorylation event, reducing shear-mediated increases in H2O2. Together, our data indicate that shear stress decreases PKCδ activity, altering the phosphorylation pattern catalase, leading to decreased catalase activity and increased H2O2 signaling, and this in turn leads to increases in phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 and NO generation. PMID:19897742

  17. Enrichment in Fraser broth supplemented with catalase or Oxyrase, combined with the microcolony immunoblot technique, for detecting heat-injured Listeria monocytogenes in foods.

    PubMed

    Patel, J R; Beuchat, L R

    1995-07-01

    The microcolony immunoblot technique using monoclonal antibodies to Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated for its suitability to detect heat-injured cells. Pasteurized milk and filtrates of homogenized raw ground beef slurry and cabbage were inoculated with L. monocytogenes Scott A, heated, diluted, inoculated into Fraser broth (FB) supplemented with 400 micrograms of catalase ml-1 or 0.01 unit of Oxyrase ml-1, and incubated at 30 degrees C for 6 h. Three inoculum populations (high, medium, and low) were used. The extent of injury was dependent on the heating menstruum. Forty percent of the cells were injured in beef slurry filtrate, whereas 79 and 94% were injured in milk and cabbage filtrate, respectively, when foods were heated at 52 degrees C for 20 min. Populations of viable cells were determined using the immunoblot technique and by surface plating on modified Oxford (mMOX) agar. Recovery of cells from heated foods was enhanced in FB supplemented with catalase or Oxyrase compared to recovery in control broth. Essentially all unheated (control) cells could be detected within about 30 h using enrichment and the immunoblot technique; 54 h were required to easily detect colonies on mMOX. In most cases, the number of cells detected in heated milk or filtrates of homogenized beef after enrichment in FB supplemented with catalase or Oxyrase was significantly higher than populations detected using unsupplemented FB; however, enrichment in FB supplemented with catalase or Oxyrase did not significantly increase cell populations in heated cabbage filtrate. Within each heat treatment and level of inoculum, cell populations detected on mMOX agar after incubating plates for 48 h or on immunoblots after 24 h were not significantly different. Results indicate that the immunoblot technique in conjunction with enrichment in FB containing either catalase or Oxyrase can be successfully used to detect healthy and heat-injured cells of L. monocytogenes in diverse types of foods within 34 h. PMID:7577355

  18. Identification of a member of the catalase multigene family on wheat chromosome 7A associated with flour b* colour and biological significance of allelic variation.

    PubMed

    Li, Dora A; Walker, Esther; Francki, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Carotenoids (especially lutein) are known to be the pigment source for flour b* colour in bread wheat. Flour b* colour variation is controlled by a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on wheat chromosome 7AL and one gene from the carotenoid pathway, phytoene synthase, was functionally associated with the QTL on 7AL in some, but not all, wheat genotypes. A SNP marker within a sequence similar to catalase (Cat3-A1snp) derived from full-length (FL) cDNA (AK332460), however, was consistently associated with the QTL on 7AL and implicated in regulating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to control carotenoid accumulation affecting flour b* colour. The number of catalase genes on chromosome 7AL was investigated in this study to identify which gene may be implicated in flour b* variation and two were identified through interrogation of the draft wheat genome survey sequence consisting of five exons and a further two members having eight exons identified through comparative analysis with the single catalase gene on rice chromosome 6, PCR amplification and sequencing. It was evident that the catalase genes on chromosome 7A had duplicated and diverged during evolution relative to its counterpart on rice chromosome 6. The detection of transcripts in seeds, the co-location with Cat3-A1snp marker and maximised alignment of FL-cDNA (AK332460) with cognate genomic sequence indicated that TaCat3-A1 was the member of the catalase gene family associated with flour b* colour variation. Re-sequencing identified three alleles from three wheat varieties, TaCat3-A1a, TaCat3-A1b and TaCat3-A1c, and their predicted protein identified differences in peroxisomal targeting signal tri-peptide domain in the carboxyl terminal end providing new insights into their potential role in regulating cellular H2O2 that contribute to flour b* colour variation. PMID:26134858

  19. Inhibitory effects of deferasirox on the structure and function of bovine liver catalase: a spectroscopic and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Moradi, M; Divsalar, A; Saboury, A A; Ghalandari, B; Harifi, A R

    2015-01-01

    Deferasirox (DFX), as an oral chelator, is used for treatment of transfusional iron overload. In this study, we have investigated the effects of DFX as an iron chelator, on the function and structure of bovine liver catalase (BLC) by different spectroscopic methods of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) at two temperatures of 25 and 37 °C. In vitro kinetic studies showed that DFX can inhibit the enzymatic activity in a competitive manner. KI value was calculated 39 nM according to the Lineweaver-Burk plot indicating a high rate of inhibition of the enzyme. Intrinsic fluorescence data showed that increasing the drug concentrations leads to a significant decrease in the intrinsic emission of the enzyme indicating a significant change in the three-dimensional environment around the chromophores of the enzyme structure. By analyzing the fluorescence quenching data, it was found that the BLC has two binding sites for DFX and the values of binding constant at 25 and 37 °C were calculated 1.7 × 10(7) and 3 × 10(7) M(-1), respectively. The static type of quenching mechanism is involved in the quenching of intrinsic emission of enzyme. The thermodynamic data suggest that hydrophobic interactions play a major role in the binding reaction. UV-vis spectroscopy results represented the changes in tryptophan (Trp) absorption and Soret band spectra, which indicated changes in Trp and heme group position caused by the drug binding. Also, CD data represented that high concentrations of DFX lead to a significant decreasing in the content of β-sheet and random coil accompanied an increasing in α-helical content of the protein. The molecular docking results indicate that docking may be an appropriate method for prediction and confirmation of experimental results and also useful for determining the binding mechanism of proteins and drugs. According to above results, it can be concluded that the DFX can chelate the Fe(III) on the enzyme active site leading to changes in the function and structure of catalase which can be considered as a side effect of this drug and consequently has an important role in hepatic complications and fibrosis. PMID:25586906

  20. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig; Han, Ho-jae; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-06-05

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation.

  1. Upregulated Copper Transporters in Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zimnicka, Adriana M.; Tang, Haiyang; Guo, Qiang; Kuhr, Frank K.; Oh, Myung-Jin; Wan, Jun; Chen, Jiwang; Smith, Kimberly A.; Fraidenburg, Dustin R.; Choudhury, Moumita S. R.; Levitan, Irena; Machado, Roberto F.; Kaplan, Jack H.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu) plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX), a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2) also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness. PMID:24614111

  2. Physiological analyses indicate superoxide dismutase, catalase, and phytochelatins play important roles in Pb tolerance in Eremochloa ophiuroides.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Cen, Huameng; Chen, Youxiang; Xu, Siying; Peng, Lingli; Zhu, Hanmingyue; Li, Yiqiao

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation is considered to be a promising approach to restore or stabilize soil contaminated by lead (Pb). Turfgrasses, due to their high biomass yields, are considered to be suitable for use in phytoextraction of soil contaminated with heavy metal. It has been demonstrated that centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack., Poaceae) is a good turfgrass for restore of soil contaminated by Pb. However, the enhanced tolerant mechanisms in metallicolous (M) centipedegrass accessions remain unknown. In this study, we made a comparative study of growth performance, Pb accumulation, antioxidant levels, and phytochelatin concentrations in roots and shoots from M and nonmetallicolous (NM) centipedegrass accessions. Results showed that turf quality and growth rate were less repressed in M accessions than in NM accession. Pb stress caused generation of reactive oxygen species in centipedegrass with relatively lower levels in M accessions. Antioxidant activity analysis indicated that superoxide dismutase and catalase played important roles in Pb tolerance in M accessions. M accessions accumulated more Pb in roots and shoots. Greatly increased phytochelatins and less repressed sulfur contents in roots and shoots of M accessions indicated that they correlated with Pb accumulation and tolerance in centipedegrass. PMID:26368658

