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Sample records for n-terminal truncated fragment

  1. Enhanced Fibril Fragmentation of N-Terminally Truncated and Pyroglutamyl-Modified Aβ Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wulff, Melanie; Baumann, Monika; Thümmler, Anka; Yadav, Jay K; Heinrich, Liesa; Knüpfer, Uwe; Schlenzig, Dagmar; Schierhorn, Angelika; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-04-11

    N-terminal truncation and pyroglutamyl (pE) formation are naturally occurring chemical modifications of the Aβ peptide in Alzheimer's disease. We show herein that these two modifications significantly reduce the fibril length and the transition midpoint of thermal unfolding of the fibrils, but they do not substantially perturb the fibrillary peptide conformation. This observation implies that the N terminus of the unmodified peptide protects Aβ fibrils against mechanical stress and fragmentation and explains the high propensity of pE-modified peptides to form small and particularly toxic aggregates. PMID:26970534

  2. Astrocytes and microglia but not neurons preferentially generate N-terminally truncated Aβ peptides.

    PubMed

    Oberstein, Timo Jan; Spitzer, Philipp; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang; Linning, Philipp; Neff, Florian; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Lewczuk, Piotr; Wiltfang, Jens; Kornhuber, Johannes; Maler, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease include extracellular neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The neuritic plaques contain β-amyloid peptides (Aβ peptides) as the major proteinaceous constituent and are surrounded by activated microglia and astrocytes as well as dystrophic neurites. N-terminally truncated forms of Aβ peptides are highly prevalent in neuritic plaques, including Aβ 3-x beginning at Glu eventually modified to pyroglutamate (Aβ N3pE-x), Aβ 2-x, Aβ 4-x, and Aβ 5-x. The precise origin of the different N-terminally modified Aβ peptides currently remains unknown. To assess the contribution of specific cell types to the formation of different N-terminally truncated Aβ peptides, supernatants from serum-free primary cell cultures of chicken neurons, astrocytes, and microglia, as well as human astrocytes, were analyzed by Aβ-ELISA and one- and two-dimensional SDS-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by immunoblot analysis. To evaluate the contribution of β- and γ-secretase to the generation of N-terminally modified Aβ, cultured astrocytes were treated with membrane-anchored "tripartite β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors" and the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT. Neurons, astrocytes, and microglia each exhibited cell type-specific patterns of secreted Aβ peptides. Neurons predominantly secreted Aβ peptides that begin at Asp1, whereas those released from astrocytes and microglia included high proportions of N-terminally modified Aβ peptides, presumably including Aβ 2/3-x and 4/5-x. The inhibition of BACE1 reduced the amount of Aβ 1-x in cell culture supernatants but not the amount of Aβ 2-x. PMID:25204716

  3. Murine erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase: Truncation of a disordered N-terminal extension is not detrimental for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Stojanovski, Bosko M; Breydo, Leonid; Uversky, Vladimir N; Ferreira, Gloria C

    2016-05-01

    5-Aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homodimeric enzyme, catalyzes the initial step of heme biosynthesis in non-plant eukaryotes. The precursor form of the enzyme is translated in the cytosol, and upon mitochondrial import, the N-terminal targeting presequence is proteolytically cleaved to generate mature ALAS. In bone marrow-derived erythroid cells, a mitochondrial- and site-specific endoprotease of yet unknown primary structure, produces a protein shorter than mature erythroid ALAS (ALAS2) found in peripheral blood erythroid cells. This truncated ALAS2 lacks the presequence and the N-terminal sequence (corresponding to ~7 KDa molecular mass) present in ALAS2 from peripheral blood erythroid cells. How the truncation affects the structural topology and catalytic properties of ALAS2 is presently not known. To address this question, we created a recombinant, truncated, murine ALAS2 (ΔmALAS2) devoid of the cleavable N-terminal region and examined its catalytic and biophysical properties. The N-terminal truncation of mALAS2 did not significantly affect the organization of the secondary structure, but a subtle reduction in the rigidity of the tertiary structure was noted. Furthermore, thermal denaturation studies revealed a decrease of 4.3°C in the Tm value of ΔmALAS2, implicating lower thermal stability. While the kcat of ΔmALAS2 is slightly increased over that of the wild-type enzyme, the slowest step in the ΔmALAS2-catalyzed reaction remains dominated by ALA release. Importantly, intrinsic disorder algorithms imply that the N-terminal region of mALAS2 is highly disordered, and thus susceptible to proteolysis. We propose that the N-terminal truncation offers a cell-specific ALAS2 regulatory mechanism without hindering heme synthesis. PMID:26854603

  4. [Effect of N-terminal truncation of Bacillus acidopullulyticus pullulanase on enzyme properties and functions].

    PubMed

    Chen, A'na; Liu, Xiuxia; Dai, Xiaofeng; Zhan, Jinling; Peng, Feng; Li, Lu; Wang, Fen; Li, Song; Yang, Yankun; Bai, Zhonghu

    2016-03-01

    We constructed different N-terminal truncated variants based on Bacillus acidopullulyticus pullulanase 3D structure (PDB code 2WAN), and studied the effects of truncated mutation on soluble expression, enzymatic properties, and application in saccharification. Upon expression, the variants of X45 domain deletion existed as inclusion bodies, whereas deletion of CBM41 domain had an effective effect on soluble expression level. The variants that lack of CBM41 (M1), lack of X25 (M3), and lack both of CBM41 and X25 (M5) had the same optimal pH (5.0) and optimal temperature (60 degrees C) with the wild-type pullulanase (WT). The K(m) of M1 and M5 were 1.42 mg/mL and 1.85 mg/mL, respectively, 2.4- and 3.1-fold higher than that of the WT. k(cat)/K(m) value of M5 was 40% lower than that of the WT. Substrate specificity results show that the enzymes exhibited greater activity with the low-molecular-weight dextrin than with high-molecular-weight soluble starch. When pullulanases were added to the saccharification reaction system, the dextrose equivalent of the WT, M1, M3, and M5 were 93.6%, 94.7%, 94.5%, and93.1%, respectively. These results indicate that the deletion of CBM41 domain and/or X25 domain did not affect the practical application in starch saccharification process. Furthermore, low-molecular-weight variants facilitate the heterologous expression. Truncated variants may be more suitable for industrial production than the WT. PMID:27349118

  5. Diuretic and myotropic activities of N-terminal truncated analogs of Musca domestica kinin neuropeptide.

    PubMed

    Coast, Geoffrey M; Zabrocki, Janusz; Nachman, Ronald J

    2002-04-01

    Musca kinin (Musdo-K; NTVVLGKKQRFHSWG-NH(2)) and N-terminal truncated analogs of 4-14 residues in length were assayed for diuretic and myotropic activity on housefly Malpighian tubules and hindgut, respectively. The pentapeptide was the minimum sequence required for biological activity, but it was > 5 orders of magnitude less potent than the intact peptide. The pharmacological profiles of the different analogs in the two assays were very similar, suggesting the same receptor is present on both tissues. Potency was little affected by the deletion of Asn(1), but was reduced > 10-fold after the removal of Thr(2). Deletion of the next 5 residues had relatively little effect, but after the second lysyl residue (Lys(8)) was removed potency fell by one to two orders of magnitude. There was a similar drop in potency after the removal of Arg(10), and at 100 microM the pentapeptide had only 20% of the diuretic activity of the intact peptide. The importance of Arg(10) was confirmed by comparing dose-response curves for Musdo-K [6-15] and Acheta kinin-V (AFSHWG-NH(2)) in the diuretic assay; the substitution of arginine by alanine produced a significant reduction in potency and some loss of activity. PMID:11897389

  6. Purification and some properties of wild-type and N-terminal-truncated ethanolamine ammonia-lyase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Akita, Keita; Hieda, Naoki; Baba, Nobuyuki; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Hirohisa; Nakanishi, Yuka; Yamanishi, Mamoru; Mori, Koichi; Toraya, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    The methods of homologous high-level expression and simple large-scale purification for coenzyme B(12)-dependent ethanolamine ammonia-lyase of Escherichia coli were developed. The eutB and eutC genes in the eut operon encoded the large and small subunits of the enzyme, respectively. The enzyme existed as the heterododecamer alpha(6)beta(6). Upon active-site titration with adeninylpentylcobalamin, a strong competitive inhibitor for coenzyme B(12), the binding of 1 mol of the inhibitor per mol of the alphabeta unit caused complete inhibition of enzyme, in consistent with its subunit structure. EPR spectra indicated the formation of substrate-derived radicals during catalysis and the binding of cobalamin in the base-on mode, i.e. with 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole coordinating to the cobalt atom. The purified wild-type enzyme underwent aggregation and inactivation at high concentrations. Limited proteolysis with trypsin indicated that the N-terminal region is not essential for catalysis. His-tagged truncated enzymes were similar to the wild-type enzyme in catalytic properties, but more resistant to p-chloromercuribenzoate than the wild-type enzyme. A truncated enzyme was highly soluble even in the absence of detergent and resistant to aggregation and oxidative inactivation at high concentrations, indicating that a short N-terminal sequence is sufficient to change the solubility and stability of the enzyme. PMID:19762342

  7. Preparation and characterization of a truncated caricain lacking 41 residues from the N-terminal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ye, Wanhui; Wang, Zhangming; Chao, Honglin; Lian, Juyu

    2005-05-01

    We purified an 18.8 kD protease from caricain solution. This protease was derived from caricain. It does not have the first 41 residues of the N-terminal sequence of caricain, and its N-terminal residue is Thr. Also, one of the disulfide bonds of caricain (cys22-cys63) was opened during the formation of the protease. We named this 18.8 kD protease caricain II. Caricain II has a wide pH range, and it is more sensitive to temperature changes than caricain. The proteolytic activity of caricain II is twice as much as that of caricain using casein as a substrate. However, caricain II has a low hydrolytic activity with N-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester (BAEE) that is one of the special substrates of caricain. Our results indicate that caricain II is remarkably different from caricain and it can provide an improvement over caricain on the proteolytic activity. PMID:16283547

  8. Small N-terminal mutant huntingtin fragments, but not wild type, are mainly present in monomeric form: Implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cong, Shu-Yan; Pepers, Barry A; Roos, Raymund A C; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2006-06-01

    N-terminal fragments of huntingtin containing an expanded polyglutamine stretch play an important role in the molecular pathogenesis of Huntington's disease. Their ultimate accumulation in insoluble protein aggregates constitutes an important pathological hallmark of Huntington's disease. We report on systematic biochemical comparison studies of soluble wild type and mutant N-terminal huntingtin fragments. The results show that soluble wild type exon 1 fragments are predominantly present in higher molecular weight complexes with a molecular size of approximately 300 kDa, while their mutant counterparts are mainly present in their monomeric form. In contrast, longer N-terminal fragments corresponding to peptides produced by caspase cleavage do not display these differential properties. These findings suggest that especially an increased amount of monomeric form of small N-terminal mutant huntingtin fragments may facilitate aberrant interactions both with itself via the polyglutamine stretch and with other proteins and thereby contribute to molecular pathogenesis. PMID:16380118

  9. Truncation of N-terminal regions of Digitalis lanata progesterone 5β-reductase alters catalytic efficiency and substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Kristin; Bauer, Peter; Schmid, Benedikt; Mueller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    N-Terminal truncated forms of progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) were synthesized taking a full-length cDNA encoding for Digitalis lanata P5βR with a hexa-histidine tag attached at the C-terminus (rDlP5βRc) as the starting point. Four pETite-c-His/DlP5βR constructs coding for P5βR derivatives truncated in the N-terminal region, termed rDlP5βRcn-10, rDlP5βRcn-20, rDlP5βRcn-30, and rDlP5βRcn-40 were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The cDNAs coding for full-length rDlP5βRc, rDlP5βRcn-10 and rDlP5βRcn-20 were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and the respective enzymes were soluble and catalytically active (progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one as substrates). GST-tagged recombinant DlP5βR (rDlP5βR-GST) and rDlP5βR-GSTr, with the GST-tag removed by protease treatment were produced as well and served as controls. The Km values and substrate preferences considerably differed between the various DlP5βR derivatives. As for the C-terminal His-tagged rDlP5βR the catalytic efficiency for progesterone was highest for the full-length rDlP5βRc whereas the N-terminal truncated forms preferred 2-cyclohexen-1-one as the substrate. Affinity tags and artifacts resulting from the cloning strategy used may alter substrate specificity. Therefore enzyme properties determined with recombinant proteins should not be used to infer in vivo scenarios and should be considered for each particular case. PMID:24370479

  10. N-terminal galanin-(1-16) fragment is an agonist at the hippocampal galanin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisone, G.; Berthold, M.; Bedecs, K.; Unden, A.; Bartfai, T.; Bertorelli, R.; Consolo, S.; Crawley, J.; Martin, B.; Nilsson, S.; )

    1989-12-01

    The galanin N-terminal fragment (galanin-(1-16)) has been prepared by solid-phase synthesis and by enzymic cleavage of galanin by endoproteinase Asp-N. This peptide fragment displaced {sup 125}I-labeled galanin in receptor autoradiography experiments on rat forebrain and spinal cord and in equilibrium binding experiments from high-affinity binding sites in the ventral hippocampus with an IC50 of approximately 3 nM. In tissue slices of the same brain area, galanin-(1-16), similarly to galanin, inhibited the muscarinic agonist-stimulated breakdown of inositol phospholipids. Upon intracerebroventricular administration, galanin-(1-16) (10 micrograms/15 microliters) also inhibited the scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg, s.c.)-evoked release of acetylcholine, as studied in vivo by microdialysis. Substitution of (L-Trp2) for (D-Trp2) resulted in a 500-fold loss in affinity as compared with galanin-(1-16). It is concluded that, in the ventral hippocampus, the N-terminal galanin fragment (galanin-(1-16)) is recognized by the galanin receptors controlling acetylcholine release and muscarinic agonist-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown as a high-affinity agonist and that amino acid residue (Trp2) plays an important role in the receptor-ligand interactions.

  11. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals a new family of topoisomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Bhupesh; Patel, Asmita; Slesarev, Alexei; Mondragon, Alfonso

    2010-09-02

    Topoisomerases are involved in controlling and maintaining the topology of DNA and are present in all kingdoms of life. Unlike all other types of topoisomerases, similar type IB enzymes have only been identified in bacteria and eukarya. The only putative type IB topoisomerase in archaea is represented by Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V. Despite several common functional characteristics, topoisomerase V shows no sequence similarity to other members of the same type. The structure of the 61 kDa N-terminal fragment of topoisomerase V reveals no structural similarity to other topoisomerases. Furthermore, the structure of the active site region is different, suggesting no conservation in the cleavage and religation mechanism. Additionally, the active site is buried, indicating the need of a conformational change for activity. The presence of a topoisomerase in archaea with a unique structure suggests the evolution of a separate mechanism to alter DNA.

  12. Membrane effects of N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I: a fluorescent probe study.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna; Girych, Mykhailo; Adachi, Emi; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Sood, Rohit; Kinnunen, Paavo; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    The binding of monomeric and aggregated variants of 1-83 N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with substitution mutations G26R, G26R/W@8, G26R/W@50 and G26R/W@72 to the model lipid membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and its mixture with cholesterol has been investigated using fluorescent probes pyrene and Laurdan. Examination of pyrene spectral behavior did not reveal any marked influence of apoA-I mutants on the hydrocarbon region of lipid bilayer. In contrast, probing the membrane effects by Laurdan revealed decrease in the probe generalized polarization in the presence of aggregated proteins. suggesting that oligomeric and fibrillar apoA-I species induce increase in hydration degree and reduction of lipid packing density in the membrane interfacial region. These findings may shed light on molecular details of amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:25595057

  13. Structure of the N-terminal fragment of Escherichia coli Lon protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Rasulova, Fatima S.; Melnikov, Edward E.; Maurizi, Michael R.; Rotanova, Tatyana V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    The medium-resolution structure of the N-terminal fragment of E. coli Lon protease shows that this part of the enzyme consists of two compact domains and a very long α-helix. The structure of a recombinant construct consisting of residues 1–245 of Escherichia coli Lon protease, the prototypical member of the A-type Lon family, is reported. This construct encompasses all or most of the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. The structure was solved by SeMet SAD to 2.6 Å resolution utilizing trigonal crystals that contained one molecule in the asymmetric unit. The molecule consists of two compact subdomains and a very long C-terminal α-helix. The structure of the first subdomain (residues 1–117), which consists mostly of β-strands, is similar to that of the shorter fragment previously expressed and crystallized, whereas the second subdomain is almost entirely helical. The fold and spatial relationship of the two subdomains, with the exception of the C-terminal helix, closely resemble the structure of BPP1347, a 203-amino-acid protein of unknown function from Bordetella parapertussis, and more distantly several other proteins. It was not possible to refine the structure to satisfactory convergence; however, since almost all of the Se atoms could be located on the basis of their anomalous scattering the correctness of the overall structure is not in question. The structure reported here was also compared with the structures of the putative substrate-binding domains of several proteins, showing topological similarities that should help in defining the binding sites used by Lon substrates.

  14. Metalloprotease Meprin β Generates Nontoxic N-terminal Amyloid Precursor Protein Fragments in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Tamara; Čaušević, Mirsada; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Schilling, Oliver; Isbert, Simone; Geyer, Rebecca; Maier, Wladislaw; Tschickardt, Sabrina; Jumpertz, Thorsten; Weggen, Sascha; Bond, Judith S.; Overall, Christopher M.; Pietrzik, Claus U.; Becker-Pauly, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Identification of physiologically relevant substrates is still the most challenging part in protease research for understanding the biological activity of these enzymes. The zinc-dependent metalloprotease meprin β is known to be expressed in many tissues with functions in health and disease. Here, we demonstrate unique interactions between meprin β and the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Although APP is intensively studied as a ubiquitously expressed cell surface protein, which is involved in Alzheimer disease, its precise physiological role and relevance remain elusive. Based on a novel proteomics technique termed terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS), APP was identified as a substrate for meprin β. Processing of APP by meprin β was subsequently validated using in vitro and in vivo approaches. N-terminal APP fragments of about 11 and 20 kDa were found in human and mouse brain lysates but not in meprin β−/− mouse brain lysates. Although these APP fragments were in the range of those responsible for caspase-induced neurodegeneration, we did not detect cytotoxicity to primary neurons treated by these fragments. Our data demonstrate that meprin β is a physiologically relevant enzyme in APP processing. PMID:21646356

  15. N-Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific Proteolytic Fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhang, Qibin; Petritis, Brianne O.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-12-01

    Proteolytic processing events are essential to physiological processes such as reproduction, development, and host responses, as well as regulating proteins in cancer; therefore, there is a significant need to develop robust approaches for characterizing such events. The current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics techniques employs a “bottom-up” strategy, which does not allow for identification of different proteolytic proteins since the strategy measures all the small peptides from any given protein. The aim of this development is to enable the effective identification of specific proteolytic fragments. The protocol utilizes an acetylation reaction to block the N-termini of a protein, as well as any lysine residues. Following digestion, N-terminal peptides are enriched by removing peptides that contain free amines, using amine-reactive silica-bond succinic anhydride beads. The resulting enriched sample has one N-terminal peptide per protein, which reduces sample complexity and allows for increased analytical sensitivity compared to global proteomics.1 We initially compared the peptide identification and efficiency of blocking lysine using acetic anhydride (a 42 Da modification) or propionic anhydride (a 56 Da modification) in our protocol. Both chemical reactions resulted in comparable peptide identifications and *95 percent efficiency for blocking lysine residues. However, the use of propionic anhydride allowed us to distinguish in vivo acetylated peptides from chemically-tagged peptides.2 In an initial experiment using mouse plasma, we were able to identify *300 unique N-termini peptides, as well as many known cleavage sites. This protocol holds potential for uncovering new information related to proteolytic pathways, which will assist our understanding about cancer biology and efforts to identify potential biomarkers for various diseases.

  16. N-Terminal Enrichment: Developing a Protocol to Detect Specific Proteolytic Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhang, Qibin; Petritis, Brianne O.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Proteolytic processing events are essential to physiological processes such as reproduction, development, and host responses, as well as regulating proteins in cancer; therefore, there is a significant need to develop robust approaches for characterizing such events. The current mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics techniques employs a “bottom-up” strategy, which does not allow for identification of different proteolytic proteins since the strategy measures all the small peptides from any given protein. The aim of this development is to enable the effective identification of specific proteolytic fragments. The protocol utilizes an acetylation reaction to block the N-termini of a protein, as well as any lysine residues. Following digestion, N-terminal peptides are enriched by removing peptides that contain free amines, using amine-reactive silica-bond succinic anhydride beads. The resulting enriched sample has one N-terminal peptide per protein, which reduces sample complexity and allows for increased analytical sensitivity compared to global proteomics.1 We initially compared the peptide identification and efficiency of blocking lysine using acetic anhydride (a 42 Da modification) or propionic anhydride (a 56 Da modification) in our protocol. Both chemical reactions resulted in comparable peptide identifications and ∼95 percent efficiency for blocking lysine residues. However, the use of propionic anhydride allowed us to distinguish in vivo acetylated peptides from chemically-tagged peptides.2 In an initial experiment using mouse plasma, we were able to identify >300 unique N-termini peptides, as well as many known cleavage sites. This protocol holds potential for uncovering new information related to proteolytic pathways, which will assist our understanding about cancer biology and efforts to identify potential biomarkers for various diseases. PMID:19949699

  17. Secondary structure, stability and tetramerisation of recombinant K(V)1.1 potassium channel cytoplasmic N-terminal fragment.

    PubMed

    Abbott, G W; Bloemendal, M; Van Stokkum, I H; Mercer, E A; Miller, R T; Sewing, S; Wolters, M; Pongs, O; Srai, S K

    1997-08-15

    The recombinant N-terminal fragment (amino acids 14-162) of a tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel (K(V)1.1) has been studied using spectroscopic techniques. Evidence is presented that it forms a tetramer in aqueous solution, whereas when solubilised in 1% Triton X-100 it remains monomeric. The secondary structure content of both monomeric and tetrameric K(V)1.1 N-terminal fragment has been estimated from FTIR and CD spectroscopy to be 20-25% alpha-helix, 20-25% beta-sheet, 20% turns and 30-40% random coil. Solubilisation of the protein in detergent is shown by hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis to alter tertiary structure rather than secondary structure and this may be the determining factor in tetramerisation ability. Using molecular modelling we propose a supersecondary structure consisting of two structural domains. PMID:9300810

  18. Structure and properties of a dimeric N-terminal fragment of human ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D; Evans, P A; Stott, K; Broadhurst, R W

    2001-12-01

    Previous peptide dissection and kinetic experiments have indicated that in vitro folding of ubiquitin may proceed via transient species in which native-like structure has been acquired in the first 45 residues. A peptide fragment, UQ(1-51), encompassing residues 1 to 51 of ubiquitin was produced in order to test whether this portion has propensity for independent self-assembly. Surprisingly, the construct formed a folded symmetrical dimer that was stabilised by 0.8 M sodium sulphate at 298 K (the S state). The solution structure of the UQ(1-51) dimer was determined by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Each subunit of UQ(1-51) consists of an N-terminal beta-hairpin followed by an alpha-helix and a final beta-strand, with orientations similar to intact ubiquitin. The dimer is formed by the third beta-strand of one subunit interleaving between the hairpin and third strand of the other to give a six-stranded beta-sheet, with the two alpha-helices sitting on top. The helix-helix and strand portions of the dimer interface also mimic related features in the structure of ubiquitin. The structural specificity of the UQ(1-51) peptide is tuneable: as the concentration of sodium sulphate is decreased, near-native alternative conformations are populated in slow chemical exchange. Magnetization transfer experiments were performed to characterize the various species present in 0.35 M sodium sulphate, namely the S state and two minor forms. Chemical shift differences suggest that one minor form is very similar to the S state, while the other experiences a significant conformational change in the third strand. A segmental rearrangement of the third strand in one subunit of the S state would render the dimer asymmetric, accounting for most of our results. Similar small-scale transitions in proteins are often invoked to explain solvent exchange at backbone amide proton sites that have an intermediate level of protection. PMID:11733996

  19. Antinociceptive effects of spinally administered nociceptin/orphanin FQ and its N-terminal fragments on capsaicin-induced nociception.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Soh; Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Komatsu, Takaaki; Sakurada, Chikai; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sakurada, Tsukasa

    2011-07-01

    Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ), the endogenous ligand for the N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptors, has been shown to be metabolized into some fragments. We examined to determine whether intrathecal (i.t.) N/OFQ (1-13), (1-11) and (1-7) have antinociceptive activity in the pain-related behavior after intraplantar injection of capsaicin. The i.t. administration of N/OFQ (0.3-1.2 nmol) produced an appreciable and dose-dependent inhibition of capsaicin-induced paw-licking/biting response. The N-terminal fragments of N/OFQ, (1-13) and (1-11), were antinociceptive with a potency lower than N/OFQ. Calculated ID₅₀ values (nmol, i.t.) were 0.83 for N/OFQ, 2.5 for N/OFQ (1-13) and 4.75 for N/OFQ (1-11), respectively. The time-course effect revealed that the antinociceptive effects of these N-terminal fragments lasted longer than those of N/OFQ. Removal of amino acids down to N/OFQ (1-7) led to be less potent than N/OFQ and its fragments, (1-13) and (1-11). Antinociception induced by N/OFQ or N/OFQ (1-13) was reversed significantly by i.t. co-injection of [Nphe¹]N/OFQ (1-13)NH₂, a peptidergic antagonist for NOP receptors, whereas i.t. injection of the antagonist did not interfere with the action of N/OFQ (1-11) and (1-7). Pretreatment with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone hydrochloride did not affect the antinociception induced by N/OFQ and its N-terminal fragments. These results suggest that N-terminal fragments of N/OFQ are active metabolites and may modulate the antinociceptive effect of N/OFQ in the spinal cord. The results also indicate that N/OFQ (1-13) still possess antinociceptive activity through NOP receptors. PMID:21672568

  20. Truncated N-terminal mutants of SV40 large T antigen as minimal immortalizing agents for CNS cells

    PubMed Central

    Freed, William J.; Zhang, Peisu; Sanchez, Joseph F.; Dillon-Carter, Ora; Coggiano, Mark; Errico, Stacie L.; Lewis, Brian D.; Truckenmiller, Mary Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Immortalized central nervous system (CNS) cell lines are useful as in vitro models for innumerable purposes such as elucidating biochemical pathways, studies of effects of drugs, and ultimately, such cells may also be useful for neural transplantation. The SV40 large T (LT) oncoprotein, commonly used for immortalization, interacts with several cell cycle regulatory factors, including binding and inactivating p53 and retinoblastoma family cell-cycle regulators. In an attempt to define the minimal requirements of SV40 T antigen for immortalizing cells of CNS origin, we constructed T155c, encoding the N-terminal 155 amino acids of LT. The p53 binding region is known to reside in the C-terminal region of LT. An additional series of mutants was produced to further narrow the molecular targets for immortalization, and plasmid vectors were constructed for each. In a p53 temperature sensitive cell line model, T64-7B, expression of T155c and all constructs having mutations outside of the first 82 amino acids were capable of overriding cell-cycle block at the non-permissive growth temperature. Several cell lines were produced from fetal rat mesencephalic and cerebral cortical cultures using the T155c construct. The E107K construct contained a mutation in the Rb binding region, but was nonetheless capable of overcoming cell cycle block in T64-7B cell and immortalizing primary cultured cells. Cells immortalized with T155c were often highly dependent on the presence of bFGF for growth. Telomerase activity, telomere length, growth rates, and integrity of the p53 gene in cells immortalized with T155c did not change over 100 population doublings in culture, indicating that cells immortalized with T155c were generally stable during long periods of continuous culture. PMID:15629761

  1. Identification of N-terminally truncated pyroglutamate amyloid-β in cholesterol-enriched diet-fed rabbit and AD brain.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garmendia, Roxanna; Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Morales, Miguel Angel; Luna-Muñoz, José; Mena, Raul; Nava-Catorce, Miriam; Acero, Gonzalo; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Viramontes-Pintos, Amparo; Cribbs, David H; Gevorkian, Goar

    2014-01-01

    The main amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) variants detected in the human brain are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42; however, a significant proportion of Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain also consists of N-terminal truncated/modified species. AβN3(pE), Aβ peptide bearing amino-terminal pyroglutamate at position 3, has been demonstrated to be a major N-truncated/modified constituent of intracellular, extracellular, and vascular Aβ deposits in AD and Down syndrome brain tissue. It has been previously demonstrated that rabbits fed a diet enriched in cholesterol and given water containing trace copper levels developed AD-like pathology including intraneuronal and extracellular Aβ accumulation, tau hyperphosphorylation, vascular inflammation, astrocytosis, microgliosis, reduced levels of acetylcholine, as well as learning deficits and thus, may be used as a non-transgenic animal model of sporadic AD. In the present study, we have demonstrated for the first time the presence of AβN3(pE) in blood vessels in cholesterol-enriched diet-fed rabbit brain. In addition, we detected AβN3(pE) immunoreactivity in all postmortem AD brain samples studied. We believe that our results are potentially important for evaluation of novel therapeutic molecules/strategies targeting Aβ peptides in a suitable non-transgenic animal model. PMID:24240639

  2. Alzheimer's Aβ Peptides with Disease-Associated N-Terminal Modifications: Influence of Isomerisation, Truncation and Mutation on Cu2+ Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Simon C.; Masters, Colin L.; Barnham, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is the primary component of the extracellular senile plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The metals hypothesis implicates redox-active copper ions in the pathogenesis of AD and the Cu2+ coordination of various Aβ peptides has been widely studied. A number of disease-associated modifications involving the first 3 residues are known, including isomerisation, mutation, truncation and cyclisation, but are yet to be characterised in detail. In particular, Aβ in plaques contain a significant amount of truncated pyroglutamate species, which appear to correlate with disease progression. Methodology/Principal Findings We previously characterised three Cu2+/Aβ1–16 coordination modes in the physiological pH range that involve the first two residues. Based upon our finding that the carbonyl of Ala2 is a Cu2+ ligand, here we speculate on a hypothetical Cu2+-mediated intramolecular cleavage mechanism as a source of truncations beginning at residue 3. Using EPR spectroscopy and site-specific isotopic labelling, we have also examined four Aβ peptides with biologically relevant N-terminal modifications, Aβ1[isoAsp]–16, Aβ1–16(A2V), Aβ3–16 and Aβ3[pE]–16. The recessive A2V mutation preserved the first coordination sphere of Cu2+/Aβ, but altered the outer coordination sphere. Isomerisation of Asp1 produced a single dominant species involving a stable 5-membered Cu2+ chelate at the amino terminus. The Aβ3–16 and Aβ3[pE]–16 peptides both exhibited an equilibrium between two Cu2+ coordination modes between pH 6–9 with nominally the same first coordination sphere, but with a dramatically different pH dependence arising from differences in H-bonding interactions at the N-terminus. Conclusions/Significance N-terminal modifications significantly influence the Cu2+ coordination of Aβ, which may be critical for alterations in aggregation propensity, redox-activity, resistance to degradation and the generation

  3. N-terminally truncated FOXP1 protein expression and alternate internal FOXP1 promoter usage in normal and malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip J; Gascoyne, Duncan M; Lyne, Linden; Spearman, Hayley; Felce, Suet Ling; McFadden, Nora; Chakravarty, Probir; Barrans, Sharon; Lynham, Steven; Calado, Dinis P; Ward, Malcolm; Banham, Alison H

    2016-07-01

    Strong FOXP1 protein expression is a poor risk factor in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and has been linked to an activated B-cell-like subtype, which preferentially expresses short FOXP1 (FOXP1S) proteins. However, both short isoform generation and function are incompletely understood. Here we prove by mass spectrometry and N-terminal antibody staining that FOXP1S proteins in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are N-terminally truncated. Furthermore, a rare strongly FOXP1-expressing population of normal germinal center B cells lacking the N-terminus of the regular long protein (FOXP1L) was identified. Exon-targeted silencing and transcript analyses identified three alternate 5' non-coding exons [FOXP1-Ex6b(s), FOXP1-Ex7b and FOXP1-Ex7c], downstream of at least two predicted promoters, giving rise to FOXP1S proteins. These were differentially controlled by B-cell activation and methylation, conserved in murine lymphoma cells, and significantly correlated with FOXP1S protein expression in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. Alternatively spliced isoforms lacking exon 9 (e.g. isoform 3) did not encode FOXP1S, and an alternate long human FOXP1 protein (FOXP1AL) likely generated from a FOXP1-Ex6b(L) transcript was detected. The ratio of FOXP1L:FOXP1S isoforms correlated with differential expression of plasmacytic differentiation markers in U-2932 subpopulations, and altering this ratio was sufficient to modulate CD19 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Thus, the activity of multiple alternate FOXP1 promoters to produce multiple protein isoforms is likely to regulate B-cell maturation. PMID:27056922

  4. N-terminally truncated FOXP1 protein expression and alternate internal FOXP1 promoter usage in normal and malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Philip J.; Gascoyne, Duncan M.; Lyne, Linden; Spearman, Hayley; Felce, Suet Ling; McFadden, Nora; Chakravarty, Probir; Barrans, Sharon; Lynham, Steven; Calado, Dinis P.; Ward, Malcolm; Banham, Alison H.

    2016-01-01

    Strong FOXP1 protein expression is a poor risk factor in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and has been linked to an activated B-cell-like subtype, which preferentially expresses short FOXP1 (FOXP1S) proteins. However, both short isoform generation and function are incompletely understood. Here we prove by mass spectrometry and N-terminal antibody staining that FOXP1S proteins in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma are N-terminally truncated. Furthermore, a rare strongly FOXP1-expressing population of normal germinal center B cells lacking the N-terminus of the regular long protein (FOXP1L) was identified. Exon-targeted silencing and transcript analyses identified three alternate 5′ non-coding exons [FOXP1-Ex6b(s), FOXP1-Ex7b and FOXP1-Ex7c], downstream of at least two predicted promoters, giving rise to FOXP1S proteins. These were differentially controlled by B-cell activation and methylation, conserved in murine lymphoma cells, and significantly correlated with FOXP1S protein expression in primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. Alternatively spliced isoforms lacking exon 9 (e.g. isoform 3) did not encode FOXP1S, and an alternate long human FOXP1 protein (FOXP1AL) likely generated from a FOXP1-Ex6b(L) transcript was detected. The ratio of FOXP1L:FOXP1S isoforms correlated with differential expression of plasmacytic differentiation markers in U-2932 subpopulations, and altering this ratio was sufficient to modulate CD19 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Thus, the activity of multiple alternate FOXP1 promoters to produce multiple protein isoforms is likely to regulate B-cell maturation. PMID:27056922

  5. The preparation and partial characterization of N-terminal and C-terminal iron-binding fragments from rabbit serum transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Heaphy, S; Williams, J

    1982-01-01

    Two iron-binding fragments of Mr 36 000 and 33 000 corresponding to the N-terminal domain of rabbit serum transferrin were prepared. One iron-binding fragment of Mr 39 000 corresponding to the C-terminal domain was prepared. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of rabbit serum transferrin is: Val-Thr-Glu-Lys-Thr-Val-Asn-Trp-?-Ala-Val-Ser. One glycan unit is presented in rabbit serum transferrin and it is located in the C-terminal domain. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6816218

  6. Differential localization of processed fragments of Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen and further processing of its N-terminal 47 kDa fragment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Mitamura, Toshihide; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Horii, Toshihiro

    2002-12-01

    The serine repeat antigen (SERA) of Plasmodium falciparum is a blood stage malaria vaccine candidate. It has been shown that 120 kDa SERA was proteolytically processed into N-terminal 47 kDa fragment (P47), central 56 kDa fragment (P56) that was further converted to 50 kDa (P50), and C-terminal 18 kDa fragment (P18). Here, we have examined the processing of SERA and the localization of its processed fragments by using mouse antibodies directed against recombinant proteins corresponding to different domains of SERA. Western blot analysis showed that all the processing events occurred inside parasitized erythrocytes at the stage just prior to the schizont rupture, that P47 was further processed into two 25 kDa fragments and that the two fragments, which were linked to P18 through disulfide bonds, were associated with the merozoite. In contrast, P50 was completely shed into culture medium and absent from the merozoite. This observation was further supported by the results of indirect immunofluorescence assay. These results could account for the findings that antibodies against P47 were inhibitory to the parasite growth in vitro but those against P50 were not. Finally, we demonstrated that the further processing of P47 is allelic type-dependent. The results of the present study would help in vaccine designing based on SERA. PMID:12421632

  7. Truncation of the unique N-terminal domain improved the thermos-stability and specific activity of alkaline α-amylase Amy703.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenghui; Wang, Qinhong; Jiang, Sijing; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-01-01

    High pH condition is of special interest for the potential applications of alkaline α-amylase in textile and detergent industries. Thus, there is a continuous demand to improve the amylase's properties to meet the requirements set by specific applications. Here we reported the systematic study of modular domain engineering to improve the specific activity and stability of the alkaline α-amylase from Bacillus pseudofirmus 703. The specific activity of the N-terminal domain truncated mutant (N-Amy) increased by ~35-fold with a significantly improved thermo-stability. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the Kcat and Kcat/Kmof N-Amy were enhanced by 1300-fold and 425.7-fold, respectively, representing the largest catalytic activity improvement of the engineered α-amylases through the methods of domain deletion, fusion or swapping. In addition, different from the wild-type Amy703, no exogenous Ca(2+) were required for N-Amy to maintain its full catalytic activity, implying its superior potential for many industrial processes. Circular dichroism analysis and structure modeling revealed that the increased compactness and α-helical content were the main contributors for the improved thermo-stability of N-Amy, while the improved catalytic efficiency was mainly attributed by the increased conformational flexibility around the active center. PMID:26926401

  8. Truncation of the unique N-terminal domain improved the thermos-stability and specific activity of alkaline α-amylase Amy703

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhenghui; Wang, Qinhong; Jiang, Sijing; Zhang, Guimin; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-01-01

    High pH condition is of special interest for the potential applications of alkaline α-amylase in textile and detergent industries. Thus, there is a continuous demand to improve the amylase’s properties to meet the requirements set by specific applications. Here we reported the systematic study of modular domain engineering to improve the specific activity and stability of the alkaline α-amylase from Bacillus pseudofirmus 703. The specific activity of the N-terminal domain truncated mutant (N-Amy) increased by ~35-fold with a significantly improved thermo-stability. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the Kcat and Kcat/Kmof N-Amy were enhanced by 1300-fold and 425.7-fold, respectively, representing the largest catalytic activity improvement of the engineered α-amylases through the methods of domain deletion, fusion or swapping. In addition, different from the wild-type Amy703, no exogenous Ca2+ were required for N-Amy to maintain its full catalytic activity, implying its superior potential for many industrial processes. Circular dichroism analysis and structure modeling revealed that the increased compactness and α-helical content were the main contributors for the improved thermo-stability of N-Amy, while the improved catalytic efficiency was mainly attributed by the increased conformational flexibility around the active center. PMID:26926401

  9. Striatal long noncoding RNA Abhd11os is neuroprotective against an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Francelle, Laetitia; Galvan, Laurie; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Petit, Fanny; Bernay, Benoît; Guillermier, Martine; Bonvento, Gilles; Dufour, Noëlle; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; Hantraye, Philippe; Déglon, Nicole; de Chaldée, Michel; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    A large number of gene products that are enriched in the striatum have ill-defined functions, although they may have key roles in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases affecting the striatum, especially Huntington disease (HD). In the present study, we focused on Abhd11os, (called ABHD11-AS1 in human) which is a putative long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) whose expression is enriched in the mouse striatum. We confirm that despite the presence of 2 small open reading frames (ORFs) in its sequence, Abhd11os is not translated into a detectable peptide in living cells. We demonstrate that Abhd11os levels are markedly reduced in different mouse models of HD. We performed in vivo experiments in mice using lentiviral vectors encoding either Abhd11os or a small hairpin RNA targeting Abhd11os. Results show that Abhd11os overexpression produces neuroprotection against an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin, whereas Abhd11os knockdown is protoxic. These novel results indicate that the loss lncRNA Abhd11os likely contribute to striatal vulnerability in HD. Our study emphasizes that lncRNA may play crucial roles in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25619660

