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1

The tribochemical mechanism of the borate modified by N-containing compound as oil additive  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tribological properties of the borate modified by N-containing compound were investigated with a four-ball tester. The boundary film on the rubbed surface were analyzed using a small area X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), the depth profiling XPS and the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Results of the tribological properties indicated that the borate modified by N-containing compound possesses good anti-wear and

Yulin Qiao; Weimin Liu; Shangkui Qi; Qunji Xue; Binshi Xu; Shining Ma

1998-01-01

2

Organic Compounds in Stardust  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The successful return of the STARDUST spacecraft provides a unique opportunity to investigate the nature and distribution of organic matter in cometary dust particles collected from Comet 81P/Wild-2. Analysis of individual cometary impact tracks in silica aerogel using the technique of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) demonstrates the presence of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated with hypervelocity capture, the majority of the observed organic species appear indigenous to the impacting particles and are hence of cometary origin. While the aromatic fraction of the total organic matter present is believed to be small, it is notable in that it appears to be N-rich. Spectral analysis in combination with instrumental detection sensitivities suggest that N is incorporated predominantly in the form of aromatic nitriles (R-C N). While organic species in the STARDUST samples do share some similarities with those present in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites, the closest match is found with stratospherically collected interplanetary dust particles. These findings are consistent with the notion that a fraction of interplanetary dust is of cometary origin. The presence of complex organic N-containing species in comets has astrobiological implications since comets are likely to have contributed to the prebiotic chemical inventory of both the Earth and Mars.

McKay, David S.; Clemett. Simon J.; Sandford, Scott A.; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Hoerz, Fredrich

2011-01-01

3

Organic Compounds Database  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Colby College Department of Chemistry offers the Organic Compounds Database, which was compiled by Harold Bell of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Visitors can search by the compounds melting point, boiling point, index of refraction, molecular weight, formula, absorption wavelength, mass spectral peak, chemical type, and by partial name. Once entered, results are returned with basically the same type of information that can be searched, plus any other critical information. References are provided for the close to 2500 organic compounds included in the database; yet, because the site was last modified in 1995, varying the data may be required to fully authenticate its accuracy.

Bell, Harold M.

2000-01-01

4

Organic compounds in meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problem of whether organic compounds originated in meteorites as a primary condensate from a solar gas or whether they were introduced as a secondary product into the meteorite during its residence in a parent body is examined by initially attempting to reconstruct the physical conditions during condensation (temperature, pressure, time) from clues in the inorganic matrix of the meteorite. The condensation behavior of carbon under these conditions is then analyzed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations, and compounds synthesized in model experiments on the condensation of carbon are compared with those actually found in meteorites. Organic compounds in meteorites seem to have formed by catalytic reactions of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and ammonia in the solar nebula at 360 to 400 K temperature and about 3 to 7.6 microtorr pressure. The onset of these reactions was triggered by the formation of suitable catalysts (magnetite, hydrated silicates) at these temperatures.

Anders, E.; Hayatsu, R.; Studier, M. H.

1973-01-01

5

Organic compounds in meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent studies of carbonaceous chondrites provide evidence that certain organic compounds are indigenous and the result of an abiotic, chemical synthesis. The results of several investigators have established the presence of amino acids and precursors, mono- and dicarboxylic acids, N-heterocycles, and hydrocarbons as well as other compounds. For example, studies of the Murchison and Murray meteorites have revealed the presence of at least 40 amino acids with nearly equal abundances of D and L isomers. The population consists of both protein and nonprotein amino acids including a wide variety of linear, cyclic, and polyfunctional types. Results show a trend of decreasing concentration with increasing carbon number, with the most abundant being glycine (41 n Moles/g). These and other results to be reviewed provide persuasive support for the theory of chemical evolution and provide the only natural evidence for the protobiological subset of molecules from which life on earth may have arisen.

Lawless, J. G.

1980-01-01

6

Potential Antimalarial Organic Sulfur Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In an attempt to develop useful antimalarial medicinal agents, a series of twenty two organic sulfur compounds were synthesized which were analogous in structure to 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone an effective antimalarial. Fifteen of these compounds were N-...

K. K. Andersen J. Bhattacharyya S. K. Mukhopadhyay

1969-01-01

7

Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. To date, these compounds provide the only record available to study a range of organic chemical processes in the early Solar System chemistry. The Murchison meteorite is the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorite with respect to organic chemistry. The study of its organic compounds has related principally to aqueous meteorite parent body chemistry and compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. Among the classes of organic compounds found in Murchison are amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, purines and pyrimidines (Table 1). Compounds such as these were quite likely delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets. Until now, polyhydroxylated compounds (polyols), including sugars (polyhydroxy aldehydes or ketones), sugar alcohols, sugar acids, etc., had not been identified in Murchison. Ribose and deoxyribose, five-carbon sugars, are central to the role of contemporary nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. Glycerol, a three-carbon sugar alcohol, is a constituent of all known biological membranes. Due to the relative lability of sugars, some researchers have questioned the lifetime of sugars under the presumed conditions on the early Earth and postulated other (more stable) compounds as constituents of the first replicating molecules. The identification of potential sources and/or formation mechanisms of pre-biotic polyols would add to the understanding of what organic compounds were available, and for what length of time, on the ancient Earth.

Cooper, Grorge

2001-01-01

8

PERSISTENT PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have gained notoriety in the recent past. Global distribution of PFCs in wildlife, environmental samples and humans has sparked a recent increase in new investigations concerning PFCs. Historically PFCs have been used in a wide variety of consume...

9

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)  

MedlinePLUS

... carbonless copy paper, graphics and craft materials including glues and adhesives, permanent markers, and photographic solutions. Organic ... day. The hazards include exposure to chemicals from glues, polishes, removers, and other salon products; muscle strains ...

10

Thermodynamics of organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research program consisted of an integrated and interrelated effort of basic and applied research in chemical thermodynamics and thermochemistry. Knowledge of variation of physical and thermodynamic properties with molecular structure was used to select compounds for study that because of high ring strain or unusual steric effects may have good energy characteristics per unit volume or per unit mass and thus be useful in the synthesis of high energy fuels. These materials were synthesized, and their thermodynamic properties were evaluated. In cooperation with researcher at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, ramjet fuels currently in use were subjected to careful thermodynamic evaluation by measurements of heat capacity, enthalpy of combustion and vapor pressure. During the last year of this effort, seven kerosene-type fuels produced by British Petroleum and seven jet fuels produced from shale oil were studied.

Gammon, B. E.; Smith, N. K.

1982-11-01

11

[Energies of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The enthalpy of reduction of lactones to the corresponding diols has been determined, allowing the enthaipies of formation of the lactones to be determined. Results of this study agree well with data obtained for enthalpies of hydrolysis of the lactones. We have begun the measurement of the enthalpies of reduction of norbornanones, and we have shown that it is possible to determine the difference in energy between the exo and endo forms of the product alcohols by measuring the equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. The study of the enthalpies of hydration of carbonyl compounds has continued, and the enthalpies of hydrolysis of the corresponding ketals is being determined. The study of the enthalpies of hydration of alkenes is nearly completed, and the rearrangement reactions which were uncovered are being investigated.

Wiberg, K.B.

1991-12-31

12

Energies of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The enthalpy of reduction of lactones to the corresponding diols has been determined, allowing the enthalpies of formation of the lactones to be determined. The results of this study agree well with the data we have obtained for the enthalpies of hydrolysis of the lactones. We have begun the measurement of the enthalpies of reduction of norbornanones, and we have shown that it is possible to determine the difference in energy between the exo and endo forms of the product alcohols by measuring the equilibrium constant as a function of temperature. The study of the enthalpies of hydration of carbonly compounds has continued, and the enthalpies of hydrolysis of the corresponding ketals is being determined. The study of the enthalpies of hydration of alkenes is nearly completed, and the rearrangement reactions which were uncovered are being investigated.

Not Available

1990-01-01

13

Photoprotective compounds from marine organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The substantial loss in the stratospheric ozone layer and consequent increase in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth’s\\u000a surface have augmented the interest in searching for natural photoprotective compounds in organisms of marine as well as freshwater\\u000a ecosystems. A number of photoprotective compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), scytonemin, carotenoids and\\u000a several other UV-absorbing substances of unknown chemical structure

Rajesh P. Rastogi; Richa; Rajeshwar P. Sinha; Shailendra P. Singh; Donat-P. Häder

2010-01-01

14

Photoprotective compounds from marine organisms.  

PubMed

The substantial loss in the stratospheric ozone layer and consequent increase in solar ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface have augmented the interest in searching for natural photoprotective compounds in organisms of marine as well as freshwater ecosystems. A number of photoprotective compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), scytonemin, carotenoids and several other UV-absorbing substances of unknown chemical structure have been identified from different organisms. MAAs form the most common class of UV-absorbing compounds known to occur widely in various marine organisms; however, several compounds having UV-screening properties still need to be identified. The synthesis of scytonemin, a predominant UV-A-photoprotective pigment, is exclusively reported in cyanobacteria. Carotenoids are important components of the photosynthetic apparatus that serve both light-harvesting and photoprotective functions, either by direct quenching of the singlet oxygen or other toxic reactive oxygen species or by dissipating the excess energy in the photosynthetic apparatus. The production of photoprotective compounds is affected by several environmental factors such as different wavelengths of UVR, desiccation, nutrients, salt concentration, light as well as dark period, and still there is controversy about the biosynthesis of various photoprotective compounds. Recent studies have focused on marine organisms as a source of natural bioactive molecules having a photoprotective role, their biosynthesis and commercial application. However, there is a need for extensive work to explore the photoprotective role of various UV-absorbing compounds from marine habitats so that a range of biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications can be found. PMID:20401734

Rastogi, Rajesh P; Richa; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Singh, Shailendra P; Häder, Donat-P

2010-06-01

15

Low volatile organic compound paints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasingly stringent air emission standards in various states has dictated the elimination of engineering finishes which are derived from high volatile organic compound (VOC) paint chemistries. In July 1989, Allied-Signal, Inc., Kansas City Division, Kansas City, Missouri, voluntarily closed its paint facility, due to non-compliance with local air emission standards. The following details the materials selection and evaluations which led

1991-01-01

16

Volatile organic compound sensor system  

DOEpatents

Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

2011-03-01

17

Volatile organic compound sensor system  

DOEpatents

Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY) [Laramie, WY; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY) [Laramie, WY; Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY) [Laramie, WY

2009-02-10

18

Organic compounds in carbonaceous meteorites.  

PubMed

The carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are fragments of asteroids that have remained relatively unprocessed since the formation of the solar system 4.6 billion years ago. These carbon-rich objects contain a variety of extraterrestrial organic molecules that constitute a record of chemical evolution prior to the origin of life. Compound classes include aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, amino acids, carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, sugars, amines, amides, nitrogen heterocycles, sulfur heterocycles and a relatively abundant high molecular weight macromolecular material. Structural and stable isotopic characteristics suggest that a number of environments may have contributed to the organic inventory, including interstellar space, the solar nebula and the asteroidal meteorite parent body. This review covers work published between 1950 and the present day and cites 193 references. PMID:12137279

Sephton, Mark A

2002-06-01

19

Electroreduction of Halogenated Organic Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The electroreductive cleavage of the carbon-halogen bond in halogenated organic compounds has been extensively studied for more than 70 years, since it is prodromal to a large variety of synthetic applications in organic electrochemistry. Over the years the research interest have progressively included the environmental applications, since several organic halocompounds are known to have (or have had) a serious environmental impact because of their (present or past) wide use as cleaning agents, herbicides, cryogenic fluids, reagents (e.g. allyl and vinyl monomers) for large production materials, etc. Recent studies have also demonstrated the wide spread out- and in-door-presence of volatile organic halides, although at low level, in connexion with residential and non-residential (e.g. stores, restaurants and transportation) activities. In this context, the detoxification of emissions to air, water and land by the selective removal of the halogen group represents a valid treatment route, which, although not leading to the complete mineralization of the pollutants, produces less harmful streams to be easily treated by electrochemical or conventional techniques. The electroreduction process is analysed and discussed in terms of electrode material, reaction medium, cell design and operation, and of substrate classification.

Rondinini, Sandra; Vertova, Alberto

20

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOEpatents

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01

21

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOEpatents

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29

22

Vapor Adsorption of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Organically Modified Clay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organically modified clay was used to adsorb volatile organic compounds from a gaseous phase. The organoclay was prepared by adsorbing hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) on the surface of montmorillonite particles. Two volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chlorobenzene and trichloroethylene, were adsorbed to the organoclay using a fixed adsorption bed. The adsorption was carried out at various inlet concentrations of gaseous VOCs in a

2008-01-01

23

Equilibrium tritium isotope effect in organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Experimental vibrational frequencies and a previously developed method for calculating equilibrium tritium (T) isotope effects are used to compose tables of {beta}-factors for T/H substitution of most organic compounds. The data presented enable the equilibrium T isotope effect to be sufficiently accurately estimated for most organic compounds.

Knyazev, D.A.; Myasoedov, N.F.; Bochkarev, A.V.

1995-01-01

24

Electrolytic Reduction of Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The final report describes very briefly the results of efforts to achieve selective, electrochemical reductions of organic molecules containing various functional groups. In all cases the electrolytic cell was a simple three-neck flask equipped with two p...

R. A. Benkeser

1970-01-01

25

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14

26

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01

27

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01

28

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07

29

BIORESTORATION OF AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Techniques available to remediate ground water contaminated with organic compounds. These include physical containment, in situ treatment with chemicals or microbes, and withdrawal and treatment via various forms of physical, chemical, or biological processes. (Copyright (c) CRC ...

30

Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

White, W. F.

1975-01-01

31

Volatile organic compounds of Schenella pityophilus.  

PubMed

Volatile organic compounds of Schenella pityophilus have been identified via solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Ten compounds have been identified, in which 3-methylthio-1-propene was the most significant component. Some other components were previously identified in Tuber aestivum and Tuber melanosporum. PMID:22236093

D'Auria, Maurizio; Racioppi, Rocco; Rana, Gian Luigi

2013-01-01

32

PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

33

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOEpatents

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01

34

Possible complex organic compounds on Mars.  

PubMed

It is suggested that primitive Mars had somehow similar environments as primitive Earth. If life was born on the primitive earth using organic compounds which were produced from the early Earth environment, the same types of organic compounds were also formed on primitive Mars. Such organic compounds might have been preserved on Mars still now. We are studying possible organic formation on primitive and present Mars. A gaseous mixture of CO2, CO, N2 and H2O with various mixing ratios were irradiated with high energy protons (major components of cosmic rays). Hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde were detected among volatile products, and yellow-brown-colored water-soluble non-volatile substances were produced, which gave amino acids after acid-hydrolysis. Major part of "amino acid precursors" were not simple molecules like aminonitriles, but complex compounds which eluted earlier than free amino acids in cation-exchange HPLC. These organic compounds should be major targets in the future Mars mission. Strategy for the detection of the complex organics on Mars will be discussed. PMID:11541335

Kobayashi, K; Sato, T; Kajishima, S; Kaneko, T; Ishikawa, Y; Saito, T

1997-01-01

35

Photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ultraviolet-stimulated catalytic oxidation is proposed as a mechanism for the destruction of organic compounds on Mars. The process involves the presence of gaseous oxygen, UV radiation, and a catalyst (titanium dioxide), and all three of these have been found to be present in the Martian environment. Therefore it seems plausible that UV-stimulated oxidation of organics is responsible for degrading organic molecules into inorganic end products.

Chun, S. F. S.; Pang, K. D.; Cutts, J. A.; Ajello, J. M.

1978-01-01

36

Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

Clark, R. N.; Curchin, J. M.; Hoefen, T. M.; Swayze, G. A.

2009-01-01

37

Analyzing method on biogenic volatile organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to analyze biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, an automated gas chromatography is developed and employed at the laboratory of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) during January to July, 2000. A small refrigerator was used so as to remove water in the air sample from gas line, and get accurate concentrations of volatile organic compounds. At 5degreesC, good water removing efficiency can be obtained at controlled flow rate. Air samples were collected around the building of Mesa Lab. of NCAR and analyzed by this gas chromatography system. This paper reports this gas chromatography system and results of air samples. The experimental results show that this gas chromatography system has a good reproducibility and stability, and main interesting volatile organic compounds such as isoprene, monoterpenes have an evident diurnal variation.

Bai, J. H.; Wang, M. X.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. P.; Guenther, A. B.

2002-02-01

38

Catalyst for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Disclosed is a process for oxidizing volatile organic compounds to carbon dioxide and water with the minimal addition of energy. A mixture of the volatile organic compound and an oxidizing agent (e.g. ambient air containing the volatile organic compound) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

Wood, George M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Schyryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

2000-01-01

39

Origin of organic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.  

PubMed

Carbonaceous chondrites, a class of primitive meteorite, have long been known to contain their complement of carbon largely in the form of organic, i.e., hydrocarbon-related, matter. Both discrete organic compounds and an insoluble, macromolecular material are present. Several characteristics of these materials provide evidence for their abiotic origin. The principal formation hypotheses have invoked chemistry occurring either in the solar nebula or on the parent body. However, recent stable isotope analyses of the meteorite carboxylic acids and amino acids indicate that they may be related to interstellar cloud compounds. These results suggest a formation scheme in which interstellar compounds were incorporated into the parent body and subsequently converted to the present suite of meteorite organics by the hydrothermal process believed to have formed the clay minerals of the meteorite matrix. PMID:11537361

Cronin, J R

1989-01-01

40

Origin of organic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbonaceous chondrites, a class of primitive meteorite, have long been known to contain their complement of carbon largely in the form of organic, i.e., hydrocarbon-related, matter. Both discrete organic compounds and an insoluble, macromolecular material are present. Several characteristics of these materials provide evidence for their abiotic origin. The principal formation hypothesis have invoked chemistry occurring either in the solar nebula or on the parent body. However, recent stable isotope analyses of the meteorite carboxylic acids and amino acids indicate that they may be related to interstellar cloud compounds. These results suggest a formation scheme in which interstellar compounds were incorporated into the parent body and subsequently converted to the present suite of meteorite organics by the hydrothermal process believed to have formed the clay minerals of the meteorite matrix.

Cronin, J. R.

41

Sulfate minerals and organic compounds on Mars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Strong evidence for evaporitic sulfate minerals such as gypsum and jarosite has recently been found on Mars. Although organic molecules are often codeposited with terrestrial evaporitic minerals, there have been no systematic investigations of organic components in sulfate minerals. We report here the detection of organic material, including amino acids and their amine degradation products, in ancient terrestrial sulfate minerals. Amino acids and amines appear to be preserved for geologically long periods in sulfate mineral matrices. This suggests that sulfate minerals should be prime targets in the search for organic compounds, including those of biological origin, on Mars.

Aubrey, Andrew; Cleaves, H. James; Chalmers, John H.; Skelley, Alison M.; Mathies, Richard A.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Bada, Jeffrey L.

2006-05-01

42

Metastable Equilibria Among Aqueous Organic Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metastable equilibrium states exist when reactions among a subset of compounds in a chemical system are reversible even though other irreversible reactions exist in the same system. The existence of metastable equilibrium among organic compounds was initially detected by comparing ratios of organic acid concentrations reported for oil-field brines (Shock, 1988, Geology 16, 886-890; Shock, 1989, Geology 17, 572-573), and calculating the same ratios for likely oxidation states determined by mineral assemblages and mixtures of hydrocarbons in coexisting petroleum (Shock, 1994, in: The Role of Organic Acids in Geological Processes, Springer). This led to the notion of extending the concept of metastable equilibrium states to explicitly account for petroleum compositions (Helgeson et al., 1993, GCA, 57, 3295-3339), which eventually yielded the concept of hydrolytic disproportionation of kerogens to produce petroleum and CO2(g) (Helgeson et al., 2009, GCA, 73, 594-695). Experimental tests of metastable equilibrium among organic compounds began with the identification of reversible reactions between alkanes and alkenes that are dependent on the H2 fugacity of the experimental system (Seewald, 1994, Nature 370, 285-287). These were followed with a comprehensive series of long-term experiments leading to the hypothesis that reversible reactions include alkanes, alkenes, alcohol, aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (e.g., Seewald, 2001, GCA 65, 1641-1664; 2003, Nature 426, 327-333; McCollom & Seewald, 2003, GCA 67, 3645-3664). We have conducted sets of hydrothermal organic transformation experiments that test the extent to which these reactions are indeed reversible using aromatic and cyclic compounds. Results demonstrate reversibility for reactions among dibenzyl ketone, 1,3-diphenyl-2-propanol, 1,3-diphenylpropene and 1,3-diphenylpropane, as well as among methylcyclohexanes, methylcyclohexenes, methylcyclohexanols, methylcyclohexanones and methylcyclohexadienes. The compounds chosen for study include structural features that provide mechanistic insight into the reactions. By including cyclic and aromatic compounds, these results expand the diversity of organic compounds that react reversibly in geochemical processes. It follows that metastable equilibria among organic compounds may be inescapable during hydrothermal alteration and petroleum generation.

Shock, E.; Shipp, J.; Yang, Z.; Gould, I. R.

2011-12-01

43

Ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds in marine organisms  

SciTech Connect

Studies on the biological effects of solar ultraviolet radiations are becoming increasingly common, in part due to recent interest in the Antarctic ozone hole and in the perceived potential for global climate change. Marine organisms possess many strategies for ameliorating the potentially damaging effects of UV-B (280-320 nm) and the shorter wavelengths of UV-A (320-400nm). One mechanism is the synthesis of bioaccumulation of ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds. Several investigators have noted the presence of absorbing compounds in spectrophotometer scans of extracts from a variety of marine organisms, particularly algae and coelenterates containing endosymbiotic algae. The absorbing compounds are often mycosporine-like amino acids. Thirteen mycosporine-like amino acids have already been described, and several others have recently been detected. Although, the mycosporine-like amino acids are widely distributed. these compounds are by no means the only type of UV-B absorbing compounds which has been identified. Coumarins from green algae, quinones from sponges, and indoles from a variety of sources are laternative examples which are documented in the natural products literature. When the biological impact of solar ultraviolet radiation is assessed, adequate attention must be devoted to the process of photoadaptation, including the accumulation of ultraviolet radiation absorbing compounds.

Chalker, B.E.; Dunlap, W.C. (Australian Inst. of Marine Science, Queensland (Australia))

1990-01-09

44

Global Exposure Modelling of Semivolatile Organic Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic compounds which are persistent and toxic as the agrochemicals ?-hexachlorocyclohexane (?-HCH, lindane) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pose a hazard for the ecosystems. These compounds are semivolatile, hence multicompartmental substances and subject to long-range transport (LRT) in atmosphere and ocean. Being lipophilic, they accumulate in exposed organism tissues and biomagnify along food chains. The multicompartmental global fate and LRT of DDT and lindane in the atmosphere and ocean have been studied using application data for 1980, on a decadal scale using a model based on the coupling of atmosphere and (for the first time for these compounds) ocean General Circulation Models (ECHAM5 and MPI-OM). The model system encompasses furthermore 2D terrestrial compartments (soil and vegetation) and sea ice, a fully dynamic atmospheric aerosol (HAM) module and an ocean biogeochemistry module (HAMOCC5). Large mass fractions of the compounds are found in soil. Lindane is also found in comparable amount in ocean. DDT has the longest residence time in almost all compartments. The sea ice compartment locally almost inhibits volatilization from the sea. The air/sea exchange is also affected , up to a reduction of 35 % for DDT by partitioning to the organic phases (suspended and dissolved particulate matter) in the global oceans. Partitioning enhances vertical transport in the sea. Ocean dynamics are found to be more significant for vertical transport than sinking associated with particulate matter. LRT in the global environment is determined by the fast atmospheric circulation. Net meridional transport taking place in the ocean is locally effective mostly via western boundary currents, upon applications at mid- latitudes. The pathways of the long-lived semivolatile organic compounds studied include a sequence of several cycles of volatilisation, transport in the atmosphere, deposition and transport in the ocean (multihopping substances). Multihopping is more significant for DDT than for lindane. It enhances the LRT potential for both compounds.

Guglielmo, F.; Lammel, G.; Maier-Reimer, E.

2008-12-01

45

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOEpatents

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ) [Princeton, NJ; Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI) [Ann Arbor, MI; Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA) [Hollywood, CA; Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA) [Alhambra, CA; Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA) [Anaheim Hills, CA

2011-07-05

46

Microbiological degradation of atmospheric organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Until now, aerosol transformation was assumed to be via chemical or physical processes. Here we present evidence that an important class of organic aerosols - dicarboxylic acids (DCA) - can be efficiently transformed by existing airborne microbes (bacteria and fungi) in the boundary layer. Isotopic studies indicate that microbiological entities transform and use DCA as nutrients. Several observed products are toxicants or pathogens. Identified volatile products indicate that DCA can be recycled back to the atmosphere via microbiological processes. Thus, biodegradation could be an important atmospheric transformation pathway for organic compounds.

Ariya, Parisa A.; Nepotchatykh, Oleg; Ignatova, Olga; Amyot, Marc

2002-11-01

47

Chemicapacitive microsensors for volatile organic compound detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

A low-cost, low-power volatile organic compound (VOC) sensor has been constructed from an array of micromachined parallel-plate capacitors. The sensor has demonstrated detection of many VOCs well below the lower explosive limits and could be used in industrial leak monitoring applications or for homeland defense. In place of a standard dielectric, the individual capacitors were filled with selectively absorbing polymers.

S. V. Patel; T. E. Mlsna; B. Fruhberger; E. Klaassen; S. Cemalovic; D. R. Baselt

2003-01-01

48

Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 mum. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the

Roger N. Clark; John M. Curchin; Todd M. Hoefen; Gregg A. Swayze

2009-01-01

49

Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 ?m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the

Roger N. Clark; John M. Curchin; Todd M. Hoefen; Gregg A. Swayze

2009-01-01

50

Self assembly properties of primitive organic compounds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A central event in the origin of life was the self-assembly of amphiphilic, lipid-like compounds into closed microenvironments. If a primitive macromolecular replicating system could be encapsulated within a vesicular membrane, the components of the system would share the same microenvironment, and the result would be a step toward true cellular function. The goal of our research has been to determine what amphiphilic molecules might plausibly have been available on the early Earth to participate in the formation of such boundary structures. To this end, we have investigated primitive organic mixtures present in carbonaceous meteorites such as the Murchison meteorite, which contains 1-2 percent of its mass in the form of organic carbon compounds. It is likely that such compounds contributed to the inventory of organic carbon on the prebiotic earth, and were available to participate in chemical evolution leading to the emergence of the first cellular life forms. We found that Murchison components extracted into non-polar solvent systems are surface active, a clear indication of amphiphilic character. One acidic fraction self-assembles into vesicular membranes that provide permeability barriers to polar solutes. Other evidence indicates that the membranes are bimolecular layers similar to those formed by contemporary membrane lipids. We conclude that bilayer membrane formation by primitive amphiphiles on the early Earth is feasible. However, only a minor fraction of acidic amphiphiles assembles into bilayers, and the resulting membranes require narrowly defined conditions of pH and ionic composition to be stable. It seems unlikely, therefore, that meteoritic infall was a direct source of membrane amphiphiles. Instead, the hydrocarbon components and their derivatives more probably would provide an organic stock available for chemical evolution. Our current research is directed at possible reactions which would generate substantial quantities of membranogenic amphiphiles. One possibility is photochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons.

Deamer, D. W.

1991-01-01

51

Production of volatile organic compounds by mycobacteria.  

PubMed

The need for improved rapid diagnostic tests for tuberculosis disease has prompted interest in the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex bacteria. We have investigated VOCs emitted by Mycobacterium bovis BCG grown on Lowenstein-Jensen media using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Compounds observed included dimethyl sulphide, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, butanone, 2-methyl-1-butanol, methyl 2-methylbutanoate, 2-phenylethanol and hydrogen sulphide. Changes in levels of acetaldehyde, methanol and ammonia were also observed. The compounds identified are not unique to M. bovis BCG, and further studies are needed to validate their diagnostic value. Investigations using an ultra-rapid gas chromatograph with a surface acoustic wave sensor (zNose) demonstrated the presence of 2-phenylethanol (PEA) in the headspace of cultures of M. bovis BCG and Mycobacterium smegmatis, when grown on Lowenstein-Jensen supplemented with glycerol. PEA is a reversible inhibitor of DNA synthesis. It is used during selective isolation of gram-positive bacteria and may also be used to inhibit mycobacterial growth. PEA production was observed to be dependent on growth of mycobacteria. Further study is required to elucidate the metabolic pathways involved and assess whether this compound is produced during in vivo growth of mycobacteria. PMID:22224870

McNerney, Ruth; Mallard, Kim; Okolo, Phyllis Ifeoma; Turner, Claire

2012-03-01

52

Adsorption of organic compounds by microbial biomass  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of hazardous organic compounds such as phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2-nitrophenol, chlorobenzene, and ethylbenzene onto two types of inactive microbial biomass (activated sludge and nitrifying bacteria) was studied. The adsorption isotherms could be expressed by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm and were found to be nearly linear over the range of concentrations (50-200 mg/l) studied. Desorption studies showed that the adsorption process was partially reversible. Heat of sorption was estimated and indicate that the biosorption process involves a physical rather than a chemical mechanism. The adsorptive capacity of biomass is about two to three orders of magnitude less than activated carbon. In bisolute systems, the uptake of each solute is reduced in the presence of a second solute, but the combined adsorptive capacity was greater than that for either of the individual substances from its pure solution. The compound with higher octanol/water partition coefficient was observed to be more favorably adsorbed. In the case of activated carbon, the more hydrophobic compound was observed to be more favorably adsorbed. The uptake of each solute is reduced, when the initial concentration of other solute is increased. In multi-solute systems, the equilibrium capacity for each solute is reduced significantly in the presence of other solutes and the effect of competition become more pronounced with the increase in number of solutes in solution. The overall adsorption capacity of biomass was barely affected by the presence of more solutes in solution. Live and inactive biomass do not exhibit the same level of biosorptive uptake, and the differences appear to depend on the specific organic compound.

Selvakumar, A.

1988-01-01

53

Preparing Soil Samples for Volatile Organic Compound Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three equilibrium headspace and three solvent extraction methods of preparing soil samples for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were compared. Soil samples were spiked with five gasoline range aromatic compounds and four chlorinated compounds...

A. D. Hewitt

1997-01-01

54

Biogenic volatile organic compounds - small is beautiful  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While canopy and regional scale flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs) are essential to obtain an integrated picture of total compound reaching the atmosphere, many fascinating and important emission details are waiting to be discovered at smaller scales, in different ecological and functional compartments. We concentrate on bVOCs below ground to <2m above ground level. Emissions at leaf scale are well documented and widely presented, and are not discussed here. Instead we describe some details of recent research on rhizosphere bVOCs, and bVOCs associated with pollination of flowers. Although bVOC emissions from soil surfaces are small, bVOCs are exuded by roots of some plant species, and can be extracted from decaying litter. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the rhizosphere provide a specialised carbon source for micro-organisms, helping to define the micro-organism community structure, and impacting on nutrient cycles which are partly controlled by microorganisms. Naturally occurring monoterpenes in the soil system could also affect the aboveground structure of ecosystems because of their role in plant defence strategies and as mediating chemicals in allelopathy. A gradient of monoterpene concentration was found in soil around Pinus sylvestris and Pinus halepensis, decreasing with distance from the tree. Some compounds (?-pinene, sabinene, humulene and caryophyllene) in mineral soil were linearly correlated with the total amount of each compound in the overlying litter, indicating that litter might be the dominant source of these compounds. However, ?-pinene did not fall within the correlation, indicating a source other than litter, probably root exudates. We also show that rhizosphere bVOCs can be a carbon source for soil microbes. In a horizontal gradient from Populus tremula trees, microbes closest to the tree trunk were better enzymatically equipped to metabolise labeled monoterpene substrate. Monoterpenes can also increase the degradation rate in soil of the persistant organic pollutants, likely acting as analogues for the cometabo-lism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) Flowers of a ginger species (Alpinia kwangsiensis) and a fig species (Ficus hispida) showed different bVOC signals pre- and post pollination. For Ficus hispida, there are three floral stages of a fig-wasp dependency mechanism: receptive, post pollinator and interfloral. Of 28 compounds detected, transcaryophyllene with trans-?-farnesene were the most important at the receptor stage, trans-caryophyllene was the most abundant at the post-pollinator stage, and isoprene was the most abundant in the interfloral stage. Alpinia kwangsiensis presents two morphologies for the reproductive parts of the flower. The "anaflexistyle" morphology has the flower style lowered in the morning and raised in the afternoon. This is reversed for the "cataflexistyle" morphology. The bVOC mixture emitted by each morphology in morning and afternoon was complex. However for compounds showing a difference (cis-ocimene and Z + E epoxy -ocimene), the emissions from the anaflexistyle were greater than from the cataflexistyle, and were greater in the afternoon compared with the morning emissions. Where large flowering plant species are abundant, big changes in monoterpene emissions at < 2m above ground level over relatively small periods of time during pollination are likely to be missed in larger scale integrated flux measurements.

Owen, S. M.; Asensio, D.; Li, Q.; Penuelas, J.

2012-12-01

55

Organic Compounds Evaporating from Building Materials into Indoor Atmosphere.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Volatile organic compounds evaporating from building materials produce odor to indoor atmosphere and may cause health hazards. The latest publications on organic compounds emitted by building and interior finish materials have been reviewed. These publica...

S. Jaemsae A. Kivistoe M. Ojala K. Saarela M. Waeaenaenen

1986-01-01

56

Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds  

DOEpatents

The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

2011-06-07

57

Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in Istanbul Ö. Çapraz1, A. Deniz1,3, A. Ozturk2, S. Incecik1, H. Toros1 and, M. Coskun1 (1) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Department of Meteorology, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (2) Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical, Chemical Engineering, 34469, Maslak, Istanbul, Turkey. (3) Marmara Clean Air Center, Ministry of Environment and Urbanization, Ni?anta??, 34365, ?stanbul, Turkey. One of the major problems of megacities is air pollution. Therefore, investigations of air quality are increasing and supported by many institutions in recent years. Air pollution in Istanbul contains many components that originate from a wide range of industrial, heating, motor vehicle, and natural emissions sources. VOC, originating mainly from automobile exhaust, secondhand smoke and building materials, are one of these compounds containing some thousands of chemicals. In spite of the risks to human health, relatively little is known about the levels of VOC in Istanbul. In this study, ambient air quality measurements of 32 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in Ka??thane (Golden Horn) region in Istanbul during the winter season of 2011 in order to develop the necessary scientific framework for the subsequent developments. Ka??thane creek valley is the source part of the Golden Horn and one of the most polluted locations in Istanbul due to its topographical form and pollutant sources in the region. In this valley, horizontal and vertical atmospheric motions are very weak. The target compounds most commonly found were benzene, toluene, xylene and ethyl benzene. Concentrations of total hydrocarbons ranged between 1.0 and 10.0 parts per billion, by volume (ppbv). Ambient air levels of halogenated hydrocarbons appeared to exhibit unique spatial variations and no single factor seemed to explain trends for this group of compounds. N-octane, 3-methylheptane, n-nonane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane and n-hexane parameters ranged between 3 ppbv and maximum value of 10 ppbv. The other VOC parameters are measured below 3 ppbv value. At participating urban locations for the year of data considered, levels of carbonyls were higher than the level of the other organic compound groups, suggesting that emissions from motor vehicles and photochemical reactions strongly in?uence ambient air concentrations of carbonyls. Of the most prevalent carbonyls, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the dominant compounds, ranging from 1.5-7.4 ppbv for formaldehyde, to 0.8-2.7 ppbv for acetaldehyde. Keywords: Air quality, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), industry, meteorology, urban, Ka??thane, ?stanbul. Acknowledgment: This work was part of the TUJJB-TUMEHAP-01-10 and Turkish Scientific and Technical Research Council Project No: 109Y132.

?apraz, Ö.; Deniz, A.; Öztürk, A.; Incecik, S.; Toros, H.; Co?kun, M.

2012-04-01

58

Semivolatile organic compounds in indoor environments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are ubiquitous in indoor environments, redistributing from their original sources to all indoor surfaces. Exposures resulting from their indoor presence contribute to detectable body burdens of diverse SVOCs, including pesticides, plasticizers, and flame retardants. This paper critically examines equilibrium partitioning of SVOCs among indoor compartments. It proceeds to evaluate kinetic constraints on sorptive partitioning to organic matter on fixed surfaces and airborne particles. Analyses indicate that equilibrium partitioning is achieved faster for particles than for typical indoor surfaces; indeed, for a strongly sorbing SVOC and a thick sorptive reservoir, equilibrium partitioning is never achieved. Mass-balance considerations are used to develop physical-science-based models that connect source- and sink-rates to airborne concentrations for commonly encountered situations, such as the application of a pesticide or the emission of a plasticizer or flame retardant from its host material. Calculations suggest that many SVOCs have long indoor persistence, even after the primary source is removed. If the only removal mechanism is ventilation, moderately sorbing compounds ( Koa > 10 10) may persist indoors for hundreds to thousands of hours, while strongly sorbing compounds ( Koa > 10 12) may persist for years. The paper concludes by applying the newly developed framework to explore exposure pathways of building occupants to indoor SVOCs. Accumulation of SVOCs as a consequence of direct air-to-human transport is shown to be potentially large, with a maximum indoor-air processing rate of 10-20 m 3/h for SVOC uptake by human skin, hair and clothing. Levels on human skin calculated with a simple model of direct air-to-skin transfer agree remarkably well with levels measured in dermal hand wipes for SVOCs possessing a wide range of octanol-air partition coefficients.

Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

59

Alternatives to Automotive Consumer Products That Use Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and/or Chlorinated Organic Compound Solvents. Addendum.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This addendum to the document entitled 'Alternatives to Automotive Consumer Products that use Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and/or Chlorinated Organic Compound Solvents' presents the questionnaires that were filled out by the staff of the Institute for...

D. Wolf J. Zavadil M. Morris

2004-01-01

60

Alkaline dechlorination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The vast majority of contaminated sites in the United States and abroad are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane (TCA), and chloroform. These VOCs are mobile and persistent in the subsurface and present serious health risks at trace concentrations. The goal of this project was to develop a new chemical treatment system that can rapidly and effectively degrade chlorinated VOCs. The system is based on our preliminary findings that strong alkalis such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) can absorb and degrade TCE. The main objectives of this study were to determine the reaction rates between chlorinated VOCs, particularly TCE, and strong alkalis, to elucidate the reaction mechanisms and by-products, to optimize the chemical reactions under various experimental conditions, and to develop a laboratory bench- scale alkaline destruction column that can be used to destroy vapor- phase TCE.

Gu, B.; Siegrist, R.L.

1996-06-01

61

Organic compounds in meteorites and their origins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current investigation represents an extensively updated version of a review conducted by Anders et al. (1973). The investigation takes into account the literature through mid-1980. It is pointed out that Type 1 carbonaceous chondrites (C1) contain 6% of their cosmic complement of carbon, mainly in the form of organic matter. Most authors now agree that this material represents primitive prebiotic matter. The principal questions remaining are what abiotic processes formed the organic matter, and to what extent these processes took place in locales other than the solar nebula, such as interstellar clouds or meteorite parent bodes. The problem is approached in three stages. It is attempted to reconstruct the physical conditions during condensation from the clues contained in the inorganic matrix of the meteorite. The condensation behavior of carbon under these conditions is determined on the basis of thermodynamic calculations. Model experiments on the condensation of carbon are performed, and the synthesized compounds are compared with those actually found in meteorites.

Hayatsu, R.; Anders, E.

1981-01-01

62

Relative energy of organic compounds II. Halides, nitrogen, and sulfur compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energies of the following types of compounds are characterized by their calculated relative enthalpies: alkyl, alkenyl,\\u000a and aryl halides; carboxylic acid halides; carbonyl halides; amines; carboxylic acid amides; hydrazine derivatives; nitriles;\\u000a heteroaromatic compounds; nitro-compounds; organic nitrites and nitrates; organic sulfides; thiols; disulfides; sulfoxides;\\u000a sulfones; organic sulfites and sulfates; and selected inorganic compounds. Stabilization energy of pyrrol and thiophene has

Árpád Furka

2009-01-01

63

GLOBAL INVENTORY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FORM ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes a global inventory anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that includes a separate inventory for each of seven pollutant groups--paraffins, olefins, aromatics, formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds....