  3. Changes in ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jebara, Salwa; Jebara, Moez; Limam, Férid; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2005-08-01

    To analyse nodular antioxidant enzyme expression in response to salt stress, Phaseolus vulgaris genotype BAT477 was inoculated with reference strain CIAT899, and treated with 50 mM NaCl. Plant growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixing activity were analysed. Results showed that: (1) all parameters, particularly in nodules, were affected by salt treatments, and (2) confirmed preferential growth allocation to roots. The ARA was significantly decreased by salt treatments. Protein dosage confirmed that nodules were more affected by salt treatment than were roots. We analysed superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase in nodules, roots and a free rhizobial strain. Our results indicated that SOD and CAT nodular isozymes had bacterial and root origins. The SOD expressed the same CuZn, Fe and Mn SOD isoforms in nodules and roots, whereas in free rhizobia we found only one Fe and Mn SOD. APX and POX nodule and root profiles had only root origins, as no rhizobial band was detected. Under salt stress, plant growth, nitrogen fixation and activities of antioxidant defense enzymes in nodules were affected. Thus, these enzymes appear to preserve symbiosis from stress turned out that NaCl salinity lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD and POX isoenzyme. So their levels in nodules appeared to be consistent with a symbiotic nitrogen fixing efficiency hypothesis, and they seem to function as the molecular mechanisms underlying the nodule response to salinity. PMID:16146319

  4. Engineering of a novel tri-functional enzyme with MnSOD, catalase and cell-permeable activities.

    PubMed

    Luangwattananun, Piriya; Yainoy, Sakda; Eiamphungporn, Warawan; Songtawee, Napat; Bülow, Leif; Ayudhya, Chartchalerm Isarankura Na; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-04-01

    Cooperative function of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), in protection against oxidative stress, is known to be more effective than the action of either single enzyme. Chemical conjugation of the two enzymes resulted in molecules with higher antioxidant activity and therapeutic efficacy. However, chemical methods holds several drawbacks; e.g., loss of enzymatic activity, low homogeneity, time-consuming, and the need of chemical residues removal. Yet, the conjugated enzymes have never been proven to internalize into target cells. In this study, by employing genetic and protein engineering technologies, we reported designing and production of a bi-functional protein with SOD and CAT activities for the first time. To enable cellular internalization, cell penetrating peptide from HIV-1 Tat (TAT) was incorporated. Co-expression of CAT-MnSOD and MnSOD-TAT fusion genes allowed simultaneous self-assembly of the protein sequences into a large protein complex, which is expected to contained one tetrameric structure of CAT, four tetrameric structures of MnSOD and twelve units of TAT. The protein showed cellular internalization and superior protection against paraquat-induced cell death as compared to either complex bi-functional protein without TAT or to native enzymes fused with TAT. This study not only provided an alternative strategy to produce multifunctional protein complex, but also gained an insight into the development of therapeutic agent against oxidative stress-related conditions. PMID:26778154

  5. Ultrasensitive fluorescence immunoassay for detection of ochratoxin A using catalase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaolin; Zhan, Shengnan; Xu, Hengyi; Meng, Xianwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-28

    Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to perform a dynamic linear detection of OTA ranging from 0.05 pg mL(-1) to 10 pg mL(-1). The half maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.53 pg mL(-1) and the limit of detection was 0.05 pg mL(-1). These values were approximately 283- and 300-folds lower than those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-based conventional ELISA, respectively. The reported method is accurate, highly reproducible, and specific against other mycotoxins in agricultural products as well. In summary, the developed fluorescence immunoassay based on H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs can be used for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of mycotoxins or haptens in food safety monitoring. PMID:27093176

  6. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Sofo, Adriano; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria; Vitti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS) is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses). Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidases (APX), some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants. PMID:26075872

  7. In Vitro Effect of Sodium Fluoride on Malondialdehyde Concentration and on Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; García-Ortíz, Liliana; Morales González, José A.; Hernández-Rodríguez, Sergio; Ramírez-García, Sotero; Núñez-Ramos, Norma R.; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to describe the in vitro effect of sodium fluoride (NaF) on the specific activity of the major erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes, as well as on the membrane malondialdehyde concentration, as indicators of oxidative stress. For this purpose, human erythrocytes were incubated with NaF (0, 7, 28, 56, and 100 μg/mL) or NaF (100 μg/mL) + vitamin E (1, 2.5, 5 and 10 μg/mL). The malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration on the surface of the erythrocytes was determined, as were the enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GlPx). Our results demonstrated that erythrocytes incubated with increasing NaF concentrations had an increased MDA concentration, along with decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes. The presence of vitamin E partially reversed the toxic effects of NaF on erythrocytes. These findings suggest that NaF induces oxidative stress in erythrocytes in vitro, and this stress is partially reversed by the presence of vitamin E. PMID:24223512

  8. Circadian control by the reduction/oxidation pathway: catalase represses light-dependent clock gene expression in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Jun; Cho, Sehyung; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    Light is the key entraining stimulus for the circadian clock, but several features of the signaling pathways that convert the photic signal to clock entrainment remain to be deciphered. Here, we show that light induces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) that acts as the second messenger coupling photoreception to the zebrafish circadian clock. Treatment of light-responsive Z3 cells with H(2)O(2) triggers the induction of zCry1a and zPer2 genes and the subsequent circadian oscillation of zPer1. Remarkably, the induction kinetics and oscillation profile in response to H(2)O(2) are identical to those initiated by light. Catalase (Cat), an antioxidant enzyme degrading H(2)O(2), shows an oscillating pattern of expression and activity, antiphasic to zCry1a and zPer2. Interestingly, overexpression of zCAT results in a reduced light-dependent zCry1a and zPer2 gene induction. In contrast, inhibition of zCAT function enhances light-mediated inducibility of these clock genes. These findings implicate the enzymatic function of zCAT enzyme in the negative regulation of light-dependent clock gene transcriptional activation. Our findings provide an attractive link between the regulation of the cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) state and the photic signaling pathways implicated in circadian control. PMID:17898172

  9. The impact of heterologous catalase expression and superoxide dismutase overexpression on enhancing the oxidative resistance in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jinzhong; Zou, Yexia; Cao, Kunlin; Ma, Chengjie; Chen, Zhengjun

    2016-05-01

    Two heme-dependent catalase genes were amplified from genomic DNA of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 (KatE1) and Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 367 (KatE2), respectively, and a manganese-containing superoxide dismutase from Lactobacillus casei MCJΔ1 (MnSOD) were cloned into plasmid pELX1, yielding pELX1-KatE1, pELX1-KatE2 and pELX1-MnSOD, then the recombinant plasmids were transferred into L. casei MCJΔ1. The strains of L. casei MCJΔ1/pELX1-KatE1 and L. casei MCJΔ1/pELX1-KatE2 were tolerant at 2 mM H2O2. The survival rates of L. casei MCJΔ1/pELX1-KatE1 and L. casei MCJΔ1/pELX1-KatE2 were 270-fold and 300-fold higher than that of the control strain on a short-term H2O2 exposure, and in aerated condition, the survival cells counts were 146- and 190-fold higher than that of the control strain after 96 h of incubation. Furthermore, L. casei MCJΔ1/pELX1-MnSOD was the best in three recombinants which was superior in the living cell viability during storage when co-storage with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis LBCH-1. PMID:26922415

  10. Sensitive electrochemical immunoassay of carcinoembryonic antigen with signal dual-amplification using glucose oxidase and an artificial catalase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Tang, Dianping; Li, Qunfang; Su, Biling; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2011-07-01

    A new dual-amplification strategy of electrochemical signal based on the catalytic recycling of the product was developed for the antigen-antibody interaction by glucose oxidase (GOD)- conjugated gold-silver hollow microspheres (AuAgHSs) coupled with an artificial catalase, Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB), on a graphene-based immunosensing platform. The first signal amplification introduced in this study was based on the labeled GOD on the AuAgHSs toward the catalytic oxidation of glucose. The generated H(2)O(2) was catalytically reduced by the immobilized PB on the graphene nanosheets with the second amplification. With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was monitored as a model analyte by using the synthesized AuAgHSs as labels in pH 6.0 phosphate buffer containing 10mM glucose. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor exhibited a wide dynamic range of 0.005-50 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit (LOD) of 1.0 pg mL(-1) CEA (at 3σ). Both the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation (CVs) were lower than 10%. The specificity and stability of the immunosensor were acceptable. In addition, the assay was evaluated for clinical serum specimens, and received a good correlation with those obtained by the referenced electrochemiluminescent (ECL). PMID:21641413

  11. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses.