  10. A CaV2.1 N-terminal fragment relieves the dominant-negative inhibition by an Episodic ataxia 2 mutant.

    PubMed

    Dahimene, Shehrazade; Page, Karen M; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Pratt, Wendy S; D'Arco, Marianna; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-09-01

    Episodic ataxia 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the gene CACNA1A that encodes the pore-forming CaV2.1 calcium channel subunit. The majority of EA2 mutations reported so far are nonsense or deletion/insertion mutations predicted to form truncated proteins. Heterologous expression of wild-type CaV2.1, together with truncated constructs that mimic EA2 mutants, significantly suppressed wild-type calcium channel function, indicating that the truncated protein produces a dominant-negative effect (Jouvenceau et al., 2001; Page et al., 2004). A similar finding has been shown for CaV2.2 (Raghib et al., 2001). We show here that a highly conserved sequence in the cytoplasmic N-terminus is involved in this process, for both CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 channels. Additionally, we were able to interfere with the suppressive effect of an EA2 construct by mutating key N-terminal residues within it. We postulate that the N-terminus of the truncated channel plays an essential part in its interaction with the full-length CaV2.1, which prevents the correct folding of the wild-type channel. In agreement with this, we were able to disrupt the interaction between EA2 and the full length channel by co-expressing a free N-terminal peptide. PMID:27260834

  11. Enhancing the Secretion Efficiency and Thermostability of a Bacillus deramificans Pullulanase Mutant (D437H/D503Y) by N-Terminal Domain Truncation

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xuguo

    2015-01-01

    Pullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41), an important enzyme in the production of starch syrup, catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,6 glycosidic bonds in complex carbohydrates. A double mutant (DM; D437H/D503Y) form of Bacillus deramificans pullulanase was recently constructed to enhance the thermostability and catalytic efficiency of the enzyme (X. Duan, J. Chen, and J. Wu, Appl Environ Microbiol 79:4072–4077, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00457-13). In the present study, three N-terminally truncated variants of this DM that lack the CBM41 domain (DM-T1), the CBM41 and X25 domains (DM-T2), or the CBM41, X25, and X45 domains (DM-T3) were constructed. Upon expression, DM-T3 existed as inclusion bodies, while 72.8 and 74.8% of the total pullulanase activities of DM-T1 and DM-T2, respectively, were secreted into the medium. These activities are 2.8- and 2.9-fold that of the DM enzyme, respectively. The specific activities of DM-T1 and DM-T2 were 380.0 × 108 and 449.3 × 108 U · mol−1, respectively, which are 0.94- and 1.11-fold that of the DM enzyme. DM-T1 and DM-T2 retained 50% of their activity after incubation at 60°C for 203 and 160 h, respectively, which are 1.7- and 1.3-fold that of the DM enzyme. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values of DM-T1 and DM-T2 were 1.5- and 2.7-fold higher and the Kcat/Km values were 11 and 50% lower, respectively, than those of the DM enzyme. Furthermore, DM-T1 and DM-T2 produced d-glucose contents of 95.0 and 94.1%, respectively, in a starch saccharification reaction, which are essentially identical to that produced by the DM enzyme (95%). The enhanced secretion and improved thermostability of the truncation mutant enzymes make them more suitable than the DM enzyme for industrial processes. PMID:25556190

  12. Enhancing the secretion efficiency and thermostability of a Bacillus deramificans pullulanase mutant (D437H/D503Y) by N-terminal domain truncation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Pullulanase (EC 3.2.1.41), an important enzyme in the production of starch syrup, catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,6 glycosidic bonds in complex carbohydrates. A double mutant (DM; D437H/D503Y) form of Bacillus deramificans pullulanase was recently constructed to enhance the thermostability and catalytic efficiency of the enzyme (X. Duan, J. Chen, and J. Wu, Appl Environ Microbiol 79:4072-4077, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00457-13). In the present study, three N-terminally truncated variants of this DM that lack the CBM41 domain (DM-T1), the CBM41 and X25 domains (DM-T2), or the CBM41, X25, and X45 domains (DM-T3) were constructed. Upon expression, DM-T3 existed as inclusion bodies, while 72.8 and 74.8% of the total pullulanase activities of DM-T1 and DM-T2, respectively, were secreted into the medium. These activities are 2.8- and 2.9-fold that of the DM enzyme, respectively. The specific activities of DM-T1 and DM-T2 were 380.0 × 10(8) and 449.3 × 10(8) U · mol(-1), respectively, which are 0.94- and 1.11-fold that of the DM enzyme. DM-T1 and DM-T2 retained 50% of their activity after incubation at 60°C for 203 and 160 h, respectively, which are 1.7- and 1.3-fold that of the DM enzyme. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values of DM-T1 and DM-T2 were 1.5- and 2.7-fold higher and the Kcat/Km values were 11 and 50% lower, respectively, than those of the DM enzyme. Furthermore, DM-T1 and DM-T2 produced d-glucose contents of 95.0 and 94.1%, respectively, in a starch saccharification reaction, which are essentially identical to that produced by the DM enzyme (95%). The enhanced secretion and improved thermostability of the truncation mutant enzymes make them more suitable than the DM enzyme for industrial processes. PMID:25556190

  13. Atomistic mechanisms of huntingtin N-terminal fragment insertion on a phospholipid bilayer revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Côté, Sébastien; Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-07-01

    The huntingtin protein is characterized by a segment of consecutive glutamines (Q(N)) that is responsible for its fibrillation. As with other amyloid proteins, misfolding of huntingtin is related to Huntington's disease through pathways that can involve interactions with phospholipid membranes. Experimental results suggest that the N-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (htt(NT)) positioned just before the Q(N) region is important for the binding of huntingtin to membranes. Through all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations, we unveil the structure and dynamics of the htt(NT)Q(N) fragment on a phospholipid membrane at the atomic level. We observe that the insertion dynamics of this peptide can be described by four main steps-approach, reorganization, anchoring, and insertion-that are very diverse at the atomic level. On the membrane, the htt(NT) peptide forms a stable α-helix essentially parallel to the membrane with its nonpolar side-chains-mainly Leu-4, Leu-7, Phe-11 and Leu-14-positioned in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. Salt-bridges involving Glu-5, Glu-12, Lys-6, and Lys-15, as well as hydrogen bonds involving Thr-3 and Ser-13 with the phospholipids also stabilize the structure and orientation of the htt(NT) peptide. These observations do not significantly change upon adding the Q(N) region whose role is rather to provide, through its hydrogen bonds with the phospholipids' head group, a stable scaffold facilitating the partitioning of the htt(NT) region in the membrane. Moreover, by staying accessible to the solvent, the amyloidogenic Q(N) region could also play a key role for the oligomerization of htt(NT)Q(N) on phospholipid membranes. PMID:24415136

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of the yeast prion-remodeling factor Hsp104

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sukyeong; Tsai, Francis T. F.

    2007-09-01

    An N-terminal fragment of S. cerevisiae Hsp104 has been crystallized. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones. A 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 was crystallized in two different crystal forms. Native 1 diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, b = 75.8, c = 235.7 Å. Native 2 diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 179.1, b = 179.1, c = 69.7 Å. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones.

  15. A Role for Galanin N-Terminal Fragment (1–15) in Anxiety- and Depression-Related Behaviors in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Millón, Carmelo; Flores-Burgess, Antonio; Narváez, Manuel; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Santín, Luis; Parrado, Concepción; Narváez, José Angel; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    Background: Galanin (GAL) plays a role in mood regulation. In this study we analyzed the action of the active N-terminal fragment [GAL(1–15)] in anxiety- and depression-related behavioral tests in rats. Methods: The effect of GAL(1–15) was analyzed in the forced swimming test, tail suspension test, open field test, and light/dark test. The proximity of GAL1 and GAL2 receptors was examined with the proximity ligation assay (PLA). We tested the GAL receptors involved in GAL(1–15) effects with the GAL2 receptor antagonist M871 and with an in vivo model of siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown or siRNA GAL1 receptor knockdown rats. The effects of GAL(1–15) were also studied in the cell line RN33B. Results: GAL(1–15) induced strong depression-like and anxiogenic-like effects in all the tests. These effects were stronger than the ones induced by GAL. The involvement of the GAL2 receptor was demonstrated with M871 and with the siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown rats. The PLA indicated the possible existence of GAL1 and GAL2 heteroreceptor complexes in the dorsal hippocampus and especially in the dorsal raphe nucleus. In the siRNA GAL1 receptor knockdown rats the behavioral actions of GAL(1–15) disappeared, and in the siRNA GAL2 receptor knockdown rats the reductions of the behavioral actions of GAL(1–15) was linked to a disappearance of PLA. In the cell line RN33B, GAL(1–15) decreased 5-HT immunoreactivity more strongly than GAL. Conclusions: Our results indicate that GAL(1–15) exerts strong depression-related and anxiogenic-like effects and may give the basis for the development of drugs targeting GAL1 and GAL2 heteroreceptor complexes in the raphe-limbic system for the treatment of depression and anxiety. PMID:25522404

  16. Purification and antimicrobial activity studies of the N-terminal fragment of ubiquitin from human amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Lee, Sun Young; Park, Seong-Cheol; Shin, Song Yub; Choi, Sang Joon; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2007-09-01

    A 4.3-kDa antimicrobial peptide was isolated from human amniotic fluid by dialysis, ultrafiltration, and C18 reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. This peptide, which we named Amniotic Fluid Peptide-1 (AFP-1), possessed antimicrobial activity but lacked hemolytic activity. In addition, AFP-1 potently inhibited the growth of a variety of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus), filamentous fungi (Botrytis cinerea, Aspergillus fumigatus, Neurospora crassa and Fusarium oxysporum) and yeast cells (Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans). Automated Edman degradation showed that the N-terminal sequence of AFP-1 was NH(2)-Met-Gln-Ile-Phe-Val-Lys-Thr-Leu-Thr-Gly-Lys-Thr-Ile-Thr-Leu-Glu-Val-Glu-. The partial sequence had 100% homology to the N-terminal sequence of ubiquitin. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that the molecular mass of AFP-1 was 4280.2 Da. Our data show an antimicrobial activity of ubiquitin N-terminal derived peptide that makes it suitable for use as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:17669700

  17. Beta amyloid-induced upregulation of death receptor 6 accelerates the toxic effect of N-terminal fragment of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuxia; Wang, Dandan; Luo, Ying; Li, Wei; Shan, Ye; Tan, Xiangshi; Zhu, Cuiqing

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays essential roles in the development of the Alzheimer's disease. Although full-length APP has been thoroughly studied, the role of the cleavage fragments especially the N-terminal fragments (N-APPs) in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis was still elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that application of recombinant APP₁₈₋₂₈₆ could enhance beta amyloid (Aβ)-induced neuronal injuries which were related to the activation of apoptosis proteins. Aβ treatment could induce a slight increase of N-APPs release. In addition, expression of death receptor 6 (DR6) was increased in Aβ-treated neurons and APP transgenic mice. Moreover, the effect of APP₁₈₋₂₈₆ on Aβ-induced injuries could be suppressed by the application of recombinant DR6₄₁₋₃₄₁ and DR6 antibody. Furthermore, pull-down assay revealed that APP₁₈₋₂₈₆ could bind both exogenous and endogenous DR6. Aβ promoted APP₁₈₋₂₈₆ targeting to neuron which was accompanied with the increase of DR6 expression, whereas downregulation of DR6 by interference RNA could alleviate the binding of N-APPs to neuron and also suppressed Aβ-dependent toxic effect with N-APPs. These results suggested that APP N-terminal fragments might play neurotoxic roles in Aβ-induced neuronal injuries through cell surface DR6. PMID:25150572

  18. Expression of 4 truncated fragments of Pasteurella multocida toxin and their immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jayoung; Pyo, Hyoju; Lee, Semi; Lee, Jaeil; Kim, Taejung

    2009-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a poor antigen that becomes more immunogenic after its native structure has been destroyed. In contrast, partially truncated PMT proteins, which are predicted to be good antigens when used as a vaccine, might be used to improve the control of atrophic rhinitis in pigs. In this study, 4 truncated PMT fragments were expressed in Escherichia coli, and those 4 fragments were inoculated into mice to produce the polyclonal antibodies. The results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that #1 and #4 fragments were the most immunogenic. Immunized mice were subsequently challenged intraperitoneally with P. multocida type D. Five of the eight #1 fragment-immunized mice showed some protection against death and bacterial clearance. Pigs immunized with #1 fragment produced no or mild atrophic rhinitis (turbinate conchal score) after challenge, suggesting that this #1 fragment could be a good candidate for a subunit recombinant-type vaccine. PMID:19794890

  19. Evidence that an N-terminal S-layer protein fragment triggers the release of a cell-associated high-molecular-weight amylase in Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980.

    PubMed Central

    Egelseer, E M; Schocher, I; Sleytr, U B; Sára, M

    1996-01-01

    During growth on starch medium, the S-layer-carrying Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and an S-layer-deficient variant each secreted three amylases, with identical molecular weights of 58,000, 122,000, and 184,000, into the culture fluid. Only the high-molecular-weight amylase (hmwA) was also identified as cell associated. Extraction and reassociation experiments showed that the hmwA had a high-level affinity to the peptidoglycan-containing layer and to the S-layer surface, but the interactions with the peptidoglycan-containing layer were stronger than those with the S-layer surface. For the S-layer-deficient variant, no changes in the amount of cell-associated and free hmwA could be observed during growth on starch medium, while for the S-layer-carrying strain, cell association of the hmwA strongly depended on the growth phase of the cells. The maximum amount of cell-associated hmwA was observed 3 h after inoculation, which corresponded to early exponential growth. The steady decrease in cell-associated hmwA during continued growth correlated with the appearance and the increasing intensity of a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 60,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. This protein had a high-level affinity to the peptidoglycan-containing layer and was identified as an N-terminal S-layer protein fragment which did not result from proteolytic cleavage of the whole S-layer protein but seems to be a truncated copy of the S-layer protein which is coexpressed with the hmwA under certain culture conditions. During growth on starch medium, the N-terminal S-layer protein fragment was integrated into the S-layer lattice, which led to the loss of its regular structure over a wide range and to the loss of amylase binding sites. Results obtained in the present study provide evidence that the N-terminal part of the S-layer protein is responsible for the anchoring of the subunits to the peptidoglycan-containing layer, while the surface-located C-terminal half

  20. N-terminal peptide sequence repetition influences the kinetics of backbone fragmentation: a manifestation of the Jahn-Teller effect?

    PubMed

    Good, David M; Yang, Hongqian; Zubarev, Roman A

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of large (>10,000 entries) databases consisting of high-resolution tandem mass spectra of peptide dications revealed with high statistical significance (P < 1[Symbol: see text]10(-3)) that peptides with non-identical first two N-terminal amino acids undergo cleavages of the second peptide bond at higher rates than repetitive sequences composed of the same amino acids (i.e., in general AB- and BA- bonds cleave more often than AA- and BB- bonds). This effect seems to depend upon the collisional energy, being stronger at lower energies. The phenomenon is likely to indicate the presence of the diketopiperazine structure for at least some b2 (+) ions. When consisting of two identical amino acids, these species should form through intermediates that have a symmetric geometry and, thus, must be subject to the Jahn-Teller effect that reduces the stability of such systems. PMID:23633015

  1. Biochemical and Immunological Characterization of Truncated Fragments of the Receptor-Binding Domains of C. difficile Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jui-Hsin; Shen, Zhe-Qing; Lien, Shu-Pei; Hsiao, Kuang-Nan; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chi-Chang; Siu, Leung-Kei; Chong, Pele Choi-Sing

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen responsible for opportunistic infections in hospitals worldwide and is the main cause of antibiotic-associated pseudo-membranous colitis and diarrhea in humans. Clostridial toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB) specifically bind to unknown glycoprotein(s) on the surface of epithelial cells in the host intestine, disrupting the intestinal barrier and ultimately leading to acute inflammation and diarrhea. The C-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD) of TcdA, which is responsible for the initial binding of the toxin to host glycoproteins, has been predicted to contain 7 potential oligosaccharide-binding sites. To study the specific roles and functions of these 7 putative lectin-like binding regions, a consensus sequence of TcdA RBD derived from different C. difficile strains deposited in the NCBI protein database and three truncated fragments corresponding to the N-terminal (residues 1–411), middle (residues 296–701), and C-terminal portions (residues 524–911) of the RBD (F1, F2 and F3, respectively) were designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. In this study, the recombinant RBD (rRBD) and its truncated fragments were purified, characterized biologically and found to have the following similar properties: (a) are capable of binding to the cell surface of both Vero and Caco-2 cells; (b) possess Toll-like receptor agonist-like adjuvant activities that can activate dendritic cell maturation and increase the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; and (c) function as potent adjuvants in the intramuscular immunization route to enhance immune responses against weak immunogens. Although F1, F2 and F3 have similar repetitive amino acid sequences and putative oligosaccharide-binding domains, they do not possess the same biological and immunological properties: (i) TcdA rRBD and its fragments bind to the cell surface, but only TcdA rRBD and F3 internalize into Vero cells within 15 min; (ii) the fragments exhibit various levels

  2. Biochemical and Immunological Characterization of Truncated Fragments of the Receptor-Binding Domains of C. difficile Toxin A.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jui-Hsin; Shen, Zhe-Qing; Lien, Shu-Pei; Hsiao, Kuang-Nan; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chi-Chang; Siu, Leung-Kei; Chong, Pele Choi-Sing

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an emerging pathogen responsible for opportunistic infections in hospitals worldwide and is the main cause of antibiotic-associated pseudo-membranous colitis and diarrhea in humans. Clostridial toxins A and B (TcdA and TcdB) specifically bind to unknown glycoprotein(s) on the surface of epithelial cells in the host intestine, disrupting the intestinal barrier and ultimately leading to acute inflammation and diarrhea. The C-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD) of TcdA, which is responsible for the initial binding of the toxin to host glycoproteins, has been predicted to contain 7 potential oligosaccharide-binding sites. To study the specific roles and functions of these 7 putative lectin-like binding regions, a consensus sequence of TcdA RBD derived from different C. difficile strains deposited in the NCBI protein database and three truncated fragments corresponding to the N-terminal (residues 1-411), middle (residues 296-701), and C-terminal portions (residues 524-911) of the RBD (F1, F2 and F3, respectively) were designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. In this study, the recombinant RBD (rRBD) and its truncated fragments were purified, characterized biologically and found to have the following similar properties: (a) are capable of binding to the cell surface of both Vero and Caco-2 cells; (b) possess Toll-like receptor agonist-like adjuvant activities that can activate dendritic cell maturation and increase the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines; and (c) function as potent adjuvants in the intramuscular immunization route to enhance immune responses against weak immunogens. Although F1, F2 and F3 have similar repetitive amino acid sequences and putative oligosaccharide-binding domains, they do not possess the same biological and immunological properties: (i) TcdA rRBD and its fragments bind to the cell surface, but only TcdA rRBD and F3 internalize into Vero cells within 15 min; (ii) the fragments exhibit various levels of

  3. Supramaximal elevation in B-type natriuretic peptide and its N-terminal fragment levels in anephric patients with heart failure: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the responses of natriuretic peptides to developing congestive heart failure in ‘anephric’ end-stage kidney disease. Case presentation We present three consecutive cases of surgically-induced anephric patients in a critical care environment: a 28-year-old Caucasian woman (with congestive heart failure), a 42-year-old Caucasian woman (without congestive heart failure), and a 23-year-old Caucasian woman (without congestive heart failure). Our limited study data indicate that cut-off values advocated for B-type natriuretic peptide and its N-terminal fragment to ‘rule out’ congestive heart failure in two of our end-stage kidney disease patients (without congestive heart failure) are largely appropriate for anephric patients. However, our index (first) patient developed congestive heart failure accompanied by the phenomenon of massive and persistent elevation of these natriuretic levels. Conclusion Our findings suggest that patients from the anephric subclass suffering from congestive heart failure will develop supramaximal elevation of B-type natriuretic peptide and its N-terminal fragment, implying the need for dramatically higher cut-off values with respective magnitudes of the order of 50-fold (B-type natriuretic peptide ~5780pmol/L; 20,000ng/L) to 100-fold (N-terminal fragment ~11,800pmol/L; 100,000ng/L) higher than current values used to ‘rule in’ congestive heart failure. Further research will be required to delineate those cut-off values. The role of our devised ‘Blood Volume – B-type natriuretic peptide feedback control system’ on ‘anatomical’ and ‘functional’ anephric patients led to significant mathematically-enriched arguments supporting our proposal that this model provides plausible explanations for the study findings, and the model lends support to the important hypothesis that these two groups of anephric patients inflicted with congestive heart failure should effectively have similar

  4. Mapping the binding surface of interleukin-8 complexed with an N-terminal fragment of the type 1 human interleukin-8 receptor.

    PubMed

    Clubb, R T; Omichinski, J G; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M

    1994-01-24

    Interleukin-8 and its receptors are key mediators of immune and inflammatory responses. Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy has been utilized to map the binding surface on interleukin-8 (IL-8) for an N-terminal fragment of the human Type-1 IL-8 receptor. A peptide corresponding to residues 1-40 of the IL-8 type 1 receptor (IL8-r1) was titrated into a sample of uniformly 15N-labeled IL-8. IL8-r1 binds to IL-8 with a dissociation constant of 170 +/- 50 microM assuming the peptide binds with a stoichiometry of one peptide per IL-8 monomer, exchanges rapidly (> 900 s-1) between free and bound states, and selectively perturbs the chemical environment of several IL-8 residues. The binding surface on IL-8 suggested by our results is comprised of residues in strand beta 3 of the beta-sheet (Glu48 to Cys50), the turn preceding beta 3 (Ser44), the C-terminal alpha-helix (Val61) and the irregular N-terminal loop region (Thr12, Lys15, Phe17, His18, Lys20 and Phe21). The IL-8 dimer appears to present two symmetrical binding surfaces for the IL8-r1 peptide, suggesting two receptor peptides may bind per dimer. PMID:8307164

  5. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of a 40 kDa N-Terminal Fragment of the Yeast Prion-Remodeling Factor Hsp104

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Tsai, F.

    2007-01-01

    A 40 kDa N-terminal fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp104 was crystallized in two different crystal forms. Native 1 diffracted to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 66.6, b = 75.8, c = 235.7 {angstrom}. Native 2 diffracted to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 179.1, b = 179.1, c = 69.7 {angstrom}. This is the first report of the crystallization of a eukaryotic member of the Hsp100 family of molecular chaperones.

  6. Autocrine regulation of growth stimulation in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma by serine-proteinase-catalysed release of the urinary-type-plasminogen-activator N-terminal fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, D A; Kearns, A; Larsh, S; Enghild, J J; Stack, M S

    1999-01-01

    Ovarian carcinomas secrete single-chain urinary-type plasminogen activator (scuPA) and expression of uPA is up-regulated relative to normal ovarian epithelium, leading to an enhanced proteolytic capacity which may facilitate invasion. Furthermore, the uPA receptor (uPAR) is present on ovarian carcinoma cells and is occupied in tumour tissues. In the present study, incubation of scuPA with serum-free conditioned medium from ovarian carcinoma cells resulted in release of a 14 kDa polypeptide. N-terminal sequence analysis identified this fragment as the uPA N-terminal fragment (NTF), which contains a growth-factor and a kringle domain. NTF generation was abolished by serine-proteinase inhibitors, but not inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases, and was not enhanced by the addition of plasminogen or plasmin. To determine whether ovarian carcinoma-cell growth is altered by uPA, the effect of exogenous scuPA or NTF on proliferation was analysed. Both NTF and scuPA induced a dose-dependent increase in proliferation, with maximal stimulation obtained at 10-20 nM. Furthermore, blocking the interaction of endogenous uPA with uPAR using anti-NTF antibodies significantly inhibited proliferation. Together these data indicate that, in addition to enhancing the invasive activity of ovarian carcinoma cells via increased pericellular proteolysis, uPA also acts as a mitogen for ovarian carcinoma cells, suggesting a biochemical mechanism whereby uPA may contribute to ovarian carcinoma progression by modulating both cell invasion and proliferation. PMID:10417342

  7. Coordination Environment of Cu(II) Ions Bound to N-Terminal Peptide Fragments of Angiogenin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Magrì, Antonio; Munzone, Alessia; Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Hansson, Orjan; Satriano, Cristina; Rizzarelli, Enrico; La Mendola, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenin (Ang) is a potent angiogenic factor, strongly overexpressed in patients affected by different types of cancers. The specific Ang cellular receptors have not been identified, but it is known that Ang–actin interaction induces changes both in the cell cytoskeleton and in the extracellular matrix. Most in vitro studies use the recombinant form (r-Ang) instead of the form that is normally present in vivo (“wild-type”, wt-Ang). The first residue of r-Ang is a methionine, with a free amino group, whereas wt-Ang has a glutamic acid, whose amino group spontaneously cyclizes in the pyro-glutamate form. The Ang biological activity is influenced by copper ions. To elucidate the role of such a free amino group on the protein–copper binding, we scrutinized the copper(II) complexes with the peptide fragments Ang(1–17) and AcAng(1–17), which encompass the sequence 1–17 of angiogenin (QDNSRYTHFLTQHYDAK-NH2), with free amino and acetylated N-terminus, respectively. Potentiometric, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) studies demonstrate that the two peptides show a different metal coordination environment. Confocal microscopy imaging of neuroblastoma cells with the actin staining supports the spectroscopic results, with the finding of different responses in the cytoskeleton organization upon the interaction, in the presence or not of copper ions, with the free amino and the acetylated N-terminus peptides. PMID:27490533

  8. Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Accumulation by Overexpression of an N-Terminally Truncated 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Gene in the Basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderic acids produced by Ganoderma lucidum, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, exhibit antitumor and antimetastasis activities. Genetic modification of G. lucidum is difficult but critical for the enhancement of cellular accumulation of ganoderic acids. In this study, a homologous genetic transformation system for G. lucidum was developed for the first time using mutated sdhB, encoding the iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, as a selection marker. The truncated G. lucidum gene encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) was overexpressed by using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system. The results showed that the mutated sdhB successfully conferred carboxin resistance upon transformation. Most of the integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA) appeared as a single copy in the genome. Moreover, deregulated constitutive overexpression of the HMGR gene led to a 2-fold increase in ganoderic acid content. It also increased the accumulation of intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and the upregulation of downstream genes such as those of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase. This study demonstrates that transgenic basidiomycete G. lucidum is a promising system to achieve metabolic engineering of the ganoderic acid pathway. PMID:22941092

  9. Massive CA1/2 Neuronal Loss with Intraneuronal and N-Terminal Truncated Aβ42 Accumulation in a Novel Alzheimer Transgenic Model

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Caty; Sergeant, Nicolas; Itier, Jean-Michel; Blanchard, Véronique; Wirths, Oliver; van der Kolk, Nicolien; Vingtdeux, Valérie; van de Steeg, Evita; Ret, Gwenaëlle; Canton, Thierry; Drobecq, Hervé; Clark, Allan; Bonici, Bruno; Delacourte, André; Benavides, Jesús; Schmitz, Christoph; Tremp, Günter; Bayer, Thomas A.; Benoit, Patrick; Pradier, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by a substantial degeneration of pyramidal neurons and the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Here we present a novel transgenic mouse model, APPSLPS1KI that closely mimics the development of AD-related neuropathological features including a significant hippocampal neuronal loss. This transgenic mouse model carries M233T/L235P knocked-in mutations in presenilin-1 and overexpresses mutated human β-amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein. Aβx-42 is the major form of Aβ species present in this model with progressive development of a complex pattern of N-truncated variants and dimers, similar to those observed in AD brain. At 10 months of age, an extensive neuronal loss (>50%) is present in the CA1/2 hippocampal pyramidal cell layer that correlates with strong accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ and thioflavine-S-positive intracellular material but not with extracellular Aβ deposits. A strong reactive astrogliosis develops together with the neuronal loss. This loss is already detectable at 6 months of age and is PS1KI gene dosage-dependent. Thus, APPSLPS1KI mice further confirm the critical role of intraneuronal Aβ42 in neuronal loss and provide an excellent tool to investigate therapeutic strategies designed to prevent AD neurodegeneration. PMID:15466394

  10. Crystallization of the two-domain N-terminal fragment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L10(P0) in complex with a specific fragment of 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, O. V.; Mitroshin, I. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Nikonov, S. V.; Garber, M. B.

    2011-07-15

    Lateral L12-stalk (P1-stalk in Archaea, P1/P2-stalk in eukaryotes) is an obligatory morphological element of large ribosomal subunits in all organisms studied. This stalk is composed of the complex of ribosomal proteins L10(P0) and L12(P1) and interacts with 23S rRNA through the protein L10(P0). L12(P1)-stalk is involved in the formation of GTPase center of the ribosome and plays an important role in the ribosome interaction with translation factors. High mobility of this stalk puts obstacles in determination of its structure within the intact ribosome. Crystals of a two-domain N-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein L10(P0) from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii in complex with a specific fragment of rRNA from the same organism have been obtained. The crystals diffract X-rays at 3.2 Angstrom-Sign resolution.

  11. Crystallization of the two-domain N-terminal fragment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L10(P0) in complex with a specific fragment of 23S rRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, O. V.; Mitroshin, I. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Nikonov, S. V.; Garber, M. B.

    2011-07-01

    Lateral L12-stalk (P1-stalk in Archaea, P1/P2-stalk in eukaryotes) is an obligatory morphological element of large ribosomal subunits in all organisms studied. This stalk is composed of the complex of ribosomal proteins L10(P0) and L12(P1) and interacts with 23S rRNA through the protein L10(P0). L12(P1)-stalk is involved in the formation of GTPase center of the ribosome and plays an important role in the ribosome interaction with translation factors. High mobility of this stalk puts obstacles in determination of its structure within the intact ribosome. Crystals of a two-domain N-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein L10(P0) from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii in complex with a specific fragment of rRNA from the same organism have been obtained. The crystals diffract X-rays at 3.2 Å resolution.

  12. Dopamine determines the vulnerability of striatal neurons to the N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin through the regulation of mitochondrial complex II

    PubMed Central

    Benchoua, Alexandra; Trioulier, Yaël; Diguet, Elsa; Malgorn, Carole; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Dufour, Noelle; Elalouf, Jean-Marc; Krajewski, Stan; Hantraye, Philippe; Déglon, Nicole; Brouillet, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders associated with primary or secondary mitochondrial defects such as Huntington's disease (HD), cells of the striatum are particularly vulnerable to cell death, although the mechanisms by which this cell death is induced are unclear. Dopamine, found in high concentrations in the striatum, may play a role in striatal cell death. We show that in primary striatal cultures, dopamine increases the toxicity of an N-terminal fragment of mutated huntingtin (Htt-171-82Q). Mitochondrial complex II protein (mCII) levels are reduced in HD striatum, indicating that this protein may be important for dopamine-mediated striatal cell death. We found that dopamine enhances the toxicity of the selective mCII inhibitor, 3-nitropropionic acid. We also demonstrated that dopamine doses that are insufficient to produce cell loss regulate mCII expression at the mRNA, protein and catalytic activity level. We also show that dopamine-induced down-regulation of mCII levels can be blocked by several dopamine D2 receptor antagonists. Sustained overexpression of mCII subunits using lentiviral vectors abrogated the effects of dopamine, both by high dopamine concentrations alone and neuronal death induced by low dopamine concentrations together with Htt-171-82Q. This novel pathway links dopamine signaling and regulation of mCII activity and could play a key role in oxidative energy metabolism and explain the vulnerability of the striatum in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18267960

  13. The N-terminal fragment of the tomato torrado virus RNA1-encoded polyprotein induces a hypersensitive response (HR)-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2016-07-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a defence reaction observed during incompatible plant-pathogen interactions in plants infected with a wide range of fungi, bacteria and viruses. Here, we show that an N-terminal polyprotein fragment encoded by tomato torrado virus RNA1, located between the first ATG codon and the protease cofactor (ProCo) motif, induces an HR-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of the first 105 amino acids (the calculated molecular weight of the fragment was ca. 11.33 kDa, hereafter refered to as the 11K domain) from ToTV RNA1 induced an HR-like phenotype in infiltrated leaves. To investigate whether the 11K domain could influence the virulence and pathogenicity of a recombinant virus, we created a potato virus X (PVX) with the 11K coding sequence inserted under a duplicated coat protein promoter. We found that 11K substantially increased the virulence of the recombinant virus. Disease phenotype induced in N. benthamiana by PVX-11K was characterized by strong local and systemic necrosis. This was not observed when the 11K domain was expressed from PVX in an antisense orientation. Further analyses revealed that the 11K domain could not suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the N. benthamiana 16c line. In silico analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 11K domain indicated the presence of two putative helices that are highly conserved in tomato-infecting representatives of the genus Torradovirus. PMID:27072852

  14. Soluble prion protein and its N-terminal fragment prevent impairment of synaptic plasticity by Aβ oligomers: Implications for novel therapeutic strategy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scott-McKean, Jonah J; Surewicz, Krystyna; Choi, Jin-Kyu; Ruffin, Vernon A; Salameh, Ahlam I; Nieznanski, Krzysztof; Costa, Alberto C S; Surewicz, Witold K

    2016-07-01

    The pathogenic process in Alzheimer's disease (AD) appears to be closely linked to the neurotoxic action of amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers. Recent studies have shown that these oligomers bind with high affinity to the membrane-anchored cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). It has also been proposed that this binding might mediate some of the toxic effects of the oligomers. Here, we show that the soluble (membrane anchor-free) recombinant human prion protein (rPrP) and its N-terminal fragment N1 block Aβ oligomers-induced inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal slices, an important surrogate marker of cognitive deficit associated with AD. rPrP and N1 are also strikingly potent inhibitors of Aβ cytotoxicity in primary hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, experiments using hippocampal slices and neurons from wild-type and PrP(C) null mice (as well as rat neurons in which PrP(C) expression was greatly reduced by gene silencing) indicate that, in contrast to the impairment of synaptic plasticity by Aβ oligomers, the cytotoxic effects of these oligomers, and the inhibition of these effects by rPrP and N1, are independent of the presence of endogenous PrP(C). This suggests fundamentally different mechanisms by which soluble rPrP and its fragments inhibit these two toxic responses to Aβ. Overall, these findings provide strong support to recent suggestions that PrP-based compounds may offer new avenues for pharmacological intervention in AD. PMID:26949218

  15. Engineering of a disulfide loop instead of a Zn binding loop restores the anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities of the N-terminal fragment of endostatin: Mechanistic and therapeutic insights.

    PubMed

    Chamani, Reyhane; Asghari, S Mohsen; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Eskandari, Sedigheh; Mansouri, Kamran; Khodarahmi, Reza; Taghdir, Majid; Heidari, Zahra; Gorji, Ali; Aliakbar, Alireza; Ranjbar, Bijan; Khajeh, Khosro

    2015-09-01

    Although considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the molecular mechanism of endostatin's anti-cancer activity, the role of its Zn bound N-terminal loop has not been completely clarified. To investigate whether Zn binding or the N-terminal loop is involved in the anti-cancer properties of endostatin, we compared the structure and biological activity of a native Zn binding endostatin peptide (ES-Zn) with three variants: a Zn free variant (ES), a variant containing both a Zn binding site and a disulfide bond (ES-SSZn), and a variant including a disulfide loop but incapable of Zn binding (ES-SS). Spectroscopic studies indicated that ES-Zn and ES-SS consist of random coil and β structures, whereas ES-SSZn and ES fold into random coils. Theoretical analysis proposed that ES-Zn and ES-SS have a similar binding site to αVβ3 integrin. The anti-proliferative activity of endostatin was retained by all peptides except ES, and the in vitro anti-angiogenic property was preserved in ES-Zn and ES-SS. Remarkably, breast tumor growth and CD31 activity were inhibited more effectively by ES-SS than by ES-Zn. Therefore, a correlation exists between the N-terminal loop and anti-cancer properties of endostatin fragment and a disulfide loop may be more promising than a Zn binding loop for inhibiting tumor growth. PMID:26187352

  16. Dynorphin 1-17 and Its N-Terminal Biotransformation Fragments Modulate Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Nuclear Factor-kappa B Nuclear Translocation, Interleukin-1beta and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha in Differentiated THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dynorphin 1–17, (DYN 1–17) opioid peptide produces antinociception following binding to the kappa-opioid peptide (KOP) receptor. Upon synthesis and release in inflamed tissues by immune cells, DYN 1–17 undergoes rapid biotransformation and yields a unique set of opioid and non-opioid fragments. Some of these major fragments possess a role in immunomodulation, suggesting that opioid-targeted therapeutics may be effective in diminishing the severity of inflammatory disorders. This study aimed to examine the immunomodulatory effects of DYN 1–17 and major N-terminal fragments found in the inflammatory environment on nuclear factor-kappaB/p65 (NF-κB/p65) nuclear translocation and the release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated, differentiated THP-1 cells. The results demonstrate that NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation was significantly attenuated following treatment with DYN 1–17 and a specific range of fragments, with the greatest reduction observed with DYN 1–7 at a low concentration (10 nM). Antagonism with a selective KOP receptor antagonist, ML-190, significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of DYN 1–17, DYN 1–6, DYN 1–7 and DYN 1–9, but not other DYN 1–17 N-terminal fragments (DYN 1–10 and 1–11) on NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation. DYN 1–17 and selected fragments demonstrated differential modulation on the release of IL-1β and TNF-α with significant inhibition observed with DYN 1–7 at low concentrations (1 nM and 10 pM). These effects were blocked by ML-190, suggesting a KOP receptor-mediated pathway. The results demonstrate that DYN 1–17 and certain N-terminal fragments, produced in an inflamed environment, play an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting NF-κB/p65 translocation and the subsequent cytokine release through KOP receptor-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:27055013

  17. N-terminal sequence tagging using reliably determined b2 ions: a useful approach to deconvolute tandem mass spectra of co-fragmented peptides in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kryuchkov, Fedor; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Kjeldsen, Frank

    2014-05-30

    With the recent introduction of higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) in Orbitrap mass spectrometry, the popularity of that technique has grown tremendously in the proteomics society. HCD spectra, however, are characterized by a limited distribution of bn-type ions, which permit the generation of reliable sequence tags based on complementary b,y pairs both for de novo sequencing and sequence tagging strategies. Instead, most peptide HCD spectra (~95%) are dominated with b2 ions. In this work, we analyzed positive predictive values of b2 ions in HCD, and found that b2 ions can be determined with >97% certainty in the presence of a2 and its complementary yn-2 ions. Analytically, b2 ions provide information on the composition of the first two N-terminal amino acids in peptides. Their utilization in N-terminal sequence tagging leads to a significant decrease in false discovery rate by filtering out false positives while retaining true positive identifications. As a consequence, the number of peptide spectrum matches (PSMs) increased by 4.8% at fixed FDR (1%). This approach allows for deconvolution of mixture spectra and increased the number of PSM to 9.2% in a complex human sample and to 24% in a complex sample of synthetic peptides at 1% FDR. PMID:24726481

  18. The N-terminal fragment of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS(apm)) is a monomer in solution.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Aparajita; Banerjee, Rajat

    2013-03-18

    Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRSapm) was the first reported aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase of viral origin. The previous crystal structure of TyrRSapm showed a non-canonical orientation of the dimer conformation and the CP1 domain, responsible for dimer formation, displays a major modification of a motif structurally conserved in other TyrRS structures. An earlier study reported that Bacillus stearothermophilus N-terminal TyrRS exists as a dimer under native conditions. N-terminal TyrRSapm (ΔTyrRSapm, 1-234 aa) was constructed to remove the C-terminal anticodon-binding domain. Here we show by Ferguson plot analysis and analytical ultracentrifugation that ΔTyrRSapm exists as a monomer and contains a disulfide-bridge. The ΔTyrRSapm loses the ability to bind tRNA(Tyr), however it remains active in pyrophosphate exchange with similar ligand dissociation constants as the full-length enzyme. PMID:23384724

  19. Spatial structure of oligopeptide PAP(248-261), the N-terminal fragment of the HIV enhancer prostatic acid phosphatase peptide PAP(248-286), in aqueous and SDS micelle solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2014-07-01

    Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is an enzyme that facilitates infection of cells by HIV. Its peptide fragment PAP(248-286) forms amyloid fibrils known as SEVI, which enhance attachment of the virus by viral adhesion to the host cell prior to receptor-specific binding via reducing the electrostatic repulsion between the membranes of the virus and the target cell. The secondary structure of PAP(248-286) in aqueous and SDS solutions can be divided into an N-terminal disordered region, an α-helical central part and an α/310-helical C-terminal region (Nanga et al., 2009). In this work, we used NMR spectroscopy to study the spatial structure of the isolated N-terminal fragment of PAP(248-286), PAP(248-261) (GIHKQKEKSRLQGG), in aqueous and SDS micelle solutions. Formation of a PAP(248-261)-SDS complex was confirmed by chemical shift alterations in the 1H NMR spectra of the peptide, as well as by the signs and values of Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE). In addition, the PAP(248-261) peptide does not form any specified secondary structure in either aqueous or SDS solutions.