64

ACUTE TOXICITY OF SELECTED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS TO FATHEAD MINNOWS  

EPA Science Inventory

Static nonrenewal laboratory bioassays were conducted with 26 organic compounds commonly used by industry. The selected compounds represented the five following chemical classes: acids, alcohols, hydrocarbons, ketones and aldehydes, and phenols. Juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephal...

65

Molecular Models of Volatile Organic Compounds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This month's Featured Molecules come from the Report from Other Journals column, Nature: Our Atmosphere in the Year of Planet Earth, and the summary found there of the paper by Lelieveld et al. (1, 2) Added to the collection are several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted by a variety of plants. The term VOCs is a common one in environmental chemistry, and is interpreted quite broadly, typically referring to any organic molecule with a vapor pressure sufficiently high to allow for part-per-billion levels in the atmosphere. Common VOCs include methane (the most prevalent VOC), benzene and benzene derivatives, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and many others. The source may be natural, as in the case of the plant emissions, or anthropogenic, as in the case of a molecule such as the gasoline additive methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).The oxidation of isoprene in the atmosphere has been a source of interest for many years. Several primary oxidation products are included in the molecule collection, although a number of isomeric forms are also possible (3).The area of VOCs provides innumerable topics for students research papers and projects at all levels of the curriculum from high-school chemistry through the undergraduate courses in chemistry and environmental science. Along the way students have the opportunity for exposure to fields such as epidemiology and toxicology, that may be new to them, but are of increasing importance in the environmental sciences. The MTBE story is an interesting one for students to discover, as it once again emphasizes the role that unintended consequences play in life. An exploration of the sources, structures, reactivity, health and environmental effects and ultimate fate of various VOCs reinforces in students minds just how interconnected the chemistry of the environment is, a lesson that bears repeating frequently.

66

Breath measurements as volatile organic compound biomarkers.  

PubMed Central

A brief review of the uses of breath analysis in studies of environmental exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is provided. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's large-scale Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Studies have measured concentrations of 32 target VOCs in the exhaled breath of about 800 residents of various U.S. cities. Since the previous 12-hr integrated personal air exposures to the same chemicals were also measured, the relation between exposure and body burden is illuminated. Another major use of the breath measurements has been to detect unmeasured pathways of exposure; the major impact of active smoking on exposure to benzene and styrene was detected in this way. Following the earlier field studies, a series of chamber studies have provided estimates of several important physiological parameters. Among these are the fraction, f, of the inhaled chemical that is exhaled under steady-state conditions and the residence times. tau i in several body compartments, which may be associated with the blood (or liver), organs, muscle, and fat. Most of the targeted VOCs appear to have similar residence times of a few minutes, 30 min, several hours, and several days in the respective tissue groups. Knowledge of these parameters can be helpful in estimating body burden from exposure or vice versa and in planning environmental studies, particularly in setting times to monitor breath in studies of the variation with time of body burden. Improvements in breath methods have made it possible to study short-term peak exposure situations such as filling a gas tank or taking a shower in contaminated water.

Wallace, L; Buckley, T; Pellizzari, E; Gordon, S

1996-01-01

67

Soluble organic compounds in the Tagish Lake meteorite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The C2 ungrouped Tagish Lake meteorite preserves a range of lithologies, reflecting variable degrees of parent-body aqueous alteration. Here, we report on soluble organic compounds, including aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, monocarboxylic acids, and amino acids, found within specimens representative of the range of aqueous alteration. We find that differences in soluble organic compounds among the lithologies may be explained by oxidative, fluid-assisted alteration, primarily involving the derivation of soluble organic compounds from macromolecular material. In contrast, amino acids probably evolved from precursor molecules, albeit in parallel with other soluble organic compounds. Our results demonstrate the role of parent-body alteration in the modification of organic matter and generation of prebiotic compounds in the early solar system, and have implications for interpretation of the complement of soluble organic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites.

Hilts, Robert W.; Herd, Christopher D. K.; Simkus, Danielle N.; Slater, Greg F.

2014-04-01

68

Mechanochemical synthesis of organic compounds and composites with their participation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The results of experimental studies in the mechanochemical synthesis of organic compounds and composites with their participation published over the last 15 years are described systematically. The key reactions of organic compounds are considered: synthesis of the salts of organic acids, acylation, substitution, dehalogenation, esterification, hydrometallation and other reactions. Primary attention is devoted to systems and compounds that cannot be obtained by traditional chemistry methods.

Lyakhov, Nikolai Z.; Grigorieva, Tatiana F.; Barinova, Antonina P.; Vorsina, I. A.

2010-05-01

69

Separation of Organic Compounds from Surfactant Solutions: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review summarizes the recent development in separation of emulsified organic compounds from surfactant solutions for surfactant reuse and\\/or surfactant?contaminant disposal. Three major principles have been employed for separating organic compounds and\\/or surfactants from aqueous solutions, namely, organic compound inter?phase mass transfer, surfactant micelle removal, and manipulation of surfactant solution phase behavior. Details of these principles and their applications are

Hefa Cheng; David A. Sabatini

2007-01-01

70

Secondary organic aerosol from biogenic volatile organic compound mixtures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the ozonolysis of a Siberian fir needle oil (SFNO), a Canadian fir needle oil (CFNO), and several SOA precursor mixtures containing reactive and non-reactive volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated. The use of precursor mixtures more completely describes the atmosphere where many VOCs exist. The addition of non-reactive VOCs such as bornyl acetate, camphene, and borneol had very little to no effect on SOA yields. The oxidation of VOC mixtures with VOC mass percentages similar to the SFNO produced SOA yields that became more similar to the SOA yield from SFNO as the complexity and concentration of VOCs within the mixture became more similar to overall SFNO composition. The SOA yield produced by the oxidation of CFNO was within the error of the SOA yield produced by the oxidation of SFNO at a similar VOC concentration. The SOA yields from SFNO were modeled using the volatility basis set (VBS), which predicts the SOA yields for a given mass concentration of mixtures containing similar VOCs.

Hatfield, Meagan L.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

2011-04-01

71

Oceanic protection of prebiotic organic compounds from UV radiation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is frequently stated that UV light would cause massive destruction of prebiotic organic compounds because of the absence of an ozone layer. The elevated UV flux of the early sun compounds this problem. This applies to organic compounds of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Attempts to deal with this problem generally involve atmospheric absorbers. We show here that prebiotic organic polymers as well as several inorganic compounds are sufficient to protect oceanic organic molecules from UV degradation. This aqueous protection is in addition to any atmospheric UV absorbers and should be a ubiquitous planetary phenomenon serving to increase the size of planetary habitable zones.

Cleaves, H. J.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

1998-01-01

72

Hourly, In-Situ Quantitation of Organic Aerosol Marker Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was conducted to determine the contribution from various organic aerosol sources downwind of the Los Angeles Air Basin, a region currently out of compliance with air quality standards. Organic marker compounds were measured with hourly time res...

A. H. Goldstein

2008-01-01

73

Basics of compounding: basics of compounding with organic salts.  

PubMed

The purity and form of all ingredients used in compounding, especially of active pharmaceutical ingredients, must be known and considered during formulation. When a prescription is received, it is the responsibility of the pharmacist, and should be routine procedure, to correctly determine whether or not the salt or base/acid form of a drug is to be used as the basis for the dose. This is important information because the bulk substance, or active pharmaceutical ingredient, in a salt form is not 100% active drug. The purpose of the salt form is usually to enhance the solubility of the drug, but it may also enhance and change other attributes of the drug that make it easier to handle and manipulate for producing dosage forms. Resources for the purpose of determining this information include the United States Pharmacopeia, product package insert, and a call to the manufacturer or physician as appropriate. This article discusses compounding with salts and the factors that may affect a final compounded preparation. PMID:23965540

Allen, Loyd V

2010-01-01

74

Nitrated Secondary Organic Tracer Compounds in Biomass Burning Smoke  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural and human-initiated biomass burning releases large amounts of gases and particles into the atmosphere, impacting climate, environment and affecting public health. Several hundreds of compounds are emitted from biomass burning and these compounds largely originate from the pyrolysis of biopolymers such as lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Some of compounds are known to be specific to biomass burning and widely recognized as tracer compounds that can be used to identify the presence of biomass burning PM. Detailed chemical analysis of biomass burning influenced PM samples often reveals the presence compounds that correlated well with levoglucosan, a known biomass burning tracer compound. In particular, nitrated aromatic compounds correlated very well with levoglucosan, indicating that biomass burning as a source for this class of compounds. In the present study, we present evidence for the presence of biomass burning originating secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) compounds in biomass burning influenced ambient PM. These BSOA compounds are typically nitrated aromatic compounds that are produced in the oxidation of precursor compounds in the presence of NOx. The precursor identification was performed from a series of aerosol chamber experiments. m-Cresol, which is emitted from biomass burning at significant levels, is found to be a major precursor compounds for nitrated BSOA compounds found in the ambient PM. We estimate that the total concentrations of these compounds in the ambient PM are comparable to biogenic SOA compounds in winter months, indicating the BSOA contributes important amounts to the regional organic aerosol loading.

Iinuma, Y.; Böge, O.; Gräfe, R.; Herrmann, H.

2010-12-01

75

SORPTION OF ORGANIC ACID COMPOUNDS TO SEDIMENTS: INITIAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The adsorption to sediments and soils of selected organic acid compounds was examined as a function of compound and sediment properties. ntrinsic compound properties examined included the dissociation constant (pKa) and hydrophobic character. roperties of the sediment examined in...

76

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban atmosphere of Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assessment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has become a major issue of air quality network monitoring in Hong Kong. This study is aimed to identify, quantify and characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in different urban areas in Hong Kong. The spatial distribution, temporal variation as well as correlations of VOCs at five roadside sampling sites were discussed. Twelve VOCs

S. C. Lee; M. Y. Chiu; K. F. Ho; S. C. Zou; Xinming Wang

2002-01-01

77

REACTIVITY OF NITROGENOUS AND OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH AQUEOUS CHLORINE  

EPA Science Inventory

A protocol for determining the chlorine demand of organic compounds was developed and tested. Organics were reacted with chlorine at mole ratios of 1:05, 1:1, and 1:3 at pH values of 6, 7, and 8 over a one week period. Compounds tested were drawn mainly from the EPA Register of O...

78

Organic--Inorganic Layer Compounds: Physical Properties and Chemical Reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contrast with intercalation compounds, which can exist both with and without organic molecules between the planes of inorganic material, `molecular composite' compounds have organic groups covalently or ionically bound to inorganic layers. In such crystals the aim is to combine magnetic or optical properties characteristic of the inorganic solid state, like magnetism and luminescence, with properties found in the

P. Day

1985-01-01

79

DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF SORPTION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chlorinated and brominated volatile organic compounds are among the groundwater pollutants creating major environmental problems. In this study, dynamic behavior of certain volatile organic compounds in water was investigated by using a novel moment technique. Adsorption equilibrium constant and the penetration length of tracers were evaluated by the first absolute and the second central moment expressions derived for a pulse-response

Nail Yasyerli; Ugur Harbili

2008-01-01

80

A Systematic Presentation of Organic Phosphorus and Sulfur Compounds.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because the names, interrelations, and oxidation levels of the organic compounds of phosphorus and sulfur tend to confuse students, a simple way to organize these compounds has been developed. The system consists of grouping them by oxidation state and extent of carbon substitution. (JN)

Hendrickson, James B.

1985-01-01

81

Temporal Variability Measurement of Specific Volatile Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methodology was developed to unambiguously determine trace levels of volatile organic compounds as they vary in concentration over a variety of time scales. This capability is important because volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are usually measured by time-integrative techniques that average out peak exposures to insignificance. The specific method presented here involves a preprogrammed sequential syringe sampler that can fill 150-cm

Joachim D. Pleil; William A. McClenny; Karen D. Oliver

1989-01-01

82

METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Thirteen analytical methods for the identification and measurement of organic compounds in drinking water are described in detail. ix of the methods are for volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and certain disinfection byproducts and these methods were cited in the Federal Register...

83

40 CFR 60.452 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.452 Section 60.452 Protection of Environment...Coating: Large Appliances § 60.452 Standard for volatile organic compounds. On or after the date on which the...

2013-07-01

84

40 CFR 60.462 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standards for volatile organic compounds. 60.462 Section 60.462 Protection of Environment...Coil Surface Coating § 60.462 Standards for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date on which §...

2013-07-01

85

Volatile organic compound sources for Southern Finland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have several sources, both biogenic and anthropogenic. Emissions of biogenic VOCs in a global scale are estimated to be an order of magnitude higher than anthropogenic ones. However, in densely populated areas and during winter time the anthropogenic VOC emissions dominate over the biogenic ones. The aim of this study was to clarify potential local sources and source areas of VOCs in different seasons. Diurnal behaviour in winter and spring were also compared at two different sites in Finland: SMEAR II and III (Station for Measuring Ecosystem - Atmosphere Relations). SMEAR II is a rural site located in Hyytiälä in Southern Finland 220 km North-West from Helsinki whereas SMEAR III is background urban site located 5 km from the downtown of Helsinki. The volume mixing ratios of VOCs were measured with a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS, Ionicon Analytik GmbH, Austria) during years 2006-2011. Other trace gases such as CO, NOXand SO2 were also measured in both sites and used for source analysis. Source areas for long term VOC measurements were investigated with trajectory analysis and sources for local and regional concentrations were determined by Unmix multivariate receptor model. Forest fires affect air quality and the biggest smoke plumes can be seen in satellite images and even hinder visibility in the plume areas. They provide temporally and spatially well-defined sources that can be used to verify source area estimates. During the measurement periods two different forest fire episodes with several hotspots, happened in Russia. Forest fires which showed up in these measurements were in 2006 near the border of Finland in Vyborg area and 2010 in Moscow area. Forest fire episodes were clearly observed in trajectory analysis for benzene, toluene and methanol and also CO and NOX. In addition to event sources continuous source areas were determined. Anthropogenic local sources seemed to be dominant during winter in both sites. However during spring biogenic influence increased. In addition to source analysis this behaviour was visible in enhanced diurnal cycles of VOCs (Patokoski et al., 2014, in press). We will present important sources and source areas for Southern Finland's concentrations. References: Patokoski, J., Ruuskanen, T.M., Hellén, H., Taipale, R., Grönholm, T., Kajos, M.K., Petäjä, T., Hakola, H., Kulmala, M. & Rinne, J., 2014. Winter to spring transition and diurnal variation of VOCs in Finland at an urban background site and a rural site. Boreal Env. Res. 19. In press.

Patokoski, Johanna; Ruuskanen, Taina M.; Kajos, Maija K.; Taipale, Risto; Rantala, Pekka; Aalto, Juho; Ryyppö, Timo; Hakola, Hannele; Rinne, Janne

2014-05-01

86

Effects of Organic Compounds on Amphibian Reproduction.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Aquatic toxicity tests were conducted with atrazine, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride, trisodium nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and phenol. Each compound was administered to developmental stages of three to five amphibian species. Exposu...

W. J. Birge J. A. Black R. A. Kuehne

1980-01-01

87

Volatile organic compounds from garden waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

About 170 compounds were identified in the headspace or liquid exudate from garden waste. Typical for microbiological growth were branched and straight chain alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters C2–C8. Several of the substances have been identified in early studies of compost For some waste samples the organosulfur compound concentration (C1 and C3 mono-, di- and trisulfides) was ca. 10 mg\\/m3

Ken Wilkins; Kjeld Larsen

1996-01-01

88

Extended structures and physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds.  

PubMed

The ability of uranium to undergo nuclear fission has been exploited primarily to manufacture nuclear weapons and to generate nuclear power. Outside of its nuclear physics, uranium also exhibits rich chemistry, and it forms various compounds with other elements. Among the uranium-bearing compounds, those with a uranium oxidation state of +6 are most common and a particular structural unit, uranyl UO(2)(2+) is usually involved in these hexavalent uranium compounds. Apart from forming solids with inorganic ions, the uranyl unit also bonds to organic molecules to generate uranyl-organic coordination materials. If appropriate reaction conditions are employed, uranyl-organic extended structures (1-D chains, 2-D layers, and 3-D frameworks) can be obtained. Research on uranyl-organic compounds with extended structures allows for the exploration of their rich structural chemistry, and such studies also point to potential applications such as in materials that could facilitate nuclear waste disposal. In this Account, we describe the structural features of uranyl-organic compounds and efforts to synthesize uranyl-organic compounds with desired structures. We address strategies to construct 3-D uranyl-organic frameworks through rational selection of organic ligands and the incorporation of heteroatoms. The UO(2)(2+) species with inactive U?O double bonds usually form bipyramidal polyhedral structures with ligands coordinated at the equatorial positions, and these polyhedra act as primary building units (PBUs) for the construction of uranyl-organic compounds. The geometry of the uranyl ions and the steric arrangements and functionalities of organic ligands can be exploited in the the design of uranyl--organic extended structures, We also focus on the investigation of the promising physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds. Uranyl-organic materials with an extended structure may exhibit attractive properties, such as photoluminescence, photocatalysis, photocurrent, and photovoltaic responses. In particular, the intriguing, visible-light photocatalytic activities of uranyl-organic compounds are potentially applicable in decomposition of organic pollutants and in water-splitting with the irradiation of solar light. We ascribe the photochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds to the electronic transitions within the U?O bonds, which may be affected by the presence of organic ligands. PMID:21612214

Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

2011-07-19

89

Thermal diffusion desorption for the comprehensive analysis of organic compounds.  

PubMed

Comprehensive analysis of organic compounds is crucial yet challenging considering that information on elements, fragments, and molecules is unavailable simultaneously by current analytical techniques. Additionally, many compounds are insoluble or only dissolve in toxic solvents. A solvent- and matrix-free strategy has been developed which allows the organic compound analyzed in its original form. It utilizes thermal diffusion desorption with the solid analyte irradiated with high energy laser. It is capable of providing explicit elemental, fragmental, and molecular information simultaneously for a variety of organic compounds. Thermal diffusion desorption has many advantages compared to the electrospray and MALDI techniques. The protons that form the protonated molecular ions originate from the analyte itself. All the elements and fragments are also derived from the analyte itself, which provides abundant information and expedites the identification of organic compounds. PMID:24914465

Yin, Zhibin; Wang, Xiaohua; Li, Weifeng; He, Miaohong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

2014-07-01

90

Nonmethane organic compound monitoring program final report, 1988. Volume 1. Nonmethane organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

In certain areas of the country where the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone is being exceeded, additional measurements of ambient nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC) are needed to assist the affected states in developing revised ozone control strategies. Because of previous difficulty in obtaining accurate NMOC measurements, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided monitoring and analytical assistance to these states through Radian Corporation. This assistance began in 1984 and continues through the 1988 NMOC Monitoring Program. Between April 18 and October 30, 1988, Radian analyzed 3,497 ambient air samples, collected at 45 sites. These NMOC analyses were performed by the cryogenic preconcentration, direct flame ionization detection (PDFID) method. Based on 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987 studies, the method was shown to be precise, accurate, and cost effective relative to the capillary column gas chromatographic, flame ionization detection (GC/FID) method. In 1987 Radian Corporation developed a gas chromatographic multidetector (GC/MD) method to determine the concentration of 38 selected toxic compounds in ambient air. In 1988, air toxic analyses were conducted by GC/MD on ambient air samples taken at 13 sites at which NMOC samples were taken. The 1988 Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program (UATMP) began in October 1987 at 19 urban sites and extended through September 1988.

McAllister, R.A.; O'Hara, P.L.; Moore, W.H.; Dayton, D.P.; Rice, J.

1988-12-01

91

The soluble organic compounds of the Bells meteorite: Not a unique or unusual composition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bells meteorite is a CM2 chondrite that has long been considered anomalous for having mineralogical and isotopic differences with CMs together with an overall affinity to CIs in its matrix. We extracted a fragment of the only Bells stone collected unweathered with water and solvents and studied the meteorite's soluble organic composition. We found Bells to contain abundant organic compounds, which are predominantly O-containing such as hydroxy- and di-carboxylic acids, and a scarcity of amino acids and other N-containing compounds. Amines were not detected and ammonia is less abundant than in both the Murchison and Ivuna meteorites. Overall, Bells' soluble organic composition is more similar to that of Ivuna than of Murchison. The observation that Bells' amino acid suite shares a distinct distribution of characteristic molecular species with other stones that are thought to have experienced extensive parent body aqueous alteration, such as the Orgueil, Ivuna and recently analyzed GRO 95577 CR1 meteorites, seems to allow the suggestion that such a composition is secondary to prolonged aqueous alteration processes that superseded some of the initial compositional distinctions determined by the asteroidal environments.

Monroe, Adam A.; Pizzarello, Sandra

2011-12-01

92

Enantiomeric and Isotopic Analysis of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in soluble organic compounds. The Murchison and Murray meteorites contain numerous compounds of interest in the study of early solar system organic chemistry and organic compounds of potential importance for the origin of life. These include: amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, and polyols. This talk will focus on the enantiomeric and isotopic analysis of individual meteoritic compounds - primarily polyol acids. The analyses will determine if, in addition to certain amino acids from Murchison, another potentially important class of prebiotic compounds also contains enantiomeric excesses, i.e., excesses that could have contributed to the current homochirality of life. Preliminary enantiomeric and isotopic (C- 13) measurements of Murchison glyceric acid show that it is indeed extraterrestrial. C-13 and D isotope analysis of meteoritic sugar alcohols (glycerol, threitol, ribitol, etc.) has shown that they are also indigenous to the meteorite.

Cooper, George

2004-01-01

93

40 CFR 60.492 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for the Beverage Can Surface Coating Industry § 60.492 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On or after the date on...

2013-07-01

94

SYNTHESIZING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TIO2  

EPA Science Inventory

High-value organic compounds have been synthesized successfully from linear and cyclic hydrocarbons, by photocatalytic oxidation using a semiconductor material, titanium dioxide (TiO2). Various hydrocarbons were partially oxgenated in both liquid and gaseous phase reactors usi...

95

40 CFR 60.392 - Standards for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Automobile and Light Duty Truck Surface Coating Operations § 60.392 Standards for volatile organic compounds. On and...

2013-07-01

96

ESTIMATION OF PHYSIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BY SPARC  

EPA Science Inventory

The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

97

IMPROVEMENT IN AIR TOXICS METHODS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Innovative and customized monitoring methods for air toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are being developed for applications in exposure and trends monitoring. This task addresses the following applications of specific interest: o Contributions to EPA Regional Monit...

98

DEVELOPMENT OF OZONE REACTIVITY SCALES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Methods for developing a numerical scale ranking reactivities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) towards ozone formation were investigated. ffects of small VOC additions on ozone formation (incremental reactivities) were calculated for 140 types of VOCs in model scenarios repre...

99

Determination of individual organic compounds in shale oil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several techniques have been investigated for quantitating individual organic compounds in shale oil. Acid-base extraction and high performance liquid chromatography were emphasized as independent methods of shale oil fractionation. Gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high performance liquid chromatography were used for individual compound quantitation utilizing external and\\/or internal standards or standard addition techniques. The following compounds were measured in

H. S. Hertz; J. M. Brown; S. N. Chesler; F. R. Guenther; L. R. Hilpert; W. E. May; R. M. Parris; S. A. Wise

1980-01-01

100

Toxic organic compounds from energy production: Progress report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theme of this program has been identifying potentially toxic organic compounds associated with various combustion effluents, following the fates of these compounds in the environment, and improving the analytical methodology for making these measurements. The following have been accomplished: As part of out continuing study of the fate of dioxins we are currently measuring atmospheric concentration of polychlorinated dioxins

Hites

1988-01-01

101

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS MEASURED IN DEARS PASSIVE SAMPLERS  

EPA Science Inventory

A suite of 27 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored in personal exposures, indoors and outdoors of participant's residences, and at a central community site during the DEARS summer 2004 monitoring season. The list of VOCs focused on compounds typically associated with ...

102

Volatile organic compounds at an urban monitoring station in Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements of 56 volatile organic compounds (VOC) were undertaken at a monitoring site in Seoul, Korea in 2004. The VOC pollution at the site was evaluated for both functional groups and individual compounds. The highest concentrations for the functional groups were recorded by aromatic (AR: 430ppbC) followed by paraffin (PR), olefin (OF), and alkyne (AK). The mean concentrations of individual

Hang Thi Nguyen; Ki-Hyun Kim; Min-Young Kim

2009-01-01

103

Global observations of oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds from space  

Microsoft Academic Search

Formaldehyde (HCHO), the smallest aldehyde of the atmosphere and glyoxal (CHO.CHO), the smallest a- dicarbonyl compound, are key intermediate products of the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Due to their short lifetime they are expected to provide valuable information on the global identification of the photochemical hot spots which are attributed to the various emission sources of anthropogenic, biogenic

M. Vrekoussis; F. Wittrock; A. Richter; J. P. Burrows

2008-01-01

104

Adsorption of Organic Compounds on Cottage Grove Sandstone.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The equilibrium adsorption properties of nine organic compounds on the Cottage Grove sandstone were determined at 3,000 psi and two temperatures. The rates of adsorption were calculated for each compound as a function of the concentration of the reactant ...

E. C. Donaldson M. E. Crocker F. S. Manning

1975-01-01

105

Molecular and Enantiomeric Analysis of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in carbon. Much of this carbon is in the form of soluble organic compounds. The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorites with respect to organic chemistry. Their content of organic compounds has led to an initial understanding of early solar system organic chemistry as well as what compounds may have played a role in the origin of life (Cronin and Chang, 1993). Reported compounds include: amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids, and polyols. This talk will focus on the molecular and enantiomeric analysis of individual meteoritic compounds: polyol acids; and a newly identified class of meteorite compounds, keto acids, i.e., acetoacetic acid, levulinic acid, etc. Keto acids (including pyruvic) are critically important in all contemporary organisms. They are key intermediates in metabolism and processes such as the citric acid cycle. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry we identified individual meteoritic keto acids after derivatization to one or more of the following forms: isopropyl ester (ISP), trimethyIsiIy1 (TMS), tert-butyldimethylsilyl (BDMS). Ongoing analyses will determine if, in addition to certain amino acids from Murchison (Cronin and Pizzarello, 1997), other potentially important prebiotic compounds also contain enantiomeric excesses, i.e., excesses that could have contributed to the current homochirality of life.

Cooper, George

2003-01-01

106

Shock Modifications of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Chondrite Parent Bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Impacts among asteroidal objects would have altered or destroyed pre-existing organic matter in both targets and projectiles to a greater or lesser degree depending upon impact velocities. To begin filling a knowledge gap on the shock metamorphism of organic compounds, we are studying the effects of shock impacts on selected classes of organic compounds utilizing laboratory shock facilities. Our approach is to subject mixtures of organic compounds, embedded in the matrix of the Murchison meteorite, to simulated hypervelocity impacts by firing them into targets at various pressures. The mixtures are then analyzed to determine the amount of each compound that survives as well as to determine if new compounds are being synthesized. The initial compounds added to the matrix (with the exception of thiosulfate). The sulfonic acids were chosen in part because they are relatively abundant in Murchison, relatively stable, and because they and the phosphonic acids are the first well-characterized homologous series of organic sulfur and phosphorus compounds identified in an extraterrestrial material. Experimental procedures were more fully described in the original proposal. A 20 mm gun, with its barrel extending into a vacuum chamber (10-2 torr), was used to launch the projectile containing the sample at approx. 1.6 km/sec (3,600 mi/hr) into the target material. Maximum pressure of impact depend on target/projectile materials. The target was sufficiently thin to assure minimum pressure decay over the total sample thickness.

Cooper, George W.

1998-06-01

107

Transport, behavior, and fate of volatile organic compounds in streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds with chemical and physical properties that allow the compounds to move freely between the water and air phases of the environment. VOCs are widespread in the environment because of this mobility. Many VOCs have properties making them suspected or known hazards to the health of humans and aquatic organisms. Consequently, understanding the processes affecting the concentration and distribution VOCs in the environment is necessary. The U.S. Geological Survey selected 55 VOCs for study. This report reviews the characteristics of the various process that could affect the transport, behavior, and fate of these VOCs in streams.

Rathbun, R. E.

1998-01-01

108

Analysis of volatile organic compounds from illicit cocaine samples  

SciTech Connect

Detection of illicit cocaine hydrochloride shipments can be improved if there is a greater understanding of the identity and quantity of volatile compounds present. This study provides preliminary data concerning the volatile organic compounds detected in a limited Set of cocaine hydrochloride samples. In all cases, cocaine was one of the major volatile compounds detected. Other tropeines were detected in almost all samples. Low concentrations of compounds that may be residues of processing solvents were observed in some samples. The equilibrium emissivity of. cocaine from cocaine hydrochloride was investigated and a value of 83 parts-per-trillion was determined.

Robins, W.H.; Wright, B.W.

1994-07-01

109

Temporal stability of polar organic compounds in stainless steel canisters  

SciTech Connect

Because of considerable interest at US EPA for the collection of polar organic compounds in stainless steel canisters, particularly for the Toxic Air Monitoring Site (TAMS) study, the stability of 10 selected polar organics in canisters was investigated and the results are described in this paper. The polar organic compounds selected for this stability study were: methanol, acetone, isoprene, acrylonitrile, vinyl acetate, methyl ethyl ketone, t-butyl methyl ether, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and ethyl acrylate. Two nonpolar compounds, methyl chloroform and toluene, shown to be stable in previous work were included in the stability study as controls. The compounds were loaded in unpolished and Summa-polished canisters at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels under dry and humid conditions. The canister samples were analyzed on Days 0, 1, 3, 4, 14, and 31 after loading. The experimental procedures and stability results are summarized briefly.

Pate, B.; Jayanty, R.K.M.; Peterson, M.R. (Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)); Evans, G.F. (Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

1992-04-01

110

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND CYCLODEXTRIN-CLAY SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

Computational and experimental techniques are combined in order to better understand interactions involving organic compounds and cyclodextrin (CD)-clay systems. CD-clay systems may have great potential in the containment of organic contaminants in the environment. This study w...

111

BIOCONCENTRATION FACTORS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN VEGETATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Samples of air and leaves were taken at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas campus and analyzed for volatile organic compounds using vacuum distillation coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The data were used to estimate the bioconcentration of volatile organic compo...

112

Biological aspects of constructing volatile organic compound emission inventories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The: emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from vegetation is subject to numerous biological controls. Past inventories have relied heavily on empirical models which are limited in their ability to simulate the response of organisms to short- and long-term changes in their growth environment. In this review we consider the principal biochemical, physiological and ecological controls over VOC emission with

Ray Fall; Mt Lerdau; Td Sharkey

1995-01-01

113

COMPARISON OF AMBIENT AIR SAMPLING TECHNIQUES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

A series of fourteen experimental sampling runs were carried out at a field site to collect data from several ambient air monitoring methods for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Ambient air was drawn through a sampling manifold and was continuously spiked with volatile organic ...

114

Regulation of renal tubular secretion of organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regulation of renal tubular secretion of organic compounds.BackgroundInformation on the molecular basis underlying organic anion and cation transport in renal tubules has expanded in recent years with the identification and characterization of numerous transporters. However, little is known about the regulation of this transport.MethodsBoth English and Russian language studies dealing with the regulation of organic ion transport by the kidney

Efim B Berkhin; Michael H Humphreys

2001-01-01

115

Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.  

PubMed

In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly. PMID:19710121

Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

2010-01-01

116

GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE PRESENCE OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER  

EPA Science Inventory

The effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the transport of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil columns were investigated. Three compounds (naphthalene, phenanthrene and DDT) that spanned three orders of magnitude in water solubility were used. Instead of humic matter, mo...

117

Volatile organic compounds in Gulf of Mexico sediments  

SciTech Connect

Volatile organic compounds (VOC), concentrations and compositions were documented for estuarine, coastal, shelf, slope, and deep water sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. VOC were measured (detection limit >0.01 ppb) using a closed-loop stripping apparatus with gas chromatography (GC) and flame ionization, flame photometric, and mass spectrometric detectors. The five primary sources of Gulf of Mexico sediment VOC are: (1) planktonic and benthic fauna and flora; (2) terrestrial material from riverine and atmospheric deposition; (3) anthropogenic inputs: (4) upward migration of hydrocarbons; and (5) transport by bottom currents or slumping. Detected organo-sulfur compounds include alkylated sulfides, thiophene, alkylated thiophenes, and benzothiophenes. Benzothiophenes are petroleum related. Low molecular weight organo-sulfur compounds result from the biological oxidation of organic matter. A lack of organosulfur compounds in the reducing environment of the Orca Basin may result from a lack of free sulfides which are necessary for their production.

McDonald, T.J.

1988-01-01

118

Corrosion of electrodeposited copper by exposure to volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we investigate the corrosive behaviour of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on electroplated copper.\\u000a The VOCs we considered were of the following types: (i) aromatic and substituted-aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene and\\u000a ethyl benzene); (ii) a chlorine-substituted hydrocarbon (dichloromethane) and (iii) an aliphatic alcohol (isopropyl alcohol).\\u000a Contamination by VOCs is typical of ULSI (Ultra Large Scale Integration) manufacturing

Lucia D’Urzo; Benedetto Bozzini

2009-01-01

119

Photosynthetic marine organisms as a source of anticancer compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since early human history, plants have served as the most important source of medicinal natural products, and even in the\\u000a “synthetic age” the majority of lead compounds for pharmaceutical development remain of plant origin. In the marine realm,\\u000a algae and seagrasses were amongst the first organisms investigated by marine natural products scientists on their quest for\\u000a novel pharmaceutical compounds. Forty

F. Folmer; M. Jaspars; M. Dicato; M. Diederich

2010-01-01

120

[Biosensors for detecting organic compounds. II. Sensors for carbohydrates, aromatic, heterocyclic and other organic compounds].  

PubMed

The use of biosensors for detecting aromatic compounds (aniline, hydroquinone, phenol, and N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine), heterocyclic compounds (adenosine, AMP, ATP, bilirubin, hypoxanthine, guanine, inosine, inosine 5'-phosphate, xanthine, creatinine, uric acid, and NAD), carbohydrates (glucose, galactose, lactose, maltose, and sucrose), vitamins, antibiotics, steroids, mutagens, and organophosphorous pesticides is discussed. Basic metrological characteristics of these biosensors are reviewed. PMID:9566290

Sorochinski?, V V; Kurganov, B I

1998-01-01

121

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOEpatents

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14

122

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOEpatents

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (625 Gulfwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37923)

1987-01-01

123

Determination of individual organic compounds in shale oil  

SciTech Connect

Several techniques have been investigated for quantitating individual organic compounds in shale oil. Acid-base extraction and high performance liquid chromatography were emphasized as independent methods of shale oil fractionation. Gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high performance liquid chromatography were used for individual compound quantitation utilizing external and/or internal standards or standard addition techniques. The following compounds were measured in the shale oil: pyrene, fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene, phenol, o-cresol, acridine, and 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine. Comparable results were obtained by the various methods for extraction and quantitation.

Hertz, H.S.; Brown, J.M.; Chesler,S.N.; Guenther, F.R.; Hilpert, L.R.; May, W.E.; Parris, R.M.; Wise, S.A.

1980-09-01

124

Raman scattering studies of organic semiconducting charge-transfer compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic semiconductors offer the possibility of devices with greater mechanical flexibility and lower production costs compared to existing materials. Reports of carrier mobilities in monomolecular organic semiconductors in the 10-50 cm^2/V-s range and success in fabricating electronic devices from organic materials has increased the interest in their properties for electronic applications. However, the range of properties displayed by the monomolecular crystals is rather narrow. Charge-transfer compounds composed of two different organic molecules in which one acts as a donor and the other as an acceptor may represent the next generation of organic semiconductors. Control of their properties by modification of the molecules or changes in stoichiometry and crystalline structure makes them particularly attractive for a wide range of applications provided that the relationship between the structure and constituents of the compounds and their physical properties can be elucidated. Raman scattering studies of single crystals of two representative charge-transfer compounds, perylene-TCNQ and anthracene-TCNQ, will be presented. Theoretical calculations suggest that these materials have the potential for ambipolar charge transport, and so intermolecular interactions in these compounds are of particular interest.

McNeil, Laurie; Kloc, Christian

2011-03-01

125

Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK(a)) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na(6)Al(6)Si(10)O(32)·12H(2)O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Å × 4.5 Å [100] and 2.8 Å × 4.8 Å [101]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k(ow) value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained by modified zeolite. Based on the different adsorption behavior, the uptake of non-ionizable pollutants was thought to be a single partitioning process into the surfactant bilayer. For ionizable compounds, however, interaction of the phenol group(s) with the positively charged "head" of surfactant additionally functions. PMID:22771348

Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna; Wu, Deyi; Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan

2012-09-15

126

Characterization of polar organic compounds and source analysis of fine organic aerosols in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organic aerosols, as an important fraction of airborne particulate mass, significantly affect the environment, climate, and human health. Compared with inorganic species, characterization of individual organic compounds is much less complete and comprehensive because they number in thousands or more and are diverse in chemical structures. The source contributions of organic aerosols are far from being well understood because they

Yunchun Li

2008-01-01

127

On the flux of oxygenated volatile organic compounds from organic aerosol oxidation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous laboratory and field studies suggest that oxidation of organic aerosols can be a source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC). Using measurements of atmospheric oxidants and aerosol size distributions performed on the NASA DC-8 during the INTEX-NA campaign, we estimate the potential magnitude of the continental summertime OVOC flux from organic aerosol oxidation by OH to be as large

Alan J. Kwan; John D. Crounse; Antony D. Clarke; Yohei Shinozuka; Bruce E. Anderson; James H. Crawford; Melody A. Avery; Cameron S. McNaughton; William H. Brune; Hanwant B. Singh; Paul O. Wennberg

2006-01-01

128

INFRARED REMOTE SENSING OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE UPPER TROPOSPHERE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) instrument measures the intensity of atmospheric radiation emitted in the infra-red spectral region at high spectral resolution in five bands ranging from 685 cm-1 to 2410 cm-1. The instrument has an excellent radiometric calibration, allowing the determination of weak features of organic compounds which are present and rather important in the upper

John J. Remedios; Grant Allen; H. Sembhi

2005-01-01

129

AERATION TO REMOVE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM GROUND WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

The interim report presents general information on the use of aeration to remove volatile organic compounds from drinking water for public health reasons. The report illustrates the types of aerators, shows where they are being used, presents a means of estimating aeration perfor...

130

Problems in determining the water solubility of organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have been concerned for some time about the reliability of published water solubility data for organic compounds with low solubility. The problem was illustrated by the results of our studies on the solubility of the liquid trichlorobenzene (TCB). We found that the apparent solubility is strongly dependent on the method of introducing the solute into the water (Orr 1980).

A. Bharath; C. Mallard; D. Orr; G. Ozburn; A. Smith

1984-01-01

131

PHOTOTHERMAL DESTRUCTION OF THE VAPOR OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The results of thermal and photothermal destruction of the vapors of organic compounds were compared by conducting tests in a photothermal detoxification unit. enon are lamp was used as the irradiation source. he tests were conducted on trichlorethylene (TCE), 1,2-dichlorobenzene...

132

PHOTOTHERMAL DESTRUCTION OF THE VAPOR OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The contamination of subsurface soil and groundwater by volatile organic compounds (VOCS) is a pervasive problem in the United States. n-situ soil vapor extraction (SVE) and ex-situ thermal desorption are the most adapted technologies for the remediation of contaminated soil whil...

133

Reductive amination of oxygen-containing organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The data dealing with reductive amination of oxygen-containing organic compounds of different classes are systematised. New data on the amination agents and the catalysts used are presented. The dependence of the reactivity of reagents on their structures is considered. The bibliography includes 249 references.

Tarasevich, Vladimir A.; Kozlov, Nikolai G.

