Science.gov

Sample records for nadir angle results

  1. Change detection from very high resolution satellite time series with variable off-nadir angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Brumana, Raffaella; Cuca, Branka; Previtali, Mattia

    2015-06-01

    Very high resolution (VHR) satellite images have the potential for revealing changes occurred overtime with a superior level of detail. However, their use for metric purposes requires accurate geo-localization with ancillary DEMs and GCPs to achieve sub-pixel terrain correction, in order to obtain images useful for mapping applications. Change detection with a time series of VHS images is not a simple task because images acquired with different off-nadir angles have a lack of pixel-to-pixel image correspondence, even after accurate geo-correction. This paper presents a procedure for automatic change detection able to deal with variable off-nadir angles. The case study concerns the identification of damaged buildings from pre- and post-event images acquired on the historic center of L'Aquila (Italy), which was struck by an earthquake in April 2009. The developed procedure is a multi-step approach where (i) classes are assigned to both images via object-based classification, (ii) an initial alignment is provided with an automated tile-based rubber sheeting interpolation on the extracted layers, and (iii) change detection is carried out removing residual mis-registration issues resulting in elongated features close to building edges. The method is fully automated except for some thresholds that can be interactively set to improve the visualization of the damaged buildings. The experimental results proved that damages can be automatically found without additional information, such as digital surface models, SAR data, or thematic vector layers.

  2. Sensitivity of MODIS 2.1-(micrometers) Channel for Off-Nadir View Angles for Use in Remote Sensing of Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.; Arnold, T.

    2000-01-01

    In this sensitivity study, we examined the ratio technique, the official method for remote sensing of aerosols over land from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) DATA, for view angles from nadir to 65 deg. off-nadir using Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data collected during the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment conducted in 1995. For the data analyzed and for the view angles tested, results seem to suggest that the reflectance (rho)0.47 and (rho)0.67 are predictable from (rho)2.1 using: (rho)0.47 = (rho)2.1/6, which is a slight modification and (rho)0.67 = (rho)2.1/2. These results hold for target viewed from backscattered direction, but not for the forward direction.

  3. Sensitivity of MODIS 2.1 micron Channel for Off-Nadir View Angles for Use in Remote Sensing of Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Tsay, S.-C.; Ji, Q.

    2000-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol over land, from MODIS will be based on dark targets using mid-IR channels 2.1 and 3.9 micron. This approach was developed by Kaufman et al (1997), who suggested that dark surface reflectance in the red (0.66 micron -- rho(sub 0.66)) channel is half of that at 2.2 micron (rho(sub 2.2)), and the reflectance in the blue (0.49 micron - rho(sub 0.49)) channel is a quarter of that at 2.2 micron. Using this relationship, the surface reflectance in the visible channels can be predicted within Delta.rho(sub 0.49) approximately Delat.rho(sub 0.66) approximately 0.006 from rho(sub 2.2) for rho(sub 2.2) <= 0.10. This was half the error obtained using the 3.75 micron and corresponds to an error in aerosol optical thickness of Delat.tau approximately 0.06. These results, though applicable to several biomes (e.g. forests, and brighter lower canopies), have only been tested at one view angle - the nadir (theta = 0 deg). Considering the importance of the results in remote sensing of aerosols over land surfaces from space, we are validating the relationships for off-nadir view angles using Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) data. The CAR data are available for channels between 0.3 and 2.3 micron and for different surface types and conditions: forest, tundra, ocean, sea-ice, swamp, grassland and over areas covered with smoke. In this study we analyzed data collected during the Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation - Brazil (SCAR-B) experiment to validate Kaufman et al.'s (1997) results for non-nadir view angles. We will show the correlation between rho(sub 0.472), rho(sub 0.675), and rho(sub 2.2) for view angles between nadir (0 deg) and 55 deg off-nadir, and for different viewing directions in the backscatter and forward scatter directions.

  4. Obesity, Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir, and Biochemical Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy: Biology or Technique? Results from the SEARCH Database

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tammy; Gerber, Leah; Aronson, William J.; Terris, Martha K.; Presti, Joseph C.; Kane, Christopher J.; Amling, Christopher L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with an increased risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP). It is unclear whether this is due to technical challenges related to operating on obese men or other biologic factors. Objective To examine whether obesity predicts higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir (as a measure of residual PSA-producing tissue) after RP and if this accounts for the greater BCR risk in obese men. Design, setting, and participants A retrospective analysis of 1038 RP patients from 2001 to 2010 in the multicenter US Veterans Administration–based Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database with median follow-up of 41 mo. Intervention All patients underwent RP. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis We evaluated the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and ultrasensitive PSA nadir within 6 mo after RP. Adjusted proportional hazards models were used to examine the association between BMI and BCR with and without PSA nadir. Results and limitations Mean BMI was 28.5 kg/m2. Higher BMI was associated with higher PSA nadir on both univariable (p = 0.001) and multivariable analyses (p < 0.001). Increased BMI was associated with increased BCR risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.06; p = 0.007). Adjusting for PSA nadir slightly attenuated, but did not eliminate, this association (HR: 1.04, p = 0.043). When stratified by PSA nadir, obesity only significantly predicted BCR in men with an undetectable nadir (p = 0.006). Unfortunately, other clinically relevant end points such as metastasis or mortality were not available. Conclusions Obese men are more likely to have a higher PSA nadir, suggesting that either more advanced disease or technical issues confound an ideal operation. However, even after adjusting for the increased PSA nadir, obesity remained predictive of BCR, suggesting that tumors in obese men are growing faster. This provides further support for the idea that obesity is biologically associated with prostate cancer progression. PMID:22921964

  5. Detectable Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir During Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Predicts Adverse Prostate Cancer Specific Outcomes: Results from the SEARCH Database

    PubMed Central

    Keto, Christopher J.; Aronson, William J.; Terris, Martha K.; Presti, Joseph C.; Kane, Christopher J.; Amling, Christopher L.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level <0.2 ng/ml on androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is correlated with better outcomes. However, not all men reach a nadir PSA level within 8 mo. Whether the lowest PSA on ADT—specifically, <0.2 ng/ml—can be used for risk stratification is untested. Objective We examined the predictive value of small but detectable PSA nadir values on prostate cancer (PCa)–specific outcomes in men treated with early ADT after radical prostatectomy (RP). Design, setting, and participants We performed a retrospective review of men treated with ADT after RP before metastases from the SEARCH database. We identified 402 men treated with ADT for elevated PSA following RP, of whom 294 men had complete data. Median follow-up after PSA nadir was 49 mo. All men had a PSA nadir <4 ng/ml; 223 men (76%) had an undetectable nadir. Intervention ADT for an elevated PSA following RP with no radiographic evidence of metastatic disease. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis PSA nadir on ADT was defined as the lowest PSA value during ADT. Proportional hazards models and the C index were used to test the association and predictive accuracy, respectively, between PSA nadir and PCa-specific outcomes. Results and limitations Men with a PSA nadir between 0.01 and 0.2 ng/ml had a greater risk of progression to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.14; p < 0.001), metastases (HR: 3.98; p = 0.006), and PCa-specific mortality (PCSM) (HR: 5.33; p = 0.003) than men with an undetectable nadir. When data were restricted to men followed with ultrasensitive PSA values (sensitivity of 0.01 ng/ml), the C index of PSA nadir alone for predicting CRPC, metastases, and PCSM was 0.88, 0.91, and 0.96, respectively. Conclusions A PSA nadir on ADT, even at a very low level, strongly predicts progression to CRPC, metastases, and PCSM. Men with a detectable PSA nadir during ADT should be considered for clinical trials. PMID:23245686

  6. Nadir Measurements of Carbon Monoxide Distributions by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer Instrument Onboard the Aura Spacecraft: Overview of Analysis Approach and Examples of Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Luo, Ming; Logan, Jennifer A.; Beer, Reinhard; Worden, Helen; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rider, David; Osterman, Greg; Gunson, Michael; Eldering, Annmarie; Goldman, Aaron; Shephard, Mark; Clough, Shepard A.; Rodgers, Clive; Lampel, Michael; Chiou, Linda

    2006-01-01

    We provide an overview of the nadir measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) obtained thus far by the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The instrument is a high resolution array Fourier transform spectrometer designed to measure infrared spectral radiances from low Earth orbit. It is one of four instruments successfully launched onboard the Aura platform into a sun synchronous orbit at an altitude of 705 km on July 15, 2004 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Nadir spectra are recorded at 0.06/cm spectral resolution with a nadir footprint of 5 x 8 km. We describe the TES retrieval approach for the analysis of the nadir measurements, report averaging kernels for typical tropical and polar ocean locations, characterize random and systematic errors for those locations, and describe instrument performance changes in the CO spectral region as a function of time. Sample maps of retrieved CO for the middle and upper troposphere from global surveys during December 2005 and April 2006 highlight the potential of the results for measurement and tracking of global pollution and determining air quality from space.

  7. Postoperative prostate-specific antigen nadir improves accuracy for predicting biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy: Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) and Duke Prostate Center databases

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Daniel M; Presti, Joseph C; Aronson, William J; Terris, Martha K; Kane, Christopher J; Amling, Christopher L; Sun, Leon L; Moul, Judd W; Freedland, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We previously showed that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir after radical prostatectomy (RP) significantly predicts biochemical recurrence (BCR). Herein, we sought to explore the effect of including PSA nadir into commonly used models on their accuracy to predict BCR after RP. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 943 and 1792 subjects from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) and Duke Prostate Cancer (DPC) databases, respectively. The discrimination accuracy for BCR of seven previously published models was assessed using concordance index and compared with and without adding PSA nadir level in SEARCH. Using data from SEARCH, we developed a new nomogram incorporating PSA nadir to other known predictors (preoperative PSA, pathological Gleason score, PSA nadir level, surgical findings, prostate weight, body mass index and race) of BCR and externally validated it in the DPC. Results In SEARCH, the mean concordance index across all seven nomograms was 0.687. After the inclusion of PSA nadir, the concordance index increased by nearly 7% (mean = 0.753). The concordance index of the new nomogram in SEARCH was 0.779 (bias-corrected = 0.767), which was 5% better than the next best model. In DPC, the new nomogram yielded a concordance index of 0.778. Conclusion The addition of postoperative PSA nadir to commonly used nomograms increased their accuracies by nearly 7%. Based upon this, we developed and externally validated a new nomogram, which was well calibrated and highly accurate, and is a potentially valuable tool for patients and physicians to predict BCR after RP. PMID:20880361

  8. Reflectance anisotropy for nadir observations of coniferous forest canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Syren, P. . Lab. of Remote Sensing)

    1994-07-01

    Nadir-viewed reflectances from forest canopies in four spectral bands, centered at 485 nm, 654 nm, 841 nm, and 1,676 nm were measured at different sun angles. Reflectances were measured made from a helicopter ca. 10 km NE of Stockholm, Sweden, over mature and young stands of Scotch pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). The results show a significant increase in nadir reflectance with decreasing solar zenith angle. On the average, reflectance factors increased by 1--2% for each degree of decreasing solar zenith angle. Band ratios showed that there is a disproportional reflectance response in several of the spectral bands at varying zenith angles, differently expressed according to stand type and age. Within the solar zenith angle interval 30--70[degree], canopy reflectance was expressed as linear functions for each spectral band. These functions were used to calculate factors for reflectance standardization. Nomograms, containing reflectance correction factors for mature spruce stands, are presented. These can be directly applied in time-series analysis of multitemporal spectral data.

  9. Recent Results on the CKM Angle Alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalyi, A.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-10-18

    The method to measure the CKM angle {alpha} and the modes sensitive to it are discussed. It is shown that the B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays provide the most stringent constraint on {alpha}, which is found to be {alpha} = 96{sup o} {+-} 10{sup o}(stat) {+-} 4{sup o}(syst){+-} 13{sup o}(penguin).

  10. Review of weak mixing angle results at SLC and LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, the authors review recent precise measurements of the weak mixing angle by the SLD experiment at SLC and by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3, and OPAL experiments at LEP. If they assume that the Minimal Standard Model provides a complete description of the quark and lepton couplings to the Z boson, they find sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23143 {+-} 0.00028. If this assumption is relaxed to apply to lepton couplings only, they find sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.23106 {+-} 0.00035. They compare these results with other precision electroweak tests.

  11. Results from the G0 forward angle measurement

    SciTech Connect

    J. Liu

    2006-07-01

    The results from the G0 forward angle experiment are reported in this talk. The parity-violating asymmetry of elastic e-p scattering has been measured within the range of the four-momentum transfer (Q2) from 0.12 to 1.0 (GeV/c)2, which yields linear combinations of the strange electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon, G{sub E}{sup s} + etaG{sub M}{sup s}, in the same Q2 range. The G0 results, combined with the measurements from other experiments, indicate that G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} are both likely non-zero.

  12. Versatile Surface Tension and Adhesion for SPH Fluids Nadir Akinci

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    Versatile Surface Tension and Adhesion for SPH Fluids Nadir Akinci University of Freiburg Gizem as a result of the impact of a water droplet into a filled container. Our surface tension force allows such as surface tension and adhesion emerge as a result of inter-molecular forces in a microscopic scale

  13. Clinical results of Trabectome surgery for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Takanori; Nishigaki, Shiro; Sato, Tomoki; Wakiyama, Harumi; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine outcomes when using Trabectome surgery and to evaluate factors associated with its effects in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and exfoliation glaucoma (EXG). Methods This was a prospective, non-randomized, observational, comparative cohort study in which Trabectome surgery was used alone in patients with POAG or EXG. Trabectome surgery was considered to have failed when at least one of the following three criteria was fulfilled: intraocular pressure (IOP) ?21 mmHg and a <20% reduction below the baseline IOP on two consecutive follow-up visits 3 months or more after surgery; need for additional glaucoma surgery; and an increase in number of medications compared with baseline. Results The subjects were 32 males (34 eyes) and 46 females (48 eyes). POAG was observed in 43 eyes and EXG in 39 eyes. IOP after Trabectome surgery decreased significantly from 22.3±6.8 mmHg at baseline to 14.0±3.9 mmHg (23.0% reduction) at month 24 in all cases (P<0.0000). The success rate at 2 years was 51.2% for all cases (POAG, 50.9%; EXG, 49.2%). There was no significant difference in success rate between POAG and EXG (P=0.91). Preoperative IOP (P=0.033) and number of medications (P=0.041) were significant factors for surgical success/failure in multivariate logistic regression. No serious complications were observed. Conclusion Trabectome surgery achieved favorable IOP control and was equally effective in patients with POAG and those with EXG. Its effects were influenced by preoperative IOP and number of preoperative medications. PMID:26487799

  14. The impacts of surface topography, footprint sizes and off-nadir viewing on vegetation structure retrievals from lidar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.

    2008-12-01

    The 2007 National Decadal Survey report identified the need to measure the horizontal and vertical structure of ecosystems for estimating global carbon storage and ecosystem response to climate change and human land use. The Decadal Survey recommended the use of lidar observations to obtain these data, either from the lidar mission like the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite-II (ICESat-II), or a combined lidar and radar mission like the Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamic of Ice (DESDynI). A physical based approach is required to assess the tradeoffs of the vegetation height and the above ground biomass retrieval requirements for the future lidar missions. Here we present a physical based approach to estimate the impact of vegetation structure, surface topography, off-nadir viewing, footprint size, pulse width and surface roughness on vegetation height retrieval. The key of the methodology lies in using the well developed Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) model which describes the laser pulse interactions with vegetation structure and underneath surface topography. It directly characterizes the impacts of footprint size, underneath surface topography/roughness, off-nadir viewing and laser pulse width on lidar waveforms and vegetation height retrieval. Using this physical based approach allows us to assess the vegetation height accuracies at different footprint sizes over different slope terrains for different vegetation characteristics at different off-nadir pointing angles. The results of this study will provide scientific guidance on prioritizing the new lidar mission measurement requirements and accuracies.

  15. Bidirectional measurements of surface reflectance for view angle corrections of oblique imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Teillet, P. M.; Slater, P. N.; Fedosejevs, G.; Jasinski, Michael F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for acquiring bidirectional reflectance-factor data was constructed and used over four surface types. Data sets were obtained over a headed wheat canopy, bare soil having several different roughness conditions, playa (dry lake bed), and gypsum sand. Results are presented in terms of relative bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs) as a function of view angle at a number of solar zenith angles, nadir BRFs as a function of solar zenith angles, and, for wheat, vegetation indices as related to view and solar zenith angles. The wheat canopy exhibited the largest BRF changes with view angle. BRFs for the red and the NIR bands measured over wheat did not have the same relationship with view angle. NIR/Red ratios calculated from nadir BRFs changed by nearly a factor of 2 when the solar zenith angle changed from 20 to 50 degs. BRF versus view angle relationships were similar for soils having smooth and intermediate rough surfaces but were considerably different for the roughest surface. Nadir BRF versus solar-zenith angle relationships were distinctly different for the three soil roughness levels. Of the various surfaces, BRFs for gypsum sand changed the least with view angle (10 percent at 30 degs).

  16. Impact of Footprint Diameter and Off-Nadir Pointing on the Precision of Canopy Height Estimates from Spaceborne Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, Yong; Lefskky, Michael; Sun, Guoqing; Ranson, Jon

    2011-01-01

    A spaceborne lidar mission could serve multiple scientific purposes including remote sensing of ecosystem structure, carbon storage, terrestrial topography and ice sheet monitoring. The measurement requirements of these different goals will require compromises in sensor design. Footprint diameters that would be larger than optimal for vegetation studies have been proposed. Some spaceborne lidar mission designs include the possibility that a lidar sensor would share a platform with another sensor, which might require off-nadir pointing at angles of up to 16 . To resolve multiple mission goals and sensor requirements, detailed knowledge of the sensitivity of sensor performance to these aspects of mission design is required. This research used a radiative transfer model to investigate the sensitivity of forest height estimates to footprint diameter, off-nadir pointing and their interaction over a range of forest canopy properties. An individual-based forest model was used to simulate stands of mixed conifer forest in the Tahoe National Forest (Northern California, USA) and stands of deciduous forests in the Bartlett Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Waveforms were simulated for stands generated by a forest succession model using footprint diameters of 20 m to 70 m. Off-nadir angles of 0 to 16 were considered for a 25 m diameter footprint diameter. Footprint diameters in the range of 25 m to 30 m were optimal for estimates of maximum forest height (R(sup 2) of 0.95 and RMSE of 3 m). As expected, the contribution of vegetation height to the vertical extent of the waveform decreased with larger footprints, while the contribution of terrain slope increased. Precision of estimates decreased with an increasing off-nadir pointing angle, but off-nadir pointing had less impact on height estimates in deciduous forests than in coniferous forests. When pointing off-nadir, the decrease in precision was dependent on local incidence angle (the angle between the off-nadir beam and a line normal to the terrain surface) which is dependent on the off-nadir pointing angle, terrain slope, and the difference between the laser pointing azimuth and terrain aspect; the effect was larger when the sensor was aligned with the terrain azimuth but when aspect and azimuth are opposed, there was virtually no effect on R2 or RMSE. A second effect of off-nadir pointing is that the laser beam will intersect individual crowns and the canopy as a whole from a different angle which had a distinct effect on the precision of lidar estimates of height, decreasing R2 and increasing RMSE, although the effect was most pronounced for coniferous crowns.

  17. NADIR: A Flexible Archiving System Current Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapic, C.; De Marco, M.; Smareglia, R.; Molinaro, M.

    2014-05-01

    The New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR) is under development at the Italian center for Astronomical Archives (IA2) to increase the performances of the current archival software tools at the data center. Traditional softwares usually offer simple and robust solutions to perform data archive and distribution but are awkward to adapt and reuse in projects that have different purposes. Data evolution in terms of data model, format, publication policy, version, and meta-data content are the main threats to re-usage. NADIR, using stable and mature framework features, answers those very challenging issues. Its main characteristics are a configuration database, a multi threading and multi language environment (C++, Java, Python), special features to guarantee high scalability, modularity, robustness, error tracking, and tools to monitor with confidence the status of each project at each archiving site. In this contribution, the development of the core components is presented, commenting also on some performance and innovative features (multi-cast and publisher-subscriber paradigms). NADIR is planned to be developed as simply as possible with default configurations for every project, first of all for LBT and other IA2 projects.

  18. Satellite navigation for meteorological purposes: Inverse referencing for NOAA-N and ERS-1 imagers with a 1 km nadir pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloko?ník, J.; Kostelecký, J.; Grassl, H.; Schlüssel, P.; Pospíšilová, L.; Gooding, R. H.; Lála, P.

    Iterative methods for inverse referencing from mean orbital elements or osculating position and velocity, accounting for all necessary orbital perturbations with respect to given nadir pixel size, are described. [Inverse referencing means that the geodetic coordinates of a point on the surface are given and the corresponding image coordinates (scan line number and pixel number) are obtained from satellite orbital elements or coordinates.] The idea is to treat a pixel like a satellite tracking station on the ground. This permits the use of existing software for the computation of satellite ephemerides and orbit determination. The time of culmination of a satellite over the pixel and the off-nadir angle at that moment have been computed. Two variants for such a computation have been tested. Numerical results for the NOAA-N meteorological satellites and ERS-1 are presented. The present state of our software for inverse referencing should fulfil ordinary requirements posed by meteorologists. For NOAA-N satellites, the accuracy achieved roughly the nadir pixel size. The main obstacle to an increase in accuracy is the low quality of the mean orbital elements usually available. For ERS-1, the accuracy may achieve a level of 100 m. A software package, containing versions of the FORTRAN 77 programs PIXPO 3, PIXPO 4 and PIXPOSC, for various data types, including US-2 line or TBUS mean elements or a state vector, is available for scientific exchange.

  19. Flight Test Results of an Angle of Attack and Angle of Sideslip Calibration Method Using Output-Error Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Marie-Michele; Martos, Borja; Foster, John V.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a joint partnership between the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) and the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI), research on advanced air data calibration methods has been in progress. This research was initiated to expand a novel pitot-static calibration method that was developed to allow rapid in-flight calibration for the NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) facility. This approach uses Global Positioning System (GPS) technology coupled with modern system identification methods that rapidly computes optimal pressure error models over a range of airspeed with defined confidence bounds. Subscale flight tests demonstrated small 2-s error bounds with significant reduction in test time compared to other methods. Recent UTSI full scale flight tests have shown airspeed calibrations with the same accuracy or better as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accepted GPS 'four-leg' method in a smaller test area and in less time. The current research was motivated by the desire to extend this method for inflight calibration of angle of attack (AOA) and angle of sideslip (AOS) flow vanes. An instrumented Piper Saratoga research aircraft from the UTSI was used to collect the flight test data and evaluate flight test maneuvers. Results showed that the output-error approach produces good results for flow vane calibration. In addition, maneuvers for pitot-static and flow vane calibration can be integrated to enable simultaneous and efficient testing of each system.

  20. An improved tropospheric ozone database retrieved from SCIAMACHY Limb-Nadir-Matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Rozanov, Alexei; Ladstätter-Weißenmayer, Annette; Ebojie, Felix; Rahpoe, Nabiz; Bötel, Stefan; Burrows, John

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the most important green-house gases and the main component of photochemical smog. It is either transported from the stratosphere or photochemically produced during pollution events in the troposphere that threaten the respiratory system. To investigate sources, transport mechanisms of tropospheric ozone in a global view, limb nadir matching (LNM) technique applied with SCIAMACHY instrument is used to retrieve tropospheric ozone. With the fact that 90% ozone is located in the stratosphere and only about 10% can be observed in the troposphere, the usage of satellite data requires highly qualified nadir and limb data. In this study we show an improvement of SCIAMACHY limb data as well as its influence on tropospheric ozone results. The limb nadir matching technique is also refined to increase the quality of the tropospheric ozone. The results are validated with ozone sonde measurements.

  1. Determination of Optimum Viewing Angles for the Angular Normalization of Land Surface Temperature over Vegetated Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Huazhong; Yan, Guangjian; Liu, Rongyuan; Li, Zhao-Liang; Qin, Qiming; Nerry, Françoise; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Multi-angular observation of land surface thermal radiation is considered to be a promising method of performing the angular normalization of land surface temperature (LST) retrieved from remote sensing data. This paper focuses on an investigation of the minimum requirements of viewing angles to perform such normalizations on LST. The normally kernel-driven bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is first extended to the thermal infrared (TIR) domain as TIR-BRDF model, and its uncertainty is shown to be less than 0.3 K when used to fit the hemispheric directional thermal radiation. A local optimum three-angle combination is found and verified using the TIR-BRDF model based on two patterns: the single-point pattern and the linear-array pattern. The TIR-BRDF is applied to an airborne multi-angular dataset to retrieve LST at nadir (Te-nadir) from different viewing directions, and the results show that this model can obtain reliable Te-nadir from 3 to 4 directional observations with large angle intervals, thus corresponding to large temperature angular variations. The Te-nadir is generally larger than temperature of the slant direction, with a difference of approximately 0.5~2.0 K for vegetated pixels and up to several Kelvins for non-vegetated pixels. The findings of this paper will facilitate the future development of multi-angular thermal infrared sensors. PMID:25825975

  2. Resonant scattering and resultant pitch angle evolution of relativistic electrons by plasmaspheric hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Chen, L.

    2013-12-01

    Adopting several realistic models for the wave distribution and ambient plasmaspheric density, we perform a comprehensive analysis to evaluate hiss-induced scattering coefficients, the relative role of each resonant harmonic, and the overall effect of hiss scattering on the pitch angle evolution and associated decay (loss) processes of relativistic electrons. The results show that scattering by the equatorial, highly oblique component of the hiss emission is negligible. A quasi-parallel propagating wave model of hiss emissions provides a good approximation for evaluation of scattering rates of ? 2 MeV electrons. However, realistic wave propagation angles as a function of latitude along the field line must be taken into account to accurately quantify the rates of hiss scattering above 2 MeV. Ambient plasma density is also a critical parameter that can influence hiss scattering rates and resultant pitch angle evolution of electron flux. While the first order cyclotron and the Landau resonances are dominant for hiss-induced scattering of less than 2 MeV electrons, higher order resonances become important and even dominant at intermediate equatorial pitch angles for ultra-relativistic (? 3 MeV) electrons. Hiss induced electron pitch angle evolution consistently shows a relatively rapid initial transport of electrons from high to lower pitch angles, with a gradual approach towards an equilibrium shape, and a final state where the entire distribution decays exponentially with time. Although hiss scattering rates near the loss cone control the pitch angle evolution and the ultimate loss of ultra-relativistic electrons, the presence of a scattering bottleneck (a pronounced drop in diffusion rate at intermediate pitch angles) significantly affects the loss rate and leads to characteristic top hat shaped pitch angle distributions at energies below ~1 MeV. Decay timescales are determined to be on the order of a few days, tens of days, and > 100 days for 500 keV, 2 MeV, and 5 MeV electrons, respectively, which is consistent with recent observations from the Van Allen probes, and indicates that scattering by hiss emissions can realistically account for the long-term loss process and the pitch angle evolution of relativistic electrons in the plasmasphere following injection during storm conditions.

  3. Results of a simulator test comparing two display concepts for piloted flight-path-angle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a simulator experiment which was conducted in order to compare pilot gamma-control performance using two display formats are reported. Pilots flew a variable flight path angle tracking task in the landing configuration. Pilot and airplane performance parameters were recorded and pilot comments noted for each case.

  4. Evaluating Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) Nadir and Glint Observing Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, R.; Deng, F.; Polavarapu, S.; Neish, M.; Jones, D. B. A.; O'Dell, C.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 (OCO-2) mission successfully launched on July 2, 2014. OCO-2 measures spectra of reflected solar radiation from the Earth's surface, which are used to derive high precision column-averaged CO2 mole fractions (XCO2). OCO-2 will alternate between nadir and glint mode every 16 days (233 orbits) with occasional target observations primarily for calibration and validation. Nadir mode typically has better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over land and the highest probability of avoiding clouds, but poor SNR over water. Glint mode yields good SNR over water (from the specular reflectance of solar radiation) and land, but glint observations are more susceptible to encountering clouds due to their longer paths through the atmosphere, especially at high solar zenith angles. Is there a quantifiable benefit to cycling between nadir and glint more frequently or increasing the fraction of observations from either mode? This question is investigated by generating synthetic OCO-2 observations for the baseline observing sequence (16-day nadir/glint) and by more frequent alternation (per orbit). Observation distributions (after application of filters) demonstrate the different coverage obtained by the two observing scenarios on a 16-day scale. A forward CO2 simulation of the Environment Canada Carbon Assimilation System (EC-CAS) is designated as the 'truth' in an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) and sampled with the observational coverage from each observing sequence, yielding two sets of synthetic XCO2 observations. The GEOS-Chem CO2 adjoint is used to evaluate the ability of the different synthetic datasets to constrain surface CO2 fluxes. The combination of two model systems in this OSSE enables assessment of the sensitivity of the fluxes to transport errors as well as biases in the OCO-2 observations, leading to a more robust overall assessment of the strengths and weakness of the two observing sequences.

  5. Interpreting vegetation reflectance measurements as a function of solar zenith angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Smith, J. A.; Ranson, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Spectral hemispherical-conical reflectances of a nadir looking sensor were taken throughout the day for a lodgepole pine and two grass canopies. Mathematical simulations of both spectral hemispherical-conical and bi-hemispherical reflectances were performed for two theoretical canopies of contrasting geometric structure. These results and comparisons with literature studies showed a great amount of variability of vegetation canopy reflectances as a function of solar zenith angle. Explanations for this variability are discussed and recommendations for further measurements are proposed.

  6. Postlaunch Performance of the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Nadir Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seftor, C. J.; Jaross, G.; Kowitt, M.; Haken, M.; Li, J.; Flynn, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    The prelaunch specifications for nadir sensors of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) were designed to ensure that measurements from them could be used to retrieve total column ozone and nadir ozone profile information both for operational use and for use in long-term ozone data records. In this paper, we will show results from our extensive analysis of the performance of the nadir mapper (NM) and nadir profiler (NP) sensors during the first year and a half of OMPS nadir operations. In most cases, we determined that both sensors meet or exceed their prelaunch specifications. Normalized radiance (radiance divided by irradiance) measurements have been determined to be well within their 2% specification for both sensors. In the case of stray light, the NM sensor is within its 2% specification for all but the shortest wavelengths, while the NP sensor is within its 2% specification for all but the longest wavelengths. Artifacts that negatively impacted the sensor calibration due to diffuser features were reduced to less than 1% through changes made in the solar calibration sequence. Preliminary analysis of the disagreement between measurements made by the NM and NP sensors in the region where their wavelengths overlap indicates that it is due to shifts in the shared dichroic filter after launch and that it can be corrected. In general, our analysis indicates that both the NM and NP sensors are performing well, that they are stable, and that any deviations from nominal performance can be well characterized and corrected.

  7. Structured water in polyelectrolyte dendrimers: Understanding small angle neutron scattering results through atomistic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Do, Changwoo; Hong, Kunlun; Liu, Emily; Liu, Yun; Porcar, L.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Wu, Bin; Egami, T; Smith, Sean C

    2012-01-01

    Based on atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the small angle neutron scattering (SANS) intensity behavior of a single generation-4 (G4) polyelectrolyte polyamidoamine (PAMAM) starburst dendrimer is investigated at different levels of molecular protonation. The SANS form factor, P(Q), and Debye autocorrelation function, (r), are calculated from the equilibrium MD trajectory based on a mathematical approach proposed in this work which provides a link between the neutron scattering experiment and MD computation. The simulations enable scattering calculations of not only the hydrocarbons, but also the contribution to the scattering length density fluctuations caused by structured, confined water within the dendrimer. Based on our computational results, we question the validity of using radius of gyration RG for microstructure characterization of a polyelectrolyte dendrimer from the scattering perspective.

  8. First aircraft experiment results with the wide-angle airborne laser ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Olivier; Thom, Christian; Kasser, Michel

    1999-12-01

    The first aircraft experiment with the Wide-Angle Airborne Laser Ranging System has been conducted in May 1998 over an air base in France equipped with a network of 64 cub-corner retroreflectors. The ranging system was operated from the Avion de Recherche Atmospherique et de Teledetection of CNES/IGN/INSU. Data have been collected during two 4-hour flights. The paper describes the data processing methods and presents the first experimental results. The precision is of 2 cm on the difference of vertical coordinates from two sets of 3 X 103 distance measurements, which is consistent with simulations and a posteriori covariance. The precision is mainly limited by the smallness of the number of efficient measurements remaining after a drastic data sorting for outliers. Higher precision is expected for future experiments after some instrumental improvements (achieving higher link budget) and measurement of aircraft attitude during the flight.

  9. CLINICAL RESULTS WITH THE TRABECTOME, A NOVEL SURGICAL DEVICE FOR TREATMENT OF OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA

    PubMed Central

    Minckler, Don; Baerveldt, George; Ramirez, Marina Alfaro; Mosaed, Sameh; Wilson, Richard; Shaarawy, Tarek; Zack, Barend; Dustin, Laurie; Francis, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To describe treatment outcomes after Trabectome surgery in an initial series of 101 patients with open-angle glaucoma. Methods A 19-gauge microelectrosurgical device enabled ab interno removal of a strip of trabecular meshwork and inner wall of Schlemm’s canal under gonioscopic control with continual infusion and foot-pedal control of aspiration and electrosurgery. A smooth, pointed ceramic-coated insulating footplate was inserted into Schlemm’s canal to act as a guide within the canal and to protect adjacent structures from mechanical or heat injury during ablation of a 30- to 90-degree arc of angle tissue. Results Mean preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) in the initial 101 patients was 27.6 ± 7.2 mm Hg. Thirty months postoperatively, mean IOP was 16.3 ± 3.3 mm Hg (n = 11). The mean percentage drop over the whole course of follow-up was 40%. At all times postoperatively, the absolute and percent decrease in IOP from preoperative levels were statistically significant (paired t test, P < .0001). Overall success (IOP ? 21 mm Hg with or without medications and no subsequent surgery) was 84%. Nine eyes subsequently underwent trabeculectomy, two others had IOP greater than 21 mm Hg in spite of resuming topical medications, and the rest of the patients either refused to resume medications or were still in the 1-month postoperative period without medications (total failure rate including trabeculectomies, 16/101 = 16%). Intraoperative reflux bleeding occurred in 100% of cases. Complications have been minimal and not vision-threatening. Conclusions The Trabectome facilitates minimally invasive and effective glaucoma surgery, which spares the conjunctiva and does not preclude subsequent standard filtering procedures. PMID:17471324

  10. Tropospheric ozone retrieval by using SCIAMACHY Limb-Nadir-Matching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jia; Ladstätter-Weissenmayer, Annette; Ebojie, Felix; Rozanov, Alexei; Burrows, John

    2014-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone is photochemically produced during pollution events and transported from the stratosphere towards the troposphere. It is the third most important green house gases and the main component of summer smog. Global covered satellite measurements are well suitable to investigate sources, sinks, and transport mechanisms of tropospheric ozone in a global view, and to study a characteristic behaviour of the tropospheric ozone in regions. However, the usage of satellite data is associated to a large uncertainty as 90% ozone is located in the stratosphere and only the remaining part of 10% can be observed in the troposphere. The limb-nadir matching (LNM) technique is one of the methods suitable to retrieve tropospheric ozone distributions from space borne observations of the scattered solar light in the UV-visible spectral range. In this study we apply the LNM approach to alternating limb and nadir measurements performed by the SCIAMACHY instrument. A precise tropopause height is used to subtract the stratospheric ozone from the total ozone amount for each matching point. The focus of this work is to reduce the uncertainty of the resulting tropospheric ozone distributions by analysing possible error sources, refining both limb and nadir retrievals and the matching technique.