  20. Enhancement of HCV polytope DNA vaccine efficacy by fusion to an N-terminal fragment of heat shock protein gp96.

    PubMed

    Pishraft-Sabet, Leila; Kosinska, Anna D; Rafati, Sima; Bolhassani, Azam; Taheri, Tahereh; Memarnejadian, Arash; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed; Roggendorf, Michael; Samimi-Rad, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Induction of a strong hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune response plays a key role in control and clearance of the virus. A polytope (PT) DNA vaccine containing B- and T-cell epitopes could be a promising vaccination strategy against HCV, but its efficacy needs to be improved. The N-terminal domain of heat shock protein gp96 (NT(gp96)) has been shown to be a potent adjuvant for enhancing immunity. We constructed a PT DNA vaccine encoding four HCV immunodominant cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes (two HLA-A2- and two H2-D(d)-specific motifs) from the Core, E2, NS3 and NS5B antigens in addition to a T-helper CD4+ epitope from NS3 and a B-cell epitope from E2. The NT(gp96) was fused to the C- or N-terminal end of the PT DNA (PT-NT(gp96) or NT(gp96)-PT), and their potency was compared. Cellular and humoral immune responses against the expressed peptides were evaluated in CB6F1 mice. Our results showed that immunization of mice with PT DNA vaccine fused to NT(gp96) induced significantly stronger T-cell and antibody responses than PT DNA alone. Furthermore, the adjuvant activity of NT(gp96) was more efficient in the induction of immune responses when fused to the C-terminal end of the HCV DNA polytope. In conclusion, the NT(gp96) improved the efficacy of the DNA vaccine, and this immunomodulatory effect was dependent on the position of the fusion. PMID:25348271

  1. The N-terminal half of membrane CD14 is a functional cellular lipopolysaccharide receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Viriyakosol, S; Kirkland, T N

    1996-01-01

    CD14, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein on the surface of monocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, is a receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was recently reported that an N-terminal 152-amino-acid fragment of soluble CD14 was an active soluble lipopolysaccharide receptor (T. S. -C. Juan, M. J. Kelley, D. A. Johnson, L. A. Busse, E. Hailman, S. D. Wright, and H. S. Lichenstein, J. Biol. Chem. 270:1382-1387, 1995). To determine whether the N-terminal half of the membrane CD14 was a functional LPS receptor on the cell membrane, we engineered a chimeric gene coding for amino acids 1 to 151 of CD14 fused to the C-terminal region of decay-accelerating factor and expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells and 70Z/3 cells. We found that the chimeric, truncated CD14 is a fully functional LPS receptor in both cell lines. PMID:8550221

  2. Plasma Levels of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1, n-Terminal Fragment of Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Calcidiol Are Independently Associated with the Complexity of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Reyes, Roberto; Franco-Peláez, Juan Antonio; Lorenzo, Óscar; González-Casaus, María Luisa; Pello, Ana María; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Martín-Mariscal, María Luisa; Martínez-Milla, Juan; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Piñero, Antonio; Navarro, Felipe; Egido, Jesús; Tuñón, José

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We investigated the relationship of the Syntax Score (SS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC), with plasma levels of biomarkers related to cardiovascular damage and mineral metabolism, as there is sparse information in this field. Methods We studied 270 patients with coronary disease that had an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) six months before. Calcidiol, fibroblast growth factor-23, parathormone, phosphate and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, galectin-3, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP] levels, among other biomarkers, were determined. CAC was assessed by coronary angiogram as low-grade (0–1) and high-grade (2–3) calcification, measured with a semiquantitative scale ranging from 0 (none) to 3 (severe). For the SS study patients were divided in SS<14 and SS≥14. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results MCP-1 predicted independently the SS (RC = 1.73 [95%CI = 0.08–3.39]; p = 0.040), along with NT-proBNP (RC = 0.17 [95%CI = 0.05–0.28]; p = 0.004), male sex (RC = 4.15 [95%CI = 1.47–6.83]; p = 0.003), age (RC = 0.13 [95%CI = 0.02–0.24]; p = 0.020), hypertension (RC = 3.64, [95%CI = 0.77–6.50]; p = 0.013), hyperlipidemia (RC = 2.78, [95%CI = 0.28–5.29]; p = 0.030), and statins (RC = 6.12 [95%CI = 1.28–10.96]; p = 0.013). Low calcidiol predicted high-grade calcification independently (OR = 0.57 [95% CI = 0.36–0.90]; p = 0.013) along with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR = 0.38 [95%CI = 0.19–0.78]; p = 0.006), diabetes (OR = 2.35 [95%CI = 1.11–4.98]; p = 0.028) and age (OR = 1.37 [95%CI = 1.18–1.59]; p<0.001). During follow-up (1.79 [0.94–2.86] years), 27 patients developed ACS, stroke, or transient ischemic attack. A combined score using SS and CAC predicted independently the development of the outcome. Conclusions MCP-1 and NT-proBNP are independent predictors of SS, while low calcidiol plasma levels

  3. An Intrabody Drug (rAAV6-INT41) Reduces the Binding of N-Terminal Huntingtin Fragment(s) to DNA to Basal Levels in PC12 Cells and Delays Cognitive Loss in the R6/2 Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal progressive disease linked to expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein and characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive and motor function. We show that expression of a mutant human huntingtin exon-1-GFP fusion construct results in nonspecific gene dysregulation that is significantly reduced by 50% due to coexpression of INT41, an intrabody specific for the proline-rich region of the huntingtin protein. Using stable PC12 cell lines expressing either inducible human mutant huntingtin (mHtt, Q73) or normal huntingtin (nHtt, Q23), we investigated the effect of rAAV6-INT41, an adeno-associated virus vector with the INT41 coding sequence, on the subcellular distribution of Htt. Compartmental fractionation 8 days after induction of Htt showed a 6-fold increased association of a dominate N-terminal mHtt fragment with DNA compared to N-terminal nHtt. Transduction with rAAV6-INT41 reduced DNA binding of N-terminal mHtt 6.5-fold in the nucleus and reduced nuclear translocation of the detected fragments. Subsequently, when rAAV6-INT41 is delivered to the striatum in the R6/2 mouse model, treated female mice exhibited executive function statistically indistinguishable from wild type, accompanied by reductions in Htt aggregates in the striatum, suggesting that rAAV6-INT41 is promising as a gene therapy for Huntington's disease. PMID:27595037

  4. An Intrabody Drug (rAAV6-INT41) Reduces the Binding of N-Terminal Huntingtin Fragment(s) to DNA to Basal Levels in PC12 Cells and Delays Cognitive Loss in the R6/2 Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Amaro, I Alexandra; Henderson, Lee A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal progressive disease linked to expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein and characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive and motor function. We show that expression of a mutant human huntingtin exon-1-GFP fusion construct results in nonspecific gene dysregulation that is significantly reduced by 50% due to coexpression of INT41, an intrabody specific for the proline-rich region of the huntingtin protein. Using stable PC12 cell lines expressing either inducible human mutant huntingtin (mHtt, Q73) or normal huntingtin (nHtt, Q23), we investigated the effect of rAAV6-INT41, an adeno-associated virus vector with the INT41 coding sequence, on the subcellular distribution of Htt. Compartmental fractionation 8 days after induction of Htt showed a 6-fold increased association of a dominate N-terminal mHtt fragment with DNA compared to N-terminal nHtt. Transduction with rAAV6-INT41 reduced DNA binding of N-terminal mHtt 6.5-fold in the nucleus and reduced nuclear translocation of the detected fragments. Subsequently, when rAAV6-INT41 is delivered to the striatum in the R6/2 mouse model, treated female mice exhibited executive function statistically indistinguishable from wild type, accompanied by reductions in Htt aggregates in the striatum, suggesting that rAAV6-INT41 is promising as a gene therapy for Huntington's disease. PMID:27595037

  5. Evaluation of the Naturally Acquired Antibody Immune Response to the Pv200L N-terminal Fragment of Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-1 in Four Areas of the Amazon Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Storti-Melo, Luciane M.; Souza-Neiras, Wanessa C.; Cassiano, Gustavo C.; Taveira, Leonardo C.; Cordeiro, Antônio J.; Couto, Vanja S. C. A.; Póvoa, Marinete M.; Cunha, Maristela G.; Echeverry, Diana M.; Rossit, Andréa R. B.; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates; Machado, Ricardo L. D.

    2011-01-01

    Frequency and levels of IgG antibodies to an N-terminal fragment of the Plasmodium vivax MSP-1 (Pv200L) protein, in individuals naturally exposed to malaria in four endemic areas of Brazil, were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Plasma samples of 261 P. vivax-infected individuals from communities of Macapá, Novo Repartimento, Porto Velho, and Plácido de Castro in the Amazonian region with different malaria transmission intensities. A high mean number of studied individuals (89.3%) presented with antibodies to the Pv200L that correlated with the number of previous malaria infections; there were significant differences in the frequency of the responders (71.9–98.7) and in the antibody levels (1:200–1:51,200) among the four study areas. Results of this study provide evidence that Pv200L is a naturally immunogenic fragment of the PvMSP-1 and is associated with the degree of exposure to parasites. The fine specificity of antibodies to Pv200L is currently being assessed. PMID:21292879

  6. An N-terminal Fragment of the Prion Protein Binds to Amyloid-β Oligomers and Inhibits Their Neurotoxicity in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Fluharty, Brian R.; Biasini, Emiliano; Stravalaci, Matteo; Sclip, Alessandra; Diomede, Luisa; Balducci, Claudia; La Vitola, Pietro; Messa, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Forloni, Gianluigi; Borsello, Tiziana; Gobbi, Marco; Harris, David A.

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the brain. Considerable evidence suggests that soluble Aβ oligomers are responsible for the synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficit observed in AD. However, the mechanism by which these oligomers exert their neurotoxic effect remains unknown. Recently, it was reported that Aβ oligomers bind to the cellular prion protein with high affinity. Here, we show that N1, the main physiological cleavage fragment of the cellular prion protein, is necessary and sufficient for binding early oligomeric intermediates during Aβ polymerization into amyloid fibrils. The ability of N1 to bind Aβ oligomers is influenced by positively charged residues in two sites (positions 23–31 and 95–105) and is dependent on the length of the sequence between them. Importantly, we also show that N1 strongly suppresses Aβ oligomer toxicity in cultured murine hippocampal neurons, in a Caenorhabditis elegans-based assay, and in vivo in a mouse model of Aβ-induced memory dysfunction. These data suggest that N1, or small peptides derived from it, could be potent inhibitors of Aβ oligomer toxicity and represent an entirely new class of therapeutic agents for AD. PMID:23362282

  7. N-terminal Huntingtin Knock-In Mice: Implications of Removing the N-terminal Region of Huntingtin for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Chuan-En; Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A; Sun, Miao; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-05-01

    The Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is a large protein consisting of 3144 amino acids and has conserved N-terminal sequences that are followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. Loss of Htt is known to cause embryonic lethality in mice, whereas polyQ expansion leads to adult neuronal degeneration. Whether N-terminal HTT is essential for neuronal development or contributes only to late-onset neurodegeneration remains unknown. We established HTT knock-in mice (N160Q-KI) expressing the first 208 amino acids of HTT with 160Q, and they show age-dependent HTT aggregates in the brain and neurological phenotypes. Importantly, the N-terminal mutant HTT also preferentially accumulates in the striatum, the brain region most affected in HD, indicating the importance of N-terminal HTT in selective neuropathology. That said, homozygous N160Q-KI mice are also embryonic lethal, suggesting that N-terminal HTT alone is unable to support embryonic development. Using Htt knockout neurons, we found that loss of Htt selectively affects the survival of developing neuronal cells, but not astrocytes, in culture. This neuronal degeneration could be rescued by a truncated HTT lacking the first 237 amino acids, but not by N-terminal HTT (1-208 amino acids). Also, the rescue effect depends on the region in HTT known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. Thus, the N-terminal HTT region may not be essential for the survival of developing neurons, but when carrying a large polyQ repeat, can cause selective neuropathology. These findings imply a possible therapeutic benefit of removing the N-terminal region of HTT containing the polyQ repeat to treat the neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27203582

  8. N-terminal Huntingtin Knock-In Mice: Implications of Removing the N-terminal Region of Huntingtin for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Chuan-En; Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A.; Sun, Miao; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The Huntington’s disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is a large protein consisting of 3144 amino acids and has conserved N-terminal sequences that are followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. Loss of Htt is known to cause embryonic lethality in mice, whereas polyQ expansion leads to adult neuronal degeneration. Whether N-terminal HTT is essential for neuronal development or contributes only to late-onset neurodegeneration remains unknown. We established HTT knock-in mice (N160Q-KI) expressing the first 208 amino acids of HTT with 160Q, and they show age-dependent HTT aggregates in the brain and neurological phenotypes. Importantly, the N-terminal mutant HTT also preferentially accumulates in the striatum, the brain region most affected in HD, indicating the importance of N-terminal HTT in selective neuropathology. That said, homozygous N160Q-KI mice are also embryonic lethal, suggesting that N-terminal HTT alone is unable to support embryonic development. Using Htt knockout neurons, we found that loss of Htt selectively affects the survival of developing neuronal cells, but not astrocytes, in culture. This neuronal degeneration could be rescued by a truncated HTT lacking the first 237 amino acids, but not by N-terminal HTT (1–208 amino acids). Also, the rescue effect depends on the region in HTT known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. Thus, the N-terminal HTT region may not be essential for the survival of developing neurons, but when carrying a large polyQ repeat, can cause selective neuropathology. These findings imply a possible therapeutic benefit of removing the N-terminal region of HTT containing the polyQ repeat to treat the neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27203582

  9. Incremental truncation of PHA synthases results in altered product specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xia, Yongzhen; Chen, Quan; Qi, Qingsheng

    2012-05-10

    PHA synthase is the key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of microbial polymers, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). In this study, we created a hybrid library of PHA synthase gene with different crossover points by an incremental truncation method between the C-terminal fragments of the phaC(Cn) (phaC from Cupriavidus necator) and the N-terminal fragments of the phaC1(Pa) (phaC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa). As the truncation of the hybrid enzyme increased, the in vivo PHB synthesis ability of the hybrids declined gradually. PHA synthase PhaC(Cn) with a deletion on N-terminal up to 83 amino acid residues showed no synthase activity. While with the removal of up to 270 amino acids from the N-terminus, the activity of the truncated PhaC(Cn) could be complemented by the N-terminus of PhaC1(Pa). Three of the hybrid enzymes W188, W235 and W272 (named by the deleted nucleic acid number) were found to have altered product specificities. PMID:22500895

  10. Truncated PrP(c) in mammalian brain: interspecies variation and location in membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Laffont-Proust, Isabelle; Hässig, Raymonde; Haïk, Stéphane; Simon, Stéphanie; Grassi, Jacques; Fonta, Caroline; Faucheux, Baptiste A; Moya, Kenneth L

    2006-03-01

    A key molecular event in prion diseases is the conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) into an abnormal misfolded conformer (PrP(sc)). The PrP(c) N-terminal domain plays a central role in PrP(c) functions and in prion propagation. Because mammalian PrP(c) is found as a full-length and N-terminally truncated form, we examined the presence and amount of PrP(c) C-terminal fragment in the brain of different species. We found important variations between primates and rodents. In addition, our data show that the PrP(c) fragment is present in detergent-resistant raft domains, a membrane domain of critical importance for PrP(c) functions and its conversion into PrP(sc). PMID:16542151

  11. Evaluation of combined B cell specific N-terminal immunogenic domains of LipL21 for diagnosis of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Anita, Kumari; Premlatha, Mallela Martha; Kanagavel, Murugesan; Akino Mercy, Charles Solomon; Raja, Veerapandian; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy

    2016-10-01

    Leptospiral outer membrane protein LipL21 and its truncated N-terminal immunogenic region (I-LipL21) were evaluated for diagnosis of leptospirosis. The complete coding sequence of LipL21 nucleotide sequence was subjected to BCPred and VaxiJen analysis for determination of B cell specific immunogenic epitopes. Epitope1 ACS STD TGQ KDA TTV GDG (1.8837), Epitope2 WGG PPE QRN DGK TPR DTN (0.9483), Epitope3 VKG VGV YEC KAT GSG SDP (1.4077) and Epitope4 NEW ECQ CVI YAK FPG GKD (0.4462) were predicted. LipL21 and N-terminal fragment having B-cell specific epitopes with higher VaxiJen score >0.9 as truncated I-LipL21 were cloned independently in pET15b and expressed in Escherichia coli. IgM ELISA and dot blot assay was performed for sera samples collected from Delhi-NCR for leptospiral whole cell lysate (WCL), recombinant LipL21 and I-LipL21. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were found to be 92.5%, 92.8%, 83.3%, and 97% respectively for recombinant I-LipL21 by IgM-ELISA. 11-14.8% increased sensitivity was observed over LipL21 and WCL. The I-LipL21 dot blot assay showed a further increased sensitivity of 3.8% over the IgM-ELISA. Therefore I-LipL21 may be the ideal candidate protein for diagnosis of leptospirosis. PMID:27259643

  12. N-terminal domain of complexin independently activates calcium-triggered fusion.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying; Choi, Ucheor B; Zhang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Minglei; Pfuetzner, Richard A; Wang, Austin L; Diao, Jiajie; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-08-01

    Complexin activates Ca(2+)-triggered neurotransmitter release and regulates spontaneous release in the presynaptic terminal by cooperating with the neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and the Ca(2+)-sensor synaptotagmin. The N-terminal domain of complexin is important for activation, but its molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Here, we observed that a split pair of N-terminal and central domain fragments of complexin is sufficient to activate Ca(2+)-triggered release using a reconstituted single-vesicle fusion assay, suggesting that the N-terminal domain acts as an independent module within the synaptic fusion machinery. The N-terminal domain can also interact independently with membranes, which is enhanced by a cooperative interaction with the neuronal SNARE complex. We show by mutagenesis that membrane binding of the N-terminal domain is essential for activation of Ca(2+)-triggered fusion. Consistent with the membrane-binding property, the N-terminal domain can be substituted by the influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide, and this chimera also activates Ca(2+)-triggered fusion. Membrane binding of the N-terminal domain of complexin therefore cooperates with the other fusogenic elements of the synaptic fusion machinery during Ca(2+)-triggered release. PMID:27444020

  13. N-terminal domain of complexin independently activates calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ying; Choi, Ucheor B.; Zhang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Minglei; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Wang, Austin L.; Brunger, Axel T.

    2016-01-01

    Complexin activates Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release and regulates spontaneous release in the presynaptic terminal by cooperating with the neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and the Ca2+-sensor synaptotagmin. The N-terminal domain of complexin is important for activation, but its molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Here, we observed that a split pair of N-terminal and central domain fragments of complexin is sufficient to activate Ca2+-triggered release using a reconstituted single-vesicle fusion assay, suggesting that the N-terminal domain acts as an independent module within the synaptic fusion machinery. The N-terminal domain can also interact independently with membranes, which is enhanced by a cooperative interaction with the neuronal SNARE complex. We show by mutagenesis that membrane binding of the N-terminal domain is essential for activation of Ca2+-triggered fusion. Consistent with the membrane-binding property, the N-terminal domain can be substituted by the influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide, and this chimera also activates Ca2+-triggered fusion. Membrane binding of the N-terminal domain of complexin therefore cooperates with the other fusogenic elements of the synaptic fusion machinery during Ca2+-triggered release. PMID:27444020

  14. N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuping; Minaisah, Rose-Marie; Ferraro, Elisa; Li, Chen; Porter, Lauren J; Zhou, Can; Gao, Fang; Zhang, Junyi; Rajgor, Dipen; Autore, Flavia; Shanahan, Catherine M; Warren, Derek T

    2016-07-15

    The spatial compartmentalisation of biochemical signalling pathways is essential for cell function. Nesprins are a multi-isomeric family of proteins that have emerged as signalling scaffolds, herein, we investigate the localisation and function of novel nesprin-2 N-terminal variants. We show that these nesprin-2 variants display cell specific distribution and reside in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that nesprin-2 N-terminal variants colocalised with β-catenin at cell-cell junctions in U2OS cells. Calcium switch assays demonstrated that nesprin-2 and β-catenin are lost from cell-cell junctions in low calcium conditions whereas emerin localisation at the NE remained unaltered, furthermore, an N-terminal fragment of nesprin-2 was sufficient for cell-cell junction localisation and interacted with β-catenin. Disruption of these N-terminal nesprin-2 variants, using siRNA depletion resulted in loss of β-catenin from cell-cell junctions, nuclear accumulation of active β-catenin and augmented β-catenin transcriptional activity. Importantly, we show that U2OS cells lack nesprin-2 giant, suggesting that the N-terminal nesprin-2 variants regulate β-catenin signalling independently of the NE. Together, these data identify N-terminal nesprin-2 variants as novel regulators of β-catenin signalling that tether β-catenin to cell-cell contacts to inhibit β-catenin transcriptional activity. PMID:27321956

  15. The charged region of Hsp90 modulates the function of the N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Scheibel, Thomas; Siegmund, Heiko Ingo; Jaenicke, Rainer; Ganz, Peter; Lilie, Hauke; Buchner, Johannes

    1999-01-01

    Hsp90, an abundant heat shock protein that is highly expressed even under physiological conditions, is involved in the folding of key molecules of the cellular signal transduction system such as kinases and steroid receptors. It seems to contain two chaperone sites differing in substrate specificity. Binding of ATP or the antitumor drug geldanamycin alters the substrate affinity of the N-terminal chaperone site, whereas both substances show no influence on the C-terminal one. In wild-type Hsp90 the fragments containing the chaperone sites are connected by a highly charged linker of various lengths in different organisms. As this linker region represents the most striking difference between bacterial and eukaryotic Hsp90s, it may be involved in a gain of function of eukaryotic Hsp90s. Here, we have analyzed a fragment of yeast Hsp90 consisting of the N-terminal domain and the charged region (N272) in comparison with the isolated N-terminal domain (N210). We show that the charged region causes an increase in the affinity of the N-terminal domain for nonnative protein and establishes a crosstalk between peptide and ATP binding. Thus, the binding of peptide to N272 decreases its affinity for ATP and geldanamycin, whereas the ATP-binding properties of the monomeric N-terminal domain N210 are not influenced by peptide binding. We propose that the charged region connecting the two chaperone domains plays an important role in regulating chaperone function of Hsp90. PMID:9990018

  16. N-Terminal Region of the Catalytic Domain of Human N-Myristoyltransferase 1 Acts as an Inhibitory Module

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajendra K.

    2015-01-01

    N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) plays critical roles in the modulation of various signaling molecules, however, the regulation of this enzyme in diverse cellular states remains poorly understood. We provide experimental evidence to show for the first time that for the isoform 1 of human NMT (hNMT1), the regulatory roles extend into the catalytic core. In our present study, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant devoid of 28 N-terminal amino acids from the catalytic module (Δ28-hNMT1s) and compared its properties to the full-length catalytic domain of hNMT1. The deletion of the N-terminal peptide had no effect on the enzyme stability. Our findings suggest that the N-terminal region in the catalytic module of hNMT1 functions serves as a regulatory control element. The observations of an ~3 fold increase in enzymatic efficiency following removal of the N-terminal peptide of hNMT1s indicates that N-terminal amino acids acts as an inhibitory segment and negatively regulate the enzyme activity. Our findings that the N-terminal region confers control over activity, taken together with the earlier observations that the N-terminal of hNMT1 is differentially processed in diverse cellular states, suggests that the proteolytic processing of the peptide segment containing the inhibitory region provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of myristoyltransferase activity. PMID:26000639

  17. Oxidation of the N-terminal methionine of lens alpha-A crystallin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Horwitz, J.; Emmons, T.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Antiserum against the N-terminal peptide of bovine alpha-A crystallin has been used to monitor purification of two different seropositive peptides (i.e. T1a and T1b) from a tryptic digest of bovine lens proteins. Both these peptides have similar amino acid compositions, but peptide T1b has a molecular weight 16 atomic mass units larger than T1a, suggesting posttranslational modification. Analysis of ionization fragments of the T1b peptide by mass spectrometry demonstrates that this difference in molecular weight is due to the in vivo oxidation of the N-terminal met residue of the alpha-A crystallin molecule.

  18. Top-down N-terminal sequencing of Immunoglobulin subunits with electrospray ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da; Pipes, Gary D; Hambly, David; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Treuheit, Michael J; Gadgil, Himanshu S

    2009-01-01

    An N-terminal top-down sequencing approach was developed for IgG characterization, using high-resolution HPLC separation and collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) on a single-stage LCT Premier time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Fragmentation of the IgG chains on the LCT Premier was optimized by varying the ion guide voltage values. Ion guide 1 voltage had the most significant effect on the fragmentation of the IgG chains. An ion guide 1 voltage value of 100 V was found to be optimum for the N-terminal fragmentation of IgG heavy and light chains, which are approximately 50 and 25 kDa, respectively. The most prominent ion series in this CAD experiment was the terminal b-ion series which allows N-terminal sequencing. Using this technique, we were able to confirm the sequence of up to seven N-terminal residues. Applications of this method for the identification of N-terminal pyroglutamic acid formation will be discussed. The method described could be used as a high-throughput method for the rapid N-terminal sequencing of IgG chains and for the detection of chemical modifications in the terminal residues. PMID:18834850

  19. Molecular properties of the N-terminal extension of the fission yeast kinesin-5, Cut7.

    PubMed

    Edamatsu, M

    2016-01-01

    Kinesin-5 plays an essential role in spindle formation and function, and serves as a potential target for anti-cancer drugs. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular properties of the N-terminal extension of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe kinesin-5, Cut7. This extension is rich in charged amino acids and predicted to be intrinsically disordered. In S. pombe cells, a Cut7 construct lacking half the N-terminal extension failed to localize along the spindle microtubules and formed a monopolar spindle. However, a construct lacking the entire N-terminal extension exhibited normal localization and formed a typical bipolar spindle. In addition, in vitro analyses revealed that the truncated Cut7 constructs demonstrated similar motile velocities and directionalities as the wild-type motor protein, but the microtubule landing rates were significantly reduced. These findings suggest that the N-terminal extension is not required for normal Cut7 intracellular localization or function, but alters the microtubule-binding properties of this protein in vitro. PMID:26909973

  20. Protein N-terminal acetyltransferases in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalvik, T V; Arnesen, T

    2013-01-17

    The human N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs) catalyze the transfer of acetyl moieties to the N-termini of 80-90% of all human proteins. Six NAT types are present in humans, NatA-NatF, each is composed of specific subunits and each acetylates a set of substrates defined by the N-terminal amino-acid sequence. NATs have been suggested to act as oncoproteins as well as tumor suppressors in human cancers, and NAT expression may be both elevated and decreased in cancer versus non-cancer tissues. Manipulation of NATs in cancer cells induced cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis or autophagy, implying that these enzymes target a variety of pathways. Of particular interest is hNaa10p (human ARD1), the catalytic subunit of the NatA complex, which was coupled to a number of signaling molecules including hypoxia inducible factor-1α, β-catenin/cyclin D1, TSC2/mammalian target of rapamycin, myosin light chain kinase , DNA methyltransferase1/E-cadherin and p21-activated kinase-interacting exchange factors (PIX)/Cdc42/Rac1. The variety of mechanistic links where hNaa10p acts as a NAT, a lysine acetyltransferase or displaying a non-catalytic role, provide insights to how hNaa10p may act as both a tumor suppressor and oncoprotein. PMID:22391571

  1. Role of N-terminal region of Escherichia coli maltodextrin glucosidase in folding and function of the protein.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Ashutosh; Singh, Amit K; Shukla, Prakash K; Equbal, Md Javed; Malik, Shikha T; Singh, Tej P; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2016-09-01

    Maltodextrin glucosidase (MalZ) hydrolyses short malto-oligosaccharides from the reducing end releasing glucose and maltose in Escherichia coli. MalZ is a highly aggregation prone protein and molecular chaperonins GroEL and GroES assist in the folding of this protein to a substantial level. The N-terminal region of this enzyme appears to be a unique domain as seen in sequence comparison studies with other amylases as well as through homology modelling. The sequence and homology model analysis show a probability of disorder in the N-Terminal region of MalZ. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been reported in the present communication. Based on the crystallographic structure, it has been interpreted that the N-terminal region of the enzyme (Met1-Phe131) might be unstructured or flexible. To understand the role of the N-terminal region of MalZ in its enzymatic activity, and overall stability, a truncated version (Ala111-His616) of MalZ was created. The truncated version failed to fold into an active enzyme both in E. coli cytosol and in vitro even with the assistance of chaperonins GroEL and GroES. Furthermore, the refolding effort of N-truncated MalZ in the presence of isolated N-terminal domain didn't succeed. Our studies suggest that while the structural rigidity or orientation of the N-terminal region of the MalZ protein may not be essential for its stability and function, but the said domain is likely to play an important role in the formation of the native structure of the protein when present as an integral part of the protein. PMID:27317979

  2. The N-terminal extension of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L20 is important for ribosome assembly, but dispensable for translational feedback control

    PubMed Central

    GUILLIER, MAUDE; ALLEMAND, FRÉDÉRIC; GRAFFE, MONIQUE; RAIBAUD, SOPHIE; DARDEL, FRÉDÉRIC; SPRINGER, MATHIAS; CHIARUTTINI, CLAUDE

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli autoregulatory ribosomal protein L20 consists of two structurally distinct domains. The C-terminal domain is globular and sits on the surface of the large ribosomal subunit whereas the N-terminal domain has an extended shape and penetrates deep into the RNA-rich core of the subunit. Many other ribosomal proteins have analogous internal or terminal extensions. However, the biological functions of these extended domains remain obscure. Here we show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is important for ribosome assembly in vivo. Indeed, a truncated version of L20 without its N-terminal tail is unable to complement the deletion of rplT, the gene encoding L20. In addition, this L20 truncation confers a lethal-dominant phenotype, suggesting that the N-terminal domain is essential for cell growth because it could be required for ribosome assembly. Supporting this hypothesis, partial deletions of the N-terminal tail of the protein are shown to cause a slow-growth phenotype due to altered ribosome assembly in vivo as large amounts of intermediate 40S ribosomal particles accumulate. In addition to being a ribosomal protein, L20 also acts as an autogenous repressor. Using L20 truncations, we also show that the N-terminal tail of L20 is dispensable for autogenous control. PMID:15840820

  3. The Chondroitin Sulfate A-binding Site of the VAR2CSA Protein Involves Multiple N-terminal Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Dahlbäck, Madeleine; Jørgensen, Lars M.; Nielsen, Morten A.; Clausen, Thomas M.; Ditlev, Sisse B.; Resende, Mafalda; Pinto, Vera V.; Arnot, David E.; Theander, Thor G.; Salanti, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Malaria during pregnancy is a major health problem for African women. The disease is caused by Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites, which accumulate in the placenta by adhering to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). The interaction between infected erythrocytes and the placental receptor is mediated by a parasite expressed protein named VAR2CSA. A vaccine protecting pregnant women against placental malaria should induce antibodies inhibiting the interaction between VAR2CSA and CSA. Much effort has been put into defining the part of the 350 kDa VAR2CSA protein that is responsible for binding. It has been shown that full-length recombinant VAR2CSA binds specifically to CSA with high affinity, however to date no sub-fragment of VAR2CSA has been shown to interact with CSA with similar affinity or specificity. In this study, we used a biosensor technology to examine the binding properties of a panel of truncated VAR2CSA proteins. The experiments indicate that the core of the CSA-binding site is situated in three domains, DBL2X-CIDRPAM and a flanking domain, located in the N-terminal part of VAR2CSA. Furthermore, recombinant VAR2CSA subfragments containing this region elicit antibodies with high parasite adhesion blocking activity in animal immunization experiments. PMID:21398524

  4. The large N-terminal region of the Brr2 RNA helicase guides productive spliceosome activation.

    PubMed

    Absmeier, Eva; Wollenhaupt, Jan; Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Becke, Christian; Lee, Chung-Tien; Preussner, Marco; Heyd, Florian; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Santos, Karine F; Wahl, Markus C

    2015-12-15

    The Brr2 helicase provides the key remodeling activity for spliceosome catalytic activation, during which it disrupts the U4/U6 di-snRNP (small nuclear RNA protein), and its activity has to be tightly regulated. Brr2 exhibits an unusual architecture, including an ∼ 500-residue N-terminal region, whose functions and molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, followed by a tandem array of structurally similar helicase units (cassettes), only the first of which is catalytically active. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis of full-length Brr2 in complex with a regulatory Jab1/MPN domain of the Prp8 protein and by cross-linking/mass spectrometry of isolated Brr2 that the Brr2 N-terminal region encompasses two folded domains and adjacent linear elements that clamp and interconnect the helicase cassettes. Stepwise N-terminal truncations led to yeast growth and splicing defects, reduced Brr2 association with U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNPs, and increased ATP-dependent disruption of the tri-snRNP, yielding U4/U6 di-snRNP and U5 snRNP. Trends in the RNA-binding, ATPase, and helicase activities of the Brr2 truncation variants are fully rationalized by the crystal structure, demonstrating that the N-terminal region autoinhibits Brr2 via substrate competition and conformational clamping. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms that prevent premature and unproductive tri-snRNP disruption and suggest novel principles of Brr2-dependent splicing regulation. PMID:26637280

  5. The large N-terminal region of the Brr2 RNA helicase guides productive spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Absmeier, Eva; Wollenhaupt, Jan; Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Becke, Christian; Lee, Chung-Tien; Preussner, Marco; Heyd, Florian; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Santos, Karine F.; Wahl, Markus C.

    2015-01-01

    The Brr2 helicase provides the key remodeling activity for spliceosome catalytic activation, during which it disrupts the U4/U6 di-snRNP (small nuclear RNA protein), and its activity has to be tightly regulated. Brr2 exhibits an unusual architecture, including an ∼500-residue N-terminal region, whose functions and molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, followed by a tandem array of structurally similar helicase units (cassettes), only the first of which is catalytically active. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis of full-length Brr2 in complex with a regulatory Jab1/MPN domain of the Prp8 protein and by cross-linking/mass spectrometry of isolated Brr2 that the Brr2 N-terminal region encompasses two folded domains and adjacent linear elements that clamp and interconnect the helicase cassettes. Stepwise N-terminal truncations led to yeast growth and splicing defects, reduced Brr2 association with U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNPs, and increased ATP-dependent disruption of the tri-snRNP, yielding U4/U6 di-snRNP and U5 snRNP. Trends in the RNA-binding, ATPase, and helicase activities of the Brr2 truncation variants are fully rationalized by the crystal structure, demonstrating that the N-terminal region autoinhibits Brr2 via substrate competition and conformational clamping. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms that prevent premature and unproductive tri-snRNP disruption and suggest novel principles of Brr2-dependent splicing regulation. PMID:26637280

  6. Crystal structure of a major fragment of the salt-tolerant glutaminase from Micrococcus luteus K-3

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki . E-mail: k.yoshimune@aist.go.jp; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Shiratori, Aya; Wakayama, Mamoru; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Moriguchi, Mitsuaki

    2006-08-11

    Glutaminase of Micrococcus luteus K-3 (intact glutaminase; 48 kDa) is digested to a C-terminally truncated fragment (glutaminase fragment; 42 kDa) that shows higher salt tolerance than that of the intact glutaminase. The crystal structure of the glutaminase fragment was determined at 2.4 A resolution using multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD). The glutaminase fragment is composed of N-terminal and C-terminal domains, and a putative catalytic serine-lysine dyad (S64 and K67) is located in a cleft of the N-terminal domain. Mutations of the S64 or K67 residues abolished the enzyme activity. The N-terminal domain has abundant glutamic acid residues on its surface, which may explain its salt-tolerant mechanism. A diffraction analysis of the intact glutaminase crystals (a twinning fraction of 0.43) located the glutaminase fragment in the unit cell but failed to turn up clear densities for the missing C-terminal portion of the molecule.

  7. Solid-Phase Synthesis and Characterization of N-Terminally Elongated Aβ-3-x -Peptides.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Isaak; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang; Jahn, Olaf; Haußmann, Ute; Wiltfang, Jens; Zweckstetter, Markus; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-13

    In addition to the prototypic amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 , several Aβ variants differing in their amino and carboxy termini have been described. Synthetic availability of an Aβ variant is often the key to study its role under physiological or pathological conditions. Herein, we report a protocol for the efficient solid-phase peptide synthesis of the N-terminally elongated Aβ-peptides Aβ-3-38 , Aβ-3-40 , and Aβ-3-42 . Biophysical characterization by NMR spectroscopy, CD spectroscopy, an aggregation assay, and electron microscopy revealed that all three peptides were prone to aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Immunoprecipitation, followed by mass spectrometry, indicated that Aβ-3-38 and Aβ-3-40 are generated by transfected cells even in the presence of a tripartite β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitor. The elongated Aβ peptides starting at Val(-3) can be separated from N-terminally-truncated Aβ forms by high-resolution isoelectric-focusing techniques, despite virtually identical isoelectric points. The synthetic Aβ variants and the methods presented here are providing tools to advance our understanding of the potential roles of N-terminally elongated Aβ variants in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27167300

  8. Deriving ribosomal binding site (RBS) statistical models from unannotated DNA sequences and the use of the RBS model for N-terminal prediction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, W S; Borodovsky, M

    1998-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the position of translation initiation (N-terminal prediction) is a difficult problem. N-terminal prediction from DNA sequence alone is ambiguous is several candidate start sites are close to each other. Protein similarity search is usually unable to indicate the true start of a gene as it would require a strong protein sequence similarity at the N-terminal portion of a protein where conservative regions are rarely situated. With the aid of the GeneMark program for gene identification, we extract DNA sequence fragments presumably containing ribosome binding sites (RBS) from unannotated complete genomic sequences. These DNA segments are aligned to generate the RBS model using the Gibbs' sampling method. N-terminal prediction is then performed by using the RBS model in conjunction with the GeneMark start codon prediction to aid in determining the true N-terminal site. PMID:9697189

  9. Caspase-3-mediated Cleavage of Cdc6 Induces Nuclear Localization of p49-truncated Cdc6 and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Hyungshin; Jin, Ying Hua; Park, Byoung Duck; Choi, Hye Jin; Lee, Seung Ki

    2003-01-01

    We show that Cdc6, an essential initiation factor for DNA replication, undergoes caspase-3–mediated cleavage in the early stages of apoptosis in HeLa cells and SK-HEP-1 cells induced by etoposide, paclitaxel, ginsenoside Rh2, or tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. The cleavage occurs at the SEVD442/G motif and generates an N-terminal truncated Cdc6 fragment (p49-tCdc6) that lacks the carboxy-terminal nuclear export sequence. Cdc6 is known to be phosphorylated by cyclin A-cyclin dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), an event that promotes its exit from the nucleus and probably blocks it from initiating inappropriate DNA replication. In contrast, p49-tCdc6 translocation to the cytoplasm is markedly reduced under the up-regulated conditions of Cdk2 activity, which is possibly due to the loss of nuclear export sequence. Thus, truncation of Cdc6 results in an increased nuclear retention of p49-tCdc6 that could act as a dominant negative inhibitor of DNA replication and its accumulation in the nucleus could promote apoptosis. Supporting this is that the ectopic expression of p49-tCdc6 not only promotes apoptosis of etoposide-induced HeLa cells but also induces apoptosis in untreated cells. Thus, the caspase-mediated cleavage of Cdc6 creates a truncated Cdc6 fragment that is retained in the nucleus and induces apoptosis. PMID:14517333

  10. Properties of Rab5 N-terminal domain dictate prenylation of C-terminal cysteines.

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, J C; Pan, Y; Wessling-Resnick, M

    1995-01-01

    Rab5 is a Ras-related GTP-binding protein that is post-translationally modified by prenylation. We report here that an N-terminal domain contained within the first 22 amino acids of Rab5 is critical for efficient geranylgeranylation of the protein's C-terminal cysteines. This domain is immediately upstream from the "phosphate binding loop" common to all GTP-binding proteins and contains a highly conserved sequence recognized among members of the Rab family, referred to here as the YXYLFK motif. A truncation mutant that lacks this domain (Rab5(23-215) fails to become prenylated. However, a chimeric peptide with the conserved motif replacing cognate Rab5 sequence (MAYDYLFKRab5(23-215) does become post-translationally modified, demonstrating that the presence of this simple six amino acid N-terminal element enables prenylation at Rab5's C-terminus. H-Ras/Rab5 chimeras that include the conserved YXYLFK motif at the N-terminus do not become prenylated, indicating that, while this element may be necessary for prenylation of Rab proteins, it alone is not sufficient to confer properties to a heterologous protein to enable substrate recognition by the Rab geranylgeranyl transferase. Deletion analysis and studies of point mutants further reveal that the lysine residue of the YXYLFK motif is an absolute requirement to enable geranylgeranylation of Rab proteins. Functional studies support the idea that this domain is not required for guanine nucleotide binding since prenylation-defective mutants still bind GDP and are protected from protease digestion in the presence of GTP gamma S. We conclude that the mechanism of Rab geranylgeranylation involves key elements of the protein's tertiary structure including a conserved N-terminal amino acid motif (YXYLFK) that incorporates a critical lysine residue. Images PMID:7749197

  11. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D.