1999-01-01

134

Influence of Ozone on the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation processes using titanium oxide as a photocatalyst are widely discussed topics in research for water and waste water treatment. Oxygen fed into the systems is normally used as oxidizing agent. However few investigations exist concerning the use of ozone as an additional oxidant. In this work the influence of ozone on the photocatalytic degradation of organic compounds

E. Gilbert

2002-01-01

135

Source apportionment of volatile organic compounds in Hong Kong homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Indoor volatile organic compound (VOC) data obtained in 100 Hong Kong homes were analyzed to investigate the nature of emission sources and their contributions to indoor concentrations. A principal component analysis (PCA) showed that off-gassing of building materials, household products, painted wood products, room freshener, mothballs and consumer products were the major sources of VOCs in Hong Kong homes. The

H. Guo

2011-01-01

136

Metabolism and effects of organic compounds in animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The knowledge of the metabolism and effects of organic compounds in animals, specifically food-producing animals, are of paramount importance in assessing potential human health hazards. An intensive effort has been directed at detection of chemicals in the environment, determination of their physiological insult and cellular interaction; in particular their carcinogenic and mutagenic induction capability. The chemical exposure of food-producing animals

Eisele

1985-01-01

137

Assessment of volatile organic compound emissions from ecosystems of China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Isoprene, monoterpene, and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from grasslands, shrublands, forests, and peatlands in China were characterized to estimate their regional magnitudes and to compare these emissions with those from landscapes of North America, Europe, and Africa. Ecological and VOC emission sampling was conducted at 52 sites centered in and around major research stations located in seven different

L. F. Klinger; Q.-J. Li; A. B. Guenther; J. P. Greenberg; B. Baker; J.-H. Bai

2002-01-01

138

Volatile organic compounds in ambient air of Mumbai—India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major group of air pollutants which play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry. These contribute to toxic oxidants which are harmful to ecosystem, human health and atmosphere. The variability of pollutants is an important factor in determining human exposure to these chemicals. Data on levels of VOCs in developing countries, including India, are lacking.The

Anjali Srivastava; A. E. Joseph; S. Devotta

2006-01-01

139

Volatile organic compounds in some urban locations in United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been determined to be human risk factors in urban environments, as well as primary contributors to the formation of photochemical oxidants. Ambient air quality measurements of 54 VOCs including hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons and carbonyls were conducted in or near 13 urban locations in the United States during September 1996 to August 1997. Air samples were

Mahmoud F. Mohamed; Daiwen Kang; Viney P. Aneja

2002-01-01

140

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND MODEL (VERSION 1.8) (FOR MICROCOMPUTERS)  

EPA Science Inventory

Future emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and costs of their control can be estimated by applying growth factors, emission constraints, control cost functions, and capacity retirement rates to the base line estimates of VOC emissions and industrial VOC source capacity...

141

Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds on supported noble metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are toxic and mainly contribute to the formation of photochemical smog with a consequent remarkable impact to the air quality. A few techniques are available to reduce VOC emission, among them catalytic oxidation is suitable especially for highly diluted VOCs. The development of noble metals and transition metal oxides as catalysts for VOCs oxidation has been

L. F. Liotta

2010-01-01

142

FIELD-DEPLOYABLE MONITORS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

Volatile organic compounds in ambient air are usually estimated by trapping them from air or collecting whole air samples and returning them to a laboratory for analysis by gas chromatography using selective detection. ata do not appear for several days, during which sample integ...

143

Biogeochemistry of Organic Nitrogen Compounds in Seawater and on Particles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of this research was to increase our understanding of the behavior of biogenic organic nitrogen compounds in the marine environment. Nitrogen is essential to the photosynthetic formation of life in natural waters and is one of the nutrients which...

C. Lee

1992-01-01

144

A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly

Alex Guenther; C. Nicholas Hewitt; David Erickson; Ray Fall; Chris Geron; Tom Graedel; Peter Harley; Lee Klinger; Manuel Lerdau; W. A. McKay; Tom Pierce; Bob Scholes; Rainer Steinbrecher; Raja Tallamraju; John Taylor; Pat Zimmerman

1995-01-01

145

Screening of Volatile Organic Compounds in River Sediment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as trichloroethene, toluene and xylenes have been reported to be detected from river water and sediment, because a part of VOCs charged into river can be distributed to river sediment. Fifty-three common VOCs in water have been simultaneously determined with good accuracy and precision by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC\\/MS) with headspace method as

K. Kawata; A. Tanabe; S. Saito; M. Sakai; A. Yasuhara

1997-01-01

146

IDENTIFICATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AN INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used in a survey analysis of organic compounds in an industrial wastewater. Problems in the interpretation of the GC/MS data in effluent from a specialty chemicals plant were addressed. An important feature of the study was the use...

147

Energies of organic compounds. [Polyoxygenated methanes, ketals, orthoesters, cyclopropane derivatives  

SciTech Connect

Automatic reaction calorimeters were developed. Enthalpies of hydration or hydrolysis were determined for polyoxygenated methanes, ketals, acetals, orthoesters, and alkenes. Trifluoroacetolysis of alkenes was carried out. Enthalpies of acetolysis and combustion of cyclopropane derivatives were also determined. Molecular mechanics calculations were carried out for ketones and ketals. Charge distribution in organic compounds were studied. 31 references. (DLC)

Wiberg, K. B.

1980-07-01

148

LEAVES AS INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in leaves is primarily a product of airborne exposures and dependent upon bioconcentration factors and release rates. The bioconcentration factors for VOCs in grass are found to be related to their partitioning between octan...

149

NATIONAL AMBIENT VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) DATA BASE UPDATE, DOCUMENTATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Data on the observed concentrations of three hundred twenty (320) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were compiled, critically evaluated, and assembled into a relational data base. Ambient (i.e., outdoor) measurements, indoor data, and data collected with personal monitors are inc...

150

Portable acoustic wave sensors for volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portable acoustic wave sensor (PAWS) systems are being developed for real-time, on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC's). These systems are built around acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with viscoelastic polymers. Two independent responses of the SAW sensor, wave velocity and wave attenuation, are measured to provide information about the chemical species sorbed by the coating. Rapid, reversible detection of

G. C. Frye; R. W. Cernosek; S. J. Martin

1992-01-01

151

Characterization of total volatile organic compound emissions from paints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, Homeswest in Western Australia and Murdoch University developed a project to construct low allergen houses (LAH) in a newly developed suburb. All potential volatile organic compound (VOC) emission materials used in LAH are required to be measured before the construction of LAH, to ensure they are low VOCs emission materials. To protect people sensitive to exposure to VOCs it

H. Guo; F. Murray

2000-01-01

152

OXYGENATED ORGANIC COMPOUND CONCENTRATIONS NEAR A ROADWAY IN LITHUANIA, SSR  

EPA Science Inventory

During the period June 1 to June 9, 1989, aldehyde and other oxygenated organic compound concentrations were examined at sites 3, 10, and 80 meters northeast of the Vilnius-Kaunas highway in Lithuania, SSR by collecting 120 liter (1 L/min for 120 min) samples on 2,4-dinitrophenyl...

153

Who Took Jerell's iPod? -- An Organic Compound Mystery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students learn how to test for triglycerides, glucose, starch, and protein and then use these tests to solve a mystery. The activity reinforces students understanding of the biological functions and food sources of these different types of organic compounds.

Doherty, Jennifer; Waldron, Ingrid

154

Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from soil and litter samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of nonmethane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by soil microbes is likely to have an important influence on soil ecology and terrestrial biogeochemistry. However, soil VOC production has received relatively little attention, and we do not know how the emissions of microbially-produced VOCs vary across soil and litter types. We collected 40 root-free soil and litter samples from a

Jonathan W. Leff; Noah Fierer

2008-01-01

155

Sorption of Ionizable Organic Compounds to Sediments and Soils.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The sorption of ionizable organic compounds to sediments and saturated soils is examined. The sorption of pentachlorophenol to two sediment silt-clay fractions as a function of pH is described. Sorption of both the neutral and the ionic species was shown ...

C. T. Jafvert E. J. Weber

1991-01-01

156

Composition of volatile organic compounds in flowers of Astragalus sahendi.  

PubMed

A hydrodistillation sampling method, coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, was used in monitoring the volatile organic compounds in flowers of Astragalus sahendi. Accordingly, a total of 48 compounds were recognised, which were united by their terpenoid or aliphatic skeletons and low molecular weight. Above all, the significant presence of some insect-favoured terpenoid compounds, such as farnesol, cis- and trans-geraniol, alpha-bisabolol, nerolidol isomer, alpha-terpineol, alpha-terpinolene and thymol was significant. These findings confer a better understanding of pollination processes in the giant genus Astragalus. Furthermore, the results add to an increasing quantity of data corroborating the ecologic and evolutionary correlation between the floral bioactive compounds of plant species and their special types of pollinators. PMID:20803377

Movafeghi, A; Delazar, A; Amini, M; Asnaashari, S; Nazifi, E

2010-09-01

157

Analysis of organic compounds in returned comet nucleus samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques for analysis of organic compounds in returned comet nucleus samples are described. Interstellar, chondritic and transitional organic components are discussed. Appropriate sampling procedures will be essential to the success of these analyses. It will be necessary to return samples that represent all the various regimes found in the nucleus, e.g., a complete core, volatile components (deep interior), and crustal components (surface minerals, rocks, processed organics such as macromolecular carbon and polymers). Furthermore, sampling, storage, return, and distribution of samples must be done under conditions that preclude contamination of the samples by terrestrial matter.

Cronin, J. R.

1989-01-01

158

Measurements of halogenated organic compounds near the tropical tropopause  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The amount of organic chlorine and bromine entering the stratosphere have a direct influence on the magnitude of chlorine and bromine catalyzed ozone losses. Twelve organic chlorine species and five organic bromine species were measured from 12 samples collected near the tropopause between 23.8 deg N and 25.3 deg N during AASE 2. The average mixing ratios of total organic chlorine and total organic bromine were 3.50 +/- 0.06 ppbv and 21.1 +/- 0.8 pptv, respectively. CH3Cl represented 15.1% of the total organic chlorine, with CFC 11 (CCl3F) and CFC 12 (CCl2F2) accounting for 22.6% and 28.2%, respectively, with the remaining 34.1% primarily from CCl4, CH3CCl3, and CFC 113 (CCl2FCClF2). CH3Br represented 54% of the total organic bromine. The 95% confidence intervals of the mixing ratios of all but four of the individual compounds were within the range observed in low and mid-latitude mid-troposphere samples. The four compounds with significantly lower mixing ratios at the tropopause were CHCl3, CH2Cl2, CH2Br2, and CH3CCl3. The lower mixing ratios may be due to entrainment of southern hemisphere air during vertical transport in the tropical region and/or to exchange of air across the tropopause between the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere.

Schauffler, S. M.; Heidt, L. E.; Pollock, W. H.; Gilpin, T. M.; Vedder, J. F.; Solomon, S.; Lueb, R. A.; Atlas, E. L.

1993-01-01

159

Measurements of Halogenated Organic Compounds near the Tropical Tropopause  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The amount of organic chlorine and bromine entering the stratosphere have a direct influence on the magnitude of chlorine and bromine catalyzed ozone losses. Twelve organic chlorine species and five organic bromine species were measured from 12 samples collected near the tropopause between 23.8 deg N and 25.3 deg N during AASE 2. The average mixing ratios of total organic chlorine and total organic bromine were 3.50 +/- 0.06 ppbv and 21.1 +/- 0.8 pptv, respectively. CH3Cl represented 15.1% of the total organic chlorine, with CFC 11 (CCl3F) and CFC 12 (CCl2F2) accounting for 22.6% and 28.2%, respectively, with the remaining 34.1% primarily from CCl4, CH3CCl3, and CFC 113 (CCl2FCClF2). CH3Br represented 54% of the total organic bromine. The 95% confidence intervals of the mixing ratios of all but four of the individual compounds were within the range observed in low and mid-latitude midtroposphere samples. The four compounds with significantly lower mixing ratios at the tropopause were CHCl3, CH2Cl2, CH2Br2, and CH3CCl3. The lower mixing ratios may be due to entrainment of southern hemisphere air during vertical transport in the tropical region and/or to exchange of air across the tropopause between the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere.

Schauffler, S. M.; Heidt, L. E.; Pollock, W. H.; Gilpin, T. M.; Vedder, J. F.; Solomon, S.; Leub, R. A.; Atlas, E. L.

1993-01-01

160

Designed nanostructures of clay for controlled adsorption of organic compounds.  

PubMed

The utilization of smectite clay, swelling layered silicate, as scaffolds for designing functional nanostructures was overviewed. Surface modification of smectites with organoammonium ions has given hydrophobic and microporous nature to uptake nonionic organic contaminants from environments. The states of the adsorbed nonionic organic compounds have been altered and varied by the modification of smectites as shown by the controlled release and specific catalytic reactions. Cationic species have been easily concentrated on smectites from aqueous phase and the states (orientation and distribution) have been controlled by the co-adsorption of both cationic and nonionic species. The functions of smectite-organic intercalation compounds derived from the precisely controlled nanostructures were introduced in this review. PMID:24745206

Okada, Tomohiko; Seki, Yoko; Ogawa, Makoto

2014-03-01

161

Adsorption of Dissolved Organic Compounds from Seawater Onto Sediment and Manganese Nodule Particles.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The removal of dissolved organic compounds from seawater by adsorption onto ferromanganese particles and red clay sediment was investigated. The compounds studied were chosen to represent typical classes of dissolved organic compounds in seawater and cons...

M. R. Petersen D. E. Robertson

1973-01-01

162

Biodiversity of volatile organic compounds from five French ferns.  

PubMed

Five French ferns belonging to different families were investigated for volatile organic compounds (VOC) by GC-MS using organic solvent extraction. Fifty-five VOC biosynthesized from the shikimic, lipidic and terpenic pathways including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and carotenoid-type compounds were identified. The main volatile compound of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. (Pteridaceae) was (E)-2-decenal with a plastic or "stink bug" odor. The volatile profiles of Athyrium filix-femina (L.) Roth (Woodsiaceae) and Blechnum spicant (L.) Roth (Blechnaceae) showed similarities, with small amounts of isoprenoids and the same main volatile compounds, i.e., 2-phenylethanal (odor of lilac and hyacinth) and 1-octen-3-ol (mushroom-like odor). The main volatile compound of Dryopteris filix-mas (L.) Schott (Dryopteridaceae) was (E)-nerolidol with a woody or fresh bark note. Polyketides, as acylfilicinic acids, were mainly identified in this fern. Oreopteris limbosperma (Bellardi ex. All.) J. Holub (Thelypteridaceae), well-known for its lemon smell, contained the highest biodiversity of VOC. Eighty percent of the volatiles was issued from the terpenic pathway. The main volatiles were (E)-nerolidol, alpha-terpineol, beta-caryophyllene and other minor monoterpenes (for example, linalool, pinenes, limonene, and gamma-terpinen-7-al). It was also the fern with the highest number of carotenoid-type derivatives, which were identified in large amounts. Our results were of great interest underlying new industrial valorisation for ferns based on their broad spectrum of volatiles. PMID:21121267

Fons, Françoise; Froissard, Didier; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Buatois, Bruno; Rapior, Sylvie

2010-10-01

163

Group extraction of organic compounds present in liquid samples  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An extraction device is disclosed comprising a tube containing a substantially inert, chemically non-reactive packing material with a large surface area to volume ratio. A sample which consists of organic compounds dissolved in a liquid, is introduced into the tube. As the sample passes through the packing material it spreads over the material's large surface area to form a thin liquid film which is held on the packing material in a stationary state. A particular group or family of compounds is extractable from the sample by passing a particular solvent system consisting of a solvent and selected reagents through the packing material. The reagents cause optimum conditions to exist for the compounds of the particular family to pass through the phase boundary between the sample liquid and the solvent of the solvent system. Thus, the compounds of the particular family are separated from the sample liquid and become dissolved in the solvent of the solvent system. The particular family of compounds dissolved in the solvent, representing an extract, exits the tube together with the solvent through the tube's nozzle, while the rest of the sample remains on the packing material in a stationary state. Subsequently, a different solvent system may be passed through the packing material to extract another family of compounds from the remaining sample on the packing material.

Jahnsen, Vilhelm J. (Inventor)

1976-01-01

164

78 FR 24990 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound Emission Control Measures for...Implementation Plan (SIP), several volatile organic compound (VOC) rules that were submitted...stationary sources, storage of volatile organic liquids, industrial cleaning...

2013-04-29

165

Identification of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and carbonyl compounds in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and carbonyl compounds are the major organic pollutants in the atmosphere. Emissions from motor vehicles have been one of the primary pollution sources in the metropolitan area of Hong Kong. A 12-month monitoring program for VOCs, PAHs and carbonyl compounds was performed at a roadside urban station at Hong Kong Polytechnic University

K. F. Ho; S. C. Lee

2002-01-01

166

Identification and Quantification of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Dairy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Livestock operations in the United States are an escalating environmental concern. The increasing density of livestock within a farm results in an increased emission of odorous gases, which have gained considerable attention by the public in recent years (National Research Council (NRC), 2002). Odorous compounds such as ammonia (NH3), volatile organic compounds (VOC's), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were reported to have a major effect on the quality of life of local residents living near livestock facilities (NRC, 2002). There has been little data collected related to identification and quantification of gaseous compounds collected from open stall dairy operations in the United States. The research to be presented identifies and quantifies VOCs produced from a dairy operation that contribute to odor and other air quality problems. Many different VOCs were identified in the air downwind of an open lactating cow stall area and near a waste lagoon at the Washington State University dairy using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis techniques. Identified compounds were very diverse and included many alcohols, aldehydes, amines, aromatics, esters, ethers, a fixed gas, halogenated hydrocarbons, hydrocarbons, ketones, other nitrogen containing compounds, sulfur containing compounds, and terpenes. The VOCs directly associated with cattle waste were dependent on ambient temperature, with the highest emissions produced during the summer months. Low to moderate wind speeds were ideal for VOC collection. Concentrations of quantified compounds were mostly below odor detection thresholds found in the literature, however the combined odor magnitude of the large number of compounds detected was most likely above any minimum detection threshold.

Filipy, J.; Mount, G.; Westberg, H.; Rumburg, B.

2003-12-01

167

Contributions of Individual Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds to Secondary Organic Aerosol and Organic Nitrate Formation above a Mixed Forest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are the largest source of atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons globally. However, uncertainty remains in understanding the fate of BVOCs following emission. BVOCs can be oxidized to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA), CO, and CO2, or be removed from the atmosphere through dry and wet deposition. Further, the formation of organic nitrates through BVOC reaction with OH

K. A. Pratt; L. H. Mielke; P. B. Shepson; A. M. Bryan; A. L. Steiner; D. Helmig

2010-01-01

168

Nonlinear Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Principles of nonlinear laser fluorescence spectroscopy of complicated organic compounds and of the method capable of determining photophysical parameters are considered in this chapter. Special attention is paid to the peculiarities of the method connected with specific photophysical processes in natural organic compounds, especially in proteins, and to the major role of intramolecular energy transfer and presence of localized donor-acceptor pairs (LDAP) of fluorophores within single macromolecules. These facts stimulated the development of models based on the collective states formalism describing fluorescent response of LDAP to pulsed laser excitation. Unique features of the method are illustrated by the example of proteins (proteins with intrinsic fluorescence (HSA, BSA) and fluorescent protein mRFP1) that can be used as fluorescent tags of intracellular processes while their photophysical parameters can be used as the information channel.

Fadeev, Victor V.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.

169

Bibliography on contaminants and solubility of organic compounds in oxygen  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compilation of a number of document citations is presented which contains information on contaminants in oxygen. Topics covered include contaminants and solubility of organic compounds in oxygen, reaction characteristics of organic compounds with oxygen, and sampling and detection limits of impurities. Each citation in the data bank contains many items of information about the document. Some of the items are title, author, abstract, corporate source, description of figures pertinent to hazards or safety, key references, and descriptors (keywords) by which the document can be retrieved. Each citation includes an evaluation of the technical contents as to being good/excellent, acceptable, or poor. The descriptors used to define the contents of the documents and subsequently used in the computerized search operations were developed for the cryogenic fluid safety by experts in the cryogenics field.

Ordin, P. M. (compiler)

1975-01-01

170

Sugar-Related Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sugars and related polyols are critical components of all organisms and may have been necessary for the origin of life. To date, this class of organic compounds had not been definitively identified in meteorites. This study was undertaken to determine if polyols were present in the early Solar System as constituents of carbonaceous meteorites. Results of analyses of the Murchison and Murray meteorites indicate that formaldehyde and sugar chemistry may be responsible for the presence of a variety of polyols. We conclude that polyols were present on the early Earth through delivery by asteroids and possibly comets.

Cooper, G.; Kimmich, N.; Belisle, W.; Sarinana, J.; Brabham, K.; Garrel, L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

171

PARTITION EQUILIBRIA OF NONIONIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BETWEEN SOIL ORGANIC MATTER AND WATER  

EPA Science Inventory

Equilibrium isotherms for the simultaneous uptake of binary nonionic organic compounds from water on soil indicated no competitive effect between the two solutes. The observation supports the hypothesis that partition to the soil organic phase is the primary process for sorption ...

172

Soil sampling and analysis for volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concerns over data quality have raised many questions related to sampling soils for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This paper was prepared in response to some of these questions and concerns expressed by Remedial Project Managers (RPMs) and On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs). The following questions are frequently asked:1.Is there a specific device suggested for sampling soils for VOCs?2.Are there significant losses of

T. E. Lewis; A. B. Crockett; R. L. Siegrist

1994-01-01

173

Trees and VOCs: Measuring volatile organic compounds from urban forests  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site describes a research project to measure volatile organic compounds emitted from species of trees and shrubs found in urban areas. Topics include a description of the project and a section on trees and air quality. A page updated each month or so reports field and lab work on the project. There is also a glossary, profiles of community partners, and profiles of the scientists and students involved in the project.

Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) at the University of Colorado-Boulder; Research, The N.

174

Artificial Neural Network Electronic Nose for Volatile Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advanced microsystems that include, sensors, interface-circuits, and pattern-recognition integrated monolithically or in a hybrid module are needed for civilian, military, and space applications. These include: automotive, medical applications, environmental engineering, and manufacturing automation. ASICs with Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are considered in this paper, with the objective of recognizing air-borne volatile organic compounds, especially alcohols, ethers, esters, halocarbons, NH3, NO2,

Hoda S. Abdel-aty-zohdy

1998-01-01

175

Source characteristics of oxygenated volatile organic compounds and hydrogen cyanide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airborne trace gas measurements from Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P), Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM)-Tropics B, and Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-North America (INTEX-NA) experiments are analyzed to examine the major source factors contributing to the observed variabilities of oxygenated volatile organic compounds and cyanides. The positive matrix factorization method is applied to coincident measurements of 11 chemicals including

Changsub Shim; Yuhang Wang; Hanwant B. Singh; Donald R. Blake; Alex B. Guenther

2007-01-01

176

Improved sensitivity of headspace gas chromatography for organic aromatic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The effect of adding an electrolyte and increasing the temperature on the preconcentration of volatile compounds in headspace\\u000a analysis has been investigated. Quantification of the interactive effects of temperature and addition of salt on the vapor\\u000a concentration is of interest for the determination of trace organic impurities in pharmaceutical base materials. This study\\u000a was undertaken to investigate the quantitative effects

A. Naddaf; J. Balla

2000-01-01

177

Portable acoustic wave sensors for volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portable acoustic wave sensor (PAWS) systems are being developed for real-time, on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC`s). These systems are built around acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with viscoelastic polymers. Two independent responses of the SAW sensor, wave velocity and wave attenuation, are measured to provide information about the chemical species sorbed by the coating. Rapid, reversible detection of

G. C. Frye; R. W. Cernosek; S. J. Martin

1992-01-01

178

Characterization of total volatile organic compound emissions from paints  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, Homeswest in Western Australia and Murdoch University developed a project to construct low allergen houses (LAH)\\u000a in a newly developed suburb. All potential volatile organic compound (VOC) emission materials used in LAH are required to\\u000a be measured before the construction of LAH, to ensure they are low VOCs emission materials. To protect people sensitive to\\u000a exposure to VOCs it

H. Guo; F. Murray

2000-01-01

179

Degradation of volatile organic compounds with thermally activated persulfate oxidation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the extent and treatability of the degradation of 59 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) listed in the EPA SW-846 Method 8260B with thermally activated persulfate oxidation. Data on the degradation of the 59 VOCs (in mixture) reacted with sodium persulfate in concentrations of 1gl?1 and 5gl?1 and at temperatures of 20°C, 30°C, and 40°C were obtained. The results

Kun-Chang Huang; Zhiqiang Zhao; George E. Hoag; Amine Dahmani; Philip A. Block

2005-01-01

180

Identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds from a dairy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that contribute to odor and air quality problems have been identified from the Washington State University Knott Dairy Farm using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Eighty-two VOCs were identified at a lactating cow open stall and 73 were detected from a slurry wastewater lagoon. These compounds included alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, ethers, aromatic hydrocarbons, halogenated hydrocarbons, terpenes, other hydrocarbons, amines, other nitrogen containing compounds, and sulfur-containing compounds. The concentration of VOCs directly associated with cattle waste increased with ambient air temperature, with the highest concentrations present during the summer months. Concentrations of most detected compounds were below published odor detection thresholds. Emission rates of ethanol (1026±513 ?g cow -1 s -1) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) (13.8±10.3 ?g cow -1 s -1) were measured from the lactating stall area using an atmospheric tracer method and concentrations were plotted using data over a 2-year period. Emission rates of acetone (3.03±0.85 ng cow -1 s -1), 2-butanone (145±35 ng cow -1 s -1), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.46±1.11 ng cow -1 s -1), 2-methyl-3-pentanone (25.1±8.0 ng cow -1 s -1), DMS (2.19±0.92 ng cow -1 s -1), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) (16.1±3.9 ng cow -1 s -1) were measured from the slurry waste lagoon using a laboratory emission chamber.

Filipy, Jenny; Rumburg, Brian; Mount, George; Westberg, Hal; Lamb, Brian

181

Speciation of volatile organic compounds from poultry production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from poultry production are leading source of air quality problems. However, little is known about the speciation and levels of VOCs from poultry production. The objective of this study was the speciation of VOCs from a poultry facility using evacuated canisters and sorbent tubes. Samples were taken during active poultry production cycle and between production cycles. Levels of VOCs were highest in areas with birds and the compounds in those areas had a higher percentage of polar compounds (89%) compared to aliphatic hydrocarbons (2.2%). In areas without birds, levels of VOCs were 1/3 those with birds present and compounds had a higher total percentage of aliphatic hydrocarbons (25%). Of the VOCs quantified in this study, no single sampling method was capable of quantifying more than 55% of compounds and in several sections of the building each sampling method quantified less than 50% of the quantifiable VOCs. Key classes of chemicals quantified using evacuated canisters included both alcohols and ketones, while sorbent tube samples included volatile fatty acids and ketones. The top five compounds made up close to 70% of VOCs and included: 1) acetic acid (830.1 ?g m -3); 2) 2,3-butanedione (680.6 ?g m -3); 3) methanol (195.8 ?g m -3); 4) acetone (104.6 ?g m -3); and 5) ethanol (101.9 ?g m -3). Location variations for top five compounds averaged 49.5% in each section of the building and averaged 87% for the entire building.

Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Li, Hong; Burns, Robert; Xin, Hongwei; Hatfield, Jerry

2010-09-01

182

Characteristics of the volatile organic compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Site  

SciTech Connect

The Volatile Organic Compounds -- Arid Integrated Demonstration Program (VOC-Arid ID) is targeted at demonstration and testing of technologies for the evaluation and cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated contaminants at arid DOE sites. The initial demonstration site is an area of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination located near the center of the Hanford Site. The movement of CCl{sub 4} and other volatile organic contaminants in the subsurface is very complex. The problem at the Hanford Site is further complicated by the concurrent discharge of other waste constituents including acids, lard oil, organic phosphates, and transuranic radionuclides. In addition, the subsurface environment is very complex, with large spatial variabilities in hydraulic properties. A thorough understanding of the problem is essential to the selection of appropriate containment, retrieval, and/or in situ remedial technologies. The effectiveness of remedial technologies depends on knowing where the contaminants are, how they are held up in a given physical and chemical subsurface environment; and knowing the physical, chemical, and microbiological changes that are induced by the various remedial technologies.

Last, G.V.; Lenhard, R.J.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Evans, J.C.; Roberson, K.R.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E.; Rockhold, M.L.

1991-10-01

183

Characterisation of polar organic compounds in fog water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper the results of a systematic liquid chromatographic investigation are described to characterise water-soluble organic compounds in fog. A diode array detector is used to record the UV spectrum of the components during separation and a mass spectrometer is applied to obtain information on the ion masses of the constituents. The combination of UV and mass spectra reveal that the organic carbon content of fog water is distributed among a great number of acidic compounds which have polar functional groups and polyconjugated systems absorbing up to 500 nm. Due to the complexity of the organic fraction in fog water an unresolved hump of ions was recorded by the mass spectrometer from m/ z=100-600 the most intense peaks being detected around m/ z=200-250. Tannin and fulvic acid were also examined under the same conditions. In terms of complexity and ion distribution the mass spectrum of the organic fraction was similar to that of a fulvic acid reference material rather than to that of tannin.

Kiss, Gyula; Varga, Bálint; Gelencsér, András; Krivácsy, Zoltán; Molnár, Ágnes; Alsberg, Tomas; Persson, Linn; Hansson, Hans-Christen; Cristina Facchini, Maria

184

Iodination of organic compounds via organoborane intermediates: new methods  

SciTech Connect

The incorporation of iodine into organic molecules can be accomplished through the use of organoboranes as synthetic intermediates. However, the iodination of organoboranes with molecular iodine is not suitable for the efficient incorporation of radioiodine into organic molecules since one-half of the radionuclide is lost as iodide. The iodination of organoboranes, vinylboronic acids and arylboronic acids was studied, using iodine monochloride or sodium iodide/chloramine-T. Both synthetic methods were rapid and efficient methods for iodinating organic substrates, including those with functional groups. The reactions provided maximum utilization of radioiodine in the synthesis of iodine-125 labeled compounds, both in preliminary tracer studies, and in experiments using carrier-free iodine-125.

Gooch, E.E. III

1981-01-01

185

Interaction of Saharan dust particles with semivolatile organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mineral dust particles can be transported over long distances. During transport, mineral dust particles can interact with semi-volatile organic compounds present in the atmosphere, either as local pollution or as photochemical oxidation products of volatile species. Here we report on the interaction of organic species with mineral dust particles from the Sahara over an urban region. The dust samples were collected in Israel during spring 2001, covering several dust storm events. In an integrated, multi-technique study, using Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with energy dispersion system (SEM-EDS) and bulk aerosol analysis (gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry and ion chromatography methods), the organic and inorganic content of mineral dust particles collected during dust storms were studied. Particles were collected on 8-stages impactors for size segregated analysis, by high volume samplers for ion chromatography and GC analysis, on 47 mm PTFE filters for ion chromatography, and on silicon substrates for SEM-EDS analysis. Many mixed inorganic and organic particles were identified by individual particle SEM-EDS analysis of the collected particles. We will present the findings from the SEM analysis exemplifying the existence of the mixed particles. Using direct sample introduction followed by thermal desorption GC/MS and ion chromatography analysis, tracers for urban air pollution, of photochemical degradation products of biogenic volatile organic compounds as well as tracers of biomass burning were probed and quantified. The effect of the dust storms on the size distribution of semi-volatile organics will be discussed. Differences in the redistribution behavior between local pollution, photochemical degradation products and tracers of biomass burning will be highlighted.

Rudich, Y.; Falkovich, A. H.

2001-12-01

186

Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils  

SciTech Connect

Physico-chemical sorption of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on soil minerals is one of the major processes of organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils, especially in deeper layers. The attachment of C on soil solids is related to the reactivity of the soil minerals and the chemistry of the sorbate functional groups, but the sorption studies conducted without controlling microbial activity may overestimate the sorption potential of soil. This study was conducted to examine the sorptive characteristics of a diverse functional groups of simple OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols) with and without biological degradative processes. Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0-100 mg C L-1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1:60 for 48 hrs and the sorption parameters were calculated by Langmuir model fitting. The amount of added compounds that remained in the solution phase was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and total organic C (TOC) analysis. Soil sterilization was performed by -irradiation technique and experiments were repeated to determine the contribution of microbial degradation to apparent sorption. Overall, Ultisols did not show a marked preference for apparent sorption of any of the model compounds, as indicated by a narrower range of maximum sorption capacity (Smax) of 173-527 mg kg soil-1 across compounds. Mollisols exhibited a strong preference for apparent sorption of oxalic acid (Smax of 5290 mg kg soil-1) and sinapyl alcohol (Smax of 2031 mg kg soil-1) over the other compounds. The propensity for sorption of oxalic acid is mainly attributed to the precipitation of insoluble Ca-oxalate due to the calcareous nature of most Mollisol subsoils and its preference for sinapyl alcohol could be linked to the polymerization of this lignin monomer on 2:2 mineral dominated soils. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was in between that of Ultisols and Mollisols. HPLC results revealed significantly higher sorption of D-glucose and L-alanine than did TOC results, and duplicate experiments with sterilized soils confirmed that glucose and alanine were mineralized leading to higher apparent sorption values via HPLC. This study demonstrated that three common temperate soil orders experienced differential sorption of simple OC compounds, indicating that sorbate chemistry plays a significant role in the sorptive stabilization of DOC.

Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL

2012-01-01

187

Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in anoxic environments.  

PubMed

Microbial cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSC) is investigated due to the impact these compounds are thought to have on environmental processes like global temperature control, acid precipitation and the global sulfur cycle. Moreover, in several kinds of industries like composting plants and the paper industry VOSC are released causing odor problems. Waste streams containing these compounds must be treated in order to avoid the release of these compounds to the atmosphere. This paper describes the general mechanisms for the production and degradation of methanethiol (MT) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS), two ubiquitous VOSC in anaerobic environments. Slurry incubations indicated that methylation of sulfide and MT resulting in MT and DMS, respectively, is one of the major mechanisms for VOSC in sulfide-rich anaerobic environments. An anaerobic bacterium that is responsible for the formation of MT and DMS through the anaerobic methylation of H2S and MT was isolated from a freshwater pond after enrichment with syringate as a methyl group donating compound and sole carbon source. In spite of the continuous formation of MT and DMS, steady state concentrations are generally very low. This is due to the microbial degradation of these compounds. Experiments with sulfate-rich and sulfate-amended sediment slurries demonstrated that besides methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria can also degrade MT and DMS, provided that sulfate is available. A methanogen was isolated that is able to grow on DMS as the sole carbon source. A large survey of sediments slurries of various origin demonstrated that both isolates are commonly occurring inhabitants of anaerobic environments. PMID:12188577

Lomans, B P; Pol, A; Op den Camp, H J M

2002-01-01

188

Determination of organic nitro compounds using HPLC-UV-PAED  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-performance liquid chromatography with ultra violet and photo-assisted electrochemical detection (HPLC-UV-PAED) has been applied to the sensitive and selective determination of organic nitro compounds. The system was first developed for the determination of nitro explosives, and PAED has shown superior sensitivity over UV detection for these compounds (i.e., <1 part-per-trillion for HMX). The system also shows enhanced selectivity over the traditional UV method in that two detectors can be used for improved analyte identification. Also, having two detectors permits chemometric resolution of overlapping peaks, and this is not addressed in the UV method. Because this method is applicable to a wide range of nitro explosives, it was predicted that PAED would show the same sensitivity and selectivity toward other types of nitro compounds. Since its development, the system's use has been expanded to include the determination of nitro-containing pharmaceuticals and glycosylated nitro compounds in biological matrices. Model compounds were chosen, specifically nitroglycerin and related compounds and nitrophenyl-glucoside, to represent these classes. PAED showed superior detection limits over low wavelength UV detection for nitroglycerin (PAED = 0.3ppb, UV at 220nm = 48ppb), demonstrating PAED"s applicability to determining nitro-pharmaceuticals. Conversely, UV detection at 220nm proved to be more sensitive than PAED for nitrophenyl-glucoside (UV at 220 = 0.6ppb, PAED = 3.6ppb). However, when nitrophenyl-glucoside was spiked into urine, PAED determination resulted in 99+0.3% recovery, while UV at 220nm resulted in 116+0.2% recovery, suggesting that UV determination may suffer from matrix interference.

Marple, Ronita L.; LaCourse, William R.

2004-10-01

189

Transport, behavior, and fate of volatile organic compounds in streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds with chemical and physical properties that allow the compounds to move freely between the water and air phases of the environment. VOCs are widespread in the environment because of this mobility. Many VOCs have properties that make them suspected or known hazards to the health of humans and aquatic organisms. Consequently, understanding the processes affecting the concentration and distribution of VOCs in the environment is necessary. The transport, behavior, and fate of VOCs in streams are determined by combinations of chemical, physical, and biological processes. These processes are volatilization, absorption, wet and dry deposition, microbial degradation, sorption, hydrolysis, aquatic photolysis, oxidation, chemical reaction, biocon-centration, advection, and dispersion. The relative importance of each of these processes depends on the characteristics of the VOC and the stream. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program selected 55 VOCs for study. This article reviews the characteristics of the various processes that could affect the transport, behavior, and fate of these VOCs in streams.

Rathbun, R. E.

2000-01-01

190

Characterization of carbonaceous combustion residues: II. Nonpolar organic compounds.  

PubMed

Aromatic and aliphatic fractions of black carbon (BC) solvent extracts were examined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to determine how differences in broad chemical and physical features are correlated with the load, composition, "extractability" and bioavailability of organic compounds. Diesel soot, urban dust and chimney soot had concentrations of n-alkanes >20 microg/g and of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)>8 microg/g. These high levels of solvent-extractable compounds were interpreted as resulting from combustion at temperatures below optimum values for BC formation. PAH concentrations normalized to the amount of soot carbon in chimney soot were close to values for diesel soot. However, the high proportion of polar amorphous organic matter in chimney soot suggests a higher bioavailability for associated PAHs. Carbon black, vegetation fire residues, and straw and wood charcoals had only residual concentrations of n-alkanes (<9 microg/g) and PAHs (<0.2 microg/g). PAH distributions were mostly unspecific, while the overall signature of the aliphatic fraction varied with BC origin. Molecular markers among plant-derived BC included steroid and sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbons. Molecular fingerprints suggest that compounds associated with fossil BC might be more refractory than those associated with plant-derived BC. PMID:12948528

Fernandes, Milena B; Brooks, Peter

2003-11-01

191

[New methods of constructing fluorinated organic compounds and their application].  

PubMed

This review summarizes several effective synthetic methods of fluorinated organic compounds developed by our group. Two topics have been described in this review. The first topic describes novel fluorinations using diethylaminosulfur trifluoride (DAST). The treatment of tertiary cyclopropyl silyl ethers with DAST caused ring opening and produced allylic fluorides. The reaction of DAST with a tertiary cyclobutanol provided a fluorocyclobutane, a (fluoromethyl)cyclopropane or a homoallylic fluoride. DAST reacted with cyclic ketoximes bearing substituent(s) that can stabilize a carbocation to cause the fluorinative fragmentation which produces fluorinated carbonitrile. The second topic describes the novel syntheses of organic compounds containing the difluoromethylene moiety using fluorinated building blocks. The indium-mediated coupling of aldehydes with 3-bromo-3,3-difluoropropene gives alpha,alpha-difluorohomoallylic alcohols in high yields. alpha,alpha-Difluorohomopropargylic alcohols were also obtained from the indium-mediated coupling of aldehydes with alpha-bromo-alpha,alpha-difluoropropargyl compounds. In the presence of a palladium(0) catalyst, several nucleophiles regioselectively reacted with 3-bromo-3,3-difluoropropene at its gamma-position, and reacted with 1-substituted-3-bromo-3,3-difluoropropenes at their alpha-position. (+)-(R)-1-Amino-2,2-difluorocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid was synthesized via the lipase-catalyzed asymmetric acetylation of a pro-chiral diol as a key step. PMID:10774256

Kirihara, M

2000-04-01

192

Analyses of volatile organic compounds from human skin  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Human skin emits a variety of volatile metabolites, many of them odorous. Much previous work has focused upon chemical structure and biogenesis of metabolites produced in the axillae (underarms), which are a primary source of human body odour. Nonaxillary skin also harbours volatile metabolites, possibly with different biological origins than axillary odorants. Objectives To take inventory of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the upper back and forearm skin, and assess their relative quantitative variation across 25 healthy subjects. Methods Two complementary sampling techniques were used to obtain comprehensive VOC profiles, viz., solid-phase micro extraction and solvent extraction. Analyses were performed using both gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Results Nearly 100 compounds were identified, some of which varied with age. The VOC profiles of the upper back and forearm within a subject were, for the most part, similar, although there were notable differences. Conclusions The natural variation in nonaxillary skin odorants described in this study provides a baseline of compounds we have identified from both endogenous and exogenous sources. Although complex, the profiles of volatile constituents suggest that the two body locations share a considerable number of compounds, but both quantitative and qualitative differences are present. In addition, quantitative changes due to ageing are also present. These data may provide future investigators of skin VOCs with a baseline against which any abnormalities can be viewed in searching for biomarkers of skin diseases.