    PubMed

    Sofo, Adriano; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria; Vitti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS) is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses). Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidases (APX), some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants. PMID:26075872

  12. Evaluation of the serum catalase and myeloperoxidase activities in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals and concomitant cytogenetic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Mayukh; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Ghosh, Pritha; Das, Jayanta K.; Basu, Santanu; Sarkar, Ajoy K.; States, J. Christopher; Giri, Ashok K.

    2010-11-15

    Chronic arsenic exposure through contaminated drinking water is a major environmental health issue. Chronic arsenic exposure is known to exert its toxic effects by a variety of mechanisms, of which generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the most important. A high level of ROS, in turn, leads to DNA damage that might ultimately culminate in cancer. In order to keep the level of ROS in balance, an array of enzymes is present, of which catalase (CAT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are important members. Hence, in this study, we determined the activities of these two enzymes in the sera and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes in individuals exposed and unexposed to arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic in drinking water and in urine was used as a measure of exposure. Our results show that individuals chronically exposed to arsenic have significantly higher CAT and MPO activities and higher incidence of CA. We found moderate positive correlations between CAT and MPO activities, induction of CA and arsenic in urine and water. These results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure causes higher CAT and MPO activities in serum that correlates with induction of genetic damage. We conclude that the serum levels of these enzymes might be used as biomarkers of early arsenic exposure induced disease much before the classical dermatological symptoms of arsenicosis begin to appear.

  13. Moonlighting of Helicobacter pylori catalase protects against complement-mediated killing by utilising the host molecule vitronectin.

    PubMed

    Richter, Corinna; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Ermert, David; Singh, Birendra; Su, Yu-Ching; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Blom, Anna M; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important human pathogen and a common cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Despite H. pylori provoking strong innate and adaptive immune responses, the bacterium is able to successfully establish long-term infections. Vitronectin (Vn), a component of both the extracellular matrix and plasma, is involved in many physiological processes, including regulation of the complement system. The aim of this study was to define a receptor in H. pylori that binds Vn and determine the significance of the interaction for virulence. Surprisingly, by using proteomics, we found that the hydrogen peroxide-neutralizing enzyme catalase KatA is a major Vn-binding protein. Deletion of the katA gene in three different strains resulted in impaired binding of Vn. Recombinant KatA was generated and shown to bind with high affinity to a region between heparin-binding domain 2 and 3 of Vn that differs from previously characterised bacterial binding sites on the molecule. In terms of function, KatA protected H. pylori from complement-mediated killing in a Vn-dependent manner. Taken together, the virulence factor KatA is a Vn-binding protein that moonlights on the surface of H. pylori to promote bacterial evasion of host innate immunity. PMID:27087644

  14. Moonlighting of Helicobacter pylori catalase protects against complement-mediated killing by utilising the host molecule vitronectin

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Corinna; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Ermert, David; Singh, Birendra; Su, Yu-Ching; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Blom, Anna M.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important human pathogen and a common cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Despite H. pylori provoking strong innate and adaptive immune responses, the bacterium is able to successfully establish long-term infections. Vitronectin (Vn), a component of both the extracellular matrix and plasma, is involved in many physiological processes, including regulation of the complement system. The aim of this study was to define a receptor in H. pylori that binds Vn and determine the significance of the interaction for virulence. Surprisingly, by using proteomics, we found that the hydrogen peroxide-neutralizing enzyme catalase KatA is a major Vn-binding protein. Deletion of the katA gene in three different strains resulted in impaired binding of Vn. Recombinant KatA was generated and shown to bind with high affinity to a region between heparin-binding domain 2 and 3 of Vn that differs from previously characterised bacterial binding sites on the molecule. In terms of function, KatA protected H. pylori from complement-mediated killing in a Vn-dependent manner. Taken together, the virulence factor KatA is a Vn-binding protein that moonlights on the surface of H. pylori to promote bacterial evasion of host innate immunity. PMID:27087644

  15. Catalase Prevents Maternal Diabetes–Induced Perinatal Programming via the Nrf2–HO-1 Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shiao-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Sauvé, Alexandre; Ingelfinger, Julie R.; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether overexpression of catalase (CAT) in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) could prevent the programming of hypertension and kidney disease in the offspring of dams with maternal diabetes. Male offspring of nondiabetic and diabetic dams from two transgenic (Tg) lines (Hoxb7-green fluorescent protein [GFP]-Tg [controls] and Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg, which overexpress CAT in RPTCs) were studied from the prenatal period into adulthood. Nephrogenesis, systolic blood pressure, renal hyperfiltration, kidney injury, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), nuclear factor erythroid 2p45–related factor-2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was tested in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Renal dysmorphogenesis was observed in offspring of Hoxb7-GFP-Tg dams with severe maternal diabetes; the affected male offspring displayed higher renal ROS generation and developed hypertension and renal hyperfiltration as well as renal injury with heightened TGF-β1 expression in adulthood. These changes were ameliorated in male offspring of diabetic Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg dams via the Nrf2–HO-1 defense system. CAT promoted Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 gene expression, seen in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In conclusion, CAT overexpression in the RPTCs ameliorated maternal diabetes–induced perinatal programming, mediated, at least in part, by triggering the Nrf2–HO-1 defense system. PMID:22733796

  16. Manganese(II) induces cell division and increases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in an aging deinococcal culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, F.I.; Tan, S.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Addition of Mn(II) at 2.5 microM or higher to stationary-phase cultures of Deinococcus radiodurans IR was found to trigger at least three rounds of cell division. This Mn(II)-induced cell division (Mn-CD) did not occur when the culture was in the exponential or death phase. The Mn-CD effect produced daughter cells proportionally reduced in size, pigmentation, and radioresistance but proportionally increased in activity and amount of the oxygen toxicity defense enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. In addition, the concentration of an Mn-CD-induced protein was found to remain high throughout the entire Mn-CD phase. It was also found that an untreated culture exhibited a growth curve characterized by a very rapid exponential-stationary transition and that cells which had just reached the early stationary phase were synchronous. Our results suggest the presence of an Mn(II)-sensitive mechanism for controlling cell division. The Mn-CD effect appears to be specific to the cation Mn(II) and the radioresistant bacteria, deinococci.

  17. Spectroscopic investigations on the effect of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots on catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haoyu; Yang, Bingjun; Cui, Erqian; Liu, Rutao

    2014-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are recognized as some of the most promising semiconductor nanocrystals in biomedical applications. However, the potential toxicity of QDs has aroused wide public concern. Catalase (CAT) is a common enzyme in animal and plant tissues. For the potential application of QDs in vivo, it is important to investigate the interaction of QDs with CAT. In this work, the effect of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots with fluorescence emission peak at 612 nm (QDs-612) on CAT was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. Binding of QDs-612 to CAT caused static quenching of the fluorescence, the change of the secondary structure of CAT and the alteration of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues. The association constants K were determined to be K288K = 7.98 × 105 L mol-1 and K298K = 7.21 × 105 L mol-1. The interaction between QDs-612 and CAT was spontaneous with 1:1 stoichiometry approximately. The CAT activity was also inhibited for the bound QDs-612. This work provides direct evidence about enzyme toxicity of QDs-612 to CAT in vitro and establishes a new strategy to investigate the interaction between enzyme and QDs at a molecular level, which is helpful for clarifying the bioactivities of QDs in vivo.

