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Sample records for n-ge ii change

  1. Electron spin resonance of interacting spins in n-Ge: II. Change in the width and shape of lines

    SciTech Connect

    Veinger, A. I.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Tisnek, T. V. Goloshchapov, S. I.

    2008-11-15

    The effect of spin interaction on the width and shape of the electron spin resonance line in compensated and uncompensated n-Ge:As has been studied. It is shown that, in the case of a magnetic field oriented along the [100] axis, the width of the resonance line decreases irrespective of the degree of compensation as the critical concentration of the insulator-metal transition is approached, owing to enhancement of the exchange interaction of spins and to an increase in the spin relaxation time. When the magnetic field is directed along other axes, an additional line broadening appears in compensated samples. This broadening is determined by the influence exerted on the g factor by fluctuations of the internal electrostatic field via the stresses generated by these fluctuations. For well-conducting samples, in which the thickness of the skin layer becomes smaller than that of the sample, the line takes on an asymmetric (Dysonian) shape. In this case, the ratio between the wings of the derivative, characteristic of this line shape, is determined by the ratio between the rates of spin diffusion and spin relaxation.

  2. Properties of Si{sub n}, Ge{sub n}, and Si{sub n}Ge{sub n} clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yi; Rehman, Habib ur; Springborg, Michael

    2015-01-22

    The structures of Si{sub n}, Ge{sub n}, and Si{sub n}Ge{sub n} clusters with up to 44 atoms have been determined theoretically using an unbiased structure-optimization method in combination with a parametrized, density-functional description of the total energy for a given structure. By analyzing the total energy in detail, particularly stable clusters are identified. Moreover, general trends in the structures are identified with the help of specifically constructed descriptors.

  3. Donor-vacancy pairs in irradiated n-Ge: A searching look at the problem

    SciTech Connect

    Emtsev, Vadim; Oganesyan, Gagik

    2014-02-21

    The present situation concerning the identification of vacancy-donor pairs in irradiated n-Ge is discussed. The challenging points are the energy states of these defects deduced from DLTS spectra. Hall effect data seem to be at variance with some important conclusions drawn from DLTS measurements. Critical points of the radiation-produced defect modeling in n-Ge are highlighted.

  4. Photoinduced changes in photosystem II pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Atanaska S.; Busheva, Mira C.; Stoitchkova, Katerina V.; Tzonova, Iren K.

    2010-11-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus in higher plants performs two seemingly opposing tasks: efficient harvest of sunlight, but also rapid and harmless dissipation of excess light energy as heat to avoid deleterious photodamage. In order to study this process in pigment-protein supercomplexes of photosystem II (PSII), 77 K fluorescence and room temperature resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy were applied to investigate the changes in structure and spectral properties of the pigments in spinach PSII membranes. The high-light treatment results in a strong quenching of the fluorescence (being largest when the excitation is absorbed by carotenoids) and a red-shift of the main maximum. Decomposition of the fluorescence spectra into four bands revealed intensive quenching of F685 and F695 bands, possible bleaching of chlorophyll a, enhanced extent of light harvesting complexes (LHCII) aggregation and increased energy transfer to aggregated LHCII. The analysis of RR spectra revealed the predominant contribution of ß-carotene (ß-Car) upon 457.8 and 488 nm excitations and lutein (Lut) at 514.5 nm. During prolonged exposure to strong light no significant bleaching of ß-Car and weak photobleaching of Lut is observed. The results will contribute to the efforts to produce more efficient and robust solar cells when exposed to fluctuations in light intensity.

  5. Metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy of narrow-band distributed Bragg reflectors realized by GaN:Ge modulation doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Christoph; Lesnik, Andreas; Zettler, Thomas; Schmidt, Gordon; Veit, Peter; Dadgar, Armin; Bläsing, Jürgen; Christen, Jürgen; Strittmatter, André

    2016-04-01

    We report on metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) applying a periodic modulation of the GaN doping concentration only. The doping modulation changes the refractive index of GaN via the Burstein-Moss-effect. MOVPE growth of highly doped GaN:Ge and modulation of the dopant concentration by at least two orders of magnitude within few nanometers is required to achieve a refractive index contrast of 2-3%. Such modulation characteristic is achieved despite the presence of Ge memory effects and incorporation delay. We realized DBRs with up to 100 layer pairs by combining GaN:Ge with a nominal doping concentration of 1.6×1020 cm-3 as low-refractive index material with unintentionally doped GaN as high-refractive index layer. Scanning transmission electron microscope images reveal DBR structures with abrupt interfaces and homogenous layer thicknesses in lateral and vertical direction. Reflectance measurements of DBRs designed for the blue and near UV-spectral region show a narrow stopband with a maximum reflectivity of 85% at 418 nm and even 95% at 370 nm. InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well structures grown on top of such DBRs exhibit narrow emission spectra with linewidths below 3 nm and significantly increased emission intensity.

  6. Properties of n-Ge epilayer on Si substrate with in-situ doping technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Hao, Huang; Cheng, Li; Cheng-Zhao, Chen; Chen, Wang; Wen-Ming, Xie; Shu-Yi, Lin; Ming, Shao; Ming-Xing, Nie; Cai-Yun, Chen

    2016-06-01

    The properties of n-Ge epilayer deposited on Si substrate with in-situ doping technology in a cold-wall ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHVCVD) system are investigated. The growth temperature of ∼500 °C is optimal for the n-Ge growth in our equipment with a phosphorus concentration of ∼1018 cm‑3. In the n-Ge epilayer, the depth profile of phosphorus concentration is box-shaped and the tensile strain of 0.12% confirmed by x-ray diffraction measurement is introduced which results in the red shift of the photoluminescence. The enhancements of photoluminescence intensity with the increase of the doping concentration are observed, which is consistent with the modeling of the spontaneous emission spectrum for direct transition of Ge. The results are of significance for guiding the growth of n-Ge epilayer with in-situ doping technology. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632103), the National Key Technology Support Program of China (Grant No. 2015BAF24B01), the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province of China (Grant No. 2016J05147), the Key Sci-Tech Research and Development Platform of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2014H2002), the Provincial University Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. JK2013030), the Educational Youth Key Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. JA13210), and the Scientific Research Fund of Fujian University of Technology, China (Grant No. GY-Z14073).

  7. Platinum-assisted post deposition annealing of the n-Ge/Y2O3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, C.; Bethge, O.; Lutzer, B.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2016-07-01

    The impact of annealing temperature and annealing duration on the interface properties of n-Ge/Y2O3/Pt MOS-capacitors is investigated employing an ultrathin catalytically acting Pt-layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis has been used to verify an enhanced growth of GeO2 and thermally stabilizing yttrium germanate at the n-Ge/Y2O3 interface induced by an oxygen post deposition annealing (PDA). Especially at 500 °C and 550 °C high quality Ge/Y2O3 interfaces have been achieved resulting in very low interface trap density of 7.41*1010 eV‑1 cm‑2. It is shown that either a short oxygen annealing at higher temperatures (550 °C) or a long time annealing at lower temperatures (450 °C) are appropriate to realize low interface trap density (D it). It turns out that a Pt-assisted PDA in combination with a final PMA are needed to reduce hysteresis width significantly and to bring flat band voltages toward ideal values.

  8. Inflammatory changes in vitiligo: stage I and II depigmentation.

    PubMed

    Sharquie, Khalifa E; Mehenna, Shihab H; Naji, Abbas A; Al-Azzawi, Hani

    2004-04-01

    Frequent failure of early studies to demonstrate inflammatory changes in vitiligo led many investigators to consider the disease as noninflammatory. However, others found an inflammatory element in vitiliginous lesions. In this study we tried to verify that assumption. Twenty-five patients (10 males and 15 females) with common vitiligo and 11 normal healthy individuals were included. Histopathologic studies were carried out using epon-embedded sections stained with modified toluidine blue stain. Comparisons of the results of histopathologic examination of the stained specimens of vitiliginous lesions (both stage I and II), marginal areas, and uninvolved normal skin of vitiligo patients with normal healthy control were performed. Focal spongiosis was observed in 48% of the specimens of vitiligo patients and largely limited to the marginal areas and stage I vitiligo lesions. Epidermal mononuclear cell infiltration was seen in 80% of both the marginal areas and stage I vitiligo specimens. The number of these cells was significantly higher than that in stage II lesions and uninvolved skin. Many of the epidermotropic lymphocytes were grouped together, forming clusters resembling Pautrier microabscesses. The extent of epidermal mononuclear cell invasion did not always parallel the density of the subjacent dermal infiltrate. Vitiligo is an inflammatory disease, and the epidermal lymphocytic infiltration is most likely the primary immunologic event. PMID:15024191

  9. Junction parameters and characterization of Au/n-Ge15In5Se80/p-Si/Al heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nahass, M. M.; Ali, M. H.; El-Shazly, E. A. A.; Zedan, I. T.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of the electrical properties of Au/n-Ge15In5Se80/p-Si/Al heterojunction is examined. I- V characteristics show diode-like behavior. The series resistance is found to decrease with increasing the temperature in three different methods of calculations. The thermionic emission mechanism is found to be the operating mechanism at relatively low forward voltages ( V < 0.25). While, at relatively high forward voltage, the space charge limited conduction is the operating mechanism. The rectification ratio, ideality factor, barrier height, total trap concentration and built-in voltage are determined. The capacitance-voltage ( C- V) characteristics of Au/n-Ge15In5Se80/p-Si/Al heterojunction are also investigated. The I- V curve of the Au/n-Ge15In5Se80/p-Si/Al heterojunction in the dark and after illumination is clarified.

  10. Ohmic contact formation of metal/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge junctions with an anomalous modulation of Schottky barrier height

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hanhui; Wang, Peng; Qi, Dongfeng; Li, Xin; Han, Xiang; Wang, Chen; Chen, Songyan Li, Cheng; Huang, Wei

    2014-11-10

    The modulation of Schottky barrier height of metal/Ge inserting an amorphous Ge layer has been demonstrated. It is interested that the Schottky barrier height of Al/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge junctions is oscillated with increase of the a-Ge thickness from 0 to 10 nm, and when the thickness reaches above 10 nm, the Al/amorphous-Ge/n-Ge shows ohmic characteristics. Electron hopping through localized states of a-Ge layer, the alleviation of metal induced gap states, as well as the termination of dangling bonds at the amorphous-Ge/n-Ge interface are proposed to explain the anomalous modulation of Schottky barrier height.

  11. Thermal bleaching induced changes in photosystem II function not reflected by changes in photosystem II protein content of Stylophora pistillata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeans, J.; Szabó, M.; Campbell, D. A.; Larkum, A. W. D.; Ralph, P. J.; Hill, R.

    2014-03-01

    Scleractinian corals exist in a symbiosis with marine dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium that is easily disrupted by changes in the external environment. Increasing seawater temperatures cause loss of pigments and expulsion of the symbionts from the host in a process known as coral bleaching; though, the exact mechanism and trigger of this process has yet to be elucidated. We exposed nubbins of the coral Stylophora pistillata to bleaching temperatures over a period of 14 daylight hours. Fifty-nine percent of the symbiont population was expelled over the course of this short-term treatment. Maximum quantum yield ( F V/ F M) of photosystem (PS) II for the in hospite symbiont population did not change significantly over the treatment period, but there was a significant decline in the quantity of PSII core proteins (PsbA and PsbD) at the onset of the experimental increase in temperature. F V/ F M from populations of expelled symbionts dropped sharply over the first 6 h of temperature treatment, and then toward the end of the experiment, it increased to an F V/ F M value similar to that of the in hospite population. This suggests that the symbionts were likely damaged prior to expulsion from the host, and the most damaged symbionts were expelled earlier in the bleaching. The quantity of PSII core proteins, PsbA and PsbD, per cell was significantly higher in the expelled symbionts than in the remaining in hospite population over 6-10 h of temperature treatment. We attribute this to a buildup of inactive PSII reaction centers, likely caused by a breakdown in the PSII repair cycle. Thus, thermal bleaching of the coral S. pistillata induces changes in PSII content that do not follow the pattern that would be expected based on the results of PSII function.

  12. Reactivity Studies on a Binuclear Ruthenium(0) Complex Equipped with a Bridging κ(2)N,Ge-Amidinatogermylene Ligand.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; Fernández-Colinas, José M; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Pérez-Carreño, Enrique; Polo, Diego

    2015-05-18

    The amidinatogermylene-bridged diruthenium(0) complex [Ru2{μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}(CO)7] (2; (i)Pr2bzam = N,N'-bis(iso-propyl)benzamidinate; HMDS = N(SiMe3)2) reacted at room temperature with (t)BuNC and PMe3 to give [Ru2{μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}(L)(CO)6] (L = (t)BuNC, 3; PMe3, 4), which contain the new ligand in an axial position on the Ru atom that is not attached to the amidinato fragment. At 70 °C, 2 reacted with PPh3, PMe3, dppm, and dppe to give the equatorially substituted derivatives [Ru2{μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}(L)(CO)6] (L = PPh3, 5; PMe3, 6) and [Ru2{μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}(μ-κ(2)P,P'-L2)(CO)5] (L2 = dppm, 7; dppe, 8). HSiEt3 and HSnPh3 were oxidatively added to complex 2 at 70 °C, leading to the coordinatively unsaturated products [Ru2(ER3)(μ-H){μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}(CO)5] (ER3 = SiEt3, 9; SnPh3, 10), which easily reacted with (t)BuNC and CO to give the saturated derivatives [Ru2(ER3)(μ-H){μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}((t)BuNC)(CO)5] (ER3 = SiEt3, 11; SnPh3, 12) and [Ru2(ER3)(μ-H){μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}(CO)6] (ER3 = SiEt3, 13; SnPh3, 14), respectively. Compounds 9-14 have their ER3 group on the Ru atom that is not attached to the amidinato fragment. In contrast, the reaction of 2 with H2 at 70 °C led to the unsaturated tetranuclear complex [Ru4(μ-H)2{μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}2(CO)10] (15), which also reacted with (t)BuNC and CO to give the saturated derivatives [Ru4(μ-H)2{μ-κ(2)Ge,N-Ge((i)Pr2bzam)(HMDS)}2(L)2(CO)10] (L = (t)BuNC, 16; CO, 17). All tetraruthenium complexes contain an unbridged metal-metal connecting two germylene-bridged diruthenium units. Under CO atmosphere, complex 17 reverted to compound 2. All of the coordinatively unsaturated products (9, 10, and 15) have their unsaturation(s) located on the Ru atom(s) that is(are) attached to the amidinato fragment(s). In the absence of added reagents, the thermolysis of 2 in refluxing toluene led to [Ru4{

  13. Morphological changes of V-79 cells after equinatoxin II treatment.

    PubMed

    Batista, U; Jezernik, K

    1992-02-01

    Morphological observations on the V-79-379 A cells after treatment with equinatoxin II (EqT II), isolated from the sea anemone Actina equina L., and fetal calf serum (FCS) treated toxin were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the cells incubated with FCS treated EqT II were almost ultrastructurally unaltered. When the cells were treated with low concentrations of EqT II alone cell ultrastructure was altered with the evidence of numerous blebs and decreased microvilli number on the cell surface and appearance of numerous vesicles in the Golgi regions. High concentrations of EqT II caused disintegration of plasmalemma and intracellular membranes as well as degradation of cytosol. PMID:1348018

  14. Fundus changes in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II: vitreous fluorophotometry.

    PubMed Central

    Raines, M F; Duvall-Young, J; Short, C D

    1989-01-01

    We have described a complex abnormality of retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis (MCGN) type II. Patients with MCGN type II were examined by vitreous fluorophotometry which reveals that there is a breakdown of the blood retinal barrier (BRB) in those patients with the typical fundus lesions. The function of this barrier was calculated as a penetration ratio and was statistically greater in these patients when compared with a group of (a) normal persons, (b) patients with drusen, and (c) patients with other forms of glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:2605145

  15. Angiotensin II prevents hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and vascular changes in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, M.; Mullen, M.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Maruyama, K.; O'Brodovich, H.; Olley, P.M. )

    1988-03-01

    Angiotensin II, a vasoconstrictor, has been previously demonstrated to produce a secondary vasodilatation due to release of prostaglandins. Because of this effect, the authors investigated whether infusion of exogenous angiotensin II via miniosmopumps in rats during a 1-wk exposure to chronic hypobaric hypoxia might prevent pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes. They instrumented the rats with indwelling cardiovascular catheters and compared the hemodynamic and structural response in animals given angiotensin II, indomethacin in addition to angiotensin II (to block prostaglandin production), or saline with or without indomethacin. They then determine whether angiotensin II infusion also prevents acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. They observed that exogenous angiotensin II infusion abolished the rise in pulmonary artery pressure, the right ventricular hypertrophy, and the vascular changes induced during chronic hypoxia in control saline-infused rats with or without indomethacin. The protective effects of angiotensin II was lost when indomethacin was given to block prostaglandin synthesis. During acute hypoxia, both antiotensin II and prostacyclin infusion similarly prevented the rise in pulmonary artery pressure observed in saline-infused rats and in rats given indomethacin or saralasin in addition to angiotensin II. Thus exogenous angiotensin II infusion prevents chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, associated right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes and blocks acute hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and this is likely related to its ability to release vasodilator prostaglandins.

  16. Formation of nickel germanide on SiO{sub 2}-capped n-Ge to lower its Schottky barrier height

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guangyang; Tang, Mengrao; Li, Cheng Huang, Shihao; Lu, Weifang; Wang, Chen; Yan, Guangming; Chen, Songyan

    2013-12-16

    In this Letter, NiGe/SiO{sub 2}/n-Ge ohmic contacts were demonstrated with Ge, rather than Ni, diffusion through the ion-implanted SiO{sub 2} films to form NiGe. The equivalent Schottky barrier height reduced from 0.58 eV for NiGe/n-Ge to ohmic contact. The anomalous diffusion behavior and accumulation of Ge in the SiO{sub 2} near the NiGe/SiO{sub 2} interface can be explained by vacancy-enhanced Ge diffusion. It is proposed that the presence of vacancies and Ge atoms embedded in the SiO{sub 2} layer play a significant role in the current enhancement by generation of multiple levels in the SiO{sub 2} band gap.

  17. Do changes on MCMI-II personality disorder scales in short-term psychotherapy reflect trait or state changes?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) has become an important and commonly used instrument to assess personality functioning. Several studies report significant changes on MCMI personality disorder scales after psychological treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate whether pre-post-treatment changes in 39-session psychodynamic group psychotherapy as measured with the MCMI reflect real personality change or primarily reflect symptomatic state changes. Pre-post-treatment design included 236 psychotherapy outpatients. Personality changes were measured on the MCMI-II and symptomatic state changes on the Symptom Check List 90-R (SCL-90-R). The MCMI Schizoid, Avoidant, Self-defeating, and severe personality disorder scales revealed substantial changes, which could be predicted from changes on SCL-90-R global symptomatology (GSI) and on the SCL-90-R Depression scale. The MCMI Dependent personality score was the only MCMI personality scale showing significant change when the SCL-90-R Depression change score was included as a covariate. Splitting patients into those with and without personality disorders did not change the results. Observed changes on MCMI-II personality disorder scales in short-term psychotherapy reflect change in symptomatic state. The MCMI-II Base Rate cut-off points probably include too many patients, justifying the introduction of new scoring procedures in the MCMI-III. PMID:18389425

  18. Changes in angiotensin II receptor bindings in the hen neurohypophysis before and after oviposition.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Nozaki, Y; Nakagawa-Mizuyachi, K; Nakayama, H; Kawashima, M

    2011-11-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate whether the angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor exists in the plasma membrane fraction of the neurohypophysis in hens, to estimate the time of action of ANG II on the neurohypophysis before and after oviposition, and to examine relationships between the action of ANG II on the neurohypophysis and those of estrogen and prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)) in relation to arginine vasotocin (AVT) release. The specific binding had a binding specificity to chicken ANG II (cANG II), reversibility, and saturation in the [(125)I]cANG II binding assay. Scatchard analysis revealed that the binding sites are of a single class. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) obtained by kinetic analysis and Scatchard analysis suggested a high affinity, and the maximum binding capacity (B(max)) obtained by Scatchard analysis suggested a limited capacity. These results suggest that an ANG II receptor exists in the neurohypophysis of hens. The K(d) and the B(max) value was significantly smaller in laying hens than in nonlaying hens, which suggests that bindings of the cANG II receptor change, depending on the difference in laying condition. Values of the K(d) and the B(max) decreased approximately 15 min before oviposition in laying hens, and decreased 1 h after an intramuscular injection of estradiol-17β and 5 min after an intravenous injection of cANG II in nonlaying hens. The amount of specific binding of PGF(2α) receptor in the neurohypophysis also decreased and AVT concentration in blood increased after the cANG II injection. It seems likely that the action of cANG II in the neurohypophysis increases due to the effect of estrogen approximately 15 min before oviposition, and the cANG II action stimulates AVT release through the increase in the PGF(2α) action in this tissue. PMID:22010242

  19. Rice caryopsis development II: Dynamic changes in the endosperm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoba; Liu, Jinxin; Li, Dongqi; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2016-09-01

    The rice endosperm plays crucial roles in nourishing the embryo during embryogenesis and seed germination. Although previous studies have provided the general information about rice endosperm, a systematic investigation throughout the entire endosperm developmental process is still lacking. In this study, we examined in detail rice endosperm development on a daily basis throughout the 30-day period of post-fertilization development. We observed that coenocytic nuclear division occurred in the first 2 days after pollination (DAP), cellularization occurred between 3 and 5 DAP, differentiation of the aleurone and starchy endosperm occurred between 6 and 9 DAP, and accumulation of storage products occurred concurrently with the aleurone/starchy endosperm differentiation from 6 DAP onwards and was accomplished by 21 DAP. Changes in cytoplasmic membrane permeability, possibly caused by programmed cell death, were observed in the central region of the starchy endosperm at 8 DAP, and expanded to the whole starchy endosperm at 21 DAP when the aleurone is the only living component in the endosperm. Further, we observed that a distinct multi-layered dorsal aleurone formed near the dorsal vascular bundle, while the single- or occasionally two-cell layered aleurone was located in the lateral and ventral positions of endosperm. Our results provide in detail the dynamic changes in mitotic divisions, cellularization, cell differentiation, storage product accumulation, and programmed cell death that occur during rice endosperm development. PMID:27449987

  20. Mitochondrial myopathy, cardiomyopathy, and pontine signal changes in an adult patient with isolated complex II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sonam, Kothari; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B; Nalini, Atchayaram; Govindaraju, Chikkanna; Aravinda, Hanumanthapura R; Khan, Nahid Akthar; Thangaraj, Kumaraswamy; Gayathri, Narayanappa

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial disorders resulting from an isolated deficiency of complex II of the respiratory chain is rarely reported. The phenotypic spectrum associated with these disorders is heterogeneous and still expanding. This report describes a patient who presented with myopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and pontine signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging. Muscle biopsy showed total absence of succinate dehydrogenase on enzyme histochemistry, negative succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA) activity on immunohistochemistry, and ultrastructural evidence of mitochondrial aggregates of varying sizes confirming the diagnosis of complex II deficiency. A unique phenotype with complex II deficiency is reported. PMID:25415517

  1. Microstructure and density changes in Li 2O during irradiation in BEATRIX-II, Phase I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tadashi; Noda, Kenji; Slagle, O. D.; Hobbs, F. D.

    1996-10-01

    BEATRIX-II Phase I and II were in-situ tritium recovery experiments to characterize the behavior of ceramic breeders irradiated to high burn-up using the fast flux test facility (FFTF). A thin-walled, Li 2O-sintered ring specimen and single crystals specimen were irradiated to total lithium burn-ups of about 5 at%. Scanning electron microscopy of the ring specimen in Phase II revealed a substantial increase of open porosity and platelet-shaped grains and a decrease in grain size for most parts of the specimens. At the top end of the specimen hexagonal-shaped bubbles were observed in addition to the increase of porosity and the decrease of grain size. The increase of open porosity and the decrease of grain size were considered to arise from a significant link-up of the bubbles. Such increase of open porosity led to volumetric swelling in the order of 20%. Fracture surfaces of the single crystals exhibited morphological changes resembling blisters.

  2. 75 FR 21979 - NRC Region II Address and Main Telephone Number Changes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ..., 5849); 5 U.S.C. 552, 553; Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1980, 45 FR 40561, June 16, 1980. 0 2. In Sec. 1...;having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed #0;to and codified in the Code of... telephone number. The Region II office move and telephone number change will take effect on April 12,...

  3. Electrical characterization of p-GeSn/n-Ge diodes with interface traps under dc and ac regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baert, B.; Gupta, S.; Gencarelli, F.; Loo, R.; Simoen, E.; Nguyen, N. D.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the electrical properties of p-GeSn/n-Ge diodes are investigated in order to assess the impact of defects at the interface between Ge and GeSn using temperature-dependent current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements. These structures are made from GeSn epitaxial layers grown by CVD on Ge with in situ doping by Boron. As results, an average ideality factor of 1.2 has been determined and an activation energy comprised between 0.28 eV and 0.30 eV has been extracted from the temperature dependence of the reverse-bias current. Based on the comparison with numerical results obtained from device simulations, we explain this activation energy by the presence of traps located near the GeSn/Ge interface.

  4. Atlantis II Deep geothermal brine system. Hydrographic situation in 1977 and changes since 1965

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, M.

    1980-02-01

    The geothermal brine system of the Atlantis II Deep in the Red Sea was reinvestigated hydrographically and chemically in November 1977. A comparison with results from earlier investigations confirms an increase of the hot brine volume, as suggested by the 1972 measurements ( SCHOELL, Bundesanstalt für Bodenforschung, Hannover, 1063 pp. 1974). The rate of increase is evidently parallel to the rate of temperature increase. The salinity of the lower brine was nearly constant during this period. The nearby Discovery Deep brine is evidently unaffected by the changes in the Atlantis II Deep as its temperature was constant within ±0.1°C during this time.

  5. Fluorescent Ratiometric Indicators Based on Cu(II)-Induced Changes in Poly(NIPAM) Microparticle Volume

    PubMed Central

    Osambo, John; Seitz, W. Rudolf; Kennedy, Daniel P.; Planalp, Roy P.; Jones, Aaron M.; Jackson, Randy K.; Burdette, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    Microparticles consisting of the thermal responsive polymer N-isopropyl acrylamide (polyNIPAM), a metal ion-binding ligand and a fluorophore pair that undergoes fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been prepared and characterized. Upon the addition of Cu(II), the microparticles swell or contract depending on whether charge is introduced or neutralized on the polymer backbone. The variation in microparticle morphology is translated into changes in emission of each fluorophore in the FRET pair. By measuring the emission intensity ratio between the FRET pair upon Cu(II) addition, the concentration of metal ion in solution can be quantified. This ratiometric fluorescent indicator is the newest technique in an ongoing effort to use emission spectroscopy to monitor Cu(II) thermodynamic activity in environmental water samples. PMID:23337337

  6. Occlusal changes from adolescence to adulthood in untreated patients with Class II Division 1 deepbite malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, I; Lundström, F; Peck, S

    1999-02-01

    A sample of 47 untreated children (M 32:F 15) with Class II Division 1 (II/1) deep-overbite malocclusion was collected from a group of patients who declined orthodontic therapy. Longitudinal records consisted of plaster dental casts and lateral cephalograms at original diagnosis and plaster dental casts at a follow-up observation in adulthood, an average of 11.5 years later. To study retrospectively natural changes in dental occlusion during this interval, plaster-cast millimetric measurements were recorded of sagittal dental relationships (first molar and canine), overjet, overbite, and crowding/spacing at the two registrations. Results showed statistically significant improvements in untreated II/1 deepbite malocclusion from adolescence to adulthood for all measured occlusal variables except development of mild crowding. Therefore, assumptions that untreated II/1 distoclusion will worsen with age appear to be unfounded. The evidence indicates that the absence of orthodontic correction for adolescent patients with Class II Division 1 deepbite malocclusion will not usually lead to measurable occlusal deterioration in young adulthood. PMID:10022182

  7. Single bout of running exercise changes LC3-II expression in rat cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuji; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Naito, Hisashi; Kakigi, Ryo; Kakehashi, Chiaki; Maeda, Seiji; Akema, Tatsuo

    2011-11-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is an intracellular catalytic process. We examined the effect of running exercise, which stimulates cardiac work physiologically, on the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II, an indicator of autophagy, as well as some autophagy-related proteins in rat cardiac muscle. The left ventricles were taken from rats immediately (0 h), and at 0.5h, 1h or 3h after a single bout of running exercise on a treadmill for 30 min and also from rats in a rest condition. In these samples, we evaluated the level of LC3-II and p62, and the phosphorylation level of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Akt and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα) by Western blotting. The exercise produced a biphasic change in LC3-II, with an initial decrease observed immediately after the exercise and a subsequent increase 1h thereafter. LC3-II then returned to the rest level at 3h after the exercise. A negative correlation was found between the LC3-II expression and mTOR phosphorylation, which plays a role in inhibiting autophagy. The exercise increased phosphorylation of AMPKα, which stimulates autophagy via suppression of mTOR phosphorylation, immediately after exercise. The level of p62 and phosphorylated Akt was not altered significantly by the exercise. These results suggest for the first time that a single bout of running exercise induces a biphasic change in autophagy in the cardiac muscle. The exercise-induced change in autophagy might be partially mediated by mTOR in the cardiac muscle. PMID:22005460

  8. Transient Conformational Changes of Sensory Rhodopsin II Investigated by Vibrational Stark Effect Probes.

    PubMed

    Mohrmann, Hendrik; Kube, Ines; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A; Engelhard, Martin; Heberle, Joachim

    2016-05-19

    Sensory rhodopsin II (SRII) is the primary light sensor in the photophobic reaction of the halobacterium Natronomonas pharaonis. Photoactivation of SRII results in a movement of helices F and G of this seven-helical transmembrane protein. This conformational change is conveyed to the transducer protein (HtrII). Global changes in the protein backbone have been monitored by IR difference spectroscopy by recording frequency shifts in the amide bands. Here we investigate local structural changes by judiciously inserting thiocyanides at different locations of SRII. These vibrational Stark probes absorb in a frequency range devoid of any protein vibrations and respond to local changes in the dielectric, electrostatics, and hydrogen bonding. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate the use of Stark probes to test the conformational changes occurring in SRII 12 ms after photoexcitation and later. Thus, a methodology is provided to trace local conformational changes in membrane proteins by a minimal invasive probe at the high temporal resolution inherent to IR spectroscopy. PMID:27111635

  9. PERIOD CHANGE SIMILARITIES AMONG THE RR LYRAE VARIABLES IN OOSTERHOFF I AND OOSTERHOFF II GLOBULAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunder, Andrea; Walker, Alistair; De Propris, Roberto; Stetson, Peter B.; Bono, Giuseppe; Di Cecco, Alessandra; Nemec, James M.; Monelli, Matteo; Cassisi, Santi; Andreuzzi, Gloria; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Zoccali, Manuela

    2011-01-15

    We present period change rates (dP/dt) for 42 RR Lyrae variables in the globular cluster IC 4499. Despite clear evidence of these period increases or decreases, the observed period change rates are an order of magnitude larger than predicted from theoretical models of this cluster. We find that there is a preference for increasing periods, a phenomenon observed in most RR Lyrae stars in Milky Way globular clusters. The period change rates as a function of position in the period-amplitude plane are used to examine possible evolutionary effects in OoI clusters, OoII clusters, field RR Lyrae stars, and the mixed-population cluster {omega} Centauri. It is found that there is no correlation between the period change rate and the typical definition of Oosterhoff groups. If the RR Lyrae period changes correspond with evolutionary effects, this would be in contrast to the hypothesis that RR Lyrae variables in OoII systems are evolved horizontal-branch stars that spent their zero-age horizontal-branch phase on the blue side of the instability strip. This may suggest that age may not be the primary explanation for the Oosterhoff types.

  10. Period Changes of Type II Cepheids in the Globular Cluster M5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Jill M.; Rabidoux, K.; Smith, H. A.; De Lee, N.; Pritzl, B.; Osborn, W.

    2007-05-01

    The observed period changes of a pulsating variable star can, in principle, provide a sensitive test of the movement of the variable through the instability strip of the HR diagram. We revisit the long term period behavior of variables V42 and V84 in M5, making use of new BVI light curves of these type II Cepheids. V42 has shown a small decrease in period since 1889. The period changes of V84 are more difficult to ascertain, with possible short term changes in the observed phase of maximum light. The observed period changes, in both cases based upon observations spanning more than a century, are consistent with the earlier determinations of Coutts Clement & Sawyer Hogg (1977, JRASC, 71, 281). (This research is supported by the College of Science of the Florida Institute of Technology.)

  11. Rapid, dynamic changes in glomerular permeability to macromolecules during systemic angiotensin II (ANG II) infusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Josefin; Rippe, Anna; Oberg, Carl M; Rippe, Bengt

    2012-09-15

    The actions of systemic angiotensin II (ANG II) infusions on glomerular permeability were investigated in vivo. In anesthetized Wistar rats (250-280 g), the left ureter was cannulated for urine collection, while simultaneously blood access was achieved. Rats were continuously infused intravenously with either of four doses of ANG II ranging from 16 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) (Lo-ANG II) to 1.82 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1) (Hi-ANG II), and in separate experiments with aldosterone (Aldo; 0.22 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), or with the calcium channel blocker nimodipine, or with the Aldo antagonist spironolactone together with a high ANG II dose (910 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1); Hi-Int-ANG II), respectively, and with polydisperse FITC-Ficoll-70/400 (molecular radius 10-80 Å) and (51)Cr-EDTA. Plasma and urine samples were taken at 5, 15, 30, 60, and 120 min and analyzed by high performance size-exclusion chromatography for determination of glomerular sieving coefficients (θ) to Ficoll. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were also assessed. For ANG II, there was a rapid, marked, partly reversible increase in glomerular permeability (θ) for Ficoll molecules >34 Å in radius, peaking at 5-15 min, which was completely abrogated by the ANG II blocker candesartan but not affected by spironolactone at 15 and 30 min. For Aldo, the response was similar to that found for the lowest dose of ANG II infused. For the two highest ANG II doses given (Hi-Int-ANG II and Hi-ANG II), GFR decreased transiently, concomitant with marked, sustained increases in MAP. Nimodipine completely blocked all hemodynamic ANG II actions, whereas the glomerular permeability response remained unchanged. Thus ANG II directly increased glomerular permeability independently of its hemodynamic actions and largely independently of the concomitant Aldo response. The ANG II-induced increases in glomerular permeability were, according to a two-pore and a log-normal distributed pore model, compatible with an

  12. On the tensoresistance of n-Ge and n-Si crystals with radiation-induced defects

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidar, G. P.

    2015-09-15

    A variation in the tensoresistance of n-Ge:Sb and n-Si:As crystals as a result of irradiation with γ-ray photons ({sup 60}Co source) at fixed temperatures under conditions of the application of uniaxial elastic stress (0 ≤ X ≤ 1.2 GPa) along the main crystallographic direction is studied. It is found that, in the case of the deformation axis being in an asymmetric position relative to the isoenergetic ellipsoids, there is a maximum for the dependences of the tensoresistance ρ{sub X}/ρ{sub 0} = f(X); an explanation as to the nature of the observed effect is suggested. Tensoresistance is revealed in unirradiated n-Si:As crystals in the case of the deformation axis being in a symmetric position relative to all isoenergetic ellipsoids; the value of the tensoresistance as a result of irradiation with γ-ray photons decreases. It is shown that this effect can be attributed to a variation in the mobility of electrons in the conduction band as a result of an increase in the transverse effective mass and the appearance of new deep-level centers under the effect of irradiation, respectively.