Gallagher, M.; Wysocki, C.J.; Leyden, J.J.; Spielman, A.I.; Sun, X.; Preti, G.

2008-01-01

193

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01

194

Volatile organic compounds from a Tuber melanosporum fermentation system.  

PubMed

A total of 59 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified from Tuber melanosporum fermentation: 53 from its fermented mycelia and 32 from the fermentation broth. Alcohol-derived compounds were predominant in both the fermentation mycelia and the broth, although long chain fatty acids and isoprenoids were, for the first time, also found in the mycelia. The intense wine bouquet properties of the broth arose from several specific flavor substances, including sulfur compounds, pyrazines, furans and jasmones. Comparing the VOCs identified in this work with those previously reported, our results are more similar to the composition of the Tuber fruiting-body than previous Tuber fermentations. The composition and accumulation of flavor volatiles (e.g., pyrazines, sulfur compounds, and esters) and major constituents (e.g., 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-phenylethanol) in this fermentation were significantly influenced by the sucrose concentration in the medium. The obtained information could therefore be useful in applications to convert the flavors of truffle mycelia similar to those of the fruiting-body by optimising the fermentation process. PMID:22980851

Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Guan; Li, Hong-Mei; Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Tang, Ya-Jie

2012-12-15

195

Racemization and the origin of optically active organic compounds in living organisms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The organic compounds synthesized in prebiotic experiments are racemic mixtures. A number of proposals have been offered to explain how asymmetric organic compounds formed on the Earth before life arose, with the influence of chiral weak nuclear interactions being the most frequent proposal. This and other proposed asymmetric syntheses give only sight enantiomeric excess and any slight excess will be degraded by racemization. This applies particularly to amino acids where half-lives of 10(5)-10(6) years are to be expected at temperatures characteristic of the Earth's surface. Since the generation of chiral molecules could not have been a significant process under geological conditions, the origins of this asymmetry must have occurred at the time of the origin of life or shortly thereafter. It is possible that the compounds in the first living organisms were prochiral rather than chiral; this is unlikely for amino acids, but it is possible for the monomers of RNA-like molecules.

Bada, J. L.; Miller, S. L.

1987-01-01

196

QSPR Modeling of Bioconcentration Factors of Nonionic Organic Compounds.  

PubMed

The terms bioaccumulation and bioconcentration refer to the uptake and build-up of chemicals that can occur in living organisms. Experimental measurement of bioconcentration is time-consuming and expensive, and is not feasible for a large number of chemicals of potential regulatory concern. A highly effective tool depending on a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) can be utilized to describe the tendency of chemical concentration organisms represented by, the important ecotoxicological parameter, the logarithm of Bio Concentration Factor (log BCF) with molecular descriptors for a large set of non-ionic organic compounds. QSPR models were developed using multiple linear regression, partial least squares and neural networks analyses. Linear and non-linear QSPR models to predict log BCF of the compounds developed for the relevant descriptors. The results obtained offer good regression models having good prediction ability. The descriptors used in these models depend on the volume, connectivity, molar refractivity, surface tension and the presence of atoms accepting H-bonds. PMID:20706622

Deeb, Omar; Khadikar, Padmakar V; Goodarzi, Mohammad

2010-01-01

197

Molar extinction coefficients of solutions of some organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molar extinction coefficients of aqueous solutions of some organic compounds, viz. formamide (CH3NO),N-methylformamide (C2H5NO),NN-dimethylformamide (C3H7NO),NN-dimethylacetamide (C4H9NO), 1,4-dioxane (C4H8O24), succinimide (C4H5NO2) and solutions of acetamide (C2H5NO) and benzoic acid (C7H6O2) in 1,4-dioxane (C4H8O2) have been determined by narrow beam ?-ray transmission method at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. The experimental\\u000a values of mass attenuation coefficients of these compounds

Kulwant Singh; G. K. Sandhu; B. S. Lark

2004-01-01

198

Fate of Volatile Organic Compounds in Constructed Wastewater Treatment Wetlands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The fate of volatile organic compounds was evaluated in a wastewater-dependent constructed wetland near Phoenix, AZ, using field measurements and solute transport modeling. Numerically based volatilization rates were determined using inverse modeling techniques and hydraulic parameters established by sodium bromide tracer experiments. Theoretical volatilization rates were calculated from the two-film method incorporating physicochemical properties and environmental conditions. Additional analyses were conducted using graphically determined volatilization rates based on field measurements. Transport (with first-order removal) simulations were performed using a range of volatilization rates and were evaluated with respect to field concentrations. The inverse and two-film reactive transport simulations demonstrated excellent agreement with measured concentrations for 1,4-dichlorobenzene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane, and trichloromethane and fair agreement for dibromochloromethane, bromo-dichloromethane, and toluene. Wetland removal efficiencies from inlet to outlet ranged from 63% to 87% for target compounds.

Keefe, S. H.; Barber, L. B.; Runkel, R. L.; Ryan, J. N.

2004-01-01

199

Thermodynamics of Aqueous Organic Sulfur Compounds: A Key to the Organic Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Systems?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hydrothermal environments are locations of varied geochemistry due to the disequilibrium between vent fluids and seawater. The disequilibrium geochemistry has been hypothesized to include reactions to synthesize organic compounds. Observations of the organic geochemistry of hydrothermal vent sites has received little attention. Experimental simulations of these environments, however, indicate that organic compounds may have difficulty forming in a purely aqueous environment. On the other hand, thiols. thioesters and disulfides have been implicated as reaction intermediates between CO or CO2 in experiments of carbon reduction in hydrothermal environments as well as in a variety of biological processes and other abiotic reactions (Wachtershauser, 1990, OLEB 20, 173; Heinen and Lauwers, 1996, OLEB 26, 13 1, Huber and Wachtershauser, 1997, Science 276, 245; Russell et al., 1998, in Thermophiles: The keys to molecular evolution and the origin of life?). The reduction of CO2 to thiols, for example, is observed using the FeS-H2S/FeS2 couple to provide the reducing power (see Schoonen et al., 1999, OLEB 29, 5). In addition, the enzyme involved in final stage of methanogenesis, coenzyme-M, is itself a thiol. Thus, organic sulfur compounds may hold the key to the organic chemistry leading to the origin of life at high temperatures. Understanding the biochemical processes of microorganisms that can live to temperatures at least as high as 113 C (Blochl et al., 1996, Extremophiles 1, 14) requires knowledge of the properties of the chemical reactions involved. In order to assess the role of aqueous organic sulfur compounds in hydrothermal organic geochemistry, we have been attempting to determine their thermodynamic properties. We have culled the literature to obtain the properties of organic sulfur compounds. We are able to calculate a number of essential properties, such as free energies of formation, from solubility data available in the literature together with standard properties of organic sulfur gases. However, a number of the properties for aqueous organic sulfur compounds have not been experimentally determined. Furthermore, most of thermodynamic data that are available are for 25 C and 1 bar. In order to determine reaction properties to temperatures and pressures appropriate to the hydrothermal conditions in which thermophilic organisms actually live, we use equations of state developed by Helgeson and co-workers (Helgeson et al., 1981, AJS 281, 1249). A key piece of information needed to go up in temperature is the partial molal heat capacity, which is one of the properties for which experimental data are unavailable for nearly all organic sulfur compounds. We have used correlation methods to determine the partial molal heat capacities and volumes of many organic solutes. These estimates allow us to asses the role of organic sulfur compounds during the reduction of carbon in hydrothermal settings. We will present these data, along with examples of the thermodynamic properties of reactions involving aqueous organic sulfur compounds.

Schulte, Mitchell; Rogers, Karyn L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

200

Volatile organic compounds in storm water from a parking lot  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mass balance approach was used to determine the most important nonpoint source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in storm water from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g., gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important nonpoint sources of VOCs, with each being important for different VOCs. The atmosphere is an important source of soluble, oxygenated VOCs (e.g., acetone), and the parking lot surface is an important source for the more hydrophobic VOCs (e.g., benzene). VOCs on the parking lot surface appear to be concentrated in oil and grease and organic material in urban particles (e.g., vehicle soot). Except in the case of spills, asphalt does not appear to be an important source of VOCs. The uptake isotherm of gaseous methyl tert-butyl ether on urban particles indicates a mechanism for dry deposition of VOCs from the atmosphere. This study demonstrated that a mass balance approach is a useful means of understanding non-point-source pollution, even for compounds such as VOCs, which are difficult to sample.A mass balance approach was used to determine the most important nonpoint source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in storm water from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g., gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important nonpoint sources of VOCs, with each being important for different VOCs. The atmosphere is an important source of soluble, oxygenated VOCs (e.g., acetone), and the parking lot surface is an important source for the more hydrophobic VOCs (e.g., benzene). VOCs on the parking lot surface appear to be concentrated in oil and grease and organic material in urban particles (e.g., vehicle soot). Except in the case of spills, asphalt does not appear to be an important source of VOCs. The uptake isotherm of gaseous methyl tert-butyl ether on urban particles indicates a mechanism for dry deposition of VOCs from the atmosphere. This study demonstrated that a mass balance approach is a useful means of understanding non-point-source pollution, even for compounds such as VOCs, which are difficult to sample.

Lopes, T. J.; Fallon, J. D.; Rutherford, D. W.; Hiatt, M. H.

2000-01-01

201

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOEpatents

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28

202

Volatile organic compounds released by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.  

PubMed

The composition of volatile organic compounds (VOC) released by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Hyphomycete: Deuteromycotina) utilizing two different carbon sources was investigated. Analyses were performed by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to capillary gas chromatography (CGC) and CGC-mass spectrometry (MS). Major components in glucose-grown cultures were diisopropyl naphthalenes, ethanol, and sesquiterpenes. Alkane-grown fungal VOC switched to a fingerprint with prevalence of n-decane. This is the first report on the volatiles released by entomopathogenic fungi. PMID:16733086

Crespo, R; Pedrini, N; Juárez, M P; Dal Bello, G M

2008-01-01

203

Lasing characteristics of vapors of complex organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lasing in vapors of complex organic compounds under pumping by laser single pulses is studied theoretically. Attention is given to the chief feature of the gas phase, namely the relationship between the lasing characteristics of the active molecules and the vibrational energy in the ground excited states. It is shown that the drastic growth of the average vibrational energy of active molecules during the pump pulse results in a considerable deterioration of vapor lasing as compared to lasing in solutions. Lasing in POPOP vapors is taken as an example.

Abakumov, G. A.; Vorobev, S. A.; Lademan, Iu.; Simonov, A. P.

1980-02-01

204

The synthesis of organic and inorganic compounds in evolved stars.  

PubMed

Recent isotopic analysis of meteorites and interplanetary dust has identified solid-state materials of pre-solar origin. We can now trace the origin of these inorganic grains to the circumstellar envelopes of evolved stars. Moreover, organic (aromatic and aliphatic) compounds have been detected in proto-planetary nebulae and planetary nebulae, which are the descendants of carbon stars. This implies that molecular synthesis is actively happening in the circumstellar environment on timescales as short as several hundred years. The detection of stellar grains in the Solar System suggests that they can survive their journey through the interstellar medium and that they are a major contributor of interstellar grains. PMID:15329712

Kwok, Sun

2004-08-26

205

Antioxidant combinations of molybdenum complexes and organic sulfur compounds for lubricating oils  

SciTech Connect

An antioxidant additive combination for lubricating oils is prepared by combining (a) a sulfur containing molybdenum compound prepared by reacting an ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and a basic nitrogen compound, with (b) an organic sulfur compound.

deVries, L.; King, J.M.

1983-09-06

206

Interlaboratory comparisons to determine heavy metals and organic compounds in marine sediments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes interlaboratory comparisons carried out in 1996 to determine metals and organic compounds in marine sediments. Three samples were used, one reference material for the organic compounds, and for the metals, a reference material and a ...

H. Hovind R. Lichtenthaler

1997-01-01

207

75 FR 2090 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound Automobile Refinishing Rules for Indiana AGENCY...submitted amendments to Indiana's automobile refinishing rule for approval into its...approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile refinishing rules to all persons...

2010-01-14

208

75 FR 24404 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Indiana; Volatile Organic Compound Automobile Refinishing Rules for Indiana AGENCY...Plan (SIP) amendments to Indiana's automobile refinishing rule. These rule revisions...approved volatile organic compound (VOC) automobile refinishing rules to all persons...

2010-05-05

209

40 CFR 60.502 - Standard for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. 60.502 Section 60...SOURCES Standards of Performance for Bulk Gasoline Terminals § 60.502 Standard for...Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from bulk gasoline terminals. On and after the...

2013-07-01

210

EVALUATION OF CRYOGENIC TRAPPING AS A MEANS FOR COLLECTING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AMBIENT AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

The methodology used in reduced temperature preconcentration of volatile organic compounds has been tested using a prototype automated gas chromatographic system. Mixtures of sixteen volatile organic compounds in humidified zero air were passed through a Nafion tube dryer and the...

211

Potential for Finding Evidence of Bio/Organic Compounds in Extraterrestrial Materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results contribute to improved ability to detect bio/organic compounds and determine their biogenicity, predict which landing sites are most likely to provide evidence for life, and detect bio/organic compounds for decontamination procedures for planetary protection.

Hinman, N. W.; Richardson, C. D.; Aspden, D.; Kouri, K.; Kotler, J. M.; McHenry, L. J.; Scott, J. R.

2010-04-01

212

Cyclodextrin-based microsensors for volatile organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Host-guest chemistry and self-assembly techniques are being explored to develop species selective thin-films for real-time sensing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Cyclodextrin (CD) and calixarene (CA) molecules are known to form guest-host inclusion complexes with a variety of organic molecules. Through the control of the cavity size and chemical functionality on the rims of these bucket-like molecules, the binding affinities for formation of inclusion complexes can be controlled and optimized for specific agents. Self-assembly techniques are used to covalently bond these reagent molecules to the surface of acoustic transducers to create dense, highly oriented, and stable thin films. Self-assembly techniques have also been used to fabricate multilayer thin film containing molecular recognition reagents through alternating adsorption of charged species in aqueous solutions. Self-assembly of polymeric molecules of the SAW device was also explored for fabricating species selective interfaces.

Swanson, B.; Johnson, S.; Shi, J.; Yang, Xiaoguang

1997-10-01

213

Anaerobic degradation of organic compounds at high salt concentrations.  

PubMed

A number of obligately anaerobic fermentative bacteria are known to degrade a variety of organic substrates such as sugars, amino acids, and others, in the presence of high salt concentrations (up to 3-4 M) to products such as hydrogen, CO2, acetate and higher fatty acids, and ethanol. Our understanding of the fate of these products in hypersaline environments is still extremely limited. The occurrence of bacterial sulfate reduction is well established at salt concentrations of up to 24%; however, the bacteria involved have not yet been isolated in pure culture, and the range of electron donors used is unknown. Halophilic or halotolerant methanogenic bacteria using hydrogen/CO2 or acetate as energy source are notably absent; methanogenesis under hypersaline conditions is probably limited to such substrates as methanol and methylamines, which cannot be expected to be major products of anaerobic degradation of most organic compounds. PMID:3048206

Oren, A

1988-01-01

214

ORGANIC CATION EFFECTS ON THE SORPTION OF METALS AND NEUTRAL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON AQUIFER MATERIAL (JOURNAL VERSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Sorption of ethylhexadecyldimethylammonium (EHDDMA+), a large organic cation, and three neutral organic compounds (NOC's) on two low organic carbon aquifer materials was studied using a soil batch equilibration technique. EHDDMA+ competed effectively with metals for exchange site...

215

Adsorption of volatile organic compounds in porous metal–organic frameworks functionalized by polyoxometalates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The functionalization of porous metal–organic frameworks (Cu3(BTC)2) was achieved by incorporating Keggin-type polyoxometalates (POMs), and further optimized via alkali metal ion-exchange. In addition to thermal gravimetric analysis, IR, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and powder X-ray diffraction, the adsorption properties were characterized by N2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) adsorption measurements, including short-chain alcohols (C<4), cyclohexane, benzene, and toluene. The adsorption enthalpies

Feng-Ji Ma; Shu-Xia Liu; Da-Dong Liang; Guo-Jian Ren; Feng Wei; Ya-Guang Chen; Zhong-Min Su

2011-01-01

216

Characterization of selected volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carbonyl compounds at a roadside monitoring station  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), PAHs and carbonyl compounds are the major toxic components in Hong Kong. Emissions from motor vehicles have been one of the primary pollution sources in the metropolitan areas throughout Hong Kong for a long time. A 1-yr monitoring program for VOCs, PAHs and carbonyl compounds had been performed at a roadside urban station at Hong Kong

K. F Ho; S. C Lee; Gloria M. Y Chiu

2002-01-01

217

Identifying organic nitrogen compounds in Rocky Mountain National Park aerosols  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nitrogen deposition is an important issue in Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP). While inorganic nitrogen contributions to the ecosystems in this area have been studied, the sources of organic nitrogen are still largely unknown. To better understand the potential sources of organic nitrogen, filter samples were collected and analyzed for organic nitrogen species. Samples were collected in RMNP using a Thermo Fisher Scientific TSP (total suspended particulate) high-volume sampler with a PM2.5 impactor plate from April - November of 2008. The samples presented the opportunity to compare two different methods for identification of individual organic nitrogen species. The first type of analysis was performed with a comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC) system using a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). The filter samples were spiked with propanil in dichloromethane to use as an internal standard and were then extracted in water followed by solid phase extraction. The GCxGC system was comprised of a volatility based separation (DB5 column) followed by a polarity based separation (RXI-17 column). A NCD was used to specifically detect nitrogen compounds and remove the complex background matrix. Individual standards were used to identify peaks by comparing retention times. This method has the added benefit of an equimolar response for nitrogen so only a single calibration is needed for all species. In the second analysis, a portion of the same filter samples were extracted in DI water and analyzed with liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (LC/MS). The separation was performed using a C18 column and a water-methanol gradient elution. Electrospray ionization into a time of flight mass spectrometer was used for detection. High accuracy mass measurement allowed unambiguous assignments of elemental composition of resulting ions. Positive and negative polarities were used since amines tend to show up in positive mode and nitrates in negative. The differences in the number of species and what species are identified between these two methods are important for planning future analyses of organic nitrogen compounds. In addition, these data provide new insight into the potential source of organic nitrogen in RMNP. Using the GCxGC method, 39 organic nitrogen species were detected and 20 were identified. Identified species include several types of amines and phenols. The LC/MS method identified several types of cresols, amines, and nitrates.

Beem, K. B.; Desyaterik, Y.; Ozel, M. Z.; Hamilton, J. F.; Collett, J. L.

2010-12-01

218

Biogeochemical processes governing exposure and uptake of organic pollutant compounds in aquatic organisms.  

PubMed Central

This paper reviews current knowledge of biogeochemical cycles of pollutant organic chemicals in aquatic ecosystems with a focus on coastal ecosystems. There is a bias toward discussing chemical and geochemical aspects of biogeochemical cycles and an emphasis on hydrophobic organic compounds such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated organic compounds used as pesticides. The complexity of mixtures of pollutant organic compounds, their various modes of entering ecosystems, and their physical chemical forms are discussed. Important factors that influence bioavailability and disposition (e.g., organism-water partitioning, uptake via food, food web transfer) are reviewed. These factors include solubilities of chemicals; partitioning of chemicals between solid surfaces, colloids, and soluble phases; variables rates of sorption, desorption; and physiological status of organism. It appears that more emphasis on considering food as a source of uptake and bioaccumulation is important in benthic and epibenthic ecosystems when sediment-associated pollutants are a significant source of input to an aquatic ecosystem. Progress with mathematical models for exposure and uptake of contaminant chemicals is discussed briefly.

Farrington, J W

1991-01-01

219

Characterization of polar organic compounds and source analysis of fine organic aerosols in Hong Kong  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Organic aerosols, as an important fraction of airborne particulate mass, significantly affect the environment, climate, and human health. Compared with inorganic species, characterization of individual organic compounds is much less complete and comprehensive because they number in thousands or more and are diverse in chemical structures. The source contributions of organic aerosols are far from being well understood because they can be emitted from a variety of sources as well as formed from photochemical reactions of numerous precursors. This thesis work aims to improve the characterization of polar organic compounds and source apportionment analysis of fine organic carbon (OC) in Hong Kong, which consists of two parts: (1) An improved analytical method to determine monocarboxylic acids, dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and dicarbonyls collected on filter substrates has been established. These oxygenated compounds were determined as their butyl ester or butyl acetal derivatives using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The new method made improvements over the original Kawamura method by eliminating the water extraction and evaporation steps. Aerosol materials were directly mixed with the BF 3/BuOH derivatization agent and the extracting solvent hexane. This modification improves recoveries for both the more volatile and the less water-soluble compounds. This improved method was applied to study the abundances and sources of these oxygenated compounds in PM2.5 aerosol samples collected in Hong Kong under different synoptic conditions during 2003-2005. These compounds account for on average 5.2% of OC (range: 1.4%-13.6%) on a carbon basis. Oxalic acid was the most abundant species. Six C2 and C3 oxygenated compounds, namely oxalic, malonic, glyoxylic, pyruvic acids, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal, dominated this suite of oxygenated compounds. More efforts are therefore suggested to focus on these small compounds in understanding the role of oxygenated compounds in aerosol chemistry and physics. By reference to tracers for the major organic aerosol sources, it is deduced that the oxygenated compounds are mainly of secondary origin and direct/indirect contribution from biomass burning could also be important. The chemical composition of these oxygenated species in PM2.5 samples in Hong Kong provide useful information to further ambient and model study in the aspects of chemical formation pathways and speciated organic mass distribution. (2) Source apportionment of PM2.5 organic aerosols in Hong Kong were carried out in two studies. In the first study, chemical characterization and source analysis involved samples collected on high particulate matter (PM) days (avg. PM 2.5 >84 mug m-3) at six general stations and one roadside station from October to December in 2003. Analysis of synoptic weather conditions identified three types of high PM episodes: local, regional transport (RT) and long-range transport (LRT). Roadside samples were discussed separately. Using chemical mass balance (CMB) model, contributions of major primary sources (vehicle exhaust, cooking, biomass burning, cigarette smoke, vegetative detritus, and coal combustion) were estimated, which indicate that vehicle exhaust was the most important primary source, followed by cooking and biomass burning. All primary sources except vegetative detritus had the highest contributions at roadside station, in line with its site characteristics. Primary sources dominated roadside and local samples (>64% of fine OC), while un-apportioned OC (i.e., the difference between measured OC and apportioned primary OC) dominated RT and LRT episodes (>60% of fine OC) and un-apportioned OC had characteristics of secondary OC. In the second study, cold front episodes during winter 2004 and 2005 were targeted to investigate the effect of cold front-related LRT on chemical characteristics and organic aerosol sources of PM2.5 in Hong Kong. In comparison with days under influences of mainly local emissions or RT, cold front LRT brought more organic aerosols attributable

Li, Yunchun

220

Chiral Analyses of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contents include the following: 1. Characterization of Tagish Lake organic content. The first two grant years were largely devoted to the molecular and isotopic analyses of Tagish Lake organic composition. This carbonaceous meteorite fell in Canada in the winter of the year 2000, and its exceptional atmospheric entry and subsequent recovery (e. g., the sample was recovered and stored by avoiding hand contact and above freezing temperatures) contributed in providing a rare and pristine extraterrestrial material. 2. Chiral analyses of Murchison and Murray soluble organics. One of the most intriguing finding in regard to soluble meteorite organics is the presence within the amino acid suite of some compounds displaying L-enantiomeric excesses. This configuration is exclusive in the amino acids of terrestrial proteins and the finding has raised speculations of a possible role of amino acids from meteorites in the origin of homochirality on the early Earth. The main objective for this NASA funding was the characterization of enantiomeric excesses in meteorites and we have conducted several studies toward establishing their distribution and indignity.

Pizzarello, Sandra

2004-01-01

221

Volatile organic compounds in selected micro-environments.  

PubMed

A program of sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air was undertaken in selected locations and micro-environments in Perth, Western Australia to characterise concentrations of target VOCs and to determine the relative strength of the contributing sources to ambient air in different micro-environments in a major Australian city. Twenty-seven locations were sampled and, of the forty-one target compounds, 26 VOCs were detected in the samples collected. The highest concentrations were recorded for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes (BTEX), chloroform and styrene. The maximum 12-h toluene and benzene concentrations observed were from a basement carpark and were 24.7 parts per billion (ppb) and 5.6 ppb, respectively. The maximum xylenes concentration was 29.4 ppb and occurred in a nightclub where styrene was also detected. A factor analysis of the data was undertaken. Two key factors emerge that appear to be associated with petroleum and motor vehicles and environmental tobacco smoke. A third significant occurrence was a high concentration of chloroform that was observed at a sports centre complex with a swimming pool text and was uncorrelated with other compounds in the data set. This study indicates that locations associated with motor vehicles and petrol fuel, tobacco and wood smoke and chlorinated water represent the major risks for personal exposure to VOCs in Perth. PMID:16289288

Hinwood, A L; Berko, H N; Farrar, D; Galbally, I E; Weeks, I A

2006-04-01

222

Modeling Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from New Carpets  

SciTech Connect

A simple model is proposed to account for observed emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new carpets. The model assumes that the VOCs originate predominantly in a uniform slab of polymer backing material. Parameters for the model (the initial concentration of a VOC in the polymer, a diffusion coefficient and an equilibrium polymer/air partition coefficient) are obtained from experimental data produced by a previous chamber study. The diffusion coefficients generally decrease as the molecular weight of the VOCs increase, while the polymer/air partition coefficients generally increase as the vapor pressure of the compounds decrease. In addition, for two of the study carpets that have a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) backing, the diffusion and partition coefficients are similar to independently reported values for SBR. The results suggest that predictions of VOCs emissions from new carpets may be possible based solely on a knowledge of the physical properties of the relevant compounds and the carpet backing material. However, a more rigorous validation of the model is desirable.

Little, J.C.; Hodgson, A.T.; Gadgil, A.J.

1993-02-01

223

Anti-photoaging and Photoprotective Compounds Derived from Marine Organisms  

PubMed Central

Marine organisms form a prominent component of the oceanic population, which significantly contribute in the production of cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical molecules with biologically efficient moieties. In addition to the molecules of various biological activities like anti-bacterial, anti-cancerous, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative etc., these organisms also produce potential photoprotective or anti-photoaging agents, which are attracting present day researchers. Continuous exposure to UV irradiation (both UV-A and UV-B) leads to the skin cancer and other photoaging complications, which are typically mediated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated in the oxidative pathways. Many of the anti-oxidative and anti-photoaging compounds have been identified previously, which work efficiently against photodamage of the skin. Recently, marine originated photoprotective or anti-photoaging behavior was observed in the methanol extracts of Corallina pilulifera (CPM). These extracts were found to exert potent antioxidant activity and protective effect on UV-A-induced oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells by protecting DNA and also by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a key component in photoaging of the skin due to exposure to UV-A. The present review depicts various other photoprotective compounds from algae and other marine sources for further elaborative research and their probable use in cosmeceutical and pharmaceutical industries.

Pallela, Ramjee; Na-Young, Yoon; Kim, Se-Kwon

2010-01-01

224

Evaporation of volatile organic compounds from human skin in vitro.  

PubMed

The specific evaporation rates of 21 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from either human skin or a glass substrate mounted in modified Franz diffusion cells were determined gravimetrically. The diffusion cells were positioned either on a laboratory bench top or in a controlled position in a fume hood, simulating indoor and outdoor environments, respectively. A data set of 54 observations (34 skin and 20 glass) was assembled and subjected to a correlation analysis employing 5 evaporative mass transfer relationships drawn from the literature. Models developed by Nielsen et al. (Prediction of isothermal evaporation rates of pure volatile organic compounds in occupational environments: a theoretical approach based on laminar boundary layer theory. Ann Occup Hyg 1995;39:497-511.) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Peress, Estimate evaporative losses from spills. Chem Eng Prog 2003; April: 32-34.) were found to be the most effective at correlating observed and calculated evaporation rates under the various conditions. The U.S. EPA model was selected for further use based on its simplicity. This is a turbulent flow model based only on vapor pressure and molecular weight of the VOC and the effective air flow rate u. Optimum values of u for the two laboratory environments studied were 0.23 m s(-1) (bench top) and 0.92 m s(-1) (fume hood). PMID:23609116

Gajjar, Rachna M; Miller, Matthew A; Kasting, Gerald B

2013-08-01

225

Sorption of hydrophobic ionizable organic compounds (HIOCs) onto polymeric ion exchangers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the sorption of synthetic organic compounds, such as benzene sulfonate, naphthalene mono- and disulfonates, onto ion exchangers. These organic compounds exist as aromatic anions in aqueous solutions within a wide range of pH and they are referred to as hydrophobic ionizable organic compounds (HIOCs). Characteristically, the HIOCs contain two primary constituents: non-polar aromatic head groups and ionic

Ping Li; Arup K SenGupta

2004-01-01

226

Volatile Organic Compounds in Various Marine Organisms From the Southern North Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentration levels of 12 priority volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were determined in two species of vertebrates and four species of invertebrates from sampling stations in the southern North Sea, using a modified Tekmar LSC 2000 purge and trap system coupled to gas chromatograph–mass spectrometer (GC–MS). In general, concentration levels of VOCs found in this study were of the same

Patrick Roose; Udo A. Th Brinkman

2000-01-01

227

Atmospheric deposition of semivolatile organic compounds to two forest canopies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hexachlorobenzene and polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzo- p-dioxins and dibenzofurans to a coniferous and a deciduous forest canopy was measured by simultaneously sampling bulk deposition below the canopies and in an adjacent clearing for one year. In addition, ambient air was sampled continuously, with separate analysis of the gaseous and particle-bound phases. The deposition of almost all compounds was higher under the forest canopies than in the clearing. The excess deposition to the forest sites was attributable to equilibrium partitioning between the atmosphere and the canopy vegetation, kinetically limited gaseous deposition, or particle-bound deposition. Which of these deposition processes dominated for a given compound was shown to depend on the octanol-air partition coefficient of the chemical and its gas/particle partitioning. Deposition velocities-to our knowledge the first for SOCs to forests-were calculated by dividing the excess deposition by the air concentrations. The gaseous deposition velocities were 0.78 cm s -1 to the coniferous canopy (annual weighted average) and 3.6 cm s -1 to the deciduous canopy (6 month summer average). These values are high compared to deposition velocities to forest canopies that have been measured for inorganic gases, reflecting the fact that lipophilic organic chemicals are taken up by the leaf/needle cuticle and not just via the stomata. The dry particle bound deposition velocities for particle diffusion and impaction were 0.05 and 0.73 cm s -1 for the coniferous and deciduous canopies, respectively. These values are considerably lower than the gaseous deposition velocities, underlining the importance of gaseous deposition for the accumulation of semivolatile organic compounds in forest ecosystems.

Horstmann, Michael; Mclachlan, Michael S.

228

Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds and Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed by Photooxidation of Isoprene  

SciTech Connect

Electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI HR-MS) was used to probe molecular structures of oligomers in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated in laboratory experiments on isoprene photooxidation at low- and high-NOx conditions. Up to 80-90% of the observed products are oligomers and up to 33% are nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC). We observe oligomers with up to 8 monomer units in length. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) confirms NOC compounds are organic nitrates and elucidates plausible chemical building blocks contributing to oligomer formation. Most organic nitrates are comprised of methylglyceric acid units. Other important multifunctional C2-C5 monomer units are identified including methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, hydroxyacetic acid, glycolaldehyde, and 2-methyltetrols. The majority of the NOC oligomers contain only one nitrate moiety resulting in a low average N:C ratio of 0.019. Average O:C ratios of the detected SOA compounds are 0.54 under the low-NOx conditions and 0.83 under the high-NOx conditions. Our results underscore the importance of isoprene photooxidation as a source of NOC in organic particulate matter.

Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

2011-07-06

229

Emissions of volatile organic compounds from architectural materials with indoor applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this study were to identify the major organic compounds emitted by some typical building construction and interior finish materials, quantify emissions of organic solvents from representative adhesives that have indoor applications, and evaluate methods for the rapid screening of architectural materials for organic emissions. Organic compounds emitted by 15 building construction and interior finish materials and by

A. T. Hodgson; J. R. Girman; A. S. Newton; A. Winkes

1983-01-01

230

Effect of water saturation in soil organic matter on the partition of organic compounds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The sorption of benzene, trichloroethylene, and carbon tetrachloride at room temperature from water solution and from vapor on two high-organic-content soils (peat and muck) was determined in order to evaluate the effect of water saturation on the solute partition in soil organic matter (SOM). The uptake of water vapor was similarly determined to define the amounts of water in the saturated soil samples. In such high-organic-content soils the organic vapor sorption and the respective solute sorption from water exhibit linear isotherms over a wide range of relative concentrations. This observation, along with the low BET surface areas of the samples, suggests that partition in the SOM of the samples is the dominant process in the uptake of these liquids. A comparison of the sorption from water solution and from vapor phase shows that water saturation reduces the sorption (partition) efficiency of SOM by ?? 42%; the saturated water content is ??38% by weight of dry SOM. This reduction is relatively small when compared with the almost complete suppression by water of organic compound adsorption on soil minerals. While the effect of water saturation on solute uptake by SOM is much expected in terms of solute partition in SOM, the influence of water on the solubility behavior of polar SOM can be explained only qualitatively by regular solution theory. The results suggest that the major effect of water in a drying-wetting cycle on the organic compound uptake by normal low-organic-content soils (and the associated compound's activity) is the suppression of adsorption by minerals rather than the mitigation of the partition effect in SOM.

Rutherford, D. W.; Chlou, G. T.

1992-01-01

231

Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in Northern Michigan. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

2012-07-01

232

Indoor Volatile Organic Compounds and Chemical Sensitivity Reactions  

PubMed Central

Studies of unexplained symptoms observed in chemically sensitive subjects have increased the awareness of the relationship between neurological and immunological diseases due to exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, there is no direct evidence that links exposure to low doses of VOCs and neurological and immunological dysfunction. We review animal model data to clarify the role of VOCs in neuroimmune interactions and discuss our recent studies that show a relationship between chronic exposure of C3H mice to low levels of formaldehyde and the induction of neural and immune dysfunction. We also consider the possible mechanisms by which VOC exposure can induce the symptoms presenting in patients with a multiple chemical sensitivity.

Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Arashidani, Keiichi; Kunugita, Naoki

2013-01-01

233

Stimulation of transcription on chromatin by polar organic compounds.  

PubMed Central

Polar organic compounds, including DMSO, increase RNA synthesis on isolated chromatin by E. coli RNA polymerase and RNA polymerase II from calf thymus. Transcription is stimulated on chromatin from Friend-virus-infected erythroleukemia cells and from various other sources. Using procedures which inhibit specifically the formation of a stable initiation complex, it is shown that the stimulation does not result from an increase in initiation of both E. coli and the eukaryotic RNA polymerase. After separation of chromatin into template active and inactive fractions, DMSO increases RNA synthesis by a factor of about 1.5 using the template inactive fraction, while stimulation of transcription on the template active portion is lower (factor of 1.2). It is suggested that the effect on RNA synthesis is mediated by a weakening of the apolar interactions between histones in chromatin subunits, releasing transcription partially from the constraints imposed by histones.

Stratling, W H

1976-01-01

234

In situ bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon and other organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

From supertanker oil spills to the leaking underground storage tank at the corner gas station, contamination from petroleum hydrocarbon fuels and other organic compounds is an environmental concern that affects nearly every small hamlet and major metropolis throughout the world. Moreover, the world`s rivers, estuaries, and oceans are threatened by contamination from petroleum leaks and spills. Fortunately, most petroleum hydrocarbons are amenable to biodegradation, and a considerable body of experience has been built up over the past two decades in applying in situ bioremediation to a variety of contaminants in all media. Good progress is being made in terms of developing innovative, cost-effective in situ approaches to bioremediation. This volume provides a comprehensive guide to the latest technological breakthroughs in both the laboratory and the field, covering such topics as air sparging, cometabolic biodegradation, treatment of MTBE, real-time control systems, nutrient addition, rapid biosensor analysis, multiphase extraction, and accelerated bioremediation.

Alleman, B.C.; Leeson, A. [eds.

1999-10-01

235

Field-usable portable analyzer for chlorinated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, a chemical sensor was developed which showed almost perfect selectivity to vapors of chlorinated solvents. When interfaced to an instrument, a chemical analyzer will be produced that has near- absolute selectivity to vapors of volatile chlorinated organic compounds. TRI has just completed the second of a 2-phase program to develop this new instrument system, which is called the RCL MONITOR. In Phase II, this instrument was deployed in 5 EM40 operations. Phase II applications covered clean-up process monitoring, environmental modeling, routine monitoring, health and safety, and technology validation. Vapor levels between 0 and 100 ppM can be determined in 90 s with a lower detection limit of 0.5 ppM using the hand-portable instrument. Based on the favorable performance of the RCL MONITOR, the commercial instrument was released for commercial sales on Sept. 20, 1996.

Buttner, W.J.; Penrose, W.R.; Stetter, J.R.; Williams, R.D.

1996-12-31

236

Molar extinction coefficients of solutions of some organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molar extinction coefficients of aqueous solutions of some organic compounds, viz. formamide (CH_{3}NO), N-methylformamide (C_{2}H_{5}NO), NN-dimethylformamide (C_{3}H_{7}NO), NN-dimethylacetamide (C_{4}H_{9}NO), 1,4-dioxane (C_{4}H_{8}O_{2}), succinimide (C_{4}H_{5}NO_{2}) and solutions of acetamide (C_{2}H_{5}NO) and benzoic acid (C_{7}H_{6}O_{2}) in 1,4-dioxane (C_{4}H_{8}O_{2}) have been determined by narrow beam gamma-ray transmission method at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients

Kulwant Singh; G. K. Sandhu; B. S. Lark

2004-01-01

237

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22

238

Growth Yields of Bacteria on Selected Organic Compounds  

PubMed Central

Cell yields were determined for two bacterial soil isolants grown aerobically in minimal media on a variety of synthetic organic compounds. 1-Dodecanol, benzoic acid, phenylacetic acid, phenylglyoxylic acid, and diethylene, triethylene, and tetraethylene glycols were tested. Two “biochemicals,” succinate and acetate, were also tested for comparison. Yields were calculated on the basis of grams of cells obtained per mole of substrate utilized, gram atom of carbon utilized, mole of oxygen consumed, and equivalent of “available electrons” in the substrates. This latter value appears to be nearly constant at 3 g of cells per equivalent of “available electrons.” Yields predicted on this basis for other bacteria and for yeasts on other substrates are in fair agreement with reported values.

Mayberry, W. R.; Prochazka, G. J.; Payne, W. J.