  18. Hexachlorocyclohexane-induced changes in lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione content in chick liver.

    PubMed

    Samanta, L; Chainy, G B

    1995-02-01

    An elevation in the level of lipid peroxides in nuclear, mitochondrial and microsomal fractions of chick liver was recorded 6 hr after hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH; 50 mg/kg body wt., ip) treatment. The magnitude of increase remained more or less same even 24 hr after the pesticide treatment. Total glutathione content also increased by 6 hr of HCH treatment and did not change even 24 hr after the pesticide treatment. Protein content of crude homogenate and 10000 g supernatant decreased significantly 6 hr after the pesticide treatment. The magnitude of decrease was more or less same even 24 hr after the pesticide treatment. Although cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activities (expressed as units/mg protein) did not change 24 hr after HCH treatment, a small but significant increase in superoxide dismutase activity was recorded 6 hr after HCH treatment. On the other hand when activities were expressed as units/mg tissue wt., a significant decrease in the activities of both the enzymes was recorded 6 and 24 hr after HCH treatment. Therefore, the decrease in the activities of both the enzymes in response to HCH in chick liver may be due to decrease in tissue protein content in general rather than specific decrease in the activities of the enzymes. PMID:7538972

  19. Up-regulation of metallothionein gene expression in parkinsonian astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Michael, Gregory J; Esmailzadeh, Sharmin; Moran, Linda B; Christian, Lynne; Pearce, Ronald K B; Graeber, Manuel B

    2011-11-01

    The role of glial cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) is unclear. We have previously reported a striking up-regulation of DnaJB6 heat shock protein in PD substantia nigra astrocytes. Whole genome transcriptome analysis also indicated increased expression of metallothionein genes in substantia nigra and cortex of sporadic PD cases. Metallothioneins are metal-binding proteins in the CNS that are released by astrocytes and associated with neuroprotection. Metallothionein expression was investigated in 18 PD cases and 15 non-PD controls using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), in situ hybridisation (ISH) and immunocytochemistry (ICC). We observed a strong increase in the expression of metallothioneins MT1E, MT1F, MT1G, MT1H, MT1M, MT1X and MT2A in both PD nigra and frontal cortex. Expression of LRP2 (megalin), the neuronal metallothionein receptor was also significantly increased. qRT-PCR confirmed metallothionein up-regulation. Astrocytes were found to be the main source of metallothioneins 1 and 2 based on ISH results, and this finding was confirmed by ICC. Our findings demonstrate metallothionein expression by reactive astrocytes in PD nigra and support a neuroprotective role for these cells. The traditional view that nigral astrocytes are non-reactive in PD is clearly incorrect. However, it is possible that astrocytes are themselves affected by the disease process which may explain their comparatively modest and previously overlooked response. PMID:21800131

  20. Upregulation of Monocyte Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor during Human Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Dekkers, Pascale E. P.; ten Hove, Tessa; te Velde, Anje A.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; van der Poll, Tom

    2000-01-01

    The receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) (CD87) plays an important role in leukocyte adhesion and migration. To assess the effect of endotoxin on cellular uPAR, uPAR expression was determined on leukocytes by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis in seven healthy subjects following intravenous injection of endotoxin (lot G; 4 ng/kg). Endotoxin induced a transient increase in uPAR expression on monocytes, reaching a 92% ± 46% increase over baseline expression after 6 h (P < 0.05). Endotoxin did not influence uPAR expression on granulocytes, while uPAR remained undetectable on lymphocytes. Endotoxin also increased soluble uPAR levels in plasma (P < 0.05). Stimulation of human whole blood with endotoxin or gram-positive stimuli in vitro also resulted in an upregulation of monocyte uPAR expression. Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) upregulated monocyte uPAR expression, anti-TNF did not influence the endotoxin-induced increase in monocyte uPAR expression. These data suggest that infectious stimuli may influence monocyte function in vivo by enhancing the expression of uPAR. PMID:10722614

  1. Visuomotor feedback gains upregulate during the learning of novel dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Sae; Wolpert, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    At an early stage of learning novel dynamics, changes in muscle activity are mainly due to corrective feedback responses. These feedback contributions to the overall motor command are gradually reduced as feedforward control is learned. The temporary increased use of feedback could arise simply from the large errors in early learning with either unaltered gains or even slightly downregulated gains, or from an upregulation of the feedback gains when feedforward prediction is insufficient. We therefore investigated whether the sensorimotor control system alters feedback gains during adaptation to a novel force field generated by a robotic manipulandum. To probe the feedback gains throughout learning, we measured the magnitude of involuntary rapid visuomotor responses to rapid shifts in the visual location of the hand during reaching movements. We found large increases in the magnitude of the rapid visuomotor response whenever the dynamics changed: both when the force field was first presented, and when it was removed. We confirmed that these changes in feedback gain are not simply a byproduct of the change in background load, by demonstrating that this rapid visuomotor response is not load sensitive. Our results suggest that when the sensorimotor control system experiences errors, it increases the gain of the visuomotor feedback pathways to deal with the unexpected disturbances until the feedforward controller learns the appropriate dynamics. We suggest that these feedback gains are upregulated with increased uncertainty in the knowledge of the dynamics to counteract any errors or disturbances and ensure accurate and skillful movements. PMID:22539828

  2. Geniposide protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury in mice via up-regulating the expression of the main antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junming; Zhang, Yueyue; Liu, Ruixin; Li, Xiaobing; Cui, Ying; Qu, Lingbo

    2015-04-01

    Geniposide (GP) is one of main compounds in Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, with both medicinal and nutritional value. This study was designed to determine, for the first time, how GP from G. jasminoides protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury, and the underlying mechanisms. Mice were orally administered alcohol (6.0 g/kg body mass) 2 h after intragastric administration of GP and bifendate, every day for 7 continuous days. Six hours after the alcohol was administered, levels of serum alanine/aspartate transaminase (ALT/AST), hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), and catalase (CAT), and mRNA expression of CuZn-SOD and CAT were assayed. The results demonstrated that GP (20.0, 40.0, or 80 mg/kg) significantly reversed the excessive, alcohol-induced elevation in both serum ALT/AST and hepatic LPO levels. Moreover, hepatic GSH, GST, GPx, CuZn-SOD, and CAT levels were all decreased in the alcohol-treated mice, whereas treatment with GP reversed these decreases. Further analysis indicated that hepatic mRNA expression of CuZn-SOD and CAT in the alcohol-treated mice was significantly down-regulated, whereas GP up-regulated such decreases. Taken together, this study shows that GP protects against acute alcohol-induced liver injury via up-regulating the expression of the main antioxidant enzymes, and thus ameliorates alcohol-induced oxidative stress injury in the liver. PMID:25730420

  3. Ultrasensitive fluorescence immunoassay for detection of ochratoxin A using catalase-mediated fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Zhan, Shengnan; Xu, Hengyi; Meng, Xianwei; Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-04-01

    Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to perform a dynamic linear detection of OTA ranging from 0.05 pg mL-1 to 10 pg mL-1. The half maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.53 pg mL-1 and the limit of detection was 0.05 pg mL-1. These values were approximately 283- and 300-folds lower than those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-based conventional ELISA, respectively. The reported method is accurate, highly reproducible, and specific against other mycotoxins in agricultural products as well. In summary, the developed fluorescence immunoassay based on H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs can be used for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of mycotoxins or haptens in food safety monitoring.Herein, for the first time we report an improved competitive fluorescent enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the ultrasensitive detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced fluorescence quenching of mercaptopropionic acid-modified CdTe quantum dots (QDs). In this immunoassay, catalase (CAT) was labeled with OTA as a competitive antigen to connect the fluorescence signals of the QDs with the concentration of the target. Through the combinatorial use of H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs as a fluorescence signal output and the ultrahigh catalytic activity of CAT to H2O2, our proposed method could be used to perform a dynamic linear detection of OTA ranging from 0.05 pg mL-1 to 10 pg mL-1. The half maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.53 pg mL-1 and the limit of detection was 0.05 pg mL-1. These values were approximately 283- and 300-folds lower than those of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-based conventional ELISA, respectively. The reported method is accurate, highly reproducible, and specific against other mycotoxins in agricultural products as well. In summary, the developed fluorescence immunoassay based on H2O2-induced fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs can be used for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of mycotoxins or haptens in food safety monitoring. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01136e