  11. A method for merging nadir-sounding climate records, with an application to the

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    A method for merging nadir-sounding climate records, with an application to the global. (2015) A method for merging nadir-sounding climate records, with an application to the global/9271/2015/ doi:10.5194/acp-15-9271-2015 © Author(s) 2015. CC Attribution 3.0 License. A method for merging nadir

  12. New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR): Status and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Knapic, C.; Smareglia, R.

    2015-09-01

    The New Archiving Distributed InfrastructuRe (NADIR) has been developed at INAF-OATs IA2 (Italian National Institute for Astrophysics - Astronomical Observatory of Trieste, Italian center of Astronomical Archives), as an evolution of the previous archiving and distribution system, used on several telescopes (LBT, TNG, Asiago, etc.) to improve performance, efficiency and reliability. At the present, NADIR system is running on LBT telescope and Vespa (Italian telescopes network for outreach) Ramella et al. (2014), and will be used on TNG, Asiago and IRA (Istituto Radio Astronomia) archives of Medicina, Noto and SRT radio telescopes Zanichelli et al. (2014) as the data models for radio data will be ready. This paper will discuss the progress status, the architectural choices and the solutions adopted, during the development and the commissioning phase of the project. A special attention will be given to the LBT case, due to some critical aspect of data flow and policies and standards compliance, adopted by the LBT organization.

  13. Understanding angular effects in VHR imagery and their significance for urban land-cover model portability: A study of two multi-angle in-track image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matasci, Giona; Longbotham, Nathan; Pacifici, Fabio; Kanevski, Mikhail; Tuia, Devis

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the angular effects causing spectral distortions in multi-angle remote sensing imagery. We study two WorldView-2 multispectral in-track sequences acquired over the cities of Atlanta, USA, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, consisting of 13 and 20 co-located images, respectively. The sequences possess off-nadir acquisition angles up to 47.5° and bear markedly different sun-satellite configurations with respect to each other. Both scenes comprise classic urban structures such as buildings of different size, road networks, and parks. First, we quantify the degree of distortion affecting the sequences by means of a non-linear measure of distance between probability distributions, the Maximum Mean Discrepancy. Second, we assess the ability of a classification model trained on an image acquired at a certain view angle to predict the land-cover of all the other images in the sequence. The portability across the sequence is investigated for supervised classifiers of different nature by analyzing the evolution of the classification accuracy with respect to the off-nadir look angle. For both datasets, the effectiveness of physically- and statistically-based normalization methods in obtaining angle-invariant data spaces is compared and synergies are discussed. The empirical results indicate that, after a suitable normalization (histogram matching, atmospheric compensation), the loss in classification accuracy when using a model trained on the near-nadir image to classify the most off-nadir acquisitions can be reduced to as little as 0.06 (Atlanta) or 0.03 (Rio de Janeiro) Kappa points when using a SVM classifier.

  14. Crown depth as a result of evolutionary games: decreasing solar angle should lead to shallower, not deeper crowns.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Peter Johannes

    2014-06-01

    There is a general notion in the literature that, with increasing latitude, trees have deeper crowns as a result of a lower solar elevation angle. However, these predictions are based on models that did not include the effects of competition for light between individuals. Here, I argue that there should be selection for trees to increase the height of the crown base, as this decreases shading by neighbouring trees, leading to an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Because the level of between-tree shading increases with decreasing solar angle, the predicted ESS will shift to higher crown base height. This argument is supported by a simulation model to check for the effects of crown shape and the change of light intensity that occurs with changing solar angle on model outcomes. So, the lower solar angle at higher latitudes would tend to select for shallower, and not deeper, crowns. This casts doubt on the common belief that a decreasing solar angle increases crown depth. More importantly, it shows that different assumptions about what should be optimized can lead to different predictions, not just for absolute trait values, but for the direction of selection itself. PMID:24548219

  15. Line tension approaching a first-order wetting transition: Experimental results from contact angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Y.; Betelu, S.; Law, B. M.

    2001-03-01

    The line tension values of n-octane and 1-octene on a hexadecyltrichlorosilane coated silicon wafer, are determined by contact angle measurements at temperatures near a first-order wetting transition Tw. It is shown experimentally that the line tension changes sign as the temperature increases toward Tw in agreement with a number of theoretical predictions. A simple phenomenological model possessing a repulsive barrier at l0=5.1+/-0.2 nm and a scale factor of B=78+/-6 provides a quantitative description of the experiments.

  16. Uncertainty propagation through wave optics retrieval of bending angles from GPS radio occultation: Theory and simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, Michael E.; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-10-01

    The wave optical technique for bending angle retrieval in processing radio occultation observations is nowadays widely used by different data processing and assimilation groups and centers. This technique uses Fourier Integral Operators that map the observed records of the amplitude and phase into the impact parameter representation, which allows for the retrieval of bending angle as a function of impact parameter. We investigate the propagation of uncertainty in the observed amplitude and excess phase to the retrieved bending angle. We construct a simple linear approximation, where the excess phase uncertainty is mapped into the bending angle uncertainty. This results in a simple analytical expression for the final uncertainty. To verify our approximation, we perform numerical Monte Carlo simulations for three example occultation events (tropical, middle, and polar latitude profiles from an atmospheric analysis). We demonstrate that our approximation basically gives good results in all cases over the entire troposphere. Exception is the narrow area near the top of the sharp boundary layer, especially in tropics, where, due to nonlinear effects, a significant systematic error arises accompanied by increased uncertainty.

  17. The impact of ozone field horizontal inhomogeneities on nadir-viewing orbital backscatter UV measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Martin D.; Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    Radiative transfer calculations for nadir-viewing satellites normally assume the atmosphere to be horizontally homogeneous. Yet it has been shown recently that horizontal gradients can lead to significant errors in satellite infrared and microwave soundings. We extend the methodology to backscatter ultra-violet observations of ozone, and present a first estimate of the effect s magnitude. The Solar Backscatter Ultra-Violet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument, a pure nadir sounder, serves as our test bed. Our results indicate that in a vast majority of cases the abovementioned errors can be neglected. However, occurrence of higher errors, particularly at wavelengths longer than 300 nm, coincides with some of the most interesting atmospheric phenomena like tropopause folds and the South polar ozone hole. This leads to a seasonal variation of the magnitude of the effect. Due to the mostly zonal geometry of the ozone distribution, there is also the possibility that biases may be introduced, which is particularly critical if the data are to be assimilated or used to determine trends. The results presented are tested for robustness using different model atmospheres. The influence of horizontal inhomogeneities will be even more pronounced for cross-track sounders and limb viewers, and easier to detect once higher resolution atmospheric models are available. This will be investigated in future studies.

  18. Cleaning results of new and fouled nanofiltration membrane characterized by contact angle, updated DSPM, flux and salts rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Amoudi, Ahmed; Williams, Paul; Al-Hobaib, A. S.; Lovitt, Robert W.

    2008-04-01

    In membrane process industries, membrane cleaning is one of the most important concerns from both economical and scientific points of view. Though cleaning is important to recover membrane performance, an inappropriate selection of cleaning agents may result into unsatisfactory cleaning or irreparable membrane. In this study the cleaning performance has been studied with measurements of membrane contact angle, Updated Donnan steric partitioning pore model (UDSPM) and salt rejection as well as flux measurement. Thin film nanofiltration (NF) membranes such as DK, HL and DL provided by GE Osmonics are used in this study. Tests were carried out with virgin DK, HL and DL as well as fouled DK membranes. Several cleaning agents were investigated; some of them were analytical grade such as HCl, NaOH and others such as SDS, mix agents were commercial grade agents that are already in use in commercial plants. Contact angle, DSPM and salt rejection as well as flux of virgin and fouled membranes before and after chemical cleaning were measured and compared. The contact angle measurements with and without chemical cleaning of different virgin and fouled membranes revealed very interesting results which may be used to characterise the membrane surface cleanliness. The contact angle results revealed that the cleaning agents are found to modify membrane surface properties (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) of the treated and untreated virgin and fouled membranes. The details of these results were also investigated and are reported in the paper. However, UDSPM method did not give any valuable information about pore size of the untreated and treated NF membranes. The salt rejection level of monovalent and divalent ions before and after cleaning by high and low pH cleaning agents is also investigated and is reported in the paper.

  19. Precipitation measurement using SIR-C: A feasibility study. Investigation at nadir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahamad, Atiq; Moore, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    The most significant limitation of the imaging SAR in rain measurements is the ground return coupled to the rain cell. Here we report a study of the possibility of using the X-SAR and the C-band channel of SIR-C for rain measurement. Earlier signal-to-clutter calculations rule out the use of X-SAR at steeper off-vertical angles of incidence (i.e., 20 less than theta less than 50). Only rain rates greater than 30 mm/hr at angles of incidence greater than 60 degrees showed good signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). This study involved calculations at vertical incidence. There is adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at vertical incidence, but the presence of high-range side-lobe levels leads to small SCR for measurement over oceans at both X and C bands. For larger rain thickness (greater than two km), the SCR gets better and smaller rain rates (greater than 10 mm/hr) can be measured. However, rain measurements over forests seem to be feasible at nadir even for smaller rain thickness (less than two km). We conclude that X band may be usable over the forest at vertical incidence to measure rain rates greater than five mm/hr even for shallow rain thickness and over ocean for large rain thickness.

  20. NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS RSB Comparison Using Observations from Simultaneous Nadir Overpasses (SNO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Wu, A.

    2012-01-01

    Suomi NPP (National Polar-orbiting Partnership) satellite (http://npp.gsfc.nasa.gov/viirs.html) began to daily collect global data following its successful launch on October 28, 2011. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key NPP sensor. Similar to the design of the OLS, SeaWiFS and MODIS instruments, VIIRS has on-board calibration components including a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) for the reflective solar bands (RSB), a V-groove blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB), and a space view (SV) port for background subtraction. Immediately after the VIIRS nadir door s opening on November 21, 2011, anomalously large degradation in the SD response was identified in the near-IR wavelength region, which was unexpected as decreases in the SD reflectance usually occur gradually in the blue (0.4 m) wavelength region based on past experience. In this study, we use a well-calibrated Aqua MODIS as reference to track and evaluate VIIRS RSB stability and performance. Reflectances observed by both sensors from simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNO) are used to determine VIIRS to MODIS reflectance ratios for their spectral matching bands. Results of this study provide an immediate post-launch assessment, independent validation of the anomalous degradation observed in SD measurements at near-IR wavelengths and initial analysis of calibration stability and consistency.

  1. Image Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy by Helical Tomotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Toxicity and Impact on Nadir PSA

    PubMed Central

    Barra, Salvina; Vagge, Stefano; Marcenaro, Michela; Blandino, Gladys; Timon, Giorgia; Vidano, Giulia; Agnese, Dario; Gusinu, Marco; Cavagnetto, Francesca; Corvò, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the toxicity of a hypofractionated schedule for primary radiotherapy (RT) of prostate cancer as well as the value of the nadir PSA (nPSA) and time to nadir PSA (tnPSA) as surrogate efficacy of treatment. Material and Methods. Eighty patients underwent hypofractionated schedule by Helical Tomotherapy (HT). A dose of 70.2?Gy was administered in 27 daily fractions of 2.6?Gy. Acute and late toxicities were graded on the RTOG/EORTC scales. The nPSA and the tnPSA for patients treated with exclusive RT were compared to an equal cohort of 20 patients treated with conventional fractionation and standard conformal radiotherapy. Results. Most of patients (83%) did not develop acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and 50% did not present genitourinary (GU) toxicity. After a median follow-up of 36 months only grade 1 of GU and GI was reported in 6 and 3 patients as late toxicity. Average tnPSA was 30 months. The median value of nPSA after exclusive RT with HT was 0.28?ng/mL and was significantly lower than the median nPSA (0.67?ng/mL) of the conventionally treated cohort (P = 0.02). Conclusions. Hypofractionated RT schedule with HT for prostate cancer treatment reports very low toxicity and reaches a low level of nPSA that might correlate with good outcomes. PMID:24745018

  2. Failure-plane angle in Bentheim sandstone subjected to true triaxial stresses: experimental results and theoretical prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaodong; Rudnicki, John; Haimson, Bezalel

    2014-05-01

    We conducted true triaxial tests in the high-porosity (n = 24%), quartz-rich (95%), Bentheim sandstone. An important objective was to investigate the dependence of failure-plane angle ? (angle between the normal to the plane and ?1 direction) on the prevailing stress conditions. We employed two distinct loading paths, and seven ?3 magnitudes (between 0 and 150 MPa). In tests using the common loading path, ?2 and ?3 were fixed, while ?1 was raised monotonically to failure. In tests using the novel loading path (which facilitate comparison with theoretical predictions), ?3 was fixed, and the Lode angle, ? (= tan-1 [(?1 - 2?2 + ?3) / 30.5(?1 - ?3)]) was kept constant by raising ?1 and ?2 simultaneously at a set ratio b [= (?2 -?3)/(?1 -?3)] until failure occurred. Six stress ratios b (= 0, 1/6, 1/3, 1/2, 3/4, 1), i.e. six ? (= tan-1 [(1-2b) / 30.5]) values from +?/6 (axisymmetric compression) to -?/6 (axisymmetric extension) were used. In axisymmetric common loading path tests, failure-plane angle ? generally declined as the applied ?3 = ?2 increased from about 80° at ?3 = ?2 = 0 MPa to 0° at ?3 = ?2 = 150 MPa (forming compaction bands). In tests where ?3 ? ?2, the resulting failure-plane strike was consistently parallel to ?2 direction. For low ?3, ? typically rose by up to 12° as ?2 rose from ?2 = ?3 to ?2 = ?1. However, the rise in ? with ?2 tended to diminish at higher ?3. A limiting case occurred at ?3 = 150 MPa, where failure plane remained at 0° , regardless of the rise in ?2. In the novel loading path tests, failure-plane angle ? declined monotonically for any given Lode angle ?, from roughly 80° to 0° , as the mean stress at failure (?oct,f) rose from about 20 MPa to around 220 MPa; for a constant ?oct,f, ? typically increased from 10° (at ?oct,f = 20 MPa) to 30° (at ?oct,f = 220 MPa) as ? dropped from +?/6 (?2 = ?3) to -?/6 (?2 = ?1). We compared the measured ? with that predicted using equation 28 in Rudnicki (2013), an extension of the Rudnicki and Rice (1975) prediction to include the third stress invariant ?. (Space does not permit detailing the equation in this abstract.) The theory treats octahedral shear stress at failure (?oct,f) and the resulting ? as dependent on ?oct,f and ?. We used two series of the novel loading path tests: axisymmetric compression (? = +?/6) and pure shear (? = 0) to constrain that dependence. The failure conditions in the novel loading path tests were then simulated to compare the predicted failure-plane angles with the experimental results. The predictions were in general agreement with the experimental data, except when ? = -?/6 (?2 = ?1). In the common loading path tests, failure prediction replicated the general rise of the experimentally observed ? with ?2 for a given ?3,as well as the diminished rise at high ?3 magnitudes. The reasonable agreement between the predicted and the observed failure-plane angle demonstrated the applicability and the limitations of Rudnicki's (2013) theory.

  3. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORNS) News:  TES News Join ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  4. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Lite Nadir (TL2FORLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Lite Nadir (TL2FORLN) News:  TES News ... L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Vertical Resolution Precision Order ...

  5. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORN) News:  TES News Join ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  6. TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Lite Nadir (TL2MTLLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-24

    TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Lite Nadir (TL2MTLLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Methanol Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Methanol Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  7. TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Nadir (TL2MTLNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Nadir (TL2MTLNS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Methanol Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Methanol Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  8. TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Nadir (TL2MTLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Methanol (MTL) Nadir (TL2MTLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Methanol Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Methanol Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  9. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures (ATM) Lite Nadir (TL2ATMLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-24

    TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures (ATM) Lite Nadir (TL2ATMLN) News:  ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Atmospheric Temperature Temperature Precision Vertical Resolution ...

  10. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir (TL2TNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir (TL2TNS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  Atmospheric Temperature Temperature Precision Vertical Resolution ...

  11. TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir (TL2ATMTN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Nadir (TL2ATMTN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Atmospheric Temperatures Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  Atmospheric Temperature Temperature Precision Vertical Resolution ...

  12. TES/Aura L2 Ozone (O3) Lite Nadir (TL2O3LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-26

    TES/Aura L2 Ozone (O3) Lite Nadir (TL2O3LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ozone Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Ozone Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data Guide ...

  13. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lite Nadir (TL2COLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lite Nadir (TL2COLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Carbon Monoxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  14. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Lite Nadir (TL2CO2LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-24

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Lite Nadir (TL2CO2LN) News:  TES News ... L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  15. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.2 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  16. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  17. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  18. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Lite Nadir (TL2NH3LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-26

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Lite Nadir (TL2NH3LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  19. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  20. First results from the Isaac Newton Telescope Wide Angle Survey: The z>5 quasar survey

    E-print Network

    R. G. Sharp; R. G. McMahon; M. J. Irwin; S. T. Hodgkin

    2001-09-24

    We report the first results of an observational program designed to determine the luminosity density of high redshift quasars (z > 5 quasars) using deep multi-colour CCD data. We report the discovery and spectra of 3 i 4.4) quasars, including one with z > 5. At z=5.17, this is the fourth highest redshift quasar currently published. Using these preliminary results we derive an estimate of the M \\rm_B Isaac Newton Telescope as part of the Public Isaac Newton Group Wide Field Survey (WFS). This initial sample of objects is taken from two fields of effective area $\\sim 12.5deg ^2$ from the final $\\sim 100deg ^2$.

  1. Recent Results from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Horne, K.; Lister, T.; Collier Cameron, A.; Street, R. A.; Pollacco, D. L.; James, D.; Tsapras, Y.

    2004-12-01

    WASP0 is a prototype for what is intended to become a collection of WASPs whose primary aim is to detect transiting extra-solar planets across the face of their parent star. We present some recent results from the WASP0 camera, including observations of the known transiting planet around HD 209458. The current status of the next generation camera (SuperWASP) located on La Palma is briefly outlined.

  2. Recent Results from the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Horne, K.; Street, R. A.; Pollaco, D. L.; James, D.; Tsapras, Y.; Collier Cameron, A.

    WASP0 is a prototype for what is intended to become a collection of WASPs whose primary aim is to detect transiting extrasolar planets across the face of their parent star. The WASP0 instrument is a wide-field (9-degree) 6.3 cm aperture F/2.8 Apogee 10 CCD camera (2Kx2K chip, 16-arcsec pixels). The camera is mounted piggy-back on a commercial 10-inch Meade telescope. We present some recent results from the WASP camera, including observations from La Palma of the known transiting planet around HD 209458 and preliminary analysis of other stars located in the same field. We also outline further problems which restrict the ability to achieve photon limited precision with a wide-field commercial CCD.

  3. Publications Angling, Angling Records,

    E-print Network

    Publications Angling, Angling Records, and Game Fish Conservation The 1982 edition of "World Record Game Fishes," published by the Inter- national Game Fish Association, 3000 East Las alas Boulevard, Fort Lauder- dale, FL 33316, continues to grow as an important reference work for the serious angler

  4. Backscattering enhancement for Marshall-Palmer distributed rains for a W-band nadir-pointing radar with a finite beam width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we expand the previous theory to be applied to a generic drop size distribution with spheroidal raindrops including spherical raindrops. Results will be used to discuss the multiple scattering effects on the backscatter measurements acquired by a W-band nadir-pointing radar.

  5. Tropospheric Ozone Near-Nadir-Viewing IR Spectral Sensitivity and Ozone Measurements from NAST-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared ozone spectra from near nadir observations have provided atmospheric ozone information from the sensor to the Earth's surface. Simulations of the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) from the NASA ER-2 aircraft (approximately 20 km altitude) with a spectral resolution of 0.25/cm were used for sensitivity analysis. The spectral sensitivity of ozone retrievals to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and water vapor is assessed in order to understand the relationship between the IR emissions and the atmospheric state. In addition, ozone spectral radiance sensitivity to its ozone layer densities and radiance weighting functions reveals the limit of the ozone profile retrieval accuracy from NAST-I measurements. Statistical retrievals of ozone with temperature and moisture retrievals from NAST-I spectra have been investigated and the preliminary results from NAST-I field campaigns are presented.

  6. Latest Performance Results from the FONT5 Intra-train Beam Position and Angle Feedback System at ATF2

    E-print Network

    Christian, G B; Bett, D R; Blaskovic Kraljevic, N; Burrows, P N; Davis, M R; Gerbershagen, A; Perry, C; Constance, B; Resta-Lopez, J

    2012-01-01

    A prototype Interaction Point beam-based feedback system for future electron-positron colliders, such as the International Linear Collider, has been designed and tested on the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The FONT5 intra-train feedback system aims to stabilize the beam orbit by correcting both the position and angle jitter in the vertical plane on bunch-tobunch time scales, providing micron-level stability at the entrance to the ATF2 final-focus system. The system comprises three stripline beam position monitors (BPMs) and two stripline kickers, custom low-latency analogue front-end BPM processors, a custom FPGA-based digital processing board with fast ADCs, and custom kickerdrive amplifiers. The latest results from beam tests at ATF2 will be presented, including the system latency and correction performance.

  7. NADIR: A prototype system for detecting network and file system abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, J.G.; Jackson, K.A.; Stallings, C.A.; McClary, J.F.; DuBois, D.H.; Ford, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the design of a prototype computer misuse detection system for the Los Alamos Notional Laboratory`s Integrated Computing Network (ICN). This automated expert system, the Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR), streamlines and supplements the manual audit record review traditionally performed by security auditors. NADIR compares network activity, as summarized in weekly profiles of individual users and the ICN as a whole, against expert rules that define security policy, improper or suspicious behavior, and normal user activity. NADIR reports suspicious behavior to security auditors and provides tools to aid in follow-up investigations. This paper describes analysis by NADIR of two types of ICN activity: user authentication and access control, and mass file storage. It highlights system design issues of data handling, exploiting existing auditing systems, and performing audit analysis at the network level.

  8. NADIR: A prototype system for detecting network and file system abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, J.G.; Jackson, K.A.; Stallings, C.A.; McClary, J.F.; DuBois, D.H.; Ford, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a prototype computer misuse detection system for the Los Alamos Notional Laboratory's Integrated Computing Network (ICN). This automated expert system, the Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR), streamlines and supplements the manual audit record review traditionally performed by security auditors. NADIR compares network activity, as summarized in weekly profiles of individual users and the ICN as a whole, against expert rules that define security policy, improper or suspicious behavior, and normal user activity. NADIR reports suspicious behavior to security auditors and provides tools to aid in follow-up investigations. This paper describes analysis by NADIR of two types of ICN activity: user authentication and access control, and mass file storage. It highlights system design issues of data handling, exploiting existing auditing systems, and performing audit analysis at the network level.

  9. Comparing nadir and limb observations of polar mesospheric clouds: The effect of the assumed particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Scott M.; Thomas, Gary E.; Hervig, Mark E.; Lumpe, Jerry D.; Randall, Cora E.; Carstens, Justin N.; Thurairajah, Brentha; Rusch, David W.; Russell, James M.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2015-05-01

    Nadir viewing observations of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) from the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft are compared to Common Volume (CV), limb-viewing observations by the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) also on AIM. CIPS makes multiple observations of PMC-scattered UV sunlight from a given location at a variety of geometries and uses the variation of the radiance with scattering angle to determine a cloud albedo, particle size distribution, and Ice Water Content (IWC). SOFIE uses IR solar occultation in 16 channels (0.3-5 ?m) to obtain altitude profiles of ice properties including the particle size distribution and IWC in addition to temperature, water vapor abundance, and other environmental parameters. CIPS and SOFIE made CV observations from 2007 to 2009. In order to compare the CV observations from the two instruments, SOFIE observations are used to predict the mean PMC properties observed by CIPS. Initial agreement is poor with SOFIE predicting particle size distributions with systematically smaller mean radii and a factor of two more albedo and IWC than observed by CIPS. We show that significantly improved agreement is obtained if the PMC ice is assumed to contain 0.5% meteoric smoke by mass, in agreement with previous studies. We show that the comparison is further improved if an adjustment is made in the CIPS data processing regarding the removal of Rayleigh scattered sunlight below the clouds. This change has an effect on the CV PMC, but is negligible for most of the observed clouds outside the CV. Finally, we examine the role of the assumed shape of the ice particle size distribution. Both experiments nominally assume the shape is Gaussian with a width parameter roughly half of the mean radius. We analyze modeled ice particle distributions and show that, for the column integrated ice distribution, Log-normal and Exponential distributions better represent the range of masses that contribute to the IWC. We further show that agreement between SOFIE and CIPS is further improved with the assumption of either Log-normal or Exponential ice particle size distributions. This improvement suggests that the range of mass bearing particle radii is larger, but not significantly shifted from what is obtained by assuming a Gaussian distribution. The assumption of an Exponential particle size distribution, as shown to be justifiable here, has the attractive benefits of being characterized with a single parameter, the mean radius, which greatly facilitates studies of the spatial and temporal variation of PMC particle size distributions as well as comparisons between observations and models. Overall, our results represent a validation of both the CIPS and SOFIE datasets.

  10. The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter NOMAD Spectrometer Suite for Nadir and Solar Occultation Observations of Mars' Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; López-Moreno, José Juan; Patel, Manish; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Drummond, Rachel; Neefs, Eduard; Depiesse, Cedric; Daerden, Frank; Rodriguez-Gómez, Julio; Neary, Lori; Robert, Séverine; Willame, Yannick; Mahieux, Arnaud

    2015-04-01

    NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for MArs Discovery) is one of four instruments on board the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, scheduled for launch in January 2016 and to begin nominal science mission around Mars in late 2017. It consists of a suite of three high-resolution spectrometers - Solar Occultation (SO), LNO (Limb Nadir and Occultation) and UVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) - which will generate a huge dataset of Martian atmospheric observations during the mission, across a wide spectral range. Specifically, the SO spectrometer channel will perform occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-4.3?m at a resolution of 0.15cm-1, with 180-1000m vertical spatial resolution and an SNR of 1500-3000. LNO will perform limb scanning, nadir and occultation measurements, operating between 2.2-3.8?m at a resolution of 0.3cm-1. In nadir, global coverage will extend between ±74O latitude with an IFOV of 0.5x17km on the surface. This channel can also make occultation measurements should the SO channel fail. UVIS will make limb, nadir and occultation measurements between 200-650nm, at a resolution of 1nm. It will have 300-1000m vertical resolution during occultation and 5x60km ground resolution during 15s nadir observations. An order-of-magnitude increase in spectral resolution over previous instruments will allow NOMAD to map previously unresolvable gas species, such as important trace gases and isotopes. CO, CO2, H2O, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, H2CO, CH4, SO2, H2S, HCl, O3 and several isotopologues of methane and water will be detectable, providing crucial measurements of the Martian D/H and methane isotope ratios. It will also be possible to map the sources and sinks of these gases, such as regions of surface volcanism/outgassing and atmospheric production, over the course of an entire Martian year, to further constrain atmospheric dynamics and climatology. NOMAD will also continue to monitor the Martian water, carbon, ozone and dust cycles, extending existing datasets made by successive space missions in the past decades, and to derive surface UV radiation levels. Using SO and LNO in combination with UVIS, aerosol properties such as optical depth, composition and size distribution can be derived for atmospheric particles and for distinguishing dust from ice aerosols. The NOMAD science team will interpret instrument observations using simulations of the GEM-Mars global circulation model. This GCM can model complex atmospheric and chemical processes, such as heterogeneous chemistry, phase transitions, and regolith interaction on both a localised and global scale. Model results can then influence the selection of observational modes and measurement parameters, refining future observations to optimise science return. The instrument, as of January 2015, is currently being assembled and tested. By April, the instrument will have undergone a full range of tests, calibration at Centre Spatial de Liège, and will have been delivered to ESA for mounting onto the Trace Gas Orbiter.

  11. Note on the Effect of Horizontal Gradients for Nadir-Viewing Microwave and Infrared Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Poli, P.

    2004-01-01

    Passive microwave and infrared nadir sounders such as the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), both flying on NASA s EOS Aqua satellite, provide information about vertical temperature and humidity structure that is used in data assimilation systems for numerical weather prediction and climate applications. These instruments scan cross track so that at the satellite swath edges, the satellite zenith angles can reach approx. 60 deg. The emission path through the atmosphere as observed by the satellite is therefore slanted with respect to the satellite footprint s zenith. Although radiative transfer codes currently in use at operational centers use the appropriate satellite zenith angle to compute brightness temperature, the input atmospheric fields are those from the vertical profile above the center of the satellite footprint. If horizontal gradients are present in the atmospheric fields, the use of a vertical atmospheric profile may produce an error. This note attempts to quantify the effects of horizontal gradients on AIRS and AMSU-A channels by computing brightness temperatures with accurate slanted atmospheric profiles. We use slanted temperature, water vapor, and ozone fields from data assimilation systems. We compare the calculated slanted and vertical brightness temperatures with AIRS and AMSU-A observations. We show that the effects of horizontal gradients on these sounders are generally small and below instrument noise. However, there are cases where the effects are greater than the instrument noise and may produce erroneous increments in an assimilation system. The majority of the affected channels have weighting functions that peak in the upper troposphere (water vapor sensitive channels) and above (temperature sensitive channels) and are unlikely t o significantly impact tropospheric numerical weather prediction. However, the errors could be significant for other applications such as stratospheric analysis. Gradients in ozone and tropospheric temperature appear to be well captured by the analyses. In contrast, gradients in upper stratospheric and mesospheric temperature as well as upper tropospheric humidity are less well captured. This is likely due in part to a lack of data to specify these fields accurately in the analyses. Advanced new sounders, like AIRS, may help to better specify these fields in the future.

  12. Retrieval of tropospheric ozone columns from SCIAMACHY limb-nadir matching observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebojie, F.; Savigny, C.; Ladstätter-Weissenmayer, A.; Bötel, S.; Weber, M.; Alexei, R.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite observations of tropospheric ozone are of critical importance in obtaining a global and more thorough knowledge of the phenomena affecting air quality. Tropospheric ozone has a significant adverse effect on the climate system. In the lower troposphere, during summer, it is a major constituent of photochemical smog and excess of it is toxic to the ecosystem, animal and man. It is equally known as a major oxidant and also involved in the production of other oxidants such as hydroxyl (OH) radicals. In the middle and upper troposphere, ozone acts as a greenhouse gas. The retrieval of tropospheric ozone from UV/VIS/NIR satellite spectrometer such as the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) instrument onboard the ESA satellite Envisat is difficult because only about 10 % of the Total Ozone Column (TOC) is in the troposphere. In this analysis we present the retrieval of tropospheric ozone columns from SCIAMACHY limb-nadir matching observations. This technique is a residual approach that involves the subtraction of the stratospheric ozone columns derived from the limb observations from the total ozone columns derived from the nadir observations. The stratospheric ozone columns were derived by integrating the stratospheric ozone profiles from the tropopause, which was obtained from the re-analyses data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) in 1.5o x 1.5o x 91 levels based on both the thermal definition of tropopause using the WMO lapse-rate criterion as well as the potential vorticity definition of the tropopause. The total ozone columns were on the other hand retrieved using the Weighting Function DOAS algorithm (WFDOAS) at the spectral window of 326.6 - 334.5 nm. Equally of importance in our analysis is the tropospheric ozone columns derived from the ozonesondes by integrating the tropospheric ozone profiles from the bottom to the top of the troposphere, which was determined from the ozonesondes temperature profile measurements using the WMO lapse rate criterion definition of the thermal tropopause. Our retrievals are compared with retrievals from ozonesondes and other satellites instruments, with results showing good comparability with some slight deviations of about 5 - 10 DU. Finally, some possible sources of error in our analysis are discussed.

  13. View angle dependence of MODIS liquid water path retrievals in warm oceanic clouds

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Ákos; Seethala, Chellappan; Deneke, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the view angle dependence of domain mean Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) liquid water path (LWP) and that of corresponding cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and liquid cloud fraction as proxy for plane-parallel retrieval biases. Independent Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer–EOS LWP was used to corroborate that the observed variations with sun-view geometry were not severely affected by seasonal/latitudinal changes in cloud properties. Microwave retrievals showed generally small (<10%) cross-swath variations. The view angle (cross-swath) dependence of MODIS optical thickness was weaker in backscatter than forward scatter directions and transitioned from mild ? shape to stronger ? shape as heterogeneity, sun angle, or latitude increased. The 2.2 µm effective radius variations always had a ? shape, which became pronounced and asymmetric toward forward scatter in the most heterogeneous clouds and/or at the lowest sun. Cloud fraction had the strongest and always ?-shaped view angle dependence. As a result, in-cloud MODIS cloud liquid water path (CLWP) showed surprisingly good view angle (cross-swath) consistency, usually comparable to that of microwave retrievals, due to cancelation between optical thickness and effective radius biases. Larger (20–40%) nadir-relative increases were observed in the most extreme heterogeneity and sun angle bins, that is, typically in the polar regions, which, however, constituted only 3–8% of retrievals. The good consistency of MODIS in-cloud CLWP was lost for gridbox mean LWP, which was dominated by the strong cloud fraction increase with view angle. More worryingly, MODIS LWP exhibited significant and systematic absolute increases with heterogeneity and sun angle that is not present in microwave LWP. Key Points Microwave LWP shows small overall and cross-swath variations MODIS in-cloud LWP also shows good view angle consistency in most cases MODIS retrievals show strong overall increase with heterogeneity and sun angle PMID:25821665

  14. Simultaneous ocean cross-section and rainfall measurements from space with a nadir pointing radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, D.; Meneghini, R.