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry.

  12. Fragmentation Patterns and Mechanisms of Singly and Doubly Protonated Peptoids Studied by Collision Induced Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianhua; Tian, Yuan; Hossain, Ekram; Connolly, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    Peptoids are peptide-mimicking oligomers consisting of N-alkylated glycine units. The fragmentation patterns for six singly and doubly protonated model peptoids were studied via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The experiments were carried out on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source. Both singly and doubly protonated peptoids were found to fragment mainly at the backbone amide bonds to produce peptoid B-type N-terminal fragment ions and Y-type C-terminal fragment ions. However, the relative abundances of B- versus Y-ions were significantly different. The singly protonated peptoids fragmented by producing highly abundant Y-ions and lesser abundant B-ions. The Y-ion formation mechanism was studied through calculating the energetics of truncated peptoid fragment ions using density functional theory and by controlled experiments. The results indicated that Y-ions were likely formed by transferring a proton from the C-H bond of the N-terminal fragments to the secondary amine of the C-terminal fragments. This proton transfer is energetically favored, and is in accord with the observation of abundant Y-ions. The calculations also indicated that doubly protonated peptoids would fragment at an amide bond close to the N-terminus to yield a high abundance of low-mass B-ions and high-mass Y-ions. The results of this study provide further understanding of the mechanisms of peptoid fragmentation and, therefore, are a valuable guide for de novo sequencing of peptoid libraries synthesized via combinatorial chemistry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26832347

  13. Chloride transporter KCC2-dependent neuroprotection depends on the N-terminal protein domain

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, A; Semtner, M; Meier, J C

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is a serious issue of neurodegenerative diseases including epilepsy. Downregulation of the chloride transporter KCC2 in the epileptic tissue may not only affect regulation of the polarity of GABAergic synaptic transmission but also neuronal survival. Here, we addressed the mechanisms of KCC2-dependent neuroprotection by assessing truncated and mutated KCC2 variants in different neurotoxicity models. The results identify a threonine- and tyrosine-phosphorylation-resistant KCC2 variant with increased chloride transport activity, but they also identify the KCC2 N-terminal domain (NTD) as the relevant minimal KCC2 protein domain that is sufficient for neuroprotection. As ectopic expression of the KCC2-NTD works independently of full-length KCC2-dependent regulation of Cl− transport or structural KCC2 C-terminus-dependent regulation of synaptogenesis, our study may pave the way for a selective neuroprotective therapeutic strategy that will be applicable to a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26043076

  14. Chloride transporter KCC2-dependent neuroprotection depends on the N-terminal protein domain.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A; Semtner, M; Meier, J C

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is a serious issue of neurodegenerative diseases including epilepsy. Downregulation of the chloride transporter KCC2 in the epileptic tissue may not only affect regulation of the polarity of GABAergic synaptic transmission but also neuronal survival. Here, we addressed the mechanisms of KCC2-dependent neuroprotection by assessing truncated and mutated KCC2 variants in different neurotoxicity models. The results identify a threonine- and tyrosine-phosphorylation-resistant KCC2 variant with increased chloride transport activity, but they also identify the KCC2 N-terminal domain (NTD) as the relevant minimal KCC2 protein domain that is sufficient for neuroprotection. As ectopic expression of the KCC2-NTD works independently of full-length KCC2-dependent regulation of Cl(-) transport or structural KCC2 C-terminus-dependent regulation of synaptogenesis, our study may pave the way for a selective neuroprotective therapeutic strategy that will be applicable to a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26043076

  15. The N-terminal strand modulates immunoglobulin light chain fibrillogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pozo-Yauner, Luis del; Wall, Jonathan S.; González Andrade, Martín; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Rodríguez-Ambriz, Sandra L.; Pérez Carreón, Julio I.; and others

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand of 6aJL2 protein. •Mutations destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner. •Destabilizing mutations accelerated the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time. •The effect on the kinetic of fibril elongation by seeding was of different nature. •The N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. -- Abstract: It has been suggested that the N-terminal strand of the light chain variable domain (V{sub L}) protects the molecule from aggregation by hindering spurious intermolecular contacts. We evaluated the impact of mutations in the N-terminal strand on the thermodynamic stability and kinetic of fibrillogenesis of the V{sub L} protein 6aJL2. Mutations in this strand destabilized the protein in a position-dependent manner, accelerating the fibrillogenesis by shortening the lag time; an effect that correlated with the extent of destabilization. In contrast, the effect on the kinetics of fibril elongation, as assessed in seeding experiments was of different nature, as it was not directly dependant on the degree of destabilization. This finding suggests different factors drive the nucleation-dependent and elongation phases of light chain fibrillogenesis. Finally, taking advantage of the dependence of the Trp fluorescence upon environment, four single Trp substitutions were made in the N-terminal strand, and changes in solvent exposure during aggregation were evaluated by acrylamide-quenching. The results suggest that the N-terminal strand is buried in the fibrillar state of 6aJL2 protein. This finding suggest a possible explanation for the modulating effect exerted by the mutations in this strand on the aggregation behavior of 6aJL2 protein.

  16. The N-terminal region of GAP regulates cytoskeletal structure and cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    McGlade, J; Brunkhorst, B; Anderson, D; Mbamalu, G; Settleman, J; Dedhar, S; Rozakis-Adcock, M; Chen, L B; Pawson, T

    1993-01-01

    Ras GTPase activating protein (GAP) possesses a C-terminal domain that interacts with GTP-bound Ras, and an N-terminal region containing two SH2 domains and an SH3 domain. In addition to its association with Ras, GAP binds stably to autophosphorylated beta PDGF receptors, and to two cytoplasmic phosphoproteins: p62, an RNA binding protein, and p190, which possesses GAP activity towards small guanine nucleotide binding proteins in the Rho/Rac family. To define the region of GAP that mediates these interactions with cellular phosphoproteins, and to investigate the biological significance of these complexes, a truncated GAP polypeptide (GAP-N) containing residues 1-445 was stably expressed in Rat-2 fibroblasts. GAP-N contains the SH2 and SH3 domains, but lacks the Ras GTPase activating domain. Stimulation of cells expressing GAP-N with PDGF induced association of GAP-N with the beta PDGF receptor, and phosphorylation of GAP-N on tyrosine, consistent with the notion that GAP SH2 domains direct binding to the autophosphorylated beta PDGF receptor in vivo. GAP-N bound constitutively to p190 in both serum-deprived and growth factor-stimulated cells. This GAP-N-p190 complex had Rho GAP activity in vitro. The expression of GAP-N in Rat-2 cells correlated with changes in the cytoskeleton and in cell adhesion, typified by the disruption of action stress fibres, a reduction in focal contacts, and an impaired ability to adhere to fibronectin. These results suggest that the N-terminal domain of GAP can direct interactions with cellular phosphoproteins in vivo, and thereby exert an effector function which modulates the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8344248

  17. N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequence Determination of Proteins by N-Terminal Dimethyl Labeling: Pitfalls and Advantages When Compared with Edman Degradation Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Elizabeth; Pourmal, Sergei; Zhou, Chun; Kumar, Rupesh; Teplova, Marianna; Pavletich, Nikola P.; Marians, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, alternative approaches to Edman sequencing have been investigated, and to this end, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Protein Sequencing Research Group (PSRG) initiated studies in 2014 and 2015, looking into bottom-up and top-down N-terminal (Nt) dimethyl derivatization of standard quantities of intact proteins with the aim to determine Nt sequence information. We have expanded this initiative and used low picomole amounts of myoglobin to determine the efficiency of Nt-dimethylation. Application of this approach on protein domains, generated by limited proteolysis of overexpressed proteins, confirms that it is a universal labeling technique and is very sensitive when compared with Edman sequencing. Finally, we compared Edman sequencing and Nt-dimethylation of the same polypeptide fragments; results confirm that there is agreement in the identity of the Nt amino acid sequence between these 2 methods. PMID:27006647

  18. N-Terminal Amino Acid Sequence Determination of Proteins by N-Terminal Dimethyl Labeling: Pitfalls and Advantages When Compared with Edman Degradation Sequence Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Elizabeth; Pourmal, Sergei; Zhou, Chun; Kumar, Rupesh; Teplova, Marianna; Pavletich, Nikola P; Marians, Kenneth J; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye

    2016-07-01

    In recent history, alternative approaches to Edman sequencing have been investigated, and to this end, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Protein Sequencing Research Group (PSRG) initiated studies in 2014 and 2015, looking into bottom-up and top-down N-terminal (Nt) dimethyl derivatization of standard quantities of intact proteins with the aim to determine Nt sequence information. We have expanded this initiative and used low picomole amounts of myoglobin to determine the efficiency of Nt-dimethylation. Application of this approach on protein domains, generated by limited proteolysis of overexpressed proteins, confirms that it is a universal labeling technique and is very sensitive when compared with Edman sequencing. Finally, we compared Edman sequencing and Nt-dimethylation of the same polypeptide fragments; results confirm that there is agreement in the identity of the Nt amino acid sequence between these 2 methods. PMID:27006647

  19. Emerging Functions for N-Terminal Protein Acetylation in Plants.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    N-terminal (Nt-) acetylation is a widespread but poorly understood co-translational protein modification. Two reports now shed light onto the proteome-wide dynamics and protein-specific consequences of Nt-acetylation in relation to plant development, stress-response, and protein stability, identifying this modification as a key regulator of diverse aspects of plant growth and behaviour. PMID:26319188

  20. Oxidative Folding and N-terminal Cyclization of Onconase+

    PubMed Central

    Welker, Ervin; Hathaway, Laura; Xu, Guoqiang; Narayan, Mahesh; Pradeep, Lovy; Shin, Hang-Cheol; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    Cyclization of the N-terminal glutamine residue to pyroglutamic acid in onconase, an anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent, increases the activity and stability of the protein. Here, we examine the correlated effects of the folding/unfolding process and the formation of this N-terminal pyroglutamic acid. The results in this study indicate that cyclization of the N-terminal glutamine has no significant effect on the rate of either reductive unfolding or oxidative folding of the protein. Both the cyclized and uncyclized proteins seem to follow the same oxidative folding pathways; however, cyclization altered the relative flux of the protein in these two pathways by increasing the rate of formation of a kinetically trapped intermediate. Glutaminyl cyclase (QC) catalyzed the cyclization of the unfolded, reduced protein, but had no effect on the disulfide-intact, uncyclized, folded protein. The structured intermediates of uncyclized onconase were also resistant to QC-catalysis, consistent with their having a native-like fold. These observations suggest that, in vivo, cyclization takes place during the initial stages of oxidative folding, specifically, before the formation of structured intermediates. The competition between oxidative folding and QC-mediated cyclization suggests that QC-catalyzed cyclization of the N-terminal glutamine in onconase occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum, probably co-translationally. PMID:17439243

  1. N-terminal sequence of some ribosome-inactivating proteins.

    PubMed

    Montecucchi, P C; Lazzarini, A M; Barbieri, L; Stirpe, F; Soria, M; Lappi, D

    1989-04-01

    The N-terminal portion of some type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) isolated from the seeds of Gelonium multiflorum, Momordica charantia, Bryonia dioica, Saponaria officinalis and from the leaves of Saponaria officinalis are reported in the present paper. Their relationship with other RIPs is discussed. PMID:2753596

  2. Bioinformatic mapping and production of recombinant N-terminal domains of human cardiac ryanodine receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena; Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj; Beck, Konrad; Borko, Ľubomír; Lai, F. Anthony; Zahradníková, Alexandra; Ševčík, Jozef

    2010-01-01

    We report the domain analysis of the N-terminal region (residues 1–759) of the human cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) that encompasses one of the discrete RyR2 mutation clusters associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT1) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD2). Our strategy utilizes a bioinformatics approach complemented by protein expression, solubility analysis and limited proteolytic digestion. Based on the bioinformatics analysis, we designed a series of specific RyR2 N-terminal fragments for cloning and overexpression in Escherichia coli. High yields of soluble proteins were achieved for fragments RyR21–606·His6, RyR2391–606·His6, RyR2409–606·His6, Trx·RyR2384–606·His6, Trx·RyR2391-606·His6 and Trx·RyR2409–606·His6. The folding of RyR21–606·His6 was analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy resulting in α-helix and β-sheet content of ∼23% and ∼29%, respectively, at temperatures up to 35 °C, which is in agreement with sequence based secondary structure predictions. Tryptic digestion of the largest recombinant protein, RyR21–606·His6, resulted in the appearance of two specific subfragments of ∼40 and 25 kDa. The 25 kDa fragment exhibited greater stability. Hybridization with anti-His6·Tag antibody indicated that RyR21–606·His6 is cleaved from the N-terminus and amino acid sequencing of the proteolytic fragments revealed that digestion occurred after residues 259 and 384, respectively. PMID:20045464

  3. Unique N-terminal Arm of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP Protein Plays an Unusual Role in Its Regulatory Function*

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arijit Kumar; Kumar, Vijjamarri Anil; Sevalkar, Ritesh Rajesh; Bansal, Roohi; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP, a master regulator involved in complex lipid biosynthesis and expression of unknown virulence determinants, is composed of an N-terminal receiver domain and a C-terminal effector domain. The two experimentally characterized PhoP orthologs, from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, display vastly different regulatory capabilities. Here, we demonstrate that the 20-residue-long N-terminal arm unique to M. tuberculosis PhoP plays an essential role in the expanded regulatory capabilities of this important regulator. Although the arm is not required for overall structural stability and/or phosphorylation of the PhoP N-domain, strikingly it is essential for phosphorylation-coupled transcription regulation of target genes. Consistent with this view, arm truncation of PhoP is accompanied by a conformational change of the effector domain, presenting a block in activation subsequent to phosphorylation. These results suggest that presence of the arm, unique to this regulator that shares an otherwise highly conserved domain structure with members of the protein family, contributes to the mechanism of inter-domain interactions. Thus, we propose that the N-terminal arm is an adaptable structural feature of M. tuberculosis PhoP, which evolved to fine-tune regulatory capabilities of the transcription factor in response to the changing physiology of the bacilli within its host. PMID:23963455

  4. N-terminal determinants of human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein in nuclear targeting and disrupting PML-associated subnuclear structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Huh, Yong Ho; Kim, Young-Eui; Lee, Karim; Kim, Sunyoung; Ahn, Jin-Hyun . E-mail: jahn@med.skku.ac.kr

    2007-05-04

    The 72-kDa IE1 protein of human cytomegalovirus disrupts PML-associated subnuclear structures (PODs) by inducing PML desumoylation. This process correlates with the functions of IE1 in transcriptional regulation and efficient viral replication. Here, we defined the N-terminal regions of IE1 required for nuclear targeting and POD-disrupting activity. Although the 24 N-terminal amino acids encoded by exon 2, which were previously shown to be essential for nuclear targeting, did not appear to contain typical basic nuclear localization signals, these residues were able to efficiently convey the GFP protein into the nucleus, suggesting a role in promoting nuclear translocation. In assays using a series of N-terminal truncation IE1 mutants, which were forced to enter the nucleus, exon 2 was completely dispensable for POD disruption. However, the predicted two {alpha}-helix regions in exon 3 were identified as important structural determinants for protein stability and for the correlating activities in POD disruption and PML desumoylation.

  5. Seryl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli: implication of its N-terminal domain in aminoacylation activity and specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Borel, F; Vincent, C; Leberman, R; Härtlein, M

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS) a dimeric class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase with two structural domains charges specifically the five iso-acceptor tRNA(ser) as well as the tRNA(sec) (selC product) of E. coli. The N-terminal domain is a 60 A long arm-like coiled coil structure built of 2 long antiparallel a-h helices, whereas the C-terminal domain is a alpha-beta structure. A deletion of the N-terminal arm of the enzyme does not affect the amino acid activation step of the reaction, but reduces dramatically amino-acylation activity. The Kcat/Km value for the mutant enzyme is reduced by more than 4 orders of magnitude, with a nearly 30 fold increased Km value for tRNA(ser). An only slightly truncated mutant form (16 amino acids of the tip of the arm replaced by a glycine) has an intermediate aminoacylation activity. Both mutant synthetases have lost their specificity for tRNA(ser) and charge also non-cognate type 1 tRNA(s). Our results support the hypothesis that class II synthetases have evolved from an ancestral catalytic core enzyme by adding non-catalytic N-terminal or C-terminal tRNA binding (specificity) domains which act as determinants for cognate and anti-determinants for non-cognate tRNAs. Images PMID:8065908

  6. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  7. Tumorigenic fragments of APC cause dominant defects in directional cell migration in multiple model systems.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Scott A; Li, Zhouyu; Newton, Ian P; Fraser, David; Milne, Rachel E; Martin, David M A; Schiffmann, David; Yang, Xuesong; Dormann, Dirk; Weijer, Cornelis J; Appleton, Paul L; Näthke, Inke S

    2012-11-01

    Nonsense mutations that result in the expression of truncated, N-terminal, fragments of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumour suppressor protein are found in most sporadic and some hereditary colorectal cancers. These mutations can cause tumorigenesis by eliminating β-catenin-binding sites from APC, which leads to upregulation of β-catenin and thereby results in the induction of oncogenes such as MYC. Here we show that, in three distinct experimental model systems, expression of an N-terminal fragment of APC (N-APC) results in loss of directionality, but not speed, of cell motility independently of changes in β-catenin regulation. We developed a system to culture and fluorescently label live pieces of gut tissue to record high-resolution three-dimensional time-lapse movies of cells in situ. This revealed an unexpected complexity of normal gut cell migration, a key process in gut epithelial maintenance, with cells moving with spatial and temporal discontinuity. Quantitative comparison of gut tissue from wild-type mice and APC heterozygotes (APC(Min/+); multiple intestinal neoplasia model) demonstrated that cells in precancerous epithelia lack directional preference when moving along the crypt-villus axis. This effect was reproduced in diverse experimental systems: in developing chicken embryos, mesoderm cells expressing N-APC failed to migrate normally; in amoeboid Dictyostelium, which lack endogenous APC, expressing an N-APC fragment maintained cell motility, but the cells failed to perform directional chemotaxis; and multicellular Dictyostelium slug aggregates similarly failed to perform phototaxis. We propose that N-terminal fragments of APC represent a gain-of-function mutation that causes cells within tissue to fail to migrate directionally in response to relevant guidance cues. Consistent with this idea, crypts in histologically normal tissues of APC(Min/+) intestines are overpopulated with cells, suggesting that a lack of migration might cause cell

  8. Tumorigenic fragments of APC cause dominant defects in directional cell migration in multiple model systems

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Scott A.; Li, Zhouyu; Newton, Ian P.; Fraser, David; Milne, Rachel E.; Martin, David M. A.; Schiffmann, David; Yang, Xuesong; Dormann, Dirk; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Appleton, Paul L.; Näthke, Inke S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Nonsense mutations that result in the expression of truncated, N-terminal, fragments of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumour suppressor protein are found in most sporadic and some hereditary colorectal cancers. These mutations can cause tumorigenesis by eliminating β-catenin-binding sites from APC, which leads to upregulation of β-catenin and thereby results in the induction of oncogenes such as MYC. Here we show that, in three distinct experimental model systems, expression of an N-terminal fragment of APC (N-APC) results in loss of directionality, but not speed, of cell motility independently of changes in β-catenin regulation. We developed a system to culture and fluorescently label live pieces of gut tissue to record high-resolution three-dimensional time-lapse movies of cells in situ. This revealed an unexpected complexity of normal gut cell migration, a key process in gut epithelial maintenance, with cells moving with spatial and temporal discontinuity. Quantitative comparison of gut tissue from wild-type mice and APC heterozygotes (APCMin/+; multiple intestinal neoplasia model) demonstrated that cells in precancerous epithelia lack directional preference when moving along the crypt-villus axis. This effect was reproduced in diverse experimental systems: in developing chicken embryos, mesoderm cells expressing N-APC failed to migrate normally; in amoeboid Dictyostelium, which lack endogenous APC, expressing an N-APC fragment maintained cell motility, but the cells failed to perform directional chemotaxis; and multicellular Dictyostelium slug aggregates similarly failed to perform phototaxis. We propose that N-terminal fragments of APC represent a gain-of-function mutation that causes cells within tissue to fail to migrate directionally in response to relevant guidance cues. Consistent with this idea, crypts in histologically normal tissues of APCMin/+ intestines are overpopulated with cells, suggesting that a lack of migration might cause

  9. Regulation of limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 in tumor via acetylation and its role in cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bhakat, Kishor K.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Adeniyi, Victor F.; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Bellot, Larry J.; Feng, Dan; Mantha, Anil K.; Sinha, Mala; Qiu, Suimin; Luxon, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1), a ubiquitous and multifunctional protein, plays an essential role in the repair of both endogenous and drug-induced DNA damages in the genome. Unlike its E.coli counterpart Xth, mammalian APE1 has a unique N-terminal domain and possesses both DNA damage repair and transcriptional regulatory functions. Although the overexpression of APE1 in diverse cancer types and the association of APE1 expression with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis are well documented, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that alter APE1 functions during tumorigenesis are largely unknown. Here, we show the presence of full-length APE1 and N-terminal truncated isoforms of APE1 in tumor tissue samples of various cancer types. However, primary tumor tissue has higher levels of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1) as well as full-length APE1 compared to adjacent non-tumor tissue. We found that APE1 is proteolytically cleaved by an unknown serine protease at its N-terminus following residue lysine (Lys) Lys6 and/or Lys7 and after Lys27 and Lys31 or Lys32. Acetylation of these Lys residues in APE1 prevents this proteolysis. The N-terminal domain of APE1 and its acetylation are required for modulation of the expression of hundreds of genes. Importantly, we found that AcAPE1 is essential for sustained cell proliferation. Together, our study demonstrates that increased acetylation levels of APE1 in tumor cells inhibit the limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 and thereby maintain the functions of APE1 to promote tumor cells' sustained proliferation and survival. PMID:26981776

  10. The non-catalytic N-terminal extension of formylglycine-generating enzyme is required for its biological activity and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt

    2008-04-25

    Formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) catalyzes the oxidation of a specific cysteine residue in nascent sulfatase polypeptides to formylglycine (FGly). This FGly is part of the active site of all sulfatases and is required for their catalytic activity. Here we demonstrate that residues 34-68 constitute an N-terminal extension of the FGE catalytic core that is dispensable for in vitro enzymatic activity of FGE but is required for its in vivo activity in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), i.e. for generation of FGly residues in nascent sulfatases. In addition, this extension is needed for the retention of FGE in the ER. Fusing a KDEL retention signal to the C terminus of FGE is sufficient to mediate retention of an N-terminally truncated FGE but not sufficient to restore its biological activity. Fusion of FGE residues 1-88 to secretory proteins resulted in ER retention of the fusion protein. Moreover, when fused to the paralog of FGE (pFGE), which itself lacks FGly-generating activity, the FGE extension (residues 34-88) of this hybrid construct led to partial restoration of the biological activity of co-expressed N-terminally truncated FGE. Within the FGE N-terminal extension cysteine 52 is critical for the biological activity. We postulate that this N-terminal region of FGE mediates the interaction with an ER component to be identified and that this interaction is required for both the generation of FGly residues in nascent sulfatase polypeptides and for retention of FGE in the ER. PMID:18305113

  11. Crystal Structures of the Human Doublecortin C- and N-terminal Domains in Complex with Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dominique; Stihle, Martine; Sharma, Ashwani; Di Lello, Paola; Benz, Jörg; D'Arcy, Brigitte; Debulpaep, Maja; Fry, David; Huber, Walter; Kremer, Thomas; Laeremans, Toon; Matile, Hugues; Ross, Alfred; Rufer, Arne C; Schoch, Guillaume; Steinmetz, Michel O; Steyaert, Jan; Rudolph, Markus G; Thoma, Ralf; Ruf, Armin

    2016-07-29

    Doublecortin is a microtubule-associated protein produced during neurogenesis. The protein stabilizes microtubules and stimulates their polymerization, which allows migration of immature neurons to their designated location in the brain. Mutations in the gene that impair doublecortin function and cause severe brain formation disorders are located on a tandem repeat of two doublecortin domains. The molecular mechanism of action of doublecortin is only incompletely understood. Anti-doublecortin antibodies, such as the rabbit polyclonal Abcam 18732, are widely used as neurogenesis markers. Here, we report the generation and characterization of antibodies that bind to single doublecortin domains. The antibodies were used as tools to obtain structures of both domains. Four independent crystal structures of the N-terminal domain reveal several distinct open and closed conformations of the peptide linking N- and C-terminal domains, which can be related to doublecortin function. An NMR assignment and a crystal structure in complex with a camelid antibody fragment show that the doublecortin C-terminal domain adopts the same well defined ubiquitin-like fold as the N-terminal domain, despite its reported aggregation and molten globule-like properties. The antibodies' unique domain specificity also renders them ideal research tools to better understand the role of individual domains in doublecortin function. A single chain camelid antibody fragment specific for the C-terminal doublecortin domain affected microtubule binding, whereas a monoclonal mouse antibody specific for the N-terminal domain did not. Together with steric considerations, this suggests that the microtubule-interacting doublecortin domain observed in cryo-electron micrographs is the C-terminal domain rather than the N-terminal one. PMID:27226599

  12. Amyloidogenic Mutation Promotes Fibril Formation of the N-terminal Apolipoprotein A-I on Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Ogata, Fuka; Mikawa, Shiho; Tsuji, Kohei; Baba, Teruhiko; Shigenaga, Akira; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Otaka, Akira; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid 1–83 fragment of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) has a strong propensity to form amyloid fibrils at physiological neutral pH. Because apoA-I has an ability to bind to lipid membranes, we examined the effects of the lipid environment on fibril-forming properties of the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I variants. Thioflavin T fluorescence assay as well as fluorescence and transmission microscopies revealed that upon lipid binding, fibril formation by apoA-I 1–83 is strongly inhibited, whereas the G26R mutant still retains the ability to form fibrils. Such distinct effects of lipid binding on fibril formation were also observed for the amyloidogenic prone region-containing peptides, apoA-I 8–33 and 8–33/G26R. This amyloidogenic region shifts from random coil to α-helical structure upon lipid binding. The G26R mutation appears to prevent this helix transition because lower helical propensity and more solvent-exposed conformation of the G26R variant upon lipid binding were observed in the apoA-I 1–83 fragment and 8–33 peptide. With a partially α-helical conformation induced by the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, fibril formation by apoA-I 1–83 was strongly inhibited, whereas the G26R variant can form amyloid fibrils. These findings suggest a new possible pathway for amyloid fibril formation by the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I variants: the amyloidogenic mutations partially destabilize the α-helical structure formed upon association with lipid membranes, resulting in physiologically relevant conformations that allow fibril formation. PMID:26175149

  13. Amyloidogenic Mutation Promotes Fibril Formation of the N-terminal Apolipoprotein A-I on Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Ogata, Fuka; Mikawa, Shiho; Tsuji, Kohei; Baba, Teruhiko; Shigenaga, Akira; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Otaka, Akira; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-21

    The N-terminal amino acid 1-83 fragment of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) has a strong propensity to form amyloid fibrils at physiological neutral pH. Because apoA-I has an ability to bind to lipid membranes, we examined the effects of the lipid environment on fibril-forming properties of the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I variants. Thioflavin T fluorescence assay as well as fluorescence and transmission microscopies revealed that upon lipid binding, fibril formation by apoA-I 1-83 is strongly inhibited, whereas the G26R mutant still retains the ability to form fibrils. Such distinct effects of lipid binding on fibril formation were also observed for the amyloidogenic prone region-containing peptides, apoA-I 8-33 and 8-33/G26R. This amyloidogenic region shifts from random coil to α-helical structure upon lipid binding. The G26R mutation appears to prevent this helix transition because lower helical propensity and more solvent-exposed conformation of the G26R variant upon lipid binding were observed in the apoA-I 1-83 fragment and 8-33 peptide. With a partially α-helical conformation induced by the presence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, fibril formation by apoA-I 1-83 was strongly inhibited, whereas the G26R variant can form amyloid fibrils. These findings suggest a new possible pathway for amyloid fibril formation by the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I variants: the amyloidogenic mutations partially destabilize the α-helical structure formed upon association with lipid membranes, resulting in physiologically relevant conformations that allow fibril formation. PMID:26175149

  14. The Extended Transmembrane Orai1 N-terminal (ETON) Region Combines Binding Interface and Gate for Orai1 Activation by STIM1*♦

    PubMed Central

    Derler, Isabella; Plenk, Peter; Fahrner, Marc; Muik, Martin; Jardin, Isaac; Schindl, Rainer; Gruber, Hermann J.; Groschner, Klaus; Romanin, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    STIM1 and Orai1 represent the two molecular key components of the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels. Their activation involves STIM1 C terminus coupling to both the N terminus and the C terminus of Orai. Here we focused on the extended transmembrane Orai1 N-terminal (ETON, aa73–90) region, conserved among the Orai family forming an elongated helix of TM1 as recently shown by x-ray crystallography. To identify “hot spot” residues in the ETON binding interface for STIM1 interaction, numerous Orai1 constructs with N-terminal truncations or point mutations within the ETON region were generated. N-terminal truncations of the first four residues of the ETON region or beyond completely abolished STIM1-dependent Orai1 function. Loss of Orai1 function resulted from neither an impairment of plasma membrane targeting nor pore damage, but from a disruption of STIM1 interaction. In a complementary approach, we monitored STIM1-Orai interaction via Orai1 V102A by determining restored Ca2+ selectivity as a consequence of STIM1 coupling. Orai1 N-terminal truncations that led to a loss of function consistently failed to restore Ca2+ selectivity of Orai1 V102A in the presence of STIM1, demonstrating impairment of STIM1 binding. Hence, the major portion of the ETON region (aa76–90) is essential for STIM1 binding and Orai1 activation. Mutagenesis within the ETON region revealed several hydrophobic and basic hot spot residues that appear to control STIM1 coupling to Orai1 in a concerted manner. Moreover, we identified two basic residues, which protrude into the elongated pore to redound to Orai1 gating. We suggest that several hot spot residues in the ETON region contribute in aggregate to the binding of STIM1, which in turn is coupled to a conformational reorientation of the gate. PMID:23943619

  15. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II.

    PubMed

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2015-08-15

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1-20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1-20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  16. Activation of Histidine Kinase SpaK Is Mediated by the N-Terminal Portion of Subtilin-Like Lantibiotics and Is Independent of Lipid II

    PubMed Central

    Spieß, Tobias; Korn, Sophie Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the lantibiotic subtilin is autoinduced in a quorum-sensing mechanism via histidine kinase SpaK. Subtilin-like lantibiotics, such as entianin, ericin S, and subtilin, specifically activated SpaK in a comparable manner, whereas the structurally similar nisin did not provide the signal for SpaK activation at nontoxic concentrations. Surprisingly, nevertheless, nisin if applied together with entianin partly quenched SpaK activation. The N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment (comprising N-terminal amino acids 1 to 20) was sufficient for SpaK activation, although higher concentrations were needed. The N-terminal nisin1–20 fragment also interfered with entianin-mediated activation of SpaK and, remarkably, at extremely high concentrations also activated SpaK. Our data show that the N-terminal entianin1–20 fragment is sufficient for SpaK activation. However, if present, the C-terminal part of the molecule further strongly enhances the activation, possibly by its interference with the cellular membrane. As shown by using lipid II-interfering substances and a lipid II-deficient mutant strain, lipid II is not needed for the sensing mechanism. PMID:26025904

  17. Two truncated forms of rat insulin receptor-related receptor.

    PubMed

    Itoh, N; Jobo, K; Tsujimoto, K; Ohta, M; Kawasaki, T

    1993-08-25

    The insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR) (1271 amino acids) is expected to have unique functions as a novel member of the insulin receptor family. In this paper, we report two alternatively spliced variants of rat IRR mRNA, which are predicted to encode two truncated forms of IRR, sIRR-1 (410 amino acids) and sIRR-2 (469 amino acids). The amino acid sequence of sIRR-1 is identical to the N-terminal 410-amino acid sequence of IRR. sIRR-2 has an additional 59-amino acid insertion in the C-terminal region. Both truncated forms retain the N-terminal and cysteine-rich domains but lack the transmembrane and intracellular tyrosine kinase domains, indicating that the truncated forms are the secreted forms. The translation products of the truncated form mRNAs were detected in the stomach and kidney by Western analysis. However, the physiological significance of the secreted forms remains to be elucidated. PMID:7688734

  18. N-terminal processing of proteins exported by malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Henry H.; Falick, Arnold M.; Carlton, Peter M.; Sedat, John W.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Malaria parasites utilize a short N-terminal amino acid motif termed the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) to export an array of proteins to the host erythrocyte during blood stage infection. Using immunoaffinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, insight into this signal-mediated trafficking mechanism was gained by discovering that the PEXEL motif is cleaved and N-acetylated. PfHRPII and PfEMP2 are two soluble proteins exported by Plasmodium falciparum that were demonstrated to undergo PEXEL cleavage and N-acetylation, thus indicating that this N-terminal processing may be general to many exported soluble proteins. It was established that PEXEL processing occurs upstream of the brefeldin A-sensitive trafficking step in the P. falciparum secretory pathway, therefore cleavage and N-acetylation of the PEXEL motif occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the parasite. Furthermore, it was shown that the recognition of the processed N-terminus of exported proteins within the parasitophorous vacuole may be crucial for protein transport to the host erythrocyte. It appears that the PEXEL may be defined as a novel ER peptidase cleavage site and a classical N-acetyltransferase substrate sequence. PMID:18534695

  19. Phosphorylation and the N-terminal extension of the regulatory light chain help orient and align the myosin heads in Drosophila flight muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Miller, Mark S.; Reedy, Mary C.; Soto-Adames, Felipe N.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.; Maughan, David W.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-02-02

    X-ray diffraction of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) in living Drosophila at rest and electron microscopy of intact and glycerinated IFM was used to compare the effects of mutations in the regulatory light chain (RLC) on sarcomeric structure. Truncation of the RLC N-terminal extension (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}) or disruption of the phosphorylation sites by substituting alanines (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) decreased the equatorial intensity ratio (I{sub 20}/I{sub 10}), indicating decreased myosin mass associated with the thin filaments. Phosphorylation site disruption (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}), but not N-terminal extension truncation (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46}), decreased the 14.5 nm reflection intensity, indicating a spread of the axial distribution of the myosin heads. The arrangement of thick filaments and myosin heads in electron micrographs of the phosphorylation mutant (Dmlc2{sup S66A, S67A}) appeared normal in the relaxed and rigor states, but when calcium activated, fewer myosin heads formed cross-bridges. In transgenic flies with both alterations to the RLC (Dmlc2{sup {Delta}2-46; S66A, S67A}), the effects of the dual mutation were additive. The results suggest that the RLC N-terminal extension serves as a 'tether' to help pre-position the myosin heads for attachment to actin, while phosphorylation of the RLC promotes head orientations that allow optimal interactions with the thin filament.

  20. N-Terminal Protein Characterization by Mass Spectrometry Using Combined Microscale Liquid and Solid-phase Derivatization

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Heinz; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Hawke, David H.