  4. Effects of total dissolved gas supersaturated water on lethality and catalase activity of Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker)*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi-chao; Liu, Xiao-qing; Jiang, Wen; Li, Ke-feng; Du, Jun; Shen, Dan-zhou; Gong, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation caused by dam sluicing can result in gas bubble trauma (GBT) in fish and threaten their survival. In the present study, Chinese suckers (Myxocyprinus asiaticus Bleeker) were exposed to TDG supersaturated water at levels ranging from 120% to 145% for 48 h. The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the median lethal time (LT50) were determined to evaluate acute lethal effects on Chinese suckers. The results showed that the LC50 values of 4, 6, 8, and 10 h were 142%, 137%, 135%, and 130%, respectively. The LT50 values were 3.2, 4.7, 7.8, 9.2, and 43.4 h, respectively, when TDG supersaturated levels were 145%, 140%, 135%, 130%, and 125%. Furthermore, the biological responses in Chinese suckers were studied by assaying the catalase (CAT) activities in gills and muscles at the supersaturation level of 140% within LT50. The CAT activities in the gills and muscle tissues exhibited a regularity of a decrease after an increase. CAT activities in the muscles were increased significantly at 3/5LT50 (P<0.05) and then came back to the normal level. However, there were no significant differences between the treatment group (TDG level of 140%) and the control group (TDG level of 100%) on CAT activities in the gills before 3/5LT50 (P>0.05), but the activities were significantly lower than the normal level at 4/5LT50 and LT50 (P<0.05). PMID:23024046

  5. Detection of Human Intestinal Catalase-Negative, Gram-Positive Cocci by rRNA-Targeted Reverse Transcription-PCR?

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Kazunori; Kurakawa, Takashi; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji

    2010-01-01

    An analytical system based on rRNA-targeted reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) for enumeration of catalase-negative, Gram-positive cocci was established. Subgroup- or species-specific primer sets targeting 16S or 23S rRNA from Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Lactococcus were newly developed. The RT-qPCR method using these primers together with the previously reported primer sets specific for the Enterococcus genus, the Streptococcus genus, and several Streptococcus species was found to be able to quantify the target populations with detection limits of 103 to 104 cells per gram feces, which was more than 100 times as sensitive as the qPCR method (106 to 108 cells per gram feces). The RT-qPCR analysis of fecal samples from 24 healthy adult volunteers using the genus-specific primer sets revealed that Enterococcus and Streptococcus were present as intestinal commensals at population levels of log10 6.2 1.4 and 7.5 0.9 per gram feces (mean standard deviation [SD]), respectively. Detailed investigation using species- or subgroup-specific primer sets revealed that the volunteers harbored unique Enterococcus species, including the E. avium subgroup, the E. faecium subgroup, E. faecalis, the E. casseliflavus subgroup, and E. caccae, while the dominant human intestinal Streptococcus species was found to be S. salivarius. Various Lactococcus species, such as L. lactis subsp. lactis or L. lactis subsp. cremoris, L. garvieae, L. piscium, and L. plantarum, were also detected but at a lower population level (log10 4.6 1.2 per gram feces) and prevalence (33%). These results suggest that the RT-qPCR method enables the accurate and sensitive enumeration of human intestinal subdominant but still important populations, such as Gram-positive cocci. PMID:20581195

  6. Enhanced reactive oxygen species scavenging by overproduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase delays postharvest physiological deterioration of cassava storage roots.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R; Zhang, Peng

    2013-03-01

    Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of cassava (Manihot esculenta) storage roots is the result of a rapid oxidative burst, which leads to discoloration of the vascular tissues due to the oxidation of phenolic compounds. In this study, coexpression of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) in transgenic cassava was used to explore the intrinsic relationship between ROS scavenging and PPD occurrence. Transgenic cassava plants integrated with the expression cassette p54::MeCu/ZnSOD-35S::MeCAT1 were confirmed by Southern-blot analysis. The expression of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeCAT1 was verified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic activity analysis both in the leaves and storage roots. Under exposure to the ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen or to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the transgenic plants showed higher enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT than the wild-type plants. Levels of malondialdehyde, chlorophyll degradation, lipid peroxidation, and H2O2 accumulation were dramatically reduced in the transgenic lines compared with the wild type. After harvest, the storage roots of transgenic cassava lines show a delay in their PPD response of at least 10 d, accompanied by less mitochondrial oxidation and H2O2 accumulation, compared with those of the wild type. We hypothesize that this is due to the combined ectopic expression of Cu/ZnSOD and CAT leading to an improved synergistic ROS-scavenging capacity of the roots. Our study not only sheds light on the mechanism of the PPD process but also develops an effective approach for delaying the occurrence of PPD in cassava. PMID:23344905

  7. Human disease associated with "Campylobacter upsaliensis" (catalase-negative or weakly positive Campylobacter species) in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, C M; Shaffer, N; Edmonds, P; Barrett, T J; Lambert, M A; Baker, C; Perlman, D M; Brenner, D J

    1989-01-01

    Catalase-negative or weakly positive (CNW) thermotolerant campylobacteria, first isolated from dogs in 1983, were recently recognized as a new species, "Campylobacter upsaliensis," but their association with human illness has not been established. Twelve human isolates received at the Centers for Disease Control between 1980 and 1986 were identified as CNW campylobacteria by biochemical tests, cellular fatty acid composition, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Eleven CNW Campylobacter strains tested by DNA-DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite method) were all highly related and were related to two "C. upsaliensis" strains at the species level (86% under optimal conditions and 76% under stringent conditions). Clinical information was obtained for 11 human isolates from three stool and eight blood specimens. They were isolated from four female and seven male patients 6.5 months to 83 years of age residing in 10 different states. The patients had a wide spectrum of illnesses. The stool isolates were obtained from two previously healthy persons during episodes of acute gastroenteritis and from one immunocompromised patient with persistent diarrhea and fever. The blood isolates were obtained from two infants with fever and respiratory symptoms; a young woman with a ruptured ectopic pregnancy; three elderly men with underlying chronic diseases; and two immunocompromised adults. In a bactericidal assay to assess sensitivity to serum, seven of eight blood isolates showed some resistance to killing by pooled normal human serum. These observations suggest that "C. upsaliensis" is a potential human pathogen associated with both gastroenteritis and bacteremia in normal hosts and with opportunistic infection in immunocompromised individuals. PMID:2913038

  8. Structure of the C-terminal domain of the catalase-peroxidase KatG from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Carpena, Xavier; Melik-Adamyan, William; Loewen, Peter C; Fita, Ignacio

    2004-10-01

    Catalase-peroxidases or KatGs, the apparent in vivo activators of the anti-tubercular pro-drug isoniazid, are active as homodimers, each subunit having two distinct but sequence- and structure-related domains. The N-terminal domain contains the haem group and is catalytically active, while the C-terminal domain lacks the cofactor. The C-terminal domain of KatG from Escherichia coli is expressed as a soluble protein which has been crystallized in triclinic, orthorhombic and tetragonal crystal forms. Packing in the orthorhombic crystals, with eight molecules in the asymmetric unit, follows the pattern of commensurate modulated structures, which explains the diversity of pseudo-origin peaks observed in the native Patterson map. The different crystal forms arise from variations in the length and sequence of the N-terminal extensions in the different constructs. Despite the variability in the N-terminal region, the overall domain conformations beginning with Pro437 are very similar both to each other and to the C-terminal domains within the native structures of the KatGs from Haloarcula marismortui and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Some structural reorganization in the C-terminal domain relative to the N-terminal domain has evolved to compensate for the absence of the haem group. A high percentage of the residues in the C-terminal domains of KatG proteins from different sources are highly conserved and these residues are spread uniformly throughout the domain. The easily folded nature and retention of structure in the C-terminal domain suggests that it may serve as a platform for the folding of the N-terminal domain and for stabilization of the molecular dimer. PMID:15388929