    1983-01-01

    A modified version of the surface-target-attenuation radar described by Meneghini et al. (1983) is proposed which permits simultaneous measurement of ocean radar cross sections and path-average rain rates using a nadir-pointing satellite-borne microwave radar. The basic concept is explained and illustrated; the equations describing the data reduction are derived; some preliminary numerical computations based on a 7.5-m-diameter 10-kW 1.33-microsec-pulse radar operating at 1.87 cm from an altitude of 500 km are performed; and the major error sources (mismatches between rain scattering volumes and additional multipath contributions) and limitations (nadir pointing) are discussed. It is suggested that the system could provide a nadir calibration for wide-swath observing systems such as scanning microwave radiometers.

  15. Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir Within 12 Months of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy Predicts Metastasis and Death

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Pino; Hanlon, Alexandra; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pollack, Alan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND The nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at 1 year (nPSA12) was investigated as an early estimate of biochemical and clinical outcome after radiotherapy (RT) alone for localized prostate cancer. METHODS From May 1989 to November 1999, 1000 men received 3D conformal RT alone (median, 76 Gy) with minimum and median follow-up periods of 26 and 58 months, respectively, from the end of treatment. The calculation of PSA doubling time (PSADT) was possible in 657 patients. Multivariate analyses (MVAs) via Cox proportional hazards regression were used to determine the association of nPSA12 to biochemical failure (BF; ASTRO definition), distant metastasis (DM), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and overall mortality (OM). Dichotomization of nPSA12 was optimized by evaluating the sequential model likelihood ratio and P-values. RESULTS In MVA, nPSA12 as a continuous variable was independent of RT dose, T-stage, Gleason score, pretreatment initial PSA, age, and PSADT in predicting for BF, DM, CSM, and OM. Dichotomized nPSA12 (?2 versus >2 ng/mL) was independently related to DM and CSM. Kaplan-Meier 10-year DM rates for nPSA12 ?2 versus >2 ng/mL were 4% versus 19% (P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS nPSA12 is a strong independent predictor of outcome after RTalone for prostate cancer and should be useful in identifying patients at high risk for progression to metastasis and death. PMID:17133416

  16. Assessment of the stratospheric NO2 column using long-term ground-based UV-visible and satellite nadir observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinardi, Gaia; Van Roozendael, Michel; Lambert, Jean-Christopher; Hendrick, Francois; Granville, José; Tack, Frederik; Goutail, Florence; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Pazmino, Andrea; Wittrock, Folkard; Richter, Andreas; Wagner, Thomas; Gu, Myojeong; Friess, Udo; Navarro, Monica; Puentedura, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Zenith-sky UV-visible instruments have been used to monitor stratospheric NO2 columns from pole to pole for more than 2 decades, as part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). Long-term monitoring and fit-for-purpose data quality are essential commitments of the network. Recently, recommendations were made for a better harmonization of the retrieval of NO2 stratospheric vertical columns (Van Roozendael and Hendrick 2012, http://ndacc-uvvis-wg.aeronomie.be/tools/NDACC_UVVIS-WG_NO2settings_v4.pdf). Those include, in addition to the use of harmonized SCD settings, a common approach to the air-mass factor (AMF) calculation, based on pre-calculated look-up tables of climatological AMFs resolved in latitude, time, wavelength, surface albedo, solar zenith angle and station altitude. The impact of the NDACC recommendations on the quality of the zenith-sky UV-visible stratospheric NO2 columns is first illustrated based on 10 SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales) instruments deployed from the Arctic to the Antarctic. The long-term time-series of SAOZ and other ground-based NDACC zenith-sky measurements are then used in synergy with data from an ensemble of satellite UV-vis nadir sensors (GOME-2, SCIAMACHY and OMI), for characterising the stratospheric NO2 columns on the global scale. Appropriate photochemical state matching is applied whenever necessary to combine/compare the different data sets. Results are interpreted in terms of ground-based network data homogeneity, and accuracy, consistency and long-term stability of space-borne stratospheric NO2 columns. The consistency with previously published studies including stratospheric NO2 column measurements from limb sensors such as MIPAS and SCIAMACHY is also discussed. These quality-assessed ground-based and satellite data sets offer new perspectives for the analysis of the variability and trends of stratospheric NO2 at the global scale.

  17. Using SOURCES to Examine the Nadir of Race Relations (1890-1920)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVallee, Carol; Waring, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The "nadir of race relations" is a term used by historians to describe the time period after Reconstruction, 1890-1920. During this time, African Americans were free; some argue, however, that it was a worse time than when these individuals were enslaved (Brundage 1990; Woodward 2002). There is a debate whether this time period…

  18. The influence of polarization on box air mass factors for UV/vis nadir satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilboll, Andreas; Richter, Andreas; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric abundances of pollutant trace gases like, e.g., NO2, are often derived by applying the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method to space-borne measurements of back-scattered and reflected solar radiation. The resulting quantity, the slant column density (SCD), subsequently has to be converted to more easily interpretable vertical column densities by means of the so-called box air mass factor (BAMF). The BAMF describes the ratio of SCD and VCD within one atmospheric layer and is calculated by a radiative transfer model. Current operational and scientific data products of satellite-derived trace gas VCDs do not include the effect of polarization in their radiative transfer models. However, the various scattering processes in the atmosphere do lead to a distinctive polarization pattern of the observed Earthshine spectra. This study investigates the influence of these polarization patterns on box air mass factors for satellite nadir DOAS measurements of NO2 in the UV/vis wavelength region. NO2 BAMFs have been simulated for a multitude of viewing geometries, surface albedos, and surface altitudes, using the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN. The results show a potentially large influence of polarization on the BAMF, which can reach 10% and more close to the surface. A simple correction for this effect seems not to be feasible, as it strongly depends on the specific measurement scenario and can lead to both high and low biases of the resulting NO2 VCD. We therefore conclude that all data products of NO2 VCDs derived from space-borne DOAS measurements should include polarization effects in their radiative transfer model calculations, or at least include the errors introduced by using linear models in their uncertainty estimates.

  19. Standing Long Jump Performance With an External Focus of Attention Is Improved as a Result of a More Effective Projection Angle.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Scott W; Wu, Will F W; Lim, Kenny; Porter, Jared M; Geraldo, Fransini

    2016-01-01

    Ducharme, SW, Wu, WFW, Lim, K, Porter, JM, and Geraldo, F. Standing long jump performance with an external focus of attention is improved as a result of a more effective projection angle. J Strength Cond Res 30(1): 276-281, 2016-Investigators have recently demonstrated that standing long jump performance is enhanced when participants focus their attention externally instead of their leg action but found no differences when examining peak force. The purpose of this study was to examine kinetic and kinematic properties associated with the standing long jump that may explain disparities between an internal and external focus of attention. It was hypothesized that the external focus condition would exhibit greater impulse values and a more optimal projection angle (45°) than the internal condition. Twenty-one participants each performed 5 total jumps: 1 baseline jump, in which no focus instructions were given, followed by 4 remaining jumps in which either internal or external focus instructions were introduced in a counter-balanced manner. Analysis of variance revealed that the external condition jumped significantly farther than the internal and baseline conditions. Analyses of kinetic measures (i.e., peak force and impulse) revealed no significant differences among conditions. However, there was a significant difference between the internal and baseline conditions compared with the external condition with respect to projection angle. Specifically, participants in the external focus condition exhibited an average projection angle of 45.7°, compared with the internal (49.5°) and baseline (49.0°) conditions. Therefore, the observed difference in jump distance among conditions can be explained by the external condition producing a more optimal projection angle. The results of this study partially support the constrained action hypothesis. PMID:26691415

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy of laser peripheral iridoplasty in reversing the darkroom provocative test result in Chinese patients with primary angle closure status post laser iridotomy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ping; Wu, Ling-Ling

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the efficacy and safety of krypton laser peripheral iridoplasty (LPIP) for Chinese patients with primary angle closure (PAC) or primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) status post laser iridotomy in reversing the positive results of the dark room provocative test (DRPT). METHODS This study was prospective, noncomparative, interventional case series. Thirty-three patients (thirty-eight eyes) with PAC or PACG status post patent laser iridotomy and maintained normal intraocular pressure (IOP) but with positive DRPT results were enrolled. All the subjects were treated with krypton LPIP. DRPT was repeated after krypton LPIP. Results of DRPT were recorded. The visual acuity, IOP and gonioscopy were analyzed before and after krypton LPIP. A minimum time limit for follow-up was 6mo. RESULTS Thirty-three patients (thirty-eight eyes) were followed for 17.7±8.37mo (range 7-41mo) after LPIP. Positive results of DRPT decreased from 38 eyes to 9 eyes (23.7%) after LPIP. Peripheral anterior synechiae of angle in 34 of 38 eyes (89.5%) remained unchanged at dynamic gonioscopy throughout the follow-up period after LPIP. CONCLUSION LPIP decreased positive rates of the DRPT significantly. The mechanism may be that LPIP minimized contact between the peripheral iris and trabecular meshwork, which is a key factor for developing peripheral anterior synechiae. PMID:26086012

  1. Ozone vertical profile retrieval from nadir pointing UV-VIS instruments during ozone hole conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehaan, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Dutch-Finnish Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard the NASA EOS-AURA platform measures backscattered Earth radiance in the 270-500 nm wavelength range with global coverage since October 2004. From the measured spectra ozone vertical profiles are derived with a spatial resolution of 13x48 km2 in nadir and with a vertical resolution of roughly 6 - 8 km. This performance enables monitoring of intricate details of the global ozone layer. The retrieval method used is Optimal Estimation (Rodgers) using the Labow-McPeters-Logan climatology for the a-priori profile. Initially Gauss-Newton iteration was used which converges in 4-8 iteration steps except for ozone hole conditions where the a-priori profile often differs strongly from the actual profile. Simulations show that Gauss-Newton iteration does converge under ozone hole conditions, but only after 50 - 100 iteration steps, which is unacceptable for operational use. Therefore we use a modified Levenberg-Marquardt method to reach convergence in 4 - 8 iteration steps under ozone hole conditions. This eliminates the need for pre- analysis of the measured radiances and subsequent adjustment of the ozone profile. Results of simulations showing the performance of the modified Levenberg- Marquardt method will be presented as well as ozone vertical profiles derived from OMI measurements retrieved inside the 2005 ozone hole. In addition, we present a first validation by comparisons with profiles obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder (also aboard AURA), showing very good agreement between the results obtained by these very different satellite remote sensing systems.

  2. Extending the long-term record of volcanic SO2 emissions with the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite nadir mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, S. A.; Yang, K.; Prata, A. J.; Krotkov, N. A.

    2015-02-01

    Uninterrupted, global space-based monitoring of volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions is critical for climate modeling and aviation hazard mitigation. We report the first volcanic SO2 measurements using ultraviolet (UV) Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) nadir mapper data. OMPS was launched on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite in October 2011. We demonstrate the sensitivity of OMPS SO2 measurements by quantifying SO2 emissions from the modest eruption of Paluweh volcano (Indonesia) in February 2013 and tracking the dispersion of the volcanic SO2 cloud. The OMPS SO2 retrievals are validated using Ozone Monitoring Instrument and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder measurements. The results confirm the ability of OMPS to extend the long-term record of volcanic SO2 emissions based on UV satellite observations. We also show that the Paluweh volcanic SO2 reached the lower stratosphere, further demonstrating the impact of small tropical volcanic eruptions on stratospheric aerosol optical depth and climate.

  3. Influence of subaqueous shelf angle on coastal plain-shelf-slope deposits resulting from a rise or fall in base-level

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, L.J.; Ethridge, F.G.; Schumm, S.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Extensive research in the past decade concerning the effects of base-level fluctuations on coastal plain-shelf-slope systems along passive margins has failed to properly assess the influence of the subaqueous shelf angle on the development, character, and preservation of the resulting deposits. A series of experiments were performed in a 4 m by 7 m flume to examine the effect that differing shelf angles have on a simulated coastal plain-shelf-slope system undergoing a cycle of base-level rise and fall. Results of the experiments indicate that the angle of the shelf affects (1) the amount of sediment available for deposition, (2) the timing of the influx of drainage basin sediment into the lower portions of the fluvial system, and (3) the width to depth ratio and sinuosity of fluvial systems that develop on the shelf. Base-level fall over a steep shelf results in deep, narrow, straight fluvial channels on the shelf and fine-grained, thick shelf-margin deltas. Depositional systems show high sedimentation rates, but a low ratio of coarse-grained to fine-grained sediment. Multiple fluvial incisions on the shelf are rapidly abandoned for a single incised valley. In contrast, gentle shelf angles result in shallow, wide, meandering fluvial channels on the shelf and coarser-grained, thinner shelf-margin deltas. Depositional systems have a lower sedimentation rate, but a high ratio of coarse-grained to fine-grained sediment. Multiple fluvial incisions on the shelf are active for a longer period of time. During subsequent base-level rise, deposits have a low potential for preservation owing to their thin nature and the slower rate at which transgression occurs over the shelf.

  4. Recent results in the study of heavy-ion elastic scattering at large angles. [180/sup 0/

    SciTech Connect

    Barrette, J.; Kahana, S.

    1983-01-01

    The observation, a few years ago, of unexpected large cross sections at backward angles in the elastic scattering of mass-asymmetric heavy ion systems gave us hope that we could learn something new and more precise on the properties of the average ion-ion potential. The subsequent observation of broad regular structures in the elastic and inelastic excitation functions near theta/sub cm/ = 180/sup 0/ were also very promising. Numerous models were proposed to explain some or all the observed features. These models can be divided mainly in two groups. Some try to modify directly the average optical potential whereas others associate the observed cross sections to a modification of specific partial waves outside the scope of the optical potential. This separation in two groups is not always clear since as demonstrated adding a Regge pole to a strongly absorbing potential is under some conditions perfectly equivalent to changing the shape of this potential. Similarly the resonances added to an S matrix can be understood as the manifestation of the potential resonances of a completely different optical potential. We describe recent calculations which have been carried on to try to understand the behavior of the data near the barrier.

  5. View Angle Dependence of MODIS Liquid Water Path Retrievals in Warm Oceanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, A.; Seethala, C.; Deneke, H.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the view angle dependence of domain-mean Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) liquid water path (LWP) and that of corresponding cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and liquid cloud fraction as proxy for plane-parallel retrieval biases. Independent Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS LWP was used to corroborate that the observed variations with sun-view geometry were not severely affected by seasonal/latitudinal changes in cloud properties. Microwave retrievals showed generally small (< 10%) cross-swath variations. The view angle (cross-swath) dependence of MODIS optical thickness was weaker in backscatter than forward scatter directions and transitioned from mild ? (bell) shape to stronger U (bowl) shape as heterogeneity, sun angle, or latitude increased. The 2.2 ?m effective radius variations always had a U shape, which became pronounced and asymmetric toward forward scatter in the most heterogeneous clouds and/or at the lowest sun. Cloud fraction had the strongest and always U-shaped view angle dependence. As a result, in-cloud MODIS cloud liquid water path (CLWP) showed surprisingly good view angle (cross-swath) consistency, usually comparable to that of microwave retrievals, due to cancellation between optical thickness and effective radius biases. Larger (20-40%) nadir-relative increases were observed in the most extreme heterogeneity and sun angle bins, that is, typically in the polar regions, which, however, constituted only 3-8% of retrievals. The good consistency of MODIS in-cloud CLWP was lost for gridbox-mean LWP, which was dominated by the strong cloud fraction increase with view angle. More worryingly, MODIS LWP exhibited significant and systematic absolute increases with heterogeneity and sun angle that is not present in microwave LWP.

  6. In-flight Performance and Initial Results of Plasma Energy Angle and Composition Experiment (PACE) on SELENE (Kaguya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Yokota, Shoichiro; Asamura, Kazushi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Nishino, Masaki N.; Yamamoto, Tadateru; Terakawa, Yuta; Fujimoto, Masaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Hajime; Hirahara, Masafumi; Hoshino, Masahiro; Machida, Shinobu; Mukai, Toshifumi; Nagai, Tsugunobu; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Tomoko; Nakamura, Masato; Oyama, Koh-Ichiro; Sagawa, Eiichi; Sasaki, Susumu; Seki, Kanako; Shinohara, Iku; Terasawa, Toshio; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Takahashi, Futoshi

    2010-07-01

    MAP-PACE (MAgnetic field and Plasma experiment—Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment) on SELENE (Kaguya) has completed its ˜1.5-year observation of low-energy charged particles around the Moon. MAP-PACE consists of 4 sensors: ESA (Electron Spectrum Analyzer)-S1, ESA-S2, IMA (Ion Mass Analyzer), and IEA (Ion Energy Analyzer). ESA-S1 and S2 measured the distribution function of low-energy electrons in the energy range 6 eV-9 keV and 9 eV-16 keV, respectively. IMA and IEA measured the distribution function of low-energy ions in the energy ranges 7 eV/q-28 keV/q and 7 eV/q-29 keV/q. All the sensors performed quite well as expected from the laboratory experiment carried out before launch. Since each sensor has a hemispherical field of view, two electron sensors and two ion sensors installed on the spacecraft panels opposite each other could cover the full 3-dimensional phase space of low-energy electrons and ions. One of the ion sensors IMA is an energy mass spectrometer. IMA measured mass-specific ion energy spectra that have never before been obtained at a 100 km altitude polar orbit around the Moon. The newly observed data show characteristic ion populations around the Moon. Besides the solar wind, MAP-PACE-IMA found four clearly distinguishable ion populations on the dayside of the Moon: (1) Solar wind protons backscattered at the lunar surface, (2) Solar wind protons reflected by magnetic anomalies on the lunar surface, (3) Reflected/backscattered protons picked-up by the solar wind, and (4) Ions originating from the lunar surface/lunar exosphere.

  7. Freeze/thaw-induced embolism depends on nadir temperature: the heterogeneous hydration hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ball, M C; Canny, M J; Huang, C X; Egerton, J J G; Wolfe, J

    2006-05-01

    Freeze/thaw-induced embolism was studied in leaves of field-grown snow gum (Eucalyptus pauciflora) subject to frequent morning frosts. Juvenile trees were grown in buried pots, brought to the laboratory at different stages of acclimation and subjected to simulated frost-freezes (at 2 degrees C h(-1)) to nadir temperatures of -3 or -6 degrees C, which snow gums commonly experience. Frost-frozen and subsequently thawed leaves were cryo-fixed to preserve the distribution of water and were then examined by cryo-scanning electron microscopy. No embolisms were found in leaves frozen to -3 degrees C and thawed. In contrast, 34% of vessels were embolized in thawed leaves that had been frozen to -6 degrees C. This difference was seen also in the extent of extracellular ice blocks in the mid-vein expansion zones in leaves frozen to -3 and -6 degrees C, which occupied 3 and 14% of the mid-vein area, respectively. While the proportion of embolism depended on nadir temperature, it was independent of season (and hence of acclimation state). From the observation that increased embolism at lower nadir temperature was related to the freeze-induced redistribution of water, we hypothesize that the dehydration of cell walls and cells caused by the redistribution exerts sufficient tension on xylem water to induce cavitation on thawing. PMID:17087458

  8. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Hsu, I.-C.; Pickett, Barby; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sandler, Howard M.; Roach, Mack

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or CPBRTB.

  9. Geosynchronous orbiting Nadir Etalon Sounding Spectrometer instrument concept for temperature, moisture and trace species, GeoNESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Sterritt, L. W.; Roche, A. E.; Morrow, H. E.; Willis, C. L.; Spradley, I. E.; Murray, D. O.; Shenk, W. E.; Susskind, J.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the salient features of the Geosynchronous orbiting Nadir Etalon Sounding Spectrometer (GeoNESS) designed for applications from geosynchronous orbit for nadir sounding temperature, moisture, and trace species analyses in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. Particular attention is given to the optics of GeoNESS, the optomechanical design, the cooling systems, the measurement approach used in GeoNESS, the channel selection, and the calibration considerations.

  10. Low speed rotary aerodynamics of F-18 configuration for 0 deg to 90 deg angle of attack: Test results and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultberg, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a rotational flow environment, utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley Spin Tunnel, are discussed and presented in tabular form for a 1/10 scale F-18 airplane model. The rotational aerodynamic characteristics were established for the basic airplane, as well as the influence of control deflections and the contribution of airplane components, i.e., body, wing, leading edge extension, horizontal and vertical tails, on these characteristics up to 90 deg angle of attack. Spin equilibrium conditions predicted using the measured data are also presented and compared with spin model and full scale flight results.

  11. Simultaneous ocean cross section and rainfall measurements from space with a nadir-looking radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Atlas, David

    1986-01-01

    In the case of a nadir-looking spaceborne or aircraft radar in the presence of rain, the return power corresponding to secondary surface scattering may provide information on the properties of the surface and the precipitation. The object of the study is to evaluate a method for determining simultaneously the rainfall rate and the backscattering coefficient of the surface. The method is based upon the mirror-reflected power, which corresponds to the portion of the incident power scattered from the surface to the precipitation, intercepted by the precipitation, and again returned to the surface where it is scattered a final time back to the antenna.

  12. Preliminary results for a large angle oblique jet impingement and flow and for the effect of initial conditions on the near field of an axisymmetric jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.; Kleis, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The structure of an axisymmetric jet in the near field is discussed for jet noise and for jet impingment schemes for STOL aircraft. It is inferred from previous studies, and the inference is supported by analysis, that the scale and intensity of the turbulence structure at the jet exit plane are the important boundary conditions which effect the development of the flow in the near field. The techniques to study these effects while maintaining a uniform mean flow and the results which document the range of the initial conditions are presented. The large angle, oblique jet impingment condition is of interest in terms of the jet/flap interaction. Detailed turbulence data can be obtained with the specially constructed facility. The development of the flow and instrumentation system and initial data from the new facility are presented.

  13. A randomized control trial to evaluate the effect of adjuvant selective laser trabeculoplasty versus medication alone in primary open-angle glaucoma: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacky WY; Chan, Catherine WS; Wong, Mandy OM; Chan, Jonathan CH; Li, Qing; Lai, Jimmy SM

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of adjuvant selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) versus medication alone on intraocular pressure (IOP) control, medication use, and quality of life in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. Methods This prospective, randomized control study recruited 41 consecutive primary open-angle glaucoma subjects with medically-controlled IOP ?21 mmHg. The SLT group (n=22) received a single 360-degree SLT treatment. The medication-only group (n=19) continued with their usual treatment regimen. In both groups, medication was titrated to maintain a target IOP defined as a 25% reduction from baseline IOP without medication, or <18 mmHg, whichever was lower. Outcomes, which were measured at baseline and at 6 months, included the Glaucoma Quality of Life-15 (GQL-15) and Comparison of Ophthalmic Medications for Tolerability (COMTOL) survey scores, IOP, and the number of antiglaucoma medicines. Results The baseline IOP was 15.8±2.7 mmHg and 14.5±2.5 mmHg in the SLT and medication-only groups, respectively (P=0.04). Both groups had a comparable number of baseline medication (P=0.2), GQL-15 (P=0.3) and COMTOL scores (P=0.7). At 6 months, the SLT group had a lower IOP (P=0.03) and required fewer medications compared with both baseline (P<0.0001) and with the medication-only group (P=0.02). There was no statistically significant difference in the 6-month GQL-15 or COMTOL score as compared to baseline (P?0.4) or between the two treatment groups (P?0.2). Conclusion A single session of adjuvant SLT provided further reductions in IOP and medication without substantial changes in quality of life or medication tolerability at 6 months. PMID:25284983

  14. Sun-view angle effects on reflectance factors of corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. J.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of sun and view angles on reflectance factors of corn (Zea mays L.) canopies ranging from the six leaf stage to harvest maturity were studied on the Purdue University Agronomy Farm by a multiband radiometer. The two methods of acquiring spectral data, the truck system and the tower systrem, are described. The analysis of the spectral data is presented in three parts: solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at nadir; solar angle effects on reflectance factors viewed at a fixed sun angle; and both sun and view angles effect on reflectance factors. The analysis revealed that for nadir-viewed reflectance factors there is a strong solar angle dependence in all spectral bands for canopies with low leaf area index. Reflectance factors observed from the sun angle at different view azimuth angles showed that the position of the sensor relative to the sun is important in determining angular reflectance characteristics. For both sun and view angles, reflectance factors are maximized when the sensor view direction is towards the sun.

  15. Ozone ProfilE Retrieval Algorithm for nadir-looking satellite instruments in the UV-VIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wolfram, E.; Salvador, J.; Levelt, P. F.; Kelder, H. M.

    2013-10-01

    For the retrieval of the vertical distribution of ozone in the atmosphere the Ozone ProfilE Retrieval Algorithm (OPERA) has been further developed. The new version (1.26) of OPERA is capable of retrieving ozone profiles from UV-VIS observations of most nadir looking satellite instruments like GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The set-up of OPERA is described and results are presented for GOME and GOME-2 observations. The retrieved ozone profiles are globally compared to ozone sondes for the year 1997 and 2008. Relative differences between GOME/GOME-2 and ozone sondes are within the limits as specified by the user requirements from the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) program of ESA. To demonstrate the performance of the algorithm under extreme circumstances the 2009 Antarctic ozone hole season was investigated in more detail using GOME-2 ozone profiles and lidar data, which showed an unusual persistence of the vortex over the Río Gallegos observing station (51° S, 69.3° W). By applying OPERA to multiple instruments a timeseries of ozone profiles from 1996 to 2013 from a single robust algorithm can be created.

  16. Ozone ProfilE Retrieval Algorithm (OPERA) for nadir-looking satellite instruments in the UV-VIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Peet, J. C. A.; van der A, R. J.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wolfram, E.; Salvador, J.; Levelt, P. F.; Kelder, H. M.

    2014-03-01

    For the retrieval of the vertical distribution of ozone in the atmosphere the Ozone ProfilE Retrieval Algorithm (OPERA) has been further developed. The new version (1.26) of OPERA is capable of retrieving ozone profiles from UV-VIS observations of most nadir-looking satellite instruments like GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The setup of OPERA is described and results are presented for GOME and GOME-2 observations. The retrieved ozone profiles are globally compared to ozone sondes for the years 1997 and 2008. Relative differences between GOME/GOME-2 and ozone sondes are within the limits as specified by the user requirements from the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of ESA (20% in the troposphere, 15% in the stratosphere). To demonstrate the performance of the algorithm under extreme circumstances, the 2009 Antarctic ozone hole season was investigated in more detail using GOME-2 ozone profiles and lidar data, which showed an unusual persistence of the vortex over the Río Gallegos observing station (51° S, 69.3° W). By applying OPERA to multiple instruments, a time series of ozone profiles from 1996 to 2013 from a single robust algorithm can be created.

  17. Application of nonlinear generalised minimum variance to the nadir problem in 2-axis gimbal pointing and stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savvidis, Petros; Anderson, David; Grimble, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Precision tracking applications using two-axis gimbal or antenna actuation systems suffer from a singularity when the inner axis reaches +-90 degrees. This is known by various terms - the keyhole singularity, gimbal lock or the nadir problem. Practically, sightline control is degraded and often lost in a neighborhood of this singularity. In this paper, two nonlinear control algorithms are applied to sightline pointing and stabilization control in the neighborhood of the nadir; the traditional cosecant correction and the nonlinear generalized minimum variance technique. Both controllers were tested against a validated model of an Aeromech TigerEye turret.

  18. The inference of atmospheric ozone using satellite nadir measurements in the 1042/cm band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    A description and detailed analysis of a technique for inferring atmospheric ozone information from satellite nadir measurements in the 1042 cm band are presented. A method is formulated for computing the emission from the lower boundary under the satellite which circumvents the difficult analytical problems caused by the presence of atmospheric clouds and the watervapor continuum absorption. The inversion equations are expanded in terms of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a least-squares-solution matrix, and an analysis is performed to determine the information content of the radiance measurements. Under favorable conditions there are only two pieces of independent information available from the measurements: (1) the total ozone and (2) the altitude of the primary maximum in the ozone profile.

  19. Angle performance on optima MDxt

    SciTech Connect

    David, Jonathan; Kamenitsa, Dennis

    2012-11-06

    Angle control on medium current implanters is important due to the high angle-sensitivity of typical medium current implants, such as halo implants. On the Optima MDxt, beam-to-wafer angles are controlled in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal direction, the beam angle is measured through six narrow slits, and any angle adjustment is made by electrostatically steering the beam, while cross-wafer beam parallelism is adjusted by changing the focus of the electrostatic parallelizing lens (P-lens). In the vertical direction, the beam angle is measured through a high aspect ratio mask, and any angle adjustment is made by slightly tilting the wafer platen prior to implant. A variety of tests were run to measure the accuracy and repeatability of Optima MDxt's angle control. SIMS profiles of a high energy, channeling sensitive condition show both the cross-wafer angle uniformity, along with the small-angle resolution of the system. Angle repeatability was quantified by running a channeling sensitive implant as a regular monitor over a seven month period and measuring the sheet resistance-to-angle sensitivity. Even though crystal cut error was not controlled for in this case, when attributing all Rs variation to angle changes, the overall angle repeatability was measured as 0.16 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}). A separate angle repeatability test involved running a series of V-curves tests over a four month period using low crystal cut wafers selected from the same boule. The results of this test showed the angle repeatability to be <0.1 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}).

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GRS, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2012 1 Peakedness effects in near-nadir radar observations

    E-print Network

    measurements (e.g. [6]). The GO model relates the radar cross section to the mere sea surface slope probabil studies. One diffi- culty is that the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) dependence on the surfaceIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GRS, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2012 1 Peakedness effects in near-nadir radar

  1. Impact of footprint diameter and off-nadir pointing on the precision of canopy height estimates from spaceborne lidar

    E-print Network

    Lefsky, Michael

    Forest (Northern California, USA) and stands of deciduous forests in the Bartlett Experimental Forest-nadir pointing had less impact on height estimates in deciduous forests than in coniferous forests. When pointing Collins, CO 80523, USA b Institute of Forest Resource Information Technique, Chinese Academy of Forestry

  2. Seismic Refraction & Wide-angle Reflection Experiment on the Northern Margin of North China Craton -Data Acquisition and Preliminary Processing Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gao, R.; Keller, G. R.; Hou, H.; Li, Q.; Cox, C. M.; Chang, J. C.; Zhang, J.; Guan, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The evolution history of Central Asian Orogen Belt (CAOB) is still the main tectonic problems in northeastern Asia. The Siberia Craton (NC), North China Craton (NCC) and several blocks collided, and the resulting tectonic collage formed as the Paleo-Asian Ocean disappeared. Concerning the northern margin of North China Craton, many different geological questions remain unanswered, such as: the intracontinental orogenic process in the Yanshan orogen and the nature and location of the suture between the southern NC and the northern NCC. In Dec 2009, a 400 km long seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection profile was completed jointly by Institute of Geology, CAGS and University of Oklahoma. The survey line extended from the west end of the Yanshan orogen, across a granitoid belt to the Solonker suture zone. The recording of seismic waves from 8 explosions (500~1500 kg each) was conducted in four deployments of 300 Reftek125 (Texan) seismic recorders, with an average spacing of 1 km. For the calculations, we used the Rayinvr, Vmed and Zplot programs for ray tracing, model modification and phase picking. The initial result show that: 1)the depth of low velocity sediment cover ranges from 0.6 to 2.7 km (velocity: 2.8~5.6 km/s); 2)the depth of basement is 5.6~10 km (the depth of basement under the granitoid belt deepens to 10 km and velocity increases to 6.2 km/s); 3)the upper crust extends to a depth of 15.5~21 km and has the P-wave velocities between 5.6 and 6.4 km/s; 4)the thickness of the lower crust ranges from 22~28 km(velocity: 6.4~6.9 km/s); and 5)the depth of Moho varies from 39.5 km under the granitoid belt to 49 km under the Yanshan orogen. Based on these results, we can preliminarily deduce that: 1) the concave depression of the Moho observed represents the root of the Yanshan orogen, and it may prove that the orogen is dominated by thick-skinned tectonics; 2) the shape of velocity variations under the granitoid belt is suggestive of a magma conduit. It may be connected with subduction-collision magmatism between the southern NC and the northern NCC along the Solonker suture zone. Supported by Sinoprobe-02 and US NSF PIRE grant (0730154)

  3. Estimating errors in cloud amount and cloud optical thickness due to limited spatial sampling using a satellite imager as a proxy for nadir-view sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yinghui

    2015-07-01

    Cloud climatologies from space-based active sensors have been used in climate and other studies without their uncertainties specified. This study quantifies the errors in monthly mean cloud amount and optical thickness due to the limited spatial sampling of space-based active sensors. Nadir-view observations from a satellite imager, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), serve as a proxy for those active sensors and observations within 10° of the sensor's nadir view serve as truth for data from 2003 to 2013 in the Arctic. June-July monthly mean cloud amount and liquid water and ice cloud optical thickness from MODIS for both observations are calculated and compared. Results show that errors increase with decreasing sample numbers for monthly means in cloud amount and cloud optical thickness. The root-mean-square error of monthly mean cloud amount from nadir-view observations increases with lower latitudes, with 0.7% (1.4%) at 80°N and 4.2% (11.2%) at 60°N using data from 2003 to 2013 (from 2012). For a 100 km resolution Equal-Area Scalable Earth Grid (EASE-Grid) cell of 1000 sample numbers, the absolute differences in these two monthly mean cloud amounts are less than 6.5% (9.0%, 11.5%) with an 80 (90, 95)%chance; such differences decrease to 4.0% (5.0%, 6.5%) with 5000 sample numbers. For a 100 km resolution EASE-Grid of 1000 sample numbers, the absolute differences in these two monthly mean cloud optical thicknesses are less than 2.7 (3.8) with a 90% chance for liquid water cloud (ice cloud); such differences decrease to 1.3 (1.0) for 5000 sample numbers. The uncertainties in monthly mean cloud amount and optical thickness estimated in this study may provide useful information for applying cloud climatologies from active sensors in climate studies and suggest the need for future spaceborne active sensors with a wide swath.