1967-01-01

239

Lasing characteristics of vapors of complex organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A theoretical investigation is made of laser action in vapors of complex organic compounds pumped by giant laser pulses. Allowance is made for the main feature of the gas phase, namely, a dependence of the spectroscopic and lasing characteristics of the active molecules on the vibrational energy stored in the ground and excited states. It is shown that a possible substantial increase in the average vibrational energy of the active molecules during the pump pulse causes an appreciable deterioration in the lasing characteristics of vapors compared with solutions, even in the most favorable case without induced absorption. An analysis is made using the parameters of a system similar to the experimental values for l,4-bis[2-(5-phenyloxazolyl)]benzene (POPOP) vapor and allowance is made for neutral gases.

Abakumov, G. A.; Vorob'ev, S. A.; Lademann, Jürgen; Simonov, A. P.

1980-02-01

240

Qualitative analysis of volatile organic compounds on biochar.  

PubMed

Qualitative identification of sorbed volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on biochar was conducted by headspace thermal desorption coupled to capillary gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry. VOCs may have a mechanistic role influencing plant and microbial responses to biochar amendments, since VOCs can directly inhibit/stimulate microbial and plant processes. Over 70 biochars encompassing a variety of parent feedstocks and manufacturing processes were evaluated and were observed to possess diverse sorbed VOC composition. There were over 140 individual chemical compounds thermally desorbed from some biochars, with hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) and fast pyrolysis biochars typically possessing the greatest number of sorbed volatiles. In contrast, gasification, thermal or chemical processed biochars, soil kiln mound, and open pit biochars possessed low to non-detectable levels of VOCs. Slow pyrolysis biochars were highly variable in terms of their sorbed VOC content. There were no clear feedstock dependencies to the sorbed VOC composition, suggesting a stronger linkage with biochar production conditions coupled to post-production handling and processing. Lower pyrolytic temperatures (?350°C) produced biochars with sorbed VOCs consisting of short carbon chain aldehydes, furans and ketones; elevated temperature biochars (>350°C) typically were dominated by sorbed aromatic compounds and longer carbon chain hydrocarbons. The presence of oxygen during pyrolysis also reduced sorbed VOCs. These compositional results suggest that sorbed VOCs are highly variable and that their chemical dissimilarity could play a role in the wide variety of plant and soil microbial responses to biochar soil amendment noted in the literature. This variability in VOC composition may argue for VOC characterization before land application to predict possible agroecosystem effects. PMID:21788060

Spokas, Kurt A; Novak, Jeffrey M; Stewart, Catherine E; Cantrell, Keri B; Uchimiya, Minori; Dusaire, Martin G; Ro, Kyoung S

2011-10-01

241

40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart B of... - Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile Refinish Coatings  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Content Limits for Automobile...PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for...

2013-07-01

242

Semivolatile organic compounds in the ambient air of Denver, Colorado  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A filter-polyurethane foam plug high volume air sampler was used to collect the particle (P) and vapor (V) phases of four classes of semivolatile organic compounds (SOC) in Denver, CO: n-alkanes. polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and organochlorine pesticides. The carbon preference index (CPI) of n-alkanes in the V or P phases alone was skewed by temperature-dependent V/P partitioning; a combined gaseous + particulate CPI was preferred. The CPI suggested that the alkanes in Denver air were predominently petrogenic. Total PCB were calculated as the sum of individual congeners and also as Aroclor equivalents, with good agreement between the two methods. Apparent V/P distributions of these compound classes were expressed as A(TSP)/F, were A and F are the adsorbent- and filter-retained SOC concentrations (ng m -3) and TSP is the total suspended particle concentration (?g m -3). Values of A(TSP)/F were related to the average sampling temperature ( T, K) through: log [ A( TSP)/ F] = m/ T + b. Fitted log A(TSP)/F at 5°C correlated well with pL0 at 5°C, the SOC liquid vapor pressure. No differences were observed in partitioning behavior among the four SOC types.

Foreman, William T.; Bidleman, Terry F.

243

Production of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) by basidiomycetous yeasts.  

PubMed

Thirty-seven basidiomycetous yeasts belonging to 30 species of seven genera were grown on media containing l-cysteine or l-methionine as sole nitrogen sources with the objective of evaluating volatile organic sulfur compound (VOSC) production. The headspace of yeast cultures was analyzed by the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) sampling method, and volatile compounds were quantified and identified by GC-MS techniques. Ten strains assimilating L-methionine produced the following VOSCs: 3-(methylthio)-1-propanol, methanethiol, S-methyl thioacetate, dimethyl disulfide, dimethyl trisulfide, allyl methyl sulphide and 4,5-dihydro-3(2H)-thiophenone. Production was <1 mgl(-1) except for 3-(methylthio)-1-propanol of which between 40 and 400 mgl(-1) was synthesized. Higher alcohols (isobutyl alcohol, isoamyl alcohol and active amyl alcohol) and esters (ethyl acetate, ethyl propionate, n-propyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, n-propyl propionate, n-butyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, amyl acetate, isoamyl propionate, amyl propionate and 2-phenylmethyl acetate) were also sporadically produced. This is the first report of VOSCs production by basidiomycetous yeasts. Consequently, basidiomycetous yeasts may be considered an interesting new group of microbial VOSCs producers for the flavor industry. PMID:15691743

Buzzini, Pietro; Romano, Sergio; Turchetti, Benedetta; Vaughan, Ann; Pagnoni, Ugo Maria; Davoli, Paolo

2005-02-01

244

Constituents of volatile organic compounds of evaporating essential oil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Essential oils containing aromatic compounds can affect air quality when used indoors. Five typical and popular essential oils—rose, lemon, rosemary, tea tree and lavender—were investigated in terms of composition, thermal characteristics, volatile organic compound (VOC) constituents, and emission factors. The activation energy was 6.3-8.6 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.8, and the frequency factor was 0.01-0.24 min -1. Toluene, 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene and m-diethylbenzene were the predominant VOCs of evaporating gas of essential oils at 40 °C. In addition, n-undecane, p-diethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, m-diethylbenzene, and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene revealed high emission factors during the thermogravimetric (TG) analysis procedures. The sequence of the emission factors of 52 VOCs (137-173 mg g -1) was rose ? rosemary > tea tree ? lemon ? lavender. The VOC group fraction of the emission factor of aromatics was 62-78%, paraffins were 21-37% and olefins were less than 1.5% during the TG process. Some unhealthy VOCs such as benzene and toluene were measured at low temperature; they reveal the potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lo, Cho-Ching; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

2009-12-01

245

Study of the Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Potentials of Important Compounds in the Atmosphere.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Organic particulate matter (OPM) is known to form in the atmosphere as a consequence of the oxidation of parent volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The concept of the differential organic particulate matter (OPM) formation potential (OPM) is defined as the...

J. F. Pankow W. E. Asher R. J. Griffin J. H. Seinfeld

2003-01-01

246

Exchange of volatile organic compounds in the boreal forest floor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial ecosystems, mainly plants, emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. In addition to plants, VOCs also have less-known sources, such as soil. VOCs are a very diverse group of reactive compounds, including terpenoids, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Due to their high reactivity, VOCs take part in formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere and thus affect also Earth's radiation balance (Kulmala et al. 2004). We have studied boreal soil and forest floor VOC fluxes with chamber and snow gradient techniques we were developed. Spatial and temporal variability in VOC fluxes was studied with year-round measurements in the field and the sources of boreal soil VOCs in the laboratory with fungal isolates. Determination of the compounds was performed mass spectrometrically. Our results reveal that VOCs from soil are mainly emitted by living roots, above- and belowground litter and microbes. The strongest source appears to be litter, in which both plant residuals and decomposers play a role in the emissions. Soil fungi showed high emissions of lighter VOCs, like acetone, acetaldehyde and methanol, from isolates. Temperature and moisture are the most critical physical factors driving VOC fluxes. Since the environment in boreal forests undergoes strong seasonal changes, the VOC flux strength of the forest floor varies markedly during the year, being highest in spring and autumn. The high spatial heterogeneity of the forest floor was also clearly visible in VOC fluxes. The fluxes of other trace gases (CO2, CH4 and N2O) from soil, which are also related to the soil biological activity and physical conditions, did not show correlations with the VOC fluxes. These results indicate that emissions of VOCs from the boreal forest floor account for as much as several tens of percent, depending on the season, of the total forest ecosystem VOC emissions. This emphasises that forest floor compartment should be taken into consideration when assessing ecosystem level VOC fluxes. These results can be utilized also in air chemistry models, which are almost entirely lacking the below-canopy compartment. Kulmala, M., Suni, T., Lehtinen, K.E.J., Dal Maso, M., Boy, M., Reissell, A., Rannik, Ü., Aalto, P., Keronen, P., Hakola, H., Bäck, J., Hoffmann, T., Vesala, T. & Hari, P. 2004. A new feedback mechanism linking forests, aerosols, and climate. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 4: 557-562.

Aaltonen, Hermanni; Bäck, Jaana; Pumpanen, Jukka; Pihlatie, Mari; Hakola, Hannele; Hellén, Heidi; Aalto, Juho; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Kajos, Maija K.; Kolari, Pasi; Taipale, Risto; Vesala, Timo

2013-04-01

247

The seasonal variation in bioactive compounds content in juice from organic and non-organic tomatoes.  

PubMed

A specific objective of this paper was to evaluate seasonal changes in bioactive compounds level (carotenoids and polyphenols) in juice prepared from organic and non-organic tomatoes in Poland. In the examined tomato juice, the content of dry matter, vitamin C, carotenoids as well as polyphenols (by HPLC method) has been measured. The presented results indicate the impact of the growing system and the year of production on the composition of tomato juice. The organic tomato juice contained significantly more beta-carotene, chlorogenic acid, rutin as well as more total phenolic acids, gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, total flavonoids, quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin in comparison with the non-organic. The tomato juice from 2008 contained significantly more carotenoids and some flavonoids compared to the one produced in 2009, which contained significantly more dry matter, vitamin C, as well as quercetin and it derivatives. PMID:23609833

Hallmann, Ewelina; Lipowski, Janusz; Marsza?ek, Krystian; Rembia?kowska, Ewa

2013-06-01

248

Neurotoxicity of fungal volatile organic compounds in Drosophila melanogaster.  

PubMed

Many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are found in indoor environment as products of microbial metabolism. In damp indoor environments, fungi are associated with poor air quality. Some epidemiological studies have suggested that microbial VOCs have a negative impact on human health. Our study was designed to provide a reductionist approach toward studying fungal VOC-mediated toxicity using the inexpensive model organism, Drosophila melanogaster, and pure chemical standards of several important fungal VOCs. Low concentrations of the following known fungal VOCs, 0.1% of 1-octen-3-ol and 0.5% of 2-octanone; 2,5 dimethylfuran; 3-octanol; and trans-2-octenal, caused locomotory defects and changes in green fluorescent protein (GFP)- and antigen-labeled dopaminergic neurons in adult D. melanogaster. Locomotory defects could be partially rescued with L-DOPA. Ingestion of the antioxidant, vitamin E, improved the survival span and delayed the VOC-mediated changes in dopaminergic neurons, indicating that the VOC-mediated toxicity was due, in part, to generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:20643751

Inamdar, Arati A; Masurekar, Prakash; Bennett, Joan Wennstrom

2010-10-01

249

[Research advances on volatile organic compounds emission inventory of plants].  

PubMed

Reference to relative literatures in recent years, model building and calculation on volatile organic compound (VOC) emission inventory of plants were summarized in different spatial scales, the total annual VOC emission amounts from Vegetation in China are in the range from 12.4 Tg x a(-1) to 28.4 Tg x a(-1). For garden plants in Beijing, the annual VOC emissions are approximately 38 500 tons C in 2000. Furthermore, in order to determine reduction strategies for Beijing urban atmospheric major pollutants, the contribution of garden plant VOC emissions to the ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation was presented, compared to garden plant in the same period, the largest contribution to ozone formation comes from aromatic hydrocarbons and olefin which are exhausted from anthropogenic activity, besides, the aromatic hydrocarbons exhausted from anthropogenic activity is also a main contribution source for the potential formation of SOA. In the meantime, it is suggested to focus on emission control of VOCs which are emitted from urban anthropogenic sources. PMID:24640923

Xie, Jun-Fei; Li, Yan-Ming

2013-12-01

250

Secondary Organic Aerosols Formed from Photooxidation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in Forests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photooxidation products of biogenic volatile organic compounds were characterized and measured in PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter les2.5 mum aerosol samples from forests. Aerosol sampling was conducted at four sites centred in and around major research stations located in four different regions of China: Xiaoxing'an Ling (boreal), Dongping national forest park (temperate), Dinghu mountain (subtropical) and Wuzhi mountain

Wang Wu; Zhang Ting

2008-01-01

251

Biodegradation of organic compounds sequestered in organic solids or in nanopores within silica particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

A study was conducted using model solids to determine whether the time-dependent decline in availability for biodegradation of organic pollutants in soil might result from the entrapment of these compounds in porous or nonporous solids. A strain of Pseudomonas mineralized phenanthrene in solid alkanes containing 18 to 32 carbons, three waxes, and low-molecular-weight polycaprolactone, polyethylene, and polypropylene. The rates were

Paul B. Hatzinger; Martin Alexander

1997-01-01

252

Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in northern Michigan. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Notably, reaction of isoprene with NO3 leading to isoprene nitrate formation was found to be significant (~8% of primary organic nitrate production) during the daytime, and monoterpene reactions with NO3 were simulated to comprise up to ~83% of primary organic nitrate production at night. Lastly, forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

2012-11-01

253

Distribution of hydrophobic ionogenic organic compounds between octanol and water: Organic acids  

SciTech Connect

The octanol-water distributions of 10 environmentally significant organic acid compounds were determined as a function of aqueous-phase salt concentration (0.05-0.2 M LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2}, or MgCl{sub 2}) and pH. The compounds were pentachlorophenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol, (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)acetic acid, 4-chloro-{alpha}-(4-chlorophenyl)benzeneacetic acid, 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol, (2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid, 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butanoic acid, 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid, 2,3,6-trichlorobenzeneacetic acid, and 2-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)propionic acid. The experimental results were interpreted quantitatively with an equilibrium model that accounts for acid dissociation in the aqueous phase and partitioning into the octanol phase by the neutral organic species, free inorganic and organic ions, and ion pairs. The partition constants for the neutral ion pairs correlate well with the partition constants of the neutral acids. Two experiments address the applicability of these octanol-water distribution data to the distribution of ionogenic compounds in the environment: the distribution of 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol on a natural sorbent as a function of salt concentration (NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}) and pH, and competitive adsorption of pentachlorophenol and 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol on an environmental sorbent.

Jafvert, C.T. (Environmental Protection Agency, Athens, GA (USA)); Westall, J.C. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (USA)); Grieder, E.; Schwarzenbach, R.P. (Swiss Federal Institute for Water Resources and Water Pollution Control, Kastanienbaum (Switzerland))

1990-12-01

254

A SURVEY ON RESEARCH NEEDS ON PERSONAL SAMPLERS FOR TOXIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

A survey is presented on the research and development needs for personal monitoring devices for toxic organic compounds in the ambient atmosphere. This survey includes a description of organic compounds and their ambient concentrations, individual compounds of high priority, a su...

255

Characterizing reduced sulfur compounds and non-methane volatile organic compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have become a potential environmental and human health concern. Both RSCs and NMVOCs contribute to odor. In addition, RSCs also have the potential to form fine particulate matter (PMfine) and NMVOCs the potential to form ozone. Measurements of RSCs and NMVOCs emissions were

Ian Cooper Rumsey

2010-01-01

256

Global observations of oxygenated Volatile Organic Compounds from space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Formaldehyde (HCHO), the smallest aldehyde of the atmosphere and glyoxal (CHO.CHO), the smallest a- dicarbonyl compound, are key intermediate products of the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Due to their short lifetime they are expected to provide valuable information on the global identification of the photochemical hot spots which are attributed to the various emission sources of anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning origin. This study presents the global composite maps of both HCHO and CHO.CHO vertical column densities as obtained, for the first time, from 2 different sensors the SCIAMACHY and the GOME-2 on board of the ENVISAT and METOP satellites, respectively. HCHO slant column densities (SCDs) were retrieved in the UV spectral region and the CHO.CHO in the VIS by applying the differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique (DOAS). Finally, the vertical column densities (VCDs) were calculated after taking into account the air mass factors computed with the radiative transfer model, SCIATRAN. These data sets of the VCDHCHO and VCDCHOCHO, covering the extended time period of 01.01.03 - 31.08.08, have been used to study the global seasonal and multi-annual behavior of both species. It was found that the highest values of these oVOCs, depending on the season, are observed above regions where anthropogenic activities, biogenic processes and biomass burning take place. South America, Africa, India, Indonesia and Asia (mainly South-eastern China) are among the dominant regions where high annual mean values of VCDHCHO (>1.0.1016molec.cm-2) and VCDCHO.CHO (>5.0.1014molec.cm-2) are computed. At higher latitudes, moderate annual mean values of VCDHCHO and VCDCHO.CHO are discernible, for example above North America, Europe and Australia. Notably, high column amounts of CHO.CHO are also observed over the tropical oceans and close to upwelling areas.

Vrekoussis, M.; Wittrock, F.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.

2008-12-01

257

Selective Sorption of Dissolved Organic Carbon Compounds by Temperate Soils  

PubMed Central

Background Physico-chemical sorption onto soil minerals is one of the major processes of dissolved organic carbon (OC) stabilization in deeper soils. The interaction of DOC on soil solids is related to the reactivity of soil minerals, the chemistry of sorbate functional groups, and the stability of sorbate to microbial degradation. This study was conducted to examine the sorption of diverse OC compounds (D-glucose, L-alanine, oxalic acid, salicylic acid, and sinapyl alcohol) on temperate climate soil orders (Mollisols, Ultisols and Alfisols). Methodology Equilibrium batch experiments were conducted using 0–100 mg C L?1 at a solid-solution ratio of 1?60 for 48 hrs on natural soils and on soils sterilized by ?-irradiation. The maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k were calculated by fitting to the Langmuir model. Results Ultisols appeared to sorb more glucose, alanine, and salicylic acid than did Alfisols or Mollisols and the isotherms followed a non-linear pattern (higher k). Sterile experiments revealed that glucose and alanine were both readily degraded and/or incorporated into microbial biomass because the observed Qmax under sterile conditions decreased by 22–46% for glucose and 17–77% for alanine as compared to non-sterile conditions. Mollisols, in contrast, more readily reacted with oxalic acid (Qmax of 886 mg kg?1) and sinapyl alcohol (Qmax of 2031 mg kg?1), and no degradation was observed. The reactivity of Alfisols to DOC was intermediate to that of Ultisols and Mollisols, and degradation followed similar patterns as for Ultisols. Conclusion This study demonstrated that three common temperate soil orders experienced differential sorption and degradation of simple OC compounds, indicating that sorbate chemistry plays a significant role in the sorptive stabilization of DOC.

Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie A.; Phillips, Jana R.

2012-01-01

258

Compositing water samples for analysis of volatile organic compounds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Accurate mean concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can easily and economically be obtained from a single VOC analysis by using proven methods of collecting representative, discrete water samples and compositing them with a gas-tight syringe. The technique can be used in conjunction with chemical analysis by a conventional laboratory, field-portable equipment, or a mobile laboratory. The type of mean concentration desired depends on the objectives of monitoring. For example, flow-weighted mean VOC concentrations can be used to estimate mass loadings in wastewater and urban storm water, and spatially integrated mean VOC concentrations can be used to assess sources of drinking water (e.g., reservoirs and rivers). The mean error in a discrete sample due to compositing is about 2% for most VOC concentrations greater than 0.1 ??g/L. The total error depends on the number of discrete samples comprising the composite sample and precision of the chemical analysis.Accurate mean concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can easily and economically be obtained from a single VOC analysis by using proven methods of collecting representative, discrete water samples and compositing them with a gas-tight syringe. The technique can be used in conjunction with chemical analysis by a conventional laboratory, field-portable equipment, or a mobile laboratory. The type of mean concentration desired depends on the objectives of monitoring. For example, flow-weighted mean VOC concentrations can be used to estimate mass loadings in wastewater and urban storm water, and spatially integrated mean VOC concentrations can be used to assess sources of drinking water (e.g., reservoirs and rivers). The mean error in a discrete sample due to compositing is about 2% for most VOC concentrations greater than 0.1 ??g/L. The total error depends on the number of discrete samples comprising the composite sample and precision of the chemical analysis.Researchers are able to derive accurate values for the mean concentration of VOCs from a single VOC analysis using established techniques for the collection of representative, discrete water samples. Such samples are then composited with a gas-tight syringe. This methodology can be employed in conjunction with chemical assessment using a conventional laboratory, field-portable equipment, or a mobile laboratory. Estimates of mass loadings in wastewater and urban storm runoff can be generated using values for the flow-weighted mean VOC concentrations. Spatially integrated mean VOC concentrations are useful for the evaluation of drinking waters. Factors that influence the value for the total error are identified.

Lopes, T. J.; Fallon, J. D.; Maluk, T. L.

2000-01-01

259

Rates of Dissolution and Biodegradation of Water-Insoluble Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We conducted a study of the relationship between the dissolution rates of organic compounds that are sparingly soluble in water and the biodegradation of these compounds by mixed cultures of bacteria. The rates of dissolution of naphthalene and 4-chlorobi...

J. M. Thomas J. R. Yordy J. A. Amador M. Alexander

1986-01-01

260

Novel Membrance Inlet Mass Spectrometric Methods for Analysis of Organic Compounds in Aqueous and Solid Samples.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Different volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are widely used in industry and due to accidents and fuel emissions the compounds can be discharged into the environment, causing contamination of soil and groundwater. Because of their toxicity the analysis of ...

M. Ojala

2002-01-01

261

FACTORS CONTROLLING THE EMISSIONS OF MONOTERPENES AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Plants contain a number of volatile organic compounds, including isoprene, mono- and sesquiterpenes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and esters. ndividual plant species have unique combinations of these compounds; consequently, the emission pattern for each species is also specific...

262

Factors Controlling the Emissions of Monoterpenes and Other Volatile Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Plants contain a number of volatile organic compounds, including isoprene, mono- and sesquiterpenes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and esters. Individual plant species have unique combinations of these compounds; consequently, the emission pattern for eac...

D. T. Tingey D. P. Turner J. A. Weber

1990-01-01

263

76 FR 41086 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Volatile Organic Compound Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Operations Rule...compound (VOC) emissions from reinforced plastic composites production operations. This...applies to any facility that has reinforced plastic composites production operations....

2011-07-13

264

Volatile organic compounds in ambient air of Mumbai—India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major group of air pollutants which play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry. These contribute to toxic oxidants which are harmful to ecosystem, human health and atmosphere. The variability of pollutants is an important factor in determining human exposure to these chemicals. Data on levels of VOCs in developing countries, including India, are lacking. The present work deals with the estimation of target VOCs at 15 locations of five categories in Mumbai. The categories are residential, industrial, commercial, traffic intersections and petrol refueling stations. The monitoring was carried out during peak hours in the morning and evening, once every month, during May 2001 to April 2002. The study focused on target VOCs as defined by USEPA. Concentrations of benzene, at all the locations, were found to be much above the guidelines values prescribed by World Health Organization (WHO) for ambient air quality. All other VOCs were observed to be below the WHO guideline values. The results show that levels of VOCs in Mumbai were high. There is need for a regular monitoring schedule of VOCs in the urban environment. Variability studies are important to assess the exposure potential of pollutants which are an important parameter for health impact studies. This study also presents the variability of VOCs in the urban area of Mumbai. Variability was divided into measurement spatial, temporal and temporal-spatial interaction components. The temporal component along with temporal-spatial interaction component were the major contributors to variability. VOCs associated with mobile source emissions and emissions from marine source were found to be distributed uniformly in the urban atmosphere in Mumbai. the need for continuous monitoring, to capture short term peak concentrations and averages, is evident.

Srivastava, Anjali; Joseph, A. E.; Devotta, S.

265

Secondary organic aerosol formation from intermediate-volatility organic compounds: cyclic, linear, and branched alkanes.  

PubMed

Intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) are an important class of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors that have not been traditionally included in chemical transport models. A challenge is that the vast majority of IVOCs cannot be speciated using traditional gas chromatography-based techniques; instead they are classified as an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) that is presumably made up of a complex mixture of branched and cyclic alkanes. To better understand SOA formation from IVOCs, a series of smog chamber experiments was conducted with different alkanes, including cyclic, branched, and linear compounds. The experiments focused on freshly formed SOA from hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated reactions under high-NO(x) conditions at typical atmospheric organic aerosol concentrations (C(OA)). SOA yields from cyclic alkanes were comparable to yields from linear alkanes three to four carbons larger in size. For alkanes with equivalent carbon numbers, branched alkanes had the lowest SOA mass yields, ranging between 0.05 and 0.08 at a C(OA) of 15 ?g m(-3). The SOA yield of branched alkanes also depends on the methyl branch position on the carbon backbone. High-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer data indicate that the SOA oxygen-to-carbon ratios were largely controlled by the carbon number of the precursor compound. Depending on the precursor size, the mass spectrum of SOA produced from IVOCs is similar to the semivolatile-oxygenated and hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol factors derived from ambient data. Using the new yield data, we estimated SOA formation potential from diesel exhaust and predict the contribution from UCM vapors to be nearly four times larger than the contribution from single-ring aromatics and comparable to that of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons after several hours of oxidation at typical atmospheric conditions. Therefore, SOA from IVOCs may be an important contributor to urban OA and should be included in SOA models; the yield data presented in this study are suitable for such use. PMID:22823284

Tkacik, Daniel S; Presto, Albert A; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

2012-08-21

266

[Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from large furniture].  

PubMed

Indoor air pollution by volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which may cause a hazardous influence on human being such as sick building (sick house) syndrome, has become a serious problem. In this study, VOCs emitted from nine pieces of home furniture, three sets of dining tables, three sets of chest of drawers and three sofas, were analyzed as potential sources of indoor air pollution by large chamber test method (JIS A 1911). Based on the emission rates of total VOC (TVOC), the impacts on the indoor TVOC was estimated by the sample model with a volume of 20 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated TVOC increment values were exceeded the provisional target value for indoor air (400 microg/m3) in three sets of dining tables, one set of chest of drawer and one sofa. The estimated increment of formaldehyde were exceeded the guideline value (100 microg/m3) in one set of dining table, two sets of chest of drawers and one sofa. These results revealed that VOC emissions from furniture may influence significantly indoor air quality. Also, in this study, to establish the alternative method for large chamber test methods, emission rates from representative three parts of furniture unit were evaluated using the small chamber and emission rate from full-sized furniture was predicted. Emission rates of TVOC and formaldehyde predicted by small chamber test were 3-46% and 6-252% of the data obtained using large chamber test, respectively. PMID:22259846

Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furuta, Mitsuko; Shibatsuji, Masayoshi; Jinno, Hideto; Nishimura, Tetsuji

2011-01-01

267

Sources of volatile organic compounds in Cairo's ambient air.  

PubMed

The greater Cairo area suffers from extreme levels of gas and particulate phase air pollutants. In order to reduce the levels of ambient pollution, the USAID and the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA) have supported the Cairo Air Improvement Project (CAIP). As part of this project, two intensive ambient monitoring studies were carried out during the period of February 22 to March 4 and October 27 to November 27, 1999. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured on a 24-h basis at six sampling stations during each of the intensive periods. During the February/March study, samples were collected daily, while in the October/November study samples were collected every other day. The six intensive measurement sites represented background levels, mobile source impacts, industrial impacts, and residential exposure. High levels of NMHC were observed at all locations. NMHC concentrations ranged from 365 ppb C at Helwan to 1,848 ppb C at El Qualaly during winter, 1999 and from 461 ppb C at Kaha to 2,037 ppb C at El Qualaly during fall, 1999. El Qualaly, the site chosen to represent mobile emissions, displayed the highest average NMHC concentrations of any site, by a factor of 2 or more. The highest mobile source contributions were estimated at this site. The major contributors to NMHC at all sites were mobile emissions, lead smelting, and compressed natural gas. PMID:18843549

Abu-Allaban, M; Lowenthal, D H; Gertler, A W; Labib, M

2009-10-01

268

Measurements of volatile organic compounds over West Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we describe measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) made using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) aboard the UK Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Measurements during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign. Observations were made during approximately 85 h of flying time between 17 July and 17 August 2006, above an area between 4° N and 18° N and 3° W and 4° E, encompassing ocean, mosaic forest, and the Sahel desert. High time resolution observations of counts at mass to charge (m/z) ratios of 42, 59, 69, 71, and 79 were used to calculate mixing ratios of acetonitrile, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and benzene, respectively using laboratory-derived humidity-dependent calibration factors. Strong spatial associations between vegetation and isoprene and its oxidation products were observed in the boundary layer, consistent with biogenic emissions followed by rapid atmospheric oxidation. Acetonitrile, benzene, and acetone were all enhanced in airmasses which had been heavily influenced by biomass burning. Benzene and acetone were also elevated in airmasses with urban influence from cities such as Lagos, Cotonou, and Niamey. The observations provide evidence that both deep convection and mixing associated with fair-weather cumulus were responsible for vertical redistribution of VOCs emitted from the surface. Profiles over the ocean showed a depletion of acetone in the marine boundary layer, but no significant decrease for acetonitrile.

Murphy, J. G.; Oram, D. E.; Reeves, C. E.

2010-02-01

269

Measurements of volatile organic compounds over West Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we describe measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) made using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) aboard the UK Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Measurements during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign. Observations were made during approximately 85 h of flying time between 17 July and 17 August 2006, above an area between 4° N and 18° N and 3° W and 4° E, encompassing ocean, mosaic forest, and the Sahel desert. High time resolution observations of counts at mass to charge (m/z) ratios of 42, 59, 69, 71, and 79 were used to calculate mixing ratios of acetonitrile, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and benzene respectively using laboratory-derived humidity-dependent calibration factors. Strong spatial associations between vegetation and isoprene and its oxidation products were observed in the boundary layer, consistent with biogenic emissions followed by rapid atmospheric oxidation. Acetonitrile, benzene, and acetone were all enhanced in airmasses which had been heavily influenced by biomass burning. Benzene and acetone were also elevated in airmasses with urban influence from cities such as Lagos, Cotonou, and Niamey. The observations provide evidence that both deep convection and mixing associated with fair-weather cumulus were responsible for vertical redistribution of VOC emitted from the surface. Profiles over the ocean showed a depletion of acetone in the marine boundary layer, but no significant decrease for acetonitrile.

Murphy, J. G.; Oram, D. E.; Reeves, C. E.

2010-06-01

270

Cost effective passive sampling device for volatile organic compounds monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laboratory-built passive sampler was developed as a simple and cost effective device for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX). Common glass bottles (screw cap, 10 ml, 67.6×10.6 mm ID), packed with 75 mg of activated Tenax TA, were used as passive samplers. After exposed to real sample, the adsorbent was desorbed using a laboratory-built thermal desorption device. The analytes were purged to fill a sampling loop and then injected by a gas sampling valve to a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (FID). All parameters, i.e. , desorption time, purge flow rate, gas chromatograph conditions were optimized to obtain high sensitivity, resolution and short analysis time. The system was calibrated by BTX standard gas and the linear regression coefficient of greater than 0.99 was obtained with detection limits 0.3, 0.2 and 0.7 ?g m -3 for benzene, toluene and xylene, respectively. The proposed method was implemented for the monitoring of BTX at 10 gasoline stations in Hat Yai, Thailand. The concentrations were found in the range of N.D.-19, 12-200 and 23-200 ?g m -3 for benzene, toluene and xylene, respectively.

Thammakhet, Chongdee; Muneesawang, Vilailuk; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

271

Identification of priority organic compounds in groundwater recharge of China.  

PubMed

Groundwater recharge using reclaimed water is considered a promising method to alleviate groundwater depletion, especially in arid areas. Traditional water treatment systems are inefficient to remove all the types of contaminants that would pose risks to groundwater, so it is crucial to establish a priority list of organic compounds (OCs) that deserve the preferential treatment. In this study, a comprehensive ranking system was developed to determine the list and then applied to China. 151 OCs, for which occurrence data in the wastewater treatment plants were available, were selected as candidate OCs. Based on their occurrence, exposure potential and ecological effects, two different rankings of OCs were established respectively for groundwater recharge by surface infiltration and direct aquifer injection. Thirty-four OCs were regarded as having no risks while the remaining 117 OCs were divided into three groups: high, moderate and low priority OCs. Regardless of the recharge way, nonylphenol, erythromycin and ibuprofen were the highest priority OCs; their removal should be prioritized. Also the database should be updated as detecting technology is developed. PMID:24960229

Li, Zhen; Li, Miao; Liu, Xiang; Ma, Yeping; Wu, Miaomiao

2014-09-15

272

Anharmonic theoretical simulations of infrared spectra of halogenated organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent implementation of the computation of infrared (IR) intensities beyond the double-harmonic approximation [J. Bloino and V. Barone, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 124108 (2012)] paved the route to routine calculations of infrared spectra for a wide set of molecular systems. Halogenated organic compounds represent an interesting class of molecules, from both an atmospheric and computational point of view, due to the peculiar chemical features related to the halogen atoms. In this work, we simulate the IR spectra of eight halogenated molecules (CH2F2, CHBrF2, CH2DBr, CF3Br, CH2CHF, CF2CFCl, cis-CHFCHBr, cis-CHFCHI), using two common hybrid and double-hybrid density functionals in conjunction with both double- and triple-? quality basis sets (SNSD and cc-pVTZ) as well as employing the coupled-cluster theory with basis sets of at least triple-? quality. Finally, we compare our results with available experimental spectra, with the aim of checking the accuracy and the performances of the computational approaches.

Carnimeo, Ivan; Puzzarini, Cristina; Tasinato, Nicola; Stoppa, Paolo; Charmet, Andrea Pietropolli; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Cappelli, Chiara; Barone, Vincenzo

2013-08-01

273

Removing the smoking confounder from blood volatile organic compounds measurements.  

PubMed

Because smoking is a major contributor to the internal dose levels of many volatile organic compounds (VOCs), it is difficult to assess other VOC exposures among smokers. Purge and trap/gas chromatography/isotope-dilution mass spectrometry was used to determine the internal dose of VOCs of smokers and nonsmokers. Median whole blood concentrations of benzene, styrene, and toluene were shown to be approximately two times higher among smokers than among nonsmokers. In addition, smoking elevated the blood levels of ethylbenzene, m-/p-xylene, and o-xylene when the log-transformed data were compared. Smoking also led to greatly increased levels of 2,5-dimethylfuran. These results indicate that blood levels of many VOCs are highly correlated with blood levels of 2,5-dimethylfuran and that this effect is primarily a result of smoking. The smoking confounder to blood levels of VOCs can be removed by including the concentration of blood 2,5-dimethylfuran concentration when evaluating results from a health and exposure evaluation. Determining the blood 2,5-dimethylfuran concentration appears to be an effective means of correcting the confounding influence of smoking and supplies a way of determining lower-level exposures that previously could not have been distinguished from the effects of smoking. PMID:8757237

Ashley, D L; Bonin, M A; Hamar, B; McGeehin, M A

1995-10-01

274

Prediction of boiling points of organic compounds by QSPR tools.  

PubMed

The novel electro-negativity topological descriptors of YC, WC were derived from molecular structure by equilibrium electro-negativity of atom and relative bond length of molecule. The quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) between descriptors of YC, WC as well as path number parameter P3 and the normal boiling points of 80 alkanes, 65 unsaturated hydrocarbons and 70 alcohols were obtained separately. The high-quality prediction models were evidenced by coefficient of determination (R(2)), the standard error (S), average absolute errors (AAE) and predictive parameters (Qext(2),RCV(2),Rm(2)). According to the regression equations, the influences of the length of carbon backbone, the size, the degree of branching of a molecule and the role of functional groups on the normal boiling point were analyzed. Comparison results with reference models demonstrated that novel topological descriptors based on the equilibrium electro-negativity of atom and the relative bond length were useful molecular descriptors for predicting the normal boiling points of organic compounds. PMID:23792208

Dai, Yi-min; Zhu, Zhi-ping; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Yue-fei; Zeng, Ju-lan; Li, Xun

2013-07-01

275

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total U.S. VOC emissions. The 'Toxic-Release Inventory' of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing, refrigerant production, and wood products production. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase 1 report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. The Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient, and economically priced.

1992-03-01

276

Syntheses, characterizations and properties of organic-inorganic perovskite compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this work is to synthesize and characterize a family of organic-based tin(II) iodide layered perovskites---[H3N(CH 2)mNH3](CH3NH 3)n-1SnnI 3n+1 (n = 1--4, m = 4--6, 7, 8, 9, 12). The crystalline hybrid compounds were prepared by crystallization from acidic HI solutions (Method I) and by gel techniques (Method II). The crystal structures of the resulting products were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. Their electronic structure and chemical bonding were investigated by UV-VIS reflectance spectroscopy, 4-probe resistivity measurements, and electronic band structure calculations. Normal flat single-layered perovskites with a variety of alkyldiamines---[H 3N(CH2)mNH3]SnI 4 (m = 4--6, 8, 9), were obtained from Method I, while those with longer hydrocarbon chains, e.g. [H3N(CH2)12NH 3]SnI4, were synthesized by Method II. The typical unit cell of these compounds consist of a 2-dimensional inorganic anion [SnI4 2-]---mono-layered perovskite sheets, and layers of [H 3N(CH2)mNH3] 2+ cations packed between the inorganic sheets. An unexpected corrugated anion sheet, [SnI4]2-, was also observed, for the first time, in alpha-[H3N(CH2)SNH3]SnI 4. The multi-layered perovskite hybrid compounds---the double-layered [H3N(CH2)SNH3](CH3NH3)SnI 7, the triple-layered perovskites [H3N(CH 2)4NH3](CH3NH3)2Sn 3I10, and [H3N(CH2)6NH 3](CH3NH3)2Sn3I10, and a quadruple-layered [H3N(CH2)SNH3](CH 3NH3)3Sn4I13 were obtained in polycrystalline and single crystalline forms. Single crystal X-ray diffraction, electronic band structure calculations, and electronic resistivity measurements were performed on representative members of the family of hybrid perovskites. Attempts to introduce nonprimary amines into the layered perovskite structures resulted in the preparation of 2,2'-biimidazolium tin iodide---[NH(CH)2NHC]2SnI4 and morpholinium tin iodide[O(CH2)2NH2(CH2) 2]2SnI4. These are the first reports of nonprimary amine-based layered perovskite structures. Their crystal structures reveal significant deviations from typical layered perovskite structures, characterized by severely distorted SnI6 octahedral units. Electronic band structure calculations, using the tight-binding approach, reveal significant interplay of the stereoactivity of the Sn(II) lone-pairs with the onset of hypervalent secondary bonding in morpholinium tin iodide. Thus, the seemingly layered perovskite structure of morpholinium tin iodide exhibits a one-dimensional bonding character. Two unprecedented three-dimensional (3-D) defect perovskite compounds, [H3N(CH2)7NH3]2Sn 3I10 and [H3N(CH2)7NH 3]8(H3NCH3)2Sn(IV)Sn(II) 12I46 were prepared. Their novel 3-D structures can be derived from the ordered arrangement of vacancies on the metal and anion sites of the perovskite. These defect perovskite structures are unique to metal oxide and halide chemistry.

Guan, Jun

2001-12-01

277

Air Quality in an Animal Facility: Particulates, Ammonia, and Volatile Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of ammonia, volatile organic compounds, particles, and mouse allergen were measured in an animal facility. Ammonia concentrations averaged less than 1 ppm, below any health–based standards. The concentrations of volatile organic compounds were in the 5–15 µg\\/m range. Among the volatile organic compounds found, only the terpenes a–pinene and a–terpinol (which may be derived from the pine shavings used

Julie B. Kacergis; Robert B. Jones; Carolyn K. Reeb; William A. Turner; John L. Ohman; Margarett R. Ardman; Beverly Paigen

1996-01-01

278

Method of fabricating mesocrystals of organic and organo-metallic compounds  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

The present invention fabricates mesocrystals of organic and organo-metallic compounds. Supersaturated solutions are made with different sums of an organic or organo-metallic compound and the organic or organo-metallic compound is added with an excipient. Through a water bath, mesocrystals are obtained from the supersaturated solutions with well-faceted nucleation and growth. Different polymorphisms are induced with different ratios of enantiomers. And the dissolution rate for fabricating the API is enhanced.