  13. Temperature Acclimation of Photosynthesis and Related Changes in Photosystem II Electron Transport in Winter Wheat1

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Takenobu; Yamakawa, Tomokazu; Yamane, Yoshihiro; Koike, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Kazuhiko; Katoh, Sakae

    2002-01-01

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Norin No. 61) was grown at 25°C until the third leaves reached about 10 cm in length and then at 15°C, 25°C, or 35°C until full development of the third leaves (about 1 week at 25°C, but 2–3 weeks at 15°C or 35°C). In the leaves developed at 15°C, 25°C, and 35°C, the optimum temperature for CO2-saturated photosynthesis was 15°C to 20°C, 25°C to 30°C, and 35°C, respectively. The photosystem II (PS II) electron transport, determined either polarographically with isolated thylakoids or by measuring the modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence in leaves, also showed the maximum rate near the temperature at which the leaves had developed. Maximum rates of CO2-saturated photosynthesis and PS II electron transport determined at respective optimum temperatures were the highest in the leaves developed at 25°C and lowest in the leaves developed at 35°C. So were the levels of chlorophyll, photosystem I and PS II, whereas the level of Rubisco decreased with increasing temperature at which the leaves had developed. Kinetic analyses of chlorophyll a fluorescence changes and P700 reduction showed that the temperature dependence of electron transport at the plastoquinone and water-oxidation sites was modulated by the temperature at which the leaves had developed. These results indicate that the major factor that contributes to thermal acclimation of photosynthesis in winter wheat is the plastic response of PS II electron transport to environmental temperature. PMID:11891263

  14. A Primary Investigation on Serum CTX-II Changes in Patients Infected with Brucellosis in Qinghai Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi Jun; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Xin; Ma, Li; Xu, Li Qing; Yang, Pei Zhen; Meng, Xian Ya; Yu, Hui Zhen; Xu, Xiao Qing; Cao, Jian Ying

    2016-03-01

    Brucellosis is one of the most widespread zoonotic diseases, with the most frequent complication being osteoarticular changes. The aim of this study was to assess the changes of C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) in patients infected with brucellosis. A total of 84 brucellosis patients and 43 volunteers were selected and divided into brucellosis vs. control groups. Serum samples were subjected to serological tests for brucellosis, and CTX-II levels in all samples were measured simultaneously with ELISA. The results showed that serum CTX-II levels in human brucellosis were higher than those of healthy controls, without a statistically significant difference, but serum CTX-II levels in male patients were significantly higher than those of female patients (P<0.05). This finding could indicate the biological changes in the cartilage and bone in human brucellosis. PMID:27109135

  15. The Changing Face of War in Textbooks: Depictions of World War II and Vietnam, 1970-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachmann, Richard; Mitchell, Lacy

    2014-01-01

    How have U.S. high school textbook depictions of World War II and Vietnam changed since the 1970s? We examined 102 textbooks published from 1970 to 2009 to see how they treated U.S. involvement in World War II and Vietnam. Our content analysis of high school history textbooks finds that U.S. textbooks increasingly focus on the personal experiences…

  16. Germyl cations with Ge-S bond: an experimental and theoretical study on the gaseous F(n)Ge(SH)(3-n)+ (n=0-2).

    PubMed

    Antoniotti, Paola; Benzi, Paola; Operti, Lorenzo; Rabezzana, Roberto; Borocco, Stefano; Giordani, Maria; Grandinetti, Felice

    2012-01-01

    The germyl cations F(2)Ge(SH)(+), FGe(SH)(2)(+) and Ge(SH)(3)(+) were obtained from ionized mixtures of GeF(4) and H(2)S. Ion trap mass spectrometry revealed the occurrence of three consecutive addition-HF elimination reactions between GeF(3)(+), F(2)Ge(SH)(+) and FGe(SH)(2)(+) and H(2)S. The structure and the mechanism of formation of the observed F(n)Ge(SH)(3-n)(+) (n = 0-2) were investigated by ab initio calculations performed at the MP2 and coupled cluster level of theory. It was also possible to note regular trends in the geometries and Lewis acidities of the F(n)Ge(SH)(3-n)(+) (n= 0-3). PMID:23221118

  17. Reduction of Schottky barrier height at metal/n-Ge interface by introducing an ultra-high Sn content Ge1-xSnx interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Shibayama, Shigehisa; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Wakana; Kurosawa, Masashi; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the impact of introducing an ultra-high Sn content Ge1-xSnx interlayer on the electrical properties at the metal/Ge interface. We achieved epitaxial growth of a Ge1-xSnx thin layer with an ultra-high substitutional Sn content of up to 46% on a Ge(001) substrate by considering the misfit strain between Ge1-xSnx and Ge. From the current-voltage characteristics of Al/Ge1-xSnx/n-Ge Schottky diodes, we found an increase in the forward current density of the thermionic emission current with increasing Sn content in the Ge1-xSnx interlayer. The Schottky barrier height estimated in Al/Ge1-xSnx/n-Ge diodes decreases to 0.49 eV with an increase in the Sn content up to 46% of the Ge1-xSnx interlayer. The reduction of the barrier height may be due to the shift of the Fermi level pinning position at the metal/Ge interface with a Ge1-xSnx interlayer whose valence band edge is higher than that of Ge. This result enables the effective reduction of the contact resistivity by introducing a group-IV semiconductor alloy interlayer of Ge1-xSnx into the metal/n-Ge interface.

  18. Dissection of the ATP-dependent conformational change cycle of a group II chaperonin.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Ayumi; Moriya, Kazuki; Arita, Mayuno; Yamamoto, Yohei; Kitamura, Kyotaro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kanzaki, Taro; Oka, Toshihiko; Makabe, Koki; Kuwajima, Kunihiro; Yohda, Masafumi

    2014-01-23

    Group II chaperonin captures an unfolded protein while in its open conformation and then mediates the folding of the protein during ATP-driven conformational change cycle. In this study, we performed kinetic analyses of the group II chaperonin from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Thermococcus sp. KS-1 (TKS1-Cpn), by stopped-flow fluorometry and stopped-flow small-angle X-ray scattering to reveal the reaction cycle. Two TKS1-Cpn variants containing a Trp residue at position 265 or position 56 exhibit nearly the same fluorescence kinetics induced by rapid mixing with ATP. Fluorescence started to increase immediately after the start of mixing and reached a maximum at 1-2s after mixing. Only in the presence of K(+) that a gradual decrease in fluorescence was observed after the initial peak. Similar results were obtained by stopped-flow small-angle X-ray scattering. A rapid fluorescence increase, which reflects nucleotide binding, was observed for the mutant containing a Trp residue near the ATP binding site (K485W), irrespective of the presence or absence of K(+). Without K(+), a small, rapid fluorescence decrease followed the initial increase, and then a gradual decrease was observed. In contrast, with K(+), a large, rapid fluorescence decrease occurred just after the initial increase, and then the fluorescence gradually increased. Finally, we observed ATP binding signal and also subtle conformational change in an ATPase-deficient mutant with K485W mutation. Based on these results, we propose a reaction cycle model for group II chaperonins. PMID:24120682

  19. Theory of helium under heat flow near the lambda point. II. Dynamics of phase change

    SciTech Connect

    Onuki, A.

    1984-05-01

    The HeI-He II interface is a crucial aspect in the transformation processes between the superfluid and normal fluid phases. Its motion is investigated when temperatures and heat flows at boundaries deviate from those of a stationary coexistence state. As a unique feature, the heat flow to the interface from the He I side can be mostly transmitted to the He II side by thermal counterflow, and the latent heat generation (or absorption) at the interface becomes negligibly small. In any case the interfacial motion is so slow that the temperature on the He II side T/sub infinity/ is still given by the stationary relation T/sub lambda/-T/sub infinity/proportionalQ/sup 3/4/, where T/sub lambda/ is the critical temperatue and Q is the heat flow. The temperature profile and the interfacial position are calculated in some nonstationary cases. To this end a simple approximation scheme is developed. First, the interface can propagate with a constant velocity and the superfluid region can expand as a shock wave. Second, if the heat flow at the warmer boundary Q/sub w/ and that in the He II region Q/sub -/ are fixed at different values, the length of the He I region y/sub i/ changes in time as (d/dt)y/sup 1+p//sub i/ = constproportional Q/sub w/-Q/sub -/, where p = 1/(1-x/sub lambda/), and x/sub lambda/ is the critical exponent of the thermal conductivity. In particular, if y/sub i/ = 0 at t = 0 and Q/sub w/>Q/sub -/, the normal fluid region emerges as y/sub i/proportionalt/sup() 1/1+P/ at the warmer boundary. Third, if Q/sub -/ and the temperature at the warmer boundary are fixed, the interfacial position approaches an equilibrium position exponentially in time. The uniqueness of the problem arises from the superfluidity on the He II side and the strong critical singularity of the thermal conductivity on the He I side.

  20. Broadway High School: Moving Ahead in Math. Onward to Excellence II: Committing to CHANGE with OTE II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR. School Improvement Program.

    This document describes the school reform movement at Broadway High School in rural Virginia which has led to great success in mathematics achievement as proven by the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) tests. The Onward to Excellence II model provided a way for the faculty to focus on math, especially Algebra I, and to involve the entire school…

  1. A Crisis Framework Applied to Macrosociological Family Changes: Marriage, Divorce, and Occupational Trends Associated with World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman-Blumen, Jean

    1975-01-01

    A typology of crises is developed to be used with critical aspects of the social system to predict both crisis and postcrisis period role changes. The crisis framework is then applied to macro-changes in family structure in response to an archetypal crisis, World War II. Census data generally support the hypotheses. (Author)

  2. Region-specific changes in sympathetic nerve activity in angiotensin II-salt hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Osborn, John W; Fink, Gregory D

    2010-01-01

    It is now well accepted that many forms of experimental hypertension and human essential hypertension are caused by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. However, the role of region-specific changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in the pathogenesis of hypertension has been difficult to determine because methods for chronic measurement of SNA in conscious animals have not been available. We have recently combined indirect, and continuous and chronic direct, assessment of region-specific SNA to characterize hypertension produced by administration of angiotensin II (Ang II) to rats consuming a high-salt diet (Ang II-salt hypertension). Angiotensin II increases whole-body noradrenaline (NA) spillover and depressor responses to ganglionic blockade in rats consuming a high-salt diet, but not in rats on a normal-salt diet. Despite this evidence for increased 'whole-body SNA' in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats, renal SNA is decreased in this model and renal denervation does not attenuate the steady-state level of arterial pressure. In addition, neither lumbar SNA, which largely targets skeletal muscle, nor hindlimb NA spillover is changed from control levels in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats. However, surgical denervation of the splanchnic vascular bed attenuates/abolishes the increase in arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance, as well as the decrease in vascular capacitance, observed in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats. We hypothesize that the 'sympathetic signature' of Ang II-salt hypertension is characterized by increased splanchnic SNA, no change in skeletal muscle SNA and decreased renal SNA, and this sympathetic signature creates unique haemodynamic changes capable of producing sustained hypertension. PMID:19717492

  3. Ocular surface changes in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Ru, Yu-Sha; Wang, Xiao-Wu; Yang, Ji-Zhong; Li, Chun-Hui; Wang, Hong-Xing; Li, Xiao-Rong; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    AIM To detect and analyze the changes on ocular surface and tear function in type II diabetic patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), an advanced stage of diabetic retinopathy (DR), using conventional ophthalmic tests and the high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy. METHODS Fifty-eight patients with type II diabetes were selected. Based on the diagnostic criteria and stage classification of DR, the patients were divided into the non-DR (NDR) group and the PDR group. Thirty-six patients with cataract but no other ocular and systemic disease were included as non-diabetic controls. All the patients were subjected to the conventional clinical tests of corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I Test, and corneal fluorescein staining. The non-invasive tear film break-up time (NIBUT) and tear interferometry were conducted by a Tearscope Plus. The morphology of corneal epithelia and nerve fibers was examined using the high-resolution confocal microscopy. RESULTS The NDR group exhibited significantly declined corneal sensitivity and Schirmer I test value, as compared to the non-diabetic controls (P< 0.001). The PDR group showed significantly reduced corneal sensitivity, Schirmer I test value, and NIBUT in comparison to the non-diabetic controls (P < 0.001). Corneal fluorescein staining revealed the progressively injured corneal epithelia in the PDR patients. Moreover, significant decrease in the corneal epithelial density and morphological abnormalities in the corneal epithelia and nerve fibers were also observed in the PDR patients. CONCLUSION Ocular surface changes, including blunted corneal sensitivity, reduced tear secretion, tear film dysfunction, progressive loss of corneal epithelia and degeneration of nerve fibers, are common in type II diabetic patients, particularly in the diabetic patients with PDR. The corneal sensitivity, fluorescein staining scores, and the density of corneal epithelial cells and nerve fibers in the diabetic patients correlate

  4. Changes in the energy distribution in mutant thylakoid membranes of pea with modified pigment content. II. Changes due to magnesium ions concentration.

    PubMed

    Stoitchkova, Katerina; Busheva, Mira; Apostolova, Emilia; Andreeva, Atanaska

    2006-04-01

    Low-temperature (77K) steady-state chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra, room temperature fluorescence and light scattering of thylakoid membranes isolated from pea mutants were studied as a function of Mg2+ concentration. The mutants have modified pigment content and altered structural organization of the pigment-protein complexes, distinct surface electric properties and functions. The analysis of the 77K emission spectra revealed that Mg2+-depletion of the medium caused not only an increased energy flow toward photosystem I in all investigated membranes but also changes in the quenching of the fluorescence, most probably by internal conversion. The results indicated that the macroorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus of mutants at supramolecular level (distribution and segregation of two photosystems in thylakoid membranes) and at supermolecular level (stacking of photosystem II supercomplexes) required different Mg ion concentrations. The data confirmed that the segregation of photosystems and the stacking of thylakoid membranes are two distinct phenomena and elucidated some features of their mechanisms. The segregation is initiated by changes in the lateral microorganization of light harvesting complexes II, their migration (repulsion from photosystem I) and subsequent separation of the two photosystems. Most likely 3D aggregation and formation of macrodomains, containing only photosystem II antenna complexes, play a certain precursory role for the increasing degree of the membrane stacking and the energy coupling between the light harvesting complexes II and the core complexes of photosystem II in the frame of photosystem II supercomplexes. PMID:16406551

  5. Structural changes of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II during the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Carina; Kern, Jan; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the membrane-bound protein complex photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the water oxidation reaction that takes place in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC during the S state transitions using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Overall structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, based on the manganese ligand and Mn-Mn distances obtained from this study, were incorporated into the geometry of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC obtained from a polarized XAS model and the 1.9-Å high resolution crystal structure. Additionally, we compared the S1 state XAS of the dimeric and monomeric form of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and spinach PSII. Although the basic structures of the OEC are the same for T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII, minor electronic structural differences that affect the manganese K-edge XAS between T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII are found and may originate from differences in the second sphere ligand atom geometry. PMID:23766513

  6. Structural Changes of the Oxygen-evolving Complex in Photosystem II during the Catalytic Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Carina; Kern, Jan; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the membrane-bound protein complex photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the water oxidation reaction that takes place in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC during the S state transitions using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Overall structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, based on the manganese ligand and Mn-Mn distances obtained from this study, were incorporated into the geometry of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC obtained from a polarized XAS model and the 1.9-Å high resolution crystal structure. Additionally, we compared the S1 state XAS of the dimeric and monomeric form of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and spinach PSII. Although the basic structures of the OEC are the same for T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII, minor electronic structural differences that affect the manganese K-edge XAS between T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII are found and may originate from differences in the second sphere ligand atom geometry. PMID:23766513

  7. Herbal prescription Chang'an II repairs intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with post-inflammation irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-yun; Su, Min; Zheng, Yong-qiu; Wang, Xiao-ge; Kang, Nan; Chen, Ting; Zhu, En-lin; Bian, Zhao-xiang; Tang, Xu-dong

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The herbal prescription Chang'an II is derived from a classical TCM formula Tong-Xie-Yao-Fang for the treatment of liver-qi stagnation and spleen deficiency syndrome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study we investigated the effects of Chang'an II on the intestinal mucosal immune barrier in a rat post-inflammation IBS (PI-IBS) model. Methods: A rat model of PI-IBS was established using a multi-stimulation paradigm including early postnatal sibling deprivation, bondage and intrarectal administration of TNBS. Four weeks after TNBS administration, the rats were treated with Chang'an II (2.85, 5.71 and 11.42 g·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 14 d. Intestinal sensitivity was assessed based on the abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores and fecal water content. Open field test and two-bottle sucrose intake test were used to evaluate the behavioral changes. CD4+ and CD8+ cells were counted and IL-1β and IL-4 levels were measured in intestinal mucosa. Transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate ultrastructural changes of the intestinal mucosal barrier. Results: PI-IBS model rats showed significantly increased AWR reactivity and fecal water content, and decreased locomotor activity and sucrose intake. Chang'an II treatment not only reduced AWR reactivity and fecal water content, but also suppressed the anxiety and depressive behaviors. Ultrastructural study revealed that the gut mucosal barrier function was severely damaged in PI-IBS model rats, whereas Chang'an II treatment relieved intestinal mucosal inflammation and repaired the gut mucosal barrier. Furthermore, PI-IBS model rats showed a significantly reduced CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio in lamina propria and submucosa, and increased IL-1β and reduced IL-4 expression in intestinal mucosa, whereas Chang'an II treatment reversed PI-IBS-induced changes in CD4+/CD8+ cell ratio and expression of IL-1β and IL-4. Conclusion: Chang'an II treatment protects the intestinal mucosa against PI-IBS through anti

  8. Sputter epitaxy of heavily doped p+/n+ Ge film on Si(100) by cosputtering with Al/Sb for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wenchang; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Sugihara, Keisuke

    2015-08-01

    Heavily doped p+ or n+ Ge films were grown on Si substrates by sputter epitaxy. Ge was cosputtered with Al or Sb to add dopant impurities. The maximum carrier densities were 1.0 × 1021 for p-type films and 8.4 × 1019 cm-3 for n-type films. The activation ratio of Sb was 56%. A pn junction diode was fabricated on a Si(100) substrate; it exhibited a good rectifying property with an on/off ratio of 529.

  9. Properly timed exposure to central ANG II prevents behavioral sensitization and changes in angiotensin receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Santollo, Jessica; Whalen, Philip E.; Speth, Robert C.; Clark, Stewart D.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) is susceptible to rapid desensitization, but that more chronic treatments that stimulate ANG II lead to sensitization of several responses. It is unclear, however, if the processes of desensitization and sensitization interact. To test for differences in AT1R expression associated with single or repeated injections of ANG II, we measured AT1R mRNA in nuclei that control fluid intake of rats given ANG II either in a single injection or divided into three injections spaced 20 min apart. Rats given a single injection of ANG II had more AT1R mRNA in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the periventricular tissue surrounding the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) than did controls. The effect was not observed, however, when the same cumulative dose of ANG II was divided into multiple injections. Behavioral tests found that single daily injections of ANG II sensitized the dipsogenic response to ANG II, but a daily regimen of four injections did not cause sensitization. Analysis of 125I-Sar1-ANG II binding revealed a paradoxical decrease in binding in the caudal AV3V and dorsal median preoptic nucleus after 5 days of single daily injections of ANG II; however, this effect was absent in rats treated for 5 days with four daily ANG II injections. Taken together, these data suggest that a desensitizing treatment regimen prevents behavior- and receptor-level effects of repeated daily ANG II. PMID:25354729

  10. Changes in glomerular hemodynamic response to angiotensin II after subacute renal denervation in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, B J; Mundy, C A; Maciejewski, A R; Printz, M P; Ziegler, M G; Pelayo, J C; Blantz, R C

    1986-01-01

    We examined the changes in glomerular hemodynamics produced by angiotensin II (AII) in both normal Munich-Wistar rats and rats which were unilaterally renal denervated (measured kidney) 4-6 d prior to the measurement periods. Measurements of glomerular dynamics were performed in a control period after plasma volume expansion and during infusion of 11 ng X 100 g body wt-1 X min-1 of AII. The glomerular hydrostatic pressure gradient increased from 38 +/- 1 to 49 +/- 1 mmHg in denervated rats compared with a lesser response in controls (from 39 +/- 1 to 45 +/- 1 mmHg, P less than 0.05). Single nephron plasma flow decreased from 213 +/- 17 to 87 +/- 4 nl X min-1 X g kidney wt (KW)-1 in denervated kidneys versus a more modest decrease in control kidneys (from 161 +/- 9 to 102 +/- 5 nl X min X gKW-1). These changes were due to a greater increase in both afferent and efferent arteriolar resistance after AII infusion in denervated compared with control kidneys. Glomerular AII receptor maximum binding was 1,196 +/- 267 fmol/mg protein in denervated kidneys compared with 612 +/- 89 fmol/mg protein (P less than 0.01) in controls with no change in receptor affinity. We conclude the subacute unilateral renal denervation results in renal vasodilation, denervation magnifies the vasoconstrictive effect of AII infusion on glomerular hemodynamics, and the observed increased response to AII after denervation is associated with increases in glomerular AII receptors. PMID:3745432

  11. Solvent-templated supramolecular isomerism in 2D coordination polymer constructed by Ni(II)2Co(II) nodes and dicyanamido spacers: drastic change in magnetic behaviours.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumavo; Mukherjee, Sandip; Seth, Piya; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2013-10-01

    Two heterometallic coordination polymers (CPs) have been prepared using [Ni(II)L]2Co(II) (where H2L = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)-1,3-propanediamine) as nodes and dicyanamido spacers by varying the solvent for synthesis. Structural characterizations revealed that methanol assisted the formation of a two-dimensional (4,4) connected rhombic grid network of [(NiL)2Co(NCNCN)2]∞ (1a) whereas relatively less polar acetonitrile afforded a different superstructure {[(NiL)2Co(NCNCN)2]·CH3CN}∞ (1b) with a two-dimensional (4,4) connected square grid network. The presence of acetonitrile molecules in the structure of 1b seems to change the spatial orientation of the terminal metalloligands [NiL] from pseudo-eclipsed in 1a to staggered-like in 1b around the central Co(II). These structural changes in the nodes together with the conformationally flexible dicyanamido spacers, which are cis coordinated to the Co(II) in both trinuclear units, led to the differences in the final 2D network. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed that this supramolecular isomerism led to a drastic transition from spin-frustrated antiferromagnetism for 1a to a dominant ferromagnetic behaviour for 1b. The geometrical differences in Ni2Co coordination clusters (CCs) which are scalene triangular in 1a but nearly linear in 1b, are held responsible for the changes of the magnetic properties. The DFT calculations of exchange interactions between metal centres provide a clear evidence of the role played by the fundamental geometrical factors on the nature and magnitude of the magnetic coupling in these pseudo-polymorphic CPs. PMID:23900267

  12. Histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal tract due to medications: an update for the surgical pathologist (part II of II).

    PubMed

    De Petris, Giovanni; Caldero, Sonia Gatius; Chen, Longwen; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Dhungel, Bal M; Spizcka, Amy J Wendel; Lam-Himlin, Dora

    2014-05-01

    In keeping with the stated goal of providing the surgical pathologist with tools to recognize abnormalities of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract due to drugs (AGIDS), in part II of this review we embark in a more organ-based description of AGIDS. Adequate space is given to the numerous adverse gastrointestinal effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Pill esophagitis, esophagitis dissecans, proton pump inhibitors' effects, diaphragm disease, and the recently described effects of drugs such as olmesartan, mycophenolate, and of compounds such as yttrium-90 are highlighted among several others. The inclusion of drug effects in the differential diagnosis of "conventional" diseases (such as gastric antral vascular ectasia, graft-versus-host disease, ischemic colitis, acute colitis, collagenous enteritis, inflammatory bowel disease) is underscored to avoid sometimes significant diagnostic pitfalls. We reiterate the message of the necessary collaboration between pathologist and clinician in the recognition of these entities to provide the best patient care. PMID:24021900

  13. Relationship between angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II correlates with hemodynamic changes in human liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Walkíria Wingester; Ribeiro-Oliveira Jr, Antônio; Pereira, Regina Maria; da Cunha Ribeiro, Renata; Almeida, Jerusa; Nadu, Ana Paula; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To measure circulating angiotensins at different stages of human cirrhosis and to further evaluate a possible relationship between renin angiotensin system (RAS) components and hemodynamic changes. METHODS: Patients were allocated into 4 groups: mild-to-moderate liver disease (MLD), advanced liver disease (ALD), patients undergoing liver transplantation, and healthy controls. Blood was collected to determine plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin (Ang) I, Ang II, and Ang-(1-7) levels using radioimmunoassays. During liver transplantation, hemodynamic parameters were determined and blood was simultaneously obtained from the portal vein and radial artery in order to measure RAS components. RESULTS: PRA and angiotensins were elevated in ALD when compared to MLD and controls (P < 0.05). In contrast, Ang II was significantly reduced in MLD. Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were increased in MLD when compared to controls and ALD. During transplantation, Ang II levels were lower and Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were higher in the splanchnic circulation than in the peripheral circulation (0.52 ± 0.08 vs 0.38 ± 0.04, P < 0.02), whereas the peripheral circulating Ang II/Ang I ratio was elevated in comparison to splanchnic levels (0.18 ± 0.02 vs 0.13 ± 0.02, P < 0.04). Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios positively correlated with cardiac output (r = 0.66) and negatively correlated with systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.70). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the relationship between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II may play a role in the hemodynamic changes of human cirrhosis. PMID:19469002

  14. Jump for the Sun II: can a Monthly Program Change Girls' and Women's Attitudes about Stem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Mary

    The Environmental Institute of the Jump for the Sun II program was designed to change middle school girls' and teachers' attitudes about doing science and who does science and to increase interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The institute consisted of an intensive, 2-week summer congress followed by monthly sessions during the academic year. Female-friendly learning environments were created for middle school students and in-service educators, focusing on topics such as life expectancies, solid waste production, transportation gridlock, beach erosion, and biodiversity. In both 1998 and 1999, one group of participants completed the program, which was quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated. The quantitative results showed that the program did not improve girls' attitudes in any of the major categories under study; however, the posttest results indicated that in-service educators' attitudes improved significantly in three of the four categories (science experiences, perceptions of science and scientists, and science attitudes). The qualitative results indicated that the program positively affected some of the girls and in-service educators.

  15. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Pushkar, Yulia; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Glatzel, Pieter; Yachandra, Vittal K

    2007-08-03

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn4Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (Si-states, i =0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn4(III2,IV2) and Mn4(III,IV3) for S1 and S2 states, while it is still controversial for the S0 and S3 states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn4Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mncomplexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p3/2 RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S0 to S1, and S1 to S2 transitions is twice as large as that during the S2 to S3 transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  16. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

    2012-08-17

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  17. Changes in photochemically significant solar UV spectral irradiance as estimated by the composite Mg II index and scale factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deland, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the impact of solar ultraviolet irradiance variations on stratospheric ozone abundances currently requires the use of proxy indicators. The Mg II core-to-wing index has been developed as an indicator of solar UV activity between 175-400 nm that is independent of most instrument artifacts, and measures solar variability on both rotational and solar cycle time scales. Linear regression fits have been used to merge the individual Mg II index data sets from the Nimbus-7, NOAA-9, and NOAA-11 instruments onto a single reference scale. The change in 27-dayrunning average of the composite Mg II index from solar maximum to solar minimum is approximately 8 percent for solar cycle 21, and approximately 9 percent for solar cycle 22 through January 1992. Scaling factors based on the short-term variations in the Mg II index and solar irradiance data sets have been developed to estimate solar variability at mid-UV and near-UV wavelengths. Near 205 nm, where solar irradiance variations are important for stratospheric photo-chemistry and dynamics, the estimated change in irradiance during solar cycle 22 is approximately 10 percent using the composite Mg II index and scale factors.

  18. Changes in the protective mechanism of photosystem II and molecular regulation in response to high temperature stress in grapevines.

    PubMed

    Zha, Qian; Xi, Xiaojun; Jiang, Aili; Wang, Shiping; Tian, Yihua

    2016-04-01

    The response to high temperature stress, which influences the growth and development of grapes, varies between laboratory conditions and ambient growth conditions, and is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of high temperature on grapevines (Vitis vinifera L. × Vitis labrusca L.) grown under artificial and ambient conditions. A temperature of 35 °C did not alter Photosystem II (PS II) activity and the expression of some heat-shock protein (HSPs) genes. These changes were, however, observed at 45 °C under artificial conditions, as well as when the ambient natural temperature was greater than 40 °C. Interestingly, these changes corresponded to shifts in PS II activity and HSPs expression. The protective mechanism of PS II was induced by temperatures greater than 40 °C. These data indicating that the expression of HSFA2, GLOS1 and some heat-shock protein (sHSPs) genes were more sensitive to the heat stress. Unlike the Kyoho grapevines, the Jumeigui grapevines showed rapid and dramatically deterioration in PS II activity and the expression of some heat response genes and HSP21, indicating that the Jumeigui grapevines could not counter the heat stress. These were some differences in PSII activity and the expression of heat response genes between the two cultivated conditions could be attributed to other environmental factors, inherent plant vigor, and the adaptation mechanism. PMID:26852109

  19. Fermi-level depinning and contact resistance reduction in metal/n-Ge junctions by insertion of W-encapsulating Si cluster films

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Naoya; Uchida, Noriyuki; Kanayama, Toshihiko

    2014-02-10

    We demonstrate Fermi-level depinning in metal/Ge junctions and a significant reduction of specific contact resistivity of n-Ge by inserting an ultra-thin semiconducting Si-rich W silicide film (WSi{sub n}, n = 12–14) composed of W-encapsulating Si clusters. Dependence of the specific contact resistivity on the electron Schottky barrier height followed the ideal exponential relation for various contact metal species. This result indicates that the insertion of the WSi{sub n} film provides a negligible contribution to contact resistivity because its tunneling resistance is very low owing to the low offset of the conduction band edge of Ge.

  20. A new way of phase identification, of AgGaGeS{sub 4}∙nGeS{sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, R.E. Vasilyeva, I.G.

    2013-07-15

    The phase identification of AgGaGeS{sub 4}·nGeS{sub 2} (n=0–4) crystals grown by vertical Bridgman–Stockbarger technique was carried out to find the boundary value n between a homogeneous solid solution and its mixture with GeS{sub 2}. To obtain reliable results, the conventional methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were completed by less common vapor pressure measurement in a closed volume and precise density measurements, which are very sensitive to the detection of small amounts of crystalline and glassy GeS{sub 2} and heterogeneous state of the crystals. The boundary value n=1.5 at 1045 K and the coexistence of the solid solution AgGaGeS{sub 4}·1.5GeS{sub 2} with the β-GeS{sub 2} phase for n>1.5 was found. Glassy GeS{sub 2} (∼2 mol%) was revealed by vapor pressure measurement and XRD studies in all the crystals. This is discussed in terms of the supersaturated solid solution decomposition upon temperature decreasing and the microphase separation of overcooled melt near the melting point under non-equilibrium crystallization. For the first time, the p–T dependence for glassy GeS{sub 2} was measured by the vapor pressure measurements. - Graphical abstract: lg p–1/T dependences of as-grown AgGaGeS{sub 4}·nGeS{sub 2} crystals. - Highlights: • Vapor pressure measurement as a powerful tool of phase identification. • Thermal characteristics of glassy GeS{sub 2}. • The homogeneity range of AgGaGeS{sub 4} from the GeS{sub 2} side.

  1. Change of Mandibular Position during Two-Phase Orthodontic Treatment of Skeletal Class II in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hägg, Urban; Wong, Ricky Wing Kit; Liao, Chongshan; Yang, Yanqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in mandibular position during a two-phase orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion. Thirty consecutively treated Chinese male adolescents who had undergone two-phase treatment with Herbst appliance and fixed appliance and fulfilled the specific selection criteria were sampled. Cephalograms taken at T0 (before treatment), T1 (at the end of functional appliance treatment), and T2 (at the end of fixed appliance treatment) were analyzed. The change in sagittal positioning of the mandible was 6.8±3.44 mm in phase I (T0-T1), 0.4±2.79 mm in phase II (T1-T2), and 7.2±4.61 mm in total. The mandible came forward in 100% of the patients at T1. In phase II, it came forward in one-third (positive group) remained unchanged in one-third (stable group) and went backward in one-third (negative group) of the patients. At T2, it came forward twice as much in the positive group compared to the negative group. Mandibular length was significantly increased in 100% of the patients in both phases. In conclusion, during the treatment with functional appliance, the mandibular prognathism increases in all patients, whereas during the treatment with fixed appliance there is no significant change in mandibular prognathism. PMID:25695103

  2. Myosin II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M.; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2016-01-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large scale highly coordinated flows of over 100.000 cells in the epiblast. These large scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combined light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression as well as asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localisation and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active Myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of a class specific Myosin inhibitors and gene specific knockdowns show that apical contraction and intercalation are Myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for Myosin I and Myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional Myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  3. Probing changes in Hg(II) coordination during its bacterial uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sara Anne; Ma, Qing; Gaillard, Jean-François

    2016-05-01

    We present XAFS data collected at the Hg LIII-edge for bacterial cells of Escherichia coli that have been exposed to 500 and 50 nano-molar Hg2+ in aqueous solution, which corresponds to ∼30 and ∼3μg Hg per g cells (wet weight). These concentrations are respectively 1 and 2 orders of magnitude lower than what has been previously reported for Hg-bacteria XAFS experiments. The cells were metabolically active while exposed to Hg(II), providing coordination information that can be directly compared to Hg(II) biouptake experiments. At these amounts of total dissolved metal, Hg(II) binds primarily to thiol moieties that are either present at the cell membrane or localized in the cytoplasm. We show that in this case the Hg binding environment is a mixture of 2- and 4-fold coordination to thiols. This information can be inferred from XANES spectra but the EXAFS provides a more quantitative answer.

  4. Vertical, horizontal, and temporal changes in temperature in the Atlantis II and Discovery hot brine pools, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Stephen A.; Bower, Amy S.; Schmitt, Raymond W.

    2012-06-01

    In October 2008, we measured temperature and salinity in hot, hypersaline brine filling the Atlantis II and Discovery Deeps on the Red Sea spreading center west of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In agreement with previous observations in the Atlantis II Deep, we found a stack of four convective layers with vertically uniform temperature profiles separated by thin interfaces with high vertical temperature gradients. Temperature in the thick lower convective layer in the Atlantis II Deep continued to slowly increase at 0.1 °C/year since the last observations in 1997. Previously published data show that the temperature of all four convective layers increased since the 1960s at the same rate, from which we infer that diffusive vertical heat flux between convective layers is rapid on time scales of 3-5 years and, thus, heat is lost from the brine pools to overlying Red Sea Deep Water. Heat budgets suggest that the heat flux from hydrothermal venting has decreased from 0.54 GW to 0.18 GW since 1966. A tow-yo survey found that temperature in the upper convective layers changes about 0.2 °C over 5-6 km but the temperature in the lower brine layer remains constant. Temperature in the lower convective layer in the Discovery Deep remains unchanged at 48 °C. To explain these results, we hypothesize that heat flux from a hydrothermal vent in the floor of the Discovery Deep has been stable for 40 years, whereas temperature of the brine in the Atlantis II Deep is adjusting to the change in hydrothermal heat flux from the vent in the Southwest Basin. We found no changes in the upper transition layer at 1900-1990 m depth that appeared between 1976 and 1992 and suggest that this layer originated from the seafloor elsewhere in the rift.

  5. Redox Reactions between Mn(II) and Hexagonal Birnessite Change Its Layer Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huaiyan; Zhu, Mengqiang; Li, Wei; Elzinga, Evert J; Villalobos, Mario; Liu, Fan; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Xionghan; Sparks, Donald L

    2016-02-16

    Birnessite, a phyllomanganate and the most common type of Mn oxide, affects the fate and transport of numerous contaminants and nutrients in nature. Birnessite exhibits hexagonal (HexLayBir) or orthogonal (OrthLayBir) layer symmetry. The two types of birnessite contain contrasting content of layer vacancies and Mn(III), and accordingly have different sorption and oxidation abilities. OrthLayBir can transform to HexLayBir, but it is still vaguely understood if and how the reverse transformation occurs. Here, we show that HexLayBir (e.g., δ-MnO2 and acid birnessite) transforms to OrthLayBir after reaction with aqueous Mn(II) at low Mn(II)/Mn (in HexLayBir) molar ratios (5-24%) and pH ≥ 8. The transformation is promoted by higher pH values, as well as smaller particle size, and/or greater stacking disorder of HexLayBir. The transformation is ascribed to Mn(III) formation via the comproportionation reaction between Mn(II) adsorbed on vacant sites and the surrounding layer Mn(IV), and the subsequent migration of the Mn(III) into the vacancies with an ordered distribution in the birnessite layers. This study indicates that aqueous Mn(II) and pH are critical environmental factors controlling birnessite layer structure and reactivity in the environment. PMID:26745815

  6. Meal-specific dietary changes from Squires Quest! II: A serious video game intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    "Squire's Quest! II: Saving the Kingdom of Fivealot", an online video-game, promotes fruit-vegetable (FV) consumption. An evaluation study varied type of implementation intentions used during the goal setting process (none; Action, Coping, or both Action + Coping plans). Participants who created Ac...