  9. Effects of source and level of magnesium on catalase activity and its gene expression in livers of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongxiang; Guo, Yuming; Wang, Zhong; Nie, We

    2007-08-01

    The effects of dietary supplemental magnesium oxide (MgO), magnesium-L-aspartate (MgAsp) and monomagnesium-di-L-aspartate (MgdiAsp) on hepatic catalase (CAT) activity and its mRNA expression were investigated. A total of 360 one-day-old male Abor Acre broiler chickens were allocated to ten treatments, i.e. control plus 9 treatments from 3 x 3 factorial arrangement (Mg source, Mg level), each treatment with six replicates of 6 chickens. The birds were fed with the basal diet alone or supplemented with magnesium (Mg) at 0.9, 1.8, 2.7 g/kg of the diet from MgO, MgAsp or MgdiAsp. Results showed that hepatic Mg concentration increased quadratically as MgO or MgAsp supplementation increased (p < 0.01). Hepatic CAT activity increased linearly in birds fed with MgAsp or MgdiAsp (p < 0.01) and quadratically in birds fed with MgO (p < 0.05) as dietary Mg supplementation level increased. Hepatic CAT mRNA was linearly correlated with the dietary Mg supplementation level (p < 0.01). There were positive correlations among hepatic CAT activity, its mRNA expression level and hepatic Mg concentration (p < 0.01). No effect of Mg2+ on the purified CAT activity was detected in vitro enzymatic reaction system (p > 0.05). Supplemental MgAsp or MgdiAsp was more efficient to increase hepatic Mg concentrations, enhance hepatic CAT activity and its mRNA expression than MgO (p < 0.01). It can be concluded that dietary Mg supplementation could increase hepatic Mg concentration, enhance CAT mRNA expression and consequently enhance CAT activity, and the organic Mg (MgAsp or MgdiAsp) is much more efficient than the inorganic form (MgO). PMID:17760306

  10. Isolation and characterization of a catalase gene "HuCAT3" from pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) and its expression under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qiong; Gao, Guo-Li; Fan, Qing-jie; Qiao, Guang; Wen, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Tao; Peng, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yong-Qiang

    2015-05-25

    Abiotic stresses usually cause H2O2 accumulation, with harmful effects, in plants. Catalase may play a key protective role in plant cells by detoxifying this excess H2O2. Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) shows broad ecological adaptation due to its high tolerance to abiotic stresses, e.g. drought, heat and poor soil. However, involvement of the pitaya catalase gene (HuCAT) in tolerance to abiotic stresses is unknown. In the present study, a full-length HuCAT3 cDNA (1870 bp) was isolated from pitaya based on our previous microarray data and RACE method. The cDNA sequence and deduced amino acid sequence shared 73-77% and 75-80% identity with other plant catalases, respectively. HuCAT3 contains conserved catalase family domain and catalytic sites. Pairwise comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that HuCAT3 is most similar to Eriobotrya japonica CAT, followed by Dimocarpus longan CAT and Nicotiana tabacum CAT1. Expression profile analysis demonstrated that HuCAT3 is mainly expressed in green cotyledons and mature stems, and was regulated by H2O2, drought, cold and salt stress, whereas, its expression patterns and maximum expression levels varied with stress types. HuCAT activity increased as exposure to the tested stresses, and the fluctuation of HuCAT activity was consistent with HuCAT3 mRNA abundance (except for 0.5 days upon drought stress). HuCAT3 mRNA elevations and HuCAT activities changes under cold stress were also in conformity with the cold tolerances among the four genotypes. The obtained results confirmed a major role of HuCAT3 in abiotic stress response of pitaya. This may prove useful in understanding pitaya's high tolerance to abiotic stresses at molecular level. PMID:25752288

  11. Equivalence of the projected structure of thin catalase crystals preserved for electron microscopy by negative stain, glucose or embedding in the presence of tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Akey, C W; Edelstein, S J

    1983-02-01

    Thin crystals of beef liver catalase have been examined by electron microscopy following various preservation procedures. In the first part of this investigation, micrographs of three principal projections were obtained from thin sections of micro-crystals embedded in the presence of tannic acid. Computer reconstructions confirmed the space group assignment of P2(1)2(1)2(1) and permitted the packing arrangement of the catalase tetramers to be deduced to a resolution of about 20 A. These results corroborate the packing model for this crystal form proposed by Unwin (1975) on the basis of molecular modeling of one projection. In the second part of this investigation, the projected structures of the thin crystals in various preserving media were compared. The negative contrasting of crystals embedded in the presence of tannic acid was confirmed by direct comparison with non-embedded, negatively stained thin platelet crystals. In addition, good agreement at 20 A resolution was observed between the structure of negatively stained crystals and the structure of crystal platelets preserved in glucose and examined by low-dose methods, while moderate agreement was established with the published data of Taylor (1978) for crystals embedded in thin ice films. Tannic acid alone was also found to serve as a suitable medium for preserving catalase crystals to a resolution of 3 X 7 A as judged by electron diffraction. Overall, we demonstrate that projections obtained from thin sections of catalase crystals embedded in the presence of tannic acid can provide a reliable, negatively contrasted representation of the protein structure to 20 A resolution. Examination of sectioned crystals could thus provide a useful adjunct to X-ray crystallographic studies of protein crystals and three-dimensional reconstruction of crystal thin sections should ultimately be possible. PMID:6842587

  12. Role of Biological Characteristics of Staphylococcus epidermidis in Intraerythrocytic Invasion and in Modulation of Erythrocyte Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase Activities in Experimental Generalized Infection.

    PubMed

    Shchuplova, E A; Stadnikov, A A; Fadeev, S B

    2015-05-01

    Studies on mouse model of generalized Staphylococcus epidermidis infection have demonstrated that erythrocytes more often contained microorganisms with pronounced antihemoglobin activity and less frequently with hemolytic activity. Infection with S. epidermidis strains characterized by pronounced hemolytic or antihemoglobin activities was associated with inhibition of erythrocyte catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in all cases, except infection with strains with high antihemoglobin activity, when superoxide dismutase activity increased. PMID:26033594

  13. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Upregulates the Mitochondrial Transcription and Translation Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, M. P.; Antrobus, R.; Rorbach, J.; van Haute, L.; Umrania, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Minczuk, M.; Lehner, P. J.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) profoundly affects cellular metabolism. Like in tumor cells, HCMV infection increases glycolysis, and glucose carbon is shifted from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. However, unlike in many tumor cells, where aerobic glycolysis is accompanied by suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Here, we affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We found that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle. Specifically, proteins involved in biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome were highly upregulated by HCMV infection. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation with chloramphenicol or knockdown of HCMV-induced ribosome biogenesis factor MRM3 abolished the HCMV-mediated increase in mitochondrially encoded proteins and significantly impaired viral growth under bioenergetically restricting conditions. Our findings demonstrate how HCMV manipulates mitochondrial biogenesis to support its replication. PMID:27025248