    2014-01-01

    A sample-preparation method for N-terminal peptide isolation from protein proteolytic digests has been developed. Protein thiols and primary amines were protected by carboxyamidomethylation and acetylation, respectively, followed by trypsinization. The digest was bound to ZipTipC18 pipette tips for reaction of the newly generated N-termini with sulfosuccinimidyl-6-[3′-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionamido] hexanoate. The digest was subsequently exposed to hydroxylamine for reversal of hydroxyl group acylation, followed by reductive release of the pyridine-2-thione moiety from the derivatives. The thiol group-functionalized internal and C-terminal peptides were reversibly captured by covalent chromatography on activated thiol sepharose leaving the N-terminal fragment free in solution. The use of the reversed-phase supports as a reaction bed enabled optimization of the serial modification steps for throughput and completeness of derivatization. The use of the sample-preparation method was demonstrated with low picomole amounts of in-solution- and in-gel-digested protein. The N-terminal peptide was selectively retrieved from the affinity support. The sample-preparation method provides for throughput, robustness, and simplicity of operation using standard equipment available in most biological laboratories and is anticipated to be readily expanded to proteome-wide applications. PMID:25187758

  1. Testing the Role of the N-Terminal Tail of D1 in the Maintenance of Photosystem II in Tobacco Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Michoux, Franck; Ahmad, Niaz; Wei, Zheng-Yi; Belgio, Erica; Ruban, Alexander V; Nixon, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A key step in the repair of photoinactivated oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) complexes is the selective recognition and degradation of the damaged PSII subunit, usually the D1 reaction center subunit. FtsH proteases play a major role in D1 degradation in both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. In the case of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, analysis of an N-terminal truncation mutant of D1 lacking 20 amino-acid residues has provided evidence that FtsH complexes can remove damaged D1 in a processive reaction initiated at the exposed N-terminal tail. To test the importance of the N-terminal D1 tail in higher plants, we have constructed the equivalent truncation mutant in tobacco using chloroplast transformation techniques. The resulting mutant grew poorly and only accumulated about 25% of wild-type levels of PSII in young leaves which declined as the leaves grew so that there was little PSII activity in mature leaves. Truncating D1 led to the loss of PSII supercomplexes and dimeric complexes in the membrane. Extensive and rapid non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was still induced in the mutant, supporting the conclusion that PSII complexes are not required for NPQ. Analysis of leaves exposed to high light indicated that PSII repair in the truncation mutant was impaired at the level of synthesis and/or assembly of PSII but that D1 could still be degraded. These data support the idea that tobacco plants possess a number of back-up and compensatory pathways for removal of damaged D1 upon severe light stress. PMID:27446098

  2. Testing the Role of the N-Terminal Tail of D1 in the Maintenance of Photosystem II in Tobacco Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Michoux, Franck; Ahmad, Niaz; Wei, Zheng-Yi; Belgio, Erica; Ruban, Alexander V.; Nixon, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A key step in the repair of photoinactivated oxygen-evolving photosystem II (PSII) complexes is the selective recognition and degradation of the damaged PSII subunit, usually the D1 reaction center subunit. FtsH proteases play a major role in D1 degradation in both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. In the case of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, analysis of an N-terminal truncation mutant of D1 lacking 20 amino-acid residues has provided evidence that FtsH complexes can remove damaged D1 in a processive reaction initiated at the exposed N-terminal tail. To test the importance of the N-terminal D1 tail in higher plants, we have constructed the equivalent truncation mutant in tobacco using chloroplast transformation techniques. The resulting mutant grew poorly and only accumulated about 25% of wild-type levels of PSII in young leaves which declined as the leaves grew so that there was little PSII activity in mature leaves. Truncating D1 led to the loss of PSII supercomplexes and dimeric complexes in the membrane. Extensive and rapid non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was still induced in the mutant, supporting the conclusion that PSII complexes are not required for NPQ. Analysis of leaves exposed to high light indicated that PSII repair in the truncation mutant was impaired at the level of synthesis and/or assembly of PSII but that D1 could still be degraded. These data support the idea that tobacco plants possess a number of back-up and compensatory pathways for removal of damaged D1 upon severe light stress. PMID:27446098

  3. Endogenous N-terminal Domain Cleavage Modulates α1D-Adrenergic Receptor Pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kountz, Timothy S; Lee, Kyung-Soon; Aggarwal-Howarth, Stacey; Curran, Elizabeth; Park, Ji-Min; Harris, Dorathy-Ann; Stewart, Aaron; Hendrickson, Joseph; Camp, Nathan D; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro; Wang, Edith H; Scott, John D; Hague, Chris

    2016-08-26

    The α1D-adrenergic receptor (ADRA1D) is a key regulator of cardiovascular, prostate, and central nervous system functions. This clinically relevant G protein-coupled receptor has proven difficult to study, as it must form an obligate modular homodimer containing the PDZ proteins scribble and syntrophin or become retained in the endoplasmic reticulum as non-functional protein. We previously determined that targeted removal of the N-terminal (NT) 79 amino acids facilitates ADRA1D plasma membrane expression and agonist-stimulated functional responses. However, whether such an event occurs in physiological contexts was unknown. Herein, we report the ADRA1D is subjected to innate NT processing in cultured human cells. SNAP near-infrared imaging and tandem-affinity purification revealed the ADRA1D is expressed as both full-length and NT truncated forms in multiple human cell lines. Serial truncation mapping identified the cleavage site as Leu(90)/Val(91) in the 95-amino acid ADRA1D NT domain, suggesting human cells express a Δ1-91 ADRA1D species. Tandem-affinity purification MS/MS and co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicate NT processing of ADRA1D is not required to form scribble-syntrophin macromolecular complexes. Yet, label-free dynamic mass redistribution signaling assays demonstrate that Δ1-91 ADRA1D agonist responses were greater than WT ADRA1D. Mutagenesis of the cleavage site nullified the processing event, resulting in ADRA1D agonist responses less than the WT receptor. Thus, we propose that processing of the ADRA1D NT domain is a physiological mechanism employed by cells to generate a functional ADRA1D isoform with optimal pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:27382054

  4. N-terminal domain of PB1-F2 protein of influenza A virus can fold into amyloid-like oligomers and damage cholesterol and cardiolipid containing membranes.

    PubMed

    Ajjaji, Dalila; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Mazerat, Sandra; Chevalier, Christophe; Vidic, Jasmina

    2016-08-12

    PB1-F2 protein is a factor of virulence of influenza A viruses which increases the mortality and morbidity associated with infection. Most seasonal H1N1 Influenza A viruses express nowadays a truncated version of PB1-F2. Here we show that truncation of PB1-F2 modified supramolecular organization of the protein in a membrane-mimicking environment. In addition, full-length PB1-F2(1-90) and C-terminal PB1-F2 domain (53-90), efficiently permeabilized various anionic liposomes while N-terminal domain PB1-F2(1-52) only lysed cholesterol and cardiolipin containing lipid bilayers. These findings suggest that the truncation of PB1-F2 may impact the pathogenicity of a given virus strain. PMID:27282484

  5. UNIT 11.10 N-Terminal Sequence Analysis of Proteins and Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Speicher, Kaye D.; Gorman, Nicole; Speicher, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Automated N-terminal sequence analysis involves a series of chemical reactions that derivatize and remove one amino acid at a time from the N-terminal of purified peptides or intact proteins. At least several pmoles of a purified protein or 10 to 20 pmoles of a purified peptide with an unmodified N-terminal is required in order to obtain useful sequence information. In recent years the demand for N-terminal sequencing has decreased substantially as some applications for protein identification and characterization can now be more effectively performed using mass spectrometry. However, N-terminal sequencing remains the method of choice for verifying the N-terminal boundary of recombinant proteins, determining the N-terminal of protease-resistant domains, identifying proteins isolated from species where most of the genome has not yet been sequenced, and mapping modified or crosslinked sites in proteins that prove to be refractory to analysis by mass spectrometry. PMID:18429102

  6. Identification of a mitochondrial-binding site on the N-terminal end of hexokinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nadezda; Raisch, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Hexokinase II (HKII) is responsible for the first step in the glycolysis pathway by adding a phosphate on to the glucose molecule so it can proceed down the pathway to produce the energy for continuous cancer cell growth. Tumour cells overexpress the HKII enzyme. In fact, it is the overexpression of the HKII enzyme that makes the diagnosis of cancer possible when imaged by positron emission tomography (PET). HKII binds to the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) located on the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). When bound to the MOM, HKII is blocking a major cell death pathway. Thus, HKII is responsible for two characteristics of cancer cells, rapid tumour growth and inability of cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. One method to identify novel compounds that may interfere with the HKII–VDAC-binding site is to create a molecular model using the crystal structure of HKII. However, the amino acid(s) responsible for HKII binding to VDAC are not known. Therefore, a series of truncations and point mutations were made to the N-terminal end of HKII to identify the binding site to VDAC. Deletions of the first 10 and 20 amino acids indicated that important amino acid(s) for binding were located within the first 10 amino acids. Next, a series of point mutations were made within the first 10 amino acids. It is clear from the immunofluorescence images and immunoblot results that mutating the fifth amino acid from histidine to proline completely abolished binding to the MOM. PMID:26182367

  7. N-terminal domain of prion protein directs its oligomeric association.

    PubMed

    Trevitt, Clare R; Hosszu, Laszlo L P; Batchelor, Mark; Panico, Silvia; Terry, Cassandra; Nicoll, Andrew J; Risse, Emmanuel; Taylor, William A; Sandberg, Malin K; Al-Doujaily, Huda; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Saibil, Helen R; Scott, David J; Collinge, John; Waltho, Jonathan P; Clarke, Anthony R

    2014-09-12

    The self-association of prion protein (PrP) is a critical step in the pathology of prion diseases. It is increasingly recognized that small non-fibrillar β-sheet-rich oligomers of PrP may be of crucial importance in the prion disease process. Here, we characterize the structure of a well defined β-sheet-rich oligomer, containing ∼12 PrP molecules, and often enclosing a central cavity, formed using full-length recombinant PrP. The N-terminal region of prion protein (residues 23-90) is required for the formation of this distinct oligomer; a truncated form comprising residues 91-231 forms a broad distribution of aggregated species. No infectivity or toxicity was found using cell and animal model systems. This study demonstrates that examination of the full repertoire of conformers and assembly states that can be accessed by PrP under specific experimental conditions should ideally be done using the full-length protein. PMID:25074940

  8. Structure of the Tropomyosin Overlap Complex from Chicken Smooth Muscle: Insight into the Diversity of N-Terminal Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Jeremiah; Klenchin, Vadim A.; Rayment, Ivan

    2010-09-08

    Tropomyosin is a stereotypical {alpha}-helical coiled coil that polymerizes to form a filamentous macromolecular assembly that lies on the surface of F-actin. The interaction between the C-terminal and N-terminal segments on adjacent molecules is known as the overlap region. We report here two X-ray structures of the chicken smooth muscle tropomyosin overlap complex. A novel approach was used to stabilize the C-terminal and N-terminal fragments. Globular domains from both the human DNA ligase binding protein XRCC4 and bacteriophage {phi}29 scaffolding protein Gp7 were fused to 37 and 28 C-terminal amino acid residues of tropomyosin, respectively, whereas the 29 N-terminal amino acids of tropomyosin were fused to the C-terminal helix bundle of microtubule binding protein EB1. The structures of both the XRCC4 and Gp7 fusion proteins complexed with the N-terminal EB1 fusion contain a very similar helix bundle in the overlap region that encompasses {approx}15 residues. The C-terminal coiled coil opens to allow formation of the helix bundle, which is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. These structures are similar to that observed in the NMR structure of the rat skeletal overlap complex [Greenfield, N. J., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 364, 80-96]. The interactions between the N- and C-terminal coiled coils of smooth muscle tropomyosin show significant curvature, which differs somewhat between the two structures and implies flexibility in the overlap complex, at least in solution. This is likely an important attribute that allows tropomyosin to assemble around the actin filaments. These structures provide a molecular explanation for the role of N-acetylation in the assembly of native tropomyosin.

  9. Crystallized N-terminal domain of influenza virus matrix protein M1 and method of determining and using same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Ming (Inventor); Sha, Bingdong (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The matrix protein, M1, of influenza virus strain A/PR/8/34 has been purified from virions and crystallized. The crystals consist of a stable fragment (18 Kd) of the M1 protein. X-ray diffraction studies indicated that the crystals have a space group of P3.sub.t 21 or P3.sub.2 21. Vm calculations showed that there are two monomers in an asymmetric unit. A crystallized N-terminal domain of M1, wherein the N-terminal domain of M1 is crystallized such that the three dimensional structure of the crystallized N-terminal domain of M1 can be determined to a resolution of about 2.1 .ANG. or better, and wherein the three dimensional structure of the uncrystallized N-terminal domain of M1 cannot be determined to a resolution of about 2.1 .ANG. or better. A method of purifying M1 and a method of crystallizing M1. A method of using the three-dimensional crystal structure of M1 to screen for antiviral, influenza virus treating or preventing compounds. A method of using the three-dimensional crystal structure of M1 to screen for improved binding to or inhibition of influenza virus M1. The use of the three-dimensional crystal structure of the M1 protein of influenza virus in the manufacture of an inhibitor of influenza virus M1. The use of the three-dimensional crystal structure of the M1 protein of influenza virus in the screening of candidates for inhibition of influenza virus M1.

  10. The N-Terminal Residues 43 to 60 Form the Interface for Dopamine Mediated α-Synuclein Dimerisation

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Su Ling; Hinds, Mark G.; Connor, Andrea R.; Smith, David P.; Illes-Toth, Eva; Pham, Chi L. L.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Cappai, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is a major component of the intracellular inclusions called Lewy bodies, which are a key pathological feature in the brains of Parkinson’s disease patients. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) inhibits the fibrillisation of α-syn into amyloid, and promotes α-syn aggregation into SDS-stable soluble oligomers. While this inhibition of amyloid formation requires the oxidation of both DA and the methionines in α-syn, the molecular basis for these processes is still unclear. This study sought to define the protein sequences required for the generation of oligomers. We tested N- (α-syn residues 43–140) and C-terminally (1–95) truncated α-syn, and found that similar to full-length protein both truncated species formed soluble DA:α-syn oligomers, albeit 1–95 had a different profile. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and the N-terminally truncated α-syn 43–140 protein, we analysed the structural characteristics of the DA:α-syn 43–140 dimer and α-syn 43–140 monomer and found the dimerisation interface encompassed residues 43 to 60. Narrowing the interface to this small region will help define the mechanism by which DA mediates the formation of SDS-stable soluble DA:α-syn oligomers. PMID:25679387

  11. Crystal Structure of the N-terminal Domain of the Group B Streptococcus Alpha C Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Auperin,T.; Bolduc, G.; Baron, M.; Heroux, A.; Filman, D.; Madoff, L.; Hogle, J.

    2005-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis among neonates and an important cause of morbidity among pregnant women and immunocompromised adults. Invasive diseases due to GBS are attributed to the ability of the pathogen to translocate across human epithelial surfaces. The alpha C protein (ACP) has been identified as an invasin that plays a role in internalization and translocation of GBS across epithelial cells. The soluble N-terminal domain of ACP (NtACP) blocks the internalization of GBS. We determined the 1.86-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of NtACP comprising residues Ser{sup 52} through Leu{sup 225} of the full-length ACP. NtACP has two domains, an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich and a C-terminal three-helix bundle. Structural and topological alignments reveal that the {beta}-sandwich shares structural elements with the type III fibronectin fold (FnIII), but includes structural elaborations that make it unique. We have identified a potential integrin-binding motif consisting of Lys-Thr-Asp{sup 146}, Arg{sup 110}, and Asp{sup 118}. A similar arrangement of charged residues has been described in other invasins. ACP shows a heparin binding activity that requires NtACP. We propose a possible heparin-binding site, including one surface of the three-helix bundle, and nearby portions of the sandwich and repeat domains. We have validated this prediction using assays of the heparin binding and cell-adhesion properties of engineered fragments of ACP. This is the first crystal structure of a member of the highly conserved Gram-positive surface alpha-like protein family, and it will enable the internalization mechanism of GBS to be dissected at the atomic level.

  12. Modulation of NifA activity by PII in Azospirillum brasilense: evidence for a regulatory role of the NifA N-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Arsene, F; Kaminski, P A; Elmerich, C

    1996-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense NifA, which is synthesized under all physiological conditions, exists in an active or inactive from depending on the availability of ammonia. The activity also depends on the presence of PII, as NifA is inactive in a glnB mutant. To investigate further the mechanism that regulates NifA activity, several deletions of the nifA coding sequence covering the amino-terminal domain of NifA were constructed. The ability of these truncated NifA proteins to activate the nifH promoter in the absence or presence of ammonia was assayed in A. brasilense wild-type and mutant strains. Our results suggest that the N-terminal domain is not essential for NifA activity. This domain plays an inhibitory role which prevents NifA activity in the presence of ammonia. The truncated proteins were also able to restore nif gene expression to a glnB mutant, suggesting that PII is required to activate NifA by preventing the inhibitory effect of its N-terminal domain under conditions of nitrogen fixation. Low levels of nitrogenase activity in the presence of ammonia were also observed when the truncated gene was introduced into a strain devoid of the ADP-ribosylation control of nitrogenase. We propose a model for the regulation of NifA activity in A. brasilense. PMID:8759845

  13. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Anindya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Sau, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors. PMID:24747758

  14. Comparative evaluation of recombinant HSP70 (N & C-terminal) fragments in the detection of equine trypanosomosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jaideep; Chaudhury, A; Yadav, S C

    2016-06-15

    Trypanosomosis (Surra) is an economically important disease caused by Trypanosoma evansi which is an extracellular parasite present in the plasma, tissues and other body fluids of a wide range of hosts including domesticated animals. Currently, serological reports are based on detection of antibodies by ELISA using whole cell lysate (WCL) antigen, which has a limitation of persistence of anti-trypanosomal antibodies after successful treatment of the disease. Moreover, it has some ethical issues also like requirement of mice for in vivo maintenance of parasite for preparing the antigen. Therefore, in the present study, an attempt was made to evaluate the in vitro production of recombinant heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) for detection of antibodies in experimentally infected ponies. The amino acid sequence analysis of HSP70 revealed that N-terminal region of the protein was highly conserved while the C-terminal region was most divergent. The four different regions of HSP70 protein viz. HSP-1, HSP-2, HSP-3 and HSP-4 were cloned and expressed, among which HSP-1 (N-terminal region) & HSP-2 (C-terminal region) were truncated while HSP-3 & HSP-4 were complete C-terminal proteins. The recombinant fragments were probed with sequentially pooled experimental serum samples where antibodies were detected in these fragments from 10(th) day post infection till the termination of the experiment. Further, these recombinant fragments were also comparatively evaluated with WCL antigen in ELISA using experimental as well as field serum samples. It was observed that after successful treatment of infected ponies, there was a sharp fall in antibodies (within 90 days) when tested with recombinant HSP's fragments, while antibodies persisted even after 469 days when tested against WCL antigen. The sensitivity and specificity of all HSP70 fragments were also estimated from field serum samples with reference to WCL antigen ELISA. The HSP-1 showed minimum sensitivity (41.03%) among all the

  15. The N-terminal zinc finger domain of Tgf2 transposase contributes to DNA binding and to transposition activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia-Yun; Hou, Fei; Shen, Xiao-Dan; Du, Xue-Di; Xu, Hai-Li; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Active Hobo/Activator/Tam3 (hAT) transposable elements are rarely found in vertebrates. Previously, goldfish Tgf2 was found to be an autonomously active vertebrate transposon that is efficient at gene-transfer in teleost fish. However, little is known about Tgf2 functional domains required for transposition. To explore this, we first predicted in silico a zinc finger domain in the N-terminus of full length Tgf2 transposase (L-Tgf2TPase). Two truncated recombinant Tgf2 transposases with deletions in the N-terminal zinc finger domain, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPase, were expressed in bacteria from goldfish cDNAs. Both truncated Tgf2TPases lost their DNA-binding ability in vitro, specifically at the ends of Tgf2 transposon than native L-Tgf2TPase. Consequently, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPases mediated gene transfer in the zebrafish genome in vivo at a significantly (p < 0.01) lower efficiency (21%-25%), in comparison with L-Tgf2TPase (56% efficiency). Compared to L-Tgf2TPase, truncated Tgf2TPases catalyzed imprecise excisions with partial deletion of TE ends and/or plasmid backbone insertion/deletion. The gene integration into the zebrafish genome mediated by truncated Tgf2TPases was imperfect, creating incomplete 8-bp target site duplications at the insertion sites. These results indicate that the zinc finger domain in Tgf2 transposase is involved in binding to Tgf2 terminal sequences, and loss of those domains has effects on TE transposition. PMID:27251101

  16. The N-terminal zinc finger domain of Tgf2 transposase contributes to DNA binding and to transposition activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia-Yun; Hou, Fei; Shen, Xiao-Dan; Du, Xue-Di; Xu, Hai-Li; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Active Hobo/Activator/Tam3 (hAT) transposable elements are rarely found in vertebrates. Previously, goldfish Tgf2 was found to be an autonomously active vertebrate transposon that is efficient at gene-transfer in teleost fish. However, little is known about Tgf2 functional domains required for transposition. To explore this, we first predicted in silico a zinc finger domain in the N-terminus of full length Tgf2 transposase (L-Tgf2TPase). Two truncated recombinant Tgf2 transposases with deletions in the N-terminal zinc finger domain, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPase, were expressed in bacteria from goldfish cDNAs. Both truncated Tgf2TPases lost their DNA-binding ability in vitro, specifically at the ends of Tgf2 transposon than native L-Tgf2TPase. Consequently, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPases mediated gene transfer in the zebrafish genome in vivo at a significantly (p < 0.01) lower efficiency (21%–25%), in comparison with L-Tgf2TPase (56% efficiency). Compared to L-Tgf2TPase, truncated Tgf2TPases catalyzed imprecise excisions with partial deletion of TE ends and/or plasmid backbone insertion/deletion. The gene integration into the zebrafish genome mediated by truncated Tgf2TPases was imperfect, creating incomplete 8-bp target site duplications at the insertion sites. These results indicate that the zinc finger domain in Tgf2 transposase is involved in binding to Tgf2 terminal sequences, and loss of those domains has effects on TE transposition. PMID:27251101

  17. N-terminal protein processing: A comparative proteogenomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bonissone, Stefano; Gupta, Nitin; Romine, Margaret F.; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2013-01-01

    N-Terminal Methionine Excision (NME) is a universally conserved mechanism with the same specificity across all life forms that removes the first Methionine in proteins when the second residue is Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys, Thr, Pro, or Val. In spite of its necessity for proper cell functioning, the functional role of NME remains unclear. In 1988, Arfin and Bradshaw connected NME with the N-end protein degradation rule and postulated that the role of NME is to expose the stabilizing residues with the goal to resist protein degradation. While this explanation (that treats 7 stabilizing residues in the same manner) has become the de facto dogma of NME, comparative proteogenomics analysis of NME tells a different story. We suggest that the primary role of NME is to expose only two (rather than seven) amino acids Ala and Ser for post-translational modifications (e.g., acetylation) rather than to regulate protein degradation. We argue that, contrary to the existing view, NME is not crucially important for proteins with 5 other stabilizing residue at the 2nd positions that are merely bystanders (their function is not affected by NME) that become exposed to NME because their sizes are comparable or smaller than the size of Ala and Ser.

  18. Kinetic Mechanism of Protein N-terminal Methyltransferase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Stacie L.; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L.; Huang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. PMID:25771539

  19. Kinetic mechanism of protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Stacie L; Mao, Yunfei; Zhang, Gang; Hanjra, Pahul; Peterson, Darrell L; Huang, Rong

    2015-05-01

    The protein N-terminal methyltransferase 1 (NTMT1) catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from the S-adenosyl-l-methionine to the protein α-amine, resulting in formation of S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and α-N-methylated proteins. NTMT1 is an interesting potential anticancer target because it is overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancers and plays an important role in cell mitosis. To gain insight into the biochemical mechanism of NTMT1, we have characterized the kinetic mechanism of recombinant NTMT1 using a fluorescence assay and mass spectrometry. The results of initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies indicate that methylation by NTMT1 proceeds via a random sequential Bi Bi mechanism. In addition, our processivity studies demonstrate that NTMT1 proceeds via a distributive mechanism for multiple methylations. Together, our studies provide new knowledge about the kinetic mechanism of NTMT1 and lay the foundation for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors. PMID:25771539

  20. A Conserved Acidic Motif in the N-Terminal Domain of Nitrate Reductase Is Necessary for the Inactivation of the Enzyme in the Dark by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding1

    PubMed Central

    Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Durand, Nathalie; Meyer, Christian

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the N-terminal domain of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) nitrate reductase (NR) is involved in the inactivation of the enzyme by phosphorylation, which occurs in the dark (L. Nussaume, M. Vincentz, C. Meyer, J.P. Boutin, and M. Caboche [1995] Plant Cell 7: 611–621). The activity of a mutant NR protein lacking this N-terminal domain was no longer regulated by light-dark transitions. In this study smaller deletions were performed in the N-terminal domain of tobacco NR that removed protein motifs conserved among higher plant NRs. The resulting truncated NR-coding sequences were then fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and introduced in NR-deficient mutants of the closely related species Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. We found that the deletion of a conserved stretch of acidic residues led to an active NR protein that was more thermosensitive than the wild-type enzyme, but it was relatively insensitive to the inactivation by phosphorylation in the dark. Therefore, the removal of this acidic stretch seems to have the same effects on NR activation state as the deletion of the N-terminal domain. A hypothetical explanation for these observations is that a specific factor that impedes inactivation remains bound to the truncated enzyme. A synthetic peptide derived from this acidic protein motif was also found to be a good substrate for casein kinase II. PMID:9880364

  1. N-Terminal Region of GbIspH1, Ginkgo biloba IspH Type 1, May Be Involved in the pH-Dependent Regulation of Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Bok-Kyu; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Han, Jaehong

    2015-01-01

    GbIspH1, IspH type 1 in Ginkgo biloba chloroplast, is the Fe/S enzyme catalyzing the reductive dehydroxylation of HMBPP to isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) at the final step of methylerythritol phosphate pathway in chloroplast. Compared to the bacterial IspH, plant IspH, including GbIspH1, has an additional polypeptide chain at the N-terminus. Here, biochemical function of the N-terminal region of GbIspH1 was investigated with the N-terminal truncated GbIspH1 (GbIspH1-truncated). Both wild type GbIspH1 (GbIspH1-full) and GbIspH1-truncated were catalytically active and produced IPP and DMAPP in a ratio of 15 : 1. Kinetic parameters of KM (17.3 ± 1.9 and 14.9 ± 2.3 µM) and kcat (369 ± 10 and 347 ± 12 min−1) at pH 8.0 were obtained for GbIspH1-full and GbIspH1-truncated, respectively. Interestingly, GbIspH1-full and GbIspH1-truncated showed significantly different pH-dependent activities, and the maximum enzyme activities were obtained at pH 8.0 and 7.5, respectively. However, catalytic activation energies (Ea) of GbIspH1-full and GbIspH1-truncated were almost the same with 36.5 ± 1.6 and 35.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol, respectively. It was suggested that the N-terminal region of GbIspH1 is involved in the pH-dependent regulation of enzyme activity during photosynthesis. PMID:25892986

  2. Human neutrophils are activated by a peptide fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin B presumably via formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Goy, Sebastian D; Olling, Alexandra; Neumann, Detlef; Pich, Andreas; Gerhard, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile may induce antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and, in severe cases, pseudomembranous colitis characterized by tremendous neutrophil infiltration. All symptoms are caused by two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. We describe here the activation of isolated human blood neutrophils by TcdB and, moreover, by toxin fragments generated by limited proteolytical digestion. Kinetics and profiles of TcdB-induced rise in intracellular-free Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production were similar to that induced by fMLF, which activates the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) recognizing formylated bacterial peptide sequences. Transfection assays with the FPR-1 isoform hFPR26 in HEK293 cells, heterologous desensitization experiments and FPR inhibition via cyclosporine H strongly suggest activation of cells via FPR-1. Domain analyses revealed that the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB is a potent activator of FPR pointing towards an additional mechanism that might contribute to pathogenesis. This pro-inflammatory ligand effect can be triggered even by cleaved and, thus, non-cytotoxic toxin. In summary, we report (i) a ligand effect on neutrophils as completely new molecular mode of action, (ii) pathogenic potential of truncated or proteolytically cleaved 'non-cytotoxic' fragments and (iii) an interaction of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain instead of the C-terminal receptor binding domain of TcdB with target cells. PMID:25529763

  3. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Ogataea polymorpha telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Polshakov, Vladimir I; Petrova, Olga A; Parfenova, Yulia Yu; Efimov, Sergey V; Klochkov, Vladimir V; Zvereva, Maria I; Dontsova, Olga A

    2016-04-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds telomeric DNA fragments to the ends of chromosomes. This enzyme is the focus of substantial attention, both because its structure and mechanism of action are still poorly studied, and because of its pivotal roles in aging and cellular proliferation. The use of telomerase as a potential target for the design of new anticancer drugs is also of great interest. The catalytic protein subunit of telomerase (TERT) contains an N-terminal domain (TEN) that is essential for activity and processivity. Elucidation of the structure and dynamics of TEN in solution is important for understanding the molecular mechanism of telomerase activity and for the design of new telomerase inhibitors. To approach this problem, in this study we report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments of TEN from Ogataea polymorpha. Analysis of the assigned chemical shifts allowed us to identify secondary structures and protein regions potentially involved in interaction with other participants of the telomerase catalytic cycle. PMID:26721464

  4. Peptide Scrambling During Collision-Induced Dissociation is Influenced by N-terminal Residue Basicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawner, Ross; Holman, Stephen W.; Gaskell, Simon J.; Eyers, Claire E.

    2014-08-01

    `Bottom up' proteomic studies typically use tandem mass spectrometry data to infer peptide ion sequence, enabling identification of the protein whence they derive. The majority of such studies employ collision-induced dissociation (CID) to induce fragmentation of the peptide structure giving diagnostic b-, y-, and a- ions. Recently, rearrangement processes that result in scrambling of the original peptide sequence during CID have been reported for these ions. Such processes have the potential to adversely affect ion accounting (and thus scores from automated search algorithms) in tandem mass spectra, and in extreme cases could lead to false peptide identification. Here, analysis of peptide species produced by Lys-N proteolysis of standard proteins is performed and sequences that exhibit such rearrangement processes identified. The effect of increasing the gas-phase basicity of the N-terminal lysine residue through derivatization to homoarginine toward such sequence scrambling is then assessed. The presence of a highly basic homoarginine (or arginine) residue at the N-terminus is found to disfavor/inhibit sequence scrambling with a coincident increase in the formation of b(n-1)+H2O product ions. Finally, further analysis of a sequence produced by Lys-C proteolysis provides evidence toward a potential mechanism for the apparent inhibition of sequence scrambling during resonance excitation CID.

  5. Bacterial secretion of soluble and functional trivalent scFv-based N-terminal trimerbodies.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Toribio, Ana; Álvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Sainz-Pastor, Noelia; Merino, Nekane; Compte, Marta; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant antibodies are used with great success in many different diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A variety of protein expression systems are available, but nowadays almost all therapeutic antibodies are produced in mammalian cell lines due to their complex structure and glycosylation requirements. However, production of clinical-grade antibodies in mammalian cells is very expensive and time-consuming. On the other hand, Escherichia coli (E. coli) is known to be the simplest, fastest and most cost-effective recombinant expression system, which usually achieves higher protein yields than mammalian cells. Indeed, it is one of the most popular host in the industry for the expression of recombinant proteins. In this work, a trivalent single-chain fragment variable (scFv)-based N-terminal trimerbody, specific for native laminin-111, was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and in E. coli. Mammalian and bacterially produced anti-laminin trimerbody molecules display comparable functional and structural properties, although importantly the yield of trimerbody expressed in E. coli was considerably higher than in human cells. These results demonstrated that E. coli is a versatile and efficient expression system for multivalent trimerbody-based molecules that is suitable for their industrial production. PMID:26239030

  6. The association of annexin I with early endosomes is regulated by Ca2+ and requires an intact N-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Seemann, J; Weber, K; Osborn, M; Parton, R G; Gerke, V

    1996-01-01

    Annexin I is a member of a multigene family of Ca2+/phospholipid-binding proteins and a major substrate for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor kinase, which has been implicated in membrane-related events along the endocytotic pathway, in particular in the sorting of internalized EGF receptors occurring in the multivesicular body. We analyzed in detail the intracellular distribution of this annexin by cell fractionation and immunoelectron microscopy. These studies used polyclonal as well as a set of species-specific monoclonal antibodies, whose epitopes were mapped to the lateral surface of the molecule next to a region thought to be involved in vesicle aggregation. Unexpectedly, the majority of annexin I was identified on early and not on multivesicular endosomes in a form that required micromolar levels of Ca2+ for the association. The specific cofractionation with early endosomes was also observed in transfected baby hamster kidney cells when the intracellular fate of ectopically expressed porcine annexin I was analyzed by using the species-specific monoclonal antibodies in Western blots of subcellular fractions. Interestingly, a truncation of the N-terminal 26, but not the N-terminal 13 residues of annexin I altered its intracellular distribution, shifting it from fractions containing early to those containing late and multivesicular endosomes. These findings underscore the regulatory importance of the N-terminal domain and provide evidence for an involvement of annexin I in early endocytotic processes. Images PMID:8885232

  7. Functional analysis of the N-terminal basic motif of a eukaryotic satellite RNA virus capsid protein in replication and packaging.

    PubMed

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh; Mathews, Deborah; Garmann, Rees; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya; Rao, A L N

    2016-01-01

    Efficient replication and assembly of virus particles are integral to the establishment of infection. In addition to the primary role of the capsid protein (CP) in encapsidating the RNA progeny, experimental evidence on positive sense single-stranded RNA viruses suggests that the CP also regulates RNA synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that replication of Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is controlled by the cooperative interaction between STMV CP and the helper virus (HV) Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) replicase. We identified that the STMV CP-HV replicase interaction requires a positively charged residue at the third position (3R) in the N-terminal 13 amino acid (aa) motif. Far-Northwestern blotting showed that STMV CP promotes binding between HV-replicase and STMV RNA. An STMV CP variant having an arginine to alanine substitution at position 3 in the N-terminal 13aa motif abolished replicase-CP binding. The N-terminal 13aa motif of the CP bearing alanine substitutions for positively charged residues located at positions 5, 7, 10 and 11 are defective in packaging full-length STMV, but can package a truncated STMV RNA lacking the 3' terminal 150 nt region. These findings provide insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of STMV replication and packaging. PMID:27193742

  8. Lysozyme Mutants Accumulate in Cells while Associated at their N-terminal Alpha-domain with the Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone GRP78/BiP

    PubMed Central

    Kamada, Yoshiki; Nawata, Yusuke; Sugimoto, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Amyloidogenic human lysozyme variants deposit in cells and cause systemic amyloidosis. We recently observed that such lysozymes accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with the ER chaperone GRP78/BiP, accompanying the ER stress response. Here we investigated the region of lysozyme that is critical to its association with GRP78/BiP. In addition to the above-mentioned variants of lysozyme, we constructed lysozyme truncation or substitution mutants. These were co-expressed with GRP78/BiP (tagged with FLAG) in cultured human embryonic kidney cells, which were analyzed by western blotting and immunocytochemistry using anti-lysozyme and anti-FLAG antibodies. The amyloidogenic variants were confirmed to be strongly associated with GRP78/BiP as revealed by the co-immunoprecipitation assay, whereas N-terminal mutants pruned of 1-41 or 1-51 residues were found not to be associated with the chaperone. Single amino acid substitutions for the leucine array along the α-helices in the N-terminal region resulted in wild-type lysozyme remaining attached to GRP78/BiP. These mutations also tended to show lowered secretion ability. We conclude that the N-terminal α-helices region of the lysozyme is pivotal for its strong adhesion to GRP78/BiP. We suspect that wild-type lysozyme interacts with the GRP at this region as a step in the proper folding monitored by the ER chaperone. PMID:26884716

  9. Functional analysis of the N-terminal basic motif of a eukaryotic satellite RNA virus capsid protein in replication and packaging

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh; Mathews, Deborah; Garmann, Rees; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya; Rao, A. L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient replication and assembly of virus particles are integral to the establishment of infection. In addition to the primary role of the capsid protein (CP) in encapsidating the RNA progeny, experimental evidence on positive sense single-stranded RNA viruses suggests that the CP also regulates RNA synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that replication of Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is controlled by the cooperative interaction between STMV CP and the helper virus (HV) Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) replicase. We identified that the STMV CP-HV replicase interaction requires a positively charged residue at the third position (3R) in the N-terminal 13 amino acid (aa) motif. Far-Northwestern blotting showed that STMV CP promotes binding between HV-replicase and STMV RNA. An STMV CP variant having an arginine to alanine substitution at position 3 in the N-terminal 13aa motif abolished replicase-CP binding. The N-terminal 13aa motif of the CP bearing alanine substitutions for positively charged residues located at positions 5, 7, 10 and 11 are defective in packaging full-length STMV, but can package a truncated STMV RNA lacking the 3′ terminal 150 nt region. These findings provide insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of STMV replication and packaging. PMID:27193742

  10. The N-terminal adenosine triphosphate binding domain of Hsp90 is necessary and sufficient for interaction with estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Bouhouche-Chatelier, L; Chadli, A; Catelli, M G

    2001-10-01

    To understand how the molecular chaperone Hsp90 participates in conformational maturation of the estrogen receptor (ER), we analyzed the interaction of immobilized purified avian Hsp90 with mammalian cytosolic ER. Hsp90 was either immunoadsorbed to BF4 antibody-Sepharose or GST-Hsp90 fusion protein (GST.90) was adsorbed to glutathione-Sepharose. GST.90 was able to retain specifically ER, similarly to immunoadsorbed Hsp90. When cells were treated with estradiol and the hormone treatment was maintained during cell homogenization, binding, and washing steps, GST.90 still interacted efficiently with ER, suggesting that ER may form complexes with Hsp90 even after its activation by hormone and salt extraction from nuclei. The GST.90-ER interaction was consistently reduced in the presence of increasing concentrations of potassium chloride or when cytosolic ER-Hsp90 complexes were previously stabilized by molybdate, indicating that GST.90-ER complexes behave like cytosolic Hsp90-ER complexes. A purified thioredoxin-ER fusion protein was also able to form complexes with GST.90, suggesting that the presence of other chaperones is not required. ER was retained only by GST.90 deletion mutants bearing an intact Hsp90 N-terminal region (1-224), the interaction being more efficient when the charged region A was present in the mutant (1-334). The N-terminal fragment 1-334, devoid of the dimeric GST moiety, was also able to interact with ER, pointing to the monomeric N-terminal adenosine triphosphate binding region of Hsp90 (1-224) as the region necessary and sufficient for interaction. These results contribute to understand the Hsp90-dependent process responsible for conformational competence of ER. PMID:11795466

  11. The effect of N-terminal acetylation on the structure of an N-terminal tropomyosin peptide and alpha alpha-tropomyosin.

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, N. J.; Stafford, W. F.; Hitchcock-DeGregori, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used a synthetic peptide consisting of the first 30 residues of striated muscle alpha-tropomyosin, with GlyCys added to the C-terminus, to investigate the effect of N-terminal acetylation on the conformation and stability of the N-terminal domain of the coiled-coil protein. In aqueous buffers at low ionic strength, the reduced, unacetylated 32mer had a very low alpha-helical content (approximately 20%) that was only slightly increased by disulfide crosslinking or N-terminal acetylation. Addition of salt (> 1 M) greatly increased the helical content of the peptide. The CD spectrum, the cooperativity of folding of the peptide, and sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation studies showed that it formed a 2-chained coiled coil at high ionic strength. Disulfide crosslinking and N-terminal acetylation both greatly stabilized the coiled-coil alpha-helical conformation in high salt. Addition of ethanol or trifluoroethanol to solutions of the peptide also increased its alpha-helical content. However, the CD spectra and unfolding behavior of the peptide showed no evidence of coiled-coil formation. In the presence of the organic solvents, N-terminal acetylation had very little effect on the conformation or stability of the peptide. Our results indicate that N-terminal acetylation stabilizes coiled-coil formation in the peptide. The effect cannot be explained by interactions with the "helix-dipole" because the stabilization is observed at very high salt concentrations and is independent of pH. In contrast to the results with the peptide, N-terminal acetylation has only small effects on the overall stability of tropomyosin. PMID:8019411

  12. Investigation of Truncated Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, David T.; Henry, Ross M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of truncated circular and square waveguide cross-sections are presented. An emphasis is placed upon numerical and experimental validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of these structures. A test component, a 90-degree phase shifter, was fabricated and tested at 30 GHz. The concepts explored can be directly applied in the design, synthesis and optimization of components in the microwave to sub-millimeter wavebands.