  7. Behavior Change; Weight Loss, and Physiological Improvements in Type II Diabetic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, Rena R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigated whether behavior modification would improve short- and long-term results of weight control programs for obese patients (N=53) with Type II diabetes. The behavior modification group lost more weight than the nutrition education or standard-care condition during the 16-week treatment, but at 16-month follow-up, weight loss differences…

  8. On the polymorphic and morphological changes of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC-I) upon mercerization and conversion to CNC-II.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ersuo; Guo, Jiaqi; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Yangyang; Song, Junlong; Jin, Yongcan; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-06-01

    Polymorphic and morphological transformations of cellulosic materials are strongly associated to their properties and applications, especially in the case of emerging nanocelluloses. Related changes that take place upon treatment of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) in alkaline conditions are studied here by XRD, TEM, AFM, and other techniques. The results indicate polymorphic transformation of CNC proceeds gradually in a certain range of alkali concentrations, i.e. from about 8% to 12.5% NaOH. In such transition alkali concentration, cellulose I and II allomorphs coexists. Such value and range of the transition concentration is strongly interdependent with the crystallite size of CNCs. In addition, it is distinctively lower than that for macroscopic fibers (12-15% NaOH). Transmission electron microscopy and particle sizing reveals that after mercerization CNCs tend to associate. Furthermore, TEMPO-oxidized mercerized CNC reveals the morphology of individual nanocrystal of the cellulose II type, which is composed of some interconnected granular structures. Overall, this work reveals how the polymorphism and morphology of individual CNC change in alkali conditions and sheds light onto the polymorphic transition from cellulose I to II. PMID:27083376

  9. Reasons for Change in Borderline Personality Disorder (and Other Axis II Disorders)

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.

    2008-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a slow moving disorder. Most patients with BPD improve over time. The reasons for this change are unclear. Both therapy as usual and the reparations that adult life offers can facilitate these changes. PMID:18638649

  10. Volume change of segments II and III of the liver after gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozutemiz, Can; Obuz, Funda; Taylan, Abdullah; Atila, Koray; Bora, Seymen; Ellidokuz, Hulya

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the relationship between gastrectomy and the volume of liver segments II and III in patients with gastric cancer. METHODS Computed tomography images of 54 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma were retrospectively evaluated by two blinded observers. Volumes of the total liver and segments II and III were measured. The difference between preoperative and postoperative volume measurements was compared. RESULTS Total liver volumes measured by both observers in the preoperative and postoperative scans were similar (P > 0.05). High correlation was found between both observers (preoperative r=0.99; postoperative r=0.98). Total liver volumes showed a mean reduction of 13.4% after gastrectomy (P = 0.977). The mean volume of segments II and III showed similar decrease in measurements of both observers (38.4% vs. 36.4%, P = 0.363); the correlation between the observers were high (preoperative r=0.97, P < 0.001; postoperative r=0.99, P < 0.001). Volume decrease in the rest of the liver was not different between the observers (8.2% vs. 9.1%, P = 0.388). Time had poor correlation with volume change of segments II and III and the total liver for each observer (observer 1, rseg2/3=0.32, rtotal=0.13; observer 2, rseg2/3=0.37, rtotal=0.16). CONCLUSION Segments II and III of the liver showed significant atrophy compared with the rest of the liver and the total liver after gastrectomy. Volume reduction had poor correlation with time. PMID:26899148

  11. Fundus changes in mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II: clinical and fluorescein angiographic findings.

    PubMed Central

    Duvall-Young, J; Short, C D; Raines, M F; Gokal, R; Lawler, W

    1989-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated a deposit in Bruch's membrane in a single case of mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis type II. We studied a group of patients with this disease and described extensive clinical and fluorescein angiographic abnormalities, which were in marked contrast to the findings in a group of patients with other forms of glomerulonephritis. This finding contributes to our understanding of the pathophysiology of the complex of the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris. Images PMID:2605144

  12. Relevance Revisited: Curriculum Development in the Humanities. No. II: Administrative Strategies for Curriculum Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondale, Clarence C., Ed.

    Papers presented in advance of a workshop on "administrative strategies" for curricular change in the humanities and brief summaries of discussions taking place at the workshop are provided. Background papers include: "Curricular Change and the Humanities," by Edward A. Lindell; "Developing Administrative Strategies for Curricular Change," by…

  13. Mid-twenty-first century climate change in the Central United States. Part II: Climate change processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricola, C. M.; Cook, K. H.

    2013-02-01

    Ensemble regional model simulations over the central US with 30-km resolution are analyzed to investigate the physical processes of projected precipitation changes in the mid-twenty-first century under greenhouse gas forcing. An atmospheric moisture balance is constructed, and changes in the diurnal cycle are evaluated. Wetter conditions over the central US in April and May occur most strongly in the afternoon and evening, supported primarily by moisture convergence by transient eddy activity, indicating enhanced daytime convection. In June, increased rainfall over the northern Great Plains is strongest from 0000 to 0600 LT. It is supported by positive changes in stationary meridional moisture convergence related to a strengthening of the GPLLJ accompanied by an intensification of the western extension of the North Atlantic subtropical high. In the Midwest, decreased rainfall is strongest at 1500 LT and 0000 LT. Both a suppression of daytime convection as well as changes in the zonal flow in the GPLLJ exit region are important. Future drying over the northern Great Plains in summer is triggered by weakened daytime convection, and persists throughout August and September when a deficit in soil moisture develops and land-atmosphere feedbacks become increasingly important.

  14. Changing Populations, Changing Schools. Ninety-fourth Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaxman, Erwin, Ed.; Passow, A. Harry, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    The contributors to this yearbook attempt to explain the reasons for the poor fit between schools and poor, immigrant, linguistically different, and racial minority students. The problems that confront schools because of changing populations and increased diversity are discussed in the following chapters: (1) "The Old Problem of 'New Students':…

  15. Vertical, horizontal, and temporal changes in temperature in the Atlantis II and Discovery hot brine pools, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Stephen; Bower, Amy; Schmitt, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    In October 2008, we measured temperature and salinity in hot (68°C), hypersaline (250 psu) brine filling the Atlantis II and Discovery Deeps on the Red Sea spreading center near 21°N. In agreement with previous observations in the Atlantis II Deep, we found a stack of four convective layers (in which temperature is vertically uniform) separated by thin interfaces with high vertical temperature gradients. Compared with the last observations in 1997, temperature in the thickest, deepest convective layer in the Atlantis II Deep continued to slowly increase at 0.1°C/yr. Based on earlier data extending back to the 1960s, we found that the temperature of all four convective layers increased at the same rate, from which we infer that diffusive vertical heat flux between convective layers is rapid on time scales of 3-5 yr and, thus, heat is lost from the brine pools to overlying Red Sea Deep Water. Heat budgets suggest that the heat flux from hydrothermal venting decreased from 0.54 GW in 1966 to 0.18 GW in 2008. A towed CTD survey found that temperature in the upper convective layers changes about 0.2°C over 5-6 km, whereas the temperature in the lower brine layer remains constant. Compared to previous surveys, temperature in the lower convective layer in the Discovery Deep remains unchanged at 48°C. To explain these results, we hypothesize that heat flux from a hydrothermal vent in the floor of the Discovery Deep has been stable for 40 years, whereas temperature of the brine in the Atlantis II Deep is adjusting to a decrease in hydrothermal heat flux from the vent in the Southwest Basin. We found no changes in the upper transition layer at 1900-1990 m depth that appeared between 1976 and 1992. Our data are consistent with this layer originating from a seafloor vent elsewhere in the rift.

  16. Changes of 25-OH-Vitamin D during Overwintering at the German Antarctic Stations Neumayer II and III

    PubMed Central

    Steinach, Mathias; Kohlberg, Eberhard; Maggioni, Martina Anna; Mendt, Stefan; Opatz, Oliver; Stahn, Alexander; Tiedemann, Josefine; Gunga, Hanns-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Humans in Antarctica face different environmental challenges, such as low ultra-violet radiation, which is crucial for vitamin D production in humans. Therefore we assessed changes in 25-OH-vitamin D serum concentration during 13 months of overwintering at the German Stations Neumayer II and III (2007–2012). We hypothesized that (i) 25-OH-vitamin D serum concentration would significantly decrease, (ii) changes would be affected by age, gender, baseline (i.e. pre-overwintering) fat mass, baseline 25-OH-vitamin D serum concentration, and station residence, and (iii) our results would not differ from similar previous studies in comparable high latitudes. Materials & Methods 25-OH-vitamin D serum concentrations were determined before, after, and monthly during the campaigns from venous blood samples of n = 43 participants (28 men, 15 women). Baseline fat mass was determined via bio impedance analysis and body plethysmography. Data were analyzed for change over time, dependency on independent parameters, and after categorization for sufficiency (>50nmol/l), insufficiency (25-50nmol/l), and deficiency (<25nmol/l). Results were compared with data from similar previous studies. Results We found a significant decrease of 25-OH-vitamin D with dependency on month. Age, gender, fat mass, and station residence had no influence. Only baseline 25-OH-vitamin D serum concentrations significantly affected subsequent 25-OH-vitamin D values. Conclusions Overwinterings at the Antarctic German research stations Neumayer II and III are associated with a decrease in 25-OH-vitamin D serum concentrations, unaffected by age, gender, baseline fat mass, and station residence. Higher baseline vitamin D serum concentrations might protect from subsequent deficiencies. Residence at the Neumayer Stations may lead to lower vitamin D serum concentrations than found in other comparable high latitudes. PMID:26641669

  17. Structural changes in the S3 state of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Makoto; Ogata, Koji; Fujii, Katsushi; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2016-05-01

    The S3 state of the Mn4CaO5-cluster in photosystem II was investigated by DFT calculations and compared with EXAFS data. Considering previously proposed mechanism; a water molecule is inserted into an open coordination site of Mn upon S2 to S3 transition that becomes a substrate water, we examined if the water insertion is essential for the S3 formation, or if one cannot eliminate other possible routes that do not require a water insertion at the S3 stage. The novel S3 state structure consisting of only short 2.7-2.8 Å Mnsbnd Mn distances was discussed.

  18. An organ culture system to model early degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc II: profiling global gene expression changes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite many advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of disc degeneration, there remains a paucity of preclinical models which can be used to study the biochemical and molecular events that drive disc degeneration, and the effects of potential therapeutic interventions. The goal of this study is to characterize global gene expression changes in a disc organ culture system that mimics early nontraumatic disc degeneration. Methods To mimic a degenerative insult, rat intervertebral discs were cultured in the presence of TNF-α, IL-1β and serum-limiting conditions. Gene expression analysis was performed using a microarray to identify differential gene expression between experimental and control groups. Differential pattern of gene expression was confirmed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) or Western blot. Results Treatment resulted in significant changes in expression of more than 1,000 genes affecting many aspects of cell function including cellular movement, the cell cycle, cellular development, and cell death and proliferation. Many of the most highly upregulated and downregulated genes have known functions in disc degeneration and extracellular matrix hemostasis. Construction of gene networks based on known cellular pathways and expression data from our analysis demonstrated that the network associated with cell death, cell cycle regulation and DNA replication and repair was most heavily affected in this model of disc degeneration. Conclusions This rat organ culture model uses cytokine exposure to induce wide gene expression changes with the most affected genes having known reported functions in disc degeneration. We propose that this model is a valuable tool to study the etiology of disc degeneration and evaluate potential therapeutic treatments. PMID:24171898

  19. Changes in skeletal and dental relationship in Class II Division I malocclusion after rapid maxillary expansion: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Baratieri, Carolina; Alves Jr, Matheus; Bolognese, Ana Maria; Nojima, Matilde C. G.; Nojima, Lincoln I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess skeletal and dental changes immediately after rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in Class II Division 1 malocclusion patients and after a retention period, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Methods Seventeen children with Class II, Division 1 malocclusion and maxillary skeletal transverse deficiency underwent RME following the Haas protocol. CBCT were taken before treatment (T1), at the end of the active expansion phase (T2) and after a retention period of 6 months (T3). The scanned images were measured anteroposteriorly (SNA, SNB, ANB, overjet and MR) and vertically (N-ANS, ANS-Me, N-Me and overbite). Results Significant differences were identified immediately after RME as the maxilla moved forward, the mandible moved downward, overjet increased and overbite decreased. During the retention period, the maxilla relapsed backwards and the mandible was displaced forward, leaving patients with an overall increase in anterior facial height. Conclusion RME treatment allowed more anterior than inferior positioning of the mandible during the retention period, thus significantly improving Class II dental relationship in 75% of the patients evaluated. PMID:25162569

  20. Superconductivity in Ban+2Ir4nGe12n+4 (n=1,2) with cage structure and softening of low-lying localized mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiangang; Yamaura, Jun-ichi; Lei, Hechang; Matsuishi, Satoru; Qi, Yanpeng; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-10-01

    We report on new superconductors Ban+2Ir4nGe12n+4 (n = 1, 2) with critical temperatures Tc = 6.1 and 3.2 K, respectively, along with their crystal structures, electron transport, and specific heat. The compounds are composed of alternating Ba@Ir8Ge16 and Ba@Ir2Ge16 cages, both of which are larger in the n = 1 sample than in the n = 2 sample. The normal-state heat capacity reveals two low-lying vibration modes associated with guest Ba cations, and both characteristic temperatures in Ba3Ir4Ge16 are smaller than those in Ba4Ir8Ge28. Meanwhile, the density functional theory calculations reveal that the Ge-4p bands dominated the Fermi level in both samples. We propose that the softening of localized phonons due to expansion of the cage strengthens the electron-phonon coupling between Ba cations and Ge anions, leading to the higher Tc in Ba3Ir4Ge16.

  1. Protein secondary structure of the isolated photosystem II reaction center and conformational changes studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, W Z; Newell, W R; Haris, P I; Chapman, D; Barber, J

    1991-05-01

    The secondary structure of the photosystem II (PSII) reaction center isolated from pea chloroplasts has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Spectra were recorded in aqueous buffers containing H2O or D2O; the detergent present for most measurements was dodecyl maltoside. The broad amide I and amide II bands were analyzed by using second-derivative and deconvolution procedures. Absorption bands were assigned to the presence of alpha-helices, beta-sheets, turns, or random structure. Quantitative analysis revealed that this complex contained a high proportion of alpha-helices (67%) and some antiparallel beta-sheets (9%) and turns (11%). An irreversible decrease in the intensity of the band associated with the alpha-helices occurs upon exposure of the isolated PSII reaction center to bright illumination. This loss of alpha-helical content gave rise to an increase in other secondary structures, particularly beta-sheets. After similar pretreatment with light, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveals lower mobility and solubility of constituent D1 and D2 polypeptides of the PSII reaction center. Some degradation of these polypeptides also occurs. In contrast, there is no change in the mobility of the two subunits of cytochrome b559. In the absence of illumination, the PSII reaction center exchanged into dodecyl maltoside shows good thermal stability as compared with samples in Triton X-100. Only at a temperature of about 60 degrees C do spectral changes take place that are indicative of denaturation. PMID:1850626

  2. Change in Photosystem II Photochemistry During Algal Growth Phases of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Oukarroum, Abdallah

    2016-06-01

    Sensitivity of photosynthetic processes towards environmental stress is used as a bioanalytical tool to evaluate the responses of aquatic plants to a changing environment. In this paper, change of biomass density, chlorophyll a fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters during growth phases of two microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus were studied. The photosynthetic growth behaviour changed significantly with cell age and algae species. During the exponential phase of growth, the photosynthesis capacity reached its maximum and decreased in ageing algal culture during stationary phase. In conclusion, the chlorophyll a fluorescence OJIP method and the derived fluorescence parameters would be an accurate method for obtaining information on maximum photosynthetic capacities and monitoring algal cell growth. This will contribute to more understanding, for example, of toxic actions of pollutants in microalgae test. PMID:26868257

  3. Managing Information Technology as a Catalyst of Change. Track II: Leveraging People with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    This track of the 1993 CAUSE Conference presents eight papers on how information technology can help people in institutions of higher education do their jobs more effectively. Papers include: (1) "Implementing a Culture of Change: The Five-Year Transformation of The George Washington University" (Walter M. Bortz); (2) "Empowering the User"…

  4. Selected translated abstracts of Russian-language climate-change publications: II, Clouds. Issue 159

    SciTech Connect

    Burtis, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents abstracts (translated into English) of important Russian-language literature concerning clouds as they relate to climate change. In addition to the bibliographic citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Russian. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

  5. Selected Translated Abstracts of Russian-Language Climate-Change Publications, II. Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ravina, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents abstracts (translated into English) of important Russian-language literature concerning clouds as they relate to climate change. In addition to the bibliographic citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Russian. Author and title indexes are included, to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

  6. Reference hydrologic networks II. Using reference hydrologic networks to assess climate-driven changes in streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burn, Donald H.; Hannaford, Jamie; Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Whitfield, Paul H.; Thorne, Robin; Marsh, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) can play an important role in monitoring for changes in the hydrological regime related to climate variation and change. Currently, the literature concerning hydrological response to climate variations is complex and confounded by the combinations of many methods of analysis, wide variations in hydrology, and the inclusion of data series that include changes in land use, storage regulation and water use in addition to those of climate. Three case studies that illustrate a variety of approaches to the analysis of data from RHNs are presented and used, together with a summary of studies from the literature, to develop approaches for the investigation of changes in the hydrological regime at a continental or global scale, particularly for international comparison. We present recommendations for an analysis framework and the next steps to advance such an initiative. There is a particular focus on the desirability of establishing standardized procedures and methodologies for both the creation of new national RHNs and the systematic analysis of data derived from a collection of RHNs.

  7. Analytic Corrections to CFD Heating Predictions Accounting for Changes in Surface Catalysis. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Inger, George R.

    1996-01-01

    A new approach for combining the insight afforded by integral boundary-layer analysis with comprehensive (but time intensive) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flowfield solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is described. The approach extracts CFD derived quantities at the wall and at the boundary layer edge for inclusion in a post-processing boundary-layer analysis. It allows a designer at a work-station to address two questions, given a single CFD solution. (1) How much does the heating change for a thermal protection system (TPS) with different catalytic properties than was used in the original CFD solution? (2) How does the heating change at the interface of two different TPS materials with an abrupt change in catalytic efficiency? The answer to the second question is particularly important, because abrupt changes from low to high catalytic efficiency can lead to localized increase in heating which exceeds the usually conservative estimate provided by a fully catalytic wall assumption. Capabilities of this approach for application to Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) design are demonstrated. If the definition of surface catalysis is uncertain early in the design process, results show that fully catalytic wall boundary conditions provide the best baseline for CFD design points.

  8. Direct determination of the timing of sea level change during termination II.

    PubMed

    Gallup, Christina D; Cheng, H; Taylor, F W; Edwards, R L

    2002-01-11

    An outcrop within the last interglacial terrace on Barbados contains corals that grew during the penultimate deglaciation, or Termination II. We used combined 230Th and 231Pa dating to determine that they grew 135.8 +/- 0.8 thousand years ago, indicating that sea level was 18 +/- 3 meters below present sea level at the time. This suggests that sea level had risen to within 20% of its peak last-interglacial value by 136 thousand years ago, in conflict with Milankovitch theory predictions. Orbital forcing may have played a role in the deglaciation, as may have isostatic adjustments due to large ice sheets. Other corals in the same outcrop grew during oxygen isotope (delta18O) substage 6e, indicating that sea level was 38 +/- 5 meters below present sea level, about 168.0 thousand years ago. When compared to the delta18O signal in the benthic V19-30/V19-28 record at that time, the coral data extend to the previous glacial cycle the conclusion that deep-water temperatures were colder during glacial periods. PMID:11786639

  9. Post-World War II uranium changes in dated Mont Blanc ice and snow.

    PubMed

    Barbante, C; Van De Velde, K; Cozzi, G; Capodaglio, G; Cescon, P; Planchon, F; Hong, S; Ferrari, C; Boutron, C

    2001-10-15

    Recent controversies concerning the possibility of environmental contamination due to the use of uranium in classical weaponry have led us to realize that there is a lack of time series for this metal from environmental archives. We have therefore performed analysis of a dated 140 m-long ice/snow core that was drilled in 1994 at a cold high altitude site (4250 m) near the summit of Mont Blanc in the French-Italian Alps. Ultraclean analytical procedures were employed in our analyses. Uranium concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. In ice dating from before the 1940s, uranium concentrations are found to have remained fairly constant and can be explained simply by a crustal contribution. For the post-World War II layers, on the other hand, the data show large excesses above crustal contributions. These uranium excesses are attributed to tropospheric transport of dust emitted during extensive mining and milling operations which took place in the GDR and to a smaller extent in France at that time. There is no enhancement in uranium concentrations in the ice layer in which fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl accident was previously identified from a gross beta activity vs depth profile. PMID:11686362

  10. The DRD3 Ser9Gly Polymorphism Predicted Metabolic Change in Drug-Naive Patients With Bipolar II Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po-See; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Li, Chia-Ling; Chung, Yi-Lun; Hsieh, Tsai-Hsin; Lee, I-Hui; Chen, Kao-Ching; Yang, Yen-Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band; Lee, Sheng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with bipolar II disorder (BDII) have a higher prevalence rate of metabolic disturbance. Whether BDII itself, in addition to its current standard treatment, is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome warrants additional study. The dopamine receptor D3 (DRD3) gene, one of the candidate genes for BDII, is also involved in the dopaminergic system. We investigated whether it is related to changes in the metabolic indices of patients with BDII given 12 weeks of standard treatment. Patients with a first diagnosis of BDII (n = 117) were recruited. Metabolic profiles (cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting serum glucose, body mass index) were measured at baseline and at 2, 8, and 12 weeks. The genotype of the DRD3 Ser9Gly polymorphism (rs6280) was determined. Multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used. Seventy-six (65.0%) patients completed the 12-week intervention. Significant differences in triglyceride change were associated with the DRD3 Ser9Gly genotype (P = 0.03). Patients with the Ser/Ser genotype had significantly smaller triglyceride increases and a lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome than did those with the Ser/Gly+Gly/Gly genotype. However, the associations between the DRD3 Ser9Gly polymorphism with changes in triglyceride level become nonsignificant after correcting for multiple comparisons. We conclude that the DRD3 Ser9Gly polymorphism is nominally associated with changes in triglycerides and metabolic syndrome after 12 weeks of standard BDII treatment. PMID:27310943

  11. Nanoporous cobalt(II) MOF exhibiting four magnetic ground states and changes in gas sorption upon post-synthetic modification.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming-Hua; Yin, Zheng; Tan, Yan-Xi; Zhang, Wei-Xiong; He, Yan-Ping; Kurmoo, Mohamedally

    2014-03-26

    We present the syntheses, structural characterization, gas sorption, I2 uptake, and magnetic properties of a double-walled porous metal-organic framework, [Co(II)3(lac)2(pybz)2]·3DMF (1·3DMF, purple, where pybz = 4-pyridyl benzoate, lac = d- and l-lactate) and of its post-synthetic modified (PSM) congeners, [Co(II)3(lac)2(pybz)2]·xGuest (xGuest = 6MeOH, purple; 4.5EtOH, purple; 3PrOH, purple; 2C6H6, purple; 2.7I2, black), [Co(II)3(lac)2(pybz)2] (1, purple), [Co(II)3(pybz)2(lac)2(H2O)2]·7H2O (1a·7H2O, green), and [Co(III)Co(II)2(pybz)2(lac)2(H2O)2]I·2H2O·1.5DMSO (1b·I(-)·2H2O·1.5DMSO, yellow, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide). Crystallography shows that the framework is not altered by the replacement of DMF by different solvents or by the removal of the solvent molecules during the single-crystal to single-crystal (SC-SC) transformations, while upon exchange with H2O or partial oxidation by molecular iodine, the crystallinity is affected. 1 absorbs N2, H2, CH4, CH3OH, C2H5OH, PrOH, C6H6, and I2, but once it is in contact with H2O the absorption efficiency is drastically reduced. Upon PSM, the magnetism is transformed from a canted antiferromagnet (1·3DMF and 1·xGuest) to single-chain magnet (1), to a ferrimagnet (1a·7H2O), and to a ferromagnet (1b·I(-)·2H2O·1.5DMSO). Raman spectroscopy suggests the color change (purple to green 1a·7H2O or yellow 1b·I(-)·2H2O·1.5DMSO) is associated with a change of geometry from a strained octahedron due to the very acute chelating angle (∼60°) of the lactate of a cobalt center to a regular octahedron with a monodentate carboxylate and one H2O. The magnetic transformation is explained by the different interchain exchanges (J'), antiferromagnetic for 1·3DMF and 1·xSolvent (J' < 0), SCM for 1 (J' verge to 0), and ferromagnetic for 1a·7H2O (J' > 0), between homometal topological ferrimagnetic chains (two octahedral and one tetrahedral Co(II) ions) connected by the double walls of pybz at 13.3 Å (shortest Co

  12. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Cameron; Capps, Scott

    2014-11-05

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  13. Strongly (001)-textured MgO/Co40Fe40B20 spin-tunnel contact on n-Ge(001) and its spin accumulation: Structural modification with ultrathin Mg insertion by sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soogil; Kim, Sanghoon; Son, Jangyup; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Lee, Seok-Hee; Hong, Jongill

    2016-04-01

    The sputter-deposited fcc-MgO (001)[100]/bcc-Co40Fe40B20 (001)[110] spin-tunnel contact (STC) was successfully prepared on n-Ge(001). We found that the interfacial modification by ultrathin (6 Å) Mg insertion at the interface between n-Ge and MgO plays an important role in spin injection into Ge. The significantly amplified spin accumulation was observed in this STC as a result of the structural modification. The three-terminal Hanle signal of this STC was 2.7 times larger than that of the STC without Mg insertion. Our study confirms that a sputtering technique is indeed practical and useful to modify interfacial structures for the efficient injection of spins into semiconductors.

  14. Change in sleep duration and type 2 diabetes: the Whitehall II study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrie, Jane E; Kivimäki, Mika; Akbaraly, Tasnime N; Tabak, Adam; Abell, Jessica; Smith, George Davey; Virtanen, Marianna; Kumari, Meena; Shipley, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that short and long sleep are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Using successive data waves spanning more than 20 years we examined whether a change in sleep duration is associated with incident diabetes. Research Design and Methods Sleep duration was reported at the beginning and end of four 5-year cycles: 1985-88 to 1991-94 (N=5613); 1991-94 to 1997-99 (N=4193); 1997-99 to 2002-04 (N=3840); 2002-04 to 2007-09 (N=4195). At each cycle, change in sleep duration was calculated for participants without diabetes. Incident diabetes at the end of the subsequent 5-year period was defined using: (1) fasting glucose; (2) 75g oral glucose tolerance test; and (3) glycated hemoglobin, in conjunction with diabetes medication and self-reported doctor diagnosis. Results Compared to the reference group of persistent 7-hour sleepers, an increase of ≥2hours sleep per night was associated with a higher risk of incident diabetes; Odds Ratios (95% Confidence Intervals) 1.65 (95% CI: 1.15, 2.37), in analyses adjusted for age, sex, employment grade and ethnic group. This association was partially attenuated by adjustment for body mass index and change in weight; 1.50 (1.04, 2.16). An increased risk of incident diabetes was also seen in persistent short sleepers (average ≤5.5 hours/night); 1.35 (1.04, 1.76), but this evidence weakened on adjustment for body mass index and change in weight; 1.25 (0.96, 1.63). Conclusion This study suggests that individuals whose sleep duration increases are at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Greater weight and weight gain in this group partly explain the association. PMID:26068863

  15. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: part II. Changes in sampling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Lee, Larry; Flemmer, Michael M; Harper, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This second, and concluding, part of this study evaluated changes in sampling efficiency of respirable size-selective samplers due to air pulsations generated by the selected personal sampling pumps characterized in Part I (Lee E, Lee L, Möhlmann C et al. Evaluation of pump pulsation in respirable size-selective sampling: Part I. Pulsation measurements. Ann Occup Hyg 2013). Nine particle sizes of monodisperse ammonium fluorescein (from 1 to 9 μm mass median aerodynamic diameter) were generated individually by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator from dilute solutions of fluorescein in aqueous ammonia and then injected into an environmental chamber. To collect these particles, 10-mm nylon cyclones, also known as Dorr-Oliver (DO) cyclones, were used with five medium volumetric flow rate pumps. Those were the Apex IS, HFS513, GilAir5, Elite5, and Basic5 pumps, which were found in Part I to generate pulsations of 5% (the lowest), 25%, 30%, 56%, and 70% (the highest), respectively. GK2.69 cyclones were used with the Legacy [pump pulsation (PP) = 15%] and Elite12 (PP = 41%) pumps for collection at high flows. The DO cyclone was also used to evaluate changes in sampling efficiency due to pulse shape. The HFS513 pump, which generates a more complex pulse shape, was compared to a single sine wave fluctuation generated by a piston. The luminescent intensity of the fluorescein extracted from each sample was measured with a luminescence spectrometer. Sampling efficiencies were obtained by dividing the intensity of the fluorescein extracted from the filter placed in a cyclone with the intensity obtained from the filter used with a sharp-edged reference sampler. Then, sampling efficiency curves were generated using a sigmoid function with three parameters and each sampling efficiency curve was compared to that of the reference cyclone by constructing bias maps. In general, no change in sampling efficiency (bias under ±10%) was observed until pulsations exceeded 25% for the

  16. Sunshine, Earthshine and Climate Change: II. Solar Origins of Variations in the Earth's Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, P. R.; Pallé, E.; Yurchyshyn, V.; Qiu, J.; Hickey, J.; Rodriguez, P. Montañés; Chu, M.-C.; Kolbe, E.; Brown, C. T.; Koonin, S. E.

    2003-06-01

    There are terrestrial signatures of the solar activity cycle in ice core data (Ram & Stoltz 1999), but the variations in the sun's irradiance over the cycle seem too small to account for the signature (Lean 1997; Goode & Dziembowski 2003). Thus, one would expect that the signature must arise from an indirect effect(s) of solar activity. Such an indirect effect would be expected to manifest itself in the earth's reflectance. Further, the earth's climate depends directly on the albedo. Continuous observations of the earthshine have been carried out from Big Bear Solar Observatory since December 1998, with some more sporadic measurements made during the years 1994 and 1995. We have determined the annual albedos both from our observations and from simulations utilizing the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scene model and various datasets for the cloud cover, as well as snow and ice cover. With these, we look for inter-annual and longer-term changes in the earth's total reflectance, or Bond albedo. We find that both our observations and simulations indicate that the albedo was significantly higher during 1994-1995 (activity minimum) than for the more recent period covering 1999-2001 (activity maximum). However, the sizes of the changes seem somewhat discrepant. Possible indirect solar influences on the earth's Bond albedo are discussed to emphasize that our earthshine data are already sufficiently precise to detect, if they occur, any meaningful changes in the earth's reflectance. Still greater precision will occur as we expand our single site observations to a global network.

  17. Three-dimensional dental arch changes of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Adriano Porto; Pinto, Ary dos Santos; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Gonçalves, João Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the three-dimensional changes in the dental arch of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusions at three different periods. Methods Landmarks previously identified on upper and lower dental casts were digitized on a three-dimensional digitizer MicroScribe-3DX and stored in Excel worksheets in order to assess the width, length and depth of patient's dental arches. Results During orthodontic preparation, the maxillary and mandibular transverse dimensions measured at the premolar regions were increased and maintained throughout the follow-up period. Intercanine width was increased only in the upper arch during orthodontic preparation. Maxillary arch length was reduced during orthodontic finalization, only. Upper and lower arch depths were stable in the study periods. Differences between centroid and gingival changes suggested that upper and lower arch premolars buccaly proclined during the pre-surgical period. Conclusions Maxillary and mandibular dental arches presented transverse expansion at premolar regions during preoperative orthodontic preparation, with a tendency towards buccal tipping. The transverse dimensions were not altered after surgery. No sagittal or vertical changes were observed during the follow-up periods. PMID:25279524

  18. Photosystem II functionality and antioxidant system changes during leaf rolling in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Rabiye; Saruhan, Neslihan; Sağlam, A; Nar, Hatice; Kadioğlu, A

    2009-12-01

    We studied the changes in antioxidant system and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in post-stress emerging Ctenanthe setosa (Rosc.) Eichler (Marantaceae) plants (PSE plants) having reduced leaf area under drought stress causing leaf rolling and re-watering. PSE plants were compared to primary stressed plants (PS) in previous studies. The parameters were measured at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others is intermediate form). Water potentials and stomatal conductance of leaves were gradually decreased during leaf rolling. Similarly, maximum quantum efficiency of open PS II center and quantum yield of PS II decreased during the rolling period. Non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence decreased at score 2 then increased while photochemical quenching did not change during leaf rolling. Electron transport rate decreased only at score 4 but approximately reached to score 1 level after re-watering. Superoxide dismutase activity was not constant at all leaf rolling scores. Ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities generally tended to increase during leaf rolling. Lipid peroxidation and H 2 O 2 content increased at score 2 but decreased at the later scores. On the other hand, O 2 .- production increased during the rolling period. After re-watering of the plants having score 4 of leaf rolling, antioxidant enzyme activities were lower than those of score 1. Other physiological parameters also tended to reach the value of score 1. The results indicated that PSE plants gained drought tolerance by reducing leaf area effectively induced their antioxidant systems and protected the photosynthesis under drought stress similar to PS plants. PMID:20015833

  19. Phase change in liquid face seals. II - Isothermal and adiabatic bounds with real fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. F.; Chao, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    Analytical studies of phase change effects in parallel and tapered liquid face seals are presented. An isothermal and adiabatic model of low Reynolds number flow are considered by numerical integration of the descriptive equations for a real fluid, and its thermodynamic properties are calculated for each step, using a computer program for the steam tables or fluid thermodynamic properties. It was shown that for low leakage rate the isothermal model is more accurate and for high leakage rates the adiabatic model is more accurate; that both models yield the same conclusions regarding stability; and that the transient of collapse is described by the adiabatic model which predicts a catastrophic collapse and then either failure or explosive return to a larger film thickness value. Finally, it is shown that converging seals may become unstable and the mass leakage rate is reduced significantly below the all liquid value when boiling occurs.

  20. Behavioural changes during withdrawal from desmethylimipramine (DMI). II. Increased resistance to extinction.

    PubMed

    Willner, P; Montgomery, T; Bird, D

    1981-01-01

    Rats withdrawn from chronic treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant desmethylimipramine (DMI) showed increased resistance to extinction in a runway and in continuously reinforced lever pressing. Changes were not seen in animals maintained on DMI. In acquisition, in the runway, there were no significant differences between groups; in the Skinner box, animals maintained on DMI performed worse than controls, but withdrawn animals recovered to control levels of performance. It is suggested that the effect on extinction may be mediated by a decrease in the efficacy of the dorsal noradrenaline bundle, which develops during chronic DMI treatment, but is masked by the presence of DMI. The implications of the conclusion for the " revised catecholamine hypothesis of depression" are discussed. PMID:6795662

  1. Cockle infection by Himasthla quissetensis - II. The theoretical effects of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Montaudouin, Xavier; Blanchet, Hugues; Desclaux-Marchand, Céline; Bazairi, Hocein; Alfeddy, Nazik; Bachelet, Guy

    2016-07-01

    Numerous marine populations experience parasite pressure. This is the case of the cockles Cerastoderma edule which are often highly infected by trematode macroparasites. These parasites display a complex life cycle, with a succession of free-living and parasitic stages. Climate, and in particular temperature, is an important modulator of the transmission dynamics of parasites. Consequently, global change is thought to have implications for the epidemiology of infectious diseases. Using Himasthla quissetensis, a dominant parasite of cockles as 2nd intermediate host in Arcachon Bay (France), we used mathematical models of parasite emergence (cercariae) and parasite infection (metacercariae) in cockles as a function of water temperature, in order to study different scenarios of temperature increases. Globally, with a + 0.5 °C to + 6.0 °C simulation, cumulated emergence of cercariae and accumulation of metacercariae tended to decrease or stagnate, respectively. This is the consequence of a trade-off between sooner (spring) and later (autumn) cercariae emergence/infestation on one hand, and a longer inhibition period of cercariae emergence/infestation during the hottest days in summer. Using sea water temperature in Oualidia (Morocco) where mean annual sea temperature is 3 °C higher than in Arcachon Bay, our model predicted infestation all year long (no seasonality). The model gave a correct estimation of the total number of parasites that was expected in cockles. Conversely, observed infestation in Oualidia followed a seasonal pattern like in Arcachon Bay. These results suggest that, if temperature is a strong driver of parasite transmission, extrapolation in the framework of climate change should be performed with caution.