  4. Characteristics of Deep Tropical and Subtropical Convection from Nadir-Viewing High-Altitude Airborne Doppler Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Li, Lihua; Guimond, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents observations of deep convection characteristics in the tropics and subtropics that have been classified into four categories: tropical cyclone, oceanic, land, and sea breeze. Vertical velocities in the convection were derived from Doppler radar measurements collected during several NASA field experiments from the nadir-viewing high-altitude ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP). Emphasis is placed on the vertical structure of the convection from the surface to cloud top (sometimes reaching 18-km altitude). This unique look at convection is not possible from other approaches such as ground-based or lower-altitude airborne scanning radars. The vertical motions from the radar measurements are derived using new relationships between radar reflectivity and hydrometeor fall speed. Various convective properties, such as the peak updraft and downdraft velocities and their corresponding altitude, heights of reflectivity levels, and widths of reflectivity cores, are estimated. The most significant findings are the following: 1) strong updrafts that mostly exceed 15 m/s, with a few exceeding 30 m/s, are found in all the deep convection cases, whether over land or ocean; 2) peak updrafts were almost always above the 10-km level and, in the case of tropical cyclones, were closer to the 12-km level; and 3) land-based and sea-breeze convection had higher reflectivities and wider convective cores than oceanic and tropical cyclone convection. In addition, the high-resolution EDOP data were used to examine the connection between reflectivity and vertical velocity, for which only weak linear relationships were found. The results are discussed in terms of dynamical and microphysical implications for numerical models and future remote sensors.

  5. On Orbit Measurement of Response vs. Scan Angle for the Infrared Bands on TRMM/VIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, William L.; Lyu, Cheng-Hsuan; Barnes, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    The Visible and Infrared Scanner on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM/VIRS) is a whiskbroom imaging radiometer with two reflected solar bands and three emissive infrared bands. All five detectors are on a single cooled focal plane. This configuration necessitated the use of a paddlewheel scan mirror to avoid the effects of focal plane rotation that arise when using a scan mirror that is inclined to its axis of rotation. System radiometric requirements led to the need for protected silver as the mirror surface. Unfortunately, the SiO(x) coatings currently used to protect silver from oxidation introduce a change in reflectance with angle of incidence (AOI). This AOI dependence results in a modulation of system level response with scan angle. Measurement of system response vs. scan angle (RVS) was not difficult for the VIRS reflected solar bands, but attaining the required accuracy for the IR bands in the laboratory was not possible without a large vacuum chamber and a considerable amount of custom designed testing apparatus. Therefore, the decision was made to conduct the measurement on-orbit. On three separate occasions, the TRMM spacecraft was rotated about its pitch axis and, after the nadir view passed over the Earth's limb, the VIRS performed several thousand scans while viewing deep space. The resulting data has been analyzed and the RVS curves generated for the three IR bands are being used in the VIRS radiometric calibration algorithm. This, to our knowledge, the first time this measurement has been made on-orbit. Similar measurements are planned for the EOS-AM and EOS-PM MODIS sensors and are being considered for several systems under development. The VIRS on-orbit results will be compared to VIRS and MODIS system level laboratory measurements, MODIS scan mirror witness sample measurements and modeled data.

  6. Evaluation of the Sensor Data Record from the Nadir Instruments of the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiangqian; Liu, Quanhua; Zeng, Jian; Grotenhuis, Michael; Qian, Haifeng; Caponi, Maria; Flynn, Larry; Jaross, Glen; Sen, Bhaswar; Buss, Richard H., Jr.; Johnsen, William; Janz, Scott; Pan, Chunhui; Niu, Jianguo; Beck, Trevor; Beach, Eric; Yu, Wei; Raja, M. K. Rama Varma; Stuhmer, Derek; Cumpton, Daniel; Owen, Cristina; Li, Wen-Hao

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the first 15 months of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) acquired by the nadir sensors and processed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Interface Data Processing Segment. The evaluation consists of an inter-comparison with a similar satellite instrument, an analysis using a radiative transfer model, and an assessment of product stability. This is in addition to the evaluation of sensor calibration and the Environment Data Record product that are also reported in this Special Issue. All these are parts of synergetic effort to provide comprehensive assessment at every level of the products to ensure its quality. It is found that the OMPS nadir SDR quality is satisfactory for the current Provisional maturity. Methods used in the evaluation are being further refined, developed, and expanded, in collaboration with international community through the Global Space-based Inter-Calibration System, to support the upcoming long-term monitoring.

  7. Low earth orbiting Nadir Etalon Sounding Spectrometer instrument concept for temperature, moisture and trace species, LeoNESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Sterritt, L. W.; Roche, A. E.; Rosenberg, W. J.; Morrow, H. E.; Shenk, W. E.; Susskind, J.

    1992-01-01

    A concept for a low earth orbiting nadir etalon spectrometer sounder (LeoNESS) is described which can achieve retrieval of temperature, H2O, surface, boundary conditions, cloudiness, and trace species with an accuracy that meets or exceeds the AIRS specifications. Options employing 65-K and 30-K detectors are examined; the former may be implemented via passive radiative cooling. The concept, which is derived from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer, has the potential for improving the horizontal and vertical resolution.

  8. Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) study of "two-line" ferrihydrite structure: Effect of arsenate sorption and counterion variation and comparison with EXAFS results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Rea, B.A.; Davis, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements have been made on a suite of "two-line" ferrihydrite (FHY2) samples containing varying amounts of coprecipitated arsenate. Samples prepared at pH 8 with counter ions chloride, nitrate, and a mixture of both also were examined. The raw WAXS scattering functions show that "two-line" ferrihydrite actually has a large number of non-Bragg (i.e., diffuse scattering) maxima up to our observation limit of 16 A??-1. The type of counter ion used during synthesis produces no significant change in this function. In unarsenated samples, Radial Distribution Functions (RDFs) produced from the scattering functions show a well-defined Fe-O peak at 2.02 A?? in excellent agreement with the mean distance of 2.01 A?? from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. The area under the Fe-O peak is consistent with only octahedral oxygen coordination about iron, and an iron coordination about oxygen of 2.2, in agreement with the EXAFS results, the sample composition, and XANES measurements. The second peak observed in the RDFs is clearly divided into two populations of correlations, at 3.07 and 3.52 A??, respectively. These distances are close to the EXAFS-derived Fe-Fe subshell distances of 3.02-3.05 and 3.43-3.46 A??, respectively, though this is misleading as the RDF peaks also include contributions from O-Fe and O-O correlations. Simulated RDFs of the FeOOH polymorphs indicate how the observed RDF structure relates to the EXAFS pair-correlation function, and allow comparisons with an ordered ferrihydrite structure. The effect of increasing arsenate content is dramatic, as the RDF peaks are progressively smeared out, indicating a wider range of interatomic distances even at moderate surface coverages, and a loss of longer range correlations. At an As/Fe ratio of 0.68, the surface saturation level of arsenate, the RDF shows little order beyond what would be expected from small pieces of dioctahedral Fe oxyhydroxyl chains or small "sheet" units. Analysis of the first RDF peak yields components due to As-O and Fe-O correlations. As the As-O component at 1.67 A?? increases in size, the Fe-O component decreases, reflecting a decrease in Fe coordination about the average oxygen. This reduction is consistent with a decrease in mean crystallite size as suggested by EXAFS studies. Analysis of the second RDF peak components shows the progressive decrease in Fe-Fe correlations, and the enhancement of As-Fe correlations, as arsenate level increases. Comparison of the experimental RDF from coprecipitated arsenate-saturated FHY2 with simulated RDFs of model iron oxyhydroxyl structures further constrains possible sizes and geometry for the precipitates, and is consistent with sorbed complexes of the bidentate binuclear (apical oxygen sharing) type.

  9. VHF Radar Measurements of Tropical Forests in Panama: Results from the BioSAR Deployment in Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc; Lawrence, William; Condit, Richard; Wright, Joseph; Johnson, Patrick; Holford, Warren; Hyer, Joseph; May, Lisa; Carson, Steven

    2000-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar sensor operating in 5 bands between 80 and 120 MHz was flown over forested areas in the canal zone of the Republic of Panama in an experiment to measure biomass in heavy tropical forests. The sensor is a pulse coherent SAR flown on a small aircraft and oriented straight down. The doppler history is processed to collect data on the ground in rectangular cells of varying size over a range of incidence angles fore and aft of nadir (+45 to - 45 degrees). Sensor data consists of 5 frequency bands with 20 incidence angles per band. Sensor data for over 12+ sites were collected with forest stands having biomass densities ranging from 50 to 300 tons/ha dry above ground biomass. Results are shown exploring the biomass saturation thresholds using these frequencies, the system design is explained, and preliminary attempts at data visualization using this unique sensor design are described.

  10. Seismic Images of the Crust across D-E Seismic Profile (TS04-Tsujal Project): Results of Reflection and Wide-Angle Seismic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, D.; Lopez Ortiz, J. Y.; Bartolome, R.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Danobeitia, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Escudero, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a part of TSUJAL Project (Crustal characterization of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block boundary and its implications for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment), a geophysical study has been carried out during February and March 2014 in western continental margin of Jalisco where seismic reflection, wide-angle seismic, bathymetry and potential fields (gravity and magnetism) data have been obtained. Eight land seismic stations vertical component and 4.5 Hz model TEXAN 125A (REFTEK), were deployed along an offshore-onshore seismic profile of 140 km length in SW-NE orientation. These stations registered, in continuous model, the airgun shots provided by RRS James Cook used for Multichannel Seismic Reflection data acquisition every 50 m of distance interval and total capacity of 5800 ci along seismic profile D-E (TS04). In the onshore region, these stations were deployed every 20 km from Pérula to Nacastillo (Jalisco, Mexico). The study region corresponds to onshore-offshore line limited by (18o 54'N, 105o 59'W) (19o 26'N, 105o7'W) coordinates. In this work, seismic images of the crust along a deep seismic profile of 140 km length are presented. These images provide new cortical information about the southern part of Rivera Plate, continental accretionary wedge and first kilometers of Jalisco Block continental zone.

  11. Effects of skylight polarization, cloudiness, and view angle on the detection of oil on water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three passive radiometric techniques, which use the contrast of sunlight reflected and backscattered from oil and water in specific wavelength regions, have potential application for remote sensing of oil spills. These techniques consist of measuring (1) total radiance, (2) the polarization components (normal and parallel) of radiance, and (3) the difference between the normal and parallel components. In this paper, the best view directions for these techniques are evaluated, conclusions are drawn as to the most promising technique, and explanations are developed to describe why previous total-radiance measurements yielded highest contrast between oil and water under overcast skies. The technique based on measurement of only the normal polorization component appears to be the most promising. The differential technique should be further investigated because of its potential to reduce the component of backscattered light from below the surface of the water. Measurements should be made about 45 deg nadir view angle in the direction opposite the sun. Overcast sky conditions provide a higher intensity of skylight relative to clear sky conditions and a lower intensity of backscatter within the water relative to surface reflectance. These factors result in higher contrast between oil and water under overcast skies.

  12. MISR Multi-angle Views of Sunday Morning Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Hot, dry Santa Ana winds began blowing through the Los Angeles and San Diego areas on Sunday October 21, 2007. Wind speeds ranging from 30 to 50 mph were measured in the area, with extremely low relative humidities. These winds, coupled with exceptionally dry conditions due to lack of rainfall resulted in a number of fires in the Los Angeles and San Diego areas, causing the evacuation of more than 250,000 people.

    These two images show the Southern California coast from Los Angeles to San Diego from two of the nine cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on the NASA EOS Terra satellite. These images were obtained around 11:35 a.m. PDT on Sunday morning, October 21, 2007 and show a number of plumes extending out over the Pacific ocean. In addition, locations identified as potential hot spots from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the same satellite are outlined in red.

    The left image is from MISR's nadir looking camera and the plumes appear very faint. The image on the right is from MISR's 60o forward looking camera, which accentuates the amount of light scattered by aerosols in the atmosphere, including smoke and dust. Both these images are false color and contain information from MISR's red, green, blue and near-infrared wavelengths, which makes vegetated land appear greener than it would naturally. Notice in the right hand image that the color of the plumes associated with the MODIS hot spots is bluish, while plumes not associated with hot spots appear more yellow. This is because the latter plumes are composed of dust kicked up by the strong Santa Ana winds. In some locations along Interstate 5 on this date, visibility was severely reduced due to blowing dust. MISR's multiangle and multispectral capability give it the ability to distinguish smoke from dust in this situation.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These images were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 41713, and use data from blocks 63 to 66 within World Reference System-2 path 40.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  13. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  14. Crustal Structure Across Coast Shear Zoone in SE Alaska and Western British Columbia: Extension of ACCRETE Wide-Angle Results to 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Morozov, I.; Smithson, S.

    2004-12-01

    The accreted terranes and the continental arc in southeastern Alaska and western British Columbia represent one of the best areas to study crustal structures and processes for the growth of continental crust. In particular, the structure and formation of the Coast Shear Zone (CSZ) and the Coast Mountains Batholith (CMB) is critical for understanding these processes. In 1994, the multidisciplinary ACCRETE project was carried out in this area targeting the structural contrasts across the CSZ. Seismic profiles consist of closely spaced marine air gun shot lines into 3C recording stations on land yielding densely spaced receiver gathers. Present research extends the previous ACCRETE interpretation of the crustal structure across the CSZ into 3D using two additional wide-angle lines. Line 1255, which is perpendicular to the CSZ, extends for ~80 km to the west of the CSZ, and line 1256 extends for ~200 km on the west of the CSZ, approximately parallel to the CSZ. With the basically 2-D data from line 1255 and 3-D data from line 1256 with 4 consecutive stations, a 1-D velocity model is determined to the west of the CSZ. Thereafter, several groups of 1-D models are derived to constrain the variations of the upper crustal structure across and along the strike of CSZ. A 2-D model is then obtained from Moho reflections to constrain the variations of Moho depth across the CSZ. To the west of the CSZ, the crust is modeled as consisting of 4 layers with velocities increasing from ~6.0 km/s in the upper crust to 6.8 km/s near the Moho depth of ~27 km. A shallow Tertiary graben is identified by ~300 ms advances in both the first arrivals and the reflections at the west end of shot line 1255 and the south end of shot line 1256. The observed variations of the Moho depth are in agreement with those obtained previously along the main ACCRETE transect (~27 km to the west and ~32 km to the east of the CSZ), and show that the Moho ramp is characteristic of the CSZ. The upper mantle velocity is ~7.7-7.8 km/s indicating high mantle temperature.

  15. The Feasibility of Tropospheric and Total Ozone Determination Using a Fabry-perot Interferometer as a Satellite-based Nadir-viewing Atmospheric Sensor. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen Maurice

    1993-01-01

    Monitoring of the global distribution of tropospheric ozone (O3) is desirable for enhanced scientific understanding as well as to potentially lessen the ill-health impacts associated with exposure to elevated concentrations in the lower atmosphere. Such a capability can be achieved using a satellite-based device making high spectral resolution measurements with high signal-to-noise ratios; this would enable observation in the pressure-broadened wings of strong O3 lines while minimizing the impact of undesirable signal contributions associated with, for example, the terrestrial surface, interfering species, and clouds. The Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) provides high spectral resolution and high throughput capabilities that are essential for this measurement task. Through proper selection of channel spectral regions, the FPI optimized for tropospheric O3 measurements can simultaneously observe a stratospheric component and thus the total O3 column abundance. Decreasing stratospheric O3 concentrations may lead to an increase in biologically harmful solar ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface, which is detrimental to health. In this research, a conceptual instrument design to achieve the desired measurement has been formulated. This involves a double-etalon fixed-gap series configuration FPI along with an ultra-narrow bandpass filter to achieve single-order operation with an overall spectral resolution of approximately .068 cm(exp -1). A spectral region of about 1 cm(exp -1) wide centered at 1054.73 cm(exp -1) within the strong 9.6 micron ozone infrared band is sampled with 24 spectral channels. Other design characteristics include operation from a nadir-viewing satellite configuration utilizing a 9 inch (diameter) telescope and achieving horizontal spatial resolution with a 50 km nadir footprint. A retrieval technique has been implemented and is demonstrated for a tropical atmosphere possessing enhanced tropospheric ozone amounts. An error analysis assessing the impact on retrieved O3 amounts of the most significant uncertainties associated with this particular measurement has been performed for several different types of atmospheres. Results show the proposed instrumentation to enable a good measurement of absolute ozone amounts and an even better determination of relative changes, with a range of accuracy to within 7.55 to 20.6 percent for integrated tropospheric amounts (and 1.99 to 4.02 percent for total O3 column abundance) and a corresponding range in precision to within 7.73 to 10.4 percent (and 3.30 to 3.95 percent for total O3 column abundance), for the atmospheric conditions considered.

  16. Seismic structure of the main geological provinces off the SW Iberian margin: first results from the NEAREST-SEIS wide-angle seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallarès, Valentí; Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Gailler, Audrey; Bartolomé, Rafael; Gutscher, Marc-André; Graindorge, David; Lia Grácia, Eulà; Díaz, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    The region offshore the SW Iberian margin hosts the present-day NW-SE plate convergence between the European and African Plates at a rate of 4.5 mm/yr, fact that causes continuous seismic activity of moderate magnitude. In autumn 2008 a Spanish-French team carried out a refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic survey in the area (NEAREST-SEIS cruise), in the framework of the EU, FP6-funded NEAREST project. During the survey two long seismic profiles were acquired using a pool of 36 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS), with the objectives of providing information about the geometry of the crust-mantle boundary and the physical properties of the crust, revealing the deep geometry of the main fault interfaces, and identifying the nature of the basement and the limits of the different geological provinces in the region. A total of 30 OBS were deployed along profile P1, which is 356 km long and trends NW-SE from the Tagus abyssal plain (TAP), crossing the Gorringe bank (GB), the Horseshoe abyssal plain (HAP) and the Coral Patch Ridge (CPR), up to the thrust-and-fold belt of the Seine abyssal plain (SAP). The acquired data were modeled by joint refraction and reflection travel time inversion, following a layer-stripping strategy. The inverted model show four well-differentiated domains in terms of its seismic structure: In the TAP a 3-4 km-thick, low velocity sedimentary layer covers the basement, which shows a remarkably high velocity (>7 km/s), similar to that of the basement outcropping in the Gorringe bank. In the HAP the sedimentary cover is thicker, showing an upper unit with low velocity corresponding to the Horseshoe gravitational unit, on top of a higher velocity lower unit, which may represent the highly consolidated Mesozoic sedimentary sequence. The thickness of the two units together exceeds 5 km. The basement shows the same velocity distribution as in TAP and GB, suggesting a common nature and origin. According to its seismic structure, and considering that there is no evidence for the presence of a basal reflector (e.g. Moho) in the record sections, we interpret this basement as highly serpentinized, exhumed mantle. In contrast, the CPR and SAP show evidences for the presence of a well-developed, 6-7 km-thick oceanic crust, underlying the 2-3 km-thick, moderate velocity, Mesozoic sedimentary sequence. Profile P2 is 256 km long, and trends S-N from the easternmost SAP beyond the NW Moroccan margin, crossing the Gulf of Cadiz imbricated wedge and the Portimao bank ending at the Iberian margin shelf. 15 OBS and 7 land-stations were deployed along this profile, and the recorded data were modeled following the same approach and strategy as for P1. The inverted model shows two main domains: In the southern half, there is a 3-4 km-thick cover of low velocity sediments, which represents the western edge of the sedimentary wedge that covers the internal Gulf of Cadiz, overlying a 7-8 km-thick oceanic crust. According to recent tectonic reconstructions, this crustal segment should have been emplaced there during the early phase of continental spreading between Iberia and Africa, in the context of Mesozoic Atlantic spreading. The northern part of P2 displays a relatively sharp ocean-continent transition zone concentrated in a ~50 km-wide band, that ends with the ~30 km-thick continental crust of the SW Iberian shelf.

  17. Off-nadir antenna bias correction using Amazon rain sigma(0) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrer, I. J.; Dome, G. J.; Sweet, J.; Berthold, G.; Moore, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    The radar response from the Amazon rain forest was studied to determine the suitability of this region for use as a standard target to calibrate a scatterometer like that proposed for the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS). Backscattering observations made by the SEASAT Scatterometer System (SASS) showed the Amazon rain forest to be a homogeneous, azimuthally-isotropic, radar target which was insensitive to polarization. The variation with angle of incidence was adequately modeled as scattering coefficient (dB) = a theta b with typical values for the incidence-angle coefficient from 0.07 to 0.15 dB/deg. A small diurnal effect occurs, with measurements at sunrise being 0.5 dB to 1 dB higher than the rest of the day. Maximum-likelihood estimation algorithms presented here permit determination of relative bias and true pointing angle for each beam. Specific implementation of these algorithms for the proposed NOSS scatterometer system is also discussed.

  18. Off-nadir antenna bias correction using Amazon rain forest sigma deg data. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrer, I. J.; Bracalente, E. M.; Dome, G. J.; Sweet, J.; Berthold, G.; Moore, R. K. (principal investigators)

    1981-01-01

    The radar response from the Amazon rain forest was studied to determine the suitability of this region for use as a standard target to calibrate a scatterometer like that proposed for the National Ocean Satellite System (NOSS). Backscattering observations made by the SEASAT-1 scatterometer system show the Amazon rain forest to be a homogeneous, azimuthally-isotropic, radar target which is insensitive to polarization. The variation with angle of incidence may be adequately modeled as sigma deg (dB) = alpha theta + beta with typical values for the incidence-angle coefficient from 0.07 dB deg to 0.15 dB/deg. A small diurnal effect occurs, with measurements at sunrise being 0.5 dB to 1 dB higher than the rest of the day. Maximum likelihood estimation algorithms are presented which permit determination of relative bias and true pointing angle for each beam. Specific implementation of these algorithms for the proposed NOSS scatterometer system is also discussed.

  19. Multi-Angle View of the Canary Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A multi-angle view of the Canary Islands in a dust storm, 29 February 2000. At left is a true-color image taken by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. This image was captured by the MISR camera looking at a 70.5-degree angle to the surface, ahead of the spacecraft. The middle image was taken by the MISR downward-looking (nadir) camera, and the right image is from the aftward 70.5-degree camera. The images are reproduced using the same radiometric scale, so variations in brightness, color, and contrast represent true variations in surface and atmospheric reflectance with angle. Windblown dust from the Sahara Desert is apparent in all three images, and is much brighter in the oblique views. This illustrates how MISR's oblique imaging capability makes the instrument a sensitive detector of dust and other particles in the atmosphere. Data for all channels are presented in a Space Oblique Mercator map projection to facilitate their co-registration. The images are about 400 km (250 miles)wide, with a spatial resolution of about 1.1 kilometers (1,200 yards). North is toward the top. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  20. Calibration of angle standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Brum Vieira, Luiz; Stone, Jack; Viliesid, Miguel; Gastaldi, Bruno R.; Przybylska, Joanna; Chaudhary, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2000, a key comparison, CCL-K3 (optical polygon and angle blocks) was started, piloted by NMISA. Based on it, in 2007, the SIM metrological region started a SIM.L-K3 key comparison piloted by INMETRO. The results of this regional comparison (RMO key comparison) contribute to the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA) between the national metrology institutes of the Metre Convention. It is linked with the CCL-K3 key comparison via laboratories that participated in both the CIPM and the RMO comparisons. This common participation establishes the link between the comparisons and ensures equivalence of national metrology institutes, according to the MRA between NMIs. The SIM NMIs that took part in the CCL-K3 were NIST, NRC and CENAM. However, NRC withdrew from it. GUM from Poland (EURAMET) and NPLI from India (APMP) were invited to participate in the SIM.L-K3 key comparison. The circulation of artefacts (a 12 faces polygon and 4 angle blocks) started in 2008 and was completed in 2009. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  1. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle ? between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of ? around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  2. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  3. Cerebellopontine Angle Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Martin U.; Lüdemann, Wolf O.; Schreiber, Hartwig; Samii, Madjid

    1997-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas in an infratentorial and extra-axial location are extremely rare. The presented case of an extensive lipoma of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represents 0.05% of all CPA tumors operated on in our department from 1978 to 1996. The lipoma constitutes an important differential diagnosis because the clinical management differs significantly from other CPA lesions. The clinical presentation and management of the presented case are analyzed in comparison to all previously described cases of CPA lipomas. The etiology and the radiological features of CPA lipomas are reviewed and discussed. CPA lipomas are maldevelopmental lesions that may cause slowly progressive symptoms. Neuroradiology enables a reliable preoperative diagnosis. Attempts of complete lipoma resection usually result in severe neurological deficits. Therefore, we recommend a conservative approach in managing these patients. Limited surgery is indicated if the patient has an associated vascular compression syndrome or suffers from disabling vertigo. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171031

  4. A method for merging nadir-sounding climate records, with an application to the global-mean stratospheric temperature data sets from SSU and AMSU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLandress, C.; Shepherd, T. G.; Jonsson, A. I.; von Clarmann, T.; Funke, B.

    2015-04-01

    A method is proposed for merging different nadir-sounding climate data records using measurements from high resolution limb sounders to provide a transfer function between the different nadir measurements. The nadir-sounding records need not be overlapping so long as the limb-sounding record bridges between them. The method is applied to global mean stratospheric temperatures from the NOAA Climate Data Records based on the Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU), extending the SSU record forward in time to yield a continuous data set from 1979 to present. SSU and AMSU are bridged using temperature measurements from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), which is of high enough vertical resolution to accurately represent the weighting functions of both SSU and AMSU. For this application, a purely statistical approach is not viable since the different nadir channels are not sufficiently linearly independent, statistically speaking. The extended SSU global-mean data set is in good agreement with temperatures from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite, with both exhibiting a cooling trend of ~ 0.6 ± 0.3 K decade-1 in the upper stratosphere from 2004-2012. The extended SSU data set also compares well with chemistry-climate model simulations over its entire record, including the contrast between the weak cooling seen over 1995-2004 compared with the large cooling seen in the period 1986-1995 of strong ozone depletion.

  5. Regression coefficient maps showing that Nadir CD4+ count is correlated with regional white matter volumes (FDR q=0.05, critical P=0.03)

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Paul

    's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA 4Tufts University School of Medicine, Neurology and Community Health, Boston, MA-linearly aligned to the brain template, using an inverse-consistent elastic intensity-based registration algorithm brain volumes and (1) demographic variables: age, sex (2) immune system measures: current and nadir CD4

  6. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  7. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  8. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  9. Extreme-Risk Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting With Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) >40 ng/ml: Prognostic Significance of the Preradiation PSA Nadir

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Abraham S.; Mydin, Aminudin; Jones, Stuart O.; Christie, Jennifer; Lim, Jan T.W.; Truong, Pauline T.; Ludgate, Charles M.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of patient, disease, and treatment characteristics on survival outcomes in patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radical external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for clinically localized, extreme-risk prostate adenocarcinoma with a presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of >40 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was conducted of 64 patients treated at a single institution between 1991 and 2000 with ADT and RT for prostate cancer with a presenting PSA level of >40 ng/ml. The effects of patient age, tumor (presenting PSA level, Gleason score, and T stage), and treatment (total ADT duration and pre-RT PSA level) characteristics on rates of biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 6.45 years (range, 0.09-15.19 years). Actuarial bDFS, PCSS, and OS rates at 5 years were 39%, 87%, and 78%, respectively, and 17%, 64%, and 45%, respectively, at 10 years. On multivariate analysis, the pre-RT PSA level ({<=}0.1 versus >0.1 ng/ml) was the single most significant prognostic factor for bDFS (p = 0.033) and OS (p = 0.018) rates, whereas age, T stage, Gleason score, and ADT duration ({<=}6 versus >6 months) were not predictive of outcomes. Conclusion: In prostate cancer patients with high presenting PSA levels, >40 ng/ml, treated with combined modality, neoadjuvant ADT, and RT, the pre-RT PSA nadir, rather than ADT duration, was significantly associated with improved survival. This observation supports the use of neoadjuvant ADT to drive PSA levels to below 0.1 ng/ml before initiation of RT, to optimize outcomes for patients with extreme-risk disease.

  10. Raised-angle discrimination under passive finger movement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglong; Yang, Jiajia; Ogasa, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of raised-line drawing discrimination can be defined as the sum of the discriminability of the length, curvature, and angles of the edges. The size of the angle between two edges constitutes an important feature of these tactile stimuli. In the first experiment, five standard angles (30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 150 degrees) and twenty comparison angles for each standard angle were used to investigate the human capacity for tactile discrimination of raised angles by passive finger movement. The subjects in this study were asked to identify the larger angle of each pair by passive finger movement. We found that the threshold doubled when the standard angle was increased from 30 degrees to 90 degrees; however, the threshold remained unchanged when the standard angle was greater than 90 degrees. In the second experiment, to investigate the influence of the endpoints on angle discriminability, we used one standard angle (60 degrees) and seven comparison angles that changed in four bisector orientations. The results indicate that cutaneous feedback from the local apex and endpoints of the angle contributed to the discrimination of acute angles. Taken together, these results suggest that, when an acute angle is presented, both local apex and endpoint informations are used, while cutaneous mechanoreceptors rely more on apex information to discriminate the angle size when an obtuse angle is presented. PMID:20842975

  11. Dynamic contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of a series of aqueous solutions were measured on a number of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces using a modified Wilhelmy plate technique. Superhydrophobic surfaces are hydrophobic surfaces with micron or nanometer sized surface roughness. These surfaces have very large static advancing contact angles and little static contact angle hysteresis. In this study, the dynamic advancing and dynamic receding contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces were measured as a function of plate velocity and capillary number. The dynamic contact angles measured on a smooth hydrophobic Teflon surface were found to obey the scaling with capillary number predicted by the Cox-Voinov-Tanner law, ?D3 ? Ca. The response of the dynamic contact angle on the superhydrophobic surfaces, however, did not follow the same scaling law. The advancing contact angle was found to remain constant at ?A = 160?, independent of capillary number. The dynamic receding contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces were found to decrease with increasing capillary number; however, the presence of slip on the superhydrophobic surface was found to result in a shift in the onset of dynamic contact angle variation to larger capillary numbers. In addition, a much weaker dependence of the dynamic contact angle on capillary number was observed for some of the superhydrophobic surfaces tested.

  12. Signature extension for sun angle, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A. (principal investigator); Berry, J. K.; Heimes, F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Within a restricted zenith sun angle range of 35 - 50 degrees, it was empirically observed that canopy reflectance is mainly Lambertian. Reflectance changes with crop stage were simple shifts in scale in the sun angle range. It was noted that sun angle variations depend on canopy characteristics. Effects of the vegetative canopy were most pronounced at the larger solar zenith angles (20 %). The linear sun angle correction coefficients demonstrate a dependency on both crop stage (15-20 %) and crop type (10-20 %). The use of canopy reflectance modeling allowed for the generation of a simulated data set over an extremely broad envelope of sun angles.

  13. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  14. Detecting blind building façades from highly overlapping wide angle aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burochin, Jean-Pascal; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Mallet, Clément; Brosset, Thomas; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    This paper deals with the identification of blind building façades, i.e. façades which have no openings, in wide angle aerial images with a decimeter pixel size, acquired by nadir looking cameras. This blindness characterization is in general crucial for real estate estimation and has, at least in France, a particular importance on the evaluation of legal permission of constructing on a parcel due to local urban planning schemes. We assume that we have at our disposal an aerial survey with a relatively high stereo overlap along-track and across-track and a 3D city model of LoD 1, that can have been generated with the input images. The 3D model is textured with the aerial imagery by taking into account the 3D occlusions and by selecting for each façade the best available resolution texture seeing the whole façade. We then parse all 3D façades textures by looking for evidence of openings (windows or doors). This evidence is characterized by a comprehensive set of basic radiometric and geometrical features. The blindness prognostic is then elaborated through an (SVM) supervised classification. Despite the relatively low resolution of the images, we reach a classification accuracy of around 85% on decimeter resolution imagery with 60 × 40 % stereo overlap. On the one hand, we show that the results are very sensitive to the texturing resampling process and to vegetation presence on façade textures. On the other hand, the most relevant features for our classification framework are related to texture uniformity and horizontal aspect and to the maximal contrast of the opening detections. We conclude that standard aerial imagery used to build 3D city models can also be exploited to some extent and at no additional cost for facade blindness characterisation.

  15. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  16. A method for merging nadir-sounding climate records, with an application to the global-mean stratospheric temperature data sets from SSU and AMSU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLandress, C.; Shepherd, T. G.; Jonsson, A. I.; von Clarmann, T.; Funke, B.

    2015-08-01

    A method is proposed for merging different nadir-sounding climate data records using measurements from high-resolution limb sounders to provide a transfer function between the different nadir measurements. The two nadir-sounding records need not be overlapping so long as the limb-sounding record bridges between them. The method is applied to global-mean stratospheric temperatures from the NOAA Climate Data Records based on the Stratospheric Sounding Unit (SSU) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU), extending the SSU record forward in time to yield a continuous data set from 1979 to present, and providing a simple framework for extending the SSU record into the future using AMSU. SSU and AMSU are bridged using temperature measurements from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS), which is of high enough vertical resolution to accurately represent the weighting functions of both SSU and AMSU. For this application, a purely statistical approach is not viable since the different nadir channels are not sufficiently linearly independent, statistically speaking. The near-global-mean linear temperature trends for extended SSU for 1980-2012 are -0.63 ± 0.13, -0.71 ± 0.15 and -0.80 ± 0.17 K decade-1 (95 % confidence) for channels 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The extended SSU temperature changes are in good agreement with those from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite, with both exhibiting a cooling trend of ~ 0.6 ± 0.3 K decade-1 in the upper stratosphere from 2004 to 2012. The extended SSU record is found to be in agreement with high-top coupled atmosphere-ocean models over the 1980-2012 period, including the continued cooling over the first decade of the 21st century.