  14. Upregulation of Phosphodiesterase type 5 in the Hyperplastic Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhao; Zang, Ning; Jiang, Yaoming; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xinghuan; Zhang, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Both erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common in the aging male. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) for treating LUTS/BPH with/without ED. However, the influence of BPH on prostatic PDE5 expression has never been studied. A testosterone-induced rat model of BPH was developed and human hyperplastic prostate specimens were harvested during cystoprostatectomy. PDE5, nNOS, eNOS and α1-adrenoreceptor subtypes (α1aARs, α1bARs and α1dARs) were determined with real-time RT-PCR for rat tissues whilst PDE5 and α1-adrenoreceptor subtypes were determined in human samples. PDE5 was further analyzed with Western-blot and histological examination. Serum testosterone was measured with ELISA. The rat BPH model was validated as having a significantly enlarged prostate. PDE5 localized mainly in fibromuscular stroma in prostate. Our data showed a significant and previously undocumented upregulation of PDE5 in both rat and human BPH, along with increased expression of nNOS and α1dARs for rat tissues and α1aARs for human BPH. The upregulation of PDE5 in the hyperplastic prostate could explain the mechanism and contribute to the high effectiveness of PDE5-Is for treating LUTS/BPH. Fibromuscular stroma could be the main target for PDE5-Is within prostate. PMID:26657792

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus upregulates intestinal NHE3 expression and function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varsha; Raheja, Geetu; Borthakur, Alip; Kumar, Anoop; Gill, Ravinder K.; Alakkam, Anas; Malakooti, Jaleh

    2012-01-01

    A major mechanism of electroneutral NaCl absorption in the human ileum and colon involves coupling of Na+/H+ and Cl−/HCO3− exchangers. Disturbances in these mechanisms have been implicated in diarrheal conditions. Probiotics such as Lactobacillus have been indicated to be beneficial in the management of gastrointestinal disorders, including diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying antidiarrheal effects of probiotics have not been fully understood. We have previously demonstrated Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) to stimulate Cl−/HCO3− exchange activity via an increase in the surface levels and expression of the Cl−/HCO3− exchanger DRA in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of LA on NHE3, the Na+/H+ exchanger involved in the coupled electroneutral NaCl absorption, are not known. Current studies were, therefore, undertaken to investigate the effects of LA on the function and expression of NHE3 and to determine the mechanisms involved. Treatment of Caco2 cells with LA or its conditioned culture supernatant (CS) for 8–24 h resulted in a significant increase in Na+/H+ exchange activity, mRNA, and protein levels of NHE3. LA-CS upregulation of NHE3 function and expression was also observed in SK-CO15 cells, a human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line. Additionally, LA treatment increased NHE3 promoter activity, suggesting involvement of transcriptional mechanisms. In vivo, mice gavaged with live LA showed significant increase in NHE3 mRNA and protein expression in the ileum and colonic regions. In conclusion, LA-induced increase in NHE3 expression may contribute to the upregulation of intestinal electrolyte absorption and might underlie the potential antidiarrheal effects of probiotics. PMID:23086913

  16. Expression of multiple copies of mitochondrially targeted catalase or genomic Mn superoxide dismutase transgenes does not extend the life span of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mockett, Robin J.; Sohal, Barbara H.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-01-01

    The simultaneous overexpression of multiple copies of Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ectopic catalase (mtCat) transgenes in the mitochondria of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, was shown previously to diminish the life span. The hypothesis tested in the present study was that this effect was due primarily to the presence of one or the other transgene. An alternative hypothesis was that both transgenes have additive, negative effects. Crosses were performed between five pairs of transgenic lines containing single-copy insertions of either mtCat, Mn SOD, or P element vector control transgenes at unique loci, and the life spans of progeny containing two mtCat, Mn SOD or vector insertions were determined. Increasing amounts of mitochondrial catalase activity tended to be associated with decreases in mean life span. Overexpression of two copies of the genomic Mn SOD transgene had no effect on life span. The results do not support the hypothesis that enhanced mitochondrial SOD or catalase activity promotes longevity in flies. PMID:20923705

  17. A high constitutive catalase activity confers resistance to methyl viologen-promoted oxidative stress in a mutant of the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133.

    PubMed

    Moirangthem, Lakshmipyari Devi; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Stensjö, Karin; Lindblad, Peter; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy

    2014-04-01

    A spontaneous methyl viologen (MV)-resistant mutant of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 was isolated and the major enzymatic antioxidants involved in combating MV-induced oxidative stress were evaluated. The mutant displayed a high constitutive catalase activity as a consequence of which, the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species in the mutant was lower than the wild type (N. punctiforme) in the presence of MV. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity that consisted of a SodA (manganese-SOD) and a SodB (iron-SOD) was not suppressed in the mutant following MV treatment. The mutant was, however, characterised by a lower peroxidase activity compared with its wild type, and its improved tolerance to externally added H₂O₂ could only be attributed to enhanced catalase activity. Furthermore, MV-induced toxic effects on the wild type such as (1) loss of photosynthetic performance assessed as maximal quantum yield of photosystem II, (2) nitrogenase inactivation, and (3) filament fragmentation and cell lysis were not observed in the mutant. These findings highlight the importance of catalase in preventing MV-promoted oxidative damage and cell death in the cyanobacterium N. punctiforme. Such oxidative stress resistant mutants of cyanobacteria are likely to be a better source of biofertilisers, as they can grow and fix nitrogen in an unhindered manner in agricultural fields that are often contaminated with the herbicide MV, also commonly known as paraquat. PMID:24384747

  18. Catellicoccus marimammalium gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped bacterium from porpoise and grey seal.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Paul A; Collins, Matthew D; Falsen, Enevold; Foster, Geoffrey

    2006-02-01

    Two strains of an unknown Gram-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, coccus-shaped bacterium, originating from a porpoise and a grey seal, were characterized using phenotypic, biochemical and molecular phylogenetic methods. Chemical studies revealed the presence of a cell-wall murein based on L-lysine (type L-lys-gly-D-Asp) and a DNA G+C content of 38 mol%. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that this unidentified coccus-shaped organism formed a hitherto unknown subline closely related to, albeit distinct from, a number of other catalase-negative genera which included Enterococcus, Melissococcus, Tetragenococcus and Vagococcus. Other known Gram-positive, catalase-negative taxa were more distantly related. Tree-branching considerations and sequence divergence values of >6% with recognized taxa were indicative of this novel bacterium representing a separate genus. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic evidence, it is proposed that this unknown bacterium, recovered from a porpoise and a grey seal, be classified as a novel genus and species, Catellicoccus marimammalium gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is M35/04/3T (=CCUG 49459T=CIP 108575T). PMID:16449452

  19. The peroxidase/catalase-like activities of MFe₂O₄ (M=Mg, Ni, Cu) MNPs and their application in colorimetric biosensing of glucose.

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Qin, Wenjie; Zhang, Huige; Rahman, Zia Ur; Ren, Cuiling; Ma, Sudai; Chen, Xingguo

    2015-01-15

    MFe2O4 (M=Mg, Ni, Cu) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were found to have catalytic activities similar to those of biological enzymes such as catalase and peroxidase. These nanomaterials, as bifunctional catalase/peroxidases (KatGs), not only could catalyze H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radicals, which oxidized peroxidase substrate to produce color, but also could catalyze the decomposition reaction of H2O2 into water and oxygen directly in the same condition through the catalase-like activity. And it was also found that the amount of generated hydroxyl radicals and oxygen was related to the concentration of MFe2O4 (M=Mg, Ni, Cu) MNPs. The peroxidase-like catalytic behavior of MFe2O4 MNPs was analyzed in detail. Under the optimized conditions, NiFe2O4 MNPs were used as a colorimetric biosensor for the detection of 9.4×10(-7)-2.5×10(-5) mol L(-1) glucose with a limit of detection (LOD) of 4.5×10(-7) mol L(-1). The sensor was successfully applied to glucose detection in urine sample. PMID:25127473

  20. Fenton reaction-mediated fluorescence quenching of N-acetyl-L-cysteine-protected gold nanoclusters: analytical applications of hydrogen peroxide, glucose, and catalase detection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao-Hua; Wu, Gang-Wei; He, Dong; Peng, Hua-Ping; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Wei