  2. Adrenocortical toxicity of 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE in mice. II. Mitochondrial changes following ecologically relevant doses

    SciTech Connect

    Joensson, C.J.R.; Rodriguez-Martinez, H.; Lund, B.O.; Bergman, A.; Brandt, I. )

    1991-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize early ultrastructural lesions in the adrenal zona fasciculata of female C57BL mice given a single ip injection of the adrenocorticolytic DDT-metabolite 3-methylsulfonyl-DDE (MeSO2-DDE). Following 3 mg/kg, mitochondrial changes were observed 6 hr after dosing. At 12 and 24 hr the mitochondrial changes were conspicuous, with disorganization and disappearance of central cristae. At doses of 6, 12, and 25 mg/kg body wt initial (6 hr) mitochondrial vacuolization was observed, followed by disappearance of mitochondria (6-12 mg/kg) or cellular necrosis (25 mg/kg). The metabolic activation and binding of MeSO2-(14C)DDE in adrenal homogenates were determined in vitro. The irreversible binding of MeSO2-(14C)DDE to the mitochondria-containing adrenal S-9 pellet fraction was 50 times higher than that to the postmitochondrial S-12 supernatant fraction. The apparent Km was 2.1 microM and the apparent Vmax was 104 pmol/mg protein/30 min for the binding of MeSO2-(14C)DDE to S-0.3 supernatants. The irreversible protein binding was inhibited by metyrapone (Ki = 1 microM) and 11-deoxycorticosterone (Ki = 3 microM). In conclusion, the adrenal metabolic activation of MeSO2-DDE is suggested to be mediated by a mitochondrial cytochrome P450 form, presumably P450 (11 beta). A primary mitochondrial lesion develops and subsequently leads to degeneration and necrosis of the zona fasciculata.

  3. Sleep Quality Changes during Overwintering at the German Antarctic Stations Neumayer II and III: The Gender Factor

    PubMed Central

    Steinach, Mathias; Kohlberg, Eberhard; Maggioni, Martina Anna; Mendt, Stefan; Opatz, Oliver; Stahn, Alexander; Gunga, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Antarctic residence holds many challenges to human physiology, like increased psycho-social tension and altered circadian rhythm, known to influence sleep. We assessed changes in sleep patterns during 13 months of overwintering at the German Stations Neumayer II and III from 2008 to 2014, with focus on gender, as many previous investigations were inconclusive regarding gender-based differences or had only included men. Materials & Methods Time in bed, sleep time, sleep efficiency, number of arousals, sleep latency, sleep onset, sleep offset, and physical activity level were determined twice per month during seven overwintering campaigns of n = 54 participants (37 male, 17 female) using actimetry. Data were analyzed using polynomial regression and analysis of covariance for change over time with the covariates gender, inhabited station, overwintering season and influence of physical activity and local sunshine radiation. Results We found overall longer times in bed (p = 0.004) and sleep time (p = 0.014) for women. The covariate gender had a significant influence on time in bed (p<0.001), sleep time (p<0.001), number of arousals (p = 0.04), sleep latency (p = 0.04), and sleep onset (p<0.001). Women separately (p = 0.02), but not men (p = 0.165), showed a linear increase in number of arousals. Physical activity decreased over overwintering time for men (p = 0.003), but not for women (p = 0.174). The decline in local sunshine radiation led to a 48 minutes longer time in bed (p<0.001), 3.8% lower sleep efficiency (p<0.001), a delay of 32 minutes in sleep onset (p<0.001), a delay of 54 minutes in sleep offset (p<0.001), and 11% less daily energy expenditure (p<0.001), for all participants in reaction to the Antarctic winter’s darkness-phase. Conclusions Overwinterings at the Stations Neumayer II and III are associated with significant changes in sleep patterns, with dependences from overwintering time and local sunshine radiation. Gender appears to be an

  4. The impacts of climate change on calcareous grasslands. II. Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, G.J.; Clarke, I.P.; Brown, V.K.

    1995-06-01

    Field manipulations of winter temperature and summer rainfall have been in operation since Feb. 1994. Monitoring of the two factorial experiments began in April 1994 and has continued at regular intervals to date. Pre-treatment characterization of all plots was completed at the northern (Buxton) and southern (Wytham) sites. The vegetation was sampled by point and 1m{sup 2} permanent quadrats. D-vac suction was used to sample the invertebrate community. Additionally, the leaf miners, spiders and Auchenorrhyncha (leaf hoppers) have been chosen for further study. At both sites, winter warming promoted plant growth, especially of the perennial grasses. However, species specific responses were recorded in terms of early growth and flowering. Drought inhibited and enhanced rainfall promoted plant growth during the summer. Drought responses were greater at Buxton, while watering had a greater impact at Wytham. Tap-rooted species were resistant to drought at both sites, while responding positively (Buxton) or showing no response (Wytham) to enhanced rainfall. The invertebrates parallelled the responses of the vegetation. Warming resulted in either increased density (Wytham) or earlier emergence (Buxton & Wytham). At Buxton, warming promoted the development of certain leaf miner species while the reverse occurred at Wytham. Impacts of winter warming on over-wintering strategies may govern such responses. Some Auchenorrhyncha species had greater densities on droughted plots at Wytham. These hoppers may be responding to increased nutrients, within host plants, due to drought. Such results give an insight into how grassland ecosystems may be modified by a changing climate.

  5. Repeated stress in combination with pyridostigmine Part II: changes in cerebral gene expression.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Laure; Diserbo, Michel; Lamproglou, Ioannis; Amourette, Christine; Peinnequin, André; Fauquette, William

    2009-02-11

    Organophosphates (OP) represent a potential threat in terrorism or during military conflicts. Due to its faculty to protect cholinesterase (ChE) activity against irreversible inactivation by OP, pyridostigmine bromide (PB) was used as a prophylaxis treatment during the first Persian Gulf War. To explain dysfunctions reported by Gulf War Veterans (GWV), it was suggested a potentiation of the operational stress effects by PB given to soldiers. Our companion paper (see part 1 in the same journal issue) describes that PB treatment administered in repeated stress conditions results in long-term perturbations of learning and social behaviour. The present paper examines, in adult male Wistar rats, consequences of the association of repeated stress and PB treatment on gene expression in hypothalamus and hippocampus. PB treatment (1.5 mg/kg/day) was orally administered 30 min before each stress session to inhibit 40% of blood ChE as recommended by NATO. 10 days of stress alone induce a decrease in hypothalamic Il-1alpha expression. Treatment with PB alone increases mineralocorticoid receptor expression in hypothalamus which means that PB may thus modify stress perception by animals. Stressed-PB animals showed increase in hippocampal expression of BDNF, TrkB and CamKIIalpha, three genes implicated in memory development. As a supplement to previous studies showing behavioural and biochemical effects of the association of stress with PB, our data reveal that behavioural effects of this association may be linked with genomic changes in hippocampus. Mechanisms underlying these modifications and their link with memory disturbances reported by GWV remain to be further determined. PMID:18796314

  6. Developmentally regulated changes in glucosidase II association with, and carbohydrate content of, the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, T A; Ostergaard, H L

    2001-10-01

    Glucosidase II (GII) stably interacts with the external domain of CD45 in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. We have found that the association occurs in immature cells, but is significantly reduced in mature T cells. Using mannose-binding protein (MBP), in both FACS analysis and pull-down assays, we find that MBP can specifically recognize cell surface CD45 from immature, but not mature T cells. Analysis of thymocytes reveals increased MBP binding and GII association with CD45 in double-positive thymocytes compared with either double-negative or single-positive thymocytes. As well, the same pool of CD45 recognized by MBP can also associate with GII. Initial analysis of the basis of the interaction between CD45 and MBP suggests MBP binds two different glycoforms of CD45 based on the differential competition with glucose. Finally, inhibition of GII activity in cells that do not normally express MBP ligands results in significant increases in cell surface MBP ligands, including CD45. Taken together, these data suggest that the glucose content of the cell surface CD45 changes as thymocytes undergo maturation to mature T cells, and may be regulated by GII interactions. Such changes in the cell surface carbohydrate on CD45 may affect the development of thymocytes, perhaps via binding of CD45 on thymocytes to lectins on stromal cells. PMID:11564800

  7. Hyperfine-changing transitions in {sup 3}He II and other one-electron ions by electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Sadeghpour, H. R. E-mail: hrs@cfa.harvard.edu

    2014-06-10

    We consider the spin-exchange (SE) cross-section in electron scattering from {sup 3}He II, which drives the hyperfine-changing 3.46 cm (8.665 GHz) line transition. Both the analytical quantum defect method—applicable at very low energies—and accurate R-matrix techniques for electron-He{sup +} scattering are employed to obtain SE cross-sections. The quantum defect theory is also applied to electron collisions with other one-electron ions in order to demonstrate the utility of the method and derive scaling relations. At very low energies, the hyperfine-changing cross-sections due to e-He{sup +} scattering are much larger in magnitude than for electron collisions with neutral hydrogen, hinting at large rate constants for equilibration. Specifically, we obtain rate coefficients of K(10 K) = 1.10 × 10{sup –6} cm{sup 3} s{sup –1} and K(100 K) = 3.49 × 10{sup –7} cm{sup 3} s{sup –1}.

  8. I. Climate change on ancient Mars. II. Exoplanet geodynamics and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kite, Edwin Stephen

    . Seasonal snowmelt on Early Mars is possible under unusual orbital conditions provided that the snow is dust-contaminated. The predicted distribution of snowmelt can explain the distribution of sedimentary rocks on Mars, but only if Mars had a thin atmosphere when the sedimentary rocks formed. This framework is the first to link upcoming observations by the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover at the lower Gale Crater mound to past global climate on Mars. The model makes predictions about the lower Gale Crater mound that can be tested using Curiosity rover data. Earth is the only example of long term climate stability that is available for study, so long term climate stability is difficult to understand. Extrasolar planets may ameliorate this problem of uniqueness. It is clear that rates of volcanic activity and of surface weathering are important in regulating long term climate. In the second part of this thesis, I model the rate of volcanism on massive Earth-like planets, and the surface weathering rate on planets in 1:1 spin:orbit resonance. "Super-Earths" in the range 1-10 Earth masses have been detected by radial velocity and transit methods. Using an idealized mantle thermal evolution model to drive mantle-melting models, I show that the rate of volcanism on massive Earth like planets is a weak function of planet mass. Planet mass can, however, affect tectonics by changing the mode of mantle convection. Earth's climate stability depends on a negative feedback involving the temperature-dependent rate of weathering and mean surface temperature. I use an idealized model to show that for intermediate surface pressures and for low-opacity atmospheres, nonlinearities in the surface energy balance can reverse the sign of this dependence on tidally-locked planets. This leads to climate instability. I conclude by discussing future observations and research aimed at understanding long-term climate stability.

  9. Death of pastures syndrome: tissue changes in Urochloa hybrida cv. Mulato II and Urochloa brizantha cv. Marandu.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Júnior, N G; Ariano, A P R; Silva, I V

    2016-07-11

    The quality of forage production is a prerequisite to raising livestock. Therefore, income losses in this activity, primarily cattle raising, can result in the impossibility of economic activity. Through the qualitative and quantitative anatomical study of Urochloa hybrida cv. Mulato II and U. brizantha cv. Marandu, we searched for descriptions and compared changes in the individual vegetative body from populations with death syndrome pastures (DPS). Specimens were collected at different physiological stages from farms in northern Mato Grosso. After collection, the individuals were fixed in FAA50 and stored in 70% alcohol. Histological slides were prepared from the middle third of the sections of roots, rhizomes, and leaves, and the proportions and characteristics of tissues were evaluated in healthy, intermediate, and advanced stages of DPS. Changes were compared between cultivars. With the advancement of the syndrome, the following changes were observed: a more marked decrease in the length of roots in U. hybrida; disorganization of the cortical region of the roots and rhizome cultivars; fungal hyphae in roots and aerenchyma formation in U. hybrida; a decrease in sclerenchyma fiber proportions in roots and leaves; sclerification of the epidermis of U. brizantha rhizomes; and an increase in pericyclic fibers in U. hybrida. Furthermore, there was a decrease in the volume of epidermal cells of the abaxial face of the leaves of both cultivars, with a greater reduction in U. hybrida; a gradual decrease in thickness in the midrib of leaves similar to leaf mesophyll; conduction system obstructions; partial or total cell lysis in roots and rhizomes affected by the syndrome. Obstructions in sieve tube element and companion cells, and sometimes obstruction in xylem vessel elements. The evolution of DPS in cultivars was similar, but there were variations, arising probably from the physiological response to stress, such as aerenchyma formation in the root and increased

  10. The absence of type II collagen and changes in proteoglycan structure of hyaline cartilage in a case of Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feshchenko, S P; Rebrin, I A; Sokolnik, V P; Sher, B M; Sokolov, B P; Kalinin, V N; Lazjuk, G I

    1989-04-01

    Structural analysis of hyaline cartilage extracellular matrix components from the ribs and knee joint of a stillborn female with type II achondrogenesis was carried out. The absence of type II collagen, a decrease in the amount of proteoglycans (PG), and structural changes in PG, namely, increased electrophoretic mobility of PG, lower relative content of chondroitin 4-sulfate (Ch4-S), lower molecular weight and decreased total chondroitin sulfate (ChS) sulfation, were detected. Increased amounts of type I and type III collagens, atypical for hyaline cartilage, were revealed. Among the link proteins (LPs), a large protein with a mol. wt. of 48 kDa was predominant. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of achondrogenesis ("chondrogenesis imperfecta") are discussed. The data obtained suggest that the primary defect in type II achondrogenesis involves ChS or type II collagen synthesis. PMID:2714779

  11. Termination-II interstadial/stadial climate change recorded in two stalagmites from the north European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, Gina E.; Spötl, Christoph; Cheng, Hai; Boch, Ronny; Min, Angela; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the sequence of events that take place during glacial-interglacial climate transitions is important for improving our knowledge of abrupt climate change. Here, we present a new stacked, high-resolution, precisely-dated speleothem stable isotope record from the northern Alps, which provides an important record of temperature and moisture-source changes between 134 and 111 ka for Europe and the wider North Atlantic realm. The record encompasses the penultimate deglaciation (Termination II (TII)), which lies beyond the limit of radiocarbon dating, thus providing an important new archive for a crucial period of rapid paleoclimate change. Warmer and wetter ice-free conditions were achieved by 134.1 ± 0.7 ka (modelled ages) as indicated by the presence of liquid water at the site. Temperatures warmed further at 133.7 ± 0.5 ka and led into an interstadial, synchronous with slightly elevated monsoon strength during the week monsoon interval. The interstadial experienced an unstable climate with a trough in temperature associated with a slowdown in Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and a reduction in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation. The interstadial ended with a more extreme cold reversal lasting 500 years in which NADW formation remained active but the subpolar gyre weakened allowing cool polar waters to penetrate southwards. The main warming associated with TII was very rapid, taking place between 130.9 ± 0.9 and 130.7 ± 0.9 ka coeval with initial monsoon strengthening. Temperatures then plateaued before being interrupted by a 600-year cold event at 129.1 ± 0.6 ka, associated once again with penetration of polar waters southwards into the North Atlantic and a slowdown in monsoon strengthening. Sub-orbital climate oscillations were thus a feature of TII in the north Atlantic realm, which broadly resemble the Bølling/Allerød-Younger Dryas-8.2 ka event pattern of change observed in Termination I despite monsoon records

  12. Mechanical strain of alveolar type II cells in culture: changes in the transcellular cytokeratin network and adaptations.

    PubMed

    Felder, Edward; Siebenbrunner, Marcus; Busch, Tobias; Fois, Giorgio; Miklavc, Pika; Walther, Paul; Dietl, Paul

    2008-11-01

    Mechanical forces exert multiple effects in cells, ranging from altered protein expression patterns to cell damage and death. Despite undisputable biological importance, little is known about structural changes in cells subjected to strain ex vivo. Here, we undertake the first transmission electron microscopy investigation combined with fluorescence imaging on pulmonary alveolar type II cells that are subjected to equibiaxial strain. When cells are investigated immediately after stretch, we demonstrate that curved cytokeratin (CK) fibers are straightened out at 10% increase in cell surface area (CSA) and that this is accompanied by a widened extracellular gap of desmosomes-the insertion points of CK fibers. Surprisingly, a CSA increase by 20% led to higher fiber curvatures of CK fibers and a concurrent return of the desmosomal gap to normal values. Since 20% CSA increase also induced a significant phosphorylation of CK8-ser431, we suggest CK phosphorylation might lower the tensile force of the transcellular CK network, which could explain the morphological observations. Stretch durations of 5 min caused membrane injury in up to 24% of the cells stretched by 30%, but the CK network remained surprisingly intact even in dead cells. We conclude that CK and desmosomes constitute a strong transcellular scaffold that survives cell death and hypothesize that phosphorylation of CK fibers is a mechano-induced adaptive mechanism to maintain epithelial overall integrity. PMID:18708634

  13. Diverse mechanisms for photoprotection in photosynthesis. Dynamic regulation of photosystem II excitation in response to rapid environmental change.

    PubMed

    Derks, Allen; Schaven, Kristin; Bruce, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) of photosynthesis catalyzes one of the most challenging reactions in nature, the light driven oxidation of water and release of molecular oxygen. PSII couples the sequential four step oxidation of water and two step reduction of plastoquinone to single photon photochemistry with charge accumulation centers on both its electron donor and acceptor sides. Photon capture, excitation energy transfer, and trapping occur on a much faster time scale than the subsequent electron transfer and charge accumulation steps. A balance between excitation of PSII and the use of the absorbed energy to drive electron transport is essential. If the absorption of light energy increases and/or the sink capacity for photosynthetically derived electrons decreases, potentially deleterious side reactions may occur, including the production of reactive oxygen species. In response, a myriad of fast (second to minutes timescale) and reversible photoprotective mechanisms are observed to regulate PSII excitation when the environment changes more quickly than can be acclimated to by gene expression. This review compares the diverse photoprotective mechanisms that are used to dissipate (quench) PSII excitation within the antenna systems of higher land plants, green algae, diatoms, and cyanobacteria. The molecular bases of how PSII excitation pressure is sensed by the antenna system and how the antenna then reconfigures itself from a light harvesting to an energy dissipative mode are discussed. PMID:25687894

  14. Correlating chemical changes in subchondral bone mineral due to aging or defective type II collagen by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehring, Karen A.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2007-02-01

    We show that early indicators of osteoarthritis are observed in Raman spectroscopy by probing femur surfaces excised from mouse models of early-onset osteoarthritis. Current clinical methods to examine arthritic joints include radiological examination of the joint, but may not be capable of detecting subtle chemical changes in the bone tissue, which may provide the earliest indications of osteoarthritis. Recent research has indicated that the subchondral bone may have a more significant role in the onset of osteoarthritis than previously realized. We will report the effect of age and defective type II collagen on Raman band area ratios used to describe bone structure and function. The carbonate-to-phosphate ratio is used to assess carbonate substitution into the bone mineral and the mineral-to-matrix ratio is used to measure bone mineralization. Mineral-to-matrix ratios indicate that subchondral bone becomes less mineralized as both the wild-type and Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice age. Moreover, the mineral-to-matrix ratios show that the subchondral bone of Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice is less mineralized than that of the wild-type mice. Carbonate-to-phosphate ratios from Del1 (+/-) transgenic mice follow the same longitudinal trend as wild-type mice. The ratio is slightly higher in the transgenic mice, indicating more carbonate content in the bone mineral. Raman characterization of bone mineralization provides an invaluable insight into the process of cartilage degeneration and the relationship with subchondral bone at the ultrastructural level.

  15. Defective histone supply causes changes in RNA polymerase II elongation rate and cotranscriptional pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Payán-Bravo, Laura; Muñoz-Cabello, Ana M.; Guijo, Macarena; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Prado, Félix; Reyes, José C.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription elongation is a highly regulated process that greatly influences mRNA levels as well as pre-mRNA splicing. Despite many studies in vitro, how chromatin modulates RNAPII elongation in vivo is still unclear. Here, we show that a decrease in the level of available canonical histones leads to more accessible chromatin with decreased levels of canonical histones and variants H2A.X and H2A.Z and increased levels of H3.3. With this altered chromatin structure, the RNAPII elongation rate increases, and the kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing is delayed with respect to RNAPII elongation. Consistent with the kinetic model of cotranscriptional splicing, the rapid RNAPII elongation induced by histone depletion promotes the skipping of variable exons in the CD44 gene. Indeed, a slowly elongating mutant of RNAPII was able to rescue this defect, indicating that the defective splicing induced by histone depletion is a direct consequence of the increased elongation rate. In addition, genome-wide analysis evidenced that histone reduction promotes widespread alterations in pre-mRNA processing, including intron retention and changes in alternative splicing. Our data demonstrate that pre-mRNA splicing may be regulated by chromatin structure through the modulation of the RNAPII elongation rate. PMID:26578803

  16. A single-base change in the tyrosine kinase II domain of ovine FGFR3 causes hereditary chondrodysplasia in sheep.

    PubMed

    Beever, J E; Smit, M A; Meyers, S N; Hadfield, T S; Bottema, C; Albretsen, J; Cockett, N E

    2006-02-01

    Ovine hereditary chondrodysplasia, or spider lamb syndrome (SLS), is a genetic disorder that is characterized by severe skeletal abnormalities and has resulted in substantial economic losses for sheep producers. Here we demonstrate that a non-synonymous T>A transversion in the highly conserved tyrosine kinase II domain of a positional candidate gene, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), is responsible for SLS. We also demonstrate that the mutant FGFR3 allele has an additive effect on long-bone length, calling into question the long-standing belief that SLS is inherited as a strict monogenic, Mendelian recessive trait. Instead, we suggest that SLS manifestation is determined primarily by the presence of the mutant FGFR3 allele, but it is also influenced by an animal's genetic background. In contrast to FGFR3 mutations causing dwarfism in humans, this single-base change is the only known natural mutation of FGFR3 that results in a skeletal overgrowth phenotype in any species. PMID:16441300

  17. Changes in blood pressure and dipsogenic responsiveness to angiotensin II during chronic exposure of rats to cold

    SciTech Connect

    Fregly, M.J.; Shechtman, O.; van Bergen, P.; Reeber, C.; Papanek, P.E. )

    1991-03-11

    To assess the role of the renin-angiotensin (RA) system in the development of cold-induced hypertension in rats, systolic blood pressure (SBP), plasma renin activity (PRA), and the dipsogenic responsiveness to s.c. administration of angiotensin II (AII) were measured weekly for 4 weeks. SBP increased significantly during the third week of exposure to cold (5C), compared to warm-adapted controls. A significant increase in SBP occurred during the third week of cold. In contrast, (PRA) increased within the first week of cold, and declined thereafter to reach the level of the control by the third week. By the fourth week, PRA decreased to a level significantly below that of control. The dipsogenic responsiveness to acute administration of AII increased significantly by the third week of cold and remained significantly elevated during the fourth week. There was a significant direct relationship between dipsogenic responsiveness to AII and SBP in the cold-treated but not the control group. There was also a significant indirect linear relationship between PRA and dipsogenic responsiveness to AII. Cold-treated rats had significant increases in urinary norepinephrine output and weights of heart, kidneys, adrenals, and brown adipose tissue. Thus, the results suggest, but do not prove, either that the elevation of blood pressure under these conditions may be induced by changes in the RA system. The results suggest further that the reduction in the drinking response to AII accompanying increases in PRA may be related to changes in the regulation of central receptors for AII.

  18. Light-induced voltage changes associated with electron and proton transfer in photosystem II core complexes reconstituted in phospholipid monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Höök, F; Brzezinski, P

    1994-01-01

    We have measured light-induced voltage changes (electrogenic events) in photosystem II (PSII) core complexes oriented in phospholipid monolayers. These events are compared to those measured in the functionally and structurally closely related reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In both systems we observed a rapid (< 100 ns) light-induced increase in voltage associated with charge separation. In PSII reaction centers it was followed by a decrease (decay) of approximately 14% of the charge-separation voltage and a time constant of approximately 500 microseconds. In bacterial reaction centers this decay was approximately 9% of the charge-separation voltage, and the time constant was approximately 200 microseconds. The decay was presumably associated with a structural change. In bacterial reaction centers, in the presence of excess water-soluble cytochrome c2+, it was followed by a slower increase of approximately 30% of the charge-separation voltage, associated with electron transfer from the cytochrome to the oxidized donor, P+. In PSII reaction centers, after the decay the voltage remained on the same level for > or = 0.5 s. In PSII reaction centers the electron transfer Q-AQB-->QA Q-B contributed with an electrogenicity of < or = 5% of that of the charge separation. In bacterial reaction centers this electrogenicity was < or = 2% of the charge-separation electrogenicity. Proton transfer to Q2-B in PSII reaction centers contributed with approximately 5% of the charge-separation voltage, which is approximately a factor of three smaller than that observed in bacterial reaction centers. PMID:8075340

  19. A Multi-Stage Longitudinal Comparative Design Stage II Evaluation of the Changing Lives Program: The Life Course Interview (RDA-LCI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arango, Lisa Lewis; Kurtines, William M.; Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Ritchie, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    The study reported in this article, a Multi-Stage Longitudinal Comparative Design Stage II evaluation conducted as a planned preliminary efficacy evaluation (psychometric evaluation of measures, short-term controlled outcome studies, etc.) of the Changing Lives Program (CLP), provided evidence for the reliability and validity of the qualitative…

  20. A Multistage Longitudinal Comparative (MLC) Design Stage II: Evaluation of the Changing Lives Program (CLP)--The Possible Selves Questionnaire-Qualitative Extensions (PSQ-QE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortsch, Gabrielle; Kurtines, William M.; Montgomery, Marilyn J.

    2008-01-01

    The study reported in this paper, a Multistage Longitudinal Comparative (MLC) Design Stage II evaluation conducted as a planned preliminary efficacy evaluation (psychometric evaluation of measures, short-term controlled outcome studies, etc.) of the Changing Lives Program (CLP), provided evidence for the reliability and validity of qualitative…

  1. He II 4686 in eta Carinae: no significant changes between 2009.0 and 2014.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Mairan; Heathcote, Bernard; Richardson, Noel; Luckas, Paul; Walter, Frederick; Prates, Rodrigo; Hickel, Gabriel; Coimbra, Adriano M.; Navarete, Felipe; Locke, Malcolm; Bohlsen, Terry; Damineli, Augusto; Jablonski, Francisco; Henrique, William; Powles, Jonathan; West, Julian; Andrade, Thiago A.; Fernandez-Lajus, Eduardo; Gull, Theodore; Corcoran, Michael F.; Groh, Jose H.; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Madura, Thomas; St-Jean, Lucas; Weigelt, Gerd

    2014-09-01

    We are conducting a multi-observatory campaign focused on the monitoring of He II 4686 emission across the periastron event of eta Carinae. The behavior of the equivalent width of the He II 4686 emission line across the 2014.6 event is similar to that observed in 2009.0.

  2. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Models for Change in Quantitative Variables, Part II Scholastic Models. Part II, Chapter 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannan, Michael T.

    This document is part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759. Stochastic models for the sociological analysis of change and the change process in quantitative variables are presented. The author lays groundwork for the statistical treatment of simple stochastic differential equations (SDEs) and discusses some of the continuities of…

  3. Stress Induces Changes in the Phosphorylation of Trypanosoma cruzi RNA Polymerase II, Affecting Its Association with Chromatin and RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal heptapeptide repeats of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) controls several transcription-related events in eukaryotes. Trypanosomatids lack these typical repeats and display an unusual transcription control. RNA Pol II associates with the transcription site of the spliced leader (SL) RNA, which is used in the trans-splicing of all mRNAs transcribed on long polycistronic units. We found that Trypanosoma cruzi RNA Pol II associated with chromatin is highly phosphorylated. When transcription is inhibited by actinomycin D, the enzyme runs off from SL genes, remaining hyperphosphorylated and associated with polycistronic transcription units. Upon heat shock, the enzyme is dephosphorylated and remains associated with the chromatin. Transcription is partially inhibited with the accumulation of housekeeping precursor mRNAs, except for heat shock genes. DNA damage caused dephosphorylation and transcription arrest, with RNA Pol II dissociating from chromatin although staying at the SL. In the presence of calyculin A, the hyperphosphorylated form detached from chromatin, including the SL loci. These results indicate that in trypanosomes, the unusual RNA Pol II is phosphorylated during the transcription of SL and polycistronic operons. Different types of stresses modify its phosphorylation state, affecting pre-RNA processing. PMID:24813189

  4. Microstructural characterization and density change of 304 stainless steel reflector blocks after long-term irradiation in EBR-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.; Garner, F. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Okita, T.; Sagisaka, M.; Isobe, Y.; Allen, T. R.

    2015-10-01

    While thin reactor structural components such as cladding and ducts do not experience significant gradients in dpa rate, gamma heating rate, temperature or stress, thick components can develop strong local variations in void swelling and irradiation creep in response to gradients in these variables. In this study we conducted microstructural investigations by transmission electron microscopy of two 52 mm thick 304-type stainless steel hex-blocks irradiated for 12 years in the EBR-II reactor with accumulated doses ranging from ∼0.4 to 33 dpa. Spatial variations in the populations of voids, precipitates, Frank loops and dislocation lines have been determined for 304 stainless steel sections exposed to different temperatures, different dpa levels and at different dpa rates, demonstrating the existence of spatial gradients in the resulting void swelling. The microstructural measurements compare very well with complementary density change measurements regarding void swelling gradients in the 304 stainless steel hex-block components. The TEM studies revealed that the original cold-worked-state microstructure of the unirradiated blocks was completely erased by irradiation, replaced by high densities of interstitial Frank loops, voids and carbide precipitates at both the lowest and highest doses. At large dose levels the amount of volumetric void swelling correlated directly with the gamma heating gradient-related temperature increase (e.g. for 28 dpa, ∼2% swelling at 418 °C and ∼2.9% swelling at 448 °C). Under approximately iso-thermal local conditions, volumetric void swelling was found to increase with dose level (e.g. ∼0.2% swelling at 0.4 dpa, ∼0.5% swelling at 4 dpa and ∼2% swelling at 28 dpa). Carbide precipitate formation levels were found to be relatively independent of both dpa level and temperature and induced a measurable densification. Void swelling was dominant at the higher dose levels and caused measurable decreases in density. Void swelling

  5. Coordinated changes of histone modifications and HDAC mobilization regulate the induction of MHC class II genes by Trichostatin A

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    The deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) induces the transcription of the Major Histocompatibility Class II (MHC II) DRA gene in a way independent of the master coactivator CIITA. To analyze the molecular mechanisms by which this epigenetic regulator stimulates MHC II expression, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to monitor the alterations in histone modifications that correlate with DRA transcription after TSA treatment. We found that a dramatic increase in promoter linked histone acetylation is followed by an increase in Histone H3 lysine 4 methylation and a decrease of lysine 9 methylation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments showed that TSA increases the mobility of HDAC while decreasing the mobility of the class II enhanceosome factor RFX5. These data, in combination with ChIP experiments, indicate that the TSA-mediated induction of DRA transcription involves HDAC relocation and enhanceosome stabilization. In order to gain a genome-wide view of the genes responding to inhibition of deacetylases, we compared the transcriptome of B cells before and after TSA treatment using Affymetrix microarrays. This analysis showed that in addition to the DRA gene, the entire MHC II family and the adjacent histone cluster that are located in chromosome 6p21-22 locus are strongly induced by TSA. A complex pattern of gene reprogramming by TSA involves immune recognition, antiviral, apoptotic and inflammatory pathways and extends the rationale for using Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) to modulate the immune response. PMID:16452299

  6. Salinity changes in the Agulhas leakage area recorded by stable hydrogen isotopes of C37 alkenones during Termination I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, S.; van der Meer, M. T. J.; Mets, A.; Zahn, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2014-02-01

    At the southern tip of Africa, the Agulhas Current reflects back into the Indian Ocean causing so-called "Agulhas rings" to spin off and release relatively warm and saline water into the South Atlantic Ocean. Previous reconstructions of the dynamics of the Agulhas Current, based on paleo-sea surface temperature and sea surface salinity proxies, inferred that Agulhas leakage from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic was reduced during glacial stages as a consequence of shifted wind fields and a northwards migration of the subtropical front. Subsequently, this might have led to a buildup of warm saline water in the southern Indian Ocean. To investigate this latter hypothesis, we reconstructed sea surface salinity changes using alkenone δD, and paleo-sea surface temperature using TEXH86 and UK'37, from two sediment cores (MD02-2594, MD96-2080) located in the Agulhas leakage area during Termination I and II. Both UK'37 and TEXH86 temperature reconstructions indicate an abrupt warming during the glacial terminations, while a shift to more negative δDalkenone values of approximately 14‰ during glacial Termination I and II is also observed. Approximately half of the isotopic shift can be attributed to the change in global ice volume, while the residual isotopic shift is attributed to changes in salinity, suggesting relatively high salinities at the core sites during glacials, with subsequent freshening during glacial terminations. Approximate estimations suggest that δDalkenone represents a salinity change of ca. 1.7-1.9 during Termination I and Termination II. These estimations are in good agreement with the proposed changes in salinity derived from previously reported combined planktonic Foraminifera δ18O values and Mg/Ca-based temperature reconstructions. Our results confirm that the δD of alkenones is a potentially suitable tool to reconstruct salinity changes independent of planktonic Foraminifera δ18O.

  7. Acute mental status change as the presenting feature of adrenal insufficiency in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type II and stroke.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sara; Raj, Shekar; Eugster, Erica; Sanchez, Juan

    2014-05-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency (AI) in children usually presents with non-specific symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and anorexia. Here, we report an unusual case of a 15 year old girl who presented with acute mental status change and was ultimately diagnosed with AI due to autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type II (APS2). Central nervous system imaging revealed a cerebral infarction. To our knowledge, the constellation of APS2, stroke and acute mental status change has not been previously reported. We review the literature with regard to the presentation of AI as well as the association between vasculitis and APS2. PMID:24259239

  8. Changes of Multiple Metal Accumulation (MMA) in New Orleans Soil: Preliminary Evaluation of Differences between Survey I (1992) and Survey II (2000)

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Howard W.; Gonzales, Christopher; Powell, Eric; MielkeJr, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    Soil metal surveys were conducted in Baltimore, MD (1976–1979), Minnesota (1981–1988) and most recently, New Orleans, LA (1989-present). The unique characteristic of New Orleans is that it has two surveys; Survey I was completed in 1992 and Survey II was completed in 2000. This paper seeks to determine if there is a perceptible change in the amount of metals during less than a decade that separated these surveys. The Survey I collection was 4,026 samples stratified by 283 census tracts. All samples were collected in residential neighborhoods at least one block from a busy street. The Survey II collection was 5,467 samples stratified by 286 census tracts (plus City Park). The Survey II collection included busy streets as a category of samples. For comparison, the busy street category of 1,078 samples was excluded from Survey II for a total of 4,388 samples. The extraction methods of the two surveys used the same protocol for strength of acid (1 M HNO3), shaker-time (2 hours), and room temperature (~22ºC). However, Survey II differed in amount of sample used in extraction. For Surveys I and II, 4.0g and 0.4g were used respectively. The same ICP-AES was used to measure 8 metals in both surveys. To evaluate the analytical results of the two methods, reference soil samples (n=36) from the Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories, International Soil-analytical Exchange (WEPAL; ISE) were used. The relationship between the 4.0 and 0.4 g results were linear and the Survey I results were adjusted for sample:acid ratio. Further evaluation was done by creating interpolated Multiple Metal Accumulation (MMA) maps based on the median MMA for each census tract. A new map was created by dividing Survey II MMA by Survey I MMA. The ratio indicates increases of soil metals in the inner city and decreases of soil metals in the outlying areas of Metropolitan New Orleans. Comparing fresh parent alluvium from the Mississippi River with urban soil metal quantities

  9. Involvement of Type 1 Angiontensin II Receptor (AT1) in Cardiovascular Changes Induced by Chronic Emotional Stress: Comparison between Homotypic and Heterotypic Stressors

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Ferreira, Willian; Vieira, Jonas O.; Almeida, Jeferson; Gomes-de-Souza, Lucas; Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence has shown an important role of emotional stress in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, studies in animal models have demonstrated that daily exposure to different stressor (heterotypic stressor) evokes more severe changes than those resulting from repeated exposure to the same aversive stimulus (homotypic stressor), possibly due to the habituation process upon repeated exposure to the same stressor. Despite these pieces of evidence, the mechanisms involved in the stress-evoked cardiovascular dysfunction are poorly understood. Therefore, the present study investigated the involvement of angiotensin II (Ang II) acting on the type 1 Ang II receptor (AT1) in the cardiovascular dysfunctions evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic emotional stresses in rats. For this purpose, we compared the effect of the chronic treatment with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (30 mg/kg/day, p.o.) on the cardiovascular and autonomic changes evoked by the heterotypic stressor chronic variable stress (CVS) and the homotypic stressor repeated restraint stress (RRS). RRS increased the sympathetic tone to the heart and decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity, whereas CVS decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity. Additionally, both stressors impaired the baroreflex function. Alterations in the autonomic activity and the baroreflex impairment were inhibited by losartan treatment. Additionally, CVS reduced the body weight and increased the circulating corticosterone; however, these effects were not affected by losartan. In conclusion, these findings indicate the involvement of angiotensin II/AT1 receptors in the autonomic changes evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic stressors. Moreover, the present results provide evidence that the increase in the circulating corticosterone and body weight reduction evoked by heterotypic stressors are independent of AT1 receptors. PMID:27588004

  10. Involvement of Type 1 Angiontensin II Receptor (AT1) in Cardiovascular Changes Induced by Chronic Emotional Stress: Comparison between Homotypic and Heterotypic Stressors.