2012-03-13

279

Corrosion of stainless steels in acid solutions with organic sulfur-containing compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of the organic sulfur-containing compounds on the corrosion of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels in sulfuric acid was studied. The results showed that the anodic dissolution and self-corrosion of stainless steels were remarkably accelerated in solutions with a low amount of the organic sulfur-containing compounds (0.02 mmol\\/dm3). With an increase of the organic sulfur-containing compound concentration, more and

X. L Cheng; H. Y Ma; S. H Chen; R Yu; X Chen; Z. M Yao

1998-01-01

280

Effects of polar and nonpolar groups on the solubility of organic compounds in soil organic matter  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Vapor sorption capacities on a high-organic-content peat, a model for soil organic matter (SOM), were determined at room temperature for the following liquids: n-hexane, 1,4-dioxane, nitroethane, acetone, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, ethanol, and methanol. The linear organic vapor sorption is in keeping with the dominance of vapor partition in peat SOM. These data and similar results of carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE), benzene, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME), and water on the same peat from earlier studies are used to evaluate the effect of polarity on the vapor partition in SOM. The extrapolated liquid solubility from the vapor isotherm increases sharply from 3-6 wt % for low-polarity liquids (hexane, CT, and benzene) to 62 wt % for polar methanol and correlates positively with the liquid's component solubility parameters for polar interaction (??P) and hydrogen bonding (??h). The same polarity effect may be expected to influence the relative solubilities of a variety of contaminants in SOM and, therefore, the relative deviations between the SOM-water partition coefficients (Kom) and corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) for different classes of compounds. The large solubility disparity in SOM between polar and nonpolar solutes suggests that the accurate prediction of Kom from Kow or Sw (solute water solubility) would be limited to compounds of similar polarity.

Chiou, C. T.; Kile, D. E.

1994-01-01

281

A review of the tissue residue approach for organic and organometallic compounds in aquatic organisms.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the tissue residue approach (TRA) for toxicity assessment as it applies to organic chemicals and some organometallic compounds (Sn, Hg, and Pb) in aquatic organisms. Specific emphasis was placed on evaluating key factors that influence interpretation of critical body residue (CBR) toxicity metrics including data quality issues, lipid dynamics, choice of endpoints, processes that alter toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics, phototoxicity, species- and life stage-specific sensitivities, and biotransformation. The vast majority of data available on TRA is derived from laboratory studies of acute lethal responses to organic toxicants exhibiting baseline toxicity. Application of the TRA to various baseline toxicants as well as substances with specific modes of action via receptor-mediated processes, such as chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, and organometallics is discussed, as is application of TRA concepts in field assessments of tissue residues. In contrast to media-based toxicity relationships, CBR values tend to be less variable and less influenced by factors that control bioavailability and bioaccumulation, and TRA can be used to infer mechanisms of toxic action, evaluate the toxicity of mixtures, and interpret field data on bioaccumulated toxicants. If residue-effects data are not available, body residues can be estimated, as has been done using the target lipid model for baseline toxicants, to derive critical values for risk assessment. One of the primary unresolved issues complicating TRA for organic chemicals is biotransformation. Further work on the influence of biotransformation, a better understanding of contaminant lipid interactions, and an explicit understanding of the time dependency of CBRs and receptor-mediated toxicity are all required to advance this field. Additional residue-effects data on sublethal endpoints, early life stages, and a wider range of legacy and emergent contaminants will be needed to improve the ability to use TRA for organic and organometallic compounds. PMID:21184569

McElroy, Anne E; Barron, Mace G; Beckvar, Nancy; Driscoll, Susan B Kane; Meador, James P; Parkerton, Tom F; Preuss, Thomas G; Steevens, Jeffery A

2011-01-01

282

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOEpatents

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25

283

Source apportionment modeling of volatile organic compounds in streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

It often is of interest to understand the relative importance of the different sources contributing to the concentration cw of a contaminant in a stream; the portions related to sources 1, 2, 3, etc. are denoted cw,1, cw,2, cw,3, etc. Like c w, 'he fractions ??1, = cw,1/c w, ??2 = cw,2/cw, ??3 = cw,3/cw, etc. depend on location and time. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can undergo absorption from the atmosphere into stream water or loss from stream water to the atmosphere, causing complexities affecting the source apportionment (SA) of VOCs in streams. Two SA rules are elaborated. Rule 1: VOC entering a stream across the air/water interface exclusively is assigned to the atmospheric portion of cw. Rule 2: VOC loss by volatilization, flow loss to groundwater, in-stream degradation, etc. is distributed over cw,1 cw,2, c w,3, etc. in proportion to their corresponding ?? values. How the two SA rules are applied, as well as the nature of the SA output for a given case, will depend on whether transport across the air/water interface is handled using the net flux F convention or using the individual fluxes J convention. Four hypothetical stream cases involving acetone, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzene, chloroform, and perchloroethylene (PCE) are considered. Acetone and MTBE are sufficiently water soluble from air for a domestic atmospheric source to be capable of yielding cw values approaching the common water quality guideline range of 1 to 10 ??g/L. For most other VOCs, such levels cause net outgassing (F > 0). When F > 0 in a given section of stream, in the net flux convention, all of the ??j, for the compound remain unchanged over that section while cw decreases. A characteristic time ??d can be calculated to predict when there will be differences between SA results obtained by the net flux convention versus the individual fluxes convention. Source apportionment modeling provides the framework necessary for comparing different strategies for mitigating contamination at points of interest along a stream. ?? 2006 SETAC.

Pankow, J. F.; Asher, W. E.; Zogorski, J. S.

2006-01-01

284

Electrochemical Arylation of N -Containing Chelate and Macrocyclic Complexes of Transition Metals with the Aid of Diphenyliodonium Salts  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method of electrochemical arylation of complexes of transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni) with N-containing chelate and macrocyclic (dimethylglyoximate, porphyrin, etc.) ligands employs diphenyliodonium salts as arylating agents and permits the synthesis of compounds containing functional groups that are easily reduceable or sensitive to the action of organometallic compounds. A homogeneous redox catalysis (mediator 1,5-dinitroanthraquinone-9,10) reduces the reaction potential

T. V. Magdesieva; P. S. Ivanov; D. N. Kravchuk; K. P. Butin

2003-01-01

285

Collapsing Aged Culture of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus Produces Compound(s) Toxic to Photosynthetic Organisms  

PubMed Central

Phytoplankton mortality allows effective nutrient cycling, and thus plays a pivotal role in driving biogeochemical cycles. A growing body of literature demonstrates the involvement of regulated death programs in the abrupt collapse of phytoplankton populations, and particularly implicates processes that exhibit characteristics of metazoan programmed cell death. Here, we report that the cell-free, extracellular fluid (conditioned medium) of a collapsing aged culture of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is toxic to exponentially growing cells of this cyanobacterium, as well as to a large variety of photosynthetic organisms, but not to eubacteria. The toxic effect, which is light-dependent, involves oxidative stress, as suggested by damage alleviation by antioxidants, and the very high sensitivity of a catalase-mutant to the conditioned medium. At relatively high cell densities, S. elongatus cells survived the deleterious effect of conditioned medium in a process that required de novo protein synthesis. Application of conditioned medium from a collapsing culture caused severe pigment bleaching not only in S. elongatus cells, but also resulted in bleaching of pigments in a cell free extract. The latter observation indicates that the elicited damage is a direct effect that does not require an intact cell, and therefore, is mechanistically different from the metazoan-like programmed cell death described for phytoplankton. We suggest that S. elongatus in aged cultures are triggered to produce a toxic compound, and thus, this process may be envisaged as a novel regulated death program.

Cohen, Assaf; Sendersky, Eleonora; Carmeli, Shmuel; Schwarz, Rakefet

2014-01-01

286

Evaluation of Control Strategies for Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air (Journal Article).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper discusses research which evaluates the application of adsorption techniques to the control of indoor organic vapors. The adsorption on activated carbon of three compounds representing three classes of organic species was studied at 30 C in the c...

K. Ramanathan V. L. Debler

1988-01-01

287

Naturally Occurring Organic Compounds and Algal Growth in a Eutrophic Lake.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The literature was reviewed with respect to naturally occurring organic compounds. Their identity and effects on life forms are listed in tabular form. Methods of separation and identification of trace organics in aquatic systems are discussed and applied...

V. D. Adams R. R. Renk P. A. Cowan D. B. Procella

1975-01-01

288

Models for the Kinetics of Biodegradation of Organic Compounds Not Supporting Growth.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We developed 12 models of kinetics to describe the metabolism of organic substrates that are not supporting bacterial growth. These models can be used to describe the biodegradation of organic compounds that are not supporting growth when the responsible ...

S. K. Schmidt S. Simkins M. Alexander

1985-01-01

289

EVALUATION OF THE WALKTHROUGH SURVEY METHOD FOR DETECTION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND LEAKS  

EPA Science Inventory

During 1978 and 1979, the Emission Standards and Engineering Division of EPA's Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards conducted a fugitive volatile organic compound (VOC) emission sampling program in organic chemical manufacturing plants and petroleum refineries. As a part ...

290

Measuring concentrations of volatile organic compounds in vinyl flooring.  

PubMed

The initial solid-phase concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a key parameter influencing the emission characteristics of many indoor materials. Solid-phase measurements are typically made using solvent extraction or thermal headspace analysis. The high temperatures and chemical solvents associated with these methods can modify the physical structure of polymeric materials and, consequently, affect mass transfer characteristics. To measure solid-phase concentrations under conditions resembling those in which the material would be installed in an indoor environment, a new technique was developed for measuring VOC concentrations in vinyl flooring (VF) and similar materials. A 0.09-m2 section of new VF was punched randomly to produce -200 0.78-cm2 disks. The disks were milled to a powder at -140 degrees C to simultaneously homogenize the material and reduce the diffusion path length without loss of VOCs. VOCs were extracted from the VF particles at room temperature by fluidized-bed desorption (FBD) and by direct thermal desorption (DTD) at elevated temperatures. The VOCs in the extraction gas from FBD and DTD were collected on sorbent tubes and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seven VOCs emitted by VF were quantified. Concentration measurements by FBD ranged from 5.1 microg/g VF for n-hexadecane to 130 microg/g VF for phenol. Concentrations measured by DTD were higher than concentrations measured by FBD. Differences between FBD and DTD results may be explained using free-volume and dual-mobility sorption theory, but further research is necessary to more completely characterize the complex nature of a diffusant in a polymer matrix. PMID:11518293

Cox, S S; Little, J C; Hodgson, A T

2001-08-01

291

Biogenic contributions to atmospheric volatile organic compounds in Azusa, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An objective of the 1997 Southern California Ozone Study (SCOS97) was to provide an up-to-date assessment of the importance of biogenic emissions for tropospheric ozone production in the South Coast Air Basin. To this end, ambient air samples were collected during September 1997 at the Azusa air-monitoring station for subsequent measurement of their radiocarbon (14C) content of the atmospheric nonmethane volatile organic compound (VOC) fraction. The 14C/12C ratio is proportional to the fraction of a sample's carbon that is biogenic. The proportionality constant was determined from local samples of vegetation, gasoline, and ambient CO2 collected during the same period. The median fraction of biogenic VOC observed from 0600 to 0900 hours (LT) was 7% (n = 5) with a range of -8% to 24%, from 1300 to 1600 hours it was 27% (n = 4) with a range of 11% to 39%, and from 1700 to 2000 hours it was 34 +/- 7% for a single sample. On the basis of calculated 24-hour back trajectories the dominant source region for the air masses associated with periods of high biogenic VOC-C levels was a sector extending from the north to the east. Over all time and space that the samples represent, the median fraction of biogenic VOC was 18% (n = 10). Expressed as an atmospheric mixing ratio, the overall (median and 95% confidence interval) biogenic VOC-carbon contribution was 80 +/- 50 nmol mol-1 which may be representative of the natural VOC-C background for the Los Angeles air basin.

Klouda, George A.; Lewis, Charles W.; Stiles, David C.; Marolf, Julie L.; Ellenson, William D.; Lonneman, William A.

2002-04-01

292

Passive remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds using barometric pumping  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, is to demonstrate new subsurface characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. The interbedded clay and sand layers at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS) are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). Characterization studies show that the bulk of the contamination is located in the approximately 40 m thick vadose zone. The most successful strategy for removing contaminants of this type from this environment is vapor extraction alone or in combination with other methods such as air sparging or enhanced bioremediation. Preliminary work at the IDS has indicated that natural pressure differences between surface and subsurface air caused by surface barometric fluctuations can produce enough gas flow to make barometric pumping a viable method for subsurface remediation. Air flow and pressure were measured in wells that are across three stratigraphic intervals in the vadose zone` The subsurface pressures were correlated to surface pressure fluctuations but were damped and lagging in phase corresponding to depth and stratum permeability. Piezometer wells screened at lower elevations exhibited a greater phase lag and damping than wells screened at higher elevations where the pressure wave from barometric fluctuations passes through a smaller number of low permeable layers. The phase lag between surface and subsurface pressures results in significant fluxes through these wells. The resultant air flows through the subsurface impacts CVOC fate and transport. With the appropriate controls (e.g. solenoid valves) a naturally driven vapor extraction system can be implemented requiring negligible operating costs yet capable of a large CVOC removal rate (as much as 1--2 kg/day in each well at the IDS).

Rossabi, J.; Looney, B.B.; Dilek, C.A.E.; Riha, B.; Rohay, V.J.

1993-12-31

293

Peat fires and air quality: volatile organic compounds and particulates.  

PubMed

There are numerous localized peat deposits on the Swan Coastal Plain, an urban and rural bioregion otherwise dominated by wetland ecosystems in southwestern Australia. Hydrological change is significant in the bioregion: urban development encroaches on wetlands, groundwater extraction provides the city population with most of its water, and rainfall declines will not recharge aquifers in the future. The wetland processes which contribute to the formation of these peat deposits have therefore changed and are becoming vulnerable to fire events with residents increasingly exposed to peat smoke. There is an imperative to characterise this peat smoke to determine if exposures are harmful or toxic, and opportunities to do so in this setting arise due to the absence of bushfire smoke which has confounded other international studies. We have measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate concentrations from an opportunistic assessment of two peat fires. SUMMA canister grab samples and a portable GCMS were used to determine the VOCs with high 1h benzene concentrations of 16 and 30 ppm v/v. PM10 and PM2.5 particulate data were collected using an Osiris continuous analyser with 24h concentrations recorded at varying time periods (within a 5 months timeframe) ranging from 1h maximums of between 23-37 microgm(-3) for PM10 and 50.5-106 microgm(-3) for PM2.5. While the 24h averages were generally below national air quality standards, elevated 1h concentrations were observed on numerous occasions and on most days. Given the proximity of residential development to many peat deposits, a drying climate and the increased risk of arson in peri-urban environments, the health impacts of exposure to peat smoke need to be determined and if necessary measures developed to prevent exposure (which would include maintaining wetland sediment integrity so as to reduce its vulnerability to fire). PMID:19394676

Blake, D; Hinwood, A L; Horwitz, P

2009-07-01

294

Transport of volatile organic compounds across the capillary fringe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physical experiments were conducted to investigate the transport of a dissolved volatile organic compound (trichloroethylene, TCE) from shallow groundwater to the unsaturated zone under a variety of conditions including changes in the soil moisture profile and water table position. Experimental data indicated that at moderate groundwater velocities (0.1 m/d), vertical mechanical dispersion was negligible and molecular diffusion was the dominant vertical transport mechanism. Under these conditions, TCE concentrations decreased nearly 3 orders of magnitude across the capillary fringe and soil gas concentrations remained low relative to those of underlying groundwater. Data collected during a water table drop showed a short-term increase in concentrations throughout most of the unsaturated zone, but these concentrations quickly declined and approached initial values after the water table was returned to its original level. In the deep part of the unsaturated zone, the water table drop resulted in a long-term decrease in concentrations, illustrating the effects of hysteresis in the soil moisture profile. A two-dimensional random walk advection-diffusion model was developed to simulate the experimental conditions, and numerical simulations agreed well with experimental data. A simpler, one-dimensional finite-difference diffusion-dispersion model was also developed. One-dimensional simulations based on molecular diffusion also agreed well with experimental data. Simulations which incorporated mechanical dispersion tended to overestimate flux across the capillary fringe. Good agreement between the one- and two-dimensional models suggested that a simple, one-dimensional approximation of vertical transport across the capillary fringe can be useful when conditions are appropriate.

McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Johnson, Richard L.

1993-06-01

295

MULTISPECTRAL IDENTIFICATION AND CONFIRMATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WASTEWATER EXTRACTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Application of multispectral identification techniques to samples from industrial and POTW wastewaters revealed identities of 63 compounds that had not been identified by empirical matching of mass spectra with spectral libraries. wenty-five of the compounds had not been found in...

296

Rejection of organic micropollutants (disinfection by-products, endocrine disrupting compounds, and pharmaceutically active compounds) by NF\\/RO membranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing demand on water resources has increased interest in wastewater reclamation for potable reuse, in which rejection of organic micropollutants such as disinfection by-products (DBPs), endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), and pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) is of great concern. The objective of this study was to investigate the rejection of DBPs, EDCs, and PhACs by nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis

Katsuki Kimura; Gary Amy; Jörg E. Drewes; Thomas Heberer; Tae-Uk Kim; Yoshimasa Watanabe

2003-01-01

297

Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of volatile organic compounds produced by some micromycetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The volatile organic compounds evolved from various fungi were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All the fungi studied were selected for their relevance in human mycology. According to their behaviour in the production of volatile compounds the fungi were divided into three groups. Group I was composed of fungi characteristically yeasts producing very high levels of volatile compounds. Ethanol, ethyl

A. Caileux; J. P. Bouchara; V. Daniel; D. Chabasse; P. Allain

1992-01-01

298

Origin of organic compounds on the primitive earth and in meteorites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The role and relative contributions of different forms of energy to the synthesis of amino acids and other organic compounds on the primitive earth, in the parent bodies or carbonaceous chondrites, and in the solar nebula are examined. A single source of energy or a single process would not account for all the organic compounds synthesized in the solar

Stanley L. Miller; Harold C. Urey; J. Oró

1976-01-01

299

National Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCS) data base, 1970-1987 (for microcomputers), Data file  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Ambient Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Data Base update is the result of an ongoing effort to gather, evaluate, and compile the measured concentrations of a large number of VOCs. Data on the observed concentrations of 320 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were compiled, critically evaluated, and assembled into a relational data base. Ambient (outdoor) measurements, indoor data, and data

J. J. Shah; L. T. Cupitt

1987-01-01

300

Closed cycle cooler for VOC preconcentration. Final report. [VOC (volatile organic compound)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of automated gas chromatographs at air quality network monitoring stations to obtain measurements of ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been a goal of EPA's Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory. Presently, instrument designs require excessive amounts of cryogen to preconcentrate and resolve the more volatile organic compounds. The large consumption of cryogen becomes a major

1993-01-01

301

Effect of biomedical organic compounds on the setting reaction of calcium phosphates  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, the effect of biomedical organic compounds (starch, sodium alginate, chitosan and gelatin) on the hydration of calcium phosphates was studied using X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and XPS analysis. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was prepared by a mechanochemical route and mixed with biomedical organic compounds. A solidification reaction occurred between ACP and dicalcium phosphate

Tao Yu; Jiandong Ye; Chengying Gao; Long Yu; Yingjun Wang

2010-01-01

302

Characterization of microbial species in a regenerative bio-filter system for volatile organic compound removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective removal of volatile organic compounds is critical for indoor air quality control. The performance of traditional technologies of volatile organic compound removal is limited by inadequate selection of filter media, poor airflow management inside the cleaning devices, insufficient catalytic reaction surface area, and poor distribution of UV light irradiation. In comparison, the relatively new regenerative air filtration systems use

Wen-Hsuan Huang; Zhiqiang Wang; Geetika Choudhary; Beverly Guo; Jianshun Zhang; Dacheng Ren

2012-01-01

303

Ion-trap detection of volatile organic compounds in alveolar breath  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a method for the collection and microanalysis of the volatile organic compounds in human breath. A transportable apparatus supplies subjects with purified air and samples their alveolar breath; the volatile organic compounds are captured in an adsorptive trap containing activated carbon and molecular sieve. The sample is thermally desorbed from the trap in an automated microprocessor-controlled device, concentrated

M. Phillips; J. Greenberg

1992-01-01

304

Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds—Old, However, Actual Analytical and Toxicological Problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interest in chlorinated volatile organic compounds is not a new task but still draws the attention of scientists. The role they play in human organism, is an important aspect to consider, since the development of analytical techniques and instrumental solutions gives new possibilities of their application in the analytics of volatile compounds and recognition of properties, so far impossible

El?bieta Dobrzy?ska; Ma?gorzata Po?niak; Ma?gorzata Szewczy?ska; Bogus?aw Buszewski

2010-01-01

305

Estimation of buffering capacity of mangrove soils by using hydrophobic organic compounds, atrazine and linuron  

Microsoft Academic Search

Samples of two soils and two sediments collected at sites originating from mangrove forests in Thailand, were examined in terms of buffering capacity to organic compounds. Atrazine and linuron were used as representative hydrophobic organic compounds for estimating the buffering capacity by observing their adsorptive and desorptive behavior. The buffering capacity could be represented by the distribution of the adsorption

Munehiro Ebato; Naohiro Matsui; Makoto Nomura; Koyo Yonebayashi

2004-01-01

306

Clarifying the role of silver deposits on titania for the photocatalytic mineralisation of organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of silver deposits on titanium dioxide on the photocatalytic mineralisation of various organic compounds was investigated. A series of fourteen organic compounds comprising C, H and O atoms alone, were assessed to gain insights into the influence of photodeposited silver. Photodeposition of the silver provided a bimodal distribution of silver deposit sizes, comprising of deposits less than 5nm

Hoang Tran; Jason Scott; Ken Chiang; Rose Amal

2006-01-01

307

Process for the treatment of vent gas containing organic halide compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a process for the removal of organic halide compounds from an effluent waste gas containing organic halide compounds and water vapor. It comprises: compressing the effluent waste gas in a first compression zone to produce a condensed water vapor liquid phase and a first gaseous phase having a pressure greater than that of the effluent waste gas

S. P. Lankton; R. T. Maurer; R. B. Jr. James

1991-01-01

308

Chemisorption of Organic Compounds on a Clean Aluminum Surface Prepared by Cutting Under High Vacuum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chemisorption of organic compounds as model compounds of lubrication additives has been studied at room temperature on a clean aluminum surface which was prepared by cutting under high-vacuum conditions. Hydrocarbons such as n-hexane, butene, and cyclohexene did not adsorb, but alkyl halides, organic acid, and alcohols adsorbed on the clean aluminum surface. The adsorption activity was monitored with a

Shigeyuki Mori; Mitsuru Suginoya; Yasukatsu Tamai

1982-01-01

309

Spatial and Temporal Volatile Organic Compound Measurements in New England: Key Insight on Sources and Distributions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere act as precursors in the formation of tropospheric ozone and their emissions and oxidation products can contribute to secondary organic aerosol formation and growth. In examining their effects on regional chemistry and pollution events, considerable uncertainties exist in our understanding of the relative contributions from different sources and classes of compounds as well

B. C. Sive; M. L. White; R. S. Russo; Y. Zhou; J. L. Ambrose; K. Haase; H. Mao; R. W. Talbot

2010-01-01

310

DETERMINATION OF ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUND TYPES IN VACUUM GAS OILS USING GC-FID-SCD METHOD  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analyses of individual organic sulfur compounds in petroleum distillates are the key to understanding the kinetics of the chemistry involved in hydrodesulfurization, HDS. A sample of vacuum gas oil (VGO) produced commercially by distillation of treated atmospheric residue was analyzed by GC-FID-SCD method for individual organic sulfur compounds characterization and quantification. Dibenzothiophene and benzonaphthothiophene and their alkyl derivatives were

H. Behbehani; M. K. Andari

2000-01-01

311

Quantitative Analysis of Organic Compounds: A Simple and Rapid Method for Use in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the procedure for making a quantitative analysis of organic compounds suitable for secondary school chemistry classes. Using the Schoniger procedure, the organic compound, such as PVC, is decomposed in a conical flask with oxygen. The products are absorbed in a suitable liquid and analyzed by titration. (JR)

Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

1973-01-01

312

SOIL SORPTION OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN A MIXTURE  

EPA Science Inventory

Studies were conducted to evaluate lipophilicity as a predictor of sorption for a mixture of organic compounds with high vapor pressures commonly present at hazardous waste sites. orption partition coefficients (Kp) for the mixture of 16 volatile and semivolatile organic compound...

313

40 CFR 60.542a - Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-07-01 false Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. 60.542a Section 60.542a Protection of...Manufacturing Industry § 60.542a Alternate standard for volatile organic compounds. (a) On and after the date on which...

2013-07-01

314

Organic Compounds in Produced Waters From Coalbed Methane Wells in the Powder River Basin, WY  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coalbed methane (CBM) is a significant energy resource, accounting for about 7.5% of natural gas production in the USA. The Powder River Basin (PRB), WY is currently one of the most active CBM drilling sites in the USA. One aspect of concern in the exploitation of CBM resources is the large volumes of water recovered from wells along with the natural gas (so-called produced waters). CBM produced waters may contain coal-derived dissolved substances (inorganic and organic) of environmental concern, and a potential disposal problem for CBM producers. Studies of CBM produced water have mostly focused on inorganics. Dissolved organic compounds in CBM produced water may also present an environmental issue, but little information is available. As part of a larger study of the health and environmental effects of organic compounds derived from coal, we analyzed a number of produced water samples from CBM wells in the PRB, WY for dissolved organic substances. Our goals were results on coal-derived organic compounds in the environment to evaluate potential health and environmental impacts. In 2001, we sampled produced water from 13 CBM wells covering a broad area of the PRB in order to identify and quantify the organic compounds present. In 2002, produced water from 4 of the 2001 CBM wells and 8 new CBM wells were sampled for dissolved organic components. Produced water was collected directly from each well and filtered on site. Organic compounds were isolated from produced water samples by liquid/liquid extraction with methylene chloride and identified and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Organic compounds identified by GC/MS in extracts of the produced water samples, included: phenols, biphenyls, N-, O-, and S-containing heterocyclic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and fatty acids. However, most compounds had structures unidentified by GC/MS databases. Many of the identified organic compounds (phenols, heterocyclic compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) are likely coal-derived. Concentrations of individual compounds ranged from about 10 to 0.01 ? g/l. Some CBM wells with high concentrations of dissolved organic compounds present in 2001 had much lower concentrations in 2002, indicating temporal variability. Some of the organic compounds identified in the produced water samples are toxic (mutagenic and cancer promoters), but are unlikely to have acute health effects at the low levels present. Chronic health and environmental effects from long periods of low-level exposure, however, are possible. Continuing studies will expand the existing dataset on dissolved organic compounds in produced water, and evaluate the toxic effects of these compounds.

Orem, W.; Lerch, H.; Rice, C.; Tatu, C.

2003-12-01

315

Source apportionment of volatile organic compounds measured in Edmonton, Alberta  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From 2003 to 2009, whole air samples were collected at two sites in Edmonton and analyzed for over 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs were sampled in the downtown area (Central site) and an industrial area on the eastern side of the city (East site). Concentrations of most VOCs were highest at the East site, with an average total VOC mass concentration of 221 ?g m-3. The average total VOC mass concentration at the Central site was 65 ?g m-3. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization receptor model (EPA PMF) was used to apportion ambient concentrations of VOCs into eleven factors, which were associated with emissions sources. On average, 94 and 99% of the measured mass were apportioned by PMF at the East and Central site, respectively. Factors include transportation combustion (gasoline and diesel), industrial sources (industrial evaporative, industrial feedstock, gasoline production/storage, industrial chemical use), mixed mobile and industrial (gasoline evaporative, fugitive butane), a biogenic source, a natural gas related source, and a factor that was associated with global background pollutants transported into the area. Transportation sources accounted for more than half of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the Central site, but less than 10% of the reconstructed mass concentration at the East site. By contrast, industrial sources accounted for ten times more of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site than at the Central site and were responsible for approximately 75% of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration observed at the East site. Of the six industrial factors identified at the East site, four were linked to petrochemical industry production and storage. The two largest contributors to the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site were associated with fugitive emissions of volatile species (butanes, pentanes, hexane, and cyclohexane); together, these two factors accounted for more than 50% of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site in contrast to less than 2% of the reconstructed mass concentration at the Central site. Natural gas related emissions accounted for 10%-20% of the reconstructed mass concentration at both sites. Biogenic emissions and VOCs associated with well-mixed global background were less than 10% of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the Central site and less than 3% of the reconstructed mass concentration at the East site.

McCarthy, Michael C.; Aklilu, Yayne-Abeba; Brown, Steven G.; Lyder, David A.

2013-12-01

316

Volatile organic compound emission factors from roadside measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a significant role in the generation of urban photochemical smog. In addition, some VOCs, such as benzene, are harmful to human health. In Japan, motor vehicles are the dominant source of VOCs. Therefore, it is important to determine the emission of VOCs from vehicles in order to estimate human risk and the production mechanisms of photochemical smog. In this study, we estimated emission factors with a methodology that considered the following points: (1) real-world emissions, (2) individual VOCs, (3) low vehicle speeds, (4) low investigation cost, and (5) user-friendly methodology. Samples were collected approximately 5 m from each side of National Route No. 467 in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. Sampling consisted of twelve 1-h sampling periods at three points on three dates: 21 February 2003 (7:00-19:00), 13 May 2003 (7:00-19:00), and 13 September 2003 (8:00-20:00). The samples were analyzed using GC/FID and GC/MS. In addition, information on vehicle types, traffic volumes, and weather conditions was collected from beside the road. Emission factors of individual VOCs were estimated from the measured data by running the CALINE4 dispersion model as an inverse model. The average speed of all vehicles was 22 km h -1; 81.3% of all vehicles were light-duty vehicles, 12.3% were heavy-duty vehicles, and 6.5% were motorcycles. We estimated the emission factors of 34 individual VOCs. The emission factors for all vehicles combined averaged over all sampling days ranged from 0.25 to 51 mg vehicle -1 km -1. The emission factors of benzene and toluene were 5.2 and 17 mg vehicle -1 km -1, respectively. In addition, the estimated emission factors were compared with those estimated from other recent studies. The emission factors for light-duty vehicles (LDVs), heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), and motorcycles separately were also estimated by using a non-negative least squares method. However, these emission factors were found to be unreliable for the current sample size; therefore, the sample size needed to estimate reliable emission factors was calculated.

Kawashima, Hiroto; Minami, Shigeki; Hanai, Yoshimichi; Fushimi, Akihiro

317

A survey of household products for volatile organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A total of 1159 common household products were analysed for 31 volatile organic compounds as potential sources of indoor air pollution. The products were distributed among 65 product categories within 8 category classes: automotive products (14.4% of the products); household cleaners/polishes (9.6%); paint-related products (39.9%); fabric and leather treatments (7.9%); cleaners for electronic equipment (6.0%); oils, greases and lubricants (9.6%); adhesive-related products (6.6%); and miscellaneous products (6.1%). The study was conducted in two parts. In the first part, or the original study, the products were reanalysed for methylene chloride and five other chlorocarbons using purge-and-trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and a data base containing the analytical results was developed. Because full mass spectra were taken, the original set of GC/MS data also contained information regarding other volatile chemicals in the products. However, this additional data was not reported at that time. In the second part of the study, the GC/MS data were reanalysed to determine the presence and concentrations of an additional 25 volatile chemicals. The 31 chemicals included in both parts of this study were: carbon tetrachloride; methylene chloride; tetrachloroethylene; 1,1,1-trichloroethane; trichlorethylene; 1,1,2-tricholorotrifluoroethane; acetone; benzene; 2-butanone; chlorobenzene; chloroform; cyclohexane; 1,2-dichloroethane; 1,4-dioxane; ethylbenzene; n-hexane; d-limonene; methylcyclohexane; methylcyclopentane; methyl isobutyl ketone; n-nonane; n-octane; ?-pinene; propylene oxide; styrene; 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane; tetrahydrofuran; toluene; m-mxylene; o-xylene; and p-xylene. Of the 31 chemicals, toluene, the xylenes and methylene chloride were found to occur most frequently—in over 40% of the products tested. Chemicals that were typically found in relatively high concentrations in the samples (i.e. greater than 20% w/w) included acetone, 2-butanone, hexane, methylene chloride, tetrachloroethylene, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane and the xylenes. Chlorobenzene, d-limonene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, n-nonane and styrene were not found in any of the products at or above the 0.1% level. In all, 935 of the products contained one or more of the target solvents at levels greater than 0.1%. The resulting data base contains information regarding the 1159 products, such as origin, cost, container type, lot number, etc., as well as quantitative information for each of the 31 chemicals. The frequency of occurrence and average concentrations for the target chemicals are summarized for each of the product classes.

Sack, Thomas M.; Steele, David H.; Hammerstrom, Karen; Remmers, Janet

318

Volatile Organic Compound Investigation Results, 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were discovered while drilling in the unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site’s 300 Area during 2006. The discovery involved an interval of relatively finer-grained sediment within the unconfined aquifer, an interval that is not sampled by routine groundwater monitoring. Although VOC contamination in the unconfined aquifer has been identified and monitored, the concentrations of newly discovered contamination are much higher than encountered previously, with some new results significantly higher than the drinking water standards. The primary contaminant is trichloroethene, with lesser amounts of tetrachloroethene. Both chemicals were used extensively as degreasing agents during the fuels fabrication process. A biological degradation product of these chemicals, 1,2-dichloroethene, was also detected. To further define the nature and extent of this contamination, additional characterization drilling was undertaken during 2007. Four locations were drilled to supplement the information obtained at four locations drilled during the earlier investigation in 2006. The results of the combined drilling indicate that the newly discovered contamination is limited to a relatively finer-grained interval of Ringold Formation sediment within the unconfined aquifer. The extent of this contamination appears to be the area immediately east and south of the former South Process Pond. Samples collected from the finer-grained sediment at locations along the shoreline confirm the presence of the contamination near the groundwater/river interface. Contamination was not detected in river water that flows over the area where the river channel potentially incises the finer-grained interval of aquifer sediment. The source for this contamination is not readily apparent. A search of historical documents and the Hanford Waste Information Data System did not provide definitive clues as to waste disposal operations and/or spills that might have resulted in groundwater contamination in this sediment, although several relatively small accidental releases of VOCs have occurred in the past in the northern portion of the 300 Area. It is likely that large quantities of degreasing solutions were disposed to the North and South Process Ponds during the 1950s and 1960s, and that evidence for them in the upper portion of the unconfined aquifer has been removed because of groundwater movement through the much more transmissive sediment. Also, investigations to date have revealed no evidence to suggest that a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid remains undetected in the subsurface. Potential pathways for contamination to migrate from this finer-grained sediment include groundwater movement through the interval to offshore locations in the Columbia River channel, dispersion out of the finer-grained interval into the overlying transmissive sediment (again, with transport to the riverbed), and potential future withdrawal via water supply wells.

Peterson, Robert E.; Williams, Bruce A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2008-07-07

319

Methods of Reducing Water Contaminants: Removal of Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Much of the recent concern by regulatory agencies about drinking water quality has been directed toward organic contamination in drinking water. Although organic contamination has been thought to primarily affect surface waters, there is a growing awarene...

B. W. Lykins J. A. Goodrich

1990-01-01

320

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

DOEpatents

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08

321

Chemical process for the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde and other organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The invention discusses a chemical process for the catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde and other organic compounds contained in a dilute aqueous solution, particularly waste water. The inventive feature resides in the use of a cobalt catalyst to increase the rate of oxidation of the organic compounds when hypochlorous acid is the oxidant. The latter may be provided by a chlorine compound, such as sodium hypochlorite, calcium hypochlorite or chlorine gas dissolved in water.

Murphy, A.P.

1991-01-01

322

Anaerobic inhibition of trace organic compound removal during rapid infiltration of wastewater.  

PubMed Central

When soil columns were operated aerobically on a flooding-drying schedule in a previous study, good removals were observed for several organic compounds at concentrations ranging from 1 to 1,000 micrograms per liter in primary wastewater. In this study, fractional breakthroughs of most compounds increased substantially once operating parameters were modified and the soil became anaerobic. These results imply that microbial removal of trace organic compounds can be inhibited if anaerobic conditions develop during rapid infiltration of wastewater.

Hutchins, S R; Tomson, M B; Wilson, J T; Ward, C H

1984-01-01

323

Self Assembly Properties of Primitive Organic Compounds (Abstract Only).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A central event in the origin of life was the self-assembly of amphiphilic, lipid-like compounds into closed microenvironments. If a primitive macromolecular replicating system could be encapsulated within a vesicular membrane, the components of the syste...

D. W. Deamer

1991-01-01

324

INVESTIGATIONS OF BIODEGRADABILITY AND TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The development of elaborate industrial societies has led to proliferation of a vast number of complex chemicals for industrial, agricultural and domestic use. Some portion of these compounds eventually find their way into municipal and industrial wastewater. Unless specifically ...

325

Abiotic emissions of methane and reduced organic compounds from organic matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent laboratory studies show that the important greenhouse gas methane, but also other reduced atmospheric trace gases, can be emitted by abiotic processes from organic matter, such as plants, pure organic compounds and soils. It is very difficult to distinguish abiotic from biotic emissions in field studies, but in laboratory experiments this is easier because it is possible to carefully prepare/sterilize samples, or to control external parameters. For example, the abiotic emissions always show a strong increase with temperature when temperatures are increased to 70C or higher, well above the temperature optimum for bacterial activity. UV radiation has also been clearly shown to lead to emission of methane and other reduced gases from organic matter. Interesting information on the production mechanism has been obtained from isotope studies, both at natural abundance and with isotope labeling. For example, the methoxyl groups of pectin were clearly identified to produce methane. However, analysis of the isotopic composition of methane from natural samples clearly indicates that there must be other molecular mechanisms that lead to methane production. Abiotic methane generation could be a ubiquitous process that occurs naturally at low rates from many different sources.

Roeckmann, T.; Keppler, F.; Vigano, I.; Derendorp, L.; Holzinger, R.

2012-12-01

326

Control of Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Volatile Organic Liquid Storage in Floating and Fixed Roof Tanks. Guideline Series.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Control Techniques Guidelines (CTG) are documents prepared by the EPA that serve as guidance to States in developing reasonably available control technology (RACT). The CTG's contain volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions and control technology informa...

1993-01-01

327

Effects on Carp Embryos (Cyprinus Carpio) and Daphnia Pulex of Chlorinated Organic Compounds Produced During Control of Fouling Organisms.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Chlorinated organic compounds have been identified in cooling, waste treatment, and drinking waters after application of chlorine. The advisability of chlorination for some purposes and the suitability of present chlorination technology for others have be...

J. R. Trabalka S. C. Tsai J. S. Mattice M. B. Burch

1979-01-01

328

The Separation and Identification of Two Unknown Solid Organic Compounds: An Experiment for the Sophomore Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Segregation and recognition of two unfamiliar concrete organic compounds are achieved through microscale flash chromatography and spectroscopy plus melting point verifications respectively. This inexpensive and harmless microscale experiment for sophomore students ensures exercise in chromatographic and spectroscopic methods.

Feist, Patty L.

2004-01-01

329

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States; a review of current understanding  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report reviews the occurrence and distribution of manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States. On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves among water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: 1. Polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides, 2. Carbamate and organophosphorus insecticides, 3. Herbicides, 4. Phenols, 5. Halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 6. Phthalate esters, 7. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and 8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Processes that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate processes are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison with concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where data are sufficient, regional and temporal contamination trends in the United States are discussed.

Smith, James A.; Witkowski, P. J.; Fusillo, Thomas V.

1988-01-01

330

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: a review of current understanding  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report reviews the occurrence and distribution of manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States. On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be absorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rate commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: 1. Polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides, 2. Carbamate and organophosphorus insecticides, 3. Herbicides, 4. Phenols, 5. Halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 6. Phthalate esters, 7. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and 8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Processes that influence that the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate processes are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the United States are discussed.