    2015-11-21

    Given the importance of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in many biological processes and its wide application in various industries, the demand for sensitive, accurate, and economical H2O2 sensors is high. In this study, we used Fenton reaction-stimulated fluorescence quenching of N-acetyl-L-cysteine-protected gold nanoclusters (NAC-AuNCs) as a reporter system for the determination of H2O2. After the experimental conditions were optimized, the sensing platform enabled the analysis of H2O2 with a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.027 μM. As the glucose oxidase cascade leads to the generation of H2O2 and catalase catalyzes the decomposition of H2O2, these two biocatalytic procedures can be probed by the Fenton reaction-mediated quenching of NAC-AuNCs. The LOD for glucose was found to be 0.18 μM, and the linear range was 0.39-27.22 μM. The LOD for catalase was 0.002 U mL(-1), and the linear range was 0.01-0.3 U mL(-1). Moreover, the proposed sensing methods were successfully applied for human serum glucose detection and the non-invasive determination of catalase activity in human saliva, demonstrating their great potential for practical applications. PMID:26436146

  1. Environmental Lead Exposure, Catalase Gene, and Markers of Antioxidant and Oxidative Stress Relation to Hypertension: An Analysis Based on the EGAT Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaojarern, Sukhumpun; Chanprasertyothin, Suwannee; Panpunuan, Pachara; Petchpoung, Krittaya; Tatsaneeyapant, Aninthita; Yoovathaworn, Krongtong; Sura, Thunyachai; Kaojarern, Sming; Sritara, Piyamit

    2015-01-01

    Lead has been linked to the development of hypertension via oxidative stress. Catalase plays an important role in the disposal of hydrogen peroxide in erythrocyte and its activity was determined by CAT gene. The aims of this study were to investigate (1) the association between blood levels of antioxidant markers such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, oxidative stress-marker (malondialdehyde), and blood lead level and (2) the influence of genetic polymorphism of CAT gene (rs769217) on change in blood pressure in general population of EGAT study project. This is a cross-sectional study of 332 normotensive, 432 prehypertensive, and 222 hypertensive male subjects. Hypertensive subjects had significantly higher blood lead level (5.28 μg/dL) compared to normotensive (4.41 μg/dL) and prehypertensive (4.55 μg/dL) subjects (P < 0.05). These significant findings are also found in MDA levels. Moreover, individuals with TT genotype in hypertensive group had significantly higher blood lead and MDA levels (6.06 μg/dL and 9.67 μmol/L) than those with CC genotype (5.32 μg/dL and 8.31 μmol/L, P < 0.05). Our findings suggested that decreased blood catalase activity in this polymorphism together with low level lead exposure induced lipid peroxidation may be responsible for hypertension. PMID:25793211

  2. Environmental lead exposure, catalase gene, and markers of antioxidant and oxidative stress relation to hypertension: an analysis based on the EGAT study.

    PubMed

    Sirivarasai, Jintana; Kaojarern, Sukhumpun; Chanprasertyothin, Suwannee; Panpunuan, Pachara; Petchpoung, Krittaya; Tatsaneeyapant, Aninthita; Yoovathaworn, Krongtong; Sura, Thunyachai; Kaojarern, Sming; Sritara, Piyamit

    2015-01-01

    Lead has been linked to the development of hypertension via oxidative stress. Catalase plays an important role in the disposal of hydrogen peroxide in erythrocyte and its activity was determined by CAT gene. The aims of this study were to investigate (1) the association between blood levels of antioxidant markers such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, oxidative stress-marker (malondialdehyde), and blood lead level and (2) the influence of genetic polymorphism of CAT gene (rs769217) on change in blood pressure in general population of EGAT study project. This is a cross-sectional study of 332 normotensive, 432 prehypertensive, and 222 hypertensive male subjects. Hypertensive subjects had significantly higher blood lead level (5.28 μg/dL) compared to normotensive (4.41 μg/dL) and prehypertensive (4.55 μg/dL) subjects (P < 0.05). These significant findings are also found in MDA levels. Moreover, individuals with TT genotype in hypertensive group had significantly higher blood lead and MDA levels (6.06 μg/dL and 9.67 μmol/L) than those with CC genotype (5.32 μg/dL and 8.31 μmol/L, P < 0.05). Our findings suggested that decreased blood catalase activity in this polymorphism together with low level lead exposure induced lipid peroxidation may be responsible for hypertension. PMID:25793211

  3. Expression of multiple copies of mitochondrially targeted catalase or genomic Mn superoxide dismutase transgenes does not extend the life span of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mockett, Robin J; Sohal, Barbara H; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2010-12-15

    The simultaneous overexpression of multiple copies of Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ectopic catalase (mtCat) transgenes in the mitochondria of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, was shown previously to diminish the life span. The hypothesis tested in this study was that this effect was due primarily to the presence of one or the other transgene. An alternative hypothesis was that both transgenes have additive, negative effects. Crosses were performed between five pairs of transgenic lines containing single-copy insertions of mtCat, Mn SOD, or P element vector control transgenes at unique loci, and the life spans of progeny containing two mtCat, Mn SOD, or vector insertions were determined. Increasing amounts of mitochondrial catalase activity tended to be associated with decreases in mean life span. Overexpression of two copies of the genomic Mn SOD transgene had no effect on life span. The results do not support the hypothesis that enhanced mitochondrial SOD or catalase activity promotes longevity in flies. PMID:20923705

  4. Protopanaxatriol Ginsenoside Rh1 Upregulates Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Gene Expression in Rat Primary Astrocytes: Involvement of MAP Kinases and Nrf2/ARE Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Sun; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress activates several intracellular signaling cascades that may have deleterious effects on neuronal cell survival. Thus, controlling oxidative stress has been suggested as an important strategy for prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we found that ginsenoside Rh1 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species generation and subsequent cell death in rat primary astrocytes. Rh1 increased the expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, superoxide dismutase-2, and catalase, that are under the control of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. Further mechanistic studies showed that Rh1 increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE), and increased the ARE-mediated transcription activities in rat primary astrocytes. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed that MAP kinases are important in HO-1 expression, and act by modulating ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. Therefore, the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes by Rh1 may provide preventive therapeutic potential for various neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with oxidative stress. PMID:26759699

  5. Poxue Huayu and Tianjing Busui Decoction for cerebral hemorrhage (Upregulation of neurotrophic factor expression): Upregulation of neurotrophic factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jixiang; Zhou, Xiangyu; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhang, Pengguo

    2013-01-01

    This study established a rat model of cerebral hemorrhage by injecting autologous anticoagulated blood. Rat models were intragastrically administered 5, 10, 20 g/kg Poxue Huayu and Tianjing Busui Decoction, supplemented with Hirudo, raw rhubarb, raw Pollen Typhae, gadfly, Fructrs Trichosanthis, Radix Notoginseng, Rhizoma Acori Talarinowii, and glue of tortoise plastron, once a day, for 14 consecutive days. Results demonstrated that brain water content significantly reduced in rats with cerebral hemorrhage, and intracerebral hematoma volume markedly reduced after treatment. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tyrosine kinase B and vascular endothelial growth factor expression noticeably increased around the surrounding hematoma. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase B mRNA expression significantly increased around the surrounding hematoma. Neurologic impairment obviously reduced. These results indicated that Poxue Huayu and Tianjing Busui Decoction exert therapeutic effects on cerebral hemorrhage by upregulating the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. PMID:25206512

  6. Effects of aluminum sulphate and citric acid ingestion on lipid peroxidation and on activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in cerebral hemisphere and liver of developing young chicks.

    PubMed

    Swain, C; Chainy, G B

    1998-10-01

    Effect of oral administration of aluminum sulphate (200 and 400 mg/kg body wt/day) without or with citric acid (62 mg/kg body wt/day) to day-old White Leghorn male chicks (n = 5 per group) for 30 days was studied on the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, and level of lipid peroxidation in cerebral hemisphere and l