  13. The N-terminal peptide of mammalian GTP cyclohydrolase I is an autoinhibitory control element and contributes to binding the allosteric regulatory protein GFRP.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Christina E; Gross, Steven S

    2011-04-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  14. The N-terminal Peptide of Mammalian GTP Cyclohydrolase I Is an Autoinhibitory Control Element and Contributes to Binding the Allosteric Regulatory Protein GFRP*

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Christina E.; Gross, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an obligate cofactor for NO synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. BH4 can limit its own synthesis by triggering decameric GTPCH to assemble in an inhibitory complex with two GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) pentamers. Subsequent phenylalanine binding to the GTPCH·GFRP inhibitory complex converts it to a stimulatory complex. An N-terminal inhibitory peptide in GTPCH may also contribute to autoregulation of GTPCH activity, but mechanisms are undefined. To characterize potential regulatory actions of the N-terminal peptide in rat GTPCH, we expressed, purified, and characterized a truncation mutant, devoid of 45 N-terminal amino acids (Δ45-GTPCH) and contrasted its catalytic and GFRP binding properties to wild type GTPCH (wt-GTPCH). Contrary to prior reports, we show that GFRP binds wt-GTPCH in the absence of any small molecule effector, resulting in allosteric stimulation of GTPCH activity: a 20% increase in Vmax, 50% decrease in KmGTP, and increase in Hill coefficient to 1.6, from 1.0. These features of GFRP-stimulated wt-GTPCH activity were phenocopied by Δ45-GTPCH in the absence of bound GFRP. Addition of GFRP to Δ45-GTPCH failed to elicit complex formation or a substantial further increase in GTPCH catalytic activity. Expression of Δ45-GTPCH in HEK-293 cells elicited 3-fold greater BH4 accumulation than an equivalent of wt-GTPCH. Together, results indicate that the N-terminal peptide exerts autoinhibitory control over rat GTPCH and is required for GFRP binding on its own. Displacement of the autoinhibitory peptide provides a molecular mechanism for physiological up-regulation of GTPCH activity. PMID:21163945

  15. The predicted N-terminal signal sequence of the human α₂C-adrenoceptor does not act as a functional cleavable signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Jahnsen, Jan Anker; Uhlén, Staffan

    2012-06-01

    The N-terminal region of the human α(2C)-adrenoceptor has a 22 amino acid sequence MASPALAAALAVAAAAGPNASG. This stretch is predicted to be a cleavable signal peptide. Signal peptides facilitate the translocation of membrane proteins from ribosomes into the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) for further transport to the plasma membrane. However, recently it has been suggested that the hydrophobic stretch ALAAALAAAAA in the N-tail of the rat α(2C)-adrenoceptor, rather than being part of a signal peptide, is an ER retention signal (Angelotti, 2010). Here, we have investigated the functionality of the N-terminal region of the human α(2C)-adrenoceptor further. The predicted signal peptide was found to be non-cleavable, as shown for a modified α(2C)-adrenoceptor construct equipped with a FLAG epitope. The influence of the N-terminal region on receptor translocation to the plasma membrane was investigated by rebuilding the N-tail and then by analyzing the expression level of binding-competent receptors in transfected COS-7 cell membranes. Truncated α(2C)-adrenoceptor constructs showed decreased expression levels as compared to the wild type α(2C)-adrenoceptor. Addition of, or exchange for, the influenza virus hemagglutinin signal peptide to the α(2C)-adrenoceptor had no effect, respectively decreased, the expression level of binding-competent receptor in the membranes. Our analysis supports the conclusions that the predicted signal peptide in the N-terminal tail of the α(2C)-adrenoceptor does not act as a cleavable signal peptide. In addition, the results indicate that the presence of an intact N-tail is augmenting the amount of binding-competent α(2C)-adrenoceptors at the cell surface. PMID:22503931

  16. Cellular toxicity of yeast prion protein Rnq1 can be modulated by N-terminal wild type huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Ratnika; Patel, Vishal; Saleh, Aliabbas A; Roy, Ipsita

    2016-01-15

    Aggregation of the N-terminal human mutant huntingtin and the consequent toxicity in the yeast model of Huntington's disease (HD) requires the presence of Rnq1 protein (Rnq1p) in its prion conformation [RNQ1(+)]. The understanding of interaction of wild-type huntingtin (wt-Htt) with the amyloidogenic prion has some gaps. In this work, we show that N-terminal fragment of wt-Htt (N-wt-Htt) ameliorated the toxic effect of [RNQ1(+)] depending on expression levels of both proteins. When the expression of N-wt-Htt was high, it increased the expression and delayed the aggregation of [RNQ1(+)]. As the expression of N-wt-Htt was reduced, it formed high molecular weight aggregates along with the prion. Even when sequestered by [RNQ1(+)], the beneficial effect of N-wt-Htt on expression of Rnq1p and on cell survival was evident. Huntingtin protein ameliorated toxicity due to the prion protein [RNQ1(+)] in yeast cells in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in increase in cell survival, hinting at its probable role as a component of the proteostasis network of the cell. Taking into account the earlier reports of the beneficial effect of expression of N-wt-Htt on the aggregation of mutant huntingtin, the function of wild-type huntingtin as an inhibitor of protein aggregation in the cell needs to be explored. PMID:26628321

  17. A modification of the N-terminal amino acid in the eremomycin aglycone.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikova, O V; Berdnikova, T F; Olsufyeva, E N; Pavlov, A Y; Reznikova, M I; Preobrazhenskaya, M N; Ciabatti, R; Malabarba, A; Colombo, L

    1996-11-01

    An Edman degradation of the antibiotic eremomycin aglycone produced the corresponding hexapeptide, which was aminoacylated with D-lysine, D-histidine or D-tryptophan derivatives to give new heptapeptide analogs of the eremomycin aglycone. The aminoacylation of the eremomycin aglycone produced an octapeptide analog. The substitution of D-lysine for the N-terminal N-methyl-D-leucine does not seriously affect the in vitro antibacterial properties of the eremomycin aglycone whereas the heptapeptides with the N-terminal D-tryptophan or D-histidine moieties and the octapeptide with the N-terminal D-lysine are practically devoid of the antibacterial properties. PMID:8982345

  18. Conformational changes of the N-terminal part of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus p12 protein during multimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Knejzlik, Zdenek; Ulbrich, Pavel; Strohalm, Martin; Lastuvkova, Hana; Kodicek, Milan; Sakalian, Michael; Ruml, Tomas

    2009-10-10

    The Mason-Pfizer monkey virus is a prototype Betaretrovirus with the defining characteristic that it assembles spherical immature particles from Gag-related polyprotein precursors within the cytoplasm of the infected cell. It was shown previously that the N-terminal part of the Gag p12 domain (wt-Np12) is required for efficient assembly. However, the precise role for p12 in mediating Gag-Gag interaction is still poorly understood. In this study we employed detailed circular dichroism spectroscopy, electron microscopy and ultracentrifugation analyses of recombinant wt-Np12 prepared by in vitro transcription and translation. The wt-Np12 domain fragment forms fibrillar structures in a concentration-dependent manner. Assembly into fibers is linked to a conformational transition from unfolded or another non-periodical state to alpha-helix during multimerization.

  19. Allosteric stabilization of the amyloid-β peptide hairpin by the fluctuating N-terminal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-01-28

    Immobilized ions modulate nearby hydrophobic interactions and influence molecular recognition and self-assembly. We simulated disulfide bond-locked double mutants (L17C/L34C) and observed allosteric modulation of the peptide's intra-molecular interactions by the N-terminal tail. We revealed that the non-contacting charged N-terminal residues help the transfer of entropy to the surrounding solvation shell and stabilizing β-hairpin. PMID:26666686

  20. The proline-rich N-terminal sequence of calcineurin Abeta determines substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Kilka, Susann; Erdmann, Frank; Migdoll, Alexander; Fischer, Gunter; Weiwad, Matthias

    2009-03-10

    Three different genes of catalytic subunit A of the Ca(2+)-dependent serine/threonine protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) are encoded in the human genome forming heterodimers with regulatory subunit B. Even though physiological roles of CaN have been investigated extensively, less is known about the specific functions of the different catalytic isoforms. In this study, all human CaN holoenzymes containing either the alpha, beta, or gamma isoform of the catalytic subunit (CaN alpha, beta, or gamma, respectively) were expressed for the first time. Comparative kinetic analysis of the dephosphorylation of five specific CaN substrates provided evidence that the distinct isoforms of the catalytic subunit confer substrate specificities to the holoenzymes. CaN alpha dephosphorylates the transcription factor Elk-1 with 7- and 2-fold higher catalytic efficiencies than the beta and gamma isoforms, respectively. CaN gamma exhibits the highest k(cat)/K(m) value for DARPP-32, whereas the catalytic efficiencies for the dephosphorylation of NFAT and RII peptide were 3- and 5-fold lower, respectively, when compared with the other isoforms. Elk-1 and NFAT reporter gene activity measurements revealed even more pronounced substrate preferences of CaNA isoforms. Moreover, kinetic analysis demonstrated that CaN beta exhibits for all tested protein substrates the lowest K(m) values. Enzymatic characterization of the CaN beta(P14G/P18G) variant as well as the N-terminal truncated form CaN beta(22-524) revealed that the proline-rich sequence of CaN beta is involved in substrate recognition. CaN beta(22-524) exhibits an at least 4-fold decreased substrate affinity and a 5-fold increased turnover number. Since this study demonstrates that all CaN isoforms display the same cytoplasmic subcellular distribution and are expressed in each tested cell line, differences in substrate specificities may determine specific physiological functions of the distinct isoforms. PMID:19154138

  1. Purification and characterization of recombinant sugarcane sucrose phosphate synthase expressed in E. coli and insect Sf9 cells: an importance of the N-terminal domain for an allosteric regulatory property.

    PubMed

    Sawitri, Widhi Dyah; Narita, Hirotaka; Ishizaka-Ikeda, Etsuko; Sugiharto, Bambang; Hase, Toshiharu; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) catalyses the transfer of glycosyl group of uridine diphosphate glucose to fructose-6-phosphate to form sucrose-6-phosphate. Plant SPS plays a key role in photosynthetic carbon metabolisms, which activity is modulated by an allosteric activator glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). We produced recombinant sugarcane SPS using Escherichia coli and Sf9 insect cells to investigate its structure-function relationship. When expressed in E. coli, two forms of SPS with different sizes appeared; the larger was comparable in size with the authentic plant enzyme and the shorter was trimmed the N-terminal 20 kDa region off. In the insect cells, only enzyme with the authentic size was produced. We purified the trimmed SPS and the full size enzyme from insect cells and found their enzymatic properties differed significantly; the full size enzyme was activated allosterically by G6P, while the trimmed one showed a high activity even without G6P. We further introduced a series of N-terminal truncations up to 171 residue and found G6P-independent activity was enhanced by the truncation. These combined results indicated that the N-terminal region of sugarcane SPS is crucial for the allosteric regulation by G6P and may function like a suppressor domain for the enzyme activity. PMID:26826371

  2. An improved stable isotope N-terminal labeling approach with light/heavy TMPP to automate proteogenomics data validation: dN-TOP.

    PubMed

    Bertaccini, Diego; Vaca, Sebastian; Carapito, Christine; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine

    2013-06-01

    In silico gene prediction has proven to be prone to errors, especially regarding precise localization of start codons that spread in subsequent biological studies. Therefore, the high throughput characterization of protein N-termini is becoming an emerging challenge in the proteomics and especially proteogenomics fields. The trimethoxyphenyl phosphonium (TMPP) labeling approach (N-TOP) is an efficient N-terminomic approach that allows the characterization of both N-terminal and internal peptides in a single experiment. Due to its permanent positive charge, TMPP labeling strongly affects MS/MS fragmentation resulting in unadapted scoring of TMPP-derivatized peptide spectra by classical search engines. This behavior has led to difficulties in validating TMPP-derivatized peptide identifications with usual score filtering and thus to low/underestimated numbers of identified N-termini. We present herein a new strategy (dN-TOP) that overwhelmed the previous limitation allowing a confident and automated N-terminal peptide validation thanks to a combined labeling with light and heavy TMPP reagents. We show how this double labeling allows increasing the number of validated N-terminal peptides. This strategy represents a considerable improvement to the well-established N-TOP method with an enhanced and accelerated data processing making it now fully compatible with high-throughput proteogenomics studies. PMID:23641718

  3. The N-Terminal Peptides of the Three Human Isoforms of the Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel Have Different Helical Propensities.

    PubMed

    Guardiani, Carlo; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Amodeo, Giuseppe Federico; Grdadolnik, Joze; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; De Pinto, Vito; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Casu, Mariano

    2015-09-15

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main mitochondrial porin allowing the exchange of ions and metabolites between the cytosol and the mitochondrion. In addition, VDAC was found to actively interact with proteins playing a fundamental role in the regulation of apoptosis and being of central interest in cancer research. VDAC is a large transmembrane β-barrel channel, whose N-terminal helical fragment adheres to the channel interior, partially closing the pore. This fragment is considered to play a key role in protein stability and function as well as in the interaction with apoptosis-related proteins. Three VDAC isoforms are differently expressed in higher eukaryotes, for which distinct and complementary roles are proposed. In this work, the folding propensity of their N-terminal fragments has been compared. By using multiple spectroscopic techniques, and complementing the experimental results with theoretical computer-assisted approaches, we have characterized their conformational equilibrium. Significant differences were found in the intrinsic helical propensity of the three peptides, decreasing in the following order: hVDAC2 > hVDAC3 > hVDAC1. In light of the models proposed in the literature to explain voltage gating, selectivity, and permeability, as well as interactions with functionally related proteins, our results suggest that the different chemicophysical properties of the N-terminal domain are possibly correlated to different functions for the three isoforms. The overall emerging picture is that a similar transmembrane water accessible conduit has been equipped with not identical domains, whose differences can modulate the functional roles of the three VDAC isoforms. PMID:26303511

  4. Transformation of a fragment of beta-structural bacteriophage T4 adhesin to stable alpha-helical trimer.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikov, K A; Sernova, N V; Shneider, M M; Mesyanzhinov, V V

    2000-12-01

    Gene product 12 of bacteriophage T4, adhesin, serves to adhere the virus to host cells. Adhesin is a fibrous homotrimer, and a novel tertiary structure element, a beta-helix, is supposed to be a major structural feature of this protein. We have constructed two truncated gp12 mutants, 12N1 and 12N2, containing 221 and 135 N-terminal residues, respectively. When expressed in E. coli cells, these gp12 fragments formed labile beta-structural trimers. Another hybrid protein, 12FN, containing 179 N-terminal amino acid residues of gp12 fused to the C-terminal domain (31 amino acids) of T4 fibritin, was shown to have a trimeric proteolytically resistant alpha-helical structure. This structure is probably similar to that of fibritin, which has a triple alpha-helical coiled-coil structure. Hence, we have demonstrated the possibility of global transformation of fibrous protein structure using fusion with a C-terminal domain that initiates trimerization. PMID:11173503

  5. The N-terminal segment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Haemonchus contortus interacts with complements C1q and C3.

    PubMed

    Vedamurthy, G V; Sahoo, S; Devi, I K; Murugavel, S; Joshi, P

    2015-11-01

    Haemonchus contortus, an economically important blood-sucking parasite of sheep and goats, survives the harsh host gut environment by secreting a number of proteins referred as excretory/secretory (ES) products. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a glycolytic enzyme, is one of the components of H. contortus ES products. The parasite enzyme binds to complement C3 and inhibits its activity. In this study, the C3-binding activity of the parasite GAPDH was mapped to the N-terminal part of the enzyme by generating defined recombinant fragments of the protein. The N-terminal fragment also trapped complement C1q but not C5 and inhibited complement-mediated lysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes. Competitive binding assay indicates different binding regions for C1q and C3 proteins. GAPDH stimulated proliferation of goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro and reacted with the sera from H. contortus-infected animals. However, the fragments of GAPDH did not stimulate cell proliferation nor reacted with the infected animal sera. Furthermore, denatured GAPDH failed to react with the infected animal sera in dot blot suggesting conformation-dependent epitope. These results demonstrate an elegant strategy of the parasite to completely shut down complement activation and identify GAPDH as a promising target for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26332726

  6. N-terminal sequences direct the autophosphorylation states of the FER tyrosine kinases in vivo.

    PubMed

    Orlovsky, K; Ben-Dor, I; Priel-Halachmi, S; Malovany, H; Nir, U

    2000-09-12

    p94(fer) and p51(ferT) are two tyrosine kinases which share identical SH2 and kinase domains but differ in their N-terminal regions. While p94(fer) is expressed in most mammalian cells, the accumulation of p51(ferT) is restricted to meiotic spermatocytes. Here we show that the different N-terminal tails of p94(fer) and p51(ferT) direct different autophosphorylation states of these two kinases in vivo. N-terminal coiled-coil domains cooperated to drive the oligomerization and autophosphorylation in trans of p94(fer). Moreover, the ectopically expressed N-terminal tail of p94(fer) could act as a dominant negative mutant and associated with the endogenous p94(fer) protein in CHO cells. This increased significantly the percentage of cells residing in the G0/G1 phase, thus suggesting a role for p94(fer) in the regulation of G1 progression. Unlike p94(fer), overexpressed p51(ferT) was not autophosphorylated in COS1 cells. However, removal of the unique N-terminal 43 aa of p51(ferT) or the replacement of this region by a parallel segment from p94(fer) endowed the modified p51(ferT) with the ability to autophosphorylate. The unique N-terminal sequences of p51(ferT) thus interfere with its ability to autophosphorylate in vivo. These experiments indicate that the N-terminal sequences of the FER tyrosine kinases direct their different cellular autophosphorylation states, thereby dictating their different cellular functions. PMID:10998246

  7. BacM, an N-terminally processed bactofilin of Myxococcus xanthus, is crucial for proper cell shape

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Matthias K.; McHugh, Colleen A.; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bactofilins are fibre-forming bacterial cytoskeletal proteins. Here, we report the structural and biochemical characterization of MXAN_7475 (BacM), one of the four bactofilins of Myxococcus xanthus. Absence of BacM leads to a characteristic ‘crooked’ cell morphology and an increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting cell wall biosynthesis. The absence of the other three bactofilins MXAN_4637–4635 (BacN-P) has no obvious phenotype. In M. xanthus, BacM exists as a 150-amino-acid full-length version and as a version cleaved before Ser28. In the cell, native BacM forms 3 nm wide fibres, which assemble into bundles forming helix-like cytoplasmic cables throughout the cell, and in a subset of cells additionally a polarly arranged lateral rod-like structure. Isolated fibres consist almost completely of the N-terminally truncated version, suggesting that the proteolytic cleavage occurs before or during fibre formation. Fusion of BacM to mCherry perturbs BacM function and cellular fibre arrangement, resulting for example in the formation of one prominent polar corkscrew-like structure per cell. Immunofluorescence staining of BacM and MreB shows that their cellular distributions are not matching. Taken together, these data suggest that rod-shaped bacteria like M. xanthus use bactofilin fibres to achieve and maintain their characteristic cell morphology and cell wall stability. PMID:21414039

  8. BacM, an N-terminally processed bactofilin of Myxococcus xanthus, is crucial for proper cell shape.

    PubMed

    Koch, Matthias K; McHugh, Colleen A; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2011-05-01

    Bactofilins are fibre-forming bacterial cytoskeletal proteins. Here, we report the structural and biochemical characterization of MXAN_7475 (BacM), one of the four bactofilins of Myxococcus xanthus. Absence of BacM leads to a characteristic 'crooked' cell morphology and an increased sensitivity to antibiotics targeting cell wall biosynthesis. The absence of the other three bactofilins MXAN_4637-4635 (BacN-P) has no obvious phenotype. In M. xanthus, BacM exists as a 150-amino-acid full-length version and as a version cleaved before Ser28. In the cell, native BacM forms 3 nm wide fibres, which assemble into bundles forming helix-like cytoplasmic cables throughout the cell, and in a subset of cells additionally a polarly arranged lateral rod-like structure. Isolated fibres consist almost completely of the N-terminally truncated version, suggesting that the proteolytic cleavage occurs before or during fibre formation. Fusion of BacM to mCherry perturbs BacM function and cellular fibre arrangement, resulting for example in the formation of one prominent polar corkscrew-like structure per cell. Immunofluorescence staining of BacM and MreB shows that their cellular distributions are not matching. Taken together, these data suggest that rod-shaped bacteria like M. xanthus use bactofilin fibres to achieve and maintain their characteristic cell morphology and cell wall stability. PMID:21414039

  9. N-terminal cleavage of the mitochondrial fusion GTPase OPA1 occurs via a caspase-independent mechanism in cerebellar granule neurons exposed to oxidative or nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Josie J.; Zommer, Amelia E.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Duval, Nathan; Blackstone, Craig; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal cell death via apoptosis or necrosis underlies several devastating neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from oxidative or nitrosative stress often acts as an initiating stimulus for intrinsic apoptosis or necrosis. These events frequently occur in conjunction with imbalances in the mitochondrial fission and fusion equilibrium, although the cause and effect relationships remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) that oxidative or nitrosative stress induces an N-terminal cleavage of optic atrophy-1 (OPA1), a dynamin-like GTPase that regulates mitochondrial fusion and maintenance of cristae architecture. This cleavage event is indistinguishable from the N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 observed in CGNs undergoing caspase-mediated apoptosis (Loucks et al., 2009) and results in removal of a key lysine residue (K301) within the GTPase domain. OPA1 cleavage in CGNs occurs coincident with extensive mitochondrial fragmentation, disruption of the microtubule network, and cell death. In contrast to OPA1 cleavage induced in CGNs by removing depolarizing extracellular potassium (5K apoptotic conditions), oxidative or nitrosative stress-induced OPA1 cleavage caused by complex I inhibition or nitric oxide, respectively, is caspase-independent. N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 is also observed in vivo in aged rat and mouse midbrain and hippocampal tissues. We conclude that N-terminal cleavage and subsequent inactivation of OPA1 may be a contributing factor in the neuronal cell death processes underlying neurodegenerative diseases, particularly those associated with aging. Furthermore, these data suggest that OPA1 cleavage is a likely convergence point for mitochondrial dysfunction and imbalances in mitochondrial fission and fusion induced by oxidative or nitrosative stress. PMID:23220553

  10. N-terminal cleavage of the mitochondrial fusion GTPase OPA1 occurs via a caspase-independent mechanism in cerebellar granule neurons exposed to oxidative or nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Gray, Josie J; Zommer, Amelia E; Bouchard, Ron J; Duval, Nathan; Blackstone, Craig; Linseman, Daniel A

    2013-02-01

    Neuronal cell death via apoptosis or necrosis underlies several devastating neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from oxidative or nitrosative stress often acts as an initiating stimulus for intrinsic apoptosis or necrosis. These events frequently occur in conjunction with imbalances in the mitochondrial fission and fusion equilibrium, although the cause and effect relationships remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) that oxidative or nitrosative stress induces an N-terminal cleavage of optic atrophy-1 (OPA1), a dynamin-like GTPase that regulates mitochondrial fusion and maintenance of cristae architecture. This cleavage event is indistinguishable from the N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 observed in CGNs undergoing caspase-mediated apoptosis (Loucks et al., 2009) and results in removal of a key lysine residue (K301) within the GTPase domain. OPA1 cleavage in CGNs occurs coincident with extensive mitochondrial fragmentation, disruption of the microtubule network, and cell death. In contrast to OPA1 cleavage induced in CGNs by removing depolarizing extracellular potassium (5K apoptotic conditions), oxidative or nitrosative stress-induced OPA1 cleavage caused by complex I inhibition or nitric oxide, respectively, is caspase-independent. N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 is also observed in vivo in aged rat and mouse midbrain and hippocampal tissues. We conclude that N-terminal cleavage and subsequent inactivation of OPA1 may be a contributing factor in the neuronal cell death processes underlying neurodegenerative diseases, particularly those associated with aging. Furthermore, these data suggest that OPA1 cleavage is a likely convergence point for mitochondrial dysfunction and imbalances in mitochondrial fission and fusion induced by oxidative or nitrosative stress. PMID:23220553

  11. Determination of statherin N-terminal peptide conformation on hydroxyapatite crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Long, J.R.; Dindot, J.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Stayton, P.S.; Drobny, G.P.

    2000-03-01

    Proteins play an important role in inorganic crystal engineering during the development and growth of hard tissues such as bone and teeth. Although many of these proteins have been studied in the liquid state, there is little direct information describing molecular recognition at the protein-crystal interface. The authors have used {sup 13}C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques to investigate the conformation of an N-terminal peptide of salivary statherin both free and adsorbed on hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals. The torsion angle {var{underscore}phi} was determined at three positions along the backbone of the phosphorylated N-terminal 15 amino acid peptide fragment (DpSpSEEKFLRRIGRFG) by measuring distances between the backbone carbonyls carbons in the indicated adjacent amino acids using dipolar recoupling with a windowless sequence (DRAWS). Global secondary structure was determined by measuring the dipolar coupling between the {sup 13}C backbone carbonyl and the backbone {sup 15}N in the i {r{underscore}arrow} i + 4 residues (DpSpSEEKFLRRIGRFG) using rotational echo double resonance (REDOR). Peptides singly labeled at amino acids pS{sub 3}, L{sub 8}, and G{sub 12} were used for relaxation and line width measurements. The peptides adsorbed to the HAP surface have an average {var{underscore}phi} of {minus}85{degree} at the N-terminus (pSpS), {minus}60{degree} in the middle (FL) and {minus}73{degree} near the C-terminus (IG). The average {var{underscore}phi} angle measured at the pSpS position and the observed high conformational dispersion suggest a random coil conformation at this position. However, the FL position displays an average {var{underscore}phi} that indicates significant {alpha}-helical content, and the long time points in the DRAWS experiment fit best to a relatively narrow distribution of {var{underscore}phi} that falls within the protein data bank {alpha}-helical conformational space. REDOR measurements confirm the presence of helical content, where the

  12. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  13. Loss of N-terminal Acetylation Suppresses A Prion Phenotype By Modulating Global Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William M.; Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2014-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation is among the most ubiquitous of protein modifications in eukaryotes. While loss of N-terminal acetylation is associated with many abnormalities, the molecular basis of these effects is known for only a few cases, where acetylation of single factors has been linked to binding avidity or metabolic stability. In contrast, the impact of N-terminal acetylation for the majority of the proteome, and its combinatorial contributions to phenotypes, are unknown. Here, by studying the yeast prion [PSI+], an amyloid of the Sup35 protein, we show that loss of N-terminal acetylation promotes general protein misfolding, a redeployment of chaperones to these substrates, and a corresponding stress response. These proteostasis changes, combined with the decreased stability of unacetylated Sup35 amyloid, reduce the size of prion aggregates and reverse their phenotypic consequences. Thus, loss of N-terminal acetylation, and its previously unanticipated role in protein biogenesis, globally resculpts the proteome to create a unique phenotype. PMID:25023910

  14. Crystal Structure of the Measles Virus Nucleoprotein Core in Complex with an N-Terminal Region of Phosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Guryanov, Sergey G.; Liljeroos, Lassi; Kasaragod, Prasad; Kajander, Tommi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The enveloped negative-stranded RNA virus measles virus (MeV) is an important human pathogen. The nucleoprotein (N0) assembles with the viral RNA into helical ribonucleocapsids (NC) which are, in turn, coated by a helical layer of the matrix protein. The viral polymerase complex uses the NC as its template. The N0 assembly onto the NC and the activity of the polymerase are regulated by the viral phosphoprotein (P). In this study, we pulled down an N01-408 fragment lacking most of its C-terminal tail domain by several affinity-tagged, N-terminal P fragments to map the N0-binding region of P to the first 48 amino acids. We showed biochemically and using P mutants the importance of the hydrophobic interactions for the binding. We fused an N0 binding peptide, P1-48, to the C terminus of an N021-408 fragment lacking both the N-terminal peptide and the C-terminal tail of N protein to reconstitute and crystallize the N0-P complex. We solved the X-ray structure of the resulting N0-P chimeric protein at a resolution of 2.7 Å. The structure reveals the molecular details of the conserved N0-P interface and explains how P chaperones N0, preventing both self-assembly of N0 and its binding to RNA. Finally, we propose a model for a preinitiation complex for RNA polymerization. IMPORTANCE Measles virus is an important, highly contagious human pathogen. The nucleoprotein N binds only to viral genomic RNA and forms the helical ribonucleocapsid that serves as a template for viral replication. We address how N is regulated by another protein, the phosphoprotein (P), to prevent newly synthesized N from binding to cellular RNA. We describe the atomic model of an N-P complex and compare it to helical ribonucleocapsid. We thus provide insight into how P chaperones N and helps to start viral RNA synthesis. Our results provide a new insight into mechanisms of paramyxovirus replication. New data on the mechanisms of phosphoprotein chaperone action allows better understanding of

  15. N-terminal-mediated oligomerization of DnaA drives the occupancy-dependent rejuvenation of the protein on the membrane

    PubMed Central

    Aranovich, Alexander; Braier-Marcovitz, Shani; Ansbacher, Esti; Granek, Rony; Parola, Abraham H.; Fishov, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    DnaA, the initiator of chromosome replication in most known eubacteria species, is activated once per cell division cycle. Its overall activity cycle is driven by ATP hydrolysis and ADP–ATP exchange. The latter can be promoted by binding to specific sequences on the chromosome and/or to acidic phospholipids in the membrane. We have previously shown that the transition into an active form (rejuvenation) is strongly co-operative with respect to DnaA membrane occupancy. Only at low membrane occupancy is DnaA reactivation efficiently catalysed by the acidic phospholipids. The present study was aimed at unravelling the molecular mechanism underlying the occupancy-dependent DnaA rejuvenation. We found that truncation of the DnaA N-terminal completely abolishes the co-operative transformation between the high and low occupancy states (I and II respectively) without affecting the membrane binding. The environmentally sensitive fluorophore specifically attached to the N-terminal cysteines of DnaA reported on occupancy-correlated changes in its vicinity. Cross-linking of DnaA with a short homobifunctional reagent revealed that state II of the protein on the membrane corresponds to a distinct oligomeric form of DnaA. The kinetic transition of DnaA on the membrane surface is described in the present study by a generalized 2D condensation phase transition model, confirming the existence of two states of DnaA on the membrane and pointing to the possibility that membrane protein density serves as an on-off switch in vivo. We conclude that the DnaA conformation attained at low surface density drives its N-terminal-mediated oligomerization, which is presumably a pre-requisite for facilitated nt exchange. PMID:26272946

  16. A domain in the N-terminal extension of class IIb eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is important for tRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Frugier, Magali; Moulinier, Luc; Giegé, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Cytoplasmic aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a homodimer of 64 kDa subunits. Previous studies have emphasized the high sensitivity of the N-terminal region to proteolytic cleavage, leading to truncated species that have lost the first 20–70 residues but that retain enzymatic activity and dimeric structure. In this work, we demonstrate that the N-terminal extension in yeast AspRS participates in tRNA binding and we generalize this finding to eukaryotic class IIb aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. By gel retardation studies and footprinting experiments on yeast tRNAAsp, we show that the extension, connected to the anticodon-binding module of the synthetase, contacts tRNA on the minor groove side of its anticodon stem. Sequence comparison of eukaryotic class IIb synthetases identifies a lysine-rich 11 residue sequence (29LSKKALKKLQK39 in yeast AspRS with the consensus xSKxxLKKxxK in class IIb synthetases) that is important for this binding. Direct proof of the role of this sequence comes from a mutagenesis analysis and from binding studies using the isolated peptide. PMID:10811628

  17. Isolation of a novel cold-active family 11 Xylanase from the filamentous fungus Bispora antennata and deletion of its N-terminal amino acids on thermostability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Wang, Yaru; Luo, Huiying; Wang, Liwen; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we first reported a cold-active xylanase of glycosyl hydrolase family 11, Xyn11, from the filamentous fungus Bispora antennata. The coding gene (xyn11) was cloned and successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris. Deduced Xyn11 exhibited the highest identity of 65 % with a family 11 endo-β-1,4-xylanase from Alternaria sp. HB186. Recombinant Xyn11 exhibited maximal activity at 35 °C and remained 21 % of the activity at 0 °C. Sequence alignment showed that the N-terminal sequence of Xyn11 is distinct from those of thermophilic xylanases of family 11. To determine its effect on enzyme properties, the Xyn11 mutant without the N-terminal sequence, t-Xyn11, was then constructed, expressed in P. pastoris, and compared with Xyn11. Both enzymes showed optimal activities at 35 °C and pH 5.5 and were stable at pH 2.0-12.0. Compared with truncated mutant t-Xyn11, Xyn11 retained more activity after 20-min incubation at 40 °C (Xyn11:28 % vs. t-Xyn11:4 %) and degraded xylan substrates more completely. Thus, a new factor affecting the thermostability of cold-active xylanase of family 11 was identified. PMID:25351632

  18. N-terminal Proteomics and Ribosome Profiling Provide a Comprehensive View of the Alternative Translation Initiation Landscape in Mice and Men*

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Petra; Gawron, Daria; Van Criekinge, Wim; Menschaert, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Usage of presumed 5′UTR or downstream in-frame AUG codons, next to non-AUG codons as translation start codons contributes to the diversity of a proteome as protein isoforms harboring different N-terminal extensions or truncations can serve different functions. Recent ribosome profiling data revealed a highly underestimated occurrence of database nonannotated, and thus alternative translation initiation sites (aTIS), at the mRNA level. N-terminomics data in addition showed that in higher eukaryotes around 20% of all identified protein N termini point to such aTIS, to incorrect assignments of the translation start codon, translation initiation at near-cognate start codons, or to alternative splicing. We here report on more than 1700 unique alternative protein N termini identified at the proteome level in human and murine cellular proteomes. Customized databases, created using the translation initiation mapping obtained from ribosome profiling data, additionally demonstrate the use of initiator methionine decoded near-cognate start codons besides the existence of N-terminal extended protein variants at the level of the proteome. Various newly identified aTIS were confirmed by mutagenesis, and meta-analyses demonstrated that aTIS reside in strong Kozak-like motifs and are conserved among eukaryotes, hinting to a possible biological impact. Finally, TargetP analysis predicted that the usage of aTIS often results in altered subcellular localization patterns, providing a mechanism for functional diversification. PMID:24623590

  19. Identification of specific antigenic epitope at N-terminal segment of enterovirus 71 (EV-71) VP1 protein and characterization of its use in recombinant form for early diagnosis of EV-71 infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Bingfu; Xu, Mingjie; Dai, Xing; Purdy, Michael A.; Meng, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiologic agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). We sought to identify EV-71 specific antigens and develop serologic assays for acute-phase EV-71 infection. A series of truncated proteins within the N-terminal 100 amino acids (aa) of EV-71 VP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. Western blot (WB) analysis showed that positions around 11–21 aa contain EV-71-specific antigenic sites, whereas positions 1–5 and 51–100 contain epitopes shared with human coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) and human echovirus 6 (E-6). The N-terminal truncated protein of VP1, VP16–43, exhibited good stability and was recognized by anti-EV-71 specific rabbit sera. Alignment analysis showed that VP16–43 is highly conserved among EV-71 strains from different genotypes but was heterologous among other enteroviruses. When the GST-VP16–43 fusion protein was incorporated as antibody-capture agent in a WB assay and an ELISA for detecting anti-EV-71 IgM in human sera, sensitivities of 91.7% and 77.8% were achieved, respectively, with 100% specificity for both. The characterized EV-71 VP1 protein truncated to positions 6–43 aa has potential as an antigen for detection of anti-EV-71 IgM for early diagnosis of EV-71 infection in a WB format. PMID:24952304

  20. Structure of a double hexamer of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance protein N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Martin; Enemark, Eric J

    2016-07-01

    The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of the Pyrococcus furiosus minichromosome maintenance (MCM) protein as a double hexamer is described. The MCM complex is a ring-shaped helicase that unwinds DNA at the replication fork of eukaryotes and archaea. Prior to replication initiation, the MCM complex assembles as an inactive double hexamer at specific sites of DNA. The presented structure is highly consistent with previous MCM double-hexamer structures and shows two MCM hexamers with a head-to-head interaction mediated by the N-terminal domain. Minor differences include a diminished head-to-head interaction and a slightly reduced inter-hexamer rotation. PMID:27380371

  1. Role of N-terminal residues on folding and stability of C-phycoerythrin: simulation and urea-induced denaturation studies.

    PubMed

    Anwer, Khalid; Sonani, Ravi; Madamwar, Datta; Singh, Parvesh; Khan, Faez; Bisetty, Krishna; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    The conformational state of biliproteins can be determined by optical properties of the covalently linked chromophores. Recently determined crystal structure of truncated form of α-subunit of cyanobacterial phycoerythrin (αC-PE) from Phormidium tenue provides a new insight into the structure-function relationship of αC-PE. To compare their stabilities, we have measured urea-induced denaturation transitions of the full length αC-PE (FL-αC-PE) and truncated αC-PE (Tr-αC-PE) followed by observing changes in absorbance at 565 nm, fluorescence at 350 and 573 nm, and circular dichroism at 222 nm as a function of [urea], the molar concentration of urea. The transition curve of each protein was analyzed for ΔG(D)(0), the value of Gibbs free energy change on denaturation (ΔG(D)) in the absence of urea; m, the slope (=∂∆G(D)/∂[urea]), and C(m), the midpoint of the denaturation curve, i.e. [urea] at which ΔG(D) = 0. A difference of about 10% in ΔG(D)(0) observed between FL-αC-PE and Tr-αC-PE, suggests that the two proteins are almost equally stable, and the natural deletion of 31 residues from the N-terminal side of the full length protein does not alter its stability. Furthermore, normalization of probes shows that the urea-induced denaturation of both the proteins is a two-state process. Folding of both structural variants (Tr-αC-PE and FL-αC-PE) of P. tenue were also studied using molecular dynamics simulations at 300 K. The results show clearly that the stability of the proteins is evenly distributed over the whole structure indicating no significant role of N-terminal residues in the stability of both proteins. PMID:24279700

  2. Ezrin self-association involves binding of an N-terminal domain to a normally masked C-terminal domain that includes the F-actin binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Gary, R; Bretscher, A

    1995-01-01

    Ezrin is a membrane-cytoskeletal linking protein that is concentrated in actin-rich surface structures. It is closely related to the microvillar proteins radixin and moesin and to the tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin. Cell extracts contain ezrin dimers and ezrin-moesin heterodimers in addition to monomers. Truncated ezrin fusion proteins were assayed by blot overlay to determine which regions mediate self-association. Here we report that ezrin self-association occurs by head-to-tail joining of distinct N-terminal and C-terminal domains. It is likely that these domains, termed N- and C-ERMADs (ezrin-radixin-moesin association domain), are responsible for homotypic and heterotypic associations among ERM family members. The N-ERMAD of ezrin resided within amino acids 1-296; deletion of 10 additional residues resulted in loss of activity. The C-ERMAD was mapped to the last 107 amino acids of ezrin, residues 479-585. The two residues at the C-terminus were required for activity, and the region from 530-585 was insufficient. The C-ERMAD was masked in the native monomer. Exposure of this domain required unfolding ezrin with sodium dodecyl sulfate or expressing the domain as part of a truncated protein. Intermolecular association could not occur unless the C-ERMAD had been made accessible to its N-terminal partner. It can be inferred that dimerization in vivo requires an activation step that exposes this masked domain. The conformationally inaccessible C-terminal region included the F-actin binding site, suggesting that this activity is likewise regulated by masking. Images PMID:7579708

  3. Calmodulin activation of an endoplasmic reticulum-located calcium pump involves an interaction with the N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, I.; Harper, J. F.; Liang, F.; Sze, H.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate how calmodulin regulates a unique subfamily of Ca(2+) pumps found in plants, we examined the kinetic properties of isoform ACA2 identified in Arabidopsis. A recombinant ACA2 was expressed in a yeast K616 mutant deficient in two endogenous Ca(2+) pumps. Orthovanadate-sensitive (45)Ca(2+) transport into vesicles isolated from transformants demonstrated that ACA2 is a Ca(2+) pump. Ca(2+) pumping by the full-length protein (ACA2-1) was 4- to 10-fold lower than that of the N-terminal truncated ACA2-2 (Delta2-80), indicating that the N-terminal domain normally acts to inhibit the pump. An inhibitory sequence (IC(50) = 4 microM) was localized to a region within valine-20 to leucine-44, because a peptide corresponding to this sequence lowered the V(max) and increased the K(m) for Ca(2+) of the constitutively active ACA2-2 to values comparable to the full-length pump. The peptide also blocked the activity (IC(50) = 7 microM) of a Ca(2+) pump (AtECA1) belonging to a second family of Ca(2+) pumps. This inhibitory sequence appears to overlap with a calmodulin-binding site in ACA2, previously mapped between aspartate-19 and arginine-36 (J.F. Harper, B. Hong, I. Hwang, H.Q. Guo, R. Stoddard, J.F. Huang, M.G. Palmgren, H. Sze inverted question mark1998 J Biol Chem 273: 1099-1106). These results support a model in which the pump is kept "unactivated" by an intramolecular interaction between an autoinhibitory sequence located between residues 20 and 44 and a site in the Ca(2+) pump core that is highly conserved between different Ca(2+) pump families. Results further support a model in which activation occurs as a result of Ca(2+)-induced binding of calmodulin to a site overlapping or immediately adjacent to the autoinhibitory sequence.