  17. Pre-launch characterization of aqua MODIS scan mirror response versus scan angle for thermal emissive bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Kwo-Fu; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2007-09-01

    The double-sided paddle wheel scan mirror is the key optical component of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on-board the NASA EOS Terra and Aqua satellites. At a constant rotating speed, the scan mirror continuously reflects the Earth's top-of-atmosphere radiances through the instrument nadir aperture door and onto four focal plane assemblies (FPA), which consist of 36 spectral bands. Of those 36 bands, 16 are thermal emissive bands (TEB) with wavelengths ranging from 3.7 to 14.4?m. While this cross-track scanning system provides the Earth scene observations over a range of +/-55° viewing angles from the nadir, the on-orbit calibration for TEB is performed by an On-Board Calibrator Blackbody (OBC BB) at a fixed viewing angle. The response versus scan angle (RVS) of the scan mirror is sensitive to the MODIS radiometric calibration. This paper describes how the pre-launch TEB RVS of the Aqua MODIS was characterized at the instrument system level by using ground support equipment, a Blackbody Calibration Source (BCS). The RVS test setup, test procedure, data analysis, derivation of RVS, and the fitting uncertainty are discussed in the paper. A separate paper that gives similar RVS analysis for the MODIS Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) is presented in this proceeding.

  18. Skylab S-193 radar altimeter experiment analyses and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S. (editor)

    1977-01-01

    The design of optimum filtering procedures for geoid recovery is discussed. Statistical error bounds are obtained for pointing angle estimates using average waveform data. A correlation of tracking loop bandwidth with magnitude of pointing error is established. The impact of ocean currents and precipitation on the received power are shown to be measurable effects. For large sea state conditions, measurements of sigma 0 deg indicate a distinct saturation level of about 8 dB. Near-nadir less than 15 deg values of sigma 0 deg are also presented and compared with theoretical models. Examination of Great Salt Lake Desert scattering data leads to rejection of a previously hypothesized specularly reflecting surface. Pulse-to-pulse correlation results are in agreement with quasi-monochromatic optics theoretical predictions and indicate a means for estimating direction of pointing error. Pulse compression techniques for and results of estimating significant waveheight from waveform data are presented and are also shown to be in good agreement with surface truth data. A number of results pertaining to system performance are presented.

  19. Rain Fallspeeds and Rates Derived from Airborne Nadir-Pointing Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, L.; Geerts, Bart

    1999-01-01

    The use of vertical-incidence Doppler velocity in addition to radar reflectivity may yield information on drop size distribution and therefore result in better rainrate estimates. Doppler velocity can provide useful information on the raindrop size distribution. Doppler velocities from a zenith-pointing radar represent the sum of the mean reflectivity-weighted hydrometeor fallspeed and the vertical air motion. Dual-parameter rain estimation methods using the Doppler velocity, require that the latter can be removed, or is negligible. Atlas et al. (1972) derived relations between Doppler velocity, reflectivity, and rain rate assuming an exponential size distribution for rain. Ulbrich (1994) expanded on this work by deriving the relation between the Doppler velocity and the reflectivity assuming a Gamma size distribution. This distribution provides a more realistic representation of the small rain drops. To get accurate information on raindrop size distributions with the above method, the air motions must be removed from the observed Doppler velocities

  20. A new stratospheric and tropospheric NO2 retrieval algorithm for nadir-viewing satellite instruments: applications to OMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucsela, E. J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Celarier, E. A.; Lamsal, L. N.; Swartz, W. H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Boersma, K. F.; Veefkind, J. P.; Gleason, J. F.; Pickering, K. E.

    2013-10-01

    We describe a new algorithm for the retrieval of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical columns from nadir-viewing satellite instruments. This algorithm (SP2) is the basis for the Version 2.1 OMI This algorithm (SP2) is the basis for the Version 2.1 Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 Standard Product and features a novel method for separating the stratospheric and tropospheric columns. NO2 Standard Product and features a novel method for separating the stratospheric and tropospheric columns. The approach estimates the stratospheric NO2 directly from satellite data without using stratospheric chemical transport models or assuming any global zonal wave pattern. Tropospheric NO2 columns are retrieved using air mass factors derived from high-resolution radiative transfer calculations and a monthly climatology of NO2 profile shapes. We also present details of how uncertainties in the retrieved columns are estimated. The sensitivity of the retrieval to assumptions made in the stratosphere-troposphere separation is discussed and shown to be small, in an absolute sense, for most regions. We compare daily and monthly mean global OMI NO2 retrievals using the SP2 algorithm with those of the original Version 1 Standard Product (SP1) and the Dutch DOMINO product. The SP2 retrievals yield significantly smaller summertime tropospheric columns than SP1, particularly in polluted regions, and are more consistent with validation studies. SP2 retrievals are also relatively free of modeling artifacts and negative tropospheric NO2 values. In a reanalysis of an INTEX-B validation study, we show that SP2 largely eliminates an ~20% discrepancy that existed between OMI and independent in situ springtime NO2 SP1 measurements.

  1. Later endogenous circadian temperature nadir relative to an earlier wake time in older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Dijk, D. J.; Klerman, E. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of the circadian timing system to the age-related advance of sleep-wake timing was investigated in two experiments. In a constant routine protocol, we found that the average wake time and endogenous circadian phase of 44 older subjects were earlier than that of 101 young men. However, the earlier circadian phase of the older subjects actually occurred later relative to their habitual wake time than it did in young men. These results indicate that an age-related advance of circadian phase cannot fully account for the high prevalence of early morning awakening in healthy older people. In a second study, 13 older subjects and 10 young men were scheduled to a 28-h day, such that they were scheduled to sleep at many circadian phases. Self-reported awakening from scheduled sleep episodes and cognitive throughput during the second half of the wake episode varied markedly as a function of circadian phase in both groups. The rising phase of both rhythms was advanced in the older subjects, suggesting an age-related change in the circadian regulation of sleep-wake propensity. We hypothesize that under entrained conditions, these age-related changes in the relationship between circadian phase and wake time are likely associated with self-selected light exposure at an earlier circadian phase. This earlier exposure to light could account for the earlier clock hour to which the endogenous circadian pacemaker is entrained in older people and thereby further increase their propensity to awaken at an even earlier time.

  2. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  3. Reliable measurement of the receding contact angle.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Juuso T; Huhtamäki, Tommi; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2013-03-26

    Surface wettability is usually evaluated by the contact angle between the perimeter of a water drop and the surface. However, this single measurement is not enough for proper characterization, and the so-called advancing and receding contact angles also need to be measured. Measuring the receding contact angle can be challenging, especially for extremely hydrophobic surfaces. We demonstrate a reliable procedure by using the common needle-in-the-sessile-drop method. Generally, the contact line movement needs to be followed, and true receding movement has to be distinguished from "pseudo-movement" occurring before the receding angle is reached. Depending on the contact angle hysteresis, the initial size of the drop may need to be surprisingly large to achieve a reliable result. Although our motivation for this work was the characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces, we also show that this method works universally ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:23451825

  4. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  5. Meridional Distribution of CH3C2H and C4H2 in Saturn's Stratosphere from CIRS/Cassini Limb and Nadir Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerlet, Sandrine; Fouchet, Thierry; Bezard, Bruno; Moses, Julianne I.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Limb and nadir spectra acquired by Cassini/CIRS (Composite InfraRed Spectrometer) are analyzed in order to derive, for the first time, the meridional variations of diacetylene (C4H2) and methylacetylene (CH3C2H) mixing ratios in Saturn's stratosphere, from 5 hPa up to 0.05 hPa and 80 deg S to 45 deg N. We find that the C4H2 and CH3C2H meridional distributions mimic that of acetylene (C2H2), exhibiting small-scale variations that are not present in photochemical model predictions. The most striking feature of the meridional distribution of both molecules is an asymmetry between mid-southern and mid-northern latitudes. The mid-southern latitudes are found depleted in hydrocarbons relative to their northern counterparts. In contrast, photochemical models predict similar abundances at north and south mid-latitudes. We favor a dynamical explanation for this asymmetry, with upwelling in the south and downwelling in the north, the latter coinciding with the region undergoing ring shadowing. The depletion in hydrocarbons at mid-southern latitudes could also result from chemical reactions with oxygen-bearing molecules. Poleward of 60 deg S, at 0.1 and 0.05 hPa, we find that the CH3C2H and C4H2 abundances increase dramatically. This behavior is in sharp contradiction with photochemical model predictions, which exhibit a strong decrease towards the south pole. Several processes could explain our observations, such as subsidence, a large vertical eddy diffusion coefficient at high altitudes, auroral chemistry that enhances CH3C2H and C4H2 production, or shielding from photolysis by aerosols or molecules produced from auroral chemistry. However, problems remain with all these hypotheses, including the lack of similar behavior at lower altitudes. Our derived mean mixing ratios at 0.5 hPa of (2.4 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -10) for C4H2 and of (1.1 +/- 0.3) 10(exp -9) for CH3C2H are compatible with the analysis of global-average ISO observations performed by Moses et al. Finally, we provide values for the ratios [CH3C2H]/[C2H2] and [C4H2]/[C2H2] that can constrain the coupled chemistry of these hydrocarbons.

  6. Angle amplifier based on multiplexed volume holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liangcai; Zhao, Yifei; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2008-03-01

    Angle amplifier of laser beam scanner is a widely used device in optical systems. Volume holographic optical elements can be applied in the angle amplifier. Compared with the traditional angle amplifier, it has the advantages of high angle resolution, high diffraction efficiency, small size, and high angle magnification and flexible design. Bragg anglewavelength- compensating recording method is introduced. Because of the Bragg compensatory relation between angle and wavelength, this device could be recorded at another wavelength. The design of the angle amplifier recording at the wavelength of 514.2nm for the working wavelength of 632.8nm is described. An optical setup for recording the angle amplifier device is designed and discussed. Experimental results in the photorefractive crystal Fe:LiNbO 3 demonstrate the feasibility of the angle amplifier scheme.

  7. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  8. Primary cerebellopontine angle angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Guode, Zhai; Qi, Pang; Hua, Guo; Shangchen, Xu; Hanbin, Wang

    2008-08-01

    Primary intracranial angiosarcomas are rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. All cases reported were located in the supratentorial areas. To our knowledge, no cerebellopontine (CP) angle angiosarcoma has been reported. We report a 16-year-old girl who had mild headache, right-sided tinnitus and amblyacousia of 1-year's duration. She later developed abruptly severe headache and vomiting, accompanied by left hemiparesis, numbness, ataxia and bucking, and computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. There was a lesion in the right CP angle with haemorrhage and edema. The preoperative diagnosis was neurogenic tumor with haemorrhage. The patient underwent an emergency suboccipital craniectomy, and the lesion was excised completely. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry revealed an angiosarcoma. Postoperative radiotherapy was given. At the time of hospital discharge, she was in better clinical and neurological condition than her preoperative state. She has been followed up for 6 months and is is still in excellent condition without any sign of recurrence. This case report highlights that clinicians should be aware of the characteristics of angiosarcoma, and also stresses the need to include angiosarcoma in the differential diagnosis of rare lesions located in the CP angle. PMID:18314334

  9. Trigger Angle Targeting for Orbital Rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woffinden, David C.; Ben Rose, M.; Geller, David K.

    2008-12-01

    Orbital rendezvous missions often have a co-elliptic approach phase where a chaser vehicle approaches an object with a near-constant relative altitude and relative velocity. A well known orbital rendezvous technique is to trigger the Terminal Phase Initiation (TPI) maneuver when the apparent elevation of the target reaches some nominal angle. The best elevation trigger angle on which to initiate the final transfer maneuver must balance favorable performance characteristics and desirable operational simplicity. A detailed analysis is given deriving the best trigger angles and showing how these results correlate to past missions and how they could potentially influence future ones.

  10. Utilizing the US Lab Nadir Research Window for Remote Sensing Operations with The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Richard; Barley, Bryan; Gilbert, Paul A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) is an ISPR-based rack facility designed to take advantage of the high optical quality US Lab Nadir research window. The WORF is based on the ISS Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) rack mechanical structure and electronic systems. The WORF has a unique payload volume located at the center of the rack that provides access to the window. The interior dimensions of the payload volume are 34-in. (86.36 cm) wide by 33-in. (83.82 cm) high by 23-in. (58.42 cm) deep. This facility supports the deployment of payloads such as 9 in. aerial photography cameras and 12 in. diameter optical equipment. The WORF coupled with the optical quality of the United States Lab window support the deployment of various payload disciplines. The WORF provides payloads with power, data command and control, air cooling, water cooling, and video processing. The WORF's payload mounting surfaces and interfaces include the interior payload mounting shelf and the interior and exterior aircraft-like seat tracks. The payload mounting shelf is limited to a maximum mass of 136 kg (299 pounds). The WORF can accommodate large payloads such as the commonly used Leica-Heerbrug RC-30 aerial photography camera (whose dimensions are 53.3 cm (21-in.) wide by 50.8 cm (20-in.) deep by 76.2 cm (30-in.) long). The performance characteristics of the WORF allow it to support an array of payload disciplines. The WORF provides a maximum of 3 Kw at 28 Vdc and has a maximum data rate of 10 Mbps. The WORF's unique payload volume is designed to be light-tight, down to 2.8 x 10(exp -11) Watts/cm2/steradian, and have low-reflective surfaces. This specially designed WORF interior supports payload investigations that observe low-light-level phenomenon such as aurora. Although the WORF rack does not employ any active rack isolation (i.e., vibration dampening) technology, the rack provides a very stable environment for payload operations (on the order of X microradians). The facility's software is capable of being updated during its period of deployment. The WORF project also includes a Suitcase Simulator to allow for a payload developer to verify data interfaces at his development site, a trainer rack for astronauts to learn how to operate the WORF prior to flight, and the use of the EXPRESS Functional Checkout Units to allow for payload checkout at the KSC prior to launch.

  11. Dayside temperatures in the Venus upper atmosphere from Venus Express/VIRTIS nadir measurements at 4.3 ?m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Gilli, G.; Piccialli, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analysed nadir observations of atmospheric infrared emissions carried out by VIRTIS, a high-resolution spectrometer on board the European spacecraft Venus Express. We focused on the ro-vibrational band of CO2 at 4.3 ?m on the dayside, whose fluorescence originates in the Venus upper mesosphere and above. This is the first time that a systematic sounding of these non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) emissions has been carried out in Venus using this geometry. As many as 143,218 spectra have been analysed on the dayside during the period 14/05/2006 to 14/09/2009. We designed an inversion method to obtain the atmospheric temperature from these non-thermal observations, including a NLTE line-by-line forward model and a pre-computed set of spectra for a set of thermal structures and illumination conditions. Our measurements sound a broad region of the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere of Venus ranging from 10-2-10-5 mb (which in the Venus International Reference Atmosphere, VIRA, is approximately 100-150 km during the daytime) and show a maximum around 195 ± 10 K in the subsolar region, decreasing with latitude and local time towards the terminator. This is in qualitative agreement with predictions by a Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) after a proper averaging of altitudes for meaningful comparisons, although our temperatures are colder than the model by about 25 K throughout. We estimate a thermal gradient of about 35 K between the subsolar and antisolar points when comparing our data with nightside temperatures measured at similar altitudes by SPICAV, another instrument on Venus Express (VEx). Our data show a stable temperature structure through five years of measurements, but we also found episodes of strong heating/cooling to occur in the subsolar region of less than two days. The table with numerical data and averaged temperatures displayed in Fig. 7A provided as a CSV data file is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A53

  12. Longitudinal Changes of Angle Configuration in Primary Angle-Closure Suspects

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuzhen; Chang, Dolly S.; Zhu, Haogang; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Aung, Tin; Huang, Shengsong; Chen, Qianyun; Munoz, Beatriz; Grossi, Carlota M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine longitudinal changes in angle configuration in the eyes of primary angle-closure suspects (PACS) treated by laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) and in untreated fellow eyes. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Participants Primary angle-closure suspects aged 50 to 70 years were enrolled in a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Methods Each participant was treated by LPI in 1 randomly selected eye, with the fellow eye serving as a control. Angle width was assessed in a masked fashion using gonioscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) before and at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 18 months after LPI. Main Outcome Measures Angle width in degrees was calculated from Shaffer grades assessed under static gonioscopy. Angle configuration was also evaluated using angle opening distance (AOD250, AOD500, AOD750), trabecular-iris space area (TISA500, TISA750), and angle recess area (ARA) measured in AS-OCT images. Results No significant difference was found in baseline measures of angle configuration between treated and untreated eyes. At 2 weeks after LPI, the drainage angle on gonioscopy widened from a mean of 13.5° at baseline to a mean of 25.7° in treated eyes, which was also confirmed by significant increases in all AS-OCT angle width measures (P<0.001 for all variables). Between 2 weeks and 18 months after LPI, a significant decrease in angle width was observed over time in treated eyes (P<0.001 for all variables), although the change over the first 5.5 months was not statistically significant for angle width measured under gonioscopy (P = 0.18), AOD250 (P = 0.167) and ARA (P = 0.83). In untreated eyes, angle width consistently decreased across all follow-up visits after LPI, with a more rapid longitudinal decrease compared with treated eyes (P values for all variables ?0.003). The annual rate of change in angle width was equivalent to 1.2°/year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8–1.6) in treated eyes and 1.6°/year (95% CI, 1.3–2.0) in untreated eyes (P<0.001). Conclusions Angle width of treated eyes increased markedly after LPI, remained stable for 6 months, and then decreased significantly by 18 months after LPI. Untreated eyes experienced a more consistent and rapid decrease in angle width over the same time period. PMID:24835757

  13. Angle only tracking with particle flow filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Fred; Huang, Jim

    2011-09-01

    We show the results of numerical experiments for tracking ballistic missiles using only angle measurements. We compare the performance of an extended Kalman filter with a new nonlinear filter using particle flow to compute Bayes' rule. For certain difficult geometries, the particle flow filter is an order of magnitude more accurate than the EKF. Angle only tracking is of interest in several different sensors; for example, passive optics and radars in which range and Doppler data are spoiled by jamming.

  14. Satellite navigation for meteorological purposes - Inverse referencing for NOAA-N and ERS-1 imagers with a 1 km nadir pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klokocnik, J.; Kostelecky, J.; Grassl, H.; Schluessel, P.; Pospisilova, L.; Gooding, R. H.; Lala, P.

    1992-08-01

    Inverse referencing navigation for meteorological satellites NOAA-N and the remote sensing satellite ERS-1 is studied and the PIXPOS software package has been developed and applied to radiometer observations from NOAA-N satellites. By inverse referencing, the geodetic coordinates of a point on the surface are given, and the corresponding image coordinates are obtained from satellite orbital elements or coordinates. Iterative techniques for inverse referencing from mean orbital elements or osculating position and velocity, accounting for all required orbital perturbations with respect to given nadir pixel size, are presented.

  15. Near-Nadiral Normalized Radar Cross Section of the SEA Surface at Ku, Ka, and W-Bands: Comparison of Measurements and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majurec, Ninoslav; Johnson, Joel T.; Tanelli, Simone; Durden, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between wind speed and direction and the near-nadiral normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of the sea surface is important in many oceanographic and atmospheric remote sensing applications: (1) wind speed retrievals in traditional altimeter systems (2) assistance in calibration and path integrated attenuation processing for atmospheric profiling radars The desired wind speed (and direction in some cases) retrieval requires a clear understanding of the relationship between the relevant geophysical quantities and the observed NRCS Such understanding is available from existing electromagnetic models, but the presence of many such models, as well as implicit descriptions of the sea surface, motivates continued evaluation of model performance.

  16. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  17. A Note on Angle Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1978-01-01

    The author investigates the construction of angles (using Euclidean tools) through a numerical approach. He calls attention to the surprising impossibility of constructing the conventional units of angle measure--the degree, minute, second, radian, and mil. (MN)

  18. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  19. Particle chaos and pitch angle scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Speiser, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    Pitch angle scattering is a factor that helps determine the dawn-to-dusk current, controls particle energization, and it has also been used as a remote probe of the current sheet structure. Previous studies have interpreted their results under the exception that randomization will be greatest when the ratio of the two timescales of motion (gyration parallel to and perpendicular to the current sheet) is closet to one. Recently, the average expotential divergence rate (AEDR) has been calculated for particle motion in a hyperbolic current sheet (Chen, 1992). It is claimed that this AEDR measures the degree of chaos and therefore may be thought to measure the randomization. In contrast to previous expectations, the AEDR is not maximized when Kappa is approximately equal to 1 but instead increases with decreasing Kappa. Also contrary to previous expectations, the AEDR is dependent upon the parameter b(sub z). In response to the challenge to previous expectations that has been raised by this calculation of the AEDR, we have investigated the dependence of a measure of particle pitch angle scattering on both the parameters Kappa and b(sub z). We find that, as was previously expected, particle pitch angle scattering is maximized near Kappa = 1 provided that Kappa/b(sub z) greater than 1. In the opposite regime, Kappa/b(sub z) less than 1, we find that particle pitch angle scattering is still largest when the two timescales are equal, but the ratio of the timescales is proportional to b(sub z). In this second regime, particle pitch angle scattering is not due to randomization, but is instead due to a systematic pitch angle change. This result shows that particle pitch angle scattering need not be due to randomization and indicates how a measure of pitch angle scattering can exhibit a different behavior than a measure of chaos.

  20. The impact of inlet angle and outlet angle of guide vane on pump in reversal based hydraulic turbine performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, F. X.; Yang, J. H.; Wang, X. H.; Zhang, R. H.; Li, C. E.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, in order to research the impact of inlet angle and outlet angle of guide vane on hydraulic turbine performance, a centrifugal pump in reversal is adopted as turbine. A numerical simulation method is adopted for researching outer performance and flow field of turbine. The results show: inlet angle has a crucial role to turbine, to the same flow, there is a noticeable decline for the efficiency and head of turbine with the inlet angle increases. At the best efficiency point(EFP),to a same inlet angle, when the inlet angle greater than inlet angle, velocity circulation in guide vane outlet decreases, which lead the efficiency of turbine to reduce, Contrarily, the efficiency rises. With the increase of inlet angle and outlet angle, the EFP moves to the big flow area and the uniformity of pressure distribution becomes worse. The paper indicates that the inlet angle and outlet angle have great impact on the turbine performance, and the best combination exists for the inlet angle and outlet angle of the guide vane.

  1. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  2. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  3. Angle at the Medial Border: The Spinovertebra Angle and Its Significance

    PubMed Central

    Oladipo, G. S.; Aigbogun, E. O.; Akani, G. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The evolution from quadrupedalism to bipedalism has adjusted the balance of the upper limb to extensive movement at the shoulder. The scapular angles provide the point of attachment and control to various muscles and have been associated with the different movements of the shoulder girdle and joint. This has made the morphometric and anthropometric study of scapula a subject of extensive investigation. Aim. In the present study, the angle at the medial border was measured in the South-Southern Nigerian population and an anatomical name was ascribed to the angle. Method. The study was conducted on 173 scapulae (75 right and 98 left) obtained from various Anatomy Department of South-Sothern Nigerian Universities. The angle at medial border was obtained by pinning the edge of the superior and inferior angles, the lined traced out, and the angle measured using a protractor. SPSS version 20 was used to analyse the data. t-test was used to determine mean angular difference in the sides. Result. The mean ± SD of the medial angle was observed to be 136.88 ± 7.70° (R = 138.13 ± 7.06°?:?L = 135.92 ± 8.05°). Statistical analysis using the Z-test for mean difference showed the medial angle was found to be higher in the right side of the scapula (mean difference of 2.214 ± 1.152°), but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The above findings have adjusted the scapula from three to four angles (lateral, superior, inferior, and medial) formed from four borders (lateral, superior, inferior, and superomedial and inferomedial). The medial angle because of its anatomical location was named “spinovertebral” angle, owing to its position at the scapulae spine, and located in medial proximity to the vertebra column. Conclusion. The medial angle (now referred to as the spinovertebral angle) of the right side of the scapula is wider than the left. The representation of the spinovertebral angle is very important, as the directional attachment of the levator scapulae may be altered if it increases or decreases greatly hence resulting in stiffness of the neck. At this point, it could be postulated that the scapular is quadrangular rather than triangular. PMID:26523233

  4. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  5. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q?0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer configurations, optimization of sample characteristics prior to measurements (thickness, volume, hydrogen content…), standards measurements to be made and principle of data reduction.

  6. Execution phase (C/D) spectral band characteristics of the EOS moderate resolution imaging spectrometer-Nadir (Modis-N) facility instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, Vincent V.; Toll, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (Modis) observing facility on the Earth Observing System (EOS) is composed of two instruments: Modis-Nadir (N) and Modis-Tilt (T). Modis-N has 36 spectral bands between 0.4 and 14.2 microns, with spatial resolution between 250 and 1000 meters. Modis-T has 32 bands with 10-15 nm bandwidths between 0.4 and 0.9 microns. Modis-T scans fore and aft +/- 50 degrees. Both instruments scan cross-track so as to provide daily (Modis-N) or once every two days (Modis-T) coverage at 705-km altitude. Both instruments are entering into the execution phases of their development in 1990. The bands of the Modis-N hve been chosen so as to provide key observations of land, ocean, and atmosphere parameters that will provide key data sets assisting in gaining an improved understanding of global processes.

  7. Changes in angle of optic nerve and angle of ocular orbit with increasing age in Japanese children

    PubMed Central

    Tsukitome, Hideyuki; Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Morimitsu, Tomoko; Yagasaki, Teiji; Kondo, Mineo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study changes in the opening angle of the optic nerve and the angle of the ocular orbit with increasing age in normal Japanese children. Methods We studied 147 normal children (aged 6?months to 18?years) who had undergone CT as a diagnostic procedure. Measurements were performed on axial CT images that included the entire optic nerve of both eyes. The opening angle of the optic nerve was defined as the angle formed by the intersection of a line running through the left optic nerve and a vertical line passing through the centre of the nose. The opening angle of the orbit was defined as the angle formed by the intersection of a line running tangentially along the deep lateral wall of the left orbit and a vertical line passing through the centre of the nose. The relationship between age and these opening angles was analysed by regression analysis. Results The correlation between age and opening angle of the optic nerve was not significant. In contrast, the opening angle of the orbit decreased relatively rapidly until about 2–3?years of age, and then it stabilised. The decrease in the opening angle of the orbit with increasing age was significant (p<0.001). The relationship between these two parameters was best fitted by a logarithmic regression curve. Conclusions Because the opening angle of the orbit decreased significantly with increasing age, this factor must be considered when diagnosing and treating strabismus in children. PMID:25147368

  8. Measurement of the UT angle phi_2

    E-print Network

    Gagan B. Mohanty

    2011-10-05

    We give a status report on measurements of the angle phi_2 (alpha) of the CKM unitarity triangle (UT) and the so-called Kpi puzzle. Results presented are mostly from the two B-factory experiments, Belle and BaBar.

  9. Measurement of the UT angle phi_2

    E-print Network

    Mohanty, Gagan B

    2011-01-01

    We give a status report on measurements of the angle phi_2 (alpha) of the CKM unitarity triangle (UT) and the so-called Kpi puzzle. Results presented are mostly from the two B-factory experiments, Belle and BaBar.

  10. Limits of the seismogenic zone in the epicentral region of the 26 December 2004 great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake: Results from seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection surveys and thermal modeling

    E-print Network

    Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Ladage, S; Dessa, J -X; Graindorge, David; Franke, D; André, C; Permana, Haryadi; Yudistira, T; Chauhan, Ajay; 10.1029/2009JB006569

    2010-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Sumatra earthquake (Mw = 9.1) initiated around 30 km depth and ruptured 1300 km of the Indo-Australian Sunda plate boundary. During the Sumatra OBS (ocean bottom seismometer) survey, a wide angle seismic profile was acquired across the epicentral region. A seismic velocity model was obtained from combined travel time tomography and forward modeling. Together with reflection seismic data from the SeaCause II cruise, the deep structure of the source region of the great earthquake is revealed. Four to five kilometers of sediments overlie the oceanic crust at the trench, and the subducting slab can be imaged down to a depth of 35 km. We find a crystalline backstop 120 km from the trench axis, below the fore arc basin. A high velocity zone at the lower landward limit of the raycovered domain, at 22 km depth, marks a shallow continental Moho, 170 km from the trench. The deep structure obtained from the seismic data was used to construct a thermal model of the fore arc in order to predict the li...

  11. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K. (Morgantown, WV); Pratt, II, Harold R. (Morgantown, WV)

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  12. Patellar Tendon–Trochlear Groove Angle Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina B.; Gobbi, Riccardo G.; Kihara Filho, Eduardo N.; Demange, Marco K.; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The tibial tubercle–trochlear groove (TT-TG) is used as the gold standard for patellofemoral malalignment. Purpose: To assess 3 patellar tendon–trochlear groove (PT-TG) angle measurement techniques and the PT-TG distance measurement (tendinous cartilaginous TT-TG) as predictors of patellar instability. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Three PT-TG angle measurements and the PT-TG distance were measured in 82 participants with patellar instability and 100 controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measurement landmarks were the line tangent to the posterior femoral condyles, the deepest point of the trochlea, the transepicondylar line, and the patellar tendon center. All measurements were recorded once by 1 examiner, and the measurements were recorded twice by 2 examiners in a random group of 100 knees. Mean values and standard deviations (SDs) were obtained. Normality cutoff values were defined as 2 and 3 SDs above the mean in the control group. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio (LR+) were calculated. Inter- and intrarater reliability were assessed based on the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The measurements from the patellar instability and control groups, respectively, for angle 1 (16.4° and 8.4°), angle 2 (31° and 15.6°), angle 3 (30.8° and 15.7°), PT-TG distance (14.5 and 8.4 mm), and patellar tilt (21.1° and 7.5°) were significantly different (P < .05). The angle measurements showed greater sensitivity, specificity, and LR+ than the PT-TG distance. Inter- and intrarater ICC values were >0.95 for all measurements. Conclusion: The PT-TG angle and the PT-TG distance are reliable and are different between the patellar instability and control groups. PT-TG angles are more closely associated with patellar instability than PT-TG distance. Clinical Relevance: PT-TG angle measurements show high reliability and association with patellar instability and can aid in the assessment of extensor mechanism malalignment. A more sensitive and specific evaluation of extensor mechanism malalignment can improve patient care by preventing both redislocation and abnormal tracking of overlooked malalignment and complications of unnecessary tibial tuberosity medialization. PMID:26535396

  13. Unitarity Triangle Angle Measurements at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, Thomas E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-30

    We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory. We present recent results of measurements of the Unitarity Triangle angles alpha, beta and gamma made with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory.

  14. What we Hope to Learn about Global Mineral Dust Aerosols from EOS Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    On global scales, just a few broad atmospheric aerosol compositional groups are commonly observed. Of these, "mineral dust" is the only group which both contains non-spherical particles, and typically has size distributions with enough large particles for particle shape to affect its visible-light-scattering properties. The MISR instrument is scheduled for launch into a 10:30 AM sun-synchronous, polar orbit aboard the EOS Terra satellite in 1999. MISR will measure the upwelling visible radiance from Earth in 4 spectral bands centered at 446, 558, 672, and 866 nm, at each of 9 emission angles spread out in the forward and aft directions along the flight path at +/-70.5 deg, +/-60.0 deg, +/-45.6 deg, +/-26.1deg, and nadir. Over a period of 7 minutes, as the spacecraft flies along, a 360 km wide swath of Earth will successively be viewed by each of the cameras, allowing MISR to sample a very large range of scattering angles; in mid latitudes, the instrument will observe scattering angles between about 60 deg and 160 deg. Global coverage will be acquired about once in 9 days at the equator; the nominal mission lifetime is 6 years. The distinction in single scattering phase function between natural distributions of spherical and randomly oriented, non-spherical particles, with a broad range of aspect ratios, shows up strongly for scattering angles ranging from about 90 deg to near 180 deg. For non-spherical particle distributions, single scattering phase functions tend to be much flatter in this region than for spherical particles. Since MISR samples the relevant range of scattering angles very well, we expect to be able to make critical distinctions between natural distributions of spherical and randomly oriented, non-spherical particles with MISR data. We anticipate that the new multiangle, multispectral data from MISR will also contain other information about particle properties, a major step beyond current spacecraft remote sensing retrievals, which obtain aerosol optical depth based on entirely assumed particle microphysical properties. According to simulations over cloud-free, calm ocean, for pure particles with natural ranges of optical depth, particle size, and indices of refraction, MISR should retrieve column optical depth for all but the darkest particles, to an uncertainty of at most 0.05 or 20%, whichever is larger, even if the particle properties are poorly known. For one common particle type, soot, constraints on the optical depth over dark ocean are very poor. The simulated measurements also should allow us to separate two to four compositional groups based on indices of refraction, and to identify three to four distinct size groups between 0.1 and 2.0 microns characteristic radius at most latitudes. The technique is most sensitive to particle microphysical properties in the "accumulation mode" sizes. where particle scattering undergoes the transition from Rayleigh to large-particle regimes for the MISR wavelengths. Based on these results, we expect to distinguish air masses containing different aerosol types, routinely and globally, with multiangle remote sensing data. Such data complements in situ and field data, which can provide details about aerosol size and composition locally that are needed to assess the radiative effects of aerosols quantitatively. Both field data and correlations in space and time with likely source and sink regions will also be helpful in developing a global picture of mineral dust aerosol budgets. Further work on the expected sensitivity of MISR to natural mixtures of pure particles, including climatologically likely mineral dust components, is currently underway.

  15. Determination of detector rotation angle in the experiment based on the total internal reflection using an equilateral right angle prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendro, Viridi, S.; Pratama, Y.

    2015-04-01

    We present a relation between incident angle and rotation angle detector in the Total Internal Reflection (TIR) experiments when using a right angle prism. In the TIR method, the light coming toward the prism will experience reflection and out of the prism at a certain angle direction. Results of analysis of the geometry and Snell's law shows that the angular position of the detector is not only determined by the angle of incidence of light alone but also by the size of the prism and the detector position from the rotation axis of goniometer. The experimental results show relation between the angle of detector and angle of goniometer. When the prism rotated 45 °, position of goniometer detector is 2×45 °. However, when the prism rotated at an angle instead of 45 °, detector position µ is not always equal to twice the rotation angle goniometer ?, so that this relationship needs to be corrected. This correction is also determined by the value of the refractive index of the prism is used. By knowing the relationship between detector position and the incident angle of light, this formulation can be used to control the position of the sample and the detector in the experiments based on ATR.

  16. An Experimental Study on the Iso-Content-Based Angle Similarity Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Rasmussen, Edie M.