    PubMed

    Costa-Ferreira, Willian; Vieira, Jonas O; Almeida, Jeferson; Gomes-de-Souza, Lucas; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    Consistent evidence has shown an important role of emotional stress in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Additionally, studies in animal models have demonstrated that daily exposure to different stressor (heterotypic stressor) evokes more severe changes than those resulting from repeated exposure to the same aversive stimulus (homotypic stressor), possibly due to the habituation process upon repeated exposure to the same stressor. Despite these pieces of evidence, the mechanisms involved in the stress-evoked cardiovascular dysfunction are poorly understood. Therefore, the present study investigated the involvement of angiotensin II (Ang II) acting on the type 1 Ang II receptor (AT1) in the cardiovascular dysfunctions evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic emotional stresses in rats. For this purpose, we compared the effect of the chronic treatment with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (30 mg/kg/day, p.o.) on the cardiovascular and autonomic changes evoked by the heterotypic stressor chronic variable stress (CVS) and the homotypic stressor repeated restraint stress (RRS). RRS increased the sympathetic tone to the heart and decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity, whereas CVS decreased the cardiac parasympathetic activity. Additionally, both stressors impaired the baroreflex function. Alterations in the autonomic activity and the baroreflex impairment were inhibited by losartan treatment. Additionally, CVS reduced the body weight and increased the circulating corticosterone; however, these effects were not affected by losartan. In conclusion, these findings indicate the involvement of angiotensin II/AT1 receptors in the autonomic changes evoked by both homotypic and heterotypic chronic stressors. Moreover, the present results provide evidence that the increase in the circulating corticosterone and body weight reduction evoked by heterotypic stressors are independent of AT1 receptors. PMID:27588004

  11. Partnerships for Reform: Changing Teacher Preparation through the Title II HEA Partnership Program: Interim Report. PPSS 2003-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Title II Higher Education Amendment (HEA) Partnership Grants Program provides grants to fund partnerships among colleges of education, schools of arts and sciences and local school districts in high-need areas. The goal of the program is to improve student achievement by increasing the quality of teachers. This evaluation examined the extent…

  12. Sharpening the Focus on Acculturative Change: ARSMA-II, Stress, Pregnancy Anxiety, and Infant Birthweight in Recently Immigrated Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Belinda; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Walsh, Julia A.; Schenker, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Acculturation is conceptualized as a multidimensional process but is typically measured as a concurrent movement away from culture of origin as a new cultural orientation is obtained. In this study, the authors examined the overall and subscale scoring systems of the ARSMA-II, the most popular acculturation measure, for its associations with…

  13. Cleavage of synthetic substrates containing non-nucleotide inserts by restriction endonucleases. Change in the cleavage specificity of endonuclease SsoII.

    PubMed Central

    Kubareva, E A; Petrauskene, O V; Karyagina, A S; Tashlitsky, V N; Nikolskaya, I I; Gromova, E S

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the interaction between restriction endonucleases recognizing CCNGG (SsoII and ScrFI) or CCA/TGG (MvaI and EcoRII) DNA sequences and a set of synthetic substrates containing 1,3-propanediol, 1,2-dideoxy-D-ribofuranose or 9-[1'-hydroxy-2'-(hydroxymethyl)ethoxy] methylguanine (gIG) residues replacing either one of the central nucleosides or dG residues in the recognition site. The non-nucleotide inserts (except for gIG) introduced into the recognition site both increase the efficiency of SsoII and change its specificity. A cleavage at the noncanonical position takes place, in some cases in addition to the correct ones. Noncanonical hydrolysis by SsoII occurs at the phosphodiester bond adjacent to the point of modification towards the 5'-end. With the guanine base returned (the substrate with gIG), the correct cleavage position is restored. ScrFI specifically cleaves all the modified substrates. DNA duplexes with non-nucleotide inserts (except for the gIG-containing duplex) are resistant to hydrolysis by MvaI and EcoRII. Prompted by the data obtained we discuss the peculiarities of recognition by restriction endonucleases of 5-membered DNA sequences which have completely or partially degenerated central base pairs. It is suggested that SsoII forms a complex with DNA in an 'open' form. Images PMID:1408753

  14. Renal Hemodynamic and Morphological Changes after 7 and 28 Days of Leptin Treatment: The Participation of Angiotensin II via the AT1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Thieme, Karina; Oliveira-Souza, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The role of hyperleptinemia in cardiovascular diseases is well known; however, in the renal tissue, the exact site of leptin’s action has not been established. This study was conducted to assess the effect of leptin treatment for 7 and 28 days on renal function and morphology and the participation of angiotensin II (Ang II), through its AT1 receptor. Rats were divided into four groups: sham, losartan (10 mg/kg/day, s.c.), leptin (0.5 mg/kg/day for the 7 days group and 0.25 mg/kg/day for the 28 days group) and leptin plus losartan. Plasma leptin, Ang II and endothelin 1 (ET-1) levels were measured using an enzymatic immuno assay. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) was evaluated using the tail-cuff method. The renal plasma flow (RPF) and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined by p-aminohippuric acid and inulin clearance, respectively. Urinary Na+ and K+ levels were also analyzed. Renal morphological analyses, desmin and ED-1 immunostaining were performed. Proteinuria was analyzed by silver staining. mRNA expression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, TNF-α and collagen type III was analyzed by quantitative PCR. Our results showed that leptin treatment increased Ang II plasma levels and progressively increased the SBP, achieving a pre-hypertension state. Rats treated with leptin 7 days showed a normal RPF and GFR, but increased filtration fraction (FF) and natriuresis. However, rats treated with leptin for 28 showed a decrease in the RPF, an increase in the FF and no changes in the GFR or tubular function. Leptin treatment-induced renal injury was demonstrated by: glomerular hypertrophy, increased desmin staining, macrophage infiltration in the renal tissue, TNF-α and collagen type III mRNA expression and proteinuria. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the progressive renal morphological changes in experimental hyperleptinemia and the interaction between leptin and the RAS on these effects. PMID:25793389

  15. Changing the PEP-II Center-of-Mass Energy Down to 10 GeV and up to 11 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M; Bertsche, K.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20

    PEP-II, the SLAC, LBNL, LLNL B-Factory was designed and optimized to run at the Upsilon 4S resonance (10.580 GeV with an 8.973 GeV e- beam and a 3.119 GeV e+ beam). The interaction region (IR) used permanent magnet dipoles to bring the beams into a head-on collision. The first focusing element for both beams was also a permanent magnet. The IR geometry, masking, beam orbits and beam pipe apertures were designed for 4S running. Even though PEP-II was optimized for the 4S, we successfully changed the center-of-mass energy (E{sub cm}) down to the Upsilon 2S resonance and completed an E{sub cm} scan from the 4S resonance up to 11.2 GeV. The luminosity throughout most of these changes remained near 1 x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The E{sub cm} was changed by moving the energy of the high-energy beam (HEB). The beam energy differed by more than 20% which produced significantly different running conditions for the RF system. The energy loss per turn changed 2.5 times over this range. We describe how the beam energy was changed and discuss some of the consequences for the beam orbit in the interaction region. We also describe some of the RF issues that arose and how we solved them as the high-current HEB energy changed.

  16. Salinity changes in the Agulhas leakage area recorded by stable hydrogen isotopes of C37 alkenones during Termination I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, S.; van der Meer, M. T. J.; Mets, A.; Zahn, R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Schouten, S.

    2013-06-01

    At the southern tip of the African shelf, the Agulhas Current reflects back into the Indian Ocean causing so called "Agulhas rings" to spin off and release relatively warm and saline water into the South Atlantic Ocean. Previous reconstructions of the dynamics of the Agulhas current, based on paleo sea surface temperature and sea surface salinity proxies, inferred that Agulhas leakage from the Indian Ocean to the South Atlantic is reduced as a consequence of changes in wind fields related to a northwards migration of ice masses and the subtropical front during glacial stages. Subsequently, this might have led to a build-up of warm saline water in the southern Indian Ocean. To investigate this latter hypothesis, we reconstructed sea surface salinity changes using alkenone δ D, and paleo sea surface temperature using TEXH86 and UK'37, from two sediment cores (MD02-2594, MD96-2080) located in the Agulhas leakage area during Termination I and II. Both UK'37 and TEXH86 temperature reconstructions infer an abrupt warming during the glacial terminations, which is different from the gradual warming trend previously reconstructed based on Mg/Ca ratios of Globigerina bulloides. These differences in temperature reconstructions might be related to differences in the growth season or depth habitat between organisms. A shift to more negative δ Dalkenone values of approximately 14‰ during glacial Termination I and approximately 13‰ during Termination II is also observed. Approximately half of these shifts can be attributed to the change in global ice volume, while the residual isotopic shift is attributed to changes in salinity, suggesting relatively high salinities at the core sites during glacials, with subsequent freshening during glacial terminations. Approximate estimations suggest that δ Dalkenone represents a salinity change of ca. 1.7-2 during Termination I and ca. 1.5-1.7 during Termination II. These estimations are in good agreement with the proposed changes in

  17. The G.I. Bill and the Changing Place of U.S. Higher Education after World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jennifer Ann

    The geography of U.S. higher education changed dramatically with the enactment of the Serviceman's Readjustment Act of 1944, popularly known as the G.I. Bill of Rights (Public Law 346). This discussion shows how the G.I. Bill paved the way for marked changes in terms of where colleges and universities were located and who benefited from higher…

  18. 12-Lipoxygenase Inhibition on Microalbuminuria in Type-1 and Type-2 Diabetes Is Associated with Changes of Glomerular Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Related to Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong-Zhao; Cheng, Yan-Li; Wang, Wan-Ning; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zang, Chong-Sen; Xu, Zhong-Gao

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO) is involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). In the present study, we investigated whether 12-LO inhibition may ameliorate type-2 DN (T2DN) by interfering with insulin resistance (IR); (2) Methods: Rat glomerular mesangial cells, glomeruli and skeletal muscles were isolated and used in this study. Kidney histological changes were confirmed by periodic-acid Schiff staining; mRNA expression was detected by competitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction; and the protein level was determined by Western blot and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively; (3) Results: The inhibition of 12-LO attenuated microalbuminuria (MAU) increases in type-2 diabetic rats, but not in type-1 diabetic rats. Infusion of 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12(S)-HETE) significantly increased the expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R), but decreased the expression of AT1R-associated protein (ATRAP) in rat glomeruli, compared to the control. An in vitro study revealed that both 12(S)-HETE and insulin upregulated AT1R expression in rat mesangial cells. In the presence of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, SB202190, the 12(S)-HETE-induced ATRAP reduction was significantly abolished. Interestingly, 12-LO inhibition did not influence AT1R expression in type-1 diabetic rats, but significantly abolished the increased AT1R and Ang II expression in glomeruli of type-2 diabetic rats. Furthermore, the inhibition of 12-LO significantly corrected impaired insulin sensitivity and fast serum insulin level, as well as the p-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) reduction in skeletal muscle of type-2 diabetic rats; (4) Conclusion: The inhibition of 12-LO potentially ameliorated MAU by preventing IR through the downregulation of glomerular AT1R expression in T2DN. PMID:27164093

  19. Changes in the BDNF-immunopositive cell population of neocortical layers I and II/III after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongwon; Kang, Sung Goo; Kam, Kyung-Yoon

    2015-04-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family and is widely distributed in the central nervous system, including the cerebral cortex. BDNF plays an important role in normal neural development, survival of existing neurons, and activity-dependent neuroplasticity. BDNF can also be neuroprotective and evoke neurogenesis in certain pathological conditions, such as cerebral ischemia. Neocortical layer I is an important region that can integrate feedforward and feedback information from other cortical areas and subcortical regions. In addition, it has recently been proposed as a possible source of neuronal progenitor cells after ischemia. Therefore, we investigated changes in the BDNF-immunoreactive cell population of neocortical layers I and II/III after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced cerebral ischemia in rats. In unaffected condition, the number of BDNF(+) cells in layer I was significantly less than in layer II/III in the cingulate cortex and in the motor and sensory areas. The increase in the number of BDNF(+) cells in layer I 8 days after MCAO was more remarkable than layer II/III, in all regions except the area of cingulate cortex farthest from the infarct core. Only BDNF(+)-Ox-42(+) cells showed a tendency to increase consistently toward the infarct core in both layers I and II/III, implying a major source of BDNF for response to ischemic injury. The present study suggests that some beneficial effects during recovery from ischemic injury, such as increased supportive microglia/macrophages, occur owing to a sensitive response of BDNF in layer I. PMID:25681548

  20. Role of type II pneumocytes in pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis: dose response of radiation-induced lung changes in the transient high vascular permeability period.

    PubMed

    Osterreicher, Jan; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Skopek, Jirí; Mokrỳ, Jaroslav; Vilasová, Zdena; Psutka, Jan; Vávrová, Jirina; Mazurová, Yvona

    2004-12-01

    We studied the dose response of pulmonary changes at 3 weeks after 1-25 Gy irradiation and we investigated the effects of an anti-inflammatory drug. Wistar rats were given a single dose of 1-25Gy irradiation to the thorax. Group one was treated with saline only, while group two was administered subcutaneously a combination of pentoxifylline (35 mg/kg) and dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) twice per week. Lungs were examined histochemically and number of neutrophile granulocytes, alveolar septal thickness, air/tissue ratio, number of alveoli per field, number of type II pneumocytes per alveolus, and occludin 1 expression were measured. A significant dose-dependent depletion of type II pneumocytes was found after irradiation with a dose of 1 Gy and higher. Alveolar neutrophils increased after 1 Gy with a dose dependency noted after 10-25Gy and alveolar septa thickening followed 5-25 Gy. A lower occludin 1 expression was observed in animals irradiated with the doses of 5 20 Gy, indicating an effect on vascular permeability. Anti-inflammatory therapy partially inhibited the increase of neutrophils at all radiation doses and the depletion of type II pneumocytes after doses of 1, 10, and 15 Gy. Occludin 1 did not decrease in the lungs of rats treated with the anti-inflammatory drugs as it did in most rats treated only with saline. Our results suggest that pneumocytes depletion is a major factor responsible for radiation pneumonitis development and that these changes may be compensated for provided radiation doses are below the threshold. PMID:15625787

  1. Energetic changes in the surface of activated carbons and relationship with Ni(II) adsorption from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Estupiñan, Paola; Giraldo, Liliana; Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated Ni(II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution on activated carbons obtained by chemically modifying the surface with the oxidizing agents nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide (CAGoxP and CAGoxN, respectively). The activated carbons were characterized by total acidity and basicity, pH at the point of charge zero determination and IR spectroscopy. Textural parameters such as the BET area and pore volumes were evaluated by gas adsorption. The BET area of the materials was between 816 and 876 m2 g-1. Additionally, the immersion enthalpies of the activated carbons in water and benzene were determined. The experimental results on adsorption in solution were adjusted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models, obtaining values for the monolayer capacity between 29.68 and 50.97 mg g-1, which indicates that the adsorption capacity depends largely on solid surface chemistry.

  2. Changes in temporomandibular joint morphology in class II patients treated with fixed mandibular repositioning and evaluated through 3D imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, M A Q; Alsufyani, N; Flores-Mir, C; Nebbe, B; Major, P W

    2015-11-01

    To estimate the effects of skeletal class II malocclusion treatment using fixed mandibular repositioning appliances on the position and morphology of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Two independent reviewers performed comprehensive electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM reviews and Scopus (until May 5, 2015). The references of the identified articles were also manually searched. All studies investigating morphological changes of the TMJ articular disc, condyle and glenoid fossa with 3D imaging following non-surgical fixed mandibular repositioning appliances in growing individuals with class II malocclusions were included in the analysis. Of the 269 articles initially reviewed, only 12 articles used magnetic resonance imaging and two articles used computed tomography (CT) or cone-beam CT images. Treatment effect on condyle and glenoid fossa was discussed in eight articles. Treatment effect on TMJ articular disc position and morphology was discussed in seven articles. All articles showed a high risk of bias due to deficient methodology: inadequate consideration of confounding variables, blinding of image assessment, selection or absence of control group and outcome measurement. Reported changes in osseous remodelling, condylar and disc position were contradictory. The selected articles failed to establish conclusive evidence of the exact nature of TMJ tissue response to fixed mandibular repositioning appliances. PMID:26260422

  3. Plants Actively Avoid State Transitions upon Changes in Light Intensity: Role of Light-Harvesting Complex II Protein Dephosphorylation in High Light1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Suorsa, Marjaana; Rantala, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) core and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) proteins in plant chloroplasts undergo reversible phosphorylation upon changes in light intensity (being under control of redox-regulated STN7 and STN8 kinases and TAP38/PPH1 and PSII core phosphatases). Shift of plants from growth light to high light results in an increase of PSII core phosphorylation, whereas LHCII phosphorylation concomitantly decreases. Exactly the opposite takes place when plants are shifted to lower light intensity. Despite distinct changes occurring in thylakoid protein phosphorylation upon light intensity changes, the excitation balance between PSII and photosystem I remains unchanged. This differs drastically from the canonical-state transition model induced by artificial states 1 and 2 lights that concomitantly either dephosphorylate or phosphorylate, respectively, both the PSII core and LHCII phosphoproteins. Analysis of the kinase and phosphatase mutants revealed that TAP38/PPH1 phosphatase is crucial in preventing state transition upon increase in light intensity. Indeed, tap38/pph1 mutant revealed strong concomitant phosphorylation of both the PSII core and LHCII proteins upon transfer to high light, thus resembling the wild type under state 2 light. Coordinated function of thylakoid protein kinases and phosphatases is shown to secure balanced excitation energy for both photosystems by preventing state transitions upon changes in light intensity. Moreover, PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION5 (PGR5) is required for proper regulation of thylakoid protein kinases and phosphatases, and the pgr5 mutant mimics phenotypes of tap38/pph1. This shows that there is a close cooperation between the redox- and proton gradient-dependent regulatory mechanisms for proper function of the photosynthetic machinery. PMID:25902812

  4. Changes in monsoon-driven upwelling in the South China Sea over glacial Terminations I and II: a multi-proxy record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadatzki, Henrik; Sarnthein, Michael; Andersen, Nils

    2016-06-01

    Upwelling intensity in the South China Sea has changed over glacial-interglacial cycles in response to orbital-scale changes in the East Asian Monsoon. Here, we evaluate new multi-proxy records of two sediment cores from the north-eastern South China Sea to uncover millennial-scale changes in winter monsoon-driven upwelling over glacial Terminations I and II. On the basis of U/Th-based speleothem chronology, we compare these changes with sediment records of summer monsoon-driven upwelling east of South Vietnam. Ocean upwelling is traced by reduced (UK'37-based) temperature and increased nutrient and productivity estimates of sea surface waters (δ13C on planktic foraminifera, accumulation rates of alkenones, chlorins, and total organic carbon). Accordingly, strong winter upwelling occurred north-west of Luzon (Philippines) during late Marine Isotope Stage 6.2, Heinrich (HS) and Greenland stadials (GS) HS-11, GS-26, GS-25, HS-1, and the Younger Dryas. During these stadials, summer upwelling decreased off South Vietnam and sea surface salinity reached a maximum suggesting a drop in monsoon rains, concurrent with speleothem records of aridity in China. In harmony with a stadial-to-interstadial see-saw pattern, winter upwelling off Luzon in turn was weak during interstadials, in particular those of glacial Terminations I and II, when summer upwelling culminated east of South Vietnam. Most likely, this upwelling terminated widespread deep-water stratification, coeval with the deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2. Yet, a synchronous maximum in precipitation fostered estuarine overturning circulation in the South China Sea, in particular as long as the Borneo Strait was closed when sea level dropped below -40 m.

  5. Yield responses of crops to changes in environment and management practices: Model sensitivity analysis. II. Rice, wheat, and potato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terjung, W. H.; Hayes, J. T.; O'Rourke, P. A.; Todhunter, P. E.

    1984-12-01

    This paper is a continuation of our prior examination of yield responses of maize (Terjung et al., 1984b). The analysis of the response of the model YIELD to changes in a variety of basic environmental and decision-making inputs was continued for paddy rice, winter wheat, and early potato. As before, temperature, solar radiation, and relative humidity regimes were analyzed during a growing season along with different water application strategies, irrigation frequencies, soil types, and wind regimes. Among the results, yield decreased on the average by 4.9% (rice) and 6.0% (wheat) per 1‡ (C) increase in air temperature. A 1% change in solar radiation resulted in an average of 1% (wheat) and 0.4% (rice) change in yield. Analogous changes in relative humidity caused yield changes of about 0.8% and nothing for wheat and rice, respectively. For all crops, the relationship between irrigation frequency and yield increase was near-linear for large irrigation intervals. This linearity vanished under high frequency waterings. With respect to irrigation amounts, 1 mm/ha of applied water was related, on the average, to 75 (potato), 19 (grain corn), 8 (rice), and 6 kg/ha (wheat) of harvestable yield.

  6. Part II. Empowering grassroots evidence-based practice: a curricular model to foster undergraduate student-enabled practice change.

    PubMed

    Moch, Susan D; Cronje, Ruth J

    2010-01-01

    This article presents evidence collected over the past 15 years that attests to the success of curricular innovations conducted to foster socially meaningful contact between nursing students and practicing nurses as a means to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). Action research data collected as these pedagogical strategies have evolved suggest that such student-staff partnerships offer promise not only to encourage commitment to EBP among nursing students but also to surmount most of the barriers that prevent the widespread diffusion of EBP among practicing nurses in clinical settings. Based upon our successful experiences with student-staff interactions, we propose a curricular model-the Student-Enabled Practice Change model-that suffuses the undergraduate nursing school curriculum with opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful partnerships with practicing nurses. The Student-Enabled Practice Change Curricular Model relocates the power to drive practice change to the grassroots level of students and practicing nurses. PMID:20129588

  7. Evolution of the P-type II ATPase gene family in the fungi and presence of structural genomic changes among isolates of Glomus intraradices

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Nicolas; Sanders, Ian R

    2006-01-01

    Background The P-type II ATPase gene family encodes proteins with an important role in adaptation of the cell to variation in external K+, Ca2+ and Na2+ concentrations. The presence of P-type II gene subfamilies that are specific for certain kingdoms has been reported but was sometimes contradicted by discovery of previously unknown homologous sequences in newly sequenced genomes. Members of this gene family have been sampled in all of the fungal phyla except the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; phylum Glomeromycota), which are known to play a key-role in terrestrial ecosystems and to be genetically highly variable within populations. Here we used highly degenerate primers on AMF genomic DNA to increase the sampling of fungal P-Type II ATPases and to test previous predictions about their evolution. In parallel, homologous sequences of the P-type II ATPases have been used to determine the nature and amount of polymorphism that is present at these loci among isolates of Glomus intraradices harvested from the same field. Results In this study, four P-type II ATPase sub-families have been isolated from three AMF species. We show that, contrary to previous predictions, P-type IIC ATPases are present in all basal fungal taxa. Additionally, P-Type IIE ATPases should no longer be considered as exclusive to the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota, since we also demonstrate their presence in the Zygomycota. Finally, a comparison of homologous sequences encoding P-type IID ATPases showed unexpectedly that indel mutations among coding regions, as well as specific gene duplications occur among AMF individuals within the same field. Conclusion On the basis of these results we suggest that the diversification of P-Type IIC and E ATPases followed the diversification of the extant fungal phyla with independent events of gene gains and losses. Consistent with recent findings on the human genome, but at a much smaller geographic scale, we provided evidence that structural genomic

  8. Effects of climate change on agricultural-plant pests. Volume II, Part 10 of environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Plant pests and their community of biotic cohorts respond to climatic changes, whether temporal aberrations or long term shifts. How they respond depends on the magnitude of the change and the ability of the species to tolerate or adapt to the new environment. Scientists see several climatological scenarios concerning the increase of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and ambient temperature. Those who foresee a slow incremental raising of temperatures base their predictions mainly on the available empirical evidence and the notion that long term weather is basically a cyclical phenomena that continually adjusts and readjusts through time. The other scenario interprets the available empirical data as a gradual buildup that pushes the climatic picture towards a threshold or a trigger point that, once arrived at, is irreversible and dramatic. This paper explores the possible climatic scenarios as they relate to the ecological principles that affect pest abundance and the distribution and impact on domestic and international agriculture.

  9. Digital image processing. II. In vitro quantitative evaluation of soft and hard peri-implant tissue changes.

    PubMed

    Fourmousis, I; Brägger, U; Bürgin, W; Tonetti, M; Lang, N P

    1994-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of computer-assisted densitometric image analysis (CADIA) to detect small changes in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues adjacent to dental implants and to correlate these changes with CADIA values. A section of a pig mandible including all soft tissues and in which a hollow cylinder ITI Bonefit implant with an artificial mesial and a buccal infrabony defect was placed was used to obtain pairs of standardized radiographs. Series of radiographs were obtained with exposure times of 0.13, 0.20, 0.44, and 0.53 s. Specimens of mineralized or nonmineralized tissues were placed arbitrarily in the defects before each radiographic exposure. The radiographs were captured through a video camera, digitized and stored in a personal computer. Every radiographic image was then subtracted from a baseline one without any change. The result of the subtraction was evaluated with CADIA. A linear correlation (r2 = 0.99) was found between the bone chips (1-5 mg of dry weight) placed in the mesial defect and the CADIA values. Bone chips in the buccal defect (behind the implant), however, were not detected unless their weight reached 14 mg or more. For conventionally exposed radiographs, it was not possible to recognize soft tissue specimens (1-6 mg), either in the buccal or the mesial defect. However, when "underexposed" radiographs (exposure time: 0.13 s) were obtained, a linear correlation (r2 = 0.80) was calculated for soft tissue specimens in the mesial defect and CADIA values. In normally exposed radiographs, the CADIA system could detect even the smallest change in bone density (bone chip of 1 mg of dry bone weight) and correlated almost linearly with these changes. Provided that the radiographic images are obtained with standardized geometry and normal exposure time, the tissue density changes detected by this system within bone defects represent only mineralized tissue changes. By underexposing radiographs, CADIA may even

  10. Belowground Response to Drought in a Tropical Forest Soil. II. Change in Microbial Function Impacts Carbon Composition.

    PubMed

    Bouskill, Nicholas J; Wood, Tana E; Baran, Richard; Hao, Zhao; Ye, Zaw; Bowen, Ben P; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nico, Peter S; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Gilbert, Benjamin; Silver, Whendee L; Northen, Trent R; Brodie, Eoin L

    2016-01-01

    Climate model projections for tropical regions show clear perturbation of precipitation patterns leading to increased frequency and severity of drought in some regions. Previous work has shown declining soil moisture to be a strong driver of changes in microbial trait distribution, however, the feedback of any shift in functional potential on ecosystem properties related to carbon cycling are poorly understood. Here we show that drought-induced changes in microbial functional diversity and activity shape, and are in turn shaped by, the composition of dissolved and soil-associated carbon. We also demonstrate that a shift in microbial functional traits that favor the production of hygroscopic compounds alter the efflux of carbon dioxide following soil rewetting. Under drought the composition of the dissolved organic carbon pool changed in a manner consistent with a microbial metabolic response. We hypothesize that this microbial ecophysiological response to changing soil moisture elevates the intracellular carbon demand stimulating extracellular enzyme production, that prompts the observed decline in more complex carbon compounds (e.g., cellulose and lignin). Furthermore, a metabolic response to drought appeared to condition (biologically and physically) the soil, notably through the production of polysaccharides, particularly in experimental plots that had been pre-exposed to a short-term drought. This hysteretic response, in addition to an observed drought-related decline in phosphorus concentration, may have been responsible for a comparatively modest CO2 efflux following wet-up in drought plots relative to control plots. PMID:27014243

  11. Belowground Response to Drought in a Tropical Forest Soil. II. Change in Microbial Function Impacts Carbon Composition

    PubMed Central

    Bouskill, Nicholas J.; Wood, Tana E.; Baran, Richard; Hao, Zhao; Ye, Zaw; Bowen, Ben P.; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Nico, Peter S.; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Gilbert, Benjamin; Silver, Whendee L.; Northen, Trent R.; Brodie, Eoin L.

    2016-01-01

    Climate model projections for tropical regions show clear perturbation of precipitation patterns leading to increased frequency and severity of drought in some regions. Previous work has shown declining soil moisture to be a strong driver of changes in microbial trait distribution, however, the feedback of any shift in functional potential on ecosystem properties related to carbon cycling are poorly understood. Here we show that drought-induced changes in microbial functional diversity and activity shape, and are in turn shaped by, the composition of dissolved and soil-associated carbon. We also demonstrate that a shift in microbial functional traits that favor the production of hygroscopic compounds alter the efflux of carbon dioxide following soil rewetting. Under drought the composition of the dissolved organic carbon pool changed in a manner consistent with a microbial metabolic response. We hypothesize that this microbial ecophysiological response to changing soil moisture elevates the intracellular carbon demand stimulating extracellular enzyme production, that prompts the observed decline in more complex carbon compounds (e.g., cellulose and lignin). Furthermore, a metabolic response to drought appeared to condition (biologically and physically) the soil, notably through the production of polysaccharides, particularly in experimental plots that had been pre-exposed to a short-term drought. This hysteretic response, in addition to an observed drought-related decline in phosphorus concentration, may have been responsible for a comparatively modest CO2 efflux following wet-up in drought plots relative to control plots. PMID:27014243

  12. COMPARISON OF EEG CHANGES PRODUCED BY CARBARYL (CARBAMATE), PERMETHRIN (TYPE I PYRETHROID), AND DELTAMETHRIN (TYPE II PYRETHROID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have reported that treatment with carbaryl may alter Theta activity in the EEG (Lyke et al., Toxicologist, 108(S-1):441, 2009). In this study, we examined the ability to detect changes in EEG activity produced by pesticides with different modes of action. Long Evans rats were ...

  13. Quantum yield of charge separation in photosystem II: functional effect of changes in the antenna size upon light acclimation.

    PubMed

    Wientjes, Emilie; van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2013-09-26

    We have studied thylakoid membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana acclimated to different light conditions and have related protein composition to excitation energy transfer and trapping kinetics in Photosystem II (PSII). In high light: the plants have reduced amounts of the antenna complexes LHCII and CP24, the overall trapping time of PSII is only ∼180 ps, and the quantum efficiency reaches a value of 91%. In low light: LHCII is upregulated, the PSII lifetime becomes ∼310 ps, and the efficiency decreases to 84%. This difference is largely caused by slower excitation energy migration to the reaction centers in low-light plants due to the LHCII trimers that are not part of the C2S2M2 supercomplex. This pool of "extra" LHCII normally transfers energy to both photosystems, whereas it transfers only to PSII upon far-red light treatment (state 1). It is shown that in high light the reduction of LHCII mainly concerns the LHCII-M trimers, while the pool of "extra" LHCII remains intact and state transitions continue to occur. The obtained values for the efficiency of PSII are compared with the values of Fv/Fm, a parameter that is widely used to indicate the PSII quantum efficiency, and the observed differences are discussed. PMID:23534376

  14. Climate change impact assessment in Veneto and Friuli Plain groundwater. Part II: a spatially resolved regional risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Pasini, S; Torresan, S; Rizzi, J; Zabeo, A; Critto, A; Marcomini, A

    2012-12-01

    Climate change impact assessment on water resources has received high international attention over the last two decades, due to the observed global warming and its consequences at the global to local scale. In particular, climate-related risks for groundwater and related ecosystems pose a great concern to scientists and water authorities involved in the protection of these valuable resources. The close link of global warming with water cycle alterations encourages research to deepen current knowledge on relationships between climate trends and status of water systems, and to develop predictive tools for their sustainable management, copying with key principles of EU water policy. Within the European project Life+ TRUST (Tool for Regional-scale assessment of groundwater Storage improvement in adaptation to climaTe change), a Regional Risk Assessment (RRA) methodology was developed in order to identify impacts from climate change on groundwater and associated ecosystems (e.g. surface waters, agricultural areas, natural environments) and to rank areas and receptors at risk in the high and middle Veneto and Friuli Plain (Italy). Based on an integrated analysis of impacts, vulnerability and risks linked to climate change at the regional scale, a RRA framework complying with the Sources-Pathway-Receptor-Consequence (SPRC) approach was defined. Relevant impacts on groundwater and surface waters (i.e. groundwater level variations, changes in nitrate infiltration processes, changes in water availability for irrigation) were selected and analyzed through hazard scenario, exposure, susceptibility and risk assessment. The RRA methodology used hazard scenarios constructed through global and high resolution model simulations for the 2071-2100 period, according to IPCC A1B emission scenario in order to produce useful indications for future risk prioritization and to support the addressing of adaptation measures, primarily Managed Artificial Recharge (MAR) techniques. Relevant

  15. Metabolism of apolipoproteins C-II, C-III, and B in hypertriglyceridemic men. Changes after heparin-induced lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, M.W.; Breckenridge, W.C.; Strong, W.L.; Wolfe, B.M.

    1988-09-01

    The C apolipoproteins are normally transferred to high density lipoproteins (HDL) after lipolysis of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) triglyceride. In previous studies, a loss of plasma C apolipoproteins was documented after heparin-induced lipolysis in hypertriglyceridemic subjects. The present studies were designed to determine if this decline in plasma C apolipoproteins was due to their clearance with VLDL remnants. Five Type IV hypertriglyceridemic and two normal subjects were injected with 125I-VLDL and 131I-low density lipoproteins (LDL) to document kinetically an excess of VLDL apolipoprotein (apo) B flux relative to LDL apo B flux in the Type IV subjects. A mean of 46% VLDL apo B was cleared from the circulation, without conversion to intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) or LDL. Heparin was then infused (9000 IU over 4 hours) to generate an excess of VLDL remnants that were not converted to IDL or LDL. VLDL triglyceride, apo B, and apo C concentrations fell at a similar rate. VLDL apo B declined by 42% (p less than 0.01). However, no increases were observed in IDL or LDL apo B in the Type IV subjects. This resulted in a 14% (p less than 0.01) decline in plasma apo B concentrations, indicating a clearance of VLDL remnants. VLDL apo C-II and C-III concentrations fell by 42% (p less than 0.025) and 52% (p less than 0.01), respectively. During the first 2.5 hours of infusion, they were almost quantitatively recovered in HDL. Thereafter, the C apolipoproteins declined in HDL during which time VLDL apo C concentrations continued to decline.

  16. Prospects of the New Science and Outreach Network Baltic Earth with Results of the Second Climate Change Assessment for the Baltic Sea Region (BACC II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckermann, M.; Von Storch, H.; Omstedt, A. T.; Meier, M.; Rutgersson, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Baltic Sea region in Northern Europe spans different climate and population zones, from a temperate, highly populated, industrialized south with intensive agriculture to a boreal, rural north. It represents an old cultural landscape, and the Baltic Sea itself is among the most intensively studied sea areas of the world. Baltic Earth is the new Earth system research network for the Baltic Sea region. It is the successor to BALTEX, which was terminated in June 2013 after 20 years and two successful phases. Baltic Earth stands for the vision to achieve an improved Earth system understanding of the Baltic Sea region. This means that the research disciplines of BALTEX continue to be relevant, i.e. atmospheric and climate sciences, hydrology, oceanography and biogeochemistry, but a more holistic view of the Earth system encompassing processes in the atmosphere, on land and in the sea as well as in the anthroposphere shall gain in importance in Baltic Earth. Specific grand research challenges have been formulated, representing interdisciplinary research questions to be tackled in the coming years. A major means will be scientific assessments of particular research topics by expert groups, similar to the BACC approach, which shall help to identify knowledge gaps and develop research strategies. A major outcome of Baltic Earth will be the update of the BALTEX Assessment of Climate Change for the Baltic Sea Basin (BACC II). This new study after 5 years finds the results of BACC I still valid. Climate change can be detected at the regional scale but attribution is still weak. The effect of changing atmospheric aerosol loads and land use change is largely unknown so far and needs further attention in the coming years. For the observed changes in biogeochemical and ecological systems, multiple drivers are at work of which climate change is one. Their relative importance still needs to be evaluated. When addressing climate change impacts on e.g. forestry, agriculture, urban

  17. A Change in the Solar He II EUV Global Network Structure as an Indicator of the Geo-Effectiveness of Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Gurman, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Solar activity during 2007 - 2009 was very low, causing anomalously low thermospheric density. A comparison of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance in the He II spectral band (26 to 34 nm) from the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), one of instruments on the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) for the two latest solar minima showed a decrease of the absolute irradiance of about 15 +/- 6 % during the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24 compared with the Cycle 22/23 minimum when a yearly running-mean filter was used. We found that some local, shorter-term minima including those with the same absolute EUV flux in the SEM spectral band show a higher concentration of spatial power in the global network structure from the 30.4 nm SOHO/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images for the local minimum of 1996 compared with the minima of 2008 - 2011.We interpret this higher concentration of spatial power in the transition region's global network structure as a larger number of larger-area features on the solar disk. These changes in the global network structure during solar minima may characterize, in part, the geo-effectiveness of the solar He II EUV irradiance in addition to the estimations based on its absolute levels.