  4. Cooperative binding of the yeast Spt10p activator to the histone upstream activating sequences is mediated through an N-terminal dimerization domain

    PubMed Central

    Mendiratta, Geetu; Eriksson, Peter R.; Clark, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The yeast Spt10p activator is a putative histone acetyltransferase (HAT) possessing a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain (DBD) which binds to the upstream activation sequences (UAS elements) in the histone gene promoters. Spt10p binds to a pair of histone UAS elements with extreme positive cooperativity. The molecular basis of this cooperativity was addressed. Spt10p (640 residues) is an elongated dimer, but the isolated DBD (residues 283–396) is a monomer and binds non-cooperatively to DNA. A Spt10p fragment comprising the N-terminal domain (NTD), HAT domain and DBD (residues 1–396) binds cooperatively and is a dimer, whereas an overlapping Spt10p fragment comprising the DBD and C-terminal domains (residues 283–640) binds non-cooperatively and is a monomer. These observations imply that cooperative binding requires dimerization. The isolated NTD (residues 1–98) is a dimer and is responsible for dimerization. We propose that cooperativity involves a conformational change in the Spt10p dimer which facilitates the simultaneous recognition of two UAS elements. In vivo, deletion of the NTD results in poor growth, but does not prevent the binding at the HTA1 promoter, suggesting that dimerization is biologically important. Residues 1–396 are sufficient for normal growth, indicating that the critical functions of Spt10p reside in the N-terminal domains. PMID:17202156

  5. Focusing of truncated Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Zoltán L.; Bor, Zsolt

    2003-07-01

    It is shown that the focusing of truncated Gaussian beams can be treated by the same manner as uniform spherical waves, i.e., the diffraction integral can be expressed by the Lommel functions, which offers a very efficient way for the calculation of the three-dimensional light distribution near focus. All the expressions for the uniform spherical waves hold good for Gaussian beams if the first variable in the Lommel functions is extended to the complex domain. The intensity distribution depending on the Fresnel number and the truncation coefficient is calculated. The location of the first few minima and maxima of the intensity in focal plane is given for different values of the truncation coefficient. The phase behavior depending on the truncation coefficient is studied.

  6. The N-terminal part of the E.coli DNA binding protein FIS is essential for stimulating site-specific DNA inversion but is not required for specific DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, C; Ninnemann, O; Fuss, H; Kahmann, R

    1991-01-01

    FIS protein is involved in several different cellular processes stimulating site-specific recombination in phages Mu and lambda as well as transcription of stable RNA operons in E.coli. We have performed a mutational analysis of fis and provide genetic and biochemical evidence that a truncated version of FIS lacking the N-terminal region is sufficient for specific DNA binding and for stimulating lambda excision. These mutants also retain their ability to autoregulate fis gene expression. Such mutant proteins, however, cannot stimulate the enhancer dependent DNA inversion reaction. Images PMID:1834996

  7. The N-terminal acetyltransferase Naa10 is essential for zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Rasmus; Myklebust, Line M.; Thiel, Puja; Foyn, Håvard; Fladmark, Kari E.; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation, catalysed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes and involves the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the α-amino group of the first amino acid. Functions of N-terminal acetylation include protein degradation and sub-cellular targeting. Recent findings in humans indicate that a dysfunctional Nα-acetyltransferase (Naa) 10, the catalytic subunit of NatA, the major NAT, is associated with lethality during infancy. In the present study, we identified the Danio rerio orthologue zebrafish Naa 10 (zNaa10). In vitro N-terminal acetylation assays revealed that zNaa10 has NAT activity with substrate specificity highly similar to that of human Naa10. Spatiotemporal expression pattern was determined by in situ hybridization, showing ubiquitous expression with especially strong staining in brain and eye. By morpholino-mediated knockdown, we demonstrated that naa10 morphants displayed increased lethality, growth retardation and developmental abnormalities like bent axis, abnormal eyes and bent tails. In conclusion, we identified the zebrafish Naa10 orthologue and revealed that it is essential for normal development and viability of zebrafish. PMID:26251455

  8. Supramolecular hydrogelators of N-terminated dipeptides selectively inhibit cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Bing

    2011-12-21

    Consisting of N-terminated diphenylalanine, a new type of supramolecular hydrogelators forms hydrogels within a narrow pH window (pH 5.0 to 6.0) and selectively inhibits growth of HeLa cells, which provides important and useful insights for designing molecular nanofibers as potential nanomedicines. PMID:22037699

  9. Supramolecular hydrogelators of N-terminated dipeptides selectively inhibit cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Consisting of N-terminated diphenylalanine, a new type of supramolecular hydrogelators forms hydrogels within a narrow pH window (pH 5.0 to 6.0) and selectively inhibits growth of HeLa cells, which provides important and useful insights for designing molecular nanofibers as potential nanomedicines. PMID:22037699

  10. Crystal structure of the Sec18p N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Babor, S. Mariana; Fass, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Yeast Sec18p and its mammalian orthologue N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) are hexameric ATPases with a central role in vesicle trafficking. Aided by soluble adapter factors (SNAPs), Sec18p/NSF induces ATP-dependent disassembly of a complex of integral membrane proteins from the vesicle and target membranes (SNAP receptors). During the ATP hydrolysis cycle, the Sec18p/NSF homohexamer undergoes a large-scale conformational change involving repositioning of the most N terminal of the three domains of each protomer, a domain that is required for SNAP-mediated interaction with SNAP receptors. Whether an internal conformational change in the N-terminal domains accompanies their reorientation with respect to the rest of the hexamer remains to be addressed. We have determined the structure of the N-terminal domain from Sec18p by x-ray crystallography. The Sec18p N-terminal domain consists of two β-sheet-rich subdomains connected by a short linker. A conserved basic cleft opposite the linker may constitute a SNAP-binding site. Despite structural variability in the linker region and in an adjacent loop, all three independent molecules in the crystal asymmetric unit have the identical subdomain interface, supporting the notion that this interface is a preferred packing arrangement. However, the linker flexibility allows for the possibility that other subdomain orientations may be sampled. PMID:10611286

  11. Alzheimer therapy with an antibody against N-terminal Abeta 4-X and pyroglutamate Abeta 3-X

    PubMed Central

    Antonios, Gregory; Borgers, Henning; Richard, Bernhard C.; Brauß, Andreas; Meißner, Julius; Weggen, Sascha; Pena, Vladimir; Pillot, Thierry; Davies, Sarah L.; Bakrania, Preeti; Matthews, David; Brownlees, Janet; Bouter, Yvonne; Bayer, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Full-length Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40, N-truncated pyroglutamate Aβ3-42 and Aβ4-42 are major variants in the Alzheimer brain. Aβ4-42 has not been considered as a therapeutic target yet. We demonstrate that the antibody NT4X and its Fab fragment reacting with both the free N-terminus of Aβ4-x and pyroglutamate Aβ3-X mitigated neuron loss in Tg4-42 mice expressing Aβ4-42 and completely rescued spatial reference memory deficits after passive immunization. NT4X and its Fab fragment also rescued working memory deficits in wild type mice induced by intraventricular injection of Aβ4-42. NT4X reduced pyroglutamate Aβ3-x, Aβx-40 and Thioflavin-S positive plaque load after passive immunization of 5XFAD mice. Aβ1-x and Aβx-42 plaque deposits were unchanged. Importantly, for the first time, we demonstrate that passive immunization using the antibody NT4X is therapeutically beneficial in Alzheimer mouse models showing that N-truncated Aβ starting with position four in addition to pyroglutamate Aβ3-x is a relevant target to fight Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26626428

  12. Trypanosome Alternative Oxidase Possesses both an N-Terminal and Internal Mitochondrial Targeting Signal

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, VaNae; Singha, Ujjal K.; Smith, Joseph T.; Weems, Ebony

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of mitochondrial targeting signals (MTS) by receptor translocases of outer and inner membranes of mitochondria is one of the prerequisites for import of nucleus-encoded proteins into this organelle. The MTS for a majority of trypanosomatid mitochondrial proteins have not been well defined. Here we analyzed the targeting signal for trypanosome alternative oxidase (TAO), which functions as the sole terminal oxidase in the infective form of Trypanosoma brucei. Deleting the first 10 of 24 amino acids predicted to be the classical N-terminal MTS of TAO did not affect its import into mitochondria in vitro. Furthermore, ectopically expressed TAO was targeted to mitochondria in both forms of the parasite even after deletion of first 40 amino acid residues. However, deletion of more than 20 amino acid residues from the N terminus reduced the efficiency of import. These data suggest that besides an N-terminal MTS, TAO possesses an internal mitochondrial targeting signal. In addition, both the N-terminal MTS and the mature TAO protein were able to target a cytosolic protein, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), to a T. brucei mitochondrion. Further analysis identified a cryptic internal MTS of TAO, located within amino acid residues 115 to 146, which was fully capable of targeting DHFR to mitochondria. The internal signal was more efficient than the N-terminal MTS for import of this heterologous protein. Together, these results show that TAO possesses a cleavable N-terminal MTS as well as an internal MTS and that these signals act together for efficient import of TAO into mitochondria. PMID:24562910

  13. N-terminal modifications contribute to flowering time and immune response regulations

    PubMed Central

    Kapos, Paul; Xu, Fang; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    A variety of N-terminal co-translational modifications play crucial roles in many cellular processes across eukaryotic organisms. Recently, N-terminal acetylation has been proposed as a regulatory mechanism for the control of plant immunity. Analysis of an N-terminal acetyltransferase complex A (NatA) mutant, naa15–1, revealed that NatA controls the stability of immune receptor Suppressor of NPR1, Constitutive 1 (SNC1) in an antagonistic fashion with NatB. Here, we further report on an antagonistic regulation of flowering time by NatA and NatB, where naa15–1 plants exhibit late flowering, opposite of the early flowering phenotype previously observed in natB mutants. In addition, we provide evidence for the involvement of another N-terminal modification, N-myristoylation, in controlling pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity (PTI) through the characterization of N-myristoyltransferase 1 (NMT1) defective mutants, which express a low level of NMT1 protein. The mutant line lacks induced production of reactive oxygen species and MAP kinase phosphorylation in response to treatment with the known immune elicitor flg22. NMT1 deficient plants also exhibit increased susceptibility to Pst hrcC, a non-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae tomato strain lacking a functional type-III secretion system. The potential for the NatA-NatB antagonistic relationship to exist outside of the regulation of SNC1 as well as the disclosing of NMT1s role in PTI further supports the significant contribution of N-terminal co-translational modifications in the regulation of biological processes in plants, and present interesting areas for further exploration. PMID:26361095

  14. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, Sheila G.; Cristina Nonato, M.

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  15. Pharmacological activity of the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of secretory leukoprotease inhibitor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, K.; Kamimura, T.; Watanabe, K.; Suga, T.; Kanesaki, M.; Takeuchi, A.; Imaizumi, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    1995-01-01

    1. In order to characterize the physiological functions of the domain structure of secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), the biological capacities of half-length SLPIs, (Ser1-Pro54)SLPI and (Asn55-Ala107)SLPI, were investigated and compared with those of full-length SLPI. 2. The activities of these inhibitors against several serine proteases were determined using synthetic chromogenic substrates. The inhibitory capacity of the C-terminal domain, (Asn55-Ala107)SLPI, was as strong as that of full-length SLPI against human neutrophil elastase (NE), cathepsin G and chymotrypsin. It possessed less trypsin inhibitory activity than intact SLPI. For the N-terminal domain of SLPI, (Ser1-Pro54)SLPI, no inhibitory activity could be detected against the serine proteases tested in this study. 3. The inhibitory activity of (Asn55-Ala107)SLPI against the proteolysis of the natural substrates elastin and collagen by NE was comparable with that of full-SLPI (elastin, IC50 = 907 +/- 31 nM for SLPI, 767 +/- 33 nM for (Asn55-Ala107)SLPI; collagen, IC50 = 862 +/- 36 nM for SLPI, 727 +/- 47 nM for (Asn55-Ala107)SLPI). 4. The binding affinities of full- and half-length SLPIs for heparin were measured by affinity column chromatography. Full-length SLPI showed high affinity for heparin while the binding capacities of both half-length SLPIs were lower. (Concentration of NaCl for elution, 0.45 M for SLPI, 0.24 M for (Ser1-Pro54)SLPI, 0.27 M for (Asn55-Ala107)SLPI). 5. The effects of full-SLPI and (Asn55-Ala107)SLPI on blood coagulation were measured using the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582515

  16. N-Terminal Domain of Feline Calicivirus (FCV) Proteinase-Polymerase Contributes to the Inhibition of Host Cell Transcription.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxia; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Yongxiang; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    Feline Calicivirus (FCV) infection results in the inhibition of host protein synthesis, known as "shut-off". However, the precise mechanism of shut-off remains unknown. Here, we found that the FCV strain 2280 proteinase-polymerase (PP) protein can suppress luciferase reporter gene expression driven by endogenous and exogenous promoters. Furthermore, we found that the N-terminal 263 aa of PP (PPN-263) determined its shut-off activity using the expression of truncated proteins. However, the same domain of the FCV strain F9 PP protein failed to inhibit gene expression. A comparison between strains 2280 and F9 indicated that Val27, Ala96 and Ala98 were key sites for the inhibition of host gene expression by strain 2280 PPN-263, and PPN-263 exhibited the ability to shut off host gene expression as long as it contained any two of the three amino acids. Because the N-terminus of the PP protein is required for its proteinase and shut-off activities, we investigated the ability of norovirus 3C-like proteins (3CLP) from the GII.4-1987 and -2012 isolates to interfere with host gene expression. The results showed that 3CLP from both isolates was able to shut off host gene expression, but 3CLP from GII.4-2012 had a stronger inhibitory activity than that from GII.4-1987. Finally, we found that 2280 PP and 3CLP significantly repressed reporter gene transcription but did not affect mRNA translation. Our results provide new insight into the mechanism of the FCV-mediated inhibition of host gene expression. PMID:27447663

  17. N-Terminal Domain of Feline Calicivirus (FCV) Proteinase-Polymerase Contributes to the Inhibition of Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongxia; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Yongxiang; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-01-01

    Feline Calicivirus (FCV) infection results in the inhibition of host protein synthesis, known as “shut-off”. However, the precise mechanism of shut-off remains unknown. Here, we found that the FCV strain 2280 proteinase-polymerase (PP) protein can suppress luciferase reporter gene expression driven by endogenous and exogenous promoters. Furthermore, we found that the N-terminal 263 aa of PP (PPN-263) determined its shut-off activity using the expression of truncated proteins. However, the same domain of the FCV strain F9 PP protein failed to inhibit gene expression. A comparison between strains 2280 and F9 indicated that Val27, Ala96 and Ala98 were key sites for the inhibition of host gene expression by strain 2280 PPN-263, and PPN-263 exhibited the ability to shut off host gene expression as long as it contained any two of the three amino acids. Because the N-terminus of the PP protein is required for its proteinase and shut-off activities, we investigated the ability of norovirus 3C-like proteins (3CLP) from the GII.4-1987 and -2012 isolates to interfere with host gene expression. The results showed that 3CLP from both isolates was able to shut off host gene expression, but 3CLP from GII.4-2012 had a stronger inhibitory activity than that from GII.4-1987. Finally, we found that 2280 PP and 3CLP significantly repressed reporter gene transcription but did not affect mRNA translation. Our results provide new insight into the mechanism of the FCV-mediated inhibition of host gene expression. PMID:27447663

  18. The S-layer proteins of two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains are bound via their N-terminal region to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Egelseer, E M; Leitner, K; Jarosch, M; Hotzy, C; Zayni, S; Sleytr, U B; Sára, M

    1998-03-01

    Two Bacillus stearothermophilus wild-type strains were investigated regarding a common recognition and binding mechanism between the S-layer protein and the underlying cell envelope layer. The S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 has a molecular weight of 130,000 and assembles into a hexagonally ordered lattice. The S-layer from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 shows oblique lattice symmetry and is composed of subunits with a molecular weight of 122,000. Immunoblotting, peptide mapping, N-terminal sequencing of the whole S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 and of proteolytic cleavage fragments, and comparison with the S-layer protein from B. stearothermophilus PV72/p6 revealed that the two S-layer proteins have identical N-terminal regions but no other extended structurally homologous domains. In contrast to the heterogeneity observed for the S-layer proteins, the secondary cell wall polymer isolated from peptidoglycan-containing sacculi of the different strains showed identical chemical compositions and comparable molecular weights. The S-layer proteins could bind and recrystallize into the appropriate lattice type on native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi from both organisms but not on those extracted with hydrofluoric acid, leading to peptidoglycan of the A1gamma chemotype. Affinity studies showed that only proteolytic cleavage fragments possessing the complete N terminus of the mature S-layer proteins recognized native peptidoglycan-containing sacculi as binding sites or could associate with the isolated secondary cell wall polymer, while proteolytic cleavage fragments missing the N-terminal region remained unbound. From the results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that S-layer proteins from B. stearothermophilus wild-type strains possess an identical N-terminal region which is responsible for anchoring the S-layer subunits to a secondary cell wall polymer of identical chemical composition. PMID:9515918

  19. Truncation of domain V of the multidomain glucansucrase GTF180 of Lactobacillus reuteri 180 heavily impairs its polysaccharide-synthesizing ability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangfeng; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Pijning, Tjaard; Gerwig, Gerrit J; Kamerling, Johannis P; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-07-01

    Glucansucrases are exclusively found in lactic acid bacteria and synthesize a variety of α-glucans from sucrose. They are large multidomain enzymes belonging to the CAZy family 70 of glycoside hydrolase enzymes (GH70). The crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated GTF180 of Lactobacillus reuteri 180 (GTF180-ΔN) revealed that the polypeptide chain follows a U shape course to form five domains, including domains A, B, and C, which resemble those of family GH13 enzymes, and two extra and novel domains (domains IV and V), which are attached to the catalytic core. To elucidate the functional roles of domain V, we have deleted the domain V fragments from both the N- and C-terminal ends (GTF180-ΔNΔV). Truncation of domain V of GTF180-ΔN yielded a catalytically fully active enzyme but with heavily impaired polysaccharide synthesis ability. Instead, GTF180-ΔNΔV produced a large amount of oligosaccharides. Domain V is not involved in determining the linkage specificity, and the size of polysaccharide produced as the polysaccharide produced by GTF180-ΔNΔV was identical in size and structure with that of GTF180-ΔN. The data indicates that GTF180-ΔNΔV acts nonprocessively, frequently initiating synthesis of a new oligosaccharide from sucrose, instead of continuing the synthesis of a full size polysaccharide. Mutations L940E and L940F in GTF180-ΔNΔV, which are involved in the acceptor substrate binding, restored polysaccharide synthesis almost to the level of GTF180-ΔN. These results demonstrated that interactions of growing glucan chains with both domain V and acceptor substrate binding sites are important for polysaccharide synthesis. PMID:25586581

  20. Identification and characterization of an 18.4kDa antimicrobial truncation from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei hemocyanin upon Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ying; Zhan, Shixiong; Huang, He; Zhong, Mingqi; Chen, Jiehui; You, Cuihong; Wang, Fan; Zhang, Yueling

    2016-09-01

    Hemocyanin (HMC) is a multifunctional protein which plays many essential roles in invertebrate organism. Recently more and more immune-related functions have been discovered on this protein. Here the shrimp was infected with Vibrio parahaemolyticus and the shrimp sera were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Totally 15 spots were identified as significantly up-regulated spots and further analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry (MS). Four of them were identified as HMC derived truncations (HMCS1, HMCS3, HMCS4 and HMCS5). The HMCS4 primary sequence was further determined via Edman N terminal sequencing, MALDI-TOF MS and amino acid sequence alignment. The result indicated that the HMCS4 was a 165aa fragment from shrimp HMC small subunit C-terminal. The HMCS4 immunological activities were further analyzed by agglutination experiment and antibacterial assay in vitro. The results showed that the recombinant HMCS4 (rHMCS4) had strong agglutination and antibacterial activities against pathogenic bacteria at the optimum bacteriostasis concentration. In addition, the HMCS4 immunological activities were explored via mortality assay in vivo. The shrimp was challenged with V. parahaemolyticus and rHMCS4 V. parahaemolyticus mixture separately. The shrimp mortality rate was significantly decreased at 96 h post-infection with rHMCS4 injection. Our data showed that shrimp HMC truncation generation upon infection was an effective immune response against invaded pathogens. Moreover, these findings may have some potential applications in shrimp industry. PMID:27506277

  1. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain and a long, highly basic C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that the binding abilities of H1 are at large determined by the properties of the C-terminal domain; much less attention has been paid to role of the N-terminal domain. We have previously shown that H1 can be reconstituted via cytoplasmic mRNA injection in Xenopus oocytes, cells that lack somatic H1. The heterologously expressed H1 proteins are incorporated into in vivo assembled chromatin at specific sites and the binding event is monitored as an increase in nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Using this setup we have here compared the binding properties of wt-H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of its N-terminal domain ({Delta}N-hH1.4). The {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays a drastically lower affinity for chromatin binding as compared to the wild type hH1.4. Our data also indicates that {Delta}N-hH1.4 is more prone to unspecific chromatin binding than the wild type. We conclude that the N-terminal domain of H1 is an important determinant of affinity and specificity of H1-chromatin interactions.

  2. Endogenous proteolytic cleavage of disease-associated prion protein to produce C2 fragments is strongly cell- and tissue-dependent.

    PubMed

    Dron, Michel; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Salamat, Muhammad Khalid Farooq; Bernard, Julie; Cronier, Sabrina; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2010-04-01

    The abnormally folded form of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) accumulating in nervous and lymphoid tissues of prion-infected individuals can be naturally cleaved to generate a N-terminal-truncated fragment called C2. Information about the identity of the cellular proteases involved in this process and its possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. We investigated PrP(Sc) N-terminal trimming in different cell lines and primary cultured nerve cells, and in the brain and spleen tissue from transgenic mice infected by ovine and mouse prions. We found the following: (i) the full-length to C2 ratio varies considerably depending on the infected cell or tissue. Thus, in primary neurons and brain tissue, PrP(Sc) accumulated predominantly as untrimmed species, whereas efficient trimming occurred in Rov and MovS cells, and in spleen tissue. (ii) Although C2 is generally considered to be the counterpart of the PrP(Sc) proteinase K-resistant core, the N termini of the fragments cleaved in vivo and in vitro can actually differ, as evidenced by a different reactivity toward the Pc248 anti-octarepeat antibody. (iii) In lysosome-impaired cells, the ratio of full-length versus C2 species dramatically increased, yet efficient prion propagation could occur. Moreover, cathepsin but not calpain inhibitors markedly inhibited C2 formation, and in vitro cleavage by cathepsins B and L produced PrP(Sc) fragments lacking the Pc248 epitope, strongly arguing for the primary involvement of acidic hydrolases of the endolysosomal compartment. These findings have implications on the molecular analysis of PrP(Sc) and cell pathogenesis of prion infection. PMID:20154089

  3. An internal promoter underlies the difference in disease severity between N- and C-terminal truncation mutations of Titin in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Tran, Diana; Baalbaki, Mai; Tang, Ling Fung; Poon, Annie; Pelonero, Angelo; Titus, Erron W; Yuan, Christiana; Shi, Chenxu; Patchava, Shruthi; Halper, Elizabeth; Garg, Jasmine; Movsesyan, Irina; Yin, Chaoying; Wu, Roland; Wilsbacher, Lisa D; Liu, Jiandong; Hager, Ronald L; Coughlin, Shaun R; Jinek, Martin; Pullinger, Clive R; Kane, John P; Hart, Daniel O; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Deo, Rahul C

    2015-01-01

    Truncating mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein Titin result in dilated cardiomyopathy and skeletal myopathy. The most severely affected dilated cardiomyopathy patients harbor Titin truncations in the C-terminal two-thirds of the protein, suggesting that mutation position might influence disease mechanism. Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated six zebrafish lines with Titin truncations in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Although all exons were constitutive, C-terminal mutations caused severe myopathy whereas N-terminal mutations demonstrated mild phenotypes. Surprisingly, neither mutation type acted as a dominant negative. Instead, we found a conserved internal promoter at the precise position where divergence in disease severity occurs, with the resulting protein product partially rescuing N-terminal truncations. In addition to its clinical implications, our work may shed light on a long-standing mystery regarding the architecture of the sarcomere. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09406.001 PMID:26473617

  4. Thermodynamic Characterization of Binding Oxytricha nova Single Strand Telomere DNA with the Alpha Protein N-terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Buczek, Pawel; Horvath, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    The Oxytricha nova telomere binding protein alpha subunit binds single strand DNA and participates in a nucleoprotein complex that protects the very ends of chromosomes. To understand how the N-terminal, DNA binding domain of alpha interacts with DNA we measured the stoichiometry, enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), and dissociation constant (KD-DNA) for binding telomere DNA fragments at different temperatures and salt concentrations using native gel electrophoresis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). About 85% of the total free energy of binding corresponded with non-electrostatic interactions for all DNAs. Telomere DNA fragments d(T2G4), d(T4G4), d(G3T4G4), and d(G4T4G4) each formed monovalent protein complexes. In the case of d(T4G4T4G4), which has two tandemly repeated d(TTTTTGGGG) telomere motifs, two binding sites were observed. The high-affinity “A site” has a dissociation constant, KD-DNA(A)=13(±4) nM, while the low-affinity “B site” is characterized by KD-DNA(B)=5600(±600) nM at 25 °C. Nucleotide substitution variants verified that the A site corresponds principally with the 3′-terminal portion of d(T4G4T4G4). The relative contributions of entropy (ΔS) and enthalpy (ΔH) for binding reactions were DNA length-dependent as was heat capacity (ΔCp). These trends with respect to DNA length likely reflect structural transitions in the DNA molecule that are coupled with DNA–protein association. Results presented here are important for understanding early intermediates and subsequent stages in the assembly of the full telomere nucleoprotein complex and how binding events can prepare the telomere DNA for extension by telomerase, a critical event in telomere biology. PMID:16678852

  5. N-terminal mutations in the anti-estradiol Fab 57-2 modify its hapten binding properties.

    PubMed Central

    Saviranta PJauria, P.; Lamminmäki, U.; Hellman, J.; Eriksson, S.; Lövgren, T.

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies often contain N-terminal mutations arising from the use of degenerate cloning primer sets and/or the introduction of restriction sites in the framework 1 regions. We studied the effects of such mutations in a recombinant anti-estradiol Fab fragment derived from the hybridoma cell line 57-2. The 5' ends of the heavy and light chain genes were originally modified to introduce the restriction sites XhoI and SacI, respectively, for cloning purposes. However, the affinity and specificity of the recombinant Fab were lowered compared to the proteolytic Fab' fragment of the parental hybridoma IgG. Replacing the mutated sites with authentic amino acid coding sequences restored the binding properties as well as increased the bacterial production levels fivefold and 10-fold at 30 and 37 degrees C, respectively. Local changes in the antigen binding site were probed by determining the affinity constants (Kd) for estradiol and four related steroids. It was found that the mutated heavy chain amino terminus specifically increased the Kd for testosterone whereas the mutated light chain amino terminus decreased the Kd for all of the steroids to the same extent; the heavy and light chain effects were additive. Analysis of a newly determined crystal structure of the authentic Fab 57-2 in complex with estradiol suggests that mutations in the residue 2 in V(H), and 2 and 4 in the V(L) domain were those responsible for the observed effects. Their general roles as structure-determining residues for the CDR3 loops imply that similar effects can occur with other recombinant antibodies as well. PMID:11206076

  6. Role of N-terminal methionine residues in the redox activity of copper bound to alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esaú E; Arcos-López, Trinidad; Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; Fernández, Claudio O; González, Felipe J; Vela, Alberto; Quintanar, Liliana

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid aggregation of α-synuclein (AS) is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The interaction of copper ions with the N-terminal region of AS promotes its amyloid aggregation and metal-catalyzed oxidation has been proposed as a plausible mechanism. The AS(1-6) fragment represents the minimal sequence that models copper coordination to this intrinsically disordered protein. In this study, we evaluated the role of methionine residues Met1 and Met5 in Cu(II) coordination to the AS(1-6) fragment, and in the redox activity of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex. Spectroscopic and electronic structure calculations show that Met1 may play a role as an axial ligand in the Cu(II)-AS(1-6) complex, while Met5 does not participate in metal coordination. Cyclic voltammetry and reactivity studies demonstrate that Met residues play an important role in the reduction and reoxidation processes of this complex. However, Met1 plays a more important role than Met5, as substitution of Met1 by Ile decreases the reduction potential of the Cu-AS(1-6) complex by ~80 mV, causing a significant decrease in its rate of reduction. Reoxidation of the complex by oxygen results in oxidation of the Met residues to sulfoxide, being Met1 more susceptible to copper-catalyzed oxidation than Met5. The sulfoxide species can suffer elimination of methanesulfenic acid, rendering a peptide with no thioether moiety, which would impair the ability of AS to bind Cu(I) ions. Overall, our study underscores the important roles that Met1 plays in copper coordination and the reactivity of the Cu-AS complex. PMID:27422629

  7. Lytic Action of the Truncated yncE Gene in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Xiong, Kun; Zou, Lingyun; Chen, Zhijin; Wang, Yiran; Hu, Xiaomei; Rao, Xiancai; Cong, Yanguang

    2016-04-01

    We recently found lytic action of the truncated yncE gene. When the truncated yncE gene of Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi A was expressed in Escherichia coli DH5α under the control of the Ara promoter, bacterial growth was markedly inhibited. In the present study, we characterized this lytic action. The N-terminal 103 aa of YncE, containing a signal peptide, was demonstrated to be essential for inhibition. Microscopic observation showed that the bacterial envelope of E. coli was damaged by the expression of truncated yncE, resulting in the release of cytoplasmic content and the formation of bacterial ghosts. The addition of MgSO4 or spermine, which is the stabilizer of bacterial membrane structure, dramatically reversed the cell lysis induced by the toxic truncated YncE. In contrast, the lytic action was significantly enhanced by the addition of SDS or EDTA. Our data indicated that the toxic truncated YncE could cause cell lysis by the disruption of the bacterial membrane. PMID:26687463

  8. Downregulation of N-terminal acetylation triggers ABA-mediated drought responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Linster, Eric; Stephan, Iwona; Bienvenut, Willy V.; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Myklebust, Line M.; Huber, Monika; Reichelt, Michael; Sticht, Carsten; Geir Møller, Simon; Meinnel, Thierry; Arnesen, Thomas; Giglione, Carmela; Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2015-01-01

    N-terminal acetylation (NTA) catalysed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (Nats) is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes, but its significance is still enigmatic. Here we characterize the plant NatA complex and reveal evolutionary conservation of NatA biochemical properties in higher eukaryotes and uncover specific and essential functions of NatA for development, biosynthetic pathways and stress responses in plants. We show that NTA decreases significantly after drought stress, and NatA abundance is rapidly downregulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid. Accordingly, transgenic downregulation of NatA induces the drought stress response and results in strikingly drought resistant plants. Thus, we propose that NTA by the NatA complex acts as a cellular surveillance mechanism during stress and that imprinting of the proteome by NatA is an important switch for the control of metabolism, development and cellular stress responses downstream of abscisic acid. PMID:26184543

  9. PRINT: A Protein Bioconjugation Method with Exquisite N-terminal Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Surojit; Qiao, Yuan; Fries, Anja; O’Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-01-01

    Chemical conjugation is commonly used to enhance the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and potency of protein therapeutics, but often leads to non-specific modification or loss of bioactivity. Here, we present a simple, versatile and widely applicable method that allows exquisite N-terminal specific modification of proteins. Combining reversible side-chain blocking and protease mediated cleavage of a commonly used HIS tag appended to a protein, we generate with high yield and purity exquisitely site specific and selective bio-conjugates of TNF-α by using amine reactive NHS ester chemistry. We confirm the N terminal selectivity and specificity using mass spectral analyses and show near complete retention of the biological activity of our model protein both in vitro and in vivo murine models. We believe that this methodology would be applicable to a variety of potentially therapeutic proteins and the specificity afforded by this technique would allow for rapid generation of novel biologics. PMID:26678960

  10. PRINT: A Protein Bioconjugation Method with Exquisite N-terminal Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Surojit; Qiao, Yuan; Fries, Anja; O'Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-12-01

    Chemical conjugation is commonly used to enhance the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and potency of protein therapeutics, but often leads to non-specific modification or loss of bioactivity. Here, we present a simple, versatile and widely applicable method that allows exquisite N-terminal specific modification of proteins. Combining reversible side-chain blocking and protease mediated cleavage of a commonly used HIS tag appended to a protein, we generate with high yield and purity exquisitely site specific and selective bio-conjugates of TNF-α by using amine reactive NHS ester chemistry. We confirm the N terminal selectivity and specificity using mass spectral analyses and show near complete retention of the biological activity of our model protein both in vitro and in vivo murine models. We believe that this methodology would be applicable to a variety of potentially therapeutic proteins and the specificity afforded by this technique would allow for rapid generation of novel biologics.

  11. The basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 limits recombination endonuclease action at human telomeres.

    PubMed

    Saint-Léger, Adélaïde; Koelblen, Melanie; Civitelli, Livia; Bah, Amadou; Djerbi, Nadir; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The stability of mammalian telomeres depends upon TRF2, which prevents inappropriate repair and checkpoint activation. By using a plasmid integration assay in yeasts carrying humanized telomeres, we demonstrated that TRF2 possesses the intrinsic property to both stimulate initial homologous recombination events and to prevent their resolution via its basic N-terminal domain. In human cells, we further showed that this TRF2 domain prevents telomere shortening mediated by the resolvase-associated protein SLX4 as well as GEN1 and MUS81, 2 different types of endonucleases with resolvase activities. We propose that various types of resolvase activities are kept in check by the basic N-terminal domain of TRF2 in order to favor an accurate repair of the stalled forks that occur during telomere replication. PMID:25483196

  12. Involvement of the N-terminal region in alpha-crystallin-lens membrane recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifeanyi, F.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that alpha-crystallin binds specifically, in a saturable manner, to lens membrane. To determine the region of the alpha-crystallin molecule that might be involved in this binding, native alpha-crystallin from the bovine lens has been treated by limited digestion with trypsin, to produce alpha-A molecules with an intact C-terminal region, and a nicked N-terminal region. Compared to intact alpha-crystallin, trypsin-treated alpha-crystallin binds less avidly to lens membrane, suggesting that the N-terminal region of the alpha-A molecule may play a key role in the recognition between lens membrane and crystallin.

  13. Resin-assisted Enrichment of N-terminal Peptides for Characterizing Proteolytic Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Seo; Dai, Ziyu; Aryal, Uma K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Baker, Scott E.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-06-17

    Proteolytic processing is a ubiquitous, irreversible posttranslational modification that plays an important role in cellular regulation in all living organisms. Herein we report a resin-assisted positive selection method for specifically enriching protein N-terminal peptides to facilitate the characterization of proteolytic processing events by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In this approach, proteins are initially reduced and alkylated and their lysine residues are converted to homoarginines. Then, protein N-termini are selectively converted to reactive thiol groups. We demonstrate that these sequential reactions were achieved with nearly quantitative efficiencies. Thiol-containing N-terminal peptides are then captured (>98% efficiency) by a thiol-affinity resin, a significant improvement over the traditional avidin/biotin enrichment. Application to cell lysates of Aspergillus niger, a filamentous fungus of interest for biomass degradation, enabled the identification of 1672 unique protein N-termini and proteolytic cleavage sites from 690 unique proteins.

  14. Absence of N-terminal acetyltransferase diversification during evolution of eukaryotic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Om Singh; Faustino, Alexandra; Prudêncio, Pedro; Van Damme, Petra; Cox, Cymon J.; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Protein N-terminal acetylation is an ancient and ubiquitous co-translational modification catalyzed by a highly conserved family of N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). Prokaryotes have at least 3 NATs, whereas humans have six distinct but highly conserved NATs, suggesting an increase in regulatory complexity of this modification during eukaryotic evolution. Despite this, and against our initial expectations, we determined that NAT diversification did not occur in the eukaryotes, as all six major human NATs were most likely present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA). Furthermore, we also observed that some NATs were actually secondarily lost during evolution of major eukaryotic lineages; therefore, the increased complexity of the higher eukaryotic proteome occurred without a concomitant diversification of NAT complexes. PMID:26861501

  15. In vitro phosphorylation of the N-terminal half of hordeivirus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Makarov, V V; Iconnikova, A Y; Guseinov, M A; Vishnichenko, V K; Kalinina, N O

    2012-09-01

    The N-terminal half of TGB1 movement protein of poa semilatent hordeivirus, which forms a ribonucleoprotein complex involved in movement of the viral genome in the plant, and its two domains, NTD and ID, are phosphorylated in vitro by a fraction enriched in cell walls from Nicotiana benthamiana. Using a set of protein kinase inhibitors with different specificities, it was found that enzymes possessing activities of casein kinase 1, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C are involved in phosphorylation. Commercial preparations of protein kinases A and C are able to phosphorylate in vitro recombinant proteins corresponding to the N-terminal half of the protein and its domains NTD and ID. Phosphorylation of the NTD has no effect on the efficiency and character of its binding to RNA. However, phosphorylation of the ID leads to a decrease in its RNA-binding activity and in the ability for homological protein-protein interactions. PMID:23157268

  16. Structure of the human histone chaperone FACT Spt16 N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Marcianò, G; Huang, D T

    2016-02-01

    The histone chaperone FACT plays an important role in facilitating nucleosome assembly and disassembly during transcription. FACT is a heterodimeric complex consisting of Spt16 and SSRP1. The N-terminal domain of Spt16 resembles an inactive aminopeptidase. How this domain contributes to the histone chaperone activity of FACT remains elusive. Here, the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of human Spt16 is reported at a resolution of 1.84 Å. The structure adopts an aminopeptidase-like fold similar to those of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Spt16 NTDs. Isothermal titration calorimetry analyses show that human Spt16 NTD binds histones H3/H4 with low-micromolar affinity, suggesting that Spt16 NTD may contribute to histone binding in the FACT complex. Surface-residue conservation and electrostatic analysis reveal a conserved acidic patch that may be involved in histone binding. PMID:26841762

  17. First Things First: Vital Protein Marks by N-Terminal Acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Aksnes, Henriette; Drazic, Adrian; Marie, Michaël; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    N-terminal (Nt) acetylation is known to be a highly abundant co-translational protein modification, but the recent discovery of Golgi- and chloroplast-resident N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs) revealed that it can also be added post-translationally. Nt-acetylation may act as a degradation signal in a novel branch of the N-end rule pathway, whose functions include the regulation of human blood pressure. Nt-acetylation also modulates protein interactions, targeting, and folding. In plants, Nt-acetylation plays a role in the control of resistance to drought and in regulation of immune responses. Mutations of specific human NATs that decrease their activity can cause either the lethal Ogden syndrome or severe intellectual disability and cardiovascular defects. In sum, recent advances highlight Nt-acetylation as a key factor in many biological pathways. PMID:27498224

  18. Divergent N-Terminal Sequences Target an Inducible Testis Deubiquitinating Enzyme to Distinct Subcellular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Haijiang; Keriel, Anne; Morales, Carlos R.; Bedard, Nathalie; Zhao, Qing; Hingamp, Pascal; Lefrançois, Stephane; Combaret, Lydie; Wing, Simon S.