    2002-01-01

    Retrieval performance of the iso-content-based angle similarity measure within the angle, distance, conjunction, disjunction, and ellipse retrieval models is compared with retrieval performance of the distance similarity measure and the angle similarity measure. Results show the iso-content-based angle similarity measure achieves satisfactory…

  17. Management of mandibular angle fracture.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Daniel Cameron; Abubaker, A Omar

    2013-11-01

    Fractures through the angle of the mandible are one of the most common facial fractures. The management of such fractures has been controversial, however. This controversy is related to the anatomic relations and complex biomechanical aspects of the mandibular angle. The debate has become even more heated since the evolution of rigid fixation and the ability to provide adequate stability of the fractured segments. This article provides an overview of the special anatomic and biomechanical features of the mandibular angle and their impact on the management of these fractures. PMID:24183373

  18. Methane Cross-Validation Between Spaceborne Solar Occultation Observations from ACE-FTS, Spaceborne Nadir Sounding from Gosat, and Ground-Based Solar Absorption Measurements, at a High Arctic Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, G.; Walker, K. A.; Conway, S. A.; Saitoh, N.; Boone, C. D.; Strong, K.; Drummond, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    We present cross-validation of remote sensing observations of methane profiles in the Canadian High Arctic. Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas on Earth, and second only to carbon dioxide in its contribution to anthropogenic global warming. Accurate and precise observations of methane are essential to understand quantitatively its role in the climate system and in global change. The Arctic is a particular region of concern, as melting permafrost and disappearing sea ice might lead to accelerated release of methane into the atmosphere. Global observations require spaceborne instruments, in particular in the Arctic, where surface measurements are sparse and expensive to perform. Satellite-based remote sensing is an underconstrained problem, and specific validation under Arctic circumstances is required. Here, we show a cross-validation between two spaceborne instruments and ground-based measurements, all Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS). We consider the Canadian SCISAT ACE-FTS, a solar occultation spectrometer operating since 2004, and the Japanese GOSAT TANSO-FTS, a nadir-pointing FTS operating at solar and terrestrial infrared wavelengths, since 2009. The ground-based instrument is a Bruker Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, measuring mid-infrared solar absorption spectra at the Polar Environmental and Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut (80°N, 86°W) since 2006. Measurements are collocated considering temporal, spatial, and geophysical criteria and regridded to a common vertical grid. We perform smoothing on the higher-resolution instrument results to account for different vertical resolutions. Then, profiles of differences for each pair of instruments are examined. Any bias between instruments, or any accuracy that is worse than expected, needs to be understood prior to using the data. The results of the study will serve as a guideline on how to use the vertically resolved methane products from ACE and GOSAT within the High Arctic region.

  19. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single parameter, such as a ratio of wave amplitude to wave length, to describe waviness in a laminate would be inaccurate. Throughout, results for AS4/3502, studied previously, are included for comparison. At low off-axis angles, the AS4/3502 material system was found to be less sensitive to layer waviness than IM7/8551-7a. Analytical predictions were also obtained for laminates with waviness in only some of the layers. For this type of waviness, laminate compression strength could also be considered a function of which layers in the laminate were wavy, and where those wavy layers were. Overall, the geometrically nonlinear model correlates well with experimental results.

  20. Minimum uncertainty measurements of angle and angular momentum

    E-print Network

    Z. Hradil; J. Rehacek; Z. Bouchal; R. Celechovsky; L. L. Sanchez-Soto

    2006-05-16

    The uncertainty relations for angle and angular momentum are revisited. We use the exponential of the angle instead of the angle itself and adopt dispersion as a natural measure of resolution. We find states that minimize the uncertainty product under the constraint of a given uncertainty in angle or in angular momentum. These states are described in terms of Mathieu wave functions and may be approximated by a von Mises distribution, which is the closest analogous of the Gaussian on the unit circle. We report experimental results using beam optics that confirm our predictions.

  1. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  2. Angles of multivariable root loci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A generalized eigenvalue problem is demonstrated to be useful for computing the multivariable root locus, particularly when obtaining the arrival angles to finite transmission zeros. The multivariable root loci are found for a linear, time-invariant output feedback problem. The problem is then employed to compute a closed-loop eigenstructure. The method of computing angles on the root locus is demonstrated, and the method is extended to a multivariable optimal root locus.

  3. View Angle Bias Corrections of Geostationary Satellite Land Surface Temperature Measurements Using an Empirical Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnis, P.; Scarino, B. R.; Palikonda, R.; Yost, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the surface emissivity is essential for retrieving surface skin temperature (Ts), a key parameter for understanding and modeling the surface energy budget, from satellite remote sensors. For a given region, land and ocean Ts is observed at a constant viewing zenith angle (VZA) by any geostationary satellite (GEOsat) imager. Emission from the surface and, hence, Ts is VZA-dependent, varying by 6 K or more with increasing VZA. Although commonly ignored, it has been established that methodologies for angular normalization of Ts are needed to better understand surface emissivity and reduce errors in Ts retrievals. In order to develop corrections for the VZA-dependence of Ts from GEOsats, inter-calibrated GEOsat and MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are collocated, in time and space, for clear scenes observed at different viewing and illumination angles. The radiances in these temporally and spatially matched datasets are used to retrieve coincident Ts using the same one-channel retrieval algorithm, by which Ts is computed from the observed 11-?m brightness temperature (T11) through application of atmospheric absorption corrections appropriate for that spectral channel. Matches from the two instruments are used to build an empirical model that describes the dependence of Ts on VZA by calculating the radiance differences between the near-nadir views and off-nadir data. With matched T11 data from GOES-East, GOES-West, and Aqua-MODIS for North and South America, an adjustment can be computed using matched pairs, for which the Aqua-MODIS VZA is set less than 5º. Applying this correction to the same GOES data removes the angle dependence. Errors are assessed using independent matched land surface temperature datasets from Terra- and Aqua-MODIS and in situ measurements from SURFRAD. The approach can be used to develop corrections for each GEOsat, and should also be applicable to low-Earth orbit satellites. These corrections will be valuable for improving estimates of instantaneous surface emissivity, surface radiation, and surface heat exchange in observations and models.

  4. Growth competition during glancing angle deposition of nanorod honeycomb arrays

    E-print Network

    Gall, Daniel

    Growth competition during glancing angle deposition of nanorod honeycomb arrays C. M. Zhou and D approximately constant with a fixed l/w ratio. This is attributed to an intercolumnar growth competition. The competitive growth mode during GLAD is caused by the oblique deposition angle that results in strong atomic

  5. Classification of two dimensional fixed sun angle solar sail trajectories

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Mark

    Classification of two dimensional fixed sun angle solar sail trajectories Stephen Wokes, Phil heliocentric trajectories for fixed sun angle solar sails are examined. The objective of this work which results in a two dimensional phase space interpretation of the problem. For a given sail quality

  6. Peripapillary Schisis in Glaucoma Patients With Narrow Angles and

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    Peripapillary Schisis in Glaucoma Patients With Narrow Angles and Increased Intraocular Pressure cases of peripapillary retinal schisis in patients with glaucoma without evidence of optic nerve pits patient was followed over time. RESULTS: The first patient, diagnosed with narrow angle glaucoma

  7. Recent Flight Results of the TRMM Kalman Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Bilanow, Stephen; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls the roll and pitch attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. TRMM's nominal orbit altitude was 350 km, until raised to 402 km to prolong mission life. During the boost, the ESA experienced a decreasing signal to noise ratio, until sun interference at 393 km altitude made the ESA data unreliable for attitude determination. At that point, the backup attitude determination algorithm, an extended Kalman filter, was enabled. After the boost finished, TRMM reacquired its nadir-pointing attitude, and continued its mission. This paper will briefly discuss the boost and the decision to turn on the backup attitude determination algorithm. A description of the extended Kalman filter algorithm will be given. In addition, flight results from analyzing attitude data and the results of software changes made onboard TRMM will be discussed. Some lessons learned are presented.

  8. Angle parameter changes of phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy for acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Wei; Chen, Yan; Wu, Qiang; Lu, Bin; Wang, Wen-Qing; Fang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the difference in angle parameters and clinical outcome following phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy in patients with acute primary angle closure (APAC) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). METHODS Patients (n=23, 31 eyes) were randomized to receive phacoemulsification or combined phacotrabeculectomy (n=24, 31 eyes). Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), the main complications following surgery, and indentation gonioscopy and angle parameters measured using UBM were documented preoperatively and postoperatively. RESULTS The improvement in BCVA in the phacoemulsification group was significantly greater than in the combined group (P<0.05). IOP in the phacoemulsification group was slightly higher than in the combined group following 1wk of follow-up (P<0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between the two groups at the latter follow-up (P>0.05). Phacoemulsification alone resulted in a slight increase in the trabecular ciliary processes distance compared with the combined surgery (P<0.05), whereas the other angle parameters showed no significant difference between the groups. Complications in combined group were greater than phacoemulsification only group. CONCLUSION Both surgeries effectively opened the drainage angle and deepened the anterior chamber, and IOP was well controlled postoperatively. However, phacoemulsification showed better efficacy in improving visual function and showed reduced complications following surgery. PMID:26309873

  9. Linkage studies in primary open angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Avramopoulos, D.; Grigoriadu, M.; Kitsos, G.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The majority of glaucoma is associated with an open, normal appearing anterior chamber angle and is termed primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, MIM 137760). It is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure and onset in middle age or later. A subset of POAG with juvenile onset has recently been linked to chromosome 1q in two families with autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven pedigrees with autosomal dominant POG (non-juvenile-onset) have been identified in Epirus, Greece. In the present study DNA samples have been collected from 50 individuals from one large pedigree, including 12 affected individuals. Preliminary results of linkage analysis with chromosome 1 microsatellites using the computer program package LINKAGE Version 5.1 showed no linkage with the markers previously linked to juvenile-onset POAG. Further linkage analysis is being pursued, and the results will be presented.

  10. Initial flight results of the TRMM Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Stephen F.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft is a nadir pointing spacecraft that nominally controls attitude based on the Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA) output. After a potential single point failure in the ESA was identified, the contingency attitude determination method chosen to backup the ESA-based system was a sixth-order extended Kalman filter that uses magnetometer and digital sun sensor measurements. A brief description of the TRMM Kalman filter will be given, including some implementation issues and algorithm heritage. Operational aspects of the Kalman filter and some failure detection and correction will be described. The Kalman filter was tested in a sun pointing attitude and in a nadir pointing attitude during the in-orbit checkout period, and results from those tests will be presented. This paper will describe some lessons learned from the experience of the TRMM team.

  11. Tilt angle control of nanocolumns grown by glancing angle sputtering at variable argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Martin, J. M.; Cebollada, A.; Alvarez, R.; Romero-Gomez, P.; Palmero, A.

    2010-10-25

    We show that the tilt angle of nanostructures obtained by glancing angle sputtering is finely tuned by selecting the adequate argon pressure. At low pressures, a ballistic deposition regime dominates, yielding high directional atoms that form tilted nanocolumns. High pressures lead to a diffusive regime which gives rise to vertical columnar growth. Monte Carlo simulations reproduce the experimental results indicating that the loss of directionality of the sputtered particles in the gas phase, together with the self-shadowing mechanism at the surface, are the main processes responsible for the development of the columns.

  12. ASYMPTOTIC OPENING ANGLES FOR COLLIDING-WIND BOW SHOCKS: THE CHARACTERISTIC-ANGLE APPROXIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gayley, Kenneth G.

    2009-09-20

    By considering the advection and interaction of the vector momentum flux in highly supersonic spherically diverging winds, we derive a simple analytic description of the asymptotic opening angle of a wind-collision shock cone, in the approximation that the shocked gas is contained in a cone streaming out along a single characteristic opening angle. Both highly radiative and highly adiabatic limits are treated, and their comparison is the novel result. Analytic closed-form expressions are obtained for the inferred wind momentum ratios as a function of the observed shock opening angle, allowing the conspicuous shape of the asymptotic bow shock to be used as a preliminary constraint on more detailed modeling of the colliding winds. In the process, we explore from a general perspective the limitations in applying to the global shock geometry the so-called Dyson approximation, which asserts a local balance in the perpendicular ram pressure across the shock.

  13. Head flexion angle while using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojeong; Kang, Hwayeong; Shin, Gwanseob

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive or prolonged head flexion posture while using a smartphone is known as one of risk factors for pain symptoms in the neck. To quantitatively assess the amount and range of head flexion of smartphone users, head forward flexion angle was measured from 18 participants when they were conducing three common smartphone tasks (text messaging, web browsing, video watching) while sitting and standing in a laboratory setting. It was found that participants maintained head flexion of 33-45° (50th percentile angle) from vertical when using the smartphone. The head flexion angle was significantly larger (p < 0.05) for text messaging than for the other tasks, and significantly larger while sitting than while standing. Study results suggest that text messaging, which is one of the most frequently used app categories of smartphone, could be a main contributing factor to the occurrence of neck pain of heavy smartphone users. Practitioner Summary: In this laboratory study, the severity of head flexion of smartphone users was quantitatively evaluated when conducting text messaging, web browsing and video watching while sitting and standing. Study results indicate that text messaging while sitting caused the largest head flexion than that of other task conditions. PMID:25323467

  14. Quantifying foot deformation using finite helical angle.

    PubMed

    Pothrat, Claude; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Viehweger, Elke; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2015-10-15

    Foot intrinsic motion originates from the combination of numerous joint motions giving this segment a high adaptive ability. Existing foot kinematic models are mostly focused on analyzing small scale foot bone to bone motions which require both complex experimental methodology and complex interpretative work to assess the global foot functionality. This study proposes a method to assess the total foot deformation by calculating a helical angle from the relative motions of the rearfoot and the forefoot. This method required a limited number of retro-reflective markers placed on the foot and was tested for five different movements (walking, forefoot impact running, heel impact running, 90° cutting, and 180° U-turn) and 12 participants. Overtime intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the helical angle pattern repeatability for each movement. Our results indicated that the method was suitable to identify the different motions as different amplitudes of helical angle were observed according to the flexibility required in each movement. Moreover, the results showed that the repeatability could be used to identify the mastering of each motion as this repeatability was high for well mastered movements. Together with existing methods, this new protocol could be applied to fully assess foot function in sport or clinical contexts. PMID:26319503

  15. The contact angle in inviscid fluid mechanics

    E-print Network

    P N Shankar; R Kidambi

    2005-08-17

    We show that in general, the specification of a contact angle condition at the contact line in inviscid fluid motions is incompatible with the classical field equations and boundary conditions generally applicable to them. The limited conditions under which such a specification is permissible are derived; however, these include cases where the static meniscus is not flat. In view of this situation, the status of the many `solutions' in the literature which prescribe a contact angle in potential flows comes into question. We suggest that these solutions which attempt to incorporate a phenomenological, but incompatible, condition are in some, imprecise sense `weak-type solutions'; they satisfy or are likely to satisfy, at least in the limit, the governing equations and boundary conditions everywhere except in the neighbourhood of the contact line. We discuss the implications of the result for the analysis of inviscid flows with free surfaces.

  16. Angle set-on apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmore, R. R.

    1985-05-01

    An angle set on apparatus for an electronic countermeasure system utilizing a single dual mode phased array antenna which is operated under receiver/processor control to serve as both a transmit and receive element thereby avoiding the need for a separate direction finding system and, since transmit and receive functions share the same antenna, eliminating the need for precision pointing accuracy. The receiver/processor unit would continue to identify emitters using the jamming unit's receive antenna element and, where appropriate, PRI trackers would be assigned. The time of arrival window would be assigned. The time of arrival window would then be used to blank the transmitter signal and to switch the phased array to the receive mode. During sequential time of arrival windows the receiver/processor would vary the pointing angle of the phase array until the emitter angle of arrival is determined and stored in memory. At periodic intervals in the future, the receiver/processor unit would be pointed to the stored angle of arrival value for high effective radiated power jamming.

  17. Discovering the Inscribed Angle Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Matt B.

    2012-01-01

    Learning to play tennis is difficult. It takes practice, but it also helps to have a coach--someone who gives tips and pointers but allows the freedom to play the game on one's own. Learning to act like a mathematician is a similar process. Students report that the process of proving the inscribed angle theorem is challenging and, at times,…

  18. Return of hunger following a relatively high carbohydrate breakfast is associated with earlier recorded glucose peak and nadir

    PubMed Central

    Chandler-Laney, Paula C.; Morrison, Shannon A.; Goree, Laura Lee T.; Ellis, Amy C.; Casazza, Krista; Desmond, Renee; Gower, Barbara A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a breakfast meal with high carbohydrate/ low fat results in an earlier increase in postprandial glucose and insulin, a greater decrease below baseline in postprandial glucose, and an earlier return of appetite, compared to a low carbohydrate/high fat meal. Design Overweight but otherwise healthy adults (n=64) were maintained on one of two eucaloric diets: high carbohydrate/low fat (HC/LF; 55:27:18% kcals from carbohydrate: fat: protein) versus low carbohydrate/high fat (LC/HF; 43:39:18% kcals from carbohydrate: fat: protein). After 4 weeks of acclimation to the diets, participants underwent a meal test during which circulating glucose and insulin and self-reported hunger and fullness, were measured before and after consumption of breakfast from their assigned diets. Results The LC/HF meal resulted in a later time at the highest and lowest recorded glucose, higher glucose concentrations at 3 and 4 hours post-meal, and lower insulin incremental area under the curve. Participants consuming the LC/HF meal reported lower appetite 3 and 4 hours following the meal, a response that was associated with the timing of the highest and lowest recorded glucose. Conclusions Modest increases in meal carbohydrate content at the expense of fat content may facilitate weight gain over the long-term by contributing to an earlier rise and fall of postprandial glucose concentrations and an earlier return of appetite. PMID:24819342

  19. The influence of channel intersection angle on droplets coalescence process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaomiao; Cao, Rentuo; Pang, Yan; Shen, Feng

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigates the influence of channel intersection angle on the droplets coalescence process using high-speed microscope and micro-PIV system. "Spontaneous coalescence" and "delayed coalescence" occur when the droplets meet at low flow rate conditions. The film drainage time and critical capillary number are organized by recording the phenomena after droplets meet at channel junctions with different intersection angles. The microchannel junction structure details are taken for the in-depth understanding of droplets coalescence process. The experimental results show that the critical capillary number for droplets coalescence decreases with the increase of channel intersection angle, and increasing two-phase flow rates and intersection angle can reduce the film drainage time. It can be concluded that reducing the intersection angle may improve the coalescence efficiency.

  20. Investigating the angle or response and maximum stability of a cohesive granular pile

    E-print Network

    Nowak, Sara Alice, 1982-

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, I investigate the static and dynamic properties of a granular heap made cohesive by an interstitial fluid. I present the results of experimental work measuring the maximum angle of stability and the angle ...

  1. Centric slide in different Angle's classes of occlusion.

    PubMed

    ?imi?, Samir; Badel, Tomislav; Šimunkovi?, Sonja Kraljevi?; Pavi?in, Ivana Savi?; ?ati?, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the possible differences in centric slide values between different Angle's classes of occlusion. The study included 98 participants divided into four groups: Angle's class I, Angle's class II, subdivision 1, Angle's class II, subdivision 2 and Angle's class III. All recordings were obtained using an ultrasound jaw tracking device with six degrees of freedom. The distance between the maximum intercuspation (reference position) and the centric occlusion was recorded at the condylar level. Anteroposterior, superoinferior and transversal distance of the centric slide were calculated for each participant, and the data were statistically analyzed (analysis of variance and Newman-Keuls post hoc test). No statistically significant difference was found in the anteroposterior and transversal distance of the centric slide between tested groups, while Angle's class II, subdivision 2 showed smaller vertical amount of the centric slide compared to Angle's class I and class II, subdivision 1. None of the 98 participants showed coincidence of centric occlusion and maximum intercuspation. Our results suggest that coincidence of the maximum intercuspation with the centric occlusion should not be expected. Smaller extent of the vertical distance of the centric slide could be morphological and a functional expression characteristic of the Angle's class II, subdivision 2. PMID:26434757

  2. Multiple incidence angle SIR-B experiment over Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, Jobea; Casey, Daren; Wall, Stephen; Brandani, Aldo; Domik, Gitta; Leberl, Franz

    1986-01-01

    The Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-B), the second synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to fly aboard a shuttle, was launched on October 5, 1984. One of the primary goals of the SIR-B experiment was to use multiple incidence angle radar images to distinguish different terrain types through the use of their characteristic backscatter curves. This goal was accomplished in several locations including the Chubut Province of southern Argentina. Four descending image acquisitions were collected providing a multiple incidence angle image set. The data were first used to assess stereo-radargrammetric techniques. A digital elevation model was produced using the optimum pair of multiple incidence angle images. This model was then used to determine the local incidence angle of each picture element to generate curves of relative brightness vs. incidence angle. Secondary image products were also generated using the multi-angle data. The results of this work indicate that: (1) various forest species and various structures of a single species may be discriminated using multiple incidence angle radar imagery, and (2) it is essential to consider the variation in backscatter due to a variable incidence angle when analyzing and comparing data collected at varying frequencies and polarizations.

  3. Elevation angle dependence of the SMA antenna focus position

    E-print Network

    Satoki Matsushita; Masao Saito; Kazushi Sakamoto; Todd R. Hunter; Nimesh A. Patel; Tirupati K. Sridharan; Robert W. Wilson

    2006-06-21

    We report the measurement results and compensation of the antenna elevation angle dependences of the Sub-millimeter Array (SMA) antenna characteristics. Without optimizing the subreflector (focus) positions as a function of the antenna elevation angle, antenna beam patterns show lopsided sidelobes, and antenna efficiencies show degradations. The sidelobe level increases and the antenna efficiencies decrease about 1% and a few %, respectively, for every 10 degrees change in the elevation angle at the measured frequency of 237 GHz. We therefore obtained the optimized subreflector positions for X (azimuth), Y (elevation), and Z (radio optics) focus axes at various elevation angles for all the eight SMA antennas. The X axis position does not depend on the elevation angle. The Y and Z axes positions depend on the elevation angles, and are well fitted with a simple function for each axis with including a gravity term (cosine and sine of elevation, respectively). In the optimized subreflector positions, the antenna beam patterns show low level symmetric sidelobe of at most a few %, and the antenna efficiencies stay constant at any antenna elevation angles. Using one set of fitted functions for all antennas, the SMA is now operating with real-time focusing, and showing constant antenna characteristics at any given elevation angle.

  4. Curriculum vitae Nadir Alvarez Prof. Dr. Nadir Alvarez

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Nadir

    '900 Comparative Evolutionary Ecology of an Emblematic European Plant-Insect Mutualism-126624 CHF 580'727 Coalescence and adaptation processes in plant-insect interactions'000 Phylogeography of mutualistic vs. antagonistic plant-insect interactions 2002-2011 n

  5. Optimum Projection Angle for Attaining Maximum Distance in a Soccer Punt Kick

    PubMed Central

    Linthorne, Nicholas P.; Patel, Dipesh S.

    2011-01-01

    To produce the greatest horizontal distance in a punt kick the ball must be projected at an appropriate angle. Here, we investigated the optimum projection angle that maximises the distance attained in a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper. Two male players performed many maximum-effort kicks using projection angles of between 10° and 90°. The kicks were recorded by a video camera at 100 Hz and a 2 D biomechanical analysis was conducted to obtain measures of the projection velocity, projection angle, projection height, ball spin rate, and foot velocity at impact. The player’s optimum projection angle was calculated by substituting mathematical equations for the relationships between the projection variables into the equations for the aerodynamic flight of a soccer ball. The calculated optimum projection angles were in agreement with the player’s preferred projection angles (40° and 44°). In projectile sports even a small dependence of projection velocity on projection angle is sufficient to produce a substantial shift in the optimum projection angle away from 45°. In the punt kicks studied here, the optimum projection angle was close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball remained almost constant across all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing projection angle and so the optimum projection angle is well below 45°. Key points The optimum projection angle that maximizes the distance of a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper is about 45°. The optimum projection angle is close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball is almost the same at all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the optimum projection angle is well below 45° because the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing projection angle. PMID:24149315

  6. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by ?{sub j} ? 1/5?{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, ?{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of ?{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle ?{sub j,{sub max}} ? 1/5 ? 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  7. Gaia basic angle monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielesen, W.; de Bruijn, D.; van den Dool, T.; Kamphues, F.; Meijer, E.; Calvel, B.; Laborie, A.; Monteiro, D.; Coatantiec, C.; Touzeau, S.; Erdmann, M.; Gare, P.

    2012-09-01

    The Gaia mission will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than one billion stars in our Galaxy. The Gaia spacecraft, built by EADS Astrium, is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision programme and scheduled for launch in 2013. Gaia measures the position, distance and motion of stars with an accuracy of 24 micro-arcsec using two telescopes at a fixed mutual angle of 106.5°, named the ‘Basic Angle’. This accuracy requires ultra-high stability, which can only be achieved by using Silicon Carbide for both the optical bench and the telescopes. TNO has developed, built and space qualified the Silicon carbide Basic Angle Monitoring (BAM) on-board metrology system for this mission. The BAM measures the relative motion of Gaia’s telescopes with accuracies in the range of 0.5 micro-arcsec. This is achieved by a system of two laser interferometers able to measure Optical Path Differences (OPD) as small as 1.5 picometer rms. Following a general introduction to the Gaia mission, the Payload Module (PLM) and the use of Silicon Carbide as base material, this presentation will address an overview of the challenges towards the key requirements, design, integration and testing (including space-level qualification) of the Gaia BAM.

  8. Measurement of critical contact angle in a microgravity space experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1999-06-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the NASA USML-2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's double proboscis containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  9. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, L. D.; Hyer, M. W.; Shuart, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Test results from the compression loading of (+ or - Theta/ - or + Theta)(sub 6s) angle-ply IM7-8551-7a specimens, 0 less than or = Theta less than or = 90 degs, are presented. The observed failure strengths and modes are discussed, and typical stress-strain relations shown. Using classical lamination theory and the maximum stress criterion, an attempt is made to predict failure stress as a function of Theta. This attempt results in poor correlation with test results and thus a more advanced model is used. The model, which is based on a geometrically nonlinear theory, and which was taken from previous work, includes the influence of observed layer waviness. The waviness is described by the wave length and the wave amplitude. The theory is briefly described and results from the theory are correlated with test results. It is shown that by using levels of waviness observed in the specimens, the correlation between predictions and observations is good.

  10. Fractal fragmentation and small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.

    2015-09-01

    The small-angle scattering form factor of a three-dimensional idealized fragmentation model based on the concept of renormalization is calculated. The system consists of randomly oriented microscopic fractal objects whose positions are uncorrelated. It is shown that in the fractal region, the monodisperse form factor is characterized by a succession of maxima and minima superimposed on a simple power-law decay, and whose scattering exponent coincide with the fractal dimension ofthe scatterer. The results could be used to obtain additional structural information about systems obtained through fragmentation processes at microscale.

  11. SU-E-I-56: Scan Angle Reduction for a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scanning angle required by the limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for intrafraction verification. Methods: LIVE acquires limited angle MV projections from the exit fluence of the arc treatment beam or during gantry rotation between static beams. Orthogonal limited-angle kV projections are also acquired simultaneously to provide additional information. LIVE considers the on-board 4D-CBCT images as a deformation of the prior 4D-CT images, and solves the deformation field based on deformation models and data fidelity constraint. LIVE reaches a checkpoint after a limited-angle scan, and reconstructs 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification at the checkpoint. In adaptive reconstruction strategy, a larger scanning angle of 30° is used for the first checkpoint, and smaller scanning angles of 15° are used for subsequent checkpoints. The onboard images reconstructed at the previous adjacent checkpoint are used as the prior images for reconstruction at the current checkpoint. As the algorithm only needs to reconstruct the small deformation occurred between adjacent checkpoints, projections from a smaller scan angle provide enough information for the reconstruction. XCAT was used to simulate tumor motion baseline drift of 2mm along sup-inf direction at every subsequent checkpoint, which are 15° apart. Adaptive reconstruction strategy was used to reconstruct the images at each checkpoint using orthogonal 15° kV and MV projections. Results: Results showed that LIVE reconstructed the tumor volumes accurately using orthogonal 15° kV-MV projections. Volume percentage differences (VPDs) were within 5% and center of mass shifts (COMS) were within 1mm for reconstruction at all checkpoints. Conclusion: It's feasible to use an adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scan angle needed by LIVE to allow faster and more frequent intrafraction verification to minimize the treatment errors in lung cancer treatments. Grant from Varian Medical System.

  12. Optimal Foraging Strategy: Angle Matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Udo; Göller, Sebastian; Sokolov, Igor M.; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2006-03-01

    We report a theory to describe the motion of zooplankton. In contrast to move just randomly like a classical Brownian particle, zooplankters like Daphnia or Copepods pick their turning angle from a distribution which is far from being Gaussian or equally distributed. This leads to different behavior in the motion compared to normal diffusion. The question which can be asked here is: Is there an evolutionary reason to forage for food in the aforementioned manner? The talk is planned to give an answer into that direction.

  13. Glide mechanisms of {l{underscore}angle}001{r{underscore}angle} dislocations in NiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Caillard, D.

    1999-07-01

    The glide properties of {l{underscore}angle}001{r{underscore}angle} dislocations have been studied by in situ straining experiments at and below room temperature, with the aim of studying slip, cross-slip, Peierls friction forces, and pinning at small obstacles. Most results are in a good agreement with atomistic calculations. It is concluded that unpinning from small extrinsic obstacles is probably the rate controlling mechanism in this temperature range and in the soft orientation.

  14. The Effect of Incidence Angle on Stereo DTM Quality: Simulations in Support of Europa Clipper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Hare, T. M.; Jorda, L.

    2014-12-01

    Many quality factors for digital topographic models (DTMs) from stereo imaging can be predicted geometrically. For example, pixel scale is related to instantaneous field of view and to range. DTM resolution can be no better than a few times this pixel scale. Even vertical precision is a known function of the pixel scale and convergence angle, providedthe image quality is high enough that automated image matching reaches its optimal precision (~0.2 pixel). The influence of incidence angle is harder to predict. Reduced quality is expected both at low incidence (where topographic shading disappears) and high incidence (where signal/noise ratio is low and shadows occur). This problem is of general interest, but especially critical for the Europa Clipper mission profile. Clipper would obtain a radar sounding profile on each Europa flyby. Stereo images collected simultaneously would be used to produce a DTM needed to distinguish off-nadir surface echos (clutter) from subsurface features. The question is, how much of this DTM strip will be useful, given that incidence angle will vary substantially? We are using simulations to answer this question. We produced a 210 m/post DTM of the Castalia Macula region of Europa from 6 Galileo images by photoclinometry. A low-incidence image was used to correct for albedo variations before photoclinometry. We are using the image simulation software OASIS to generate synthetic stereopairs of the region at a full range of incidence angles. These images will be realistic in terms of image resolution, noise, photometry including albedo variations (based on the low incidence image), and cast shadows. The pairs will then be analyzed with the commercial stereomapping software SOCET SET (® BAE Systems), which we have used for a wide variety of planetary mapping projects. Comparing the stereo-derived DTMs to the input ("truth") DTM will allow us to quantify the dependence of true DTM resolution and vertical precision on illumination, and to document the qualitative ways that DTMs degrade at high and low incidence angles. This methodology is immediately applicable to other planetary targets, and in particular can be used to address how much difference in illumination can be tolerated in stereopairs that are not (as for Clipper) acquired simultaneously.

  15. Neptune high-latitude emission: Dependence of angle on frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, Constance

    1993-01-01

    Smooth broadband radio emission reached a maximum and then cut off as Voyager approached the north magnetic pole of Neptune. The time of each event depends on frequency, yielding information on radio source location, and emission angle. In a preliminary analysis L-shell and magnetic longitude define radio-source locations in a dipole field. The emission angle at each frequency is identified with the angle between the magnetic-field direction at the source and the line of sight to Voyager 2 at the time of emission maximum. At each value of L in the range 6 less than L less than 9, there is one source longitude for which emission angle varies smoothly from greater or equal to 90 deg at 40 kHz to as low as 20 deg at 462 kHz. A more complex magnetic-field model can give a qualitatively different result.

  16. Averaging kernel prediction from atmospheric and surface state parameters based on multiple regression for nadir-viewing satellite measurements of carbon monoxide and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, H. M.; Edwards, D. P.; Deeter, M. N.; Fu, D.; Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Arellano, A.

    2013-07-01

    A current obstacle to the observation system simulation experiments (OSSEs) used to quantify the potential performance of future atmospheric composition remote sensing systems is a computationally efficient method to define the scene-dependent vertical sensitivity of measurements as expressed by the retrieval averaging kernels (AKs). We present a method for the efficient prediction of AKs for multispectral retrievals of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) based on actual retrievals from MOPITT (Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere) on the Earth Observing System (EOS)-Terra satellite and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) on EOS-Aura, respectively. This employs a multiple regression approach for deriving scene-dependent AKs using predictors based on state parameters such as the thermal contrast between the surface and lower atmospheric layers, trace gas volume mixing ratios (VMRs), solar zenith angle, water vapor amount, etc. We first compute the singular value decomposition (SVD) for individual cloud-free AKs and retain the first three ranked singular vectors in order to fit the most significant orthogonal components of the AK in the subsequent multiple regression on a training set of retrieval cases. The resulting fit coefficients are applied to the predictors from a different test set of test retrievals cased to reconstruct predicted AKs, which can then be evaluated against the true retrieval AKs from the test set. By comparing the VMR profile adjustment resulting from the use of the predicted vs. true AKs, we quantify the CO and O3 VMR profile errors associated with the use of the predicted AKs compared to the true AKs that might be obtained from a computationally expensive full retrieval calculation as part of an OSSE. Similarly, we estimate the errors in CO and O3 VMRs from using a single regional average AK to represent all retrievals, which has been a common approximation in chemical OSSEs performed to date. For both CO and O3 in the lower troposphere, we find a significant reduction in error when using the predicted AKs as compared to a single average AK. This study examined data from the continental United States (CONUS) for 2006, but the approach could be applied to other regions and times.