  18. Effect of graphene tunnel barrier on Schottky barrier height of Heusler alloy Co2MnSi/graphene/n-Ge junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui-fang, Li; Jing, Hu; Hui, Lv; Zhijun, Cui; Xiaowei, Hou; Shibin, Liu; Yongqian, Du

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the insertion of a graphene tunnel barrier between Heusler alloy Co2MnSi and the germanium (Ge) channel modulates the Schottky barrier height and the resistance-area product of the spin diode. We confirm that the Fermi level is depinned and a reduction in the electron Schottky barrier height (SBH) occurs following the insertion of the graphene layer between Co2MnSi and Ge. The electron SBH is modulated in the 0.34 eV-0.61 eV range. Furthermore, the transport mechanism changes from rectifying to symmetric tunneling following the insertion. This behavior provides a pathway for highly efficient spin injection from a Heusler alloy into a Ge channel with high electron and hole mobility. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61504107) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 3102014JCQ01059 and 3102015ZY043).

  19. Light-induced changes within photosystem II protects Microcoleus sp. in biological desert sand crusts against excess light.

    PubMed

    Ohad, Itzhak; Raanan, Hagai; Keren, Nir; Tchernov, Dan; Kaplan, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus, a major primary producer in desert biological sand crusts, is exposed to frequent hydration (by early morning dew) followed by desiccation during potentially damaging excess light conditions. Nevertheless, its photosynthetic machinery is hardly affected by high light, unlike "model" organisms whereby light-induced oxidative stress leads to photoinactivation of the oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII). Field experiments showed a dramatic decline in the fluorescence yield with rising light intensity in both drying and artificially maintained wet plots. Laboratory experiments showed that, contrary to "model" organisms, photosynthesis persists in Microcoleus sp. even at light intensities 2-3 times higher than required to saturate oxygen evolution. This is despite an extensive loss (85-90%) of variable fluorescence and thermoluminescence, representing radiative PSII charge recombination that promotes the generation of damaging singlet oxygen. Light induced loss of variable fluorescence is not inhibited by the electron transfer inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropylbenzoquinone (DBMIB), nor the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), thus indicating that reduction of plastoquinone or O(2), or lumen acidification essential for non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) are not involved. The rate of Q(A) (-) re-oxidation in the presence of DCMU is enhanced with time and intensity of illumination. The difference in temperatures required for maximal thermoluminescence emissions from S(2)/Q(A) (-) (Q band, 22 degrees C) and S(2,3)/Q(B) (-) (B band, 25 degrees C) charge recombinations is considerably smaller in Microcoleus as compared to "model" photosynthetic organisms, thus indicating a significant alteration of the S(2)/Q(A) (-) redox potential. We propose that enhancement of non-radiative charge recombination with rising light intensity may reduce

  20. Light-Induced Changes within Photosystem II Protects Microcoleus sp. in Biological Desert Sand Crusts against Excess Light

    PubMed Central

    Ohad, Itzhak; Raanan, Hagai; Keren, Nir; Tchernov, Dan; Kaplan, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus, a major primary producer in desert biological sand crusts, is exposed to frequent hydration (by early morning dew) followed by desiccation during potentially damaging excess light conditions. Nevertheless, its photosynthetic machinery is hardly affected by high light, unlike “model” organisms whereby light-induced oxidative stress leads to photoinactivation of the oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII). Field experiments showed a dramatic decline in the fluorescence yield with rising light intensity in both drying and artificially maintained wet plots. Laboratory experiments showed that, contrary to “model” organisms, photosynthesis persists in Microcoleus sp. even at light intensities 2–3 times higher than required to saturate oxygen evolution. This is despite an extensive loss (85–90%) of variable fluorescence and thermoluminescence, representing radiative PSII charge recombination that promotes the generation of damaging singlet oxygen. Light induced loss of variable fluorescence is not inhibited by the electron transfer inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropylbenzoquinone (DBMIB), nor the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), thus indicating that reduction of plastoquinone or O2, or lumen acidification essential for non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) are not involved. The rate of QA− re-oxidation in the presence of DCMU is enhanced with time and intensity of illumination. The difference in temperatures required for maximal thermoluminescence emissions from S2/QA− (Q band, 22°C) and S2,3/QB− (B band, 25°C) charge recombinations is considerably smaller in Microcoleus as compared to “model” photosynthetic organisms, thus indicating a significant alteration of the S2/QA− redox potential. We propose that enhancement of non-radiative charge recombination with rising light intensity may reduce harmful radiative

  1. Direct deconvolution of two-state pump-probe x-ray absorption spectra and the structural changes in a 100 ps transient of Ni(II)-tetramesitylporphyrin.

    SciTech Connect

    Della-Longa, S.; Chen, L. X.; Frank, P.; Hayakawa, K.; Hatada, K.; Benfatto, M.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. dell' Aquila; Lab. Nazionali di Frascati; Northwestern Univ.; Stanford Univ.; Museo storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche

    2009-05-04

    Full multiple scattering (FMS) Minuit XANES (MXAN) has been combined with laser pump-probe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the structure of photoexcited Ni(II)tetramesitylporphyrin, Ni(II)TMP, in dilute toluene solution. It is shown that an excellent simulation of the XANES spectrum is obtained, excluding the lowest-energy bound-state transitions. In ground-state Ni(II)TMP, the first-shell and second-shell distances are, respectively, d(Ni-N) = (1.93 {+-} 0.02) {angstrom} and d(Ni-C) = (2.94 {+-} 0.03) {angstrom}, in agreement with a previous EXAFS result. The time-resolved XANES difference spectrum was obtained from the spectra of Ni(II)TMP in its photoexcited T{sub 1} state and its ground state, S{sub 0}. The XANES difference spectrum has been analyzed to obtain both the structure and the fraction of the T{sub 1} state. If the T{sub 1} fraction is kept fixed at the value (0.37 {+-} 0.10) determined by optical transient spectroscopy, a 0.07 {angstrom} elongation of the Ni-N and Ni-C distances [d(Ni-N) and d(Ni-C)] is found, in agreement with the EXAFS result. However, an evaluation of both the distance elongation and the T{sub 1} fraction can also be obtained using XANES data only. According to experimental evidence, and MXAN simulations, the T{sub 1} fraction is (0.60 {+-} 0.15) with d(Ni-N) = (1.98 {+-} 0.03) {angstrom} (0.05 {angstrom} elongation). The overall uncertainty of these results depends on the statistical correlation between the distances and T{sub 1} fraction, and the chemical shift of the ionization energy because of subtle changes of metal charge between the T{sub 1} and S{sub 0} states. The T{sub 1} excited-state structure results, independently obtained without the excited-state fraction from optical transient spectroscopy, are still in agreement with previous EXAFS investigations. Thus, full multiple scattering theory applied through the MXAN formalism can be used to provide structural information, not only on the ground

  2. Strong-light photoinhibition treatment accelerates the changes of protein secondary structures in triton-treated photosystem I and photosystem II complexes.

    PubMed

    Ruan, X; Xu, Q; Mao, H B; Li, G F; Wei, J; Gong, Y D; Kuang, T Y; Zhao, N M

    2001-04-01

    Changes in the protein secondary structure and electron transport activity of the Triton X-100-treated photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) complexes after strong illumination treatment were studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and an oxygen electrode. Short periods of photoinhibitory treatment led to obvious decreases in the rates of PSI-mediated electron transport activity and PSII-mediated oxygen evolution in the native or Triton-treated PSI and PSII complexes. In the native PSI and PSII complexes, the protein secondary structures had little changes after the photoinhibitory treatment. However, in both Triton-treated PSI and PSII complexes, short photoinhibition times caused significant loss of alpha-helical content and increase of beta-sheet structure, similar to the conformational changes in samples of Triton-treated PSI and PSII complexes after long periods of dark incubation. Our results demonstrate that strong-light treatment to the Triton-treated PSI and PSII complexes accelerates destruction of the transmembrane structure of proteins in the two photosynthetic membranes. PMID:11565905

  3. Pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinus changes after maxillomandibular advancement with counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Prado, FB; Rossi, AC; Freire, AR; Groppo, FC; De Moraes, M; Caria, PHF

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to cephalometrically evaluate the pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinus changes after maxillomandibular advancement counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusion. Methods The study included 49 patients (98 lateral teleradiographs; 36 females and 13 males) who were analysed in the pre-operative (1 week before surgery) and post-operative (6 months after surgery) periods. In each lateral teleradiography, the dimensions of the inferior and superior pharyngeal airway space, TB-PhW1 [the point between the posterior aspect of the tongue to the dorsal pharyngeal wall (oropharynx) (TB) and the point on the dorsal pharyngeal wall closest to TB (PhW1)] and UP-PhW2 [and the point between the posterior aspect of the soft palate to the dorsal pharyngeal wall (nasopharynx) (UP) (PhW2)] measurements were evaluated, as well as the dimensions of the frontal and sphenoid sinuses. The differences between the two operative times were evaluated by Student's t-test. Results All measurements showed excellent reproducibility for the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC > 0.9; p < 0.0001). There was an increase in the measurements TB-PhW1 and UP-PhW2 and a decrease in the dimensions of the frontal and sphenoid sinuses after orthognathic surgery. Conclusions The morphology of the superior and inferior pharyngeal airway space and frontal and sphenoid sinuses changes after 6 months of maxillomandibular advancement counterclockwise rotation for class II anterior open bite malocclusion. PMID:22116128

  4. The influence of ocean surface temperature gradient and continentality on the Walker circulation. II - Prescribed global changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, P. H.; Chervin, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The series of experiments presently used to investigate the mechanisms responsible for forcing the global Walker circulation features worldwide changes in ocean surface temperatures (OSTs), topography, and/or continents. The primary factor affecting circulation is noted to be the global distribution of continents and oceans; while OST gradients are also important, topography emerges as comparatively unimportant. Continentality and OST gradients force the model atmosphere through the introduction of zonal variations in surface heating. The vertical motions to which they give rise yield moisture convergence and condensation variations which reinforce vertical motions. The forcing by OST gradients is partly nonlocal, and the atmospheric response is effected by continentality. In all cases, vertical motion zonal variations correlate with precipitation.

  5. In vivo digestion of bovine milk fat globules: effect of processing and interfacial structural changes. II. Upper digestive tract digestion.

    PubMed

    Gallier, Sophie; Zhu, Xiang Q; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Ye, Aiqian; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of milk processing on the in vivo upper digestive tract digestion of milk fat globules. Fasted rats were serially gavaged over a 5h period with cream from raw, pasteurised, or pasteurised and homogenised milk. Only a few intact dietary proteins and peptides were present in the small intestinal digesta. Significantly (P<0.05) more longer chain (C≥10) fatty acids were present in the digesta of rats gavaged with raw (448 mg g(-1) digesta dry matter (DDM)) and homogenised creams (528 mg g(-1) DDM), as compared to pasteurised and homogenised cream (249 mg g(-1) DDM). Microscopy techniques were used to investigate the structural changes during digestion. Liquid-crystalline lamellar phases surrounding the fat globules, fatty acid soap crystals and lipid-mucin interactions were evident in all small intestinal digesta. Overall, the pasteurised and homogenised cream appeared to be digested to a greater extent. PMID:23871080

  6. Analysis of rabbit intervertebral disc physiology based on water metabolism. II. Changes in normal intervertebral discs under axial vibratory load

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, N.; Tsuji, H.; Ohshima, H.; Kitano, S.; Itoh, T.; Sano, A.

    1988-11-01

    Metabolic changes induced by axial vibratory load to the spine were investigated based on water metabolism in normal intervertebral discs of rabbits with or without pentobarbital anesthesia. Tritiated water concentration in the intervertebral discs of unanesthetized rabbits was reduced remarkably by axial vibration for 30 minutes using the vibration machine developed for this study. Repeated vibratory load for 18 and 42 hours duration showed the recovery of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration of the intervertebral disc without anesthesia. Computer simulation suggested a reduction of blood flow surrounding the intervertebral disc following the vibration stress. However, no reduction of the /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration in the intervertebral disc was noted under anesthesia. Emotional stress cannot be excluded as a factor in water metabolism in the intervertebral disc.

  7. Controlled production of Camembert-type cheeses. Part II. Changes in the concentration of the more volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Leclercq-Perlat, Marie-Noëlle; Latrille, Eric; Corrieu, Georges; Spinnler, Henry-Eric

    2004-08-01

    Flavour generation in cheese is a major aspect of ripening. In order to enhance aromatic qualities it is necessary to better understand the chemical and microbiological changes. Experimental Camembert-type cheeses were prepared in duplicate from pasteurized milk inoculated with Kluyveromyces lactis, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium camemberti and Brevibacterium linens under aseptic conditions. Two replicates performed under controlled conditions of temperature (12 degrees C), relative humidity (95 +/- 2%), and atmosphere showed similar ripening characteristics. The evolutions of metabolite concentrations were studied during ripening. The volatile components were extracted by dynamic headspace extraction, separated and quantified by gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. For each cheese the volatile concentrations varied with the part considered (rind or core). Except for ethyl acetate and 2-pentanone, the volatile quantities observed were higher than their perception thresholds. The flavour component production was best correlated with the starter strains. During the first 10 days the ester formations (ethyl, butyl and isoamyl acetates) were associated with the concentrations of K. lactis and G. candidum. The rind quantity of esters was lower than that observed in core probably due to (1) a diffusion from the core to the surface and (2) evaporation from the surface to the chamber atmosphere. G. candidum and Brev. linens association produced 3 methyl butanol and methyl 3-butanal from leucine, respectively. DMDS came from the methionine catabolism due to Brev. linens. Styrene production was attributed to Pen. camemberti. 2-Pentanone evolution was associated with Pen. camemberti spores and G. candidum. 2-Heptanone changes were not directly related to flora activities while 2-octanone production was essentially due to G. candidum. This study also demonstrates the determining role of volatile component diffusion. PMID:15354583

  8. Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikel, William J.

    1999-01-01

    The author, founding editor of the American Mental Health Counselors Association (AMHC) Journal, now the Journal of Mental Health Counseling, examines some of the changes that have taken place in the profession over the past 20 years. Special emphasis is given to the visionary excellence that set the "AMHCA Agenda" over 20 years ago. (Author)

  9. Changes in variation at the MHC class II DQA locus during the final demise of the woolly mammoth

    PubMed Central

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Díez-del-Molino, David; Vartanyan, Sergey; Dalén, Love

    2016-01-01

    According to the nearly-neutral theory of evolution, the relative strengths of selection and drift shift in favour of drift at small population sizes. Numerous studies have analysed the effect of bottlenecks and small population sizes on genetic diversity in the MHC, which plays a central role in pathogen recognition and immune defense and is thus considered a model example for the study of adaptive evolution. However, to understand changes in genetic diversity at loci under selection, it is necessary to compare the genetic diversity of a population before and after the bottleneck. In this study, we analyse three fragments of the MHC DQA gene in woolly mammoth samples radiocarbon dated to before and after a well-documented bottleneck that took place about ten thousand years ago. Our results indicate a decrease in observed heterozygosity and number of alleles, suggesting that genetic drift had an impact on the variation on MHC. Based on coalescent simulations, we found no evidence of balancing selection maintaining MHC diversity during the Holocene. However, strong trans-species polymorphism among mammoths and elephants points to historical effects of balancing selection on the woolly mammoth lineage. PMID:27143688

  10. Sharing our successes II: Changing the face of science and mathematics education through teacher-focused partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education (IISME) in the San Francisco Bay Area planned and convened the second national conference for representatives of scientific work experience programs for K-12 teachers (SWEPs) at Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkeley October 13-14, 1994. The goal of this conference was to further strengthen the growing community of SWEP managers and teacher participants by providing an opportunity for sharing expertise and strategies about the following: (1) How SWEPs can complement and stimulate systemic education reform efforts; (2) Assessment strategies piloted by the ambitious multi-site evaluation project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as well as smaller evaluation projects piloted by other SWEPs; (3) Expanding and strengthening the base of teachers served by SWEPs; (4) Ensuring that SWEPs adequately support teachers in affecting classroom transfer and offer {open_quotes}more than just a summerjob{close_quotes}; (5) Sustaining and expanding new programs. A special teacher strand focused on leadership development supporting teachers to become effective change agents in their classrooms and schools, and developing strong teacher communities.

  11. Plant Defense Response to Fungal Pathogens (II. G-Protein-Mediated Changes in Host Plasma Membrane Redox Reactions).

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Estrella, R.; Higgins, V. J.; Blumwald, E.

    1994-01-01

    Elicitor preparations containing the avr5 gene products from races 4 and 2.3 of Cladosporium fulvum, and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) cells containing the resistance gene Cf5 were used to investigate the involvement of redox processes in the production of active oxygen species associated with the plant response to the fungal elicitors. Here we demonstrate that certain race-specific elicitors of C. fulvum induced an increase in ferricyanide reduction in enriched plasma membrane fractions of tomato cells. The addition of elicitors to plasma membranes also induced increases in NADH oxidase and NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase activities, whereas ascorbate peroxidase activity was decreased. These results suggest that changes in the host plasma membrane redox processes, transferring electrons from reducing agents to oxygen, could be involved in the increased production of active oxygen species by the race-specific elicitors. Our results also show that the dephosphorylation of enzymes involved in redox reactions is responsible for the race-specific induced redox activity. The effects of guanidine nucleotide analogs and mastoparan on the activation of plasma membrane redox reactions support the role of GTP-binding proteins in the transduction of signals leading to the activation of the defense response mechanisms of tomato against fungal pathogens. PMID:12232307

  12. Excitation of geomagnetic micropulsations by means of ionospheric conductivity changes induced by solar flares. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    The premise is developed that solar flares with large components in the X-ray and euv spectra stimulate geomagnetic pulsations in the earth's magnetosphere by means of sudden conductivity changes in the dayside ionosphere. Ground-based observations of 7-22 mHz (Pc4 band) magnetic pulsations are shown to be associated with conductivity enhancements for four selected solar flare events in 1980. Magnetic activity was measured at four stations in a meridional chain in the US and Canada having magnetic shell parameters (L-values) between 3.2 and 4.4 and a conjugate station in Siple, Antarctica. Solar x-ray flux data from earth-orbiting satellites are used with an energy deposition model to calculate the time-dependent height-integrated conductivity tensor in the ionospheric region above each magnetometer site. Hydromagnetic wave theory is initially applied to a simple model of a cold magnetospheric plasma and a plane, anisotropic, conducting ionosphere to determine reflection coefficients and induced currents in the presence of reflected wave mode conversion.

  13. Changes in variation at the MHC class II DQA locus during the final demise of the woolly mammoth.

    PubMed

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Díez-Del-Molino, David; Vartanyan, Sergey; Dalén, Love

    2016-01-01

    According to the nearly-neutral theory of evolution, the relative strengths of selection and drift shift in favour of drift at small population sizes. Numerous studies have analysed the effect of bottlenecks and small population sizes on genetic diversity in the MHC, which plays a central role in pathogen recognition and immune defense and is thus considered a model example for the study of adaptive evolution. However, to understand changes in genetic diversity at loci under selection, it is necessary to compare the genetic diversity of a population before and after the bottleneck. In this study, we analyse three fragments of the MHC DQA gene in woolly mammoth samples radiocarbon dated to before and after a well-documented bottleneck that took place about ten thousand years ago. Our results indicate a decrease in observed heterozygosity and number of alleles, suggesting that genetic drift had an impact on the variation on MHC. Based on coalescent simulations, we found no evidence of balancing selection maintaining MHC diversity during the Holocene. However, strong trans-species polymorphism among mammoths and elephants points to historical effects of balancing selection on the woolly mammoth lineage. PMID:27143688

  14. Changes in variation at the MHC class II DQA locus during the final demise of the woolly mammoth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Díez-Del-Molino, David; Vartanyan, Sergey; Dalén, Love

    2016-05-01

    According to the nearly-neutral theory of evolution, the relative strengths of selection and drift shift in favour of drift at small population sizes. Numerous studies have analysed the effect of bottlenecks and small population sizes on genetic diversity in the MHC, which plays a central role in pathogen recognition and immune defense and is thus considered a model example for the study of adaptive evolution. However, to understand changes in genetic diversity at loci under selection, it is necessary to compare the genetic diversity of a population before and after the bottleneck. In this study, we analyse three fragments of the MHC DQA gene in woolly mammoth samples radiocarbon dated to before and after a well-documented bottleneck that took place about ten thousand years ago. Our results indicate a decrease in observed heterozygosity and number of alleles, suggesting that genetic drift had an impact on the variation on MHC. Based on coalescent simulations, we found no evidence of balancing selection maintaining MHC diversity during the Holocene. However, strong trans-species polymorphism among mammoths and elephants points to historical effects of balancing selection on the woolly mammoth lineage.

  15. Second- and higher-order structural changes of DNA induced by antitumor-active tetrazolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes with different types of 5-substituent.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Masako; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Sato, Takaji; Mino, Yoshiki; Chikuma, Masahiko; Komeda, Seiji

    2013-10-01

    Here, we used circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence microscopy (FM) to examine the interactions of a series of antitumor-active tetrazolato-bridged dinuclear platinum(II) complexes, [{cis-Pt(NH3)2}2(μ-OH)(μ-5-R-tetrazolato-N2,N3)](n+) (R=CH3 (1), C6H5 (2), CH2COOCH2CH3 (3), CH2COO(-) (4), n=2 (1-3) or 1 (4)), which are derivatives of [{cis-Pt(NH3)2}2(μ-OH)(μ-tetrazolato-N2,N3)](2+) (5-H-Y), with DNA to elucidate the influence of these interactions on the secondary or higher-order structure of DNA and reveal the mechanism of action. The CD study showed that three derivatives, 1-3, with a double-positive charge altered the secondary structures of calf thymus DNA but that 4, the only complex with a single positive charge, induced almost no change, implying that the B- to C-form conformational change is influenced by ionic attraction. Unexpectedly, single-molecule observations with FM revealed that 4 changed the higher-order structure of T4 DNA into the compact-globule state most efficiently, at the lowest concentration, which was nearly equal to that of 5-H-Y. These contradictory results suggest that secondary structural changes are not necessarily linked to higher-order ones, and that the non-coordinative interaction could be divided into two distinct interactions: (1) ionic attraction and (2) hydrogen bonding and/or van der Waals contact. The relationship between diffusion-controlled non-coordinative DNA interactions and cytotoxicities is also discussed. PMID:23725767

  16. Move for Change Part II: a European survey evaluating the impact of the EPDA Charter for people with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Stocchi, F; Bloem, B R

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose The Move for Change campaign is a three-part series of pan-European surveys designed by the European Parkinson's Disease Association (EPDA) to assess the impact that the EPDA Charter for People with Parkinson's disease (PD) has had since its launch in 1997. Here, we report results from the second survey, focusing on the third right of the Charter; that is, ‘all patients have the right to have access to support services’. Although the level of evidence for different support services varies, it is important to ensure that patients can access services with clinically proven benefits. Methods This survey comprised nine questions administered online via the EPDA and PD organization Web sites. Accessibility of support services was defined as ‘services/medication/multidisciplinary healthcare professionals, etc. being available and on hand to patients when required’. Results Neurologists and general practitioners (GPs) received highest accessibility results (90.0 and 87.0% of respondents, respectively), with moderate results for physiotherapists (68.0%) and PD organizations (72.0%) and lower results for PD specialist nurses (26.0%), occupational therapists (23.0%), and counselors (27.0%). Support provided by neurologists and PD specialists was considered to be ‘very helpful’ by 59.0 and 55.7%, respectively, whilst only 31.8% of respondents gave such favorable ratings to GPs. Funding of services was variable across Europe. Conclusions These data demonstrate the challenges faced by PD patients in accessing the adequate care and support required throughout the course of their disease. These findings can assist healthcare professionals and policymakers in improving access to support services for patients and their families across Europe. PMID:23034057

  17. Evaluating Problems with Long-Established Methods for Calculating Evapotranspiration Under Climate Change in the Great Lakes Basin: Take II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofgren, B. M.; Rouhana, J.

    2014-12-01

    A 2011 paper by a group from the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory established that a long- and widely-used method for projecting evapotranspiration (ET) and runoff from the land portions of the Great Lakes basin exhibited severe deficiencies in terms of conservation of energy at the land surface, and consequent errors in projected runoff and lake levels. The key component of this older method is known as the Large Basin Runoff Model (LBRM). A simple alternative method was developed to better account for energy conservation, and this was run for two different general circulation model (GCM) datasets, in order to demonstrate the corresponding discrepancies in terms of ET, runoff, and lake water level. In the Third National Climate Assessment, the regional chapter on the Midwest acknowledged these results, while Appendix 3 (Climate Science Supplement) expressed less credence, with the lead authors of that appendix maintaining that the models needed to be run with more GCMs as input. We will report on the results of runs using more than 40 GCM realizations from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 class. In addition to the previously-used method of adjusting future potential evapotranspiration (PET) according to changes in net radiative energy available at the surface, we introduce one that additionally estimates the air temperature dependence term of the Penman-Monteith formulation, and one in which PET varies in proportion to the Clausius-Clapeyron relation (i.e. PET increases by about 7% per degree C, in contrast to LBRM, in which PET typically increases by 30-50% per degree C).

  18. Collisions of small ice particles under microgravity conditions. II. Does the chemical composition of the ice change the collisional properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C. R.; Heißelmann, D.; Blum, J.; Fraser, H. J.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Understanding the collisional properties of ice is important for understanding both the early stages of planet formation and the evolution of planetary ring systems. Simple chemicals such as methanol and formic acid are known to be present in cold protostellar regions alongside the dominant water ice; they are also likely to be incorporated into planets which form in protoplanetary disks, and planetary ring systems. However, the effect of the chemical composition of the ice on its collisional properties has not yet been studied. Aims: Collisions of 1.5 cm ice spheres composed of pure crystalline water ice, water with 5% methanol, and water with 5% formic acid were investigated to determine the effect of the ice composition on the collisional outcomes. Methods: The collisions were conducted in a dedicated experimental instrument, operated under microgravity conditions, at relative particle impact velocities between 0.01 and 0.19 ms-1, temperatures between 131 and 160 K and a pressure of around 10-5 mbar. Results: A range of coefficients of restitution were found, with no correlation between this and the chemical composition, relative impact velocity, or temperature. Conclusions: We conclude that the chemical composition of the ice (at the level of 95% water ice and 5% methanol or formic acid) does not affect the collisional properties at these temperatures and pressures due to the inability of surface wetting to take place. At a level of 5% methanol or formic acid, the structure is likely to be dominated by crystalline water ice, leading to no change in collisional properties. The surface roughness of the particles is the dominant factor in explaining the range of coefficients of restitution.

  19. Photoprotection in plants involves a change in lutein 1 binding domain in the major light-harvesting complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ilioaia, Cristian; Johnson, Matthew P; Liao, Pen-Nan; Pascal, Andrew A; van Grondelle, Rienk; Walla, Peter J; Ruban, Alexander V; Robert, Bruno

    2011-08-01

    Nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) is the fundamental process by which plants exposed to high light intensities dissipate the potentially harmful excess energy as heat. Recently, it has been shown that efficient energy dissipation can be induced in the major light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHCII) in the absence of protein-protein interactions. Spectroscopic measurements on these samples (LHCII gels) in the quenched state revealed specific alterations in the absorption and circular dichroism bands assigned to neoxanthin and lutein 1 molecules. In this work, we investigate the changes in conformation of the pigments involved in NPQ using resonance Raman spectroscopy. By selective excitation we show that, as well as the twisting of neoxanthin that has been reported previously, the lutein 1 pigment also undergoes a significant change in conformation when LHCII switches to the energy dissipative state. Selective two-photon excitation of carotenoid (Car) dark states (Car S(1)) performed on LHCII gels shows that the extent of electronic interactions between Car S(1) and chlorophyll states correlates linearly with chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, as observed previously for isolated LHCII (aggregated versus trimeric) and whole plants (with versus without NPQ). PMID:21646360

  20. Changes in the patterns, presentation and management of penetrating chest trauma patients at a level II trauma centre in southern Pakistan over the last two decades.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Umer Muhammad; Faruque, Ahmad; Ansari, Hamza; Ahmad, Mansoor; Rashid, Umar; Perveen, Shazia; Sharif, Hasanat

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating chest trauma can be used as an indicator of violence in the country. We aimed to look at the changes in its incidence and management at a major trauma centre in the country. We also wanted to look at any effect of prehospital time on surgical intervention and outcome of the victim. In this retrospective descriptive study, we observed the presentation and management of 191 penetrating chest injury patients at a level II trauma hospital in Pakistan in the last 20 years. The study sample was divided into two groups: Group 1, 1988-1998 and Group 2, 1999-2009. No significant change in incidence of trauma was observed between the two groups. The delay in the time between event and arrival showed an increase in the number of surgical procedures performed. Also the number of thoracotomies performed went up significantly in the second decade from 5.7 to 16.5% with a P<0.05. Six (3.1%) mortality cases were observed in 20 years. It was seen that the greater the prehospital time, the greater the chances of surgery. Also seen was the increase in mortality as critical cases could make it to the hospital alive in recent times due to improved transportation services. PMID:20923826

  1. Mechanism of Substrate Recognition And PLP-Induced Conformational Changes in II-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase From Arabidopsis Thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, N.; Clay, M.D.; Belkum, M.J.van; Cherney, M.M.; Vederas, J.C.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-26

    -AtDAP-AT structure missing PLP revealed details of conformational changes induced by PLP binding and substrate entry into the active site.

  2. HEAD INJURY ASSESSMENT IN JUVENILE CHINOOK USING THE ALPHA II-SPECTRIN BIOMARKER: EFFECTS OF PRESSURE CHANGES AND PASSAGE THROUGH A REMOVABLE SPILLWAY WEIR

    SciTech Connect

    Jonason, C.; Miracle, A.

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein alpha II-spectrin has specifi c neurodegenerative mechanisms that allow the necrotic (injury-induced) and apoptotic (non-injury-induced) pathways of proteolysis to be differentiated in an immunoblot. Consequently, αII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) are potential biomarkers for diagnosing traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the following investigation, consisting of two studies, was to evaluate the utility of the spectrin biomarker in diagnosing TBI in fi sh that travel through hydroelectric dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The fi rst study used hyperbaric pressure chambers to simulate the pressure changes that affect fi sh during passage through a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Kaplan turbine. The second study tested the effect of a removable spillway weir (RSW) on the passage of juvenile chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). This study was conducted in tandem with a balloon-tag study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Brain samples from fi sh were collected and analyzed using an immunoblot for SBDPs, and imaging software was used to quantify the protein band density and determine the ratio of cleaved protein to total protein. The biomarker analyses found higher SBDP expression levels in fi sh that were exposed to lower pressure nadirs and fi sh that passed through the RSW at a deep orientation. In general, the incidence of injuries observed after treatment positively correlated with expression levels, suggesting that the biomarker method of analysis is comparable to traditional methods of injury assessment. It was also found that, for some treatments, the 110 kDa spectrin fragment (SBDP 110) correlated more strongly with necrotic head injury incidence and mortality rates than did the total cleaved protein or the 120 kDa fragment. These studies will be informative in future decisions regarding the design of turbines and fi sh passage structures in hydroelectric dams and will hopefully contribute to the

  3. Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury: III. Criterion-Related Validity and Sensitivity to Change in the NABIS Hypothermia-II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Moretti, Paolo; MacLeod, Marianne C.; Pedroza, Claudia; Drever, Pamala; Fourwinds, Sierra; Frisby, Melisa L.; Beers, Sue R.; Scott, James N.; Hunter, Jill V.; Traipe, Elfrides; Valadka, Alex B.; Okonkwo, David O.; Zygun, David A.; Puccio, Ava M.; Clifton, Guy L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure assessing neurological functioning in patients with TBI. We hypothesized that the NOS-TBI would exhibit adequate concurrent and predictive validity and demonstrate more sensitivity to change, compared with other well-established outcome measures. We analyzed data from the National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia-II clinical trial. Participants were 16–45 years of age with severe TBI assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. For analysis of criterion-related validity (concurrent and predictive), Spearman's rank-order correlations were calculated between the NOS-TBI and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), GOS-Extended (GOS-E), Disability Rating Scale (DRS), and Neurobehavioral Rating Scale-Revised (NRS-R). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through significant correlations between the NOS-TBI and GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R measured contemporaneously at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury (all p<0.0013). For prediction analyses, the multiplicity-adjusted p value using the false discovery rate was <0.015. The 1-month NOS-TBI score was a significant predictor of outcome in the GOS, GOS-E, and DRS at 3 and 6 months postinjury (all p<0.015). The 3-month NOS-TBI significantly predicted GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R outcomes at 6 and 12 months postinjury (all p<0.0015). Sensitivity to change was analyzed using Wilcoxon's signed rank-sum test of subsamples demonstrating no change in the GOS or GOS-E between 3 and 6 months. The NOS-TBI demonstrated higher sensitivity to change, compared with the GOS (p<0.038) and GOS-E (p<0.016). In summary, the NOS-TBI demonstrated adequate concurrent and predictive validity as well as sensitivity to change, compared with gold-standard outcome measures. The NOS-TBI may enhance prediction of outcome in clinical practice and measurement of outcome in TBI research. PMID:23617608

  4. Regulation of Electron Transport in Photosystems I and II in C3, C3-C4, and C4 Species of Panicum in Response to Changing Irradiance and O2 Levels.

    PubMed

    Peterson, R. B.

    1994-05-01

    Regulation of the quantum yields of linear electron transport and photosystem II photochemistry ([phi]II) with changing irradiance and gas-phase O2 concentration was studied in leaf tissue from Panicum bisulcatum (C3), Panicum milioides (C3-C4), and Panicum antidotale (C4) at 200 [mu]bars of CO2 and 25[deg]C using infrared gas analysis and chlorophyll fluorescence yield measurements. When the O2 level was increased from 14 to 213 mbars at high irradiance, [phi]II increased by as much as 115% in P. bisulcatum but by no more than 17% in P. antidotale. Under the same conditions [phi]II increased to an intermediate degree in P. milioides. Measurements of accumulation of the photooxidized form of the photosystem I reaction center (P700+) based on the light-dependent in vivo absorbance change at 830 nm indicate that the steady-state concentration of P700+ varied in an antiparallel manner with [phi]II when either the irradiance or O2 concentration was changed. Hence, O2-dependent changes in [phi]II were indicative of variations in linear photosynthetic electron transport. These experiments revealed, however, that a significant capacity was retained for in vivo regulation of the apparent quantum yield of photosystem I ([phi]I) independently of [phi]II+ Coordinate regulation of quantum yields of photosystems I and II (expressed as [phi]I:[phi]II in response to changing irradiance and O2 level differed markedly for the C3 and C4 species, and the response for the C3-C4 species most closely resembled that observed for the C4 species. The fraction of total linear electron transport supporting photorespiration at 213 mbars of O2 was negligible in the C4 species and was 13% lower in the C3-C4 species relative to the C3 species as calculated from fluorescence and gas-exchange determinations. At high photon-flux rates and high O2 concentration, the potential benefit to light use for net CO2 uptake arising from lower photorespiration in P. milioides was offset by a reduced capacity

  5. Drastic changes of electronic structure and crystal chemistry upon oxidation of SnII2TiO4E2 into SnIV2TiO6: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Samir F.; Maglione, Mario; Nakhl, Michel; Kfoury, Charbel N.; Etourneau, Jean

    2016-09-01

    From DFT based calculations establishing energy-volume equations of state and electron localization mapping, the electronic structure and crystal chemistry changes from Sn2TiO4 to Sn2TiO6 by oxidation are rationalized; the key effect being the destabilization of divalent tin SnII towards tetravalent state SnIV leading to rutile Sn2TiO6 as experimentally observed. The subsequent electronic structure change is highlighted in the relative change of the electronic band gap which increases from ∼1 eV up to 2.2 eV and the 1.5 times increase of the bulk modulus assigned to the change from covalently SnII based compound to the more ionic SnIV one. Such trends are also confronted with the relevant properties of black SnIIO.