    2000-01-01

    Ubiquitin-specific processing proteases (UBPs) presently form the largest enzyme family in the ubiquitin system, characterized by a core region containing conserved motifs surrounded by divergent sequences, most commonly at the N-terminal end. The functions of these divergent sequences remain unclear. We identified two isoforms of a novel testis-specific UBP, UBP-t1 and UBP-t2, which contain identical core regions but distinct N termini, thereby permitting dissection of the functions of these two regions. Both isoforms were germ cell specific and developmentally regulated. Immunocytochemistry revealed that UBP-t1 was induced in step 16 to 19 spermatids while UBP-t2 was expressed in step 18 to 19 spermatids. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that UBP-t1 was found in the nucleus while UBP-t2 was extranuclear and was found in residual bodies. For the first time, we show that the differential subcellular localization was due to the distinct N-terminal sequences. When transfected into COS-7 cells, the core region was expressed throughout the cell but the UBP-t1 and UBP-t2 isoforms were concentrated in the nucleus and the perinuclear region, respectively. Fusions of each N-terminal end with green fluorescent protein yielded the same subcellular localization as the native proteins, indicating that the N-terminal ends were sufficient for determining differential localization. Interestingly, UBP-t2 colocalized with anti-γ-tubulin immunoreactivity, indicating that like several other components of the ubiquitin system, a deubiquitinating enzyme is associated with the centrosome. Regulated expression and alternative N termini can confer specificity of UBP function by restricting its temporal and spatial loci of action. PMID:10938131

  19. Expanding the Phenotype Associated with NAA10-Related N-Terminal Acetylation Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saunier, Chloé; Støve, Svein Isungset; Popp, Bernt; Gérard, Bénédicte; Blenski, Marina; AhMew, Nicholas; de Bie, Charlotte; Goldenberg, Paula; Isidor, Bertrand; Keren, Boris; Leheup, Bruno; Lampert, Laetitia; Mignot, Cyril; Tezcan, Kamer; Mancini, Grazia M S; Nava, Caroline; Wasserstein, Melissa; Bruel, Ange-Line; Thevenon, Julien; Masurel, Alice; Duffourd, Yannis; Kuentz, Paul; Huet, Frédéric; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Faivre, Laurence; Piton, Amélie; Reis, André; Arnesen, Thomas; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Zweier, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    N-terminal acetylation is a common protein modification in eukaryotes associated with numerous cellular processes. Inherited mutations in NAA10, encoding the catalytic subunit of the major N-terminal acetylation complex NatA have been associated with diverse, syndromic X-linked recessive disorders, whereas de novo missense mutations have been reported in one male and one female individual with severe intellectual disability but otherwise unspecific phenotypes. Thus, the full genetic and clinical spectrum of NAA10 deficiency is yet to be delineated. We identified three different novel and one known missense mutation in NAA10, de novo in 11 females, and due to maternal germ line mosaicism in another girl and her more severely affected and deceased brother. In vitro enzymatic assays for the novel, recurrent mutations p.(Arg83Cys) and p.(Phe128Leu) revealed reduced catalytic activity. X-inactivation was random in five females. The core phenotype of X-linked NAA10-related N-terminal-acetyltransferase deficiency in both males and females includes developmental delay, severe intellectual disability, postnatal growth failure with severe microcephaly, and skeletal or cardiac anomalies. Genotype-phenotype correlations within and between both genders are complex and may include various factors such as location and nature of mutations, enzymatic stability and activity, and X-inactivation in females. PMID:27094817

  20. Intrinsic disorder and multiple phosphorylations constrain the evolution of the flightin N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Lemas, Dominick; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Ballif, Bryan A; Vigoreaux, Jim O

    2016-03-01

    Flightin is a myosin binding phosphoprotein that originated in the ancestor to Pancrustacea ~500 MYA. In Drosophila melanogaster, flightin is essential for length determination and flexural rigidity of thick filaments. Here, we show that among 12 Drosophila species, the N-terminal region is characterized by low sequence conservation, low pI, a cluster of phosphorylation sites, and a high propensity to intrinsic disorder (ID) that is augmented by phosphorylation. Using mass spectrometry, we identified eight phosphorylation sites within a 29 amino acid segment in the N-terminal region of D. melanogaster flightin. We show that phosphorylation of D. melanogaster flightin is modulated during flight and, through a comparative analysis to orthologs from other Drosophila species, we found phosphorylation sites that remain invariant, sites that retain the charge character, and sites that are clade-specific. While the number of predicted phosphorylation sites differs across species, we uncovered a conserved pattern that relates the number of phosphorylation sites to pI and ID. Extending the analysis to orthologs of other insects, we found additional conserved features in flightin despite the near absence of sequence identity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that structural constraints demarcate the evolution of the highly variable N-terminal region. PMID:26691840

  1. Structure and Function of the Sterol Carrier Protein-2 N-Terminal Presequence†

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory G.; Hostetler, Heather A.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Tichy, Shane E.; Williams, Brad J.; Russell, David H.; Berg, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Thomas A.; Ball, Judith; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) is encoded as a precursor protein (proSCP-2), little is known regarding the structure and function of the 20-amino acid N-terminal presequence. As shown herein, the presequence contains significant secondary structure and alters SCP-2: (i) secondary structure (CD), (ii) tertiary structure (aqueous exposure of Trp shown by UV absorbance, fluorescence, fluorescence quenching), (iii) ligand binding site [Trp response to ligands, peptide cross-linked by photoactivatable free cholesterol (FCBP)], (iv) selectivity for interaction with anionic phospholipid-rich membranes, (v) interaction with a peroxisomal import protein [FRET studies of Pex5p(C) binding], the N-terminal presequence increased SCP-2’s affinity for Pex5p(C) by 10-fold, and (vi) intracellular targeting in living and fixed cells (confocal microscopy). Nearly 5-fold more SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with plasma membrane lipid rafts/caveolae (AF488-CTB), 2.8-fold more SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with a mitochondrial marker (Mitotracker), but nearly 2-fold less SCP-2 than proSCP-2 colocalized with peroxisomes (AF488-antibody to PMP70). These data indicate the importance of the N-terminal presequence in regulating SCP-2 structure, cholesterol localization within the ligand binding site, membrane association, and, potentially, intracellular targeting. PMID:18465878

  2. Protein N-terminal acetylation is required for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinlin; Li, Ruiqi; Yu, Junya; Ma, Shuangshuang; Wu, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2016-08-01

    Early embryonic development generates precursors of all major cell types in Arabidopsis. Among these precursors, the hypophysis divides asymmetrically to form the progenitors of the quiescent center and columella stem cells. A great deal has been learnt about the mechanisms that control the asymmetric division of the hypophysis and embryogenesis at the transcriptional level; however, no evidence of regulation at the co- or post-translational level has been reported. Here, we show that mutation of the catalytic subunit (Naa10) or auxiliary subunit (Naa15) of NatA, an N-terminal acetyltransferase that catalyzes protein N-terminal acetylation, produces an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, Naa10 and Naa15 were found to interact physically in planta Further analysis revealed that the observed embryonic patterning defects started at the early globular stage and that the asymmetric division of the hypophysis was irregular; thus, no quiescent center progenitor cells were generated in naa10 and naa15 embryos. We further observed that the polar distributions of auxin and its efflux carrier PIN1 were disturbed in naa10 embryos. Our results suggest that NatA is required for asymmetric division of the hypophysis and early embryonic patterning in Arabidopsis, and provides a link between protein N-terminal acetylation and embryogenesis in plants. PMID:27385766

  3. Disease mutations in the ryanodine receptor N-terminal region couple to a mobile intersubunit interface

    PubMed Central

    Kimlicka, Lynn; Lau, Kelvin; Tung, Ching-Chieh; Van Petegem, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors are large channels that release Ca2+ from the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Hundreds of RyR mutations can cause cardiac and skeletal muscle disorders, yet detailed mechanisms explaining their effects have been lacking. Here we compare pseudo-atomic models and propose that channel opening coincides with widening of a cytoplasmic vestibule formed by the N-terminal region, thus altering an interface targeted by 20 disease mutations. We solve crystal structures of several disease mutants that affect intrasubunit domain–domain interfaces. Mutations affecting intrasubunit ionic pairs alter relative domain orientations, and thus couple to surrounding interfaces. Buried disease mutations cause structural changes that also connect to the intersubunit contact area. These results suggest that the intersubunit contact region between N-terminal domains is a prime target for disease mutations, direct or indirect, and we present a model whereby ryanodine receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors are activated by altering domain arrangements in the N-terminal region. PMID:23422674

  4. Protein N-terminal acetylation is required for embryogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jinlin; Li, Ruiqi; Yu, Junya; Ma, Shuangshuang; Wu, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Cao, Ying; Ma, Ligeng

    2016-01-01

    Early embryonic development generates precursors of all major cell types in Arabidopsis. Among these precursors, the hypophysis divides asymmetrically to form the progenitors of the quiescent center and columella stem cells. A great deal has been learnt about the mechanisms that control the asymmetric division of the hypophysis and embryogenesis at the transcriptional level; however, no evidence of regulation at the co- or post-translational level has been reported. Here, we show that mutation of the catalytic subunit (Naa10) or auxiliary subunit (Naa15) of NatA, an N-terminal acetyltransferase that catalyzes protein N-terminal acetylation, produces an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, Naa10 and Naa15 were found to interact physically in planta. Further analysis revealed that the observed embryonic patterning defects started at the early globular stage and that the asymmetric division of the hypophysis was irregular; thus, no quiescent center progenitor cells were generated in naa10 and naa15 embryos. We further observed that the polar distributions of auxin and its efflux carrier PIN1 were disturbed in naa10 embryos. Our results suggest that NatA is required for asymmetric division of the hypophysis and early embryonic patterning in Arabidopsis, and provides a link between protein N-terminal acetylation and embryogenesis in plants. PMID:27385766

  5. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing proline. The proline effect.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Alex G; Young, Alex B

    2005-09-01

    The collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation reactions of a variety of deprotonated peptides containing proline have been studied in detail using MS(2) and MS(3) experiments, deuterium labelling and accurate mass measurements when necessary. The [M--H--CO(2)](-) (a(2)) ion derived from H-Pro-Xxx-OH dipeptides shows an unusual fragmentation involving loss of C(2)H(4); this fragmentation reaction is not observed for larger peptides. The primary fragmentation reactions of deprotonated tripeptides with an N-terminal proline are formation of a(3) and y(1) ions. When proline is in the central position of tripeptides, a(3), y(2) and y(1) ions are the primary fragmentation products of [M--H](-), while when the proline is in the C-terminal position, a(3)and y(1) ions are the major primary products. In the latter case, the a(3) ion fragments primarily to the ''b(2) ion; further evidence is presented that the ''b(2) ions have a deprotonated oxazolone structure. Larger deprotonated peptides having at least two amino acid residues N-terminal to proline show a distinct preference for cleavage of the amide bond N-terminal to proline to form, mainly, the appropriate y ion. This proline effect is compared and contrasted with the similar proline effect observed in the fragmentation of protonated peptides containing proline. PMID:16041740

  6. Signaling by the Engulfment Receptor Draper: A Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Implicates Cytoskeletal Regulators, Jun N-Terminal Kinase, and Yorkie

    PubMed Central

    Fullard, John F.; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Draper, the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the Ced-1 protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, is a cell-surface receptor required for the recognition and engulfment of apoptotic cells, glial clearance of axon fragments and dendritic pruning, and salivary gland autophagy. To further elucidate mechanisms of Draper signaling, we screened chromosomal deficiencies to identify loci that dominantly modify the phenotype of overexpression of Draper isoform II (suppressed differentiation of the posterior crossvein in the wing). We found evidence for 43 genetic modifiers of Draper II. Twenty-four of the 37 suppressor loci and 3 of the 6 enhancer loci were identified. An additional 5 suppressors and 2 enhancers were identified among mutations in functionally related genes. These studies reveal positive contributions to Drpr signaling for the Jun N-terminal Kinase pathway, supported by genetic interactions with hemipterous, basket, jun, and puckered, and for cytoskeleton regulation as indicated by genetic interactions with rac1, rac2, RhoA, myoblast city, Wiskcott–Aldrich syndrome protein, and the formin CG32138, and for yorkie and expanded. These findings indicate that Jun N-terminal Kinase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling collaborate in Draper signaling. Relationships between Draper signaling and Decapentaplegic signaling, insulin signaling, Salvador/Warts/Hippo signaling, apical-basal cell polarity, and cellular responses to mechanical forces are also discussed. PMID:25395664

  7. A Truncated Waveguide Phase Shifter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, D. T.; Henry, R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of a simple phase shifter based upon truncated circular and square waveguides is presented. An emphasis is placed upon validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of the structure. A test device is prototyped at approximately 40GHz; however, the concepts explored can be directly extended to millimeter and submillimeter applications.

  8. Thermodynamics of the protonation equilibria of two fragments of N-terminal β-hairpin of FPB28 WW domain.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Uber, Dorota; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2012-01-12

    The pK(a) values of two peptides derived from the formin-binding protein 28 WW domain [Ac-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-NH(2) (D7), Ac-Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH(2) (D9)] were determined by potentiometric titration in the temperature range from 25 to 60 °C, and their heat capacities were determined, by differential scanning calorimetry, in the temperature range from 10 to 90 °C. For both peptides, heat capacity has a maximum at t ≈ 50 °C, with height about 0.1 kcal/(mol × deg), suggesting that a modest unfolding transition occurs. The first two pK(a)'s are low at temperatures below 50 °C, suggesting that the two lysine residues are close to each other and the peptides have bent shapes at lower temperatures; this effect is greater for D7 compared with D9. With increasing temperature beyond 50 °C (i.e., that of the thermodynamic unfolding transition), pK(a1) and pK(a2) increase rapidly for D9, whereas their temperature variation is less significant for D7. This observation, and the fact that the enthalpies and entropies of the dissociation of the two first protons (determined from the temperature dependence of the respective pK(a)'s) decrease significantly near the transition temperature, suggest that the peptide undergoes a transition from a bent to an amorphous shape and that the presence of charged lysine residues stabilizes the folded state. PMID:22128840

  9. Two N-Terminal Acetyltransferases Antagonistically Regulate the Stability of a Nod-Like Receptor in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Gannon, Patrick; Linster, Eric; Huber, Monika; Kapos, Paul; Bienvenut, Willy; Giglione, Carmela; Zhang, Yuelin; Chen, She

    2015-01-01

    Nod-like receptors (NLRs) serve as immune receptors in plants and animals. The stability of NLRs is tightly regulated, though its mechanism is not well understood. Here, we show the crucial impact of N-terminal acetylation on the turnover of one plant NLR, Suppressor of NPR1, Constitutive 1 (SNC1), in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic and biochemical analyses of SNC1 uncovered its multilayered regulation by different N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nat) complexes. SNC1 exhibits a few distinct N-terminal isoforms generated through alternative initiation and N-terminal acetylation. Its first Met is acetylated by N-terminal acetyltransferase complex A (NatA), while the second Met is acetylated by N-terminal acetyltransferase complex B (NatB). Unexpectedly, the NatA-mediated acetylation serves as a degradation signal, while NatB-mediated acetylation stabilizes the NLR protein, thus revealing antagonistic N-terminal acetylation of a single protein substrate. Moreover, NatA also contributes to the turnover of another NLR, RESISTANCE TO P. syringae pv maculicola 1. The intricate regulation of protein stability by Nats is speculated to provide flexibility for the target protein in maintaining its homeostasis. PMID:25966763

  10. Expression and Biochemical Characterization of the Human Enzyme N-Terminal Asparagine Amidohydrolase (hNTAN1)

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Jason R.; Stone, Everett M.; Georgiou, George

    2011-01-01

    The enzymatic deamidation of N-terminal L-Asn by N-terminal asparagine amidohydrolase (NTAN1) is a feature of the ubiquitin-dependent N-end rule pathway of protein degradation, which relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. Herein we report the bacterial expression, purification, and biochemical characterization of the human NTAN1 (hNTAN1). We show here that hNTAN1 is highly selective for the hydrolysis of N-terminal peptidyl L-Asn, but fails to deamidate free L-Asn or L-Gln, N-terminal peptidyl L-Gln, or acetylated N-terminal peptidyl L-Asn. Similar to other N-terminal deamidases, hNTAN1 is shown to possess a critical Cys residue that is absolutely required for catalysis, corroborated in part by abolishment of activity through the point mutation Cys75Ala. We also present evidence that the exposure of a conserved L-Pro at the N-terminus of hNTAN1 following removal of the initiating L-Met is important for function of the enzyme. The results presented here should assist in the elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying the neurological defects of NTAN1-deficient mice observed in other studies, and in the discovery of potential physiological substrates targeted by the enzyme in the modulation of protein turnover via the N-end rule pathway. PMID:21375249

  11. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species. PMID:17714440

  12. Truncated States Obtained by Iteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso B., W.; Almeida G. de, N.

    2008-02-01

    We introduce the concept of truncated states obtained via iterative processes (TSI) and study its statistical features, making an analogy with dynamical systems theory (DST). As a specific example, we have studied TSI for the doubling and the logistic functions, which are standard functions in studying chaos. TSI for both the doubling and logistic functions exhibit certain similar patterns when their statistical features are compared from the point of view of DST.

  13. The gaf Fimbrial Gene Cluster of Escherichia coli Expresses a Full-Size and a Truncated Soluble Adhesin Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tanskanen, Jarna; Saarela, Sirkku; Tankka, Sanna; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Rhen, Mikael; Korhonen, Timo K.; Westerlund-Wikström, Benita

    2001-01-01

    The GafD lectin of the G (F17) fimbriae of diarrhea-associated Escherichia coli was overexpressed and purified from the periplasm of E. coli by affinity chromatography on GlcNAc-agarose. The predicted mature GafD peptide comprises 321 amino acids, but the predominant form of GafD recovered from the periplasm was 19,092 Da in size and corresponded to the 178 N-terminal amino acid residues, as judged by mass spectrometry and amino acid sequencing, and was named ΔGafD. Expression of gafD from the cloned gaf gene cluster in DegP-, Lon-, and OmpT-deficient recombinant strains did not significantly decrease the formation of ΔGafD. The peptide was also detected in the periplasm of the wild-type E. coli strain from which the gaf gene cluster originally was cloned. We expressed gafD fragments encoding C-terminally truncated peptides. Peptides GafD1-252, GafD1-224, GafD1-189, and the GafD1-178, isolated from the periplasm by affinity chromatography, had apparent sizes closely similar to that of ΔGafD. Only trace amounts of truncated forms with expected molecular sizes were detected in spheroplasts. In contrast, the shorter GafD1-157 peptide was detected in spheroplasts but not in the periplasm, indicating that it was poorly translocated or was degraded by periplasmic proteases. Pulse-chase assays using gafD indicated that ΔGafD was processed from GafD and is not a primary translation product. The ΔGafD peptide was soluble by biochemical criteria and exhibited specific binding to GlcNAc-agarose. Inhibition assays with mono- and oligosaccharides gave a similar inhibition pattern in the hemagglutination by the G-fimbria-expressing recombinant E. coli strain and in the binding of [14C]ΔGafD to GlcNAc-agarose. ΔGafD bound specifically to laminin, a previously described tissue target for the G fimbria. Our results show that a soluble, protease-resistant subdomain of GafD exhibits receptor-binding specificity similar to that for intact G fimbriae and that it is formed when

  14. Analytical cation-exchange chromatography to assess the identity, purity, and N-terminal integrity of human lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Harrie A; Geerts, Marlieke E J; van Berkel, Patrick H C; Nuijens, Jan H

    2002-10-01

    Human lactoferrin (hLF) is an iron-binding glycoprotein involved in the innate host defense. The positively charged N-terminal domain of hLF mediates several of its activities by interacting with ligands such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), specific receptors, and other proteins. This cationic domain is highly susceptible to limited proteolysis, which impacts on the affinity of hLF for the ligand. An analytical method, employing cation-exchange chromatography on Mono S, was developed to assess the N-terminal integrity of hLF preparations. The method, which separates N-terminally intact hLF from hLF species lacking two (Gly(1)-Arg(2)) or three (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)) residues, showed that 5-58% of total hLF in commercially obtained preparations was N-terminally degraded. The elution profile of hLF on Mono S unequivocally differed from lactoferrins from other species as well as homologous and other whey proteins. Analysis of fresh human whey samples revealed two variants of N-terminally intact hLF, but not limitedly proteolyzed hLF. Mono S chromatography of 2 out of 26 individual human whey samples showed a rare polymorphic hLF variant with three N-terminal arginines (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)-Arg(4)-Ser(5)-) instead of the usual variant with four N-terminal arginines (Gly(1)-Arg(2)-Arg(3)-Arg(4)-Arg(5)-Ser(6)-). In conclusion, Mono S cation-exchange chromatography appeared a robust method to assess the identity, purity, N-terminal integrity, and the presence of polymorphic and intact hLF variants. PMID:12381362

  15. An unusual peptide deformylase features in the human mitochondrial N-terminal methionine excision pathway.

    PubMed

    Serero, Alexandre; Giglione, Carmela; Sardini, Alessandro; Martinez-Sanz, Juan; Meinnel, Thierry

    2003-12-26

    Dedicated machinery for N-terminal methionine excision (NME) was recently identified in plant organelles and shown to be essential in plastids. We report here the existence of mitochondrial NME in mammals, as shown by the identification of cDNAs encoding specific peptide deformylases (PDFs) and new methionine aminopeptidases (MAP1D). We cloned the two full-length human cDNAs and showed that the N-terminal domains of the encoded enzymes were specifically involved in targeting to mitochondria. In contrast to mitochondrial MAP1D, the human PDF sequence differed from that of known PDFs in several key features. We characterized the human PDF fully in vivo and in vitro. Comparison of the processed human enzyme with the plant mitochondrial PDF1A, to which it is phylogenetically related, showed that the human enzyme had an extra N-terminal domain involved in both mitochondrial targeting and enzyme stability. Mammalian PDFs also display non-random substitutions in the conserved motifs important for activity. Human PDF site-directed mutagenesis variants were studied and compared with the corresponding plant PDF1A variants. We found that amino acid substitutions in human PDF specifically altered its catalytic site, resulting in an enzyme intermediate between bacterial PDF1Bs and plant PDF1As. Because (i) human PDF was found to be active both in vitro and in vivo, (ii) the entire machinery is conserved and expressed in most animals, (iii) the mitochondrial genome expresses substrates for these enzymes, and (iv) mRNA synthesis is regulated, we conclude that animal mitochondria have a functional NME machinery that can be regulated. PMID:14532271

  16. The Functional Study of the N-Terminal Region of Influenza B Virus Nucleoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; Lam, Mandy Ka-Han; Zhang, Qinfen; Elderfield, Ruth; Barclay, Wendy S.; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2015-01-01

    Influenza nucleoprotein (NP) is a major component of the ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) in influenza virus, which functions for the transcription and replication of viral genome. Compared to the nucleoprotein of influenza A (ANP), the N-terminal region of influenza B nucleoprotein (BNP) is much extended. By virus reconstitution, we found that the first 38 residues are essential for viral growth. We further illustrated the function of BNP by mini-genome reconstitution, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, light scattering and gel shift. Results show that the N terminus is involved in the formation of both higher homo-oligomers of BNP and BNP-RNA complex. PMID:26368391

  17. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, David J.; Dayeh, Daniel M.; Fredrickson, Saul W.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphatelyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or a 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated −1 or −2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of −2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of −1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase

  18. The C-terminus of CaMKII is truncated when expressed in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Praseeda, M; Beena, Mary K; Asha, Sarah John; Omkumar, R V

    2004-04-01

    The neuronal enzyme Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase type II (CaMKII) is a key molecule in biochemical events necessary for learning and memory. The alpha-subunit of CaMKII expressed in E. coli as well as in insect cells shows similar catalytic behavior [Praseeda, M., Pradeep, K. K., Krupa, A., Sri Krishna, S., Leena, S., Rajeev Kumar, R., John Cheriyan, Mayadevi, M., Srinivasan, N., and Omkumar, R. V. (2003) Biochem. J. In Press]. The association domain of the enzyme has been crystallized in its native multimeric form after expression in E. coli [Hoelz, A., Nairn, A. C. and Kuriyan, J. (2003) Molecular Cell 11, 1241]. However a major truncation product accompanies the full-length protein when expressed in E. coli. We show by epitope labeling and immunoblotting that the truncation occurs at the C-terminal half of the protein so that the N-terminal catalytic domain is complete in the truncated product. This supports the use of the preparation of alpha-CaMKII expressed in E. coli for studies on functions of the catalytic site. Our data will also be helpful in designing modified prokaryotic expression systems for CaMKII devoid of the trun-cation product, which are easier to use compared to the insect cell system. PMID:15078206

  19. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Antimicrobial Peptide Arasin 1 — And Mode of Action Studies of the N-Terminal, Proline-Rich Region

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Victoria S.; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Benincasa, Monica; Haug, Tor; Eksteen, Jacobus J.; Styrvold, Olaf B.; Scocchi, Marco; Stensvåg, Klara

    2013-01-01

    Arasin 1 is a 37 amino acid long proline-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. In this work the active region of arasin 1 was identified through structure-activity studies using different peptide fragments derived from the arasin 1 sequence. The pharmacophore was found to be located in the proline/arginine-rich NH2 terminus of the peptide and the fragment arasin 1(1–23) was almost equally active to the full length peptide. Arasin 1 and its active fragment arasin 1(1–23) were shown to be non-toxic to human red blood cells and arasin 1(1–23) was able to bind chitin, a component of fungal cell walls and the crustacean shell. The mode of action of the fully active N-terminal arasin 1(1–23) was explored through killing kinetic and membrane permeabilization studies. At the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), arasin 1(1–23) was not bactericidal and had no membrane disruptive effect. In contrast, at concentrations of 5×MIC and above it was bactericidal and interfered with membrane integrity. We conclude that arasin 1(1–23) has a different mode of action than lytic peptides, like cecropin P1. Thus, we suggest a dual mode of action for arasin 1(1–23) involving membrane disruption at peptide concentrations above MIC, and an alternative mechanism of action, possibly involving intracellular targets, at MIC. PMID:23326415

  20. Dissecting functions of the N-terminal domain and GAS-site recognition in STAT3 nuclear trafficking.

    PubMed

    Martincuks, Antons; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Haan, Serge; Herrmann, Andreas; Küster, Andrea; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a ubiquitous transcription factor involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, inflammation and cancer progression. Cytokine-induced gene transcription greatly depends on tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 on a single tyrosine residue with subsequent nuclear accumulation and specific DNA sequence (GAS) recognition. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the conserved STAT3 N-terminal domain (NTD) and GAS-element binding ability of STAT3 in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Our results demonstrate the nonessential role of GAS-element recognition for both cytokine-induced and basal nuclear import of STAT3. Substitution of five key amino acids within the DNA-binding domain rendered STAT3 unable to bind to GAS-elements while still maintaining the ability for nuclear localization. In turn, deletion of the NTD markedly decreased nuclear accumulation upon IL-6 treatment resulting in a prolonged accumulation of phosphorylated dimers in the cytoplasm, at the same time preserving specific DNA recognition ability of the truncation mutant. Observed defect in nuclear localization could not be explained by flawed importin-α binding, since both wild-type and NTD deletion mutant of STAT3 could precipitate both full-length and autoinhibitory domain (∆IBB) deletion mutants of importin-α5, as well as ∆IBB-α3 and ∆IBB-α7 isoforms independently of IL-6 stimulation. Despite its inability to translocate to the nucleus upon IL-6 stimulation, the NTD lacking mutant still showed nuclear accumulation in resting cells similar to wild-type upon inhibition of nuclear export by leptomycin B. At the same time, blocking the nuclear export pathway could not rescue cytoplasmic trapping of phosphorylated STAT3 molecules without NTD. Moreover, STAT3 mutant with dysfunctional SH2 domain (R609Q) also localized in the nucleus of unstimulated cells after nuclear export blocking, while upon cytokine treatment the

  1. Tauopathy induced by low level expression of a human brain-derived tau fragment in mice is rescued by phenylbutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Bondulich, Marie K.; Guo, Tong; Meehan, Christopher; Manion, John; Rodriguez Martin, Teresa; Mitchell, Jacqueline C.; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Yankova, Natalia; Stygelbout, Virginie; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Noble, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Human neurodegenerative tauopathies exhibit pathological tau aggregates in the brain along with diverse clinical features including cognitive and motor dysfunction. Post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and truncation, are characteristic features of tau present in the brain in human tauopathy. We have previously reported an N-terminally truncated form of tau in human brain that is associated with the development of tauopathy and is highly phosphorylated. We have generated a new mouse model of tauopathy in which this human brain-derived, 35 kDa tau fragment (Tau35) is expressed in the absence of any mutation and under the control of the human tau promoter. Most existing mouse models of tauopathy overexpress mutant tau at levels that do not occur in human neurodegenerative disease, whereas Tau35 transgene expression is equivalent to less than 10% of that of endogenous mouse tau. Tau35 mice recapitulate key features of human tauopathies, including aggregated and abnormally phosphorylated tau, progressive cognitive and motor deficits, autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction, loss of synaptic protein, and reduced life-span. Importantly, we found that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (Buphenyl®), a drug used to treat urea cycle disorders and currently in clinical trials for a range of neurodegenerative diseases, reverses the observed abnormalities in tau and autophagy, behavioural deficits, and loss of synapsin 1 in Tau35 mice. Our results show for the first time that, unlike other tau transgenic mouse models, minimal expression of a human disease-associated tau fragment in Tau35 mice causes a profound and progressive tauopathy and cognitive changes, which are rescued by pharmacological intervention using a clinically approved drug. These novel Tau35 mice therefore represent a highly disease-relevant animal model in which to investigate molecular mechanisms and to develop novel treatments for human tauopathies. PMID:27297240

  2. Tauopathy induced by low level expression of a human brain-derived tau fragment in mice is rescued by phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Bondulich, Marie K; Guo, Tong; Meehan, Christopher; Manion, John; Rodriguez Martin, Teresa; Mitchell, Jacqueline C; Hortobagyi, Tibor; Yankova, Natalia; Stygelbout, Virginie; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Noble, Wendy; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-08-01

    Human neurodegenerative tauopathies exhibit pathological tau aggregates in the brain along with diverse clinical features including cognitive and motor dysfunction. Post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination and truncation, are characteristic features of tau present in the brain in human tauopathy. We have previously reported an N-terminally truncated form of tau in human brain that is associated with the development of tauopathy and is highly phosphorylated. We have generated a new mouse model of tauopathy in which this human brain-derived, 35 kDa tau fragment (Tau35) is expressed in the absence of any mutation and under the control of the human tau promoter. Most existing mouse models of tauopathy overexpress mutant tau at levels that do not occur in human neurodegenerative disease, whereas Tau35 transgene expression is equivalent to less than 10% of that of endogenous mouse tau. Tau35 mice recapitulate key features of human tauopathies, including aggregated and abnormally phosphorylated tau, progressive cognitive and motor deficits, autophagic/lysosomal dysfunction, loss of synaptic protein, and reduced life-span. Importantly, we found that sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (Buphenyl®), a drug used to treat urea cycle disorders and currently in clinical trials for a range of neurodegenerative diseases, reverses the observed abnormalities in tau and autophagy, behavioural deficits, and loss of synapsin 1 in Tau35 mice. Our results show for the first time that, unlike other tau transgenic mouse models, minimal expression of a human disease-associated tau fragment in Tau35 mice causes a profound and progressive tauopathy and cognitive changes, which are rescued by pharmacological intervention using a clinically approved drug. These novel Tau35 mice therefore represent a highly disease-relevant animal model in which to investigate molecular mechanisms and to develop novel treatments for human tauopathies. PMID:27297240

  3. Identification of an N-terminal formylated, two-peptide bacteriocin from Enterococcus faecalis 710C.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoji; Vederas, John C; Whittal, Randy M; Zheng, Jing; Stiles, Michael E; Carlson, Denise; Franz, Charles M A P; McMullen, Lynn M; van Belkum, Marco J

    2011-05-25

    Enterococcus faecalis 710C, isolated from beef product, has a broad antimicrobial activity spectrum against foodborne pathogens. Two bacteriocins, enterocin 7A (Ent7A) and enterocin 7B (Ent7B), were purified from the culture supernatant of E. faecalis 710C and characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and electrospray infusion tandem mass spectrometry analyses. These data and subsequent genetic analysis showed that Ent7A and Ent7B are produced without N-terminal leader sequences and have amino acid sequences that are identical to those of enterocins MR10A and MR10B, respectively. However, the observed masses for Ent7A and Ent7B are 5200.80 and 5206.65 Da (monoisotopic mass), respectively, which are higher than the theoretical molecular masses of MR10A and MR10B, respectively. This study provides evidence that both Ent7A and Ent7B are formylated on the N-terminal methionine residue. Purified Ent7A and Ent7B are active against spoilage microorganisms and foodborne pathogens, including Clostridium sporogenes , Listeria monocytogenes , and Staphylococcus aureus as well as Brevundimonas diminuta , which has been associated with infections among immune-suppressed cancer patients. PMID:21469734

  4. Selection and characterization of llama single domain antibodies against N-terminal huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Schut, Menno H; Pepers, Barry A; Klooster, Rinse; van der Maarel, Silvère M; El Khatabi, Mohamed; Verrips, Theo; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-03-01

    Huntington disease is caused by expansion of a CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene that is translated into an elongated polyglutamine stretch within the N-terminal domain of the huntingtin protein. The mutation is thought to introduce a gain-of-toxic function in the mutant huntingtin protein, and blocking this toxicity by antibody binding could alleviate Huntington disease pathology. Llama single domain antibodies (VHH) directed against mutant huntingtin are interesting candidates as therapeutic agents or research tools in Huntington disease because of their small size, high thermostability, low cost of production, possibility of intracellular expression, and potency of blood-brain barrier passage. We have selected VHH from llama phage display libraries that specifically target the N-terminal domain of the huntingtin protein. Our VHH are capable of binding wild-type and mutant human huntingtin under native and denatured conditions and can be used in Huntington disease studies as a novel antibody that is easy to produce and manipulate. PMID:25294428

  5. Identification of eukaryotic peptide deformylases reveals universality of N-terminal protein processing mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Giglione, Carmela; Serero, Alexandre; Pierre, Michèle; Boisson, Bertrand; Meinnel, Thierry

    2000-01-01

    The N-terminal protein processing pathway is an essential mechanism found in all organisms. However, it is widely believed that deformylase, a key enzyme involved in this process in bacteria, does not exist in eukaryotes, thus making it a target for antibacterial agents such as actinonin. In an attempt to define this process in higher eukaryotes we have used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism. Two deformylase cDNAs, the first identified in any eukaryotic system, and six distinct methionine aminopeptidase cDNAs were cloned. The corresponding proteins were characterized in vivo and in vitro. Methionine aminopeptidases were found in the cytoplasm and in the organelles, while deformylases were localized in the organelles only. Our work shows that higher plants have a much more complex machinery for methionine removal than previously suspected. We were also able to identify deformylase homologues from several animals and clone the corresponding cDNA from human cells. Our data provide the first evidence that lower and higher eukaryotes, as well as bacteria, share a similar N-terminal protein processing machinery, indicating universality of this system. PMID:11060042

  6. Plasmodium vivax: N-terminal diversity in the blood stage SERA genes from Indian isolates.

    PubMed

    Rahul, C N; Shiva Krishna, K; Meera, M; Phadke, Sandhya; Rajesh, Vidya

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide malaria risk due to Plasmodium vivax makes development of vaccine against P. vivax, a high priority. Serine Repeat Antigen of P. vivax (PvSERA) is a multigene family of blood stage proteins with 12 homologues. Sequence diversity studies are important for understanding them as potential vaccine candidates. No information on N-terminal diversity of these genes is available in literature. In this paper, we evaluate the genetic polymorphism of N-terminal regions of the highly expressed member PvSERA4 and PvSERA5 genes from Indian field isolates. Our results show that PvSERA4 has deletions and insertions in Glutamine rich tetrameric repeat units contributing to its diversity. PvSERA5 also exhibits high genetic diversity with non-synonymous substitutions leading to identification of novel haplotypes from India. Our first report helps in elucidating the allelic variants of PvSERA genes in this region and contributes to evaluating their efficacy as vaccine candidates. PMID:25976464

  7. Immune challenge induces N-terminal cleavage of the Drosophila serpin Necrotic

    PubMed Central

    Pelte, Nadège; Robertson, Andrew S.; Zou, Zhen; Belorgey, Didier; Dafforn, Timothy R.; Jiang, Haobo; Lomas, David; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Gubb, David

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila Necrotic protein is a serine proteinase inhibitor, which regulates the Toll-mediated innate immune response. Necrotic specifically inhibits an extracellular serine proteinase cascade leading to activation of the Toll ligand, Spätzle. Necrotic carries a polyglutamine extension amino-terminal to the core serpin structure. We show here that cleavage of this N-terminal extension occurs following immune challenge. This modification is blocked in PGRP-SAsemmelweiss mutants after Gram-positive bacterial challenge and in persephone mutants after fungal or Gram-positive bacterial challenge, indicating that activation of either of the Toll pathway upstream branches induces N-terminal cleavage of the serpin. The absolute requirement of persephone gene product for this cleavage indicates that Gram-positive bacteria activate a redundant set of proteinases upstream of Toll. Both full-length Necrotic and the core serpin are active inhibitors of a range of serine proteinases: the highest affinity being for cathepsin G and elastases. We found a 13-fold increase in the specificity of the core serpin over that of full-length Necrotic for one of the tested proteinases (porcine pancreatic elastase). This finding indicates that cleavage of the Necrotic amino-terminal extension might modulate Toll activation following the initial immune response. PMID:16360948

  8. N-terminal domain-mediated homodimerization is required for photoreceptor activity of Arabidopsis CRYPTOCHROME 1.

    PubMed

    Sang, Yi; Li, Qing-Hua; Rubio, Vicente; Zhang, Yan-Chun; Mao, Jian; Deng, Xing-Wang; Yang, Hong-Quan

    2005-05-01

    Cryptochromes (CRY) are blue light receptors that share sequence similarity with photolyases, flavoproteins that catalyze the repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings expressing the C-terminal domains of the Arabidopsis CRY fused to beta-glucuronidase (GUS) display a constitutive photomorphogenic (COP) phenotype, indicating that the signaling mechanism of Arabidopsis CRY is mediated through the C-terminal domain. The role of the Arabidopsis CRY N-terminal photolyase-like domain in CRY action remains poorly understood. Here, we report the essential role of the Arabidopsis CRY1 N-terminal domain (CNT1) in the light activation of CRY1 photoreceptor activity. Yeast two-hybrid assay, in vitro binding, in vivo chemical cross-linking, gel filtration, and coimmunoprecipitation studies indicate that CRY1 homodimerizes in a light-independent manner. Mutagenesis and transgenic studies demonstrate that CNT1-mediated dimerization is required for light activation of the C-terminal domain of CRY1 (CCT1). Transgenic data and native gel electrophoresis studies suggest that multimerization of GUS is both responsible and required for mediating a COP phenotype on fusion to CCT1. These results indicate that the properties of the GUS multimer are analogous to those of the light-modified CNT1 dimer. Irradiation with blue light modifies the properties of the CNT1 dimer, resulting in a change in CCT1, activating CCT1, and eventually triggering the CRY1 signaling pathway. PMID:15805487

  9. Effect of N-Terminal Acylation on the Activity of Myostatin Inhibitory Peptides.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kentaro; Nakamura, Akari; Rentier, Cédric; Mino, Yusaku; Asari, Tomo; Saga, Yusuke; Taguchi, Akihiro; Yakushiji, Fumika; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2016-04-19

    Inhibition of myostatin, which negatively regulates skeletal muscle growth, is a promising strategy for the treatment of muscle atrophic disorders, such as muscular dystrophy, cachexia and sarcopenia. Recently, we identified peptide A (H-WRQNTRYSRIEAIKIQILSKLRL-NH2 ), the 23-amino-acid minimum myostatin inhibitory peptide derived from mouse myostatin prodomain, and highlighted the importance of its N-terminal tryptophan residue for the effective inhibition. In this study, we synthesized a series of acylated peptide derivatives focused on the tryptophan residue to develop potent myostatin inhibitors. As a result of the investigation, a more potent derivative of peptide A was successfully identified in which the N-terminal tryptophan residue is replaced with a 2-naphthyloxyacetyl moiety to give an inhibitory peptide three times (1.19±0.11 μm) more potent than parent peptide A (3.53±0.25 μm). This peptide could prove useful as a new starting point for the development of improved inhibitory peptides. PMID:26954624

  10. An N-terminal glycine-rich sequence contributes to retrovirus trimer of hairpins stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Kirilee A.; Maerz, Anne L.; Baer, Severine; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis . E-mail: apoumbourios@burnet.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain a glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide and coiled coil core. Previously, we reported that the glycine-rich segment (Met-326-Ser-337) of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, is a determinant of membrane fusion function [K.A. Wilson, S. Baer, A.L. Maerz, M. Alizon, P. Poumbourios, The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function, J. Virol. 79 (2005) 4533-4539]. Here we show that the reduced fusion activity of an I334A mutant correlated with a decrease in stability of the gp21 trimer of hairpins conformation, in the context of a maltose-binding protein-gp21 chimera. The stabilizing influence of Ile-334 required the C-terminal membrane-proximal sequence Trp-431-Ser-436. Proline substitution of four of five Gly residues altered gp21 trimer of hairpins stability. Our data indicate that flexibility within and hydrophobic interactions mediated by this region are determinants of gp21 stability and membrane fusion function.