Smith, James A.; Witkowski, Patrick J.; Fusillo, Thomas V.

1987-01-01

331

Compendium of methods for the determination of toxic organic compounds in ambient air, June 1988  

SciTech Connect

This Compendium was prepared to provide regional, state, and local environmental regulatory agencies, as well as other interested parties, with specific guidance on the determination of selected toxic organic compounds in ambient air. The decision was made to begin preparation of a Compendium that would provide specific sampling and analysis procedures, in a standardized format, for selected toxic organic compounds. The current Compendium consists of fourteen procedures considered to be of primary importance in current toxic organic monitoring efforts.

Winberry, W.T.; Murphy, N.T.; Riggan, R.M.

1988-06-01

332

Organic compounds in the water column of the eastern Baltic  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the transport, distribution, concentration, chemistry, environmental consequences, and chemical control strategies of organic wastes--including waste hydrocarbons, industrial effluents and oil spills--in the Baltic Sea and in the regions along its shorelines. Data on seasonal and compositional variations in organic waste content are provided.

Nemirovskaya, I.A.; Nesterova, M.P.; Pustel'nikov, O.S.

1987-11-01

333

THE INTERACTION OF VAPOUR PHASE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH INDOOR SINKS  

EPA Science Inventory

The interaction of indoor air pollutants with interior surfaces (i.e., sinks) is a well known, but poorly understood, phenomenon. Studies have shown that re-emissions of adsorbed organic vapours can contribute to elevated concentrations of organics in indoor environments. Researc...

334

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AN INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER. THEIR TRANSPORT INTO SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The wastewater from a small specialty chemicals manufacturing plant located on the Pawtuxet River (Rhode Island, USA) has contaminated the water and sediment of that river, the Pawtuxet Cove, the Providence River, and (to a lesser extent) the Narragansett Bay. Since the compounds...

335

Volatile organic compounds at a coastal site. 1. Seasonal variations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alkylaromatics, alkanes, aldehydes, dimethyl polysulfides, and miscellaneous compounds were determined over a 15-month period at a coastal site. Alkylbenzenes appear dominated by anthropogenic inputs and air-sea exchange, with selective biodegradation showing minor effects in the summer. Offshore mixing and adsorption to sediments seems minor. Alkylnaphthalenes showed a contrasting pattern, best explained by a dominant wintertime source such as space heating

Philip M. Gschwend; Oliver C. Zafiriou; R. Fauzi C. Mantoura; Rene P. Schwarzenbach; Robert B. Gagosian

1982-01-01

336

Organic compounds in the aqueous extract of a retorted Green River Formation oil shale  

SciTech Connect

Spent oil shale (Green River Formation) from a Paraho directly fired retort was extracted with distilled/deionized water for 28 days at ambient temperature. The aqueous extract was then analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds using EPA hazardous chemicals identification technology. Organic compounds identified were predominantly carboxylic acids, although neutral and basic compounds were also observed. Quantitative analyses indicated that the identified compounds were present in parts-per-billion amounts. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

McKay, J.F.; Lane, D.C.

1988-09-01

337

Multisorbent tubes for collecting volatile organic compounds in spacecraft air  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The sampling capability of Tenax-TA tubes, used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's solid sorbent air sampler to trap and concentrate contaminants from air aboard spacecraft, was improved by incorporating two sorbents within the tubes. Existing tubes containing only Tenax-TA allowed highly volatile compounds to "break through" during collection of a 1.5 L air sample. First the carbon molecular sieve-type sorbents Carboxen 569 and Carbosieve S-III were tested for their ability to quantitatively trap the highly volatile compounds. Breakthrough volumes were determined with the direct method, whereby low ppm levels of methanol or Freon 12 in nitrogen were flowed through the sorbent tubes at 30 mL/min, and breakthrough was detected by gas chromatography. Breakthrough volumes for methanol were about 9 L/g on Carboxen 569 and 11 L/g on Carbosieve S-III; breakthrough volumes for Freon 12 were about 7 L/g on Carboxen 569 and > 26 L/g on Carbosieve S-III. Next, dual-bed tubes containing either Tenax-TA/Carbosieve S-III, Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569, or Carbotrap/Carboxen 569 to a 10-component gas mixture were exposed, in dry and in humidified air (50% relative humidity), and percentage recoveries of each compound were determined. The Tenax-TA/Carboxen 569 combination gave the best overall recoveries (75-114% for the 10 compounds). Acetaldehyde had the lowest recovery (75%) of the 10 compounds, but this value was still an improvement over either the other two sorbent combinations or the original single-sorbent tubes.

Matney, M. L.; Beck, S. W.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

2000-01-01

338

MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC ORGANIC MATERIALS AND OTHER HAZARDOUS ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STACK GASES - STATE OF THE ART  

EPA Science Inventory

This report documents and reviews state-of-the-art methods for the measurement of polycyclic organic matter (POM) and other hazardous organic materials which are present in industrial stack emissions. Measurement methods for many hazardous compounds, such as POM and nitrosamines,...

339

MECHANISTIC ROLES OF SOIL HUMUS AND MINERALS IN THE SORPTION OF NONIONIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM AQUEOUS AND ORGANIC SOLUTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Mechanistic roles of soil humus and soil minerals and their contributions to soil sorption of nonionic organic compounds from aqueous and organic solutions are illustrated. Parathion and lindane are used as model solutes on two soils that differ greatly in their humic and mineral...

340

ORGANIC COMPOUNDS MEASURED IN PM2.5 DURING NEOPS  

EPA Science Inventory

Secondary formation of submicron ambient particulate matter occurs when organic and inorganic constituents having sufficiently low volatility condense onto preexisting particles in the atmosphere. The presence of the resulting submicron particles has led to three important env...

341

Uptake and Assimilation of Organic Compounds by Marine Protists.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An analysis of the capacity of the phytoplankter, Platymonas subcordiformis, to take up and assimilate dissolved amino acids was made. This takes place very rapidly at low ambient concentrations. When the organism is grown under conditions of low nutrient...

G. C. Stephens

1969-01-01

342

Adverse effects of organic arsenical compounds towards Vibrio fischeri bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most frequently encountered forms of organic arsenic, namely, dimethylarsinic acid, monomethylarsonic acid, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine and Roxarsone® (4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid) were tested for toxicity either by using the Microtox® bioassay, based on the rapid (within 15 min) fading of luminescence emitted by Vibrio fischeri marine bacteria, or by monitoring growth rate of the same bacteria for 3 days. Organic arsenic was generally

Elena Fulladosa; Jean-Claude Murat; Jean-Claude Bollinger; Isabel Villaescusa

2007-01-01

343

PERVAPORATIVE REMOVAL OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MULTICOMPONENT AQUEOUS MIXTURES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study concerns with the separation of binary and ternary water–organics mixtures by pervaporation using different organophilic membranes (i.e., PERVAP-1060—polydimethylsiloxane, PERVAP-1070—zeolite filled polydimethylsiloxane, PEBAX-4033—polyether block amide). The following binary and ternary liquid mixtures were investigated: water–methyl acetate; water–ethyl acetate; water–butyl acetate, water–methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE), and water–methanol–MTBE. The organic components of these mixtures can be found in the wastewaters

Wojciech Kujawski; Renata Roszak

2002-01-01

344

Acidic organic compounds in beverage, food, and feed production.  

PubMed

: Organic acids and their derivatives are frequently used in beverage, food, and feed production. Acidic additives may act as buffers to regulate acidity, antioxidants, preservatives, flavor enhancers, and sequestrants. Beneficial effects on animal health and growth performance have been observed when using acidic substances as feed additives. Organic acids could be classified in groups according to their chemical structure. Each group of organic acids has its own specific properties and is used for different applications. Organic acids with low molecular weight (e.g. acetic acid, lactic acid, and citric acid), which are part of the primary metabolism, are often produced by fermentation. Others are produced more economically by chemical synthesis based on petrochemical raw materials on an industrial scale (e.g. formic acid, propionic and benzoic acid). Biotechnology-based production is of interest due to legislation, consumer demand for natural ingredients, and increasing environmental awareness. In the United States, for example, biocatalytically produced esters for food applications can be labeled as "natural," whereas identical conventional acid catalyst-based molecules cannot. Natural esters command a price several times that of non-natural esters. Biotechnological routes need to be optimized regarding raw materials and yield, microorganisms, and recovery methods. New bioprocesses are being developed for organic acids, which are at this time commercially produced by chemical synthesis. Moreover, new organic acids that could be produced with biotechnological methods are under investigation for food applications. PMID:24275825

Quitmann, Hendrich; Fan, Rong; Czermak, Peter

2014-01-01

345

Fate of hazardous waste derived organic compounds in Lake Ontario  

SciTech Connect

Dated sediment cores from Lake Ontario's four sedimentation basins and sedentary fish from tributaries and embayments were analyzed by gas chromatographic, methane-enhanced, negative ion mass spectrometry for a group of fluorinated aromatic compounds. The historical record of these chemicals in Lake Ontario sediments agrees well with the use of the Hyde Park dump in the city of Niagara Falls, NY. These compounds first appeared in sediments in 1958 and rapidly increased until 1970. These dates coincide with the onset of dumping at Hyde Park and remedial action undertaken when this dump was closed, respectively. Chemicals introduced into Lake Ontario by the Niagara River distribute throughout the lake rapidly and uniformly and accumulate in sedentary fish taken from remote locations in the lake. 24 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

Jaffe, R.; Hites, R.A.

1986-03-01

346

Organic solvents, silicon-containing compounds and pesticides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental\\/industrial exposure to heavy metals, light hydrocarbons, pesticides and siliconcontaining compounds all have\\u000a been associated with the development and\\/or progression of renal failure. Exposure to heavy metals, more particularly lead,\\u000a cadmium and mercury has been linked with the development of acute or chronic renal failure. The current literature also contains\\u000a a growing body of information linking solvent exposure with renal

Monique M. Elseviers; Muhammed Yaqoob; Marc E. Broe

347

Organic sulfur compounds in crude oils of West Kazakhstan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The group composition of these compounds in the crude oils and cuts was determined by methods that have been used previously [1-4]. The data are listed in Table 1. The oils from the Tortai, Kultuk, and Zhilankabak fields are classed as low-sulfur(total sulfur contents 0.22%, 0.44%, and 0.47%, respectively). The yield of light cuts below 200~C varies from 7.7%to 30.4%,

V. V. Ryzhenko; A. V. Kotova; N. S. Buyanova; N. K. Nadirov

1982-01-01

348

Hydrogen Isotope Effects in Electrochemical Reductions of Organic Chloro Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetic hydrogen isotope effects in electrochemical reductions of CCl3COOD, CDCl2COOD, CCl4, CDCl3, benzyl chloride, 1-chloronaphthalene and 4-chlorobenzonitrile in deuterated reaction media were determined. The aliphatic chloro compounds are reduced with rather small isotope effects kH\\/kD = 1.2…1.7, as expected if anionic intermediates are formed and protonated. Benzyl chloride is reduced with an apparent kH\\/kD = 2.1, which is probably

M. Wahren; P. Kränke; M. Möder; S. Rummel; E. Winkler

1999-01-01

349

Multisorbent Tubes for Collecting Volatile Organic Compounds in Spacecraft Air  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sampling capability of Tenax-TA tubes, used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's solid sorbent air sampler to trap and concentrate contaminants from air aboard spacecraft, was improved by incorporating two sorbents within the tubes. Existing tubes containing only Tenax-TA allowed highly volatile compounds to “break through” during collection of a 1.5 L air sample. First the carbon molecular

Marilyn L. Matney; Steve W. Beck; Thomas F. Limero; John T. James

2000-01-01

350

Preparation of certain organic compounds labeled with carbon-14  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemical preparation of the following compounds is described: n-decane-; 2C¹⁴, decanone-5-5C¹⁴, decanone-5-6C¹⁴, decanone-54C¹⁴, ; decanone-3-3C¹⁴, decanone-2-2C¹⁴, 2-heptanone-2C¹⁴ , decanol-4-; 5C¹⁴, and 1-methylcyclohexane-1C¹⁴. (LK);

A. M. Synroezhko; N. T. Selivanov

1973-01-01

351

In situ measurements of gas/particle-phase transitions for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds  

PubMed Central

An understanding of the gas/particle-phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds is critical in determining atmospheric aerosol formation processes and growth rates, which in turn affect global climate and human health. The Study of Organic Aerosol at Riverside 2005 campaign was performed to gain a better understanding of the factors responsible for aerosol formation and growth in Riverside, CA, a region with high concentrations of secondary organic aerosol formed through the phase transfer of low-volatility reaction products from the oxidation of precursor gases. We explore the ability of the thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (TAG) to measure gas-to-particle-phase transitioning for several organic compound classes (polar and nonpolar) found in the ambient Riverside atmosphere by using in situ observations of several hundred semivolatile organic compounds. Here we compare TAG measurements to modeled partitioning of select semivolatile organic compounds. Although TAG was not designed to quantify the vapor phase of semivolatile organics, TAG measurements do distinguish when specific compounds are dominantly in the vapor phase, are dominantly in the particle phase, or have both phases present. Because the TAG data are both speciated and time-resolved, this distinction is sufficient to see the transition from vapor to particle phase as a function of carbon number and compound class. Laboratory studies typically measure the phase partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds by using pure compounds or simple mixtures, whereas hourly TAG phase partitioning measurements can be made in the complex mixture of thousands of polar/nonpolar and organic/inorganic compounds found in the atmosphere.

Williams, Brent J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Hering, Susanne V.

2010-01-01

352

Transformations of halogenated organic compounds under denitrification conditions.  

PubMed Central

Trihalomethanes, carbon tetrachloride, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane, chlorinated benzenes, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene at concentrations commonly found in surface and groundwater were incubated under anoxic conditions to study their transformability in the presence of denitrifying bacteria. None of the aromatic compounds showed significant utilization relative to sterile controls at initial concentrations from 41 to 114 micrograms/liter after 11 weeks of incubation. Of the halogenated aliphatic compounds studied, transformations of carbon tetrachloride and brominated trihalomethanes were observed after 8 weeks in batch denitrification cultures. Carbon from the decomposition of carbon tetrachloride was both assimilated into cell material and mineralized to carbon dioxide. How this was possible remains unexplained, since carbon tetrachloride is transformed to CO2 by hydrolysis and not by oxidation-reduction. Chloroform was detected in bacterial cultures with carbon tetrachloride initially present, indicating that reductive dechlorination had occurred in addition to hydrolysis. The data suggest that transformations of certain halogenated aliphatic compounds are likely to occur under denitrification conditions in the environment.

Bouwer, E J; McCarty, P L

1983-01-01

353

Transformations of trace halogenated organic compounds in biofilms  

SciTech Connect

The influence of electron acceptor and substrate concentration on biological and chemical transformations of trace halogenated aliphatics and aromatics was evaluated in this study. Biodegradation was modeled using bacterial-film kinetics. Another objective was to evaluate the importance of biotransformation as a removal mechanism for chlorinated benzenes in a granular activated carbon (GAC) column. Chlorinated benzenes present at low concentrations could be biotransformed by heterotrophic bacteria under aerobic conditions to mineralized end products, but these compounds tended to persist under anoxic conditions of denitrification and methanogenesis. Biotransformation of chlorinated benzenes was an important removal mechanism in a GAC column. Biofilm kinetic concepts developed for a single rate-limiting substrate were applied to describe secondary utilization of the chlorinated benzenes. Certain low-molecular-weight halogenated aliphatics were stable in aerobic aqueous environments, but several can be transformed at low concentrations under anoxic conditions. Some of the chlorinated aliphatics were nearly completely oxidized to CO/sub 2/ under methanogenic conditions confirming removal by biooxidation. A few of the halogenated aliphatics were transformed in the presence of denitrifying bacteria. The brominated, but not chlorinated, aliphatic compounds appeared to be transformed by chemical mechanisms under sterile aqueous conditions. Tentative reactions identified were hydrolysis, reduction, and oxidation. Biooxidation also appeared to be acting to transform the brominated compounds.

Bouwer, E.J.

1983-01-01

354

Seeking organic compounds on Mars : in situ analysis of organic compounds by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry on MOMA experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The search for signs of past or present life is one of the primary goals of future Mars exploratory missions. The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) experiment of the ExoMars mission (set to launch 2016-2018) is a joint venture by the European Space Agency and NASA to develop a sensitive detector for organics on Mars. MOMA will be one of

A. Buch; C. Freissinet; R. Sternberg; V. Pinnick; C. Szopa; P. J. Coll; C. Rodier; C. Garnier; H. Steininger

2010-01-01

355

Manmade organic compounds in the surface waters of the United States: A review of current understanding  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of their aqueous solubilities, nonionic organic compounds partition themselves between water, dissolved organic matter, particulate organic matter, and the lipid reservoirs of aquatic organisms. Ionized organic compounds can be adsorbed to sediments, thereby reducing their aqueous concentrations. Transformation processes of photolysis, hydrolysis, biodegradation, and volatilization can attenuate organic compounds, and attenuation rates commonly follow a first-order kinetic process. Eight groups of manmade organic compounds are discussed: (1) polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine insecticides; (2) carbamate and organophosphorus; (3) herbicides; (4) phenols; (5) halogenated aliphatic and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; (6) phthalate esters; (7) polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and (8) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For each compound group, data pertaining to use, production, and properties are presented and discussed. Process that influence the environmental fate of each group, as determined primarily through laboratory studies, are reviewed, and important fate process are identified. Environmental concentrations of compounds from each group in water, biota, and sediment are given to demonstrate representative values for comparison to concentrations determined during ongoing research. Finally, where sufficient data exist, regional and temporal contamination trends in the US are discussed. 699 refs., 26 figs., 47 tabs.

Smith, J.A.; Witkowski, P.J.; Fusillo, T.V.

1990-01-01

356

AQUATIC PHOTOLYSIS OF OXY-ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOETHITE.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Organic materials that will not absorb light at wavelengths longer than 295 nanometers (the solar wavelength cutoff) may nevertheless, undergo electron transfer reactions initiated by light. These reactions occur when the organic materials are adsorbed as ligand complexes to the surface of iron oxy-hydroxide (goethite). The adsorbed materials can be either inner or outer coordination sphere complexes. Goethite was chosen as the iron oxyhydroxide surface because it has the highest thermodynamic stability of any of the oxyhydroxides in water and it can be synthesized easily, with high purity.

Goldberg, Marvin, C.

1985-01-01

357

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS INHIBIT HUMAN AND RAT NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN XENOPUS OOCYTES.  

EPA Science Inventory

This manuscript provides evidence to indicate that rats and humans are equally sensitive at the pharmacodynamic level to effects of volatile organic compounds. ? This manuscript also presents novel data that provides a plausible mechanism, disruption of ion channel functi...

358

TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN UPFLOW WETLAND MESOCOSMS. (R828773C003)  

EPA Science Inventory

Sorption, biodegradation and hydraulic parameters were determined in the laboratory for two candidate soil substrate mixtures for construction of an upflow treatment wetland for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a Superfund site. The major parent contaminants in the groundw...

359

FIELD EVALUATION OF A SIMPLE MICROCOSM SIMULATING THE BEHAVIOR OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SUBSURFACE MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

A simple batch microcosm had previously been developed to simulate the behavior of volatile organic compounds in unconsolidated subsurface material. The microcosm was evaluated by comparing the behavior of tetrachloroethylene, bromoform, carbon tetrachloride, 1,2-dichlorobenzene,...

360

Plant-Associated Bacterial Degradation of Toxic Organic Compounds in Soil  

PubMed Central

A number of toxic synthetic organic compounds can contaminate environmental soil through either local (e.g., industrial) or diffuse (e.g., agricultural) contamination. Increased levels of these toxic organic compounds in the environment have been associated with human health risks including cancer. Plant-associated bacteria, such as endophytic bacteria (non-pathogenic bacteria that occur naturally in plants) and rhizospheric bacteria (bacteria that live on and near the roots of plants), have been shown to contribute to biodegradation of toxic organic compounds in contaminated soil and could have potential for improving phytoremediation. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacterial degradation of toxic organic compounds (either naturally occurring or genetically enhanced) in contaminated soil in the environment could have positive implications for human health worldwide and is the subject of this review.

McGuinness, Martina; Dowling, David

2009-01-01

361

Air cleaner Efficiencies for Removal of Nitrogen Dioxide and Volatile Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objective of this research was to measure the initial effective cleaning rate (ECR) of selected air cleaners for removing NO2 and six representative volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air. Four portable air cleaners, representing three different pr...

J. M. Daisey A. T. Hodgson

1988-01-01

362

COMPARISON OF PROCEDURES TO DETERMINE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON ACTIVATED CARBON  

EPA Science Inventory

Numerous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are under regulatory consideration for inclusion in the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Adsorption is a cost-effective treatment technology for control of VOCs. Adsorption capacities were determined for fifteen VOCs in distill...

363

Feasibility Study of Preparing Performance Evaluation Soils for Analyzing Volatile Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Vapor fortification, an alternative method for spiking soils with volatile organic compounds for quality assurance/quality control, was improved by minimizing the effects of numerous variables. The procedure developed resulted in average analytes concentr...

A. D. Hewitt

1993-01-01

364

POLAR ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN FINE PARTICLES FROM THE NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, AND CONNECTICUT REGIONAL AIRSHED  

EPA Science Inventory

Five key scientific questions guiding this research were explored. They are given here with results generated from the project.   B.1.        How can polar organic compounds be measured in atmospheric fine particulate matter? Is there potential a...

365

Nonmethane Organic Compound and Three-Hour Air Toxics Monitoring Program, 1990.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In certain areas of the country where the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone is being exceeded, additional measurements of ambient nonmethane organic compounds (NMOC) are needed to assist the affected States in developing revised ozon...

R. A. McAllister P. L. O'Hara D. P. Dayton J. E. Robbins R. F. Jongleux

1991-01-01

366

PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC  

EPA Science Inventory

The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

367

ESTIMATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The computer program SPARC (Sparc Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry)has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms ...

368

SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION-GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) FROM TENAX DEVICES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the development and evaluation of on-line supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography instrumentation and methodology for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from adsorbent sampling devices. Supercritical fluid extraction offers potential a...

369

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LEVELS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR AND BLOOD FROM THE GENERAL POPULATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Background: The relationships between levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in blood and air have not been well characterized in the general population where exposure concentrations are generally at ppb levels. Objectives: This study investigates relationships between ...

370

EVALUATION USING AN ORGANOPHILIC CLAY TO CHEMICALLY STABILIZE WASTE CONTAINING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

A modified clay (organophilic) was utilized to evaluate the potential for chemically stabilizing a waste containing organic compounds. hemical bonding between the binder and the contaminants was indicated. eachate testing also indicated strong binding. Copy available at NTIS as ...

371

VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN INDOOR AIR: A SURVEY OF VARIOUS STRUCTURES  

EPA Science Inventory

Co-workers collected indoor air samples in their homes in SUMMA polished canisters. Upon receipt in the laboratory, the whole air samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using cryogenic sample preconcentration and subsequent capillary column chromatography. Ea...

372

INTERLABORATORY STUDY OF A TEST METHOD FOR MEASURING TOTAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND CONTENT OF CONSUMER PRODUCTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes results of an interlaboratory study to estimate repeatability (precision of analyses performed by a single laboratory) and reproducibility (precision analyses performed by different laboratories) of a consumer products volatile organic compound (VOC) measurem...

373

AUTOMATED CRYOGENIC PRECONCENTRATION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

The performances of two nominally identical automated monitors for quantifying volatile organic compounds were compared on identical ambient laboratory air samples. The monitors incorporate cryogenic preconcentration subunits specially designed for controlled release of liquid ni...

374

Effects of acid-washing filter treatment on quantification of aerosol organic compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tests of standard mixtures and four sets of atmospheric particulate samples showed that an acid-wash (AW) pretreatment of fluorocarbon-coated glass fiber filters prior to aerosol sampling enhanced the quantifiable organic compounds for more than 29% (or 66 ng m -3); in particular, 47-273 ng m -3 (21-366%) more water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) were measured. When the acid-pretreated filters were employed, up to nine more organic species were measured in the individual daily samples. Because the acid pretreatment reduced the metal contaminants in the glass fiber filters, using the AW filters for aerosol sampling allows higher extraction recoveries of organic compounds. Since the fingerprinting compounds were more accurately determined when the aerosol samples were collected on the AW filters, better assessment of emission sources and toxicity of air pollutants can be obtained.

Yang, Liming; Lim, Jaehyun; Yu, Liya E.

375

Analytical Reference Standards and Supplemental Data for Pesticides and Other Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: List of available pesticide standards and ordering information; Compounds deleted from 1978 stock and name changes; List of non-pesticide organic chemical standards; Safe handling of primary reference standards; Preparation and storage of refere...

M. Beroza R. L. Caswell

1980-01-01

376

NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF CONTROLLED EXPOSURE TO A COMPLEX MIXTURE OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Subjective reactions of discomfort, impaired air quality, irritation of mucosal membranes, and impaired memory have been reported in chemically sensitive subjects during exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC's) found in new buildings. 6 normal healthy male subjects aged 18-...

377

CONTROL OF INDUSTRIAL VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) EMISSIONS BY CATALYTIC INCINERATION. VOLUME 9. QUALITY ASSURANCE  

EPA Science Inventory

Radian Corporation, under contract to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, performed site selection, test plan development, and performance tests of catalytic incinerators used for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions control at industrial sites. VOC emissions are of co...

378

Study and Development of Metal Oxide Reactive Adsorbents for the Destruction of Toxic Organic Compounds.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The achievements realized during the course of this project provide an important alternative method for mitigating the effects of the exposure of personnel and systems to chemical warfare agents and other toxic organic compounds. The research program that...

M. B. Mitchell

2008-01-01

379

Prediction of Chemical Reactivity Parameters and Physical Properties of Organic Compounds from Molecular Structure Using Sparc.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses...

S. H. Hilal S. W. Karickhoff L. A. Carreira

2003-01-01

380

HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS AND MICELLAR PARTITIONING OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SURFACTANT SOLUTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into surfactant micelles affects the apparent vapor-liquid equilibrium of VOCs in surfactant solutions. This partitioning will complicate removal of VOCs from surfactant solutions by standard separation processes. Headspace expe...

381

Ambient Organic Compounds in the Tropics and their Relationship to Microbial Effects.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Army Tropic Test Center identified ambient levels of organic compounds and determined their relationship to fungus growth and materials deterioration in the Panama Canal Zone. The study was conducted in two parts: a field phase which sampled seven ...

J. F. Sprouse W. F. Lawson

1974-01-01

382

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PERSONAL AIR MONITORS FOR POTENTIAL USE IN AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The open literature, Federal publications, industrial reports, and other sources published between 1975 and 1980 were reviewed for information relevant to personal air samplers potentially useful in sampling organic compounds at ambient levels (50-200 ppt). Seventy one references...

383

PREDICTION OF THE VAPOR PRESSURE, BOILING POINT, HEAT OF VAPORIZATION AND DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The prototype computer program SPARC has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC solute-solute physical process models have been developed and tested...

384

METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND OTHER SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HOUSE DUST  

EPA Science Inventory

Analytical methods were validated to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and other semivolatile organic compounds in house dust. e also examined the storage stability of three potential markers (solanesol, nicotine, and continine) for particulate-phase environmental ...

385

Compendium of methods for the determination of toxic organic compounds in ambient air  

SciTech Connect

Determination of toxic organic compounds in ambient air is a complex task, primarily because of the wide variety of compounds of interest and the lack of standardized sampling and analysis procedures. This compendium of methods was prepared to provide current, peer-reviewed procedures in a standardized, written format for measuring toxic organic pollutants of primary importance in ambient air. The various methods provide both sampling and analytical procedures for a variety of pollutants, including pesticides, PCBs, formaldehyde and other aldehydes, phosgene, n-nitrosodimethylamine, cresol/phenol, dioxin, non-speciated non-methane organic compounds, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and various other volatile nonpolar organic compounds. The compendium is a consolidation and republishing of Methods T01-105 from the original Compendium (EPA 600/4-84-041), Methods T06-T09 from the First Supplement (EPA-600/4-87-006), and T010-T014 from the Second Supplement (EPA-600/4-89/018).

Riggin, R.M.; Winberry, W.T.; Murphy, N.T.

1988-06-01

386

SOIL SORPTION OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN A MIXTURE  

EPA Science Inventory

Studies were conducted to evaluate lipophilicity as a predictor sorption for a mixture of organic compounds with high vapor pressures commonly present at hazardous waste sites. Sorption partition coefficients (Kp) for the mixture of 16 volatile and semivolatile ...

387

Detection, Composition and Treatment of Volatile Organic Compounds from Waste Treatment Plants  

PubMed Central

Environmental policies at the European and global level support the diversion of wastes from landfills for their treatment in different facilities. Organic waste is mainly treated or valorized through composting, anaerobic digestion or a combination of both treatments. Thus, there are an increasing number of waste treatment plants using this type of biological treatment. During waste handling and biological decomposition steps a number of gaseous compounds are generated or removed from the organic matrix and emitted. Different families of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) can be found in these emissions. Many of these compounds are also sources of odor nuisance. In fact, odors are the main source of complaints and social impacts of any waste treatment plant. This work presents a summary of the main types of VOC emitted in organic waste treatment facilities and the methods used to detect and quantify these compounds, together with the treatment methods applied to gaseous emissions commonly used in composting and anaerobic digestion facilities.

Font, Xavier; Artola, Adriana; Sanchez, Antoni

2011-01-01

388

Tunable ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence detection of trace plastics and dissolved organic compounds in water  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed a tunable (220-285-nm) UV and fixed 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system using a spectrometer and a cooled CCD imaging detector to measure the excitation-emission matrix spectra of various compounds in water, including quinine sulfate and plastic compound bisphenol-A. The LIF instrument was used for the fast, nonspecific determination of trace amounts of dissolved organic compounds present in natural

Vasanthi Sivaprakasam; Dennis K. Killinger

2003-01-01

389

Gas and particulate-phase specific tracer and toxic organic compounds in environmental tobacco smoke  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cigarette smoke constituents are worthy of concern and characterized as carcinogens. Different experiment conditions may affect the environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) constituents. A study was undertaken in a 75.5-m3 spare office to evaluate ETS constituents in a real environment. Thirty-four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including three ETS tracers: nicotine, 2,5-dimethylfuran and 3-ethenylpyridine (3-EP), 19 carbonyl compounds, 54 semi-volatile compounds (24

Xinhui Bi; Guoying Sheng; Yanli Feng; Jiamo Fu; Juexin Xie

2005-01-01

390

Batch biodegradation of industrial organic compounds using mixed liquor from different POTWs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared the levels at which organic compounds could be biologically treated by the mixed liquor from different publicly owned treatment works (POTWs). Experiments conducted using several 5-L batch reactors involved degradation of single compounds and mixtures of compounds with two different mixed liquors. One mixed liquor came from a municipal treatment plant with a throughput of 9.5 ML\\/d

Lewandowski

2009-01-01

391

40 CFR 60.582 - Standard for volatile organic compounds.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Flexible Vinyl and Urethane Coating and Printing § 60.582 Standard for volatile organic...this subpart shall either: (1) Use inks with a weighted average VOC content less than 1.0 kilogram VOC per kilogram ink solids at each affected facility,...

2013-07-01

392

EFFECTS IN HUMANS OF A VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND MIXTURE: SENSORY  

EPA Science Inventory

Time-course actions for symptoms of the sick building syndrome were derived from 66 healthy males exposed to clean air and a volatile organic (VOC) mixture in separate sessions. he mixture contained 22 VOCs (25 mg/m3 total concentration) commonly found air-borne in new or recentl...

393

Method for Spiking Soil Samples with Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the harmful side effects on indigenous soil microorganisms of two organic solvents, acetone and dichloromethane, that are normally used for spiking of soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for experimental purposes. The solvents were applied in two contamination protocols to either the whole soil sample or 25% of the soil volume, which was subsequently mixed with 75% untreated soil.

Ulla C. Brinch; Flemming Ekelund; Carsten S. Jacobsen

2002-01-01

394

ENZYMATIC PROCESSES USED BY PLANTS TO DEGRADE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

This is a review of recent plant enzyme systems that have been studied in uptake and transformation of organic contaminants. General procedures of plant preparation and enzyme isolation are covered. Six plant enzyme systems have been investigated for activity with selected pollut...

395

Metal-Organic Compounds for Vapor Plating Application.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report covers progress in studies of the feasibility of vapor plating by depositing metals from selected metal-organics. The metals under study include Al, B, Nb, Hf, Mo, Si, Ta, Ti. Relatively pure deposits of Al and B were produced, as well as a pu...

R. L. Mack R. D. Stevenson E. B. Rifkin J. Kozikowski L. M. Niebylski

1965-01-01

396

ORGANIC AND ORGANOTIN COMPOUNDS LEACHED FROM PVC AND CPVC PIPE  

EPA Science Inventory

The primary objective of this research program was to determine whether organotins, contained in heat stabilizers of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and chlorinated polyvinyl chloride (CPVC) pipe, and other organics present in pipe sealing cement solvents may leach into potable water su...

397

Development of a method for determining purgeable organic compounds in solid wastes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: This study was undertaken to develop an improved method for determining the total content of individual volatile organic compounds in industrial solid wastes. The objective was the development of a method that would (1) be applicable to a wide range of specimen matrixes. (2) be applicable to a wide range of purgeable compounds, (3) have a detection range of

J. S. Warner; P. W. Meehan; L. E. Slivon

1982-01-01

398

COMPENDIUM OF METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF TOXIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AMBIENT AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

Determination of toxic organic compounds in ambient air is a complex task, primarily because of the wide variety of compounds of interest and the lack of standardized sampling and analysis procedures. This compendium of methods has been prepared to provide current, peer-reviewed ...

399

SECOND SUPPLEMENT TO COMPENDIUM OF METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF TOXIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AMBIENT AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

Determination of toxic organic compounds in ambient air is a complex task, primarily because of the wide variety of compounds of interest and the lack of standardized sampling and analysis procedures. This methods compendium has been prepared to provide current, written, peer-rev...

400

A methodology for ranking and hazard identification of xenobiotic organic compounds in urban stormwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a novel methodology (RICH, Ranking and Identification of Chemical Hazards) for ranking and identification of xenobiotic organic compounds of environmental concern in stormwater discharged to surface water. The RICH method is illustrated as a funnel fitted with different filters that sort out problematic and hazardous compounds based on inherent physico-chemical and biological properties. The outcomes of the

A. Baun; E. Eriksson; A. Ledin; P. S. Mikkelsen

2006-01-01

401

Distribution of volatile organic compounds during the combustion process in coal-fired power stations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study concerns the distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted during combustion processes in coal-fired power stations. Thermal desorption technique was employed to analyse VOC concentrations in gaseous emissions (trapped onto Carbotrap B sorbent) and solid samples (coal, fly ash and slag). An empirical parameter (Y) was employed to evaluate the relationships between the compounds emitted during a real

G Fernández-Mart??nez; P López-Mah??a; S Muniategui-Lorenzo; D Prada-Rodr??guez; E Fernández-Fernández

2001-01-01

402

FLARES AS A MEANS OF DESTROYING VOLATILE ORGANIC AND TOXIC COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper discusses the use of flares to destroy volatile organic and toxic compounds. Flares are used to destroy industrial gases from which the heating cannot be economically recovered. Results of an EPA investigation of overall flare combustion efficiency and specific compound...

403

Volatile organic compounds in snow in the Quebec-Windsor Corridor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volatile organic compounds (VOC) were determined in snow to investigate the role of the snowpack as an exchange medium for atmospherically active compounds of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. The major question was which VOC species occur in snow and how the species identity and selected concentrations are related to the sampling area and environmental conditions. Samples were collected using a

G. Kos; P. A. Ariya

2010-01-01

404

Individual organic compounds in water extracts from podzolic soils of the Komi Republic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contents of organic compounds in water extracts from organic horizons of loamy soils with different water contents from the medium taiga zone of the Komi Republic were determined by gas-liquid chromatography and chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mass concentration of organic carbon in the extracts was in the range of 290-330 mg/dm3; the mass fraction of the carbon from the identified compounds was 0.5-1.9%. Hydrocarbons made up about 60% of the total identified compounds; acids and their derivatives composed less than 40%. Most of the acids (40-70%) were aliphatic hydroxy acids. The tendencies in the formation of different classes of organic compounds were revealed depending on the degree of the soil hydromorphism. The acid properties of the water-soluble compounds were studied by pK spectroscopy. Five groups of compounds containing acid groups with similar pKa values were revealed. The compounds containing groups with pKa < 4.0 were predominant. The increase in the surface wetting favored the formation of compounds with pKa 3.2-4.0 and 7.4-8.4.

Shamrikova, E. V.; Punegov, V. V.; Gruzdev, I. V.; Vanchikova, E. V.; Vetoshkina, A. A.

2012-10-01

405

DETERMINATION OF POLAR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER BY MEMBRANE PERMEATE AND TRAP GC-MS  

EPA Science Inventory

A novel approach is presented combining semipermeable membranes with the accepted purge and trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology to produce a method of selectively extracting polar, volatile organic compounds from water, particularly those compounds not am...

406

Production of highly charged metal ion beams from organic metal compounds at RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intense beams of highly charged metal ions (e.g., 80 ?A for Fe13+) are successfully extracted from the 18 GHz ECR Ion Source at RIKEN by feeding vapors of organic metal compounds at room temperature into the ECR plasma chamber: by MIVOC method. The beam intensity of particular metal ion is strongly dependent on the microwave power and served compounds.

T. Nakagawa; J. Ärje; Y. Miyazawa; M. Hemmi; T. Chiba; N. Inabe; M. Kase; T. Kageyama; O. Kamigaito; A. Goto; M. G Niimura; Y. Yano

1997-01-01

407

COMPLEXITY OF SOIL ORGANIC MATTER: AMS 14C ANALYSIS OF SOIL LIPID FRACTIONS AND INDIVIDUAL COMPOUNDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiocarbon measurements of different lipid fractions and individual compounds, isolated from soil samples collected on 2 different agricultural long-term study sites, located in the rural area of Rotthalmünster (Germany) and in the city of Halle\\/Saale (Germany), were analyzed to obtain information about sources and the stability of soil organic matter (SOM). Different lipid compound classes were isolated by automated solvent

Janet Rethemeyer; Christiane Kramer; Gerd Gleixner; Guido L B Wiesenberg; Lorenz Schwark; Nils Andersen; Marie-J Nadeau; Pieter M Grootes

408

Study on Determination and Composition of Volatile Organic Compounds of Larix Gmelini Particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The static head space solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) technique was applied to extract the volatile organic compounds of Larix gmelini particles,and the extracting condition was optimized, that is, 40 minute extracting time at 80°C, then 30 minute absorption, 4 minute desorption. The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of Larix gmelini particles were analyzed by head space solid-phase micro-extraction gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (HS-SPME-GC-MS)

Shijing Sun; Jun Shen; Zhiming Liu

2010-01-01

409

The activity and mechanism of uranium oxide catalysts for the oxidative destruction of volatile organic compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium oxide based catalysts have been investigated for the oxidative destruction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to carbon oxides and water. The catalysts have been tested for the destruction of a range of organic compounds at space velocities up to 70000h?1. Destruction efficiencies greater than 99% can be achieved over the appropriate uranium based catalyst in the temperature range 300–450°C.