  6. Selective detection of the structural changes upon photoreactions of several redox cofactors in photosystem II by means of light-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Tatsunori; Noguchi, Takumi

    2007-04-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied for the first time to detect the structural changes upon photoreactions of redox cofactors in photosystem II (PSII). The PSII-enriched membranes from spinach were adsorbed on the surface of a silicon prism, and FTIR measurements of various redox cofactors were performed for the same sample but under different conditions by exchanging buffers in a flow cell. Light-induced FTIR difference spectra upon redox reactions of the oxygen-evolving Mn cluster, the primary quinone electron acceptor Q A, the redox-active tyrosine Y D, the primary electron acceptor pheophytin, and the primary electron donor chlorophyll P680 were successively recorded in buffers including different redox reagents and inhibitors. All of these cofactors remained active in the PSII membranes on the silicon surface, and the resultant spectra were basically identical to those previously recorded by the conventional transmission method. These ATR-FTIR measurements enable accurate comparison between reactions of different active sites in a single PSII sample. The present results demonstrated that the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is a useful technique for investigation of the reaction mechanism of PSII.

  7. Origin of dc voltage in type II superconducting flux pumps: field, field rate of change, and current density dependence of resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, J.; Matsuda, K.; Fu, L.; Fagnard, J.-F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Shen, B.; Dong, Q.; Baghdadi, M.; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    Superconducting flux pumps are the kind of devices which can generate direct current into superconducting circuit using external magnetic field. The key point is how to induce a dc voltage across the superconducting load by ac fields. Giaever (1966 IEEE Spectr. 3 117) pointed out flux motion in superconductors will induce a dc voltage, and demonstrated a rectifier model which depended on breaking superconductivity. van de Klundert et al (1981 Cryogenics 21 195, 267) in their review(s) described various configurations for flux pumps all of which relied on inducing the normal state in at least part of the superconductor. In this letter, following their work, we reveal that a variation in the resistivity of type II superconductors is sufficient to induce a dc voltage in flux pumps and it is not necessary to break superconductivity. This variation in resistivity is due to the fact that flux flow is influenced by current density, field intensity, and field rate of change. We propose a general circuit analogy for travelling wave flux pumps, and provide a mathematical analysis to explain the dc voltage. Several existing superconducting flux pumps which rely on the use of a travelling magnetic wave can be explained using the analysis enclosed. This work can also throw light on the design and optimization of flux pumps.

  8. Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect

    John McCord

    2007-05-01

    This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. • Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases “well portion of the objective function” and “head portion of the objective function” are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

  9. Temperature Dependence of Light-Induced Absorbance Changes Associated with Chlorophyll Photooxidation in Manganese-Depleted Core Complexes of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Zabelin, A A; Shkuropatova, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya; Shuvalov, V A

    2015-10-01

    Mid-infrared (4500-1150 cm(-1)) absorbance changes induced by continuous illumination of Mn-depleted core complexes of photosystem II (PSII) from spinach in the presence of exogenous electron acceptors (potassium ferricyanide and silicomolybdate) were studied by FTIR difference spectroscopy in the temperature range 100-265 K. The FTIR difference spectrum for photooxidation of the chlorophyll dimer P680 was determined from the set of signals associated with oxidation of secondary electron donors (β-carotene, chlorophyll) and reduction of the primary quinone QA. On the basis of analysis of the temperature dependence of the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum, it was concluded that frequencies of 13(1)-keto-C=O stretching modes of neutral chlorophyll molecules PD1 and PD2, which constitute P680, are similar to each other, being located at ~1700 cm(-1). This together with considerable difference between the stretching mode frequencies of keto groups of PD1(+) and PD2(+) cations (1724 and 1709 cm(-1), respectively) is in agreement with a literature model (Okubo et al. (2007) Biochemistry, 46, 4390-4397) suggesting that the positive charge in the P680(+) dimer is mainly localized on one of the two chlorophyll molecules. A partial delocalization of the charge between the PD1 and PD2 molecules in P680(+) is supported by the presence of a characteristic electronic intervalence band at ~3000 cm(-1). It is shown that a bleaching band at 1680 cm(-1) in the P680(+)/P680 FTIR spectrum does not belong to P680. A possible origin of this band is discussed, taking into account the temperature dependence (100-265 K) of light-induced absorbance changes of PSII core complexes in the visible spectral region from 620 to 720 nm. PMID:26567571

  10. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part II. Quality-improvement strategies.

    PubMed

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    The success of quality-improvement projects relies heavily on both project design and the metrics chosen to assess change. In Part II of this three-part American Thoracic Society Seminars series, we begin by describing methods for determining which data to collect, tools for data presentation, and strategies for data dissemination. As Avedis Donabedian detailed a half century ago, defining metrics in healthcare can be challenging; algorithmic determination of the best type of metric (outcome, process, or structure) can help intensive care unit (ICU) managers begin this process. Choosing appropriate graphical data displays (e.g., run charts) can prompt discussions about and promote quality improvement. Similarly, dashboards/scorecards are useful in presenting performance improvement data either publicly or privately in a visually appealing manner. To have compelling data to show, ICU managers must plan quality-improvement projects well. The second portion of this review details four quality-improvement tools-checklists, Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen. Checklists have become commonplace in many ICUs to improve care quality; thinking about how to maximize their effectiveness is now of prime importance. Six Sigma methodology, lean thinking, and Kaizen are techniques that use multidisciplinary teams to organize thinking about process improvement, formalize change strategies, actualize initiatives, and measure progress. None originated within healthcare, but each has been used in the hospital environment with success. To conclude this part of the series, we demonstrate how to use these tools through an example of improving the timely administration of antibiotics to patients with sepsis. PMID:24601668

  11. Oligomerization and conformation change in solutions of calf lens gamma II-crystallin. Results from 1/T1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, S H; Beaulieu, C F; Brown, R D; Spiller, M

    1990-01-01

    From analyses of the magnetic field dependence of 1/T1 (nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion [NMRD] profiles) of water protons in solutions of highly purified calf lens gamma II-crystallin, we find that monomers form oligomers at relatively low concentrations, which increase in size with increasing concentration and decreasing temperature. At approximately 16% by volume and -4 degrees C, the mean oligomeric molecular weight is approximately 120-fold greater than the monomeric value of 20 kD. Below this concentration, there is no indication of any substantive change in conformation of the monomeric subunits. At higher concentrations, the tertiary structure of the monomer appears to reconfigure rather abruptly, but reversibly, as evidenced by the appearance of spectra-like 14N peaks in the NMRD profiles. The magnitudes of these peaks, known to arise from cross-relaxation of water protons through access to amide (NH) moieties of the protein backbone, indicate that the high concentration conformation is not compact, but open and extended in a manner that allows enhanced interaction with solvent. The data are analogous to those found for homogenates of calf and chicken lens (Beaulieu, C. F., J. I. Clark, R. D. Brown III, M. Spiller, and S. H. Koenig. 1988. Magn. Reson. Med. 8:47-57; Beaulieu, C. F., R. D. Brown III, J. I. Clark, M. Spiller, and S. H. Koenig. 1989. Magn. Reson. Med. 10:62-72). This unusually large dependence of oligomeric size and conformation on concentration in the physiological range is suggested as the mechanism by which osmotic equilibrium is maintained, at minimal metabolic expense, in the presence of large gradients of protein concentration in the lens in vivo (cf Vérétout and Tardieu, 1989. Eur. Biophys. J. 17:61-68). Finally, the results of the NMRD data provide a ready explanation of the low temperature phase transition, and "cold-cataract" separation of phases, observed in gamma II-crystallin solutions; we suggest that the phases that

  12. Structural changes in photosystem II after treatment with the zero-length bifunctional cross-linker 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodi-imide: an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, R F; Flint, T D; Holzenburg, A; Ford, R C

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) crystals of photosystem II (PS II) treated with various concentrations of the zero-length crosslinker 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl))carbodi-imide (EDC) were analysed by electron microscopy in conjunction with crystallographic image processing. The preparations were characterized by SDS/PAGE and oxygen-evolution measurements, and the effectiveness of cross-linking was monitored by measuring the level of protection afforded against high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl2, which normally remove extrinsic proteins from PS II. We found that low concentrations of EDC (0.25%) increase the order of 2D crystals of PS II. Treatments with EDC concentrations higher than 0.5% did not improve the order of 2D crystals but induced gross structural changes, which were correlated with a decrease in oxygen evolution activity. Structural changes due to cross-linking did not affect packing or symmetry of the 2D crystals, further supporting the conclusion that PS II has a monomeric nature in vivo. PMID:8912698

  13. Assessment of changes in photosystem II structure and function as affected by water deficit in Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. and Amaranthus hybridus L.

    PubMed

    Slabbert, Retha M; Krüger, Gert H J

    2011-09-01

    The present study describes the behaviour of photosystem II (PSII) in Amaranthus hypochondriacus and Amaranthus hybridus under water stress conditions, assessed by the analyses of the polyphasic rise in chlorophyll a fluorescence (O-J-I-P). We determined the adaptive behaviour in relation to the regulation of the different functional and structural parameters of PSII, which was a direct and rapid response due to changes in soil water status indicated by a decrease in leaf water potential and relative water content. It allows for the identification of specific key or limiting chlorophyll fluorescence parameters which could be used to identify traits conveying tolerance. For the above partial processes of PSII function studied, it seems that A. hybridus remained the more stable upon water stress (after 17 days of withholding water), concerning the specific energy fluxes of absorption/reaction centre (ABS/RC) apparent (antenna size) and trapping/reaction centre (TR/RC) (maximum trapping flux), as well as the density of the reaction centres/cross section (RC/CS) and the phenomenological trapping flux/cross section (TR(o)/CS). It was clear that amaranth adjusts the non-photochemical (k(n)) deactivation constant of PSII and to a less extend also the photochemical (k(p)) deactivation constant by means of photoregulation, which forms the basis of the quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence. Although drought stress caused the deactivation of RCs leading to a decrease in the density of active RCs, the plants compensated by increasing the efficiency of the conversion of trapped excitation energy to electron transport beyond Q(A) (efficiency of exciton trapping/reaction centre: ET(o)/TR(o)). Subsequent damage to PSII might be the reason for the slow, or lack of recovery, for most of the parameters measured. PMID:21696974

  14. Changes in DNA methylation and transgenerational mobilization of a transposable element (mPing) by the Topoisomerase II inhibitor, Etoposide, in rice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Etoposide (epipodophyllotoxin) is a chemical commonly used as an anti-cancer drug which inhibits DNA synthesis by blocking topoisomerase II activity. Previous studies in animal cells have demonstrated that etoposide constitutes a genotoxic stress which may induce genomic instability including mobilization of normally quiescent transposable elements (TEs). However, it remained unknown whether similar genetically mutagenic effects could be imposed by etoposide in plant cells. Also, no information is available with regard to whether the drug may cause a perturbation of epigenetic stability in any organism. Results To investigate whether etoposide could generate genetic and/or epigenetic instability in plant cells, we applied etoposide to germinating seeds of six cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes including both subspecies, japonica and indica. Based on the methylation-sensitive gel-blotting results, epigenetic changes in DNA methylation of three TEs (Tos17, Osr23 and Osr36) and two protein-encoding genes (Homeobox and CDPK-related genes) were detected in the etoposide-treated plants (S0 generation) in four of the six studied japonica cultivars, Nipponbare, RZ1, RZ2, and RZ35, but not in the rest japonica cultivar (Matsumae) and the indica cultivar (93-11). DNA methylation changes in the etoposide-treated S0 rice plants were validated by bisulfite sequencing at both of two analyzed loci (Tos17 and Osr36). Transpositional activity was tested for eight TEs endogenous to the rice genome in both the S0 plants and their selfed progenies (S1 and S2) of one of the cultivars, RZ1, which manifested heritable phenotypic variations. Results indicated that no transposition occurred in the etoposide-treated S0 plants for any of the TEs. Nonetheless, a MITE transposon, mPing, showed rampant mobilization in the S1 and S2 progenies descended from the drug-treated S0 plants. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that etoposide imposes a similar genotoxic stress on

  15. Structure change associated with the [M(II/III) 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetate (TCTA)](-/0) electron transfers (M = Mn, Fe, and Ni): crystal structure for [Fe(II)(H2O)6][Fe(II)(TCTA)]2.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Thomas L; Staples, Richard J; Pierce, David T

    2010-10-18

    Heterogeneous electron-transfer rate measurements using the scanning electrochemical microscope are reported for the [M(TCTA)](-/0) couples (M = Mn, Fe, and Ni) in aqueous solution. Solution IR spectroscopy indicates that N(3)O(3) coordination is preserved for each couple within the pH range of 2-4, and susceptibility measurements indicate little or no interference from spin-state changes at room temperature. Marcus-Hush expressions were used to quantitatively relate structural differences between oxidation states to measured standard heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constants. Good correlation was obtained for the Fe couple, and structural changes associated with the Mn and Ni couples were estimated. In addition, the structure of the Fe(II) complex was determined by X-ray crystallography. The molecule [Fe(H(2)O)(6)][Fe(TCTA)](2) is trigonal, space group P3(1)/c (no. 159) with a = b = 12.530(3) Å, c = 12.656(4) Å, and Z = 2. A notable feature of the structure is that the [Fe(TCTA)](-) complex is distributed between two different geometries, one being rigorously trigonal prismatic and the other having a 26° antiprismatic twist. PMID:20866086

  16. Changes in plasma angiotensin II, aldosterone, arginine vasotocin, corticosterone, and electrolyte concentrations during acclimation to dry condition and seawater in the crab-eating frog.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Maejima, Sho; Wong, Marty K S; Preyavichyapugdee, Narin; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Hyodo, Susumu; Takei, Yoshio; Matuda, Kouhei

    2014-01-01

    The crab-eating frog Fejervarya cancrivora inhabits mangrove swamps and marshes in Southeast Asia. In the present study, circulating angiotensin II (Ang II), aldosterone (Aldo), arginine vasotocin (AVT), and corticosterone (Cort) concentrations as well as various blood parameters were studied under osmotically stressful conditions. Following acclimation to hyperosmotic seawater and dry condition for 5days, body weight was significantly decreased. Under both conditions, plasma Na(+), Cl(-), and urea concentrations, hematocrit values (Ht; blood volume indicator), and osmolality were significantly increased. Dehydration associated with hypovolemic and hyperosmotic states of body fluids was induced during acclimation to hyperosmotic seawater and dry condition in the crab-eating frogs. Ang II, Aldo, AVT, and Cort were maintained within relatively narrow concentration ranges in the control frogs; however, in frogs under dry and hyperosmotic seawater conditions, large variations were observed among individuals in each group. Mean plasma Ang II and Aldo concentrations significantly increased in hyperosmotic seawater-acclimated and desiccated frogs. Although mean plasma AVT concentrations in dehydrated frogs of both the groups were approximately 2.0-3.5 times higher than those in the control frogs, the differences were not significant because of the variation. There was a significant correlation between plasma osmolality and AVT as well as Ang II but not Aldo. A significant correlation was also observed between Ht and AVT as well as Ang II. Plasma Ang II was significantly correlated with plasma Aldo. These results indicate that the crab-eating frogs may exhibit similar physiological responses to both seawater-acclimated and dry conditions. It appears that under dehydrated conditions, osmoregulatory mechanisms participate in stabilization of the situation. The renin-angiotensin system may have pivotal roles in body fluid regulation under volemic and osmotic stress in the

  17. Time-resolved absorption changes of the pheophytin Q{sub x} band in isolated photosystem II reaction centers at 7K : energy transfer and charge separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S. R.; Seibert, M.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Chemistry; LANL; NREL; Northwestern Univ.

    1999-09-30

    The pheophytin {alpha} Q{sub x} spectral region of the isolated photosystem II reaction center was investigated at 7 K using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. At this temperature, uphill energy transfer, which greatly complicates the interpretation of the kinetics at or near room temperature, should be essentially shut off. Low-energy ({approx}100 nJ) pulses at 661 and 683 nm were used to excite the short-wavelength and long-wavelength sides of the composite Q{sub y} band, providing preferential excitation of the accessory pigment pool and P680, respectively. The data analysis uses a background subtraction technique developed earlier (Greenfield et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 2251-2255) to remove the kinetic components of the data that are due to the large time-dependent changes in the background that are present in this spectral region. The instantaneous amplitude of the bleach of the pheophytin {alpha} Q{sub x} band with 683 nm excitation is roughly two-thirds of its final amplitude, providing strong evidence of a multimer description of the reaction center core. The subsequent growth of the bleach shows biphasic kinetics, similar to our earlier results at 278 K. The rate constant of the faster component is (5 ps){sup -1} for 683 nm excitation (a factor of almost two faster than at 278 K), and represents the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The bleach growth with 661 nm excitation is also biphasic; however, the faster component appears to be a composite of a (5 ps){sup -1} component corresponding to charge separation following subpicosecond energy transfer to the long-wavelength pigments and a roughly (22 ps){sup -1} component corresponding to charge separation limited by slow energy transfer. The combined quantum yield for these two energy transfer processes is near unity. For both excitation wavelengths, there is also a roughly (100 ps){sup -1} component to the bleach growth. Exposure to high excitation energies ({>=}1 {mu}J) at

  18. Time-resolved absorption changes of the pheophytin Q{sub x} band in isolated photosystem II reaction centers at 7 K: Energy transfer and charge separation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S.R.; Seibert, M.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1999-09-30

    The pheophytin a Q{sub x} spectral region of the isolated photosystem II reaction center was investigated at 7 K using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. At this temperature, uphill energy transfer, which greatly complicates the interpretation of the kinetics at or near room temperature, should be essentially shut off. Low-energy ({approximately}100 nJ) pulses at 661 and 683 nm were used to excite the short-wavelength and long-wavelength sides of the composite Q{sub y} band, providing preferential excitation of the accessory pigment pool and P680, respectively. The data analysis uses a background subtraction technique developed earlier (Greenfield et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 2251--2255) to remove the kinetic components of the data that are due to the large time-dependent changes in the background that are present in this spectral region. The instantaneous amplitude of the bleach of the pheophytin a Q{sub x} band with 683 nm excitation is roughly two-thirds of its final amplitude, providing strong evidence of a multimer description of the reaction center core. The subsequent growth of the bleach shows biphasic kinetics, similar to the earlier results at 278 K. The rate constant of the faster component is (5 ps){sup {minus}1} for 683 nm excitation (a factor of almost two faster than at 278 K), and represents the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The bleach growth with 661 nm excitation is also biphasic; however, the faster component appears to be a composite of a (5 ps){sup {minus}1} component corresponding to charge separation following subpicosecond energy transfer to the long-wavelength pigments and a roughly (22 ps){sup {minus}1} component corresponding to charge separation limited by slow energy transfer. The combined quantum yield for these two energy transfer processes is near unity. For both excitation wavelengths, there is also a roughly (100 ps){sup {minus}1} component to the bleach growth. Exposure to high excitation

  19. Assessing change in diet and biological affinity between the 4th and 3rd millennia cal BCE in the Portuguese Estremadura: a preliminary dental comparison of Feteira II and Bolores.

    PubMed

    Horwath, B C; Waterman, A J; Lillios, K T; Irish, J D

    2014-04-01

    Although the social and political changes accompanying the transition from the Neolithic through Copper Age, between the 4th and 3rd millennia cal BCE, in southwestern Iberia are reasonably well understood, much less is known about whether population movements and dietary changes accompanied these transformations. To address this question, human dental remains from the Middle through Late Neolithic site of Feteira II (3600-2900 cal BCE) and the Late Neolithic site of Bolores (2800-2600 cal BCE) in the Portuguese Estremadura were used to examine diet (microwear) and affinity (dental non-metrics). Microwear features were not found to be significantly different between Feteira II and Bolores, suggesting that the emergence of social complexity during this period did not result in large-scale changes in subsistence practices during the period of use at these sites. Using the Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System and supporting statistics, no significant difference between the samples from Feteira II and Bolores was observed, suggesting that no population replacement occurred between the Middle Neolithic and Late Neolithic/Copper Age. However, at Bolores there is some indication that there may have been demographic exchanges between southern Iberian and North African populations during the Late Neolithic/Copper Age. PMID:24642202

  20. Temporal changes in community composition of heterotrophic bacteria during in situ iron enrichment in the western subarctic Pacific (SEEDS-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Takafumi; Suzuki, Koji; Hayakawa, Maki; Kudo, Isao; Higashi, Seigo; Tsuda, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    Little is known about the effects of iron enrichment in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters on the community composition of heterotrophic bacteria, which are crucial to nutrient recycling and microbial food webs. Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA fragments, we investigated the heterotrophic eubacterial community composition in surface waters during an in situ iron-enrichment experiment (SEEDS-II) in the western subarctic Pacific in the summer of 2004. DGGE fingerprints representing the community composition of eubacteria differed inside and outside the iron-enriched patch. Sequencing of DGGE bands revealed that at least five phylotypes of α-proteobacteria including Roseobacter, Cytophaga-Flavobacteria- Bacteroides (CFB), γ-proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria occurred in almost all samples from the iron-enriched patch. Diatoms did not bloom during SEEDS-II, but the eubacterial composition in the iron-enriched patch was similar to that in diatom blooms observed previously. Although dissolved organic carbon (DOC) accumulation was not detected in surface waters during SEEDS-II, growth of the Roseobacter clade might have been particularly stimulated after iron additions. Two identified phylotypes of CFB were closely related to the genus Saprospira, whose algicidal activity might degrade the phytoplankton assemblages increased by iron enrichment. These results suggest that the responses of heterotrophic bacteria to iron enrichment could differ among phylotypes during SEEDS-II.

  1. Juno II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    The Juno II launch vehicle, shown here, was a modified Jupiter Intermediate-Range Ballistic missionile, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Between December 1958 and April 1961, the Juno II launched space probes Pioneer III and IV, as well as Explorer satellites VII, VIII and XI.

  2. Antifungal Volatile Organic Compounds from the Endophyte Nodulisporium sp. Strain GS4d2II1a: a Qualitative Change in the Intraspecific and Interspecific Interactions with Pythium aphanidermatum.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, Rosa Elvira; Diaz, Daniel; Duarte, Georgina; Lappe-Oliveras, Patricia; Sánchez, Sergio; Macías-Rubalcava, Martha Lydia

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrates volatile organic compounds (VOCs) production as one of the defense mechanisms of the antagonistic endophyte Nodulisporium sp. GS4d2II1a, and the volatile changes in two times of the fungal growth; and, as result of its intra and interspecific interactions with the plant pathogen Pythium aphanidermatum. The antifungal activity of the volatile and diffusible metabolites was evaluated by means of three types of antagonism bioassays and by organic extract agar dilution. VOCs were obtained by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry from 3- and 5-day Nodulisporium sp. cultures, as well as from its interspecific in vitro antagonistic interaction with the oomycete P. aphanidermatum, and its intraspecific Nodulisporium sp.-Nodulisporium sp. interaction. The GS4d2II1a strain completely inhibited the growth of two fungi and seven oomycetes by replacing their mycelia in simple antagonism bioassays and by producing in vitro volatile and diffusible metabolites that acted synergistically in multiple antagonism bioassays. Additionally, VOCs inhibited the growth of three oomycetes and one fungus in antagonism bioassays using divided plates. A total of 70 VOCs were detected, mainly including mono and sesquiterpenes, especially eucalyptol and limonene. Multiple correspondence analysis revealed four different volatile profiles, showing that volatiles changed with the fungus age and its intra and interspecific interactions. The metabolites produced by Nodulisporium sp. GS4d2II1a could be useful for biological control of fungal and oomycetes plant pathogens of economically important crops. PMID:26408189

  3. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Models for Change in Quantitative Variables, Part I Deterministic Models. Part II, Chapter 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannan, Michael T.

    This document is part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759. Addressing the question of effective models to measure change and the change process, the author suggests that linear structural equation systems may be viewed as steady state outcomes of continuous-change models and have rich sociological grounding. Two interpretations of the…

  4. Changes in amino acid concentration in plasma and type I and type II fibres during resistance exercise and recovery in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Blomstrand, Eva; Essén-Gustavsson, Birgitta

    2009-10-01

    Eight male subjects performed leg press exercise, 4 x 10 repetitions at 80% of their maximum. Venous blood samples were taken before, during exercise and repeatedly during 2 h of recovery. From four subjects, biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle prior to, immediately after and following one and 2 h of recovery. Samples were freeze-dried, individual muscle fibres were dissected out and identified as type I or type II. Resistance exercise led to pronounced reductions in the glutamate concentration in both type I (32%) and type II fibres (70%). Alanine concentration was elevated 60-75% in both fibre types and 29% in plasma. Glutamine concentration remained unchanged after exercise; although 2 h later the concentrations in both types of fibres were reduced 30-35%. Two hours after exercise, the plasma levels of glutamate and six of the essential amino acids, including the branched-chain amino acids were reduced 5-30%. The data suggest that glutamate acts as an important intermediate in muscle energy metabolism during resistance exercise, especially in type II fibres. PMID:18931969

  5. Disparate Changes in the Mechanical Properties of Murine Carotid Arteries and Aorta in Response to Chronic Infusion of Angiotensin-II

    PubMed Central

    Bersi, M.R.; Collins, M.J.; Wilson, E.; Humphrey, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic infusion of angiotensin-II has proved useful for generating dissecting aortic aneurysms in atheroprone mice. These lesions preferentially form in the suprarenal abdominal aorta and sometimes in the ascending aorta, but reasons for such localization remain unknown. This study focused on why these lesions do not form in other large (central) arteries. Toward this end, we quantified and compared the geometry, composition, and biaxial material behavior (using a nonlinear constitutive relation) of common carotid arteries from three groups of mice: non-treated controls as well as mice receiving a subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin-II for 28 days that either did or did not lead to the development of a dissecting aortic aneurysm. Consistent with the mild hypertension induced by the angiotensin-II, the carotid wall thickened as expected and remodeled modestly. There was no evidence, however, of a marked loss of elastic fibers or smooth muscle cells, each of which appear to be initiating events for the development of aneurysms, and there was no evidence of intramural discontinuities that might give rise to dissections. PMID:24944461

  6. Change in the height of Korean children and adolescents: analysis from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey II and V

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Na Yung; Shin, Ha Young; Moon, Jin Soo; Lee, Chong Guk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The mean adult height of Koreans has increased since nationwide anthropological measurements began in 1967. The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in heights of Korean late adolescents and young adults within and between the Second and Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES II and V). Methods Koreans aged ≤22 years with available measurements of height were enrolled from the KNHANES surveys (KNHANES II: n=3,372 [1,732 males and 1,640 females]; KNHANES V: n=6,190 [3,198 males and 2,992 females]). Differences in the height of KNHANES respondents within and between surveys were evaluated according to age and sex. Results In KNHANES II, there was no significant difference in height between males aged 17-19 years and those aged 20-22 years (174.3±0.5 cm vs. 174.3±0.6 cm, P=0.995). Females aged 20-22 years were taller than those aged 17-19 years (159.8±0.4 cm vs. 161.0±0.4 cm, P=0.017). Females aged 17-19 years were significantly taller in KNHANES V than in KNHANES II (161.2±0.3 cm vs. 159.8±0.4 cm, P=0.004). Respondents aged 20-22 years were taller in KNHANES V than in KNHANES II, although not significantly so; the difference was 0.3±0.8 cm in males (P=0.721) and 0.5±0.6 cm in females (P=0.386). Conclusion Koreans appear to continue growing even in their late adolescence and early twenties. Consequently, it may be necessary to expand the reference age ranges of the Korean growth chart. Additionally, a longitudinal growth survey is needed to determine growth patterns and secular trend in height among Koreans. PMID:26512259

  7. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  8. Changes in PSA Kinetics Predict Metastasis-Free Survival in Men with PSA-Recurrent Prostate Cancer Treated with Non-Hormonal Agents: Combined Analysis of 4 Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Lin, Jianqing; Keizman, Daniel; Carducci, Michael A.; Eisenberger, Mario A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Several phase II trials in men with non-castrate PSA-recurrent prostate cancer have assessed the impact of novel non-hormonal agents on PSA kinetics. However, it is unknown whether changes in PSA kinetics influence metastasis-free survival (MFS). Methods We performed a retrospective post hoc analysis of 146 men treated in four phase II trials examining the investigational agents marimastat (a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor; n=39), imatinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor; n=25), ATN-224 (a copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase inhibitor; n=22), and lenalidomide (an antiangiogenic/immunomodulatory drug; n=60). We investigated factors influencing MFS, including within-subject changes in PSA kinetics (PSA slope, doubling time, and velocity) before and after treatment initiation. Results After a median follow-up of 16.8 months, 70 patients (47.9%) developed metastases. In multivariable Cox regression models, factors that were independently predictive of MFS after adjusting for age and other clinical prognostic variables were baseline PSA doubling time (PSADT) (P=.05), baseline PSA slope (P=.01), on-study change in PSADT (P=.02), and on-study change in PSA slope (P=.03). In a landmark Kaplan-Meier analysis, median MFS was 63.5 months (95% CI 34.6–not reached) and 28.9 months (95% CI 13.5–68.0) for men with or without any decrease in PSA slope by 6 months after treatment, respectively. Conclusions This hypothesis-generating analysis suggests that within-subject changes in PSADT and PSA slope after initiation of experimental therapy may correlate with MFS in men with biochemically-recurrent prostate cancer. If validated in prospective trials, changes in PSA kinetics may represent a reasonable intermediate endpoint for screening new agents in these patients. PMID:21960118

  9. Characterization of oscillations in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration and measurement of cytosolic Na+ concentration changes evoked by angiotensin II and vasopressin in individual rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Use of microfluorometry and digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E M; Theler, J M; Capponi, A M; Vallotton, M B

    1991-07-01

    Dual wavelength microfluorometry was used to characterize the changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration [( Ca2+]i) in individual cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Angiotensin II (ANG II) at 10(-8) M induced a transient rise in [Ca2+]i from 43 +/- 2 to 245 +/- 23 nM, lasting for approximately 60 s (n = 42). In half of the population, discrete oscillations in [Ca2+]i of smaller amplitude occurred after the initial [Ca2+]i peak, with a period of 58 +/- 8 s and a maximum height of 132 +/- 24 nM. A similar oscillatory pattern was observed with arginine vasopressin (AVP). The oscillations depended upon the presence of extracellular Ca2+. Cytosolic free Na+ concentration ([Na+]i) in VSMC was also measured using the fluorescent Na+ probe sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate. ANG II induced a gradual and sustained elevation of [Na+]i, from 24.0 +/- 6.2 to 36 +/- 9.7 mM. In response to AVP, [Na+]i rose to 41.0 +/- 11.6 mM. Video imaging of individual VSMC, with on-line ratio calibration of [Ca2+]i, revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of Ca2+ within the cell. [Ca2+] in the nucleus was invariably lower than in the cytoplasm in resting cells. In the cytoplasm, there were small regions in which [Ca2+] was elevated, or "hot spots." In Ca(2+)-containing medium, the initial rise in [Ca2+]i triggered by ANG II and AVP appeared to emanate from the hot spots and to spread evenly throughout the cytoplasm. Between [Ca2+]i oscillations, Ca2+ retreated back to the original hot spots. This study demonstrates the cellular and subcellular heterogeneity of [Ca2+]i both in resting VSMC and during stimulation by ANG II and AVP and reports the direct measurement of [Na+]i in VSMC. The results suggest an action of Ca2+ in both the initial and sustained phases of the response in VSMC and a link between changes in [Ca2+]i and [Na+]i. PMID:2061331

  10. Analysis of free amino acids in green coffee beans. II. Changes of the amino acid content in arabica coffees in connection with post-harvest model treatment.

    PubMed

    Arnold, U; Ludwig, E

    1996-10-01

    To investigate amino acid changes in green coffee beans in the post-harvest period, amino acid concentrations were determined in green beans and after modelled drying, fermentation and storage. After the drying at alternating temperatures up to maximally 40 degrees C, considerable changes in the concentrations of individual amino acids were identified. At the beginning of the storage period, significant changes in concentration were found to a minor extent. Under the condition of drying, it was mainly the concentration of glutamic acid that changed considerably. There was an increase in all the samples by 500 mg/kg dry matter on average, which corresponds to an increase of about 50% of the original value. In contrast, the concentration of aspartic acid in most of the samples decreased clearly due to drying. For the predominant part of the coffee samples, there was a significant increase in the hydrophobic amino acids Val, Phe, Ile and Leu. Changes of the quantities of other amino acids were non-uniform and only insignificant. Constant drying at 80 degrees C for most of the amino acids brought about only minor concentration changes compared to those values obtained at 40 degrees C. Modelled fermentation had no significant effect on the concentrations of the individual amino acids. After a 4-week storage of dried beans, amino acid concentrations did not change further. It is very possible that different post-harvest treatment parameters may influence the amount of aroma precursor compounds in the coffee beans. PMID:9123976

  11. Change in equilibrium position of misfit dislocations at the GaN/sapphire interface by Si-ion implantation into sapphire. II. Electron energy loss spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Bo Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Young-Min

    2015-07-15

    In Part I, we have shown that the addition of Si into sapphire by ion implantationmakes the sapphire substrate elastically softer than for the undoped sapphire. The more compliant layer of the Si-implanted sapphire substrate can absorb the misfit stress at the GaN/sapphire interface, which produces a lower threading-dislocation density in the GaN overlayer. Here in Part II, based on experimental results by electron energy loss spectroscopy and a first-principle molecular orbital calculation in the literature, we suggest that the softening effect of Si results from a reduction of ionic bonding strength in sapphire (α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) with the substitution of Si for Al.

  12. Variation in DNA binding constants with a change in geometry of ternary copper(II) complexes with N2O donor Schiff base and cyanate or dicyanamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Subrata; Santra, Ramesh Chandra; Das, Saurabh; Chattopadhyay, Shouvik

    2014-09-01

    Two new copper(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(OCN)] (1) and [CuL(dca)]n (2), where HL = 2-(-(2-(diethylamino)ethylimino)methyl)naphthalen-1-ol, dca = N(CN)2-, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-VIS spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex 1 has square planar and complex 2 square pyramidal geometries in solid state around metal centre. Interactions of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) were studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy. Binding constant and site size of interaction were determined. Binding site size and intrinsic binding constant K revealed complex 1 interacted with calf thymus DNA better than complex 2.

  13. Change in equilibrium position of misfit dislocations at the GaN/sapphire interface by Si-ion implantation into sapphire. II. Electron energy loss spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Bo; Kim, Young-Min; Han, Heung Nam

    2015-07-01

    In Part I, we have shown that the addition of Si into sapphire by ion implantationmakes the sapphire substrate elastically softer than for the undoped sapphire. The more compliant layer of the Si-implanted sapphire substrate can absorb the misfit stress at the GaN/sapphire interface, which produces a lower threading-dislocation density in the GaN overlayer. Here in Part II, based on experimental results by electron energy loss spectroscopy and a first-principle molecular orbital calculation in the literature, we suggest that the softening effect of Si results from a reduction of ionic bonding strength in sapphire (α-Al2O3) with the substitution of Si for Al.

  14. Ten-Year Changes in the Prevalence and Socio-Demographic Determinants of Physical Activity among Polish Adults Aged 20 to 74 Years. Results of the National Multicenter Health Surveys WOBASZ (2003-2005) and WOBASZ II (2013-2014)

    PubMed Central

    Kwaśniewska, Magdalena; Pikala, Małgorzata; Bielecki, Wojciech; Dziankowska-Zaborszczyk, Elżbieta; Rębowska, Ewa; Kozakiewicz, Krystyna; Pająk, Andrzej; Piwoński, Jerzy; Tykarski, Andrzej; Zdrojewski, Tomasz; Drygas, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to estimate ten-year changes in physical activity (PA) patterns and sociodemographic determinants among adult residents of Poland. Methods The study comprised two independent samples of randomly selected adults aged 20–74 years participating in the National Multicentre Health Survey WOBASZ (2003–2005; n = 14572) and WOBASZ II (2013–2014; n = 5694). In both surveys the measurements were performed by six academic centers in all 16 voivodships of Poland (108 measurement points in each survey). Sociodemographic data were collected by an interviewer-administered questionnaire in both surveys. Physical activity was assessed in three domains: leisure-time, occupational and commuting physical activity. Results Leisure-time PA changed substantially between the surveys (p<0.001). The prevalence of subjects being active on most days of week fell in both genders in the years 2003–2014 (37.4% vs 27.3% in men); 32.7% vs 28.3% in women. None or occasional activity increased from 49.6% to 56.8% in men, while remained stable in women (55.2% vs 54.9%). In both WOBASZ surveys the likelihood of physical inactivity was higher in less educated individuals, smokers and those living in large agglomerations (p<0.01). No significant changes were observed in occupational activity in men between the surveys, while in women percentage of sedentary work increased from 43.4% to % 49.4% (p<0.01). Commuting PA decreased significantly in both genders (p<0.001). About 79.3% of men and 71.3% of women reported no active commuting in the WOBASZ II survey. Conclusions The observed unfavourable changes in PA emphasize the need for novel intervention concepts in order to reverse this direction. Further detailed monitoring of PA patterns in Poland is of particular importance. PMID:27272130

  15. Welding II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding II, a performance-based course offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to introduce students to out-of-position shielded arc welding with emphasis on proper heats, electrode selection, and alternating/direct currents. After introductory…

  16. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  17. Juno II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Wernher von Braun and his team were responsible for the Jupiter-C hardware. The family of launch vehicles developed by the team also came to include the Juno II, which was used to launch the Pioneer IV satellite on March 3, 1959. Pioneer IV passed within 37,000 miles of the Moon before going into solar orbit.