  17. Results of the Second SeaWiFS Data Analysis Round Robin, March 2000 (DARR-00)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; D'Alimonte, Davide; Maritorena, Stephane; McLean, Scott; Sildam, Juri; McClain, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate determination of upper ocean apparent optical properties (AOPs) is essential for the vicarious calibration of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) instrument and the validation of the derived data products. To evaluate the importance of data analysis methods upon derived AOP values, the Second Data Analysis Round Robin (DARR-00) activity was planned during the latter half of 1999 and executed during March 2000. The focus of the study was the intercomparison of several standard AOP parameters: (1) the upwelled radiance immediately below the sea surface, L(sub u)(0(-),lambda); (2) the downward irradiance immediately below the sea surface, E(sub d)(0(-),lambda); (3) the diffuse attenuation coefficients from the upwelling radiance and the downward irradiance profiles, L(sub L)(lambda) and K(sub d)(lambda), respectively; (4) the incident solar irradiance immediately above the sea surface, E(sub d)(0(+),lambda); (5) the remote sensing reflectance, R(sub rs)(lambda); (6) the normalized water-leaving radiance, [L(sub W)(lambda)](sub N); (7) the upward irradiance immediately below the sea surface, E(sub u)(0(-)), which is used with the upwelled radiance to derive the nadir Q-factor immediately below the sea surface, Q(sub n)(0(-),lambda); and (8) ancillary parameters like the solar zenith angle, theta, and the total chlorophyll concentration, C(sub Ta), derived from the optical data through statistical algorithms. In the results reported here, different methodologies from three research groups were applied to an identical set of 40 multispectral casts in order to evaluate the degree to which differences in data analysis methods influence AOP estimation, and whether any general improvements can be made. The overall results of DARR-00 are presented in Chapter 1 and the individual methods used by the three groups and their data processors are presented in Chapters 2-4.

  18. Contact angles of liquid metals on quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Claire; Girardeaux, Christophe; Perrin-Pellegrino, Carine; Gas, Patrick; Dubois, Jean-Marie; Rivier, Nicolas

    2008-08-01

    Wetting with µm-sized Pb droplets on thin polycrystalline films of decagonal Al13Co4 is reported. The films were prepared under high vacuum conditions in order to have Pb droplets lying on a clean surface. The method used is sequential deposition and annealing of specific stackings of Al and Co layers of nanometric thicknesses. A 300 nm thick Pb slab was then deposited on top of the films and dewetting experiments were followed in situ in a scanning Auger microprobe. The contact angle between the Pb droplet and the surface of the film is measured to be 49° ± 7°. Further investigation performed by cross section transmission electron microscopy allows us to better characterize the interface. Taking into account the rugosity of the film, it is concluded that there is partial wetting of the film, which corresponds to a smaller contact angle. The comparison with other results obtained either with pure metals or with a cubic AlCo compound leads to the conclusion that the wetting behaviour of Pb on the surface of a decagonal compound is close to that of a metal with a high melting point and not significantly different from that of a crystalline compound with a small unit cell.

  19. Scaling effects in angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Morton, John

    1992-01-01

    The effect of specimen size upon the response and strength of +/- 45 degree angle-ply laminates was investigated for two graphite fiber reinforced plastic systems and several stacking sequences. The first material system was a brittle epoxy based system, AS4 fibers in 3502 epoxy, and the second was a tough thermoplastic based system, AS4 fibers in PEEK matrix. For the epoxy based system, two generic +/- 45 degree lay-ups were studied: (+45 degrees sub n/-45 degrees sub n) sub 2S (blocked plies), and (+45 degrees/-45 degrees) sub 2nS, for n=1 and 2. The in-plane dimensions of the specimens were varied such that the width/length relationship was 12.7 x n/127 x n mm, for m=1, 2, 3, or 4. It is shown that the stress/strain response and the ultimate strength of these angle-ply laminates depends on the laminate thickness and the type of generic lay-up used. Furthermore, it is shown that first ply failure occurs in the surface plies as a result of normal rather than shear stresses. The implications of the experimental findings upon the validity of the +/- 45 degree tensile test which is used to determine the in-plane shear response of unidirectional composites are discussed.

  20. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same or the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 8 figs.

  1. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering: Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same for the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 54 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Step angles to reduce the north-finding error caused by rate random walk with fiber optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Xie, Jun; Yang, Chuanchuan; He, Changhong; Wang, Xinyue; Wang, Ziyu

    2015-10-20

    We study the relationship between the step angles and the accuracy of north finding with fiber optic gyroscopes. A north-finding method with optimized step angles is proposed to reduce the errors caused by rate random walk (RRW). Based on this method, the errors caused by both angle random walk and RRW are reduced by increasing the number of positions. For when the number of positions is even, we proposed a north-finding method with symmetric step angles that can reduce the error caused by RRW and is not affected by the azimuth angles. Experimental results show that, compared with the traditional north-finding method, the proposed methods with the optimized step angles and the symmetric step angles can reduce the north-finding errors by 67.5% and 62.5%, respectively. The method with symmetric step angles is not affected by the azimuth angles and can offer consistent high accuracy for any azimuth angles. PMID:26560383

  3. Limbus Impact on Off-angle Iris Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Barstow, Del R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Thompson, Joseph W; Bolme, David S; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of iris recognition depends on the quality of data capture and is negatively affected by several factors such as angle, occlusion, and dilation. Off-angle iris recognition is a new research focus in biometrics that tries to address several issues including corneal refraction, complex 3D iris texture, and blur. In this paper, we present an additional significant challenge that degrades the performance of the off-angle iris recognition systems, called the limbus effect . The limbus is the region at the border of the cornea where the cornea joins the sclera. The limbus is a semitransparent tissue that occludes a side portion of the iris plane. The amount of occluded iris texture on the side nearest the camera increases as the image acquisition angle increases. Without considering the role of the limbus effect, it is difficult to design an accurate off-angle iris recognition system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that investigates the limbus effect in detail from a biometrics perspective. Based on results from real images and simulated experiments with real iris texture, the limbus effect increases the hamming distance score between frontal and off-angle iris images ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 depending upon the limbus height.

  4. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  5. Sub-arcsecond precision detection for micro rolling angle by point array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Xingshu; Zhan, Dejun; Wu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Point array is proposed as the cooperated target to achieve the precise detection for rolling angle in an optical collimated path. The point array image is generated according to the rolling angle, and the algorithm for precise rolling angle detection is described. The factors which impact the detection error of the rolling angle are analyzed in detail. The results of numerical simulations indicated that sub-arcsecond precision detection for rolling angle is achieved by point array, which is superior to that attained by any other targets.

  6. Dosimetric Comparison of Manual and Beam Angle Optimization of Gantry Angles in IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-10-01

    Dosimetric comparison of manual beam angle selection (MBS) and beam angle optimization (BAO) for IMRT plans is investigated retrospectively for 15 head and neck and prostate patients. The head and neck and prostate had planning target volumes (PTVs) ranging between 96.0 and 319.9 cm{sup 3} and 153.6 and 321.3 cm{sup 3}, whereas OAR ranged between 8.3 and 47.8 cm{sup 3} and 68.3 and 469.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively. In MBS, a standard coplanar 7-9 fields equally spaced gantry angles were used. In BAO, the selection of gantry angle was optimized by the algorithm for the same number of beams. The optimization and dose-volume constraints were kept the same for both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on the Eclipse treatment planning system. Our results showed that the dose-volume histogram for PTV are nearly identical in both techniques but BAO provided superior sparing of the organs at risk compared with the MBS. Also, MBS produced statistically significant higher monitor units (MU) and segments than the BAO; 13.1 {+-} 6.6% (p = 0.012) and 10.4 {+-} 13.6% (p = 0.140), and 14.6 {+-} 5.6% (p = 1.003E-5) and 12.6 {+-} 7.4% (p = 0.76E-3) for head and neck and prostate cases, respectively. The reduction in MU translates into the reduction in total body and integral dose. It is concluded that BAO provides advantage over MBS for most intenisty-modulated radiation therapy cases.

  7. A Model of Electrowetting, Reversed Electrowetting and Contact Angle Saturation

    E-print Network

    Dan Klarman; David Andelman; Michael Urbakh

    2011-04-18

    While electrowetting has many applications, it is limited at large voltages by contact angle saturation - a phenomenon that is still not well understood. We propose a generalized approach for electrowetting that, among other results, can shed new light on contact angle saturation. The model assumes the existence of a minimum (with respect to the contact angle) in the electric energy and accounts for a quadratic voltage dependence ~U^2 in the low-voltage limit, compatible with the Young-Lippmann formula, and a ~1/U^2 saturation at the high-voltage limit. Another prediction is the surprising possibility of a reversed electrowetting regime, in which the contact angle increases with applied voltage. By explicitly taking into account the effect of the counter-electrode, our model is shown to be applicable to several AC and DC experimental electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) setups. Several features seen in experiments compare favorably with our results. Furthermore, the AC frequency dependence of EWOD agrees quantitatively with our predictions. Our numerical results are complemented with simple analytical expressions for the saturation angle in two practical limits.

  8. A model of electrowetting, reversed electrowetting, and contact angle saturation.

    PubMed

    Klarman, Dan; Andelman, David; Urbakh, Michael

    2011-05-17

    While electrowetting has many applications, it is limited at large voltages by contact angle saturation, a phenomenon that is still not well understood. We propose a generalized approach for electrowetting that, among other results, can shed new light on contact angle saturation. The model assumes the existence of a minimum (with respect to the contact angle) in the electric energy and accounts for a quadratic voltage dependence ?U(2) in the low-voltage limit, compatible with the Young-Lippmann formula, and an ?U(-2) saturation at the high-voltage limit. Another prediction is the surprising possibility of a reversed electrowetting regime, in which the contact angle increases with applied voltage. By explicitly taking into account the effect of the counter-electrode, our model is shown to be applicable to several AC and DC experimental electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) setups. Several features seen in experiments compare favorably with our results. Furthermore, the AC frequency dependence of EWOD agrees quantitatively with our predictions. Our numerical results are complemented with simple analytical expressions for the saturation angle in two practical limits. PMID:21510663

  9. Nanostructure surface design for broadband and angle-independent antireflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi Fan; Chattopadhyay, Surojit

    2013-01-01

    Three different antireflecting structures (ARS), namely, single-diameter nanorods, dual-diameter nanorods, and biomimetic nanotips (resembling moth-eye's submicrostructures) were compared to each other analytically for their reflectivities, using finite difference time domain calculations. Simulation results establish the biomimetic nanotips as better ARS than the others, in the visible and near-infrared wavelength zone and over a wider angle of incidence. The reflectance values in the nanotips are significantly lower compared to both types of nanorods and also the planar silicon below the Brewster angle (˜75 deg). The low antireflection translated to enhanced optical absorption in these subwavelength structures. A general antireflection design rule emerged from the simulation results.

  10. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircraft's unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall angle of attack, which in the X-31 was at a 30-degree angle of attack. During Dryden flight testing, the X-31 aircraft established several milestones. On November 6, 1992, the X-31 achieved controlled flight at a 70-degree angle of attack. On April 29, 1993, the second X-31 successfully executed a rapid minimum-radius, 180-degree turn using a post-stall maneuver, flying well beyond the aerodynamic limits of any conventional aircraft. This revolutionary maneuver has been called the 'Herbst Maneuver' after Wolfgang Herbst, a German proponent of using post-stall flight in air-to-air combat. It is also called a 'J Turn' when flown to an arbitrary heading change. The aircraft was flown in tactical maneuvers against an F/A-18 and other tactical aircraft as part of the test flight program. During November and December 1993, the X-31 reached a supersonic speed of Mach 1.28. In 1994, the X-31 program installed software to demonstrate quasi-tailless operation. The X-31 flight test program was conducted by an international test organization (ITO) managed by the Advanced Research Projects Office (ARPA), known as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Office (DARPA) before March 1993. The ITO included the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force, Rockwell Aerospace, the Federal Republic of Germany, Daimler-Benz (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm and Deutsche Aerospace), and NASA. Gary Trippensee was the ITO director and NASA Project Manager. Pilots came from participating organizations. The X-31 was 43.33 feet long with a wingspan of 23.83 feet. It was powered by a single General Electric P404-GE-400 turbofan engine that produced 16,000 pounds of thrust in afterburner.

  11. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall angle of attack, which in the X-31 was at a 30-degree angle of attack. During Dryden flight testing, the X-31 aircraft established several milestones. On November 6, 1992, the X-31 achieved controlled flight at a 70-degree angle of attack. On April 29, 1993, the second X-31 successfully executed a rapid minimum-radius, 180-degree turn using a post-stall maneuver, flying well beyond the aerodynamic limits of any conventional aircraft. This revolutionary maneuver has been called the 'Herbst Maneuver' after Wolfgang Herbst, a German proponent of using post-stall flight in air-to-air combat. It is also called a 'J Turn' when flown to an arbitrary heading change. The aircraft was flown in tactical maneuvers against an F/A-18 and other tactical aircraft as part of the test flight program. During November and December 1993, the X-31 reached a supersonic speed of Mach 1.28. In 1994, the X-31 program installed software to demonstrate quasi-tailless operation. The X-31 flight test program was conducted by an international test organization (ITO) managed by the Advanced Research Projects Office (ARPA), known as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Office (DARPA) before March 1993. The ITO included the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force, Rockwell Aerospace, the Federal Republic of Germany, Daimler-Benz (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm and Deutsche Aerospace), and NASA. Gary Trippensee was the ITO director and NASA Project Manager. Pilots came from participating organizations. The X-31 was 43.33 feet long with a wingspan of 23.83 feet. It was powered by a single General Electric P404-GE-400 turbofan engine that produced 16,000 pounds of thrust in afterburner.

  12. X-31 at High Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The X-31 aircraft, on a research mission from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is flying nearly perpendicular to the flight path while performing the Herbst maneuver. Effectively using the entire airframe as a speed brake and using the aircrafts unique thrust vectoring system to maintain control, the pilot rapidly rolls the aircraft to reverse the direction of flight, completing the maneuver with acceleration back to high speed in the opposite direction. This type of turning capability could reduce the turning time of a fighter aircraft by 30 percent. The Herbst maneuver was first conducted in an X-31 on April 29, 1993, in the No. 2 X-31 aircraft by German test pilot Karl-Heinz Lang. The X-31 Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator flew at the Ames- Dryden Flight Research Facility, Edwards, California (redesignated the Dryden Flight Research Center in 1994) from February 1992 until 1995 and before that at the Air Force's Plant 42 in Palmdale, California. The goal of the project was to provide design information for the next generation of highly maneuverable fighter aircraft. This program demonstrated the value of using thrust vectoring (directing engine exhaust flow) coupled with an advanced flight control system to provide controlled flight to very high angles of attack. The result was a significant advantage over most conventional fighters in close-in combat situations. The X-31 flight program focused on agile flight within the post-stall regime, producing technical data to give aircraft designers a better understanding of aerodynamics, effectiveness of flight controls and thrust vectoring, and airflow phenomena at high angles of attack. Stall is a condition of an airplane or an airfoil in which lift decreases and drag increases due to the separation of airflow. Thrust vectoring compensates for the loss of control through normal aerodynamic surfaces that occurs during a stall. Post-stall refers to flying beyond the normal stall angle of attack, which in the X-31 was at a 30-degree angle of attack. During Dryden flight testing, the X-31 aircraft established several milestones. On November 6, 1992, the X-31 achieved controlled flight at a 70-degree angle of attack. On April 29, 1993, the second X-31 successfully executed a rapid minimum-radius, 180-degree turn using a post-stall maneuver, flying well beyond the aerodynamic limits of any conventional aircraft. This revolutionary maneuver has been called the 'Herbst Maneuver' after Wolfgang Herbst, a German proponent of using post-stall flight in air-to-air combat. It is also called a 'J Turn' when flown to an arbitrary heading change. The aircraft was flown in tactical maneuvers against an F/A-18 and other tactical aircraft as part of the test flight program. During November and December 1993, the X-31 reached a supersonic speed of Mach 1.28. In 1994, the X-31 program installed software to demonstrate quasi-tailless operation. The X-31 flight test program was conducted by an international test organization (ITO) managed by the Advanced Research Projects Office (ARPA), known as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Office (DARPA) before March 1993. The ITO included the U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force, Rockwell Aerospace, the Federal Republic of Germany, Daimler-Benz (formerly Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm and Deutsche Aerospace), and NASA. Gary Trippensee was the ITO director and NASA Project Manager. Pilots came from participating organizations. The X-31 was 43.33 feet long with a wingspan of 23.83 feet. It was powered by a single General Electric P404-GE-400 turbofan engine that produced 16,000 pounds of thrust in afterburner.

  13. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from ? = 10° to ? = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as ? is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ? 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at ? = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation pressure region does not exist, and the deflection of the entire incoming jet is non-existent. In fact, for ? = 25°, 45°, 90°, the jet penetrates the pool nearly undisturbed and consequently large cavities are not formed.

  14. Large neutrino mixing angles in unified theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Barr, S. M.

    1996-02-01

    Typically in unified theories the neutrino mixing angles, like the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) angles of the quarks, are related to the small mass ratios between fermions of different generations and are therefore quite small. A new approach for explaining the intergenerational mass hierarchies is proposed here which, while giving small CKM angles, naturally leads to neutrino angles of order unity. Such large mixing angles may be required for a resolution of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and may also be relevant for the solar neutrino puzzle. The mechanism presented here provides a framework in which novel approaches to the fermion mass question can arise. In particular, within this framework a variant of the texture idea allows highly predictive models to be constructed, an illustrative example of which is given. It is shown how the neutrino mixing angles may be completely determined in such schemes.

  15. Mirtazapine-induced acute angle closure.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Nilay; Durmaz, Onur; Durna, Mehmet Murat

    2015-06-01

    Acute angle closure (AAC) is an ocular emergency with symptoms including blurred vision, eye pain, headache, nausea, vomiting and reddening of the eye those results from increased intraocular pressure. This clinical condition can lead to permanent damage in vision, thus causing blindness by generating progressive and irreversible optic neuropathy if left untreated. There are several reasons of AAC, including several types of local and systemic medications; mainly sympathomimetics, cholinergics, anti-cholinergics, mydriatics, anti-histamines, antiepileptics like topiramate, tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, sulfa-based drugs and anticoagulants. Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant, is an atypical antidepressant with a complex pharmacological profile. This case report describes a patient with major depressive disorder, who experienced AAC after the first dosage of mirtazapine treatment, and highlights the importance of close monitoring of individuals under antidepressant treatment particularly immediately after initiation of the drug. PMID:26265648

  16. Mirtazapine-induced acute angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Nilay; Durmaz, Onur; Durna, Mehmet Murat

    2015-01-01

    Acute angle closure (AAC) is an ocular emergency with symptoms including blurred vision, eye pain, headache, nausea, vomiting and reddening of the eye those results from increased intraocular pressure. This clinical condition can lead to permanent damage in vision, thus causing blindness by generating progressive and irreversible optic neuropathy if left untreated. There are several reasons of AAC, including several types of local and systemic medications; mainly sympathomimetics, cholinergics, anti-cholinergics, mydriatics, anti-histamines, antiepileptics like topiramate, tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antipsychotics, sulfa-based drugs and anticoagulants. Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant, is an atypical antidepressant with a complex pharmacological profile. This case report describes a patient with major depressive disorder, who experienced AAC after the first dosage of mirtazapine treatment, and highlights the importance of close monitoring of individuals under antidepressant treatment particularly immediately after initiation of the drug. PMID:26265648

  17. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James R.; Anastas, George V., Jr.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Flynn, Frederick J.; Goldie, James H.; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Hockney, Richard L.; Torti, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    SatCon Technology Corporation has completed a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 2 program to develop a Superconducting Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension (LAMS) for the NASA Langley Research Center. The Superconducting LAMS was a hardware demonstration of the control technology required to develop an advanced momentum exchange effector. The Phase 2 research was directed toward the demonstration for the key technology required for the advanced concept CMG, the controller. The Phase 2 hardware consists of a superconducting solenoid ('source coils') suspended within an array of nonsuperconducting coils ('control coils'), a five-degree-of-freedom positioning sensing system, switching power amplifiers, and a digital control system. The results demonstrated the feasibility of suspending the source coil. Gimballing (pointing the axis of the source coil) was demonstrated over a limited range. With further development of the rotation sensing system, enhanced angular freedom should be possible.

  18. Narrow-angle astrometry with PRIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlmann, J.; Ségransan, D.; Mérand, A.; Zimmerman, N.; Abuter, R.; Chazelas, B.; Delplancke, F.; Henning, T.; Kaminski, A.; Köhler, R.; Launhardt, R.; Mohler, M.; Pepe, F.; Queloz, D.; Quirrenbach, A.; Reffert, S.; Schmid, C.; Schuhler, N.; Schulze-Hartung, T.

    2012-07-01

    The Extrasolar Planet Search with PRIMA project (ESPRI) aims at characterising and detecting extrasolar planets by measuring the host star's reflex motion using the narrow-angle astrometry capability of the PRIMA facility at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. A first functional demonstration of the astrometric mode was achieved in early 2011. This marked the start of the astrometric commissioning phase with the purpose of characterising the instrument's performance, which ultimately has to be sufficient for exoplanet detection. We show results obtained from the observation of bright visual binary stars, which serve as test objects to determine the instrument's astrometric precision, its accuracy, and the plate scale. Finally, we report on the current status of the ESPRI project, in view of starting its scientific programme.

  19. Narrow-angle astrometry with PRIMA

    E-print Network

    Sahlmann, J; Mérand, A; Zimmerman, N; Abuter, R; Chazelas, B; Delplancke, F; Henning, T; Kaminski, A; Köhler, R; Launhardt, R; Mohler, M; Pepe, F; Queloz, D; Quirrenbach, A; Reffert, S; Schmid, C; Schuhler, N; Schulze-Hartung, T

    2012-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planet Search with PRIMA project (ESPRI) aims at characterising and detecting extrasolar planets by measuring the host star's reflex motion using the narrow-angle astrometry capability of the PRIMA facility at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer. A first functional demonstration of the astrometric mode was achieved in early 2011. This marked the start of the astrometric commissioning phase with the purpose of characterising the instrument's performance, which ultimately has to be sufficient for exoplanet detection. We show results obtained from the observation of bright visual binary stars, which serve as test objects to determine the instrument's astrometric precision, its accuracy, and the plate scale. Finally, we report on the current status of the ESPRI project, in view of starting its scientific programme.

  20. Instrumentation Of A Variable Angle Scatterometer (VAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orazio, Fred D.; Stowell, W. K.; Silva, Robert M.

    1983-04-01

    The problem of light scatter from optical surfaces is amplified to a critical level for the optics used in the Ring Laser Gyro (RLG). This has led to the development of a scatterometer at the RLG Lab, Wright-Patterson AFB, which can detect low level light scatter from the high quality optics used in RLG's, without first overcoating with metals. A helium-neon laser is used to illuminate a 0.5 mm diameter spot on the surface of the test part. The incident angle can be varied from 0 to 90 degrees, and the test piece can be maneuvered with five degrees of freedom, four of which are computer controlled. Scatter measurements are made with a photomultiplier detection system which can easily measure down to 10 parts per billion per steradian. The computer can analyze and plot the results very quickly and accurately for further interpretation.

  1. Wide-angle energy-momentum spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Christopher M; Kurvits, Jonathan A; Li, Dongfang; Zia, Rashid

    2014-07-01

    Light emission is defined by its distribution in energy, momentum, and polarization. Here, we demonstrate a method that resolves these distributions by means of wide-angle energy-momentum spectroscopy. Specifically, we image the back focal plane of a microscope objective through a Wollaston prism to obtain polarized Fourier-space momentum distributions, and disperse these two-dimensional radiation patterns through an imaging spectrograph without an entrance slit. The resulting measurements represent a convolution of individual radiation patterns at adjacent wavelengths, which can be readily deconvolved using any well-defined basis for light emission. As an illustrative example, we use this technique with the multipole basis to quantify the intrinsic emission rates for electric and magnetic dipole transitions in europium-doped yttrium oxide (Eu³?:Y?O?) and chromium-doped magnesium oxide (Cr³?:MgO). Once extracted, these rates allow us to reconstruct the full, polarized, two-dimensional radiation patterns at each wavelength. PMID:24978773

  2. A ciliary body tumor preventing angle closure.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Chadi; Desjardins, Laurence; Puech, Michel; Cohn, Howard

    2014-02-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old white woman, found to have advanced angle closure glaucoma in the right eye and appositional closure for about half of the left eye and no glaucoma. The remaining angle of the left eye was open with localized heavy pigmentation of the ciliary body band and trabecular meshwork. Ultrasound biomicroscopy showed a ciliary body tumor displacing the iris root centripetally preventing angle closure. PMID:23117627

  3. Burner tilting angle effect on velocity profile in 700 MW Utility Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munisamy, K. M.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Thangaraju, S. K.; Hassan, H.; Ahmad, A.

    2015-09-01

    700 MW of utility boiler is investigated with manipulation of inlet burner angle. Manipulation of burner titling angle is an operational methodology in controlling rear pass temperature in utility boilers. The rear pass temperature unbalance between right and left side is a problem caused by fouling and slagging of the ash from the coal fired boilers. This paper presents the CFD investigation on the 0° and -30° of the burner angle of the utility boiler. The results focusing on the velocity profile. The design condition of 0° burner firing angle is compared with the off-design burner angle -30° which would be the burner angle to reduce the rear pass temperature un-balance by boiler operators. It can be concluded that the -30° burner angle reduce the turbulence is fire ball mixing inside the furnace. It also shift the fire ball position in the furnace to reduce the rear pass temperature.

  4. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  5. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors.

    PubMed

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N H

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  6. Pitch angle of galactic spiral arms

    SciTech Connect

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    One of the key parameters that characterizes spiral arms in disk galaxies is a pitch angle that measures the inclination of a spiral arm to the direction of galactic rotation. The pitch angle differs from galaxy to galaxy, which suggests that the rotation law of galactic disks determines it. In order to investigate the relation between the pitch angle of spiral arms and the shear rate of galactic differential rotation, we perform local N-body simulations of pure stellar disks. We find that the pitch angle increases with the epicycle frequency and decreases with the shear rate and obtain the fitting formula. This dependence is explained by the swing amplification mechanism.

  7. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  8. Assessment of angle velocity in girls with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Escalada, Ferran; Marco, Ester; Duarte, Esther; Ma Muniesa, Josep; Boza, Roser; Tejero, Marta; Cáceres, Enric

    2009-01-01

    Background Although it has been demonstrated that the peak height velocity (PHV) is a predictive factor of progression in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), little is known about the usefulness of angle progression in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between height and angle velocities, as well as to determine if peak angle velocity (PAV) occurs at the same time than PHV. Methods A retrospective study of a cohort of girls with idiopathic scoliotic curves greater than 10°. Data of 132 girls who participated in a previous retrospective study about growth in AIS were used to calculate height and angle velocities. Relationship between height and angle velocities was estimated by the use of a Linear Mixed Model. Results PHV and PAV take place simultaneously 1 year before menarche in progressive curves managed with a brace in AIS. Changes in angle velocity are influenced by changes in height growth velocity, in such a way that as from 6 months post-menarche, height growth velocity in this group of girls estimates curve progression velocity (?-coefficient -0.88, p = 0.04). Conclusion As from 6 months post-menarche, there is an inverse relationship between height velocity and curve progression in the group of AIS girls with progressive curves managed with a brace. Because height velocity is decreasing from 1 year before menarche, this finding corroborates that at the end of puberty, there is still a risk of progression in this group of girls despite bracing. The assessment of both height and angle velocity might be useful in clinical practice at the time of assessing brace effectiveness and how long bracing has to be indicated. PMID:19758424

  9. Associations between Narrow Angle and Adult Anthropometry: The Liwan Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuzhen; He, Mingguang; Friedman, David S.; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Lee, Pak Sang; Nolan, Winifred P.; Yin, Qiuxia; Foster, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the associations between narrow angle and adult anthropometry. Methods Chinese adults aged 50 years and older were recruited from a population-based survey in the Liwan District of Guangzhou, China. Narrow angle was defined as the posterior trabecular meshwork not visible under static gonioscopy in at least three quadrants (i.e. a circumference of at least 270°). Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between narrow angle and anthropomorphic measures (height, weight and body mass index, BMI). Results Among the 912 participants, lower weight, shorter height, and lower BMI were significantly associated with narrower angle width (tests for trend: mean angle width in degrees vs weight p<0.001; vs height p<0.001; vs BMI p = 0.012). In univariate analyses, shorter height, lower weight and lower BMI were all significantly associated with greater odds of narrow angle. The crude association between height and narrow angle was largely attributable to a stronger association with age and sex. Lower BMI and weight remained significantly associated with narrow angle after adjustment for height, age, sex, axial ocular biometric measures and education. In analyses stratified by sex, the association between BMI and narrow angle was only observed in women. Conclusion Lower BMI and weight were associated with significantly greater odds of narrow angle after adjusting for age, education, axial ocular biometric measures and height. The odds of narrow angle increased 7% per 1 unit decrease in BMI. This association was most evident in women. PMID:24707840

  10. The Ratio R{sub dp} of the quasielastic nd {yields} p(nn) to the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange-process yields at the proton emitting angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. over 0.55-2.0 GeV neutron-beam energy region. Comparison of the results with the model-dependent calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sharov, V. I. Morozov, A. A.; Shindin, R. A.; Chernykh, E. V.; Nomofilov, A. A.; Strunov, L. N.

    2009-06-15

    Our new experimental results (see, e.g., Preprint JINR no. E1-2008-61 (Dubna, 2008)) on ratio R{sub dp} of the quasielastic charge-exchange yield at the proton emitting angle {theta}{sub p,lab} = 0 deg. for the nd {yields} p(nn) reaction to the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange yield were presented. The measurements were carried out at the Nuclotron of the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energies of the JINR (Dubna) at the neutron-beam kinetic energies of 0.55, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, and 2.0 GeV. In this paper the comparison of the experimental R{sub dp} data with the obtained R{sub dp} calculations within the impulse approximation by using the invariant-amplitude sets from the GW/VPI phase-shift analysis is made. The R{sub dp} values calculated using the set of invariant amplitude data for the elastic np {yields} pn charge exchange at {theta}{sub p,CM} = 0 deg., agree with the experimental data. This confirmed the nd {yields} p(nn) process yield at {theta}{sub p,CM} = 0 deg. is caused by the contribution of the spin-dependent part of the elastic np {yields} pn charge-exchange reaction. Thus, it has been shown that the obtained experimental R{sub dp} results can be used for the Delta-Sigma experimental program to reduce the total ambiguity in the extraction of the amplitude real parts.

  11. Physiological response of wild rainbow trout to angling: Impact of angling duration, fish size, body condition, and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meka, J.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the immediate physiological response of wild rainbow trout to catch-and-release angling in the Alagnak River, southwest Alaska. Information was recorded on individual rainbow trout (n = 415) captured by angling including landing time and the time required to remove hooks (angling duration), the time to anesthetize fish in clove oil and withdraw blood, fish length and weight, and water temperature at capture locations. Plasma cortisol, glucose, ions (sodium, potassium, chloride), and lactate were analyzed to determine the effects of angling duration, fish size, body condition, and temperature. Levels of plasma ions did not change significantly during the observed physiological response and levels of plasma glucose were sometimes influenced by length (2000, 2001), body condition (2001), or temperature (2001). Levels of plasma cortisol and lactate in extended capture fish (angling duration greater than 2 min) were significantly higher than levels in rapid capture fish (angling duration less than 2 min). Rapid capture fish were significantly smaller than extended capture fish, reflecting that fish size influenced landing and handling times. Fish size was related to cortisol and lactate in 2002, which corresponded to the year when larger fish were captured and there were longer landing times. Body condition (i.e., weight/length regression residuals index), was significantly related to lactate in 2000 and 2001. Water temperatures were higher in 2001 (mean temperature ?? S.E., 13 ?? 2??C) than in 2002 (10 ?? 2??C), and fish captured in 2001 had significantly higher cortisol and lactate concentrations than fish captured in 2002. The pattern of increase in plasma cortisol and lactate was due to the amount of time fish were angled, and the upper limit of the response was due to water temperature. The results of this study indicate the importance of minimizing the duration of angling in order to reduce the sublethal physiological disturbances in wild fish subjected to catch-and-release angling, particularly during warmer water temperatures. It is also important to note that factors such as fish size may influence both the duration of angling and subsequent physiological response. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Contact angles of wetting and water stability of soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Yashin, M. A.; Frid, A. S.; Lazarev, V. I.; Tyugai, Z. N.; Milanovskiy, E. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    From the soddy-podzolic soils and typical chernozems of different texture and land use, dry 3-1 mm aggregates were isolated and sieved in water. As a result, water-stable aggregates and water-unstable particles composing dry 3-1 mm aggregates were obtained. These preparations were ground, and contact angles of wetting were determined by the static sessile drop method. The angles varied from 11° to 85°. In most cases, the values of the angles for the water-stable aggregates significantly exceeded those for the water-unstable components. In terms of carbon content in structural units, there was no correlation between these parameters. When analyzing the soil varieties separately, the significant positive correlation between the carbon content and contact angle of aggregates was revealed only for the loamy-clayey typical chernozem. Based on the multivariate analysis of variance, the value of contact wetting angle was shown to be determined by the structural units belonging to water-stable or water-unstable components of macroaggregates and by the land use type. In addition, along with these parameters, the texture has an indirect effect.

  13. The Influence of Dynamic Contact Angle on Wetting Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    When surface tension forces dominate, and regardless of whether the situation is static or dynamic, the contact angle (the angle the interface between two immiscible fluids makes when it contacts a solid) is the key parameter that determines the shape of a fluid-fluid interface. The static contact angle is easy to measure and implement in models predicting static capillary surface shapes and such associated quantities as pressure drops. By contrast, when the interface moves relative to the solid (as in dynamic wetting processes) the dynamic contact angle is not identified unambiguously because it depends on the geometry of the system Consequently, its determination becomes problematic and measurements in one geometry cannot be applied in another for prediction purposes. However, knowing how to measure and use the dynamic contact angle is crucial to determine such dynamics as a microsystem throughput reliably. In this talk we will present experimental and analytical efforts aimed at resolving modeling issues present in dynamic wetting. We will review experiments that show the inadequacy of the usual hydrodynamic model when a fluid-fluid meniscus moves over a solid surface such as the wall of a small tube or duct. We will then present analytical results that show how to parametrize these problems in a predictive manner. We will illustrate these ideas by showing how to implement the method in numerical fluid mechanical calculations.