Stuart H Taylor; Catherine S Heneghan; Graham J Hutchings; Ian D Hudson

2000-01-01

410

Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air of Buildings in Nuclear Power Plants, Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates the composition and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air-conditioned office\\u000a space and low-level waste (LLW) repository sites of nuclear power plants located in Taiwan. Air samples were collected in\\u000a the office space and technical rooms of administration buildings of the three nuclear power plants and in LLW repository site\\u000a using canisters. Thirty-six toxic organic compounds

Ling-Ling Hsieh; Chih-Chung Chang; Usha Sree; Jiunn-Guang Lo

2006-01-01

411

Kinetics of reactions of OH with organic carbonyl compounds in aqueous solution  

Microsoft Academic Search

The OH radical plays an important role in tropospheric chemistry. The OH\\u000a radical is a very strong oxidant and its reactivity contributes to the\\u000a atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds in aqueous\\u000a solution. In this work the temperature dependencies of the rate\\u000a constants for the reactions of OH with the following organic carbonyl\\u000a compounds, ( 1) methyl ethyl ketone (MEK),

S. Gligorovski; H Herrmann

2004-01-01

412

Characterization of the solvent extractable organic compounds in PM2.5 aerosols in Hong Kong  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results from a year-long monthly study of the solvent extractable organic compounds (SEOC) in PM2.5 of the ambient aerosols in Hong Kong are reported. A total of 18 samples were analyzed. The extracted organic compounds were separated into four major fractions (n-alkanes, fatty acids, alkanols and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons)) and identified with GC-MS (gas chromatography–mass spectrometry). The percentage

Mei Zheng; Ming Fang; Fu Wang; K. L. To

2000-01-01

413

Determination of volatile organic compounds and ETS apportionment in 49 homes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forty-nine nonsmoking married women participated in a home personal exposure study for 28 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs). The women were selected and classified according to 18 socioeconomic categories based on age (18–34 y, 35–49 y, 50–64 y), family income ($40K), and husband's smoking status. Of the 29 analytes, 21 demonstrated no statistically significant difference

David L. Heavner; Walter T. Morgan; Michael W. Ogden

1995-01-01

414

Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical potential for the formation of clusters of vapor-phase organic compounds found in indoor air around the [sup 218]PoO[sub x][sup +] ion was investigated as well as which compounds were most likely to form clusters. A compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds has been made for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. Forty-four volatile and semivolatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 that have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the [sup 218]PoO[sub x][sup +] ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones, and the acetates) and the semivolatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos). Although the estimated diameters are consistent with the measured diameters for the unattached fraction, the state of experimental and theoretical knowledge in this area is not sufficiently developed to judge the quantitative validity of these predictions. 48 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Daisey, J.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Hopke, P.K. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States))

1993-07-01

415

Enhanced mineralization of organic compounds in nonaqueous-phase liquids  

SciTech Connect

Biodegradation of phenanthrene, biphenyl, or di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate initially present in a variety of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) was slow in samples of soil and aquifer solids. The NAPLs were hexadecane, dibutyl phthalate, 2, 2, 4 ,4, 6, 8, 8-heptamethylnonane, cyclohexane, commercial oils, crude oil, creosote, and kerosene. Slurrying the soil or aquifer solids markedly enhanced the rate and extent of mineralization of the test compounds initially in many of the NAPLs. Both the low rate and extent of mineralization of the three compounds initially in dibutyl phthalate in soil slurries and of di(2- ethylhexyl) phthalate in heptamethylnonane present in slurries of aquifer solids were increased by inoculation of acclimated microbial cultures. Increasing the NAPL volume decreased phenanthrene biodegradation in soil, but the effect of larger NAPL volume could be alleviated by slurrying and inoculation. The rate or extent of mineralization in aquifer slurries of di(2-ethylhexyi) phthalate initially in some NAPLs was increased by addition of N and P, and inoculation further enhanced the degradation.

Labare, M.P.; Alexander, M.

1995-11-01

416

Enhanced mineralization of organic compounds in nonaqueous-phase liquids  

SciTech Connect

Biodegradation of phenanthrene, biphenyl, or di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate initially present in a variety of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) was slow in samples of soil and aquifer solids. The NAPLs were hexadecane, dibutyl phthalate, 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, cyclohexane, commercial oils, crude oil, creosote, and kerosene. Slurrying the soil or aquifer solids markedly enhanced the rate and extent of mineralization of the test compounds initially in many of the NAPLs. Both the low rae and the extent of mineralization of the three compounds initially in dibutyl phthalate in soil slurries and of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in heptamethylnonane present in slurries of aquifer solids were increased by inoculation of acclimated microbial cultures. Increasing the NAPL volume decreased phenanthrene biodegradation in soil, but the effect of larger NAPL volume could be alleviated by slurrying and inoculation. The rate or extent of mineralization in aquifer slurries of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate initially in some NAPLs was increased by addition of N and P, and inoculation further enhanced the degradation.

Labare, M.P.; Alexander, M. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

1995-02-01

417

Organic solid state switches incorporating porphyrin compounds and method for producing organic solid state optical switches  

DOEpatents

A light-intensity dependent molecular switch comprised of a compound which shuttles an electron or a plurality of electrons from a plurality of electron donors to an electron acceptor upon being stimulated with light of predetermined wavelengths, said donors selected from porphyrins and other compounds, and a method for making said compound are disclosed. 4 figs.

Wasielewski, M.R.; Gaines, G.L.; Niemczyk, M.P.; Johnson, D.G.; Gosztola, D.J.; O`Neil, M.P.

1996-07-23

418

Organic solid state switches incorporating porphyrin compounds and method for producing organic solid state optical switches  

DOEpatents

A light-intensity dependent molecular switch comprised of a compound which shuttles an electron or a plurality of electrons from a plurality of electron donors to an electron acceptor upon being stimulated with light of predetermined wavelengths, said donors selected from porphyrins and other compounds, and a method for making said compound.

Wasielewski, Michael R. (Naperville, IL); Gaines, George L. (River Forest, IL); Niemczyk, Mark P. (Wheaton, IL); Johnson, Douglas G. (Grayslake, IL); Gosztola, David J. (Bolingbrook, IL); O'Neil, Michael P. (San Leandro, CA)

1996-01-01

419

Examination of organic compounds from insoluble organic matter isolated from some Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites by heating experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Insoluble organic matter isolated from five Antarctic CM2 chondrites was heated in a thermal analyzer from room temperature to 800 C under helium atmosphere. Organic compounds from the thermal decomposition of the Yamato-791198 sample were studied by a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The number of compounds identified was over 120, belonging mainly to the two following groups: (1) benzene and naphthalene, and their alkyl derivatives; and (2) sulfur-containing heterocycles and their alkyl derivatives. Small amounts of aliphatic hydrocarbons and nitriles were also detected. Relative amounts of compounds released from the five chondrite samples were monitored by the MS with increasing temperature. Yamato-74662 and Yamato-791198 showed organic compounds mainly over the temperature range of 300-600 C, while the other three (Yamato-793321, Yamato-86720, and Belgica-7904) did not show any, except small amounts of benzene. These results indicate that the insoluble organics in Yamato-74662 and Yamato-791198 possess a thermally labile organic fraction, whereas those in Yamato-793321, Yamato-86720, and Belgica-7904 do not and are graphitic. The difference between the insoluble organic fractions may be related to aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism on the parent bodies.

Komiya, M.; Shimoyama, A.; Harada, K.

1993-02-01

420

Fate of pharmaceutical and trace organic compounds in three septic system plumes, Ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

Three high volume septic systems in Ontario, Canada, were examined to assess the potential for onsite wastewatertreatment systems to release pharmaceutical compounds to the environment and to evaluate the mobility of these compounds in receiving aquifers. Wastewater samples were collected from the septic tanks, and groundwater samples were collected below and down gradient of the infiltration beds and analyzed for a suite of commonly used pharmaceutical and trace organic compounds. The septic tank samples contained elevated concentrations of several pharmaceutical compounds. Ten of the 12 compounds analyzed were detected in groundwater at one or more sites at concentrations in the low ng L(-1) to low microg L(-1) range. Large differences among the sites were observed in both the number of detections and the concentrations of the pharmaceutical compounds. Of the compounds analyzed, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, and naproxen were observed to be transported atthe highest concentrations and greatest distances from the infiltration source areas, particularly in anoxic zones of the plumes. PMID:18497127

Carrara, Cherilyn; Ptacek, Carol J; Robertson, William D; Blowes, David W; Moncur, Michael C; Sverko, Ed; Backus, Sean

2008-04-15

421

Volatile C 1-C 7 organic compounds in surface sediments from Walvis Bay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

C 1-C 7 volatile organic compounds were analyzed in three gravity cores taken from Walvis Bay shelf. The compounds detected included alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, i- and n-butane, and i- and n-pentane, and heptane), alkenes (2-methyl-2-butene, dimethylcyclopentenes, cyclohexene), oxygen containing compounds (2- and 3-methylfuran, 2,5-dimethylfuran, 2- and 3-methylbutanal and 3-pentanone), sulfur compounds (dimethylsulfide, thiophene, 2- and 3-methylthiophene) and aromatic compounds (benzene and toluene). In situ biological and low temperature chemical (less than 15°C) formation processes are proposed, possibly from marine terpene precursors. Subsequent to this work, these compounds were found to be widely distributed in surface gravity cores from other areas. Many of these compounds do not survive deeper burial. Furans, ketocompounds, and alkenes are generally not found in more than trace quantities in deeper (?10m subbottom) DSDP cores we have examined from other areas.

Whelan, Jean K.; Hunt, John M.; Berman, Jeffrey

1980-11-01

422

Variable emissions of microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) from root-associated fungi isolated from Scots pine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soils emit a large variety of volatile organic compounds. In natural ecosystems, measurements of microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) exchange rates between soil and atmosphere are difficult due to e.g. the spatial heterogeneity of the belowground organisms, and due to the many potential sources for the same compounds. We measured in laboratory conditions the MVOC emission rates and spectra of

Jaana Bäck; Hermanni Aaltonen; Heidi Hellén; Maija K. Kajos; Johanna Patokoski; Risto Taipale; Jukka Pumpanen; Jussi Heinonsalo

2010-01-01

423

Solvent-based dissolution method to sample gas-phase volatile organic compounds for compound-specific isotope analysis.  

PubMed

An investigation was carried out to develop a simple and efficient method to collect vapour samples for compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) by bubbling vapours through an organic solvent (methanol or ethanol). The compounds tested were benzene and trichloroethylene (TCE). The dissolution efficiency was tested for different air volume injections, using flow rates ranging from 25ml/min to 150ml/min and injection periods varying between 10 and 40min. Based on the results, complete mass recovery for benzene and TCE in both solvents was observed for the flow rates of 25 and 50ml/min. However, small mass loss was observed at increased flow rate. At 150ml/min, recovery was on average 80±17% for benzene and 84±10% for TCE, respectively in methanol and ethanol. The ?(13)C data measured for benzene and TCE dissolved in both solvents were reproducible and were stable independently of the volume of air injected (up to 6L) or the flow rate used. The stability of ?(13)C values hence underlines no isotopic fractionation due to compound-solvent interaction or mass loss. The development of a novel and simple field sampling technique undertaken in this study will facilitate the application of CSIA to diverse gas-phase volatile organic compound studies, such as atmospheric emissions, soil gas or vapour intrusion. PMID:24360256

Bouchard, Daniel; Hunkeler, Daniel

2014-01-17

424

Hot-atom synthesis of organic compounds on Jupiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of recent laboratory 'simulations' of photochemical processes on Jupiter are combined with available data on mixing rates and exposure times in the Jovian atmosphere to give quantitative predictions of the rate at which hot-atom reactions produce organic molecules. It is shown that abstraction reactions on methane by hot H atoms from solar UV photolysis of H2S will produce no more than 4 times 10 to the -17th power g/sq cm/sec for a steady-state mole fraction of total organics of approximately 10 to the -16th power. This is roughly 10 to the 7th power times less than the limit of detection of the most sensitive gas analysis experiments ever flown on a spacecraft. By far the most common organic molecule produced by this mechanism is CH3SH, methyl mercaptan, which is produced at a rate at least 600 times smaller than the rate of production of ethane by direct photolysis of CH4 at high altitudes.

Lewis, J. S.; Fegley, B., Jr.

1979-01-01

425

Biosynthesis of polybrominated aromatic organic compounds by marine bacteria.  

PubMed

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated bipyrroles are natural products that bioaccumulate in the marine food chain. PBDEs have attracted widespread attention because of their persistence in the environment and potential toxicity to humans. However, the natural origins of PBDE biosynthesis are not known. Here we report marine bacteria as producers of PBDEs and establish a genetic and molecular foundation for their production that unifies paradigms for the elaboration of bromophenols and bromopyrroles abundant in marine biota. We provide biochemical evidence of marine brominases revealing decarboxylative-halogenation enzymology previously unknown among halogenating enzymes. Biosynthetic motifs discovered in our study were used to mine sequence databases to discover unrealized marine bacterial producers of organobromine compounds. PMID:24974229

Agarwal, Vinayak; El Gamal, Abrahim A; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Poth, Dennis; Kersten, Roland D; Schorn, Michelle; Allen, Eric E; Moore, Bradley S

2014-08-01

426

Volatile organic compounds at a coastal site. 1. Seasonal variations  

SciTech Connect

Alkylaromatics, alkanes, aldehydes, dimethyl polysulfides, and miscellaneous compounds were determined over a 15-month period at a coastal site. Alkylbenzenes appear dominated by anthropogenic inputs and air-sea exchange, with selective biodegradation showing minor effects in the summer. Offshore mixing and adsorption to sediments seems minor. Alkylnaphthalenes showed a contrasting pattern, best explained by a dominant wintertime source such as space heating oil use. Alkanes were frequently petroleum derived, but pentadecane, heptadecane, and pristane showed evidence of strong biogenic sources as well. The aldehydes exhibited complex behavior, with evidence for autooxidative as well as plankton sources. The dimethyl polysulfides had great variability; they may contribute significant sea-to-air sulfur fluxes if our measured levels are typical of the larger coastal region. An incompletely identified octatriene occurs briefly; it may be an algal product related to the pheromone ''fucoserraten''.

Gschwend, P.M.; Zafiriou, O.C.; Mantoura, R.F.C.; Schwarzenbach, R.P.; Gagosian, R.B.

1982-01-01

427

Thermoresponsive organic-inorganic hybrid large-compound vesicles.  

PubMed

Herein, gelated thermoresponsive large-compound vesicles (LCVs) are reported for the first time. The LCVs are prepared by self-assembly of poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly[N-isopropylacrylamide-random-3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate] [PEO-b-P(NIPAM-r-TMPM)] in DMF-water mixture. Then, sol-gel reaction of the reactive PTMPM block is performed to stabilize the LCVs. LCVs with higher cross-linking density keep almost the same size under different temperatures while LCVs with lower cross-linking density display obviously thermoresponsive size transition between 22 and 36 °C. The gelated LCVs exhibit enhanced permeability with temperature elevation and their permeabilities at different temperatures all elevate with increasing the cross-linking density. PMID:23740858

Peng, Bo; Chen, Yongming

2013-07-25

428

Deuterium enrichment by selective photo-induced dissociation of an organic carbonyl compound  

DOEpatents

A method for producing a deuterium enriched material by photoinduced dissociation which uses as the working material a gas phase photolytically dissociable organic carbonyl compound containing at least one hydrogen atom bonded to an atom which is adjacent to a carbonyl group and consisting of molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as deuterium and molecules wherein said hydrogen atom is present as another isotope of hydrogen. The organic carbonyl compound is subjected to intense infrared radiation at a preselected wavelength to selectively excite and thereby induce dissociation of the deuterium containing species to yield a deuterium enriched stable molecular product. Undissociated carbonyl compound, depleted in deuterium, is preferably redeuterated for reuse.

Marling, John B. (Livermore, CA)

1981-01-01

429

Detecting and Eliminating Interfering Organic Compounds in Waters Analyzed for Isotopic Composition by Crds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical spectroscopy based CRDS technology for isotopic analysis of ?D and ?18O directly from liquid water has greatly increased the number and type of liquid samples analyzed. This increase has also revealed a previously unrecognized sample contamination problem. Recently West[1] and Brand[2] identified samples containing ethanol, methanol, plant extracts and other organic compounds analyzed by CRDS and other spectroscopy based techniques as yielding erroneous results for ?D and ?18O (especially ?D) due to spectroscopic interference. Not all organic compounds generate interference. Thus, identifying which samples are contaminated by which organic compounds is of key importance for data credibility and correction. To address this problem a new approach in the form of a software suite, ChemCorrect™, has been developed. A chemometrics component uses a spectral library of water isotopologues and interfering organic compounds to best fit the measured spectra. The best fit values provide a quantitative assay of the actual concentrations of the various species and are then evaluated to generate a visual flag indicating samples affected by organic contamination. Laboratory testing of samples spiked with known quantities of interfering organic compounds such as methanol, ethanol, and terpenes was performed. The software correctly flagged and identified type of contamination for all the spiked samples without any false positives. Furthermore the reported values were a linear function of actual concentration with an R^2>0.99 even for samples which contained multiple organic compounds. Further testing was carried out against a range of industrial chemical compounds which can contaminate ground water as well as a variety of plant derived waters and juices which were also analyzed by IRMS. The excellent results obtained give good insight into which organic compounds cause interference and which classes of plants are likely to contain interfering compounds. Finally approaches to minimize the effect of interfering compounds will be discussed including methods to assess the confidence level of an isotopic value obtained from a contaminated sample. [1] Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2010; 24: 1-7 [2] Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2009; 23: 1879-1884 Results from laboratory samples, most of which were spiked with interfering organic compounds. Samples are color coded as follows: blue=standard, green=no contamination, yellow=slight contamination, red=heavily contaminated.

Richman, B. A.; Hsiao, G. S.; Rella, C.

2010-12-01

430

Chemical evolution and the preservation of organic compounds on Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Several lines of evidence suggest that the environment on early Mars and early Earth were very similar. Since life is abundant on Earth, it seems likely that conditions on early Earth were conducive to chemical evolution and the origin of life. The similarity between early Mars and early Earth encourages the hypothesis that chemical evolution might have also occurred on Mars, but that decreasing temperatures and the loss of its atmosphere brought the evolution to a halt. The possibility of finding on Mars remnants of organic material dating back to this early clement period is addressed.

Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

1989-01-01

431

Cooperative water-SOM interactions derived from the organic compound effect on SOM hydration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interactions of water molecules with soil organic matter (SOM) may affect the ability of SOM to participate in multiple physical, chemical and biological processes. Specifically, water-SOM interactions may have a profound effect on interactions of organic compounds with SOM which is often considered as a major natural sorbent controlling the environmental fate of organic pollutants in the soil environment. Quantification of water - SOM interactions may be carried out by using water vapor sorption isotherms. However, water sorption isotherms providing macroscopic thermodynamic data do not allow examining water-SOM interactions on a microenvironment scale. The examination of water-SOM interactions in a local SOM environment may be carried out by determining the response of the SOM hydration to sorption of probe organic compounds. Recently, the model-free approach was proposed which allows quantifying effects of sorbing organic molecules on water - SOM interactions, by using relatively more available data on the effect of water activity on organic compound - SOM interactions. Therefore, this thermodynamic approach was applied to the experimental data describing sorption of organic compounds by SOM, both from the vapor and liquid phases, at various water activities. Hence, the response of water interactions with the model SOM materials such as a humic acid and an organic matter-rich peat soil to the presence of various organic sorbates was evaluated. Depending on a molecular structure of organic sorbates probing various molecular environments in SOM, the SOM-bound water may be driven in or out of the SOM sorbents. Organic compounds containing the atoms of oxygen, nitrogen or sulfur and preferring a relatively "polar" SOM microenvironment demonstrate the distinct enhancing effect on water-SOM interactions. In contrast, the "low-polarity" organic compounds, e.g., hydrocarbons or their halogen-substituted derivatives, produce a weakening effect on water-SOM interactions. Importantly, the changes in water-SOM interactions induced by the presence of organic compounds may demonstrate the cooperative behavior: (1) several water molecules may be involved in an enhanced hydration of SOM, (2) at the presence of an organic sorbate, interactions of water molecules with SOM enhance the uptake of the following water molecules. The proposed cooperative water-SOM interactions may result from a perturbation of the SOM matrix due to a sorption of organic and water molecules where a partial disrupting of molecular contacts in SOM makes easier the following SOM-water interactions thus promoting the enhanced SOM hydration.

Borisover, Mikhail

2014-05-01

432

Abiotic Synthesis of Organic Compounds from Carbon Disulfide Under Hydrothermal Conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abiotic formation of organic compounds under hydrothermal conditions is of interest to bio, geo-, and cosmochemists. Oceanic sulfur-rich hydrothermal systems have been proposed as settings for the abiotic synthesis of organic compounds. Carbon disulfide is a common component of magmatic and hot spring gases, and is present in marine and terrestrial hydrothermal systems. Thus, its reactivity should be considered as another carbon source in addition to carbon dioxide in reductive aqueous thermosynthesis. We have examined the formation of organic compounds in aqueous solutions of carbon disulfide and oxalic acid at 175°C for 5 and 72 h. The synthesis products from carbon disulfide in acidic aqueous solutions yielded a series of organic sulfur compounds. The major compounds after 5 h of reaction included dimethyl polysulfides (54.5%), methyl perthioacetate (27.6%), dimethyl trithiocarbonate (6.8%), trithianes (2.7%), hexathiepane (1.4%), trithiolanes (0.8%), and trithiacycloheptanes (0.3%). The main compounds after 72 h of reaction consisted of trithiacycloheptanes (39.4%), pentathiepane (11.6%), tetrathiocyclooctanes (11.5%), trithiolanes (10.6%), tetrathianes (4.4%), trithianes (1.2%), dimethyl trisulfide (1.1%), and numerous minor compounds. It is concluded that the abiotic formation of aliphatic straight-chain and cyclic polysulfides is possible under hydrothermal conditions and warrants further studies.

Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

2005-12-01

433

A review of surface-water sediment fractions and their interactions with persistent manmade organic compounds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This paper reviews the suspended and surficial sediment fractions and their interactions with manmade organic compounds. The objective of this review is to isolate and describe those contaminant and sediment properties that contribute to the persistence of organic compounds in surface-water systems. Most persistent, nonionic organic contaminants, such as the chlorinated insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are characterized by low water solubilities and high octanol-water partition coefficients. Consequently, sorptive interactions are the primary transformation processes that control their environmental behavior. For nonionic organic compounds, sorption is primarily attributed to the partitioning of an organic contaminant between a water phase and an organic phase. Partitioning processes play a central role in the uptake and release of contaminants by sediment organic matter and in the bioconcentration of contaminants by aquatic organisms. Chemically isolated sediment fractions show that organic matter is the primary determinant of the sorptive capacity exhibited by sediment. Humic substances, as dissolved organic matter, contribute a number of functions to the processes cycling organic contaminants. They alter the rate of transformation of contaminants, enhance apparent water solubility, and increase the carrying capacity of the water column beyond the solubility limits of the contaminant. As a component of sediment particles, humic substances, through sorptive interactions, serve as vectors for the hydrodynamic transport of organic contaminants. The capabilities of the humic substances stem in part from their polyfunctional chemical composition and also from their ability to exist in solution as dissolved species, flocculated aggregates, surface coatings, and colloidal organomineral and organometal complexes. The transport properties of manmade organic compounds have been investigated by field studies and laboratory experiments that examine the sorption of contaminants by different sediment size fractions. Field studies indicate that organic contaminants tend to sorb more to fine-grained sediment, and this correlates significantly with sediment organic matter content. Laboratory experiments have extended the field studies to a wider spectrum of natural particulates and anthropogenic compounds. Quantitation of isotherm results allows the comparison of different sediment sorbents as well as the estimation of field partition coefficients from laboratory-measured sediment and contaminant properties. Detailed analyses made on the basis of particle-size classes show that all sediment fractions need to be considered in evaluating the fate and distribution of manmade organic compounds. This conclusion is based on observations from field studies and on the variety of natural organic sorbents that demonstrate sorptive capabilities in laboratory isotherm experiments.

Witkowski, P. J.; Smith, J. A.; Fusillo, T. V.; Chiou, C. T.

1987-01-01

434

Speciation of trace organic ligands and inorganic and organometallic compounds in oil shale process waters  

SciTech Connect

The isolation and identification of organic ligands and inorganic and organometallic compounds in seven oil shale process waters has been carried out using a number of analytical techniques. Organic ligands, potentially associated with trace metals in the oil shale process waters, were either isolated, after methylene chloride extraction, by low pressure liquid chromatography or directly derivatized using lyophilized samples and then identified by capillary column gas chromatography in combination with electron impact mass spectrometry. Using these techniques, we were able to identify mono- and dicarboxylic acids, substituted phenols, substituted pyridines, aliphatic nitrogen heterocyclics, and substituted quinoline compounds. The inorganic and organometallic compounds in these process waters were directly separated by high performance liquid chromatography and detected by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (HPLC-GFAA). These initial studies resulted in tentative identification of several inorganic and organoarsenic compounds. A review of our analytical techniques and the identified compounds will be presented in this paper.

Fish, R.H.

1980-06-01

435

Thermochemical and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen compounds found in fossil materials: Status report  

SciTech Connect

Thermochemical and thermophysical data on 24 organic nitrogen-containing compounds found in (or formed during the processing of) alternate fossil fuels are reported here. The data are combined to give ideal gas phase thermodynamic properties for 18 of the compounds. Statistical thermodynamic calculations for six of the compounds are given, and a comparison of statistically calculated values (including those previously published) and the calorimetric values obtained here is made. The results are used to determine the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions necessary for the removal of the nitrogen atom from the molecules. The report concludes with a discussion of future research in the area. This report is the first comprehensive compilation of thermochemical and thermophysical property data on organic nitrogen compounds present in the alternate fossil fuels. Removal of these compounds during processing is necessary for the production of stable, environmentally acceptable products. 71 refs., 11 figs., 13 tabs.

Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Collier, W.B.; Hossenlopp, I.A.; Nguyen, A.; Strube, M.M.

1986-11-01

436

Determination of perfluorinated compounds in aquatic organisms: a review.  

PubMed

Bioaccumulation of PFAS in aquatic organisms is an environmental problem of growing concern around the world. This problem has been tackled by regulatory bodies by proposing EQS for biota in EU water bodies and tolerable daily intake for food. The introduction of regulatory limits requires the availability of harmonised and validated analytical methods of sufficient sensitivity. This paper reviews recent advances in analytical methods for analysis of PFAS in aquatic organisms. The methods available for biota analysis are mostly based on three extraction procedures: ion-pair extraction, solvent liquid extraction, and alkaline digestion. The resulting extracts are then subjected to different clean-up or enrichment steps on solid adsorbents, for example graphitized carbon black, C(18), and WAX phases. All methods reviewed in this work give reliable results but are partially validated only, because of the lack of certified reference materials and regular interlaboratory exercises. The few interlaboratory exercises performed on real unspiked samples did not afford satisfactory results for PFAS other than PFOS, especially for matrices with high lipid content, for example mussels. The reasons for those partially negative results have been identified, and can mainly be attributed to calibration procedures and availability and purity of standards. The urgent need for certified reference materials for this type of analysis is emphasized. PMID:23108980

Valsecchi, Sara; Rusconi, Marianna; Polesello, Stefano

2013-01-01

437

Carbon isotope composition of organic compounds produced by abiotic synthesis under hydrothermal conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although it is widely believed that production of organic compounds by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and related processes occurs in many geologic environments, unambiguous identification of compounds with an abiotic origin in natural samples has been hampered by a lack of means to discriminate between abiotic compounds and organic matter from biological sources. While isotopic compositions might provide a means to discriminate between biologic and non-biologic sources of organic matter, there are few data presently available to constrain the isotopic composition of compounds produced by abiotic processes in geologic systems. Here, we report results of laboratory experiments conducted to evaluate the isotopic composition of organic compounds synthesized abiotically under hydrothermal conditions. We find the organic products are depleted in 13C to a degree typically ascribed to biological processes, indicating that carbon isotopic composition may not be a particularly effective diagnostic means to differentiate between biologic and non-biologic sources. Furthermore, our results suggest that the isotopic compositions of reduced carbon compounds found in many ancient rocks that have heretofore been attributed to biological sources could be consistent with an abiotic origin in a hydrothermal setting.

McCollom, Thomas M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

2006-03-01

438

HS-SPME analysis of volatile organic compounds of coniferous needle litter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The composition of volatile emission of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) and spruce ( Picea exelsa) litter was studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and samples were collected by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method. The list of identified compounds includes over 60 organic substances of different classes. It was established that volatile emission contain not only components of essential oils of pine and spruce needles but also a large number of organic compounds which are probably secondary metabolites of litter-decomposing fungi. They include lower carbonyl compounds and alcohols as well as products of terpene dehydration and oxidation. These data show that the processes of litter decomposition are an important source of reactive organic compounds under canopy of coniferous forests.

Isidorov, V. A.; Vinogorova, V. T.; Rafa?owski, K.

439

Soil Samplers: New Techniques for Subsurface Sampling for Volatile Organic Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil sampling techniques for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the soil that is being sampled. Preventing VOC loss from soil cores that are collected from the subsurface and brought to the surface for subsampling is often difficult. Subsurface bulk sample retrieval systems are designed to obtain intact cylindrical cores of

Susan Sorini; John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

2009-01-01

440

The dynamic adsorption behaviour of volatile organic compounds on activated carbon honeycomb monoliths  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adsorption offers an efficient technology for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from air pollution sources. Often activated carbons (ACs) are employed owing to their large specific surface areas, high micropore volumes, rapid adsorption capabilities and selectivity towards organic molecules compared to water vapour or air. However, when large volumes of gas have to be treated pressure drop limitations may arise

M. Yates; J. Blanco; M. A. Martín-Luengo

2002-01-01

441

Modeling reactive transport of organic compounds in groundwater using a partial redox disequilibrium approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chemical transformation of organic contaminants in natural groundwater systems is clearly dependent upon local geochemistry which determines the thermodynamically favorable degradation reactions and the nature of local microbial populations. Conversely, groundwater geochemistry may be impacted significantly in terms of pH and redox couple speciation by the chemical transformation of sufficient quantities of organic compounds. Therefore an understanding of the

W. W. Jr. McNab; T. N. Narasimhan

1994-01-01

442

Distributions of brominated organic compounds in the troposphere and lower stratosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive suite of brominated organic compounds was measured from whole air samples collected during the 1996 NASA Stratospheric Tracers of Atmospheric Transport aircraft campaign and the 1996 NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics aircraft campaign. Measurements of individual species and total organic bromine were utilized to describe latitudinal and vertical distributions in the troposphere and lower stratosphere, fractional

S. M. Schauffler; E. L. Atlas; D. R. Blake; F. Flocke; R. A. Lueb; J. M. Lee-Taylor; V. Stroud; W. Travnicek

1999-01-01

443

Catalytic Hydrogenation of Organic Compounds without H2 Supply: An Electrochemical System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experiment developed for an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course that can be used to introduce the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, catalysis electrochemical principles and gas chromatography is presented. The organic compounds hydrogenated by the electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) process were styrene, benzaldehyde and…

Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Navarro, Marcelo

2004-01-01

444

Mixing and water-soluble characteristics of particulate organic compounds in individual urban aerosol particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Particulate organic compounds (POCs) in the atmosphere can alter the morphology and hygroscopicity of inorganic particles by coagulation and mixing. Direct observations can illustrate the mixing of organic and inorganic particles. Compositions, mixing states, and morphologies of 360 aerosol particles from urban Beijing collected on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids with Si-O substrate were obtained using TEM coupled with energy-dispersive

Weijun Li; Longyi Shao

2010-01-01

445

EXPERIMENTAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE MASTER ANALYTICAL SCHEME FOR ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER: PART 2. APPENDICES  

EPA Science Inventory

The Master Analytical Scheme (MAS) for Organic Compounds in Water provides for analysis of purgeable and extractable, as well as neutral and ionic-water-soluble, organics in surface and drinking water and in leachates and various effluents. This report describes experiments in th...

446

Hygroscopic properties of levoglucosan and related organic compounds characteristic to biomass burning aerosol particles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomass burning, which is characterized by pyrolysis as well as vaporization and condensation of biomass constituents, is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosols. In this study, hygroscopic properties of five organic compounds (levoglucosan, D-glucose, and vanillic, syringic, and 4-hydroxybenozoic acids), which are major pyrolysis products of wood, were measured using a tandem differential mobility analyzer. Levoglucosan, which is typically

Michihiro Mochida; Kimitaka Kawamura

2004-01-01

447

EXPERIMENTAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE MASTER ANALYTICAL SCHEME FOR ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN WATER: PART 1. TEXT  

EPA Science Inventory

The Master Analytical Scheme (MAS) for Organic Compounds in Water provides for analysis of purgeable and extractable, as well as neutral and ionic-water-soluble, organics in surface and drinking water and in leachates and various effluents. This report describes experiments in th...

448

[Characterization of atmospheric volatile organic compounds in Shenyang, China].  

PubMed

From April, 2008 to July, 2009, 187 atmospheric samples in four different seasons were collected from five sites in Shenyang. The 108 species of VOCs were measured by using the method of pre-concentration-GC-MS. The objectives of this study were to investigate the VOCs pollution level as well as its spatial and temporal distribution, and to identify the main source in Shenyang city. The results showed that the average total mass concentration of VOCs in Shenyang was 371.0 +/- 132.4 microg/m3. The major components were oxygen-containing compounds, halogenated hydrocarbon, alkanes, aromatics and alkenes, which accounted for 57.2%, 20%, 11.4%, 8.5%, and 3.0% of the total mass, respectively. A seasonal variation of VOCs across all the sampling sites was observed, with higher levels in spring and autumn and lower levels in winter and summer. Related with industrial emission, the diurnal variation of the total mean VOCs concentrations at downtown site showed three peaks in winter and two peaks in summer. The VOCs levels in the industrial and downtown areas were higher than those in other areas, with the lowest concentration observed at clean air site with no emission source around. From the results of correlation analysis and concentration ratios analysis, the VOCs pollutants in Shenyang were mainly contributed by automobile exhaust, coal & biofuel combustion, gasoline & solvent evaporation and industrial process. PMID:22165251

Liu, Ya-Ting; Peng, Yue; Bai, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Bao-Sheng; Shi, Jian-Wu; Zhao, Li-Juan

2011-09-01

449

Volatile organic compounds in the air of Izmir, Turkey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A sampling program was conducted to determine the ambient VOC levels in the city of Izmir, Turkey during daytime and overnight periods between mid-August and mid-September 1998. Sampling sites were selected at high-density traffic roads and junctions far from stationary VOC sources. Samples were analyzed for benzene, toluene, m, p-xylene and o-xylene (BTX), alkylbenzenes (ethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene), n-hexane and, n-heptane. Results were compared with similar data from other cities around the world and for probable health dangers and sources of the compounds. Results of this study indicated that Izmir has rather high ambient BTX concentrations compared to many polluted cities in the world. Toluene was the most abundant VOC in Izmir air and was followed by xylenes, benzene and alkylbenzenes, respectively. All were strongly dependent on the expected daily variations of traffic flow in the city. The concentrations of other VOCs correlated well with benzene concentration at most sampling sites, excluding Gumuldur station indicating that ambient VOC levels were mainly affected by motor vehicle emissions. The toluene-to-benzene ratios for urban and non-urban sites were in good agreement with previously reported values, indicating a good relationship between the motor vehicle emissions and ambient VOC levels.

Muezzinoglu, Aysen; Odabasi, Mustafa; Onat, Levent

450

Influence of microbial biomass on the biodegradability of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The influence of different types of inocula as well as the amount of inoculum (microbial biomass) on the biodegradation pattern of acetate, 4-nitrophenol, and the three methoxyaniline isomers was investigated in the Modified OECD test and a NPR guideline. Using sediment of the river Rhine as inoculum 4-nitrophenol could not be degraded, while an inoculum from garden soil gave only 60% degradation in the OECD test. Effluent of an activated sludge plant however was able to degrade 4-nitrophenol at a concentration of 19 mg/l in the OECD test completely. Testing the methoxyanilines for biodegradability it was found that at a low inoculum level (OECD protocol) no degradation of the three compounds occurred. Using activated sludge as inoculum 3- and 4-methoxyaniline could be degraded for 60% respectively completely while 2-methoxyaniline was still refractory to degradation. Measuring the microbial biomass by means of ATP during biodegradation strongly suggested that the microbial flora which rapidly metabolize acetate is quite another microflora than the microflora responsible for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol.

Kool, H.J.

1984-01-01

451

Second supplement to Compendium of methods for the determination of toxic organic compounds in ambient air  

SciTech Connect

This Compendium was prepared to provide regional, state, and local environmental regulatory agencies, as well as other interested parties, with specific guidance on the determination of selected toxic organic compounds in ambient air. The current Compendium consists of fourteen procedures considered to be of primary importance in current toxic organic monitoring efforts. Table 1 summarizes the methods currently in the Compendium. Table 2 presents a partial listing of toxic organic compounds that can be determined using the current set of methods in the Compendium.

Winbery, W.T.; Murphy, N.T.; Riggan, R.M.

1988-06-01

452

Factors affecting bioabsorption, metabolism, and storage of organic compounds by aquatic biota  

SciTech Connect

Biological concentration and transfer of organic chemicals through aquatic food webs can be influenced by a variety of environmental, biological, and biochemical factors. Bioaccumulation can be significantly altered by the presence of suspended matter or complex organic mixtures in the water column. In addition, the bioaccumulation factor of a compound is dependent on the species of an organism, its life stage, and the available food supply. Metabolic changes in structure of absorbed organics can alter both the rate and the mechanism of absorption and elimination of organics. In the case of quinoline absorption by trout, both the rate of absorption and the metabolic disposition depended upon whether exposure was through ingestion or through direct water column exposure. All of these factors can be used to explain why the physical properties of organic compounds (most notably octanol/water partition coefficients) are unreliable predictors of bioaccumulation potential. 24 refs., 1 tab.

Bean, R.M.; Dauble, D.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Chess, E.K.

1985-12-01

453

Hazardous organic compounds in biogas plant end products-Soil burden and risk to food safety.  

PubMed

The end products (digestate, solid fraction of the digestate, liquid fraction of the digestate) of ten biogas production lines in Finland were analyzed for ten hazardous organic compounds or compound groups: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB(7)), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH(16)), bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs), nonylphenols and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NP+NPEOs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Biogas plant feedstocks were divided into six groups: municipal sewage sludge, municipal biowaste, fat, food industry by-products, animal manure and others (consisting of milling by-products (husk) and raw former foodstuffs of animal origin from the retail trade). There was no clear connection between the origin of the feedstocks of a plant and the concentrations of hazardous organic compounds in the digestate. For PCDD/Fs and for DEHP, the median soil burden of the compound after a single addition of digestate was similar to the annual atmospheric deposition of the compound or compound group in Finland or other Nordic countries. For PFCs, the median soil burden was somewhat lower than the atmospheric deposition in Finland or Sweden. For NP+NPEOs, the soil burden was somewhat higher than the atmospheric deposition in Denmark. The median soil burden of PBDEs was 400 to 1000 times higher than the PBDE air deposition in Finland or in Sweden. With PBDEs, PFCs and HBCD, the impact of the use of end products should be a focus of further research. Highly persistent compounds, such as PBDE- and PFC-compounds may accumulate in agricultural soil after repeated use of organic fertilizers containing these compounds. For other compounds included in this study, agricultural use of biogas plant end products is unlikely to cause risk to food safety in Finland. PMID:24593894

Suominen, K; Verta, M; Marttinen, S

2014-09-01

454

Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

1999-01-01

455

Adsorption of volatile organic compounds by metal–organic frameworks MIL101: Influence of molecular size and shape  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adsorption of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on metal–organic frameworks MIL-101, a novel porous adsorbent with extremely large Langmuir surface area of 5870m2\\/g and pore volume of 1.85cm3\\/g, and the influence of VOC molecular size and shape on adsorption were investigated in this study. We observed that MIL-101 is a potential superior adsorbent for the sorptive removal of VOCs including

Kun Yang; Qian Sun; Feng Xue; Daohui Lin

2011-01-01

456

An ultraviolet Raman wavelength for the in-situ analysis of organic compounds relevant to astrobiology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A UV Raman instrument holds great promise for future in-situ astrobiology investigations on Mars and elsewhere in the solar system due to its potential for high organic sensitivity, stand-off detection, and detection on unprepared samples. We characterize the fluorescence spectra of a range of organic compounds including amino acids, fatty acids, alkanes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at three UV excitations to determine at what Raman excitation fluorescence is minimized. Both Raman and fluorescence measurements indicate that a Raman instrument operati