  18. Atomic structure of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin I at pH 8.0 reveals the large disulfide-rich region in domain II to be sensitive to a pH change

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Mikami, Bunzo; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Tani, Fumito

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a recombinant thaumatin at pH 8.0 determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substantial fluctuations of a loop in domain II was found in the structure at pH 8.0. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer B-factors for Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in mobility might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation. -- Abstract: Thaumatin, an intensely sweet-tasting plant protein, elicits a sweet taste at 50 nM. Although the sweetness remains when thaumatin is heated at 80 Degree-Sign C for 4 h under acid conditions, it rapidly declines when heating at a pH above 6.5. To clarify the structural difference at high pH, the atomic structure of a recombinant thaumatin I at pH 8.0 was determined at a resolution of 1.0 A. Comparison to the crystal structure of thaumatin at pH 7.3 and 7.0 revealed the root-mean square deviation value of a C{alpha} atom to be substantially greater in the large disulfide-rich region of domain II, especially residues 154-164, suggesting that a loop region in domain II to be affected by solvent conditions. Furthermore, B-factors of Lys137, Lys163, and Lys187 were significantly affected by pH change, suggesting that a striking increase in the mobility of these lysine residues, which could facilitate a reaction with a free sulfhydryl residue produced via the {beta}-elimination of disulfide bonds by heating at a pH above 7.0. The increase in mobility of lysine residues as well as a loop region in domain II might play an important role in the heat-induced aggregation of thaumatin above pH 7.0.

  19. Farm Mechanization And Labor Stabilization. Part II In A Series On Technological Change And Farm Labor Use, Kern County, California, 1961. Research Report No. 280.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzler, William H.

    A stratified random sample of 69 6 workers in 361 households in Kern County, California, was selected to investigate the changes in labor use resulting from farm mechanization, and to explore the trend towards a stable labor force. Some major findings were: (1) Mechanization of the cotton harvest has erased the high peak of seasonal farm labor,…

  20. Maxillo-mandibular counter-clockwise rotation and mandibular advancement with TMJ Concepts total joint prostheses: part II--airway changes and stability.

    PubMed

    Coleta, K E D; Wolford, L M; Gonçalves, J R; Pinto, A dos Santos; Cassano, D S; Gonçalves, D A G

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anatomical changes and stability of the oropharyngeal airway and head posture following TMJ reconstruction and mandibular advancement with TMJ Concepts custom-made total joint prostheses and maxillary osteotomies with counter-clockwise rotation of the maxillo-mandibular complex. All patients were operated at Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas TX, USA, by one surgeon (Wolford). The lateral cephalograms of 47 patients were analyzed to determine surgical and post-surgical changes of the oropharyngeal airway, hyoid bone and head posture. Surgery increased the narrowest retroglossal airway space 4.9 mm. Head posture showed flexure immediately after surgery (-5.6+/-6.7 degrees) and extension long-term post surgery (1.8+/-6.7 degrees); cervical curvature showed no significant change. Surgery increased the distances between the third cervical vertebrae and the menton 11.7+/-9.1 mm and the third cervical vertebrae and hyoid 3.2+/-3.9 mm, and remained stable. The distance from the hyoid to the mandibular plane decreased during surgery (-3.8+/-5.8 mm) and after surgery (-2.5+/-5.2 mm). Maxillo-mandibular advancement with counter-clockwise rotation and TMJ reconstruction with total joint prostheses produced immediate increase in oropharyngeal airway dimension, which was influenced by long-term changes in head posture but remained stable over the follow-up period. PMID:19135866

  1. Job-Linked Literacy: Innovative Strategies at Work. Part II. Meeting the Challenge of Change: Basic Skills for a Competitive Workforce. A Work in America Policy Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosow, Jerome M.; Zager, Robert

    This volume, Interim Report No. 2 in a 3-year study, establishes the need for job-linked literacy programs that respond to technological and organizational change, outlines the character of successful programs, and demonstrates these programs' potential value. The volume is divided into two parts: report and case studies. The introduction to the…

  2. Changes in the structure of dung insect communities after ivermectin usage in a grassland ecosystem. II. Impact of ivermectin under high-rainfall conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Kerstin; Scholtz, Clarke H.

    1998-10-01

    A large-scale field study was carried out to assess the ecotoxicological effect of ivermectin, a broad-spectrum veterinary agent, on dung insect communities under normal extensive farming conditions in South Africa. Dung insect communities were monitored: i) one year after a first treatment of entire herds with a single standard injection of ivermectin (200 μ·kg -1) in the 1992/93 season; and ii) for three months after a second single standard injection in the 1993/94 season. Two herds were treated with a single standard injection of ivermectin while two herds remained untreated as controls. Each herd was held in a paddock of about 80 ha. Field work was carried out in the rainy season of 1993/94, when the study area received above-average rainfall. The impact of ivermectin was examined using a variety of community measures, including univariate, graphical and multivariate methods. No effect of ivermectin on dung insect communities was observable one year after the 1992/93 treatment. Seven days after treatment in the 1993/94 season, fewer hydrophilid larvae, and scarabaeid and dipteran pupae were present in pats from treated animals in comparison with untreated controls. One and three months after treatment, there were no effects that could be attributed directly to the treatment with ivermectin. The results of the study indicate that the seriousness of the impact of ivermectin depends on several factors, including climatic conditions, spatial scale of treatment and number of animals treated in a herd.

  3. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  4. Changes in the Redox Potential of Primary and Secondary Electron-Accepting Quinones in Photosystem II Confer Increased Resistance to Photoinhibition in Low-Temperature-Acclimated Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Prafullachandra Vishnu; Ivanov, Alexander G.; Hurry, Vaughan; Huner, Norman P.A.; Öquist, Gunnar

    2003-01-01

    Exposure of control (non-hardened) Arabidopsis leaves for 2 h at high irradiance at 5°C resulted in a 55% decrease in photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency as indicated by Fv/Fm. In contrast, cold-acclimated leaves exposed to the same conditions showed only a 22% decrease in Fv/Fm. Thermoluminescence was used to assess the possible role(s) of PSII recombination events in this differential resistance to photoinhibition. Thermoluminescence measurements of PSII revealed that S2QA- recombination was shifted to higher temperatures, whereas the characteristic temperature of the S2QB- recombination was shifted to lower temperatures in cold-acclimated plants. These shifts in recombination temperatures indicate higher activation energy for the S2QA- redox pair and lower activation energy for the S2QB- redox pair. This results in an increase in the free-energy gap between P680+QA- and P680+Pheo- and a narrowing of the free energy gap between primary and secondary electron-accepting quinones in PSII electron acceptors. We propose that these effects result in an increased population of reduced primary electron-accepting quinone in PSII, facilitating non-radiative P680+QA- radical pair recombination. Enhanced reaction center quenching was confirmed using in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence-quenching analysis. The enhanced dissipation of excess light energy within the reaction center of PSII, in part, accounts for the observed increase in resistance to high-light stress in cold-acclimated Arabidopsis plants. PMID:12913169

  5. The SafeBoosC II randomized trial: treatment guided by near-infrared spectroscopy reduces cerebral hypoxia without changing early biomarkers of brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Plomgaard, Anne M.; van Oeveren, Wim; Petersen, Tue H.; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon; Claris, Olivier; Dempsey, Eugene; Franz, Axel; Fumagalli, Monica; Gluud, Christian; Hagmann, Cornelia; Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Lemmers, Petra; Pellicer, Adelina; Pichler, Gerhard; Winkel, Per; Greisen, Gorm

    2016-01-01

    Background: The SafeBoosC phase II multicentre randomized clinical trial investigated the benefits and harms of monitoring cerebral oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with an evidence-based treatment guideline vs. no NIRS data and treatment as usual in the control group during the first 72 h of life. The trial demonstrated a significant reduction in the burden of cerebral hypoxia in the experimental group. We now report the blindly assessed and analyzed treatment effects on electroencephalographic (EEG) outcomes (burst rate and spectral edge frequency 95% (SEF95)) and blood biomarkers of brain injury (S100β, brain fatty acid-binding protein, and neuroketal). Methods: One hundred and sixty-six extremely preterm infants were randomized to either experimental or control group. EEG was recorded at 64 h of age and blood samples were collected at 6 and 64 h of age. Results: One hundred and thirty-three EEGs were evaluated. The two groups did not differ regarding burst rates (experimental 7.2 vs. control 7.7 burst/min) or SEF95 (experimental 18.1 vs. control 18.0 Hz). The two groups did not differ regarding blood S100β, brain fatty acid-binding protein, and neuroketal concentrations at 6 and 64 h (n = 123 participants). Conclusion: Treatment guided by NIRS reduced the cerebral burden of hypoxia without affecting EEG or the selected blood biomarkers. PMID:26679155

  6. PORT II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  7. Late Pleistocene variations in Antarctica sea ice. I - Effect of orbital isolation changes. II - Effect of interhemispheric deep-ocean heat exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.; Parkinson, Claire L.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model is presently used to ascertain the effects of orbitally-induced insolation changes on Antarctic sea-ice cover; the results thus obtained are compared with modified CLIMAP reconstructions of sea-ice 18,000 years ago. The minor influence exerted by insolation on Pleistocene sea-ice distributions is attributable to a number of factors. In the second part of this investigation, variations in the production of warm North Atlantic Deep Water are proposed as a mechanism constituting the linkage between climate fluctuations in the Northern and Southern hemispheres during the Pleistocene; this hypothesis is tested by examining the sensitivity of the dynamic-thermodynamic model for Antarctic sea-ice changes in vertical ocean heat flux, and comparing the simulations with modified CLIMAP sea-ice maps for 18,000 years ago.

  8. Hamiltonian truncation study of the ϕ4 theory in two dimensions. II. The Z2 -broken phase and the Chang duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rychkov, Slava; Vitale, Lorenzo G.

    2016-03-01

    The Fock-space Hamiltonian truncation method is developed further, paying particular attention to the treatment of the scalar field zero mode. This is applied to the two-dimensional ϕ4 theory in the phase where the Z2 -symmetry is spontaneously broken, complementing our earlier study of the Z2 -invariant phase and of the critical point. We also check numerically the weak/strong duality of this theory discussed long ago by Chang.

  9. Historical shoreline mapping (II): application of the Digital Shoreline Mapping and Analysis Systems (DSMS/DSAS) to shoreline change mapping in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E. Robert; Danforth, William W.

    1994-01-01

    A new, state-of-the-art method for mapping historical shorelines from maps and aerial photographs, the Digital Shoreline Mapping System (DSMS), has been developed. The DSMS is a freely available, public domain software package that meets the cartographic and photogrammetric requirements of precise coastal mapping, and provides a means to quantify and analyze different sources of error in the mapping process. The DSMS is also capable of resolving imperfections in aerial photography that commonly are assumed to be nonexistent. The DSMS utilizes commonly available computer hardware and software, and permits the entire shoreline mapping process to be executed rapidly by a single person in a small lab. The DSMS generates output shoreline position data that are compatible with a variety of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). A second suite of programs, the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) has been developed to calculate shoreline rates-of-change from a series of shoreline data residing in a GIS. Four rate-of-change statistics are calculated simultaneously (end-point rate, average of rates, linear regression and jackknife) at a user-specified interval along the shoreline using a measurement baseline approach. An example of DSMS and DSAS application using historical maps and air photos of Punta Uvero, Puerto Rico provides a basis for assessing the errors associated with the source materials as well as the accuracy of computed shoreline positions and erosion rates. The maps and photos used here represent a common situation in shoreline mapping: marginal-quality source materials. The maps and photos are near the usable upper limit of scale and accuracy, yet the shoreline positions are still accurate ±9.25 m when all sources of error are considered. This level of accuracy yields a resolution of ±0.51 m/yr for shoreline rates-of-change in this example, and is sufficient to identify the short-term trend (36 years) of shoreline change in the study area.

  10. Time-related changes of motor unit properties in the rat medial gastrocnemius muscle after the spinal cord injury. II. Effects of a spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Celichowski, Jan; Kryściak, Katarzyna; Krutki, Piotr; Majczyński, Henryk; Górska, Teresa; Sławińska, Urszula

    2010-06-01

    The contractile properties of motor units (MUs) were investigated in the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle in rats after the spinal cord hemisection at a low thoracic level. Hemisected animals were divided into 4 groups: 14, 30, 90 and 180 days after injury. Intact rats formed a control group. The mass of the MG muscle did not change significantly after spinal cord hemisection, hind limb locomotor pattern was almost unchanged starting from two weeks after injury, but contractile properties of MUs were however altered. Contraction time (CT) and half-relaxation time (HRT) of MUs were prolonged in all investigated groups of hemisected rats. The twitch-to-tetanus ratio (Tw/Tet) of fast MUs after the spinal cord hemisection increased. For slow MUs Tw/Tet values did not change in the early stage after the injury, but significantly decreased in rats 90 and 180 days after hemisection. As a result of hemisection the fatigue resistance especially of slow and fast resistant MU types was reduced, as well as fatigue index (Fat I) calculated for the whole examined population of MUs decreased progressively with the time. After spinal cord hemisection a reduced number of fast MUs presented the sag at frequencies 30 and 40 Hz, however more of them revealed sag in 20 Hz tetanus in comparison to control group. Due to considerable changes in twitch contraction time and disappearance of sag effect in unfused tetani of some MUs in hemisected animals, the classification of MUs in all groups of rats was based on the 20 Hz tetanus index (20 Hz Tet I) but not on the standard criteria usually applied for MUs classification. MU type differentiations demonstrated some clear changes in MG muscle composition in hemisected animals consisting of an increase in the proportion of slow MUs (likely due to an increased participation of the studied muscle in tonic antigravity activity) together with an increase in the percentage of fast fatigable MUs. PMID:19679495

  11. Wind tunnel pressure distribution tests on a series of biplane wing models Part II : effects of changes in decalage, dihedral, sweepback and overhang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Noyes, Richard W

    1929-01-01

    This preliminary report furnishes information on the changes in the forces on each wing of a biplane cellule when the decalage, dihedral, sweepback and overhang are separately varied. The data were obtained from pressure distribution tests made in the Atmospheric Wind Tunnel of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. Since each test was carried up to 90 degree angle of attack, the results may be used in the study of stalled flight and of spinning and in the structural design of biplane wings.

  12. BORE II

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migrate upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.

  13. BORE II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  14. Ionospheric TEC, thermospheric cooling and Σ[O/N2] compositional changes during the 6-17 March 2012 magnetic storm interval (CAWSES II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Mannucci, A. J.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Paxton, L. J.

    2014-08-01

    A series of four geomagnetic storms (the minimum SYM-H~-148 nT) occurred during the March 6-17, 2012 in the ascending phase of the solar cycle 24. This interval was selected by CAWSES II for its campaign. The GPS total electron content (TEC) database and JPL's Global Ionospheric Maps (GIM) were used to study vertical TEC (VTEC) for different local times and latitude ranges. The largest response to geomagnetic activity is shown in increases of the low-latitude dayside VTEC. Several GPS sites feature post-afternoon VTEC “bite-outs”. During Sudden Impulse (SI+) event on March 8th a peak daytime VTEC restores to about quiet-time values. It is shown that the TIMED/SABER zonal flux of nitric oxide (NO) infrared cooling radiation correlates well with auroral heating. A factor of ~5 cooling increase is noted in some storms. The cooling radiation intensifies in the auroral zone and spreads towards the equator. Effects of the storm appear at lower latitudes ~18.6 h later. The column density ratio Σ[O/N2] is analyzed based on TIMED/GUVI measurements. Both increases (at low latitudes) and decreases (from auroral to middle latitudes) in the ratio occurs during the geomagnetic storms. We suggest that the column density ratio could be enhanced at low to middle latitudes on the dayside partially due to the superfountain effect (atomic oxygen uplift due to ion-neutral drag). It is suggested that decreases in the Σ[O/N2] ratio at high to middle-latitudes may be caused by high thermospheric temperatures. During SI+s, there is an increase in Σ[O/N2] ratio at auroral latitudes.

  15. Changes in the redox potential of primary and secondary electron-accepting quinones in photosystem II confer increased resistance to photoinhibition in low-temperature-acclimated Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sane, Prafullachandra Vishnu; Ivanov, Alexander G; Hurry, Vaughan; Huner, Norman P A; Oquist, Gunnar

    2003-08-01

    Exposure of control (non-hardened) Arabidopsis leaves for 2 h at high irradiance at 5 degrees C resulted in a 55% decrease in photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency as indicated by F(v)/F(m). In contrast, cold-acclimated leaves exposed to the same conditions showed only a 22% decrease in F(v)/F(m). Thermoluminescence was used to assess the possible role(s) of PSII recombination events in this differential resistance to photoinhibition. Thermoluminescence measurements of PSII revealed that S(2)Q(A)(-) recombination was shifted to higher temperatures, whereas the characteristic temperature of the S(2)Q(B)(-) recombination was shifted to lower temperatures in cold-acclimated plants. These shifts in recombination temperatures indicate higher activation energy for the S(2)Q(A)(-) redox pair and lower activation energy for the S(2)Q(B)(-) redox pair. This results in an increase in the free-energy gap between P680(+)Q(A)(-) and P680(+)Pheo(-) and a narrowing of the free energy gap between primary and secondary electron-accepting quinones in PSII electron acceptors. We propose that these effects result in an increased population of reduced primary electron-accepting quinone in PSII, facilitating non-radiative P680(+)Q(A)(-) radical pair recombination. Enhanced reaction center quenching was confirmed using in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence-quenching analysis. The enhanced dissipation of excess light energy within the reaction center of PSII, in part, accounts for the observed increase in resistance to high-light stress in cold-acclimated Arabidopsis plants. PMID:12913169

  16. Aestivation induces changes in transcription and translation of coagulation factor II and fibrinogen gamma chain in the liver of the African lungfish Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Hiong, Kum C; Tan, Xiang R; Boo, Mel V; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F; Ip, Yuen K

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to sequence and characterize two pro-coagulant genes, coagulation factor II (f2) and fibrinogen gamma chain (fgg), from the liver of the African lungfish Protopterus annectens, and to determine their hepatic mRNA expression levels during three phases of aestivation. The protein abundance of F2 and Fgg in the liver and plasma was determined by immunoblotting. The results indicated that F2 and Fgg of P. annectens were phylogenetically closer to those of amphibians than those of teleosts. Three days of aestivation resulted in an up-regulation in the hepatic fgg mRNA expression level, while 6 days of aestivation led to a significant increase (3-fold) in the protein abundance of Fgg in the plasma. Hence, there could be an increase in the blood-clotting ability in P. annectens during the induction phase of aestivation. By contrast, the blood-clotting ability in P. annectens might be reduced in response to decreased blood flow and increased possibility of thrombosis during the maintenance phase of aestivation, as 6 months of aestivation led to significant decreases in mRNA expression levels of f2 and fgg in the liver. There could also be a decrease in the export of F2 and Fgg from the liver to the plasma so as to avert thrombosis. Three to 6 days after arousal from 6 months of aestivation, the protein abundance of F2 and Fgg recovered partially in the plasma of P. annectens; a complete recovery of the transcription and translation of f2/F2 in the liver might occur only after refeeding. PMID:26449974

  17. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  18. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-06-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  19. Light acclimation in the lycophyte Selaginella martensii depends on changes in the amount of photosystems and on the flexibility of the light-harvesting complex II antenna association with both photosystems.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Lorenzo; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari; Baldisserotto, Costanza; Pancaldi, Simonetta

    2016-07-01

    Vascular plants have evolved a long-term light acclimation strategy primarily relying on the regulation of the relative amounts of light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and of the two photosystems, photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). We investigated whether such a model is also valid in Selaginella martensii, a species belonging to the early diverging group of lycophytes. Selaginella martensii plants were acclimated to three natural light regimes (extremely low light (L), medium light (M) and full sunlight (H)) and thylakoid organization was characterized combining ultrastructural, biochemical and functional methods. From L to H plants, thylakoid architecture was rearranged from (pseudo)lamellar to predominantly granal, the PSII : PSI ratio changed in favour of PSI, and the photochemical capacity increased. However, regulation of light harvesting did not occur through variations in the amount of free LHCII, but rather resulted from the flexibility of the association of free LHCII with PSII and PSI. In lycophytes, the free interspersed LHCII serves a fixed proportion of reaction centres, either PSII or PSI, and the regulation of PSI-LHCII(-PSII) megacomplexes is an integral part of long-term acclimation. Free LHCII ensures photoprotection of PSII, allows regulated use of PSI as an energy quencher, and can also quench endangered PSI. PMID:27058989

  20. Environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change. Volume II, Part 14. Research needed to determine the present carbon balance of northern ecosystems and the potential effect of carbon-dioxide-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.C.

    1982-10-01

    Given the potential significance of northern ecosystems to the global carbon budget it is critical to estimate the current carbon balance of these ecosystems as precisely as possible, to improve estimates of the future carbon balance if world climates change, and to assess the range of certainty associated with these estimates. As a first step toward quantifying some of the potential changes, a workshop with tundra and taiga ecologists and soil scientists was held in San Diego in March 1980. The first part of this report summarizes the conclusions of this workshop with regard to the estimate of the current areal extent and carbon content of the circumpolar arctic and the taiga, current rates of carbon accumulation in the peat in the arctic and the taiga, and predicted future carbon accumulation rates based on the present understanding of controlling processes and on the understanding of past climates and vegetation. This report presents a finer resolution of areal extents, standing crops, and production rates than was possible previously because of recent syntheses of data from the International Biological Program and current studies in the northern ecosystems, some of which have not yet been published. This recent information changes most of the earlier estimates of carbon content and affects predictions of the effect of climate change. The second part of this report outlines research needed to fill major gaps in the understanding of the role of northern ecosystems in global climate change.

  1. Tidal Marsh Stratigraphy, Sea-Level Change and Large EARTHQUAKES—II: Submergence Events during the Last 3500 Years at Netarts Bay, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shennan, I.; Long, A. J.; Rutherford, M. M.; Innes, J. B.; Green, F. M.; Walker, K. J.

    This is the second investigation where we apply the methods and scientific framework common to sea-level investigations in northwest Europe to test a model of coseismic land subsidence followed by land uplift during interseismic strain accumulation, used to explain alternating peat-mud couplets of late Holocene age found in many of the estuaries of the Pacific Northwest of the USA and Canada. Recent studies in this region interpret such couplets as the product of repeated large (magnitude 8 or 9) earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone. Stratigraphic investigations of the intertidal sediments at Netarts Bay, Oregon, using lithological, pollen and diatom analyses reveal different types of submergence associated with peat-mud couplets during the last 3500 yr. Three peat-mud couplets record gradual sedimentation changes within an infilling body of water. Four other couplets record rapid submergence, burial of tidal marshes and their replacement by low marsh environments. In three of the events rapid submergence is small, 0-0.5 m. The most recent marsh submergence event, around AD 1700, was 0.4±0.3 m. Most of the buried peats contain microfossil evidence for a gradual increase in marine influence before the rapid change from organic to minerogenic sedimentation. Similar gradual changes are common in comparable palaeoenvironments on non-seismic coasts and are strong evidence against a simple interseismic strain accumulation-coseismic subsidence model. One hypothesis is that the gradual increase in marine influence before each submergence represents pre-seismic relative sea-level rise caused by a reduction in the rate of land uplift. The microfossil analyses provide evidence of three stages within an earthquake deformation cycle: coseismic subsidence; interseismic land uplift; and pre-seismic reduction in the rate of land uplift. At present the microfossil data do not differentiate between rapid post-seismic land uplift and rapid sedimentation.

  2. Changes in waste stabilisation pond performance resulting from the retrofit of activated sludge treatment upstream: part II--Management and operating issues.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, D G; O'Brien, M J; Cromar, N J; Fallowfield, H J

    2005-01-01

    Bolivar Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) was originally commissioned with trickling filter secondary treatment, followed by waste stabilisation pond (WSP) treatment and marine discharge. In 1999, a dissolved air flotation/filtration (DAFF) plant was commissioned to treat a portion of the WSP effluent for horticultural reuse. In 2001, the trickling filters were replaced with activated sludge treatment. A shift in WSP ecology became evident soon after this time, characterised by a statistically significant reduction in algal counts in the pond effluent, and increased variability in algal counts and occasional population crashes in the ponds. While the photosynthetic capacity of the WSPs has been reduced, the concomitant reduction in organic loading has meant that the WSPs have not become overloaded. As a result of the improvement in water quality leaving the ponds, significant cost savings and improved product water quality have been realised in the subsequent DAFF treatment stage. A number of operating issues have arisen from the change, however, including the re-emergence of a midge fly nuisance at the site. Control of midge flies using chemical spraying has negated the cost savings realised in the DAFF treatment stage. While biomanipulation of the WSP may provide a less aggressive method of midge control, this case demonstrates the difficulty of predicting in advance all ramifications of a retrospective process change. PMID:16114659

  3. Drivers of soil organic matter vulnerability to climate change, Part II: RothC modelling of carbon dynamics including radiocarbon data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Abiven, Samuel; González Domínguez, Beatriz R.; Hagedorn, Frank; Reisser, Moritz; Walthert, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Stephan; Niklaus, Pascal A.

    2016-04-01

    It is still largely unknown what drives the vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to climate change, i.e. the likelihood of a soil to loose its SOC along with the change in environmental conditions. Our objective is to assess the SOC vulnerability of Swiss forest soils and identify its potential drivers: climate (temperature, soil moisture), soil (clay content, pH) and landscape (slope, aspect) properties. Fifty-four sites were selected for balanced spatial and driver magnitudes distribution. We measured the SOC characteristics (content and radiocarbon) and studied the C decomposition by laboratory soil incubations (details in Part I, abstract by B. González Domínguez). In order to assess the current SOC pool distribution and its radiocarbon signatures, we extended the Rothamsted Carbon (RothC) model with radiocarbon (14C) isotope modelling (RothCiso). The RothC model distinguishes four active SOC pools, decomposable and resistant plant material, microbial biomass and humified organic matter, and an inert SOC pool (Jenkinson 1990). The active pools are decomposed and mineralized to CO2 by first order kinetics. The RothCiso assigns all pools a 14C signature, based on the atmospheric 14C concentrations of the past century (plant C inputs) and their turnover. Currently we constrain the model with 14C signatures measured on the 54 fresh and their corresponding archived bulk soil samples, taken 12-24 years before. We were able to reproduce the measured radiocarbon concentrations of the SOC with the RothCiso and first results indicate, that the assumption of an inert SOC pool, that is radiocarbon dead, is not appropriate. In a second step we will compare the SOC mean residence time assessed by the two methodological approaches - incubation (C efflux based) and modelling (C stock based) - and relate it to the environmental drivers mentioned above. With the combination of the two methodological approaches and 14C analysis we hope to gain more insights into

  4. Unexpected Spin-Crossover and a Low-Pressure Phase Change in an Iron(II)/Dipyrazolylpyridine Complex Exhibiting a High-Spin Jahn- Teller Distortion.

    PubMed

    Kershaw Cook, Laurence J; Thorp-Greenwood, Flora L; Comyn, Tim P; Cespedes, Oscar; Chastanet, Guillaume; Halcrow, Malcolm A

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of 4-methyl-2,6-di(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine (L) and four salts of [FeL2]X2 (X– = BF(4)(–), 1; X– = ClO(4)(–), 2; X– = PF(6)(–), 3; X– = CF3SO(3)(–), 4) are reported. Powder samples of 1 and 2 both exhibit abrupt, hysteretic spin-state transitions on cooling, with T(1/2)↓ = 204 and T(1/2)↑ = 209 K (1), and T(1/2)↓ = 175 and T(1/2)↑ = 193 K (2). The 18 K thermal hysteresis loop for 2 is unusually wide for a complex of this type. Single crystal structures of 2 show it to exhibit a Jahn–Teller-distorted six-coordinate geometry in its high-spin state, which would normally inhibit spin-crossover. Bulk samples of 1 and 2 are isostructural by X-ray powder diffraction, and undergo a crystallographic phase change during their spin-transitions. At temperatures below T(1/2), exposing both compounds to 10(–5) Torr pressure inside the powder diffractometer causes a reversible transformation back to the high-temperature crystal phase. Consideration of thermodynamic data implies this cannot be accompanied by a low → high spin-state change, however. Both compounds also exhibit the LIESST effect, with 2 exhibiting an unusually high T(LIESST) of 112 K. The salts 3 and 4 are respectively high-spin and low-spin between 3 and 300 K, with crystalline 3 exhibiting a more pronounced version of the same Jahn–Teller distortion. PMID:26351707

  5. Unexpected Spin-Crossover and a Low-Pressure Phase Change in an Iron(II)/Dipyrazolylpyridine Complex Exhibiting a High-Spin Jahn-Teller Distortion.

    PubMed

    Kershaw Cook, Laurence J; Thorp-Greenwood, Flora L; Comyn, Tim P; Cespedes, Oscar; Chastanet, Guillaume; Halcrow, Malcolm A

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of 4-methyl-2,6-di(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine (L) and four salts of [FeL2]X2 (X(-) = BF4(-), 1; X(-) = ClO4(-), 2; X(-) = PF6(-), 3; X(-) = CF3SO3(-), 4) are reported. Powder samples of 1 and 2 both exhibit abrupt, hysteretic spin-state transitions on cooling, with T1/2↓ = 204 and T1/2↑ = 209 K (1), and T1/2↓ = 175 and T1/2↑ = 193 K (2). The 18 K thermal hysteresis loop for 2 is unusually wide for a complex of this type. Single crystal structures of 2 show it to exhibit a Jahn-Teller-distorted six-coordinate geometry in its high-spin state, which would normally inhibit spin-crossover. Bulk samples of 1 and 2 are isostructural by X-ray powder diffraction, and undergo a crystallographic phase change during their spin-transitions. At temperatures below T1/2, exposing both compounds to 10(-5) Torr pressure inside the powder diffractometer causes a reversible transformation back to the high-temperature crystal phase. Consideration of thermodynamic data implies this cannot be accompanied by a low → high spin-state change, however. Both compounds also exhibit the LIESST effect, with 2 exhibiting an unusually high T(LIESST) of 112 K. The salts 3 and 4 are respectively high-spin and low-spin between 3 and 300 K, with crystalline 3 exhibiting a more pronounced version of the same Jahn-Teller distortion. PMID:26052980

  6. Preschool Racial Attitude Measure II (PRAM II): Technical Report #1: 1970-71 Standardization Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John E.

    This report provides detailed technical information concerning the Preschool Racial Attitude Measure II (PRAM II) a method for assessing the attitudes of pre-literate children toward light- and dark-skinned individuals. Several major changes were involved in the PRAM II revision: (1) the length was doubled, (2) the general artistic quality of the…

  7. The paraveinal mesophyll of soybean leaves in relation to assimilate transfer and compartmentation : II. Structural, metabolic and compartmental changes during reproductive growth.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, V R; Giaquinta, R T

    1983-04-01

    Nitrogen and carbohydrate assimilates were temporally and spatially compartmented among various cell types in soybean (Glycine max L., Merr.) leaves during seed filling. The paraveinal mesophyll (PVM), a unique cell layer found in soybean, was demonstrated to function in the synthesis, compartmentation and remobilization of nitrogen reserves prior to and during the seed-filling stages. At anthesis, the PVM vacuoles contain substantial protein which completely disappears by two weeks into the seed filling. Distinct changes in the PVM cytoplasm, tonoplast and organelles were correlated with the presence or absence of the vacuolar material. Microautoradiography following the accumulation of several radiolabeled sugars and amino acids demonstrated the glycoprotein nature of the vacuolar material. Incorporation of methionine, leucine, glucose, and glucosamine resulted in heavy labelling of the PVM vacuole, in contrast to galactose, proline, and mannose which resulted in a much reduced labelling pattern. In addition, starch is unequally compartmented and degraded among the various leaf cells during seed filling. At the end of the photoperiod at the flowering stage, the highest starch accumulation was in the second palisade layer followed by the spongy mesophyll and the first (uppermost) palisade layer. Starch in the first palisade layer was completely degraded during the dark whereas the starch in the second palisade and spongy mesophyll was not remobilized to any appreciable extent. By mid-podfilling (approximately five weeks postanthesis) starch was absent in the first palisade layer at the end of the photoperiod while the second palisade and spongy mesophyll layers contained substantial starch. Starch was remobilized from these latter cells during the remainder of seed filling when current photosynthetic production is low. Structural changes associated with cell senescence first appear in the upper palisade layer and then progress (excluding the PVM) to the second

  8. Ecophysiological adaptations of two halophytes to salt stress: photosynthesis, PS II photochemistry and anti-oxidant feedback--implications for resilience in climate change.

    PubMed

    Duarte, B; Santos, D; Marques, J C; Caçador, I

    2013-06-01

    Halimione portulacoides and Sarcocornia fruticosa commonly exhibit a reddish coloration especially in high evaporation periods, due to betacyanin production in response to stress. Although sharing the same area in salt marshes, they present different strategies to overcome salinity stress. While S. fruticosa present a dilution strategy, increasing succulence, H. portulacoides appears to have developed an ionic compartmentalization strategy. Nevertheless, there's still a decrease in the photosynthetic activity in different extents. While in S. fruticosa, the impairment of photosynthetic activity is due to a decrease in the flow from the electron transport chain to the quinone pool; in H. portulacoides the process is affected far more early, with high amounts of energy dissipated at the PSII light harvesting centers. This photosynthetic impairment leads to energy accumulation and consequently to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). SOD was particularly active in stressed individuals, although this increment is rather more significant in S. fruticosa than in H. portulacoides suggesting that H. portulacoides may have a maximum salt concentration at which can sustain cellular balance between ROS production and scavenging. These different ecophysiological responses have great importance while evaluating the impacts climate change driven increase of sediment salinity on halophyte physiology and on the marsh community and ecosystem services. PMID:23579080

  9. Natural attenuation of contaminated marine sediments from an old floating dock Part II: changes of sediment microbial community structure and its relationship with environmental variables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Fen; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee

    2012-04-15

    Changes of microbial community structure and its relationship with various environmental variables in surface marine sediments were examined for a one-year period after the removal of an old floating dock in Hong Kong SAR, South China. Temporal variations in the microbial community structure were clearly revealed by principal component analysis (PCA) of the microbial ester-linked fatty acid methyl ester (EL-FAME) profiles. The most obvious shift in microbial community structure was detected 6 months after the removal of the dock, although no significant decline in the levels of pollutants could be detected. As determined by EL-FAME profiles, the microbial diversity recovered and the predominance of gram-negative bacteria was gradually replaced by gram-positive bacteria and fungi in the impacted stations. With redundancy analysis (RDA), the concentration of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was found to be the second important determinant of microbial community structure, next to Time. The relative abundance of 18:1ω9c and hydroxyl fatty acids enriched in the PAH hot spots, whereas 16:1ω9 and 18:1ω9t were negatively correlated to total PAH concentration. The significant relationships observed between microbial EL-FAME profiles and pollutants, exampled by PAHs in the present study, suggested the potential of microbial community analysis in the assessment of the natural attenuation process in contaminated environments. PMID:22417882

  10. Changes in material flows, treatment efficiencies and shifting of environmental loads in the wastewater treatment sector. Part II: case study of Norway.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, G; Brattebo, Helge

    2009-10-01

    In Part I, the wastewater treatment sector in the Netherlands was analyzed to determine how the degree of separation of COD (BOD), nitrogen, phosphorus and heavy metals from the wastewater increased over time, and how the proportions of these substances, separated out from the wastewater into the lithosphere and atmosphere, changed over time. This paper applies the same methodology, adopted in the first part, to Norway. Needless to say, the hydrosphere has benefited from a decline in eutrophication and marine/fresh water toxicity, owing to the favourable combination of higher degrees of separation over time and source control, especially in the industrial sector. However, this has been at the expense of damage to the atmosphere (global warming). Technologies have, of course, enabled some mitigation of the problems that have shifted to the atmosphere and lithosphere, though these are beyond the scope of this paper, which assumes a hypothetical worst-case scenario in this regard. Whereas, in Part I, the time period 1993-2005 was considered, this paper is handicapped by the lack of availability of data and is restricted to a much narrower time period: 2002-2006. PMID:19947144