  14. Use of angle kappa in myopic photorefractive keratectomy

    PubMed Central

    Khakshoor, Hamid; McCaughey, Michael V; Vejdani, Amir Hossein; Daneshvar, Ramin; Moshirfar, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore utilization of the coaxially sighted corneal light reflex (CSCLR) for centration during myopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) for patients with relatively high angle kappa (?) values. Methods Patients were stratified into two groups preoperatively, on the basis of angle ? values. Group A was composed of 166 eyes with an angle ? value <5°. Group B consisted of 182 eyes with an angle ? value >5°. Intraoperative centering of ablation was performed within group A by utilizing the pupillary center, and within group B by using the CSCLR. Visual acuities were evaluated and compared at 6 months and 12 months postoperatively between groups. Results Mean uncorrected visual acuities (UCVA) for all patients at 6 months and 12 months were ?0.073 logMAR and ?0.080 logMAR, respectively. A total of 98.9% of patients had a UCVA of 0.00 logMAR (?20/20 Snellen) 12 months postoperatively. There was not a significant between-group difference in regard to residual refractive error at 6 months or 12 months (P=0.53 and P=0.97), or in UCVA at 6 months and 12 months (P=0.76 and P=0.17). There were no subjective complaints of monocular diplopia, glare, or haloes within either group at any time during follow-up. Conclusion Availing use of the CSCLR for centration of ablation within myopic patients with high angle ? values may aid in providing better refractive outcomes after performance of PRK. PMID:25678767

  15. Rotating Shaft Tilt Angle Measurement Using an Inclinometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin; Cai, Sheng; Li, Jianrong

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes a novel measurement method to accurately measure the rotating shaft tilt angle of rotating machine for alignment or compensation using a dual-axis inclinometer. A model of the rotating shaft tilt angle measurement is established using a dual-axis inclinometer based on the designed mechanical structure, and the calculation equation between the rotating shaft tilt angle and the inclinometer axes outputs is derived under the condition that the inclinometer axes are perpendicular to the rotating shaft. The reversal measurement method is applied to decrease the effect of inclinometer drifts caused by temperature, to eliminate inclinometer and rotating shaft mechanical error and inclinometer systematic error to attain high measurement accuracy. The uncertainty estimation shows that the accuracy of rotating shaft tilt angle measurement depends mainly on the inclinometer uncertainty and its uncertainty is almost the same as the inclinometer uncertainty in the simulation. The experimental results indicate that measurement time is 4 seconds; the range of rotating shaft tilt angle is 0.002° and its standard deviation is 0.0006° using NS-5/P2 inclinometer, whose precision and resolution are ±0.01° and 0.0005°, respectively.

  16. Arrival-angle anomalies across the USArray Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Anna; Ekström, Göran; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala

    2014-09-01

    We construct composite maps of surface-wave arrival-angle anomalies using clustered earthquakes and an array method for measuring wave-front geometry. This results in observations of arrival angles covering the entire footprint of the USArray Transportable Array during 2006-2010. Bands of arrival-angle deviations in the propagation direction indicate the presence of heterogeneous velocity structure both inside and outside of the array. We compare the observed patterns to arrival angles predicted using two global tomographic models, the mantle model S362ANI and the surface-wave-dispersion model GDM52. We use both ray-theory-based prediction methods and measurements on synthetic data calculated using a spectral-element method. Both models and all prediction methods produce similar mean arrival angles and long-wavelength patterns of anomalies which are similar to the observations. Predicted short-wavelength features generally do not agree with the observations. The spectral-element method produces some complexity that is not obtained using the ray-theory-based methods; this predicted complexity is similar in character to the observed patterns, but does not match them.

  17. Magic angles and cross-hatching instability in hydrogel fracture

    E-print Network

    Tristan Baumberger; Christiane Caroli; David Martina; Olivier Ronsin

    2008-02-29

    The full 2D analysis of roughness profiles of fracture surfaces resulting from quasi-static crack propagation in gelatin gels reveals an original behavior characterized by (i) strong anisotropy with maximum roughness at $V$-independent symmetry-preserving angles, (ii) a sub-critical instability leading, below a critical velocity, to a cross-hatched regime due to straight macrosteps drifting at the same magic angles and nucleated on crack-pinning network inhomogeneities. Step height values are determined by the width of the strain-hardened zone, governed by the elastic crack blunting characteristic of soft solids with breaking stresses much larger that low strain moduli.

  18. Non-uniform projection angle processing in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simo, Yanic; Tayag, Tristan J.

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for the collection of computed tomography data. Non-uniform increments in projection angle may be used to reduce data acquisition time with minimal reduction in the accuracy of the reconstructed profile. The key is to exploit those projection angles which correspond to regions where the object contains few high spatial frequency components. This technique is applicable to optical phase computed tomography, as well as X-ray computed tomography. We present simulation results on intraocular lenses used in cataract surgery.

  19. The SU(2) action-angle variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellinas, Demosthenes

    1993-01-01

    Operator angle-action variables are studied in the frame of the SU(2) algebra, and their eigenstates and coherent states are discussed. The quantum mechanical addition of action-angle variables is shown to lead to a noncommutative Hopf algebra. The group contraction is used to make the connection with the harmonic oscillator.

  20. Classification procedure in limited angle tomography system

    SciTech Connect

    Chlewicki, W.; Baniukiewicz, P.; Chady, T.; Brykalski, A.

    2011-06-23

    In this work we propose the use of limited angle reconstruction algorithms combined with a procedure for defect detection and feature evaluation in three dimensions. The procedure consists of the following steps: acquisition of the X-ray projections, approximated limited angle 3D image reconstruction, and image preprocessing and classification.

  1. Automatic star-horizon angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, K.; Koso, D. A.; Nardella, P. C.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic star horizontal angle measuring aid for general navigational use incorporates an Apollo type sextant. The eyepiece of the sextant is replaced with two light detectors and appropriate circuitry. The device automatically determines the angle between a navigational star and a unique point on the earths horizon as seen on a spacecraft.

  2. Vision only Presented angle (Visual / Body)

    E-print Network

    Vision only Presented angle (Visual / Body) 45º / 30º 60º / 40º 75º / 50º Reproductedrotationangle rotation Vision + Body (same gain) Presented angle (Visual / Body) 45º / 30º 60º / 40º 75º / 50º Reproductedrotationangle(º) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Visual rotation Body rotation Vision + Body (different gain

  3. Custom total occlusal convergence angle sticker fabrication.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Nagy, William W

    2015-09-01

    This article describes a method of fabricating a custom total occlusal convergence angle sticker with photo editing software and label stickers. The custom total occlusal convergence angle sticker can help clinicians achieve an accurate degree of taper during axial wall reduction of tooth preparation. PMID:26013073

  4. Boundary attenuation angles for inhomogeneous plane waves

    E-print Network

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Boundary attenuation angles for inhomogeneous plane waves in anisotropic dissipative media@ig.cas.cz. Summary Attenuation angles of inhomogeneous plane waves propagating in isotropic or aniso- tropic and on the properties of the plane wave under consideration, mainly on the direction of propagation of the wave

  5. Let's Do It! Using Geostrips and "Angle-Fixers" to Develop Ideas About Shapes and Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruni, James V.; Silverman, Helene

    1975-01-01

    Homemade geostrips, "angle-fixers" (cardboard circular sectors) and brass fasteners can be used by students to explore properties of angles, triangles and other polygons. Several games and other activities are suggested. (SD)

  6. Exploring Dissections of Rectangles into Right-Angled Triangles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this article we highlight how a simple classroom activity associated with the dissection of rectangles into right-angled triangles can lead on to a number of interesting explorations for students following a post-16 mathematics course. Several results connected with this construction are obtained, and some of the educational benefits of…

  7. Small angle neutron scattering from nanometer grain sized materials

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, J.E.; Siegel, R.W.

    1991-11-01

    Small angie neutron scattering has been utilized, along with a number of complementary characterization methods suitable to the nanometer size scale, to investigate the structures of cluster-assembled nanophase materials. Results of these investigations are described and problems and opportunities in using small angle scattering for elucidating nanostructures are discussed.

  8. Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, L. E.; Kuyk, T.

    1990-01-01

    A follow-up study of an earlier report on the Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) was conducted to analyze the various applications of the device and its reliability. Results indicate high client satisfaction with WAML among test subjects (26 blind male veterans with night blindness, age 32 to 68). (Author/PB)

  9. Measurements of the angle alpha (phi2) at B factories

    E-print Network

    G. Vasseur

    2008-10-02

    The measurements of the angle alpha (phi2) of the unitarity triangle at the B factories are reviewed. The value of alpha determined by combining the results obtained in the B to pi pi, B to rho pi, and B to rho rho modes by both the BABAR and Belle experiments is (87.5 +6.2 -5.3) degrees.

  10. Guidance law against maneuvering targets with intercept angle constraint.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shaofeng; Wang, Weihong; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Sen; Chen, Zengqiang

    2014-07-01

    This study explores the guidance law against maneuvering targets with the intercept angle constraint. The limitation of the traditional guidance law, which simply treats the unknown target acceleration as zero, has been analyzed. To reduce this limitation, a linear extended state observer is constructed to estimate the acceleration of the maneuvering target to enhance the tracking performance of the desired intercept angle. Furthermore, a nonsingular terminal sliding mode control scheme is adopted to design the sliding surface, which is able to avoid the singularity in the terminal phase of guidance. Simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed guidance law outperforms the traditional guidance law in the sense that more accurate intercept angle can be achieved. PMID:24773919

  11. How to measure pitch-angle diffusion coefficient at ? ~ 90°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostryakov, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the quasilinear theory of particle pitch-angle (?) scattering by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence results in the peculiarities at ? = 90°. We propose a simple method of measuring of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient in this range. It is based on the anisotropy detection of the back-scattered flare particles. This possibility relies on the mutual geometrical location of the particle source (flare site), part of the Archemedean spiral where the particles propagate and the measuring device. The most reliably this scheme must work for the neutron-decay protons originated from the behind-limb flares. In this case only the protons scattered at ? = 90° must reach the probe while the direct proton flux will be significantly depressed. The time profile of the particle anisotropy in such a geometry (at known source properties) allows one to choose an adequate model of the particle scattering at the pitch-angle domain ? = 90°.

  12. RF CAVITY BPM'S AS BEAM ANGLE AND BEAM CORRELATION MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Marc C

    2003-05-27

    It has been shown that high performance cavity BPM's are capable of accurate beam trajectory angle and beam ''tilt'', (x-z or y-z correlation) measurements [1],[2]. Such a device will be very useful for the optimization of a variety of beamlines, such as high current linacs, bunch rotators and storage rings. The signal from a non-axial trajectory or a tilted beam is in quadrature to that observed from a simple displacement of a very short bunch. Using in-phase/quadrature-phase (I/Q) demodulation of the cavity BPM signal, it is possible to separate position and angle/tilt. In this paper, we present results of beam angle and tilt monitor tests carried out in the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) extraction line.

  13. Caustic graphene plasmons with Kelvin angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-08-01

    A century-long argument made by Lord Kelvin that all swimming objects have an effective Mach number of 3, corresponding to a Kelvin angle of 19.5° for ship waves, has been challenged recently with the conclusion that the Kelvin angle should gradually transit to the Mach angle as the ship's velocity increases. Here we show that a similar phenomenon can happen for graphene plasmons. By analyzing the caustic wave pattern of graphene plasmons stimulated by a swift charged particle moving uniformly above graphene, we show that at low velocities of the charged particle, the caustics of graphene plasmons form the Kelvin angle. At large velocities of the particle, the caustics disappear and the effective semiangle of the wave pattern approaches the Mach angle. Our study introduces caustic wave theory to the field of graphene plasmonics, and reveals a physical picture of graphene plasmon excitation during electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements.

  14. Optic Disc - Fovea Angle: The Beijing Eye Study 2011

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Rahul A.; Wang, Ya Xing; Yang, Hua; Li, Jian Jun; Xu, Liang; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Jonas, Jost B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the optic disc-fovea angle (defined as angle between the horizontal and the line between the optic disc center and the fovea) and to assess its relationships with ocular and systemic parameters. Methods The population-based cross-sectional Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals. A detailed ophthalmic examination was carried out. Using fundus photographs, we measured the disc-fovea angle. Results Readable fundus photographs were available for 6043 eyes of 3052 (88.0%) individuals with a mean age of 63.6±9.3 years (range: 50–91 years) and a mean axial length of 23.2±1.0 mm (range: 18.96–28.87 mm). Mean disc-fovea angle was 7.76 ± 3.63° (median: 7.65°; range: -6.3° to 28.9°). The mean inter-eye difference was 4.01 ± 2.94° (median: 3.49°; range: 0.00–22.3°). In multivariate analysis, larger disc-fovea angle was associated (regression coefficient r2: 0.08) with older age (P = 0.009; standardized regression coefficient beta: 0.05), thinner RNFL in the nasal superior sector (P<0.001; beta: -0.17), superior sector (P<0.001; beta: -0.10) and temporal superior sector (P<0.001; beta: -0.11) and thicker RNFL in the inferior sector (P<001; beta: 0.13), nasal inferior sector (P<001; beta: 0.13) and nasal sector (P = 0.007; beta: 0.06), higher prevalence of retinal vein occlusion (P = 0.02; beta: 0.04), and with larger cylindrical refractive error (P = 0.04; beta: 0.04). Conclusions The optic disc-fovea angle markedly influences the regional distribution of the RNFL thickness pattern. The disc-fovea angle may routinely be taken into account in the morphological glaucoma diagnosis and in the assessment of structure-function relationship in optic nerve diseases. Future studies may address potential associations between a larger disc-fovea angle and retinal vein occlusions and between the disc-fovea angle and the neuroretinal rim shape. PMID:26545259

  15. Radiative transfer in shrub savanna sites in Niger: Preliminary results from HAPEX-Sahel. Part 3: Optical dynamics and vegetation index sensitivity to biomass and plant cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanLeeuwen, W. J. D.; Huete, A. R.; Duncan, J.; Franklin, J.

    1994-01-01

    A shrub savannah landscape in Niger was optically characterized utilizing blue, green, red and near-infrared wavelengths. Selected vegetation indices were evaluated for their performance and sensitivity to describe the complex Sahelian soil/vegetation canopies. Bidirectional reflectance factors (BRF) of plants and soils were measured at several view angles, and used as input to various vegetation indices. Both soil and vegetation targets had strong anisotropic reflectance properties, rendering all vegetation index (6) responses to be a direct function of sun and view geometry. Soil background influences were shown to alter the response of most vegetation indices. N-space greenness had the smallest dynamic range in VI response, but the n-space brightness index provided additional useful information. The global environmental monitoring index (GEMI) showed a large 6 dynamic range for bare soils, which was undesirable for a vegetation index. The view angle response of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), atmosphere resistant vegetation index (ARVI) and soil atmosphere resistant vegetation index (SARVI) were asymmetric about nadir for multiple view angles, and were, except for the SARVI, altered seriously by soil moisture and/or soil brightness effects. The soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) was least affected by surface soil moisture and was symmetric about nadir for grass vegetation covers. Overall the SAVI, SARVI and the n-space vegetation index performed best under all adverse conditions and were recommended to monitor vegetation growth in the sparsely vegetated Sahelian zone.

  16. Plateau iris in Japanese patients with primary angle closure and primary angle closure glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Takanori; Ozaki, Mineo; Wakiyama, Harumi; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of plateau iris in Japanese patients with primary angle closure (PAC) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) and analyze the biometric parameters in patients with plateau iris using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Methods In this cross-sectional observational study, subjects aged >50 years with PAC and PACG who had previously undergone a patent laser peripheral iridotomy underwent UBM in one eye. UBM images were qualitatively analyzed using standardized criteria. Plateau iris in a quadrant was defined by anteriorly directed ciliary body, absent ciliary sulcus, steep iris root from its point of insertion followed by a downward angulation, flat iris plane, and irido-angle contact. At least two quadrants had to fulfill these UBM criteria for an eye to be classified as having plateau iris. A-scan biometry was used to measure anterior segment parameters. Results Ninety-one subjects with PAC (58 subjects) or PACG (33 subjects) and 68 normal controls were recruited. The mean (standard deviation) ages of PAC and PACG patients and normal controls were 73.5 (6.2) and 72.6 (7.3), respectively. Based on UBM criteria, plateau iris was found in 16 eyes (17.6%) of 91 eyes. In these 16 eyes, quadrant-wise analysis showed ten eyes (62.5%) had plateau iris in two quadrants; four eyes (25%) had plateau iris in three quadrants; and two eyes (12.5%) had plateau iris in four quadrants. Anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, axial length, lens position, and relative lens position were not statistically significant between the group having plateau iris and that not having plateau iris, respectively. Conclusion Approximately 20% of Japanese subjects with PAC and PACG with a patent laser peripheral iridotomy were found to have plateau iris on UBM. No morphological difference was noted in the anterior segment of the eye between those with or without plateau iris. PMID:26170608

  17. THE VIEWING ANGLES OF BROAD ABSORPTION LINE VERSUS UNABSORBED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; De Breuck, C.

    2012-06-10

    It was recently shown that there is a significant difference in the radio spectral index distributions of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and unabsorbed quasars, with an overabundance of BAL quasars with steeper radio spectra. This result suggests that source orientation does play into the presence or absence of BAL features. In this paper, we provide more quantitative analysis of this result based on Monte Carlo simulations. While the relationship between viewing angle and spectral index does indeed contain a lot of scatter, the spectral index distributions are different enough to overcome that intrinsic variation. Utilizing two different models of the relationship between spectral index and viewing angle, the simulations indicate that the difference in spectral index distributions can be explained by allowing BAL quasar viewing angles to extend about 10 Degree-Sign farther from the radio jet axis than non-BAL sources, though both can be seen at small angles. These results show that orientation cannot be the only factor determining whether BAL features are present, but it does play a role.

  18. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  19. Different studies of the global pitch angle of the Milky Way's spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2015-07-01

    There are many published values for the pitch angle of individual spiral arms, and their wide distribution (from -3° to -28°) begs for various attempts for a single value. Each of four statistical methods used here yields a mean pitch angle in a small range, between -12° and -14° (Table 7, Fig. 2). The final result of our meta-analysis yields a mean global pitch angle in the Milky Way's spiral arms of -13.1° ± 0.6°.

  20. Automatic learning-based beam angle selection for thoracic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Marshall, Andrea; Purdie, Thomas G. Jaffray, David A.; Levinshtein, Alex; Hope, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Patricia; Pekar, Vladimir

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The treatment of thoracic cancer using external beam radiation requires an optimal selection of the radiation beam directions to ensure effective coverage of the target volume and to avoid unnecessary treatment of normal healthy tissues. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning is a lengthy process, which requires the planner to iterate between choosing beam angles, specifying dose–volume objectives and executing IMRT optimization. In thorax treatment planning, where there are no class solutions for beam placement, beam angle selection is performed manually, based on the planner’s clinical experience. The purpose of this work is to propose and study a computationally efficient framework that utilizes machine learning to automatically select treatment beam angles. Such a framework may be helpful for reducing the overall planning workload. Methods: The authors introduce an automated beam selection method, based on learning the relationships between beam angles and anatomical features. Using a large set of clinically approved IMRT plans, a random forest regression algorithm is trained to map a multitude of anatomical features into an individual beam score. An optimization scheme is then built to select and adjust the beam angles, considering the learned interbeam dependencies. The validity and quality of the automatically selected beams evaluated using the manually selected beams from the corresponding clinical plans as the ground truth. Results: The analysis included 149 clinically approved thoracic IMRT plans. For a randomly selected test subset of 27 plans, IMRT plans were generated using automatically selected beams and compared to the clinical plans. The comparison of the predicted and the clinical beam angles demonstrated a good average correspondence between the two (angular distance 16.8° ± 10°, correlation 0.75 ± 0.2). The dose distributions of the semiautomatic and clinical plans were equivalent in terms of primary target volume coverage and organ at risk sparing and were superior over plans produced with fixed sets of common beam angles. The great majority of the automatic plans (93%) were approved as clinically acceptable by three radiation therapy specialists. Conclusions: The results demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing a learning-based approach for automatic selection of beam angles in thoracic IMRT planning. The proposed method may assist in reducing the manual planning workload, while sustaining plan quality.

  1. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.

    2014-10-01

    We use Open Geospace General Circulation Model global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30° in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger geomagnetic activity. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to a larger geomagnetic response in the nightside ionosphere. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and Mach number, can have different geoeffectiveness, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  2. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D.; Raeder, J.

    2014-12-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric/ magnetotail/ ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fast foward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, hereafter IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30o in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along th Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail on both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in a larger geomagnetic activity there. By comparing IOS-2 and FPS, we find that, despite the IOS-2 having a larger Mach number, the FPS leads to larger geomagnetic responses in the ionosphere nightside. As a result, we conclude that IP shocks with similar upstream conditions, such as magnetic field, speed, density, and even Mach number, can be differently geoeffective, depending on their shock normal orientation.

  3. Comparison of lumbar spinal angle between normal body mass index and overweight young adults

    PubMed Central

    Taweetanalarp, Soontharee; Purepong, Nithima

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the upper and lower lumbar angles of normal body mass index and overweight young adults, and examined the relationships among body mass index, waist circumferences, and lumbar angles. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty participants aged 18–25 years were recruited and allocated to 2 groups (n=30 per group): normal body mass index (18.5–24.9?kg/m2) and overweight group (body mass index, ? 25.0?kg/m2). During lumbar angle measurement, the participants stood in a relaxed position with bare feet. The upper and lower lumbar angles of each participant were measured using a flexible ruler, and the angle calculated by the tangent method. The waist circumference was also measured. [Results] The mean lower lumbar angle in the overweight group was significantly greater than that of the normal body weight group. Moreover, only the lower lumbar angle was associated with a significant increase in the body mass index (r=0.28). Waist circumference showed no association with the lumbar angles. [Conclusion] This is the first study to suggest that increased body weight could cause lower lumbar angle deviation in young adults. Further studies should investigate individuals with symptomatic back pain or back dysfunction and the impact of body weight on lumbar spinal angles. PMID:26311979

  4. Bond Angles around a Tetravalent Central Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Robert Karl

    2014-06-01

    There are several practical algorithms for building molecular geometries based on bond lengths, bond angles, and torsional angles. There seem to be few discussions of the effect changing one angle has on the remaining bond angles depending upon local symmetry. For example, in methane, CH4, the H-C-H bond angles are all tetrahedral, i.e., ? = 109.4712206... deg. If one considers CH3F, a molecule with C3v symmetry, how are the H-C-F bond angles related to the H-C-H bond angles? This study derives the bond angle relationships for a 4-bonded central atom such as a saturated C atom. For a 4-bonded central atom (6 bond angles) the possible local point group symmetries are Td(0), D2d(1), C3v(1), C2v(1), D2(2), C2(3), Cs(3), and C1(4). The numbers in parentheses are the degrees of freedom, i.e., the number of angles which can be assigned arbitrary values with the remaining angles fixed by symmetry. Analytical formulas relating the bond angles for each of the eight possible symmetries are derived. Also, formulas have been derived for the five possible symmetries of a planar 4-bonded atom, D4h(0), D2h(1), C2v(pendant, 1), C2v(trapezoid, 2), and Cs(3); the three possible structures of planar 3-bonded atoms, (D3h(0), C2v (1), and Cs(2); the three possible symmetries of pyramidal 3-bonded atoms, C3v(1), Cs(2), and C1 (3); and the trivial case of 2-bonded atoms, D{?h}(0) and C2v(bent 1). There are also six distinct 4-bonded central atom structures with all the bonds directed into a hemisphere, C4v(1), C2v(2), C2(3), Cs(trapezoid 3), Cs(pendant 3), and C1(4), geometries rarely seen in molecules.

  5. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R. (inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An actuator includes a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a Stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine. The restraint link is releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft. A second embodiment incorporates a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crank fpr a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  6. Angle-resolved coherent optical wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, Ian P.

    2010-10-15

    A generalized approach is derived for the analysis of angle-resolved coherent optical wave mixing. Remarkably with this, a signal is calculated to remain efficiently generated for the arbitrary evolution of a quantum superposition state and for energy transfer spanning an ultrawide bandwidth in solution. This approach is compact and applies across matter processes and wave-mixing schemes. A high sensitivity and sampling rate are shown to be intrinsic to angle-resolved wave mixing and an angle-resolved six-wave mixing scheme is proposed for the mapping of molecular structure.

  7. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Frosch, R.A.; McDougal, A.R.

    1980-12-23

    A first embodiment incorporating an actuator including a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine is described. The restraint link is releasably supported against axial displacement by releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft and a second embodiment incorporating a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crankshafts for a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  8. Contact Angles and Surface Tension of Germanium-Silicon Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precise knowledge of material parameters is more and more important for improving crystal growth processes. Two important parameters are the contact (wetting) angle and the surface tension, determining meniscus shapes and surface-tension driven flows in a variety of methods (Czochralski, EFG, floating-zone, detached Bridgman growth). The sessile drop technique allows the measurement of both parameters simultaneously and has been used to measure the contact angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.3) alloys on various substrate materials. Fused quartz, Sapphire, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AIN, Si3N4, and polycrystalline CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effect of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. Measurements were performed both under dynamic vacuum and gas atmospheres (argon or forming gas), with temperatures up to 1100 C. In some experiments, the sample was processed for longer times, up to a week, to investigate any changes of the contact angle and/or surface tension due to slow reactions with the substrate. For pure Ge, stable contact angles were found for carbon-based substrates and for pBN, for Ge(1-x)Si(x) only for pBN. The highest wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with angles around 170deg. For the surface tension of Ge, the most reliable values resulted in gamma(T) = (591- 0.077 (T-T(sub m)) 10(exp -3)N/m. The temperature dependence of the surface tension showed similar values for Ge(1-x)Si(x), around -0.08 x 10(exp -3)N/m K, and a compositional dependence of 2.2 x 10(exp -3)N/m at%Si.

  9. MRO Mars Color Imager (MARCI) Investigation Primary Mission Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgett, K. S.; Cantor, B. A.; Malin, M. C.; Science; Operations Teams, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Mars Color Imager (MARCI) investigation was designed to recover the wide angle camera science objectives of the Mars Climate Orbiter MARCI which was destroyed upon arrival at Mars in 1999 and extend the daily meteorological coverage of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle investigation that was systematically conducted from March 1999 to October 2006. MARCI consists of two wide angle cameras, each with a 180° field of view. The first acquires data in 5 visible wavelength channels (420, 550, 600, 650, 720 nm), the second in 2 UV channels (260, 320 nm). Data have been acquired daily, except during spacecraft upsets, since 24 September 2006. From the MRO 250 to 315 km altitude orbit, inclined 93 degrees, visible wavelength images usually have a pixel scale of about 1 km at nadir and the UV data are at about 8 km per pixel. Data are obtained during every orbit on the day side of the planet from terminator to terminator. These provide a nearly continuous record of meteorological events and changes in surface frost and albedo patterns that span more than 1 martian year and extend the daily global record of such events documented by the MGS MOC. For a few weeks in September and October 2006, both camera systems operated simultaneously, providing views of weather events at about 1400 local time (MOC) and an hour later at about 1500 (MARCI). The continuous meteorological record, now spanning more than 5 Mars years, shows very repeatable weather from year to year with cloud and dust-raising events occurring in the same regions within about 2 weeks of their prior occurrence in previous years. This provides a measure of predictability ideal for assessing future landing sites, orbiter aerobraking plans, and conditions to be encountered by the current landed spacecraft on Mars. However, less predictable are planet-encircling dust events. MOC observed one in 2001, the next was observed by MARCI in 2007. These occurred at different times of year. While popularly known as global dust storms, the nomenclature is misleading, as in each case a storm did not raise dust nor saltate sand on a global basis. Instead, multiple regional storms created a dust haze which obscured much of the martian surface from viewpoints above the lower atmosphere, but in each case the dust opacity was never so high that one could not determine where dust was being raised and where it was not. Within weeks of the end of the 2001 and 2007 global dust events, martian weather returned to its normal, repeatable pattern, with one exception: occasionally thereafter, dust storms were observed in regions where dust-raising had not been seen in the previous years. In these cases, winds capable of raising dust likely occurred at that location every year, but only became visible following a planet-encircling dust event and deposition of dust on a surface that previously did not have sufficient dust to raise. Other MARCI results center on seasonal monitoring of water vapor in the atmosphere, particularly by taking advantage of the anti-correlation between ozone (observable using the UV channels) and water vapor. Owing to their higher spatial resolution than the MOC daily global coverage, details of seasonal polar cap retreat became more apparent, as with these data it is now possible to separate surface frost from ground-hugging fog which forms along the retreating cap edge. MARCI images and meteorological observations are posted weekly on the Internet for public consumption, and the data are archived every 6 months with the NASA Planetary Data System.

  10. A Model of Electrowetting, Reversed Electrowetting and Contact Angle Saturation

    E-print Network

    Klarman, Dan; Urbakh, Michael

    2011-01-01

    While electrowetting has many applications, it is limited at large voltages by contact angle saturation - a phenomenon that is still not well understood. We propose a generalized approach for electrowetting that, among other results, can shed new light on contact angle saturation. The model assumes the existence of a minimum (with respect to the contact angle) in the electric energy and accounts for a quadratic voltage dependence ~U^2 in the low-voltage limit, compatible with the Young-Lippmann formula, and a ~1/U^2 saturation at the high-voltage limit. Another prediction is the surprising possibility of a reversed electrowetting regime, in which the contact angle increases with applied voltage. By explicitly taking into account the effect of the counter-electrode, our model is shown to be applicable to several AC and DC experimental electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) setups. Several features seen in experiments compare favorably with our results. Furthermore, the AC frequency dependence of EWOD agrees quant...

  11. Parameter dependence of conic angle of nanofibres during electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhengping; Wu, Xiang-Fa; Gao, Xueqin; Jiang, Long; Zhao, Yong; Fong, Hao

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports the dependence of conic angle of nanofibres on the processing and material parameters during electrospinning. Solutions of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in dimethylformamide (DMF) with varied PAN concentrations were studied as the model systems, and they were electrospun into nanofibres at different high direct current (dc) voltages, flow rates and needle diameters. The dynamic and transient shear viscosities of the PAN/DMF solutions were characterized by a parallel-plate rheometer at varied shear rates. Rheological measurements showed that the PAN/DMF solutions behaved as Newtonian fluids at relatively low to medium shear rates, while the solutions with high PAN concentrations of 18 and 20 wt% exhibited a significant shear-thinning behaviour at high shear rates, especially in the case of transient shear mode. Experimental results indicated that at the electrostatic field of ~80 kV m-1 and needle inner diameter of 0.48 mm (22 gauge), the conic angle of the nanofibre envelope decreased from ~160° to ~75° with an increase in PAN concentration from 12 to 20 wt%; at the PAN concentration of 16 wt%, the conic angle increased nonlinearly from ~40° to ~160° with an increase in electric field from 50 to 140 kV m-1. In addition, experimental results showed that the needle inner diameter also noticeably influenced the conic angle. This study provided the experimental evidence useful for understanding the scaling properties of electrohydrodynamic jet motion for controllable electrospinning and process modelling.

  12. Study on the effect of nonuniform polarization angles on coherently combined fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guangsen; Xu, Xiaojun; Wu, Wuming; Ma, Haotong; Ning, Yu

    2015-06-01

    The effect of nonuniform polarization angles on coherently combined fiber laser beams is analyzed numerically by using statistical methods. Beam propagation factor (BPF) is used to evaluate the quality of the combined beam. The numerical analysis shows that the reduction in beam quality caused by nonuniform polarization angles is relatively small for a phased fiber laser array. The effect of the nonuniform polarization angles and the vacancy factor are decoupled. Enlarging the array number does not weaken the influence of polarization-angle fluctuation. The results above are valid for an array with a large number of lasers or an array consisting of lasers with polarization-angle fluctuation. The mechanism of beam quality degeneration due to nonuniform polarization angle is also discussed.

  13. Model-based ankle joint angle tracing by cuff electrode recordings of peroneal and tibial nerves.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Cheng, Hang-Shing

    2007-04-01

    The main goal of the present study was to estimate the ankle joint angle from the peroneal and tibial electroneurography (ENG) recordings. Two single-channel cuff electrodes for recording ENG were placed on the proximal part of rabbit peroneal and tibial nerves respectively and static positioning and ramp-and-hold stretches were performed to characterize the static and dynamic ENG responses. An ENG model, consisting of static and dynamic parts, was constructed to relate ENG to ankle angle trajectory and an inverse ENG model was derived to predict ankle angle. The results showed that the new model could accurately estimate large-range ankle angles during and after ramp-and-hold movements. Our study provides a basis for implementing joint angle tracing without using artificial angle sensors. PMID:17273879

  14. Noise of the SR-3 propeller model at 2 deg and 4 deg angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Jeracki, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The noise effect of operating supersonic tip speed propellers at angle of attack with respect to the incoming flow was determined. Increases in the maximum blade passage noise were observed for the propeller operating at angle of attack. The noise increase was not symmetrical with one wall of the wind tunnel having significantly more noise increase than the other wall. This was apparently the result of the rotational direction of the propeller. The lack of symmetry of the noise at angle of attack to the use of oppositely rotating propellers on opposite sides of an airplane fuselage as a way of minimizing the noise due to operation at angle of attack.

  15. Nanometer scale high-aspect-ratio trench etching at controllable angles using ballistic reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Cybart, Shane; Roediger, Peter; Ulin-Avila, Erick; Wu, Stephen; Wong, Travis; Dynes, Robert

    2012-11-30

    We demonstrate a low pressure reactive ion etching process capable of patterning nanometer scale angled sidewalls and three dimensional structures in photoresist. At low pressure the plasma has a large dark space region where the etchant ions have very large highly-directional mean free paths. Mounting the sample entirely within this dark space allows for etching at angles relative to the cathode with minimal undercutting, resulting in high-aspect ratio nanometer scale angled features. By reversing the initial angle and performing a second etch we create three-dimensional mask profiles.

  16. Nanofluid surface wettability through asymptotic contact angle.

    PubMed

    Vafaei, Saeid; Wen, Dongsheng; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2011-03-15

    This investigation introduces the asymptotic contact angle as a criterion to quantify the surface wettability of nanofluids and determines the variation of solid surface tensions with nanofluid concentration and nanoparticle size. The asymptotic contact angle, which is only a function of gas-liquid-solid physical properties, is independent of droplet size for ideal surfaces and can be obtained by equating the normal component of interfacial force on an axisymmetric droplet to that of a spherical droplet. The technique is illustrated for a series of bismuth telluride nanofluids where the variation of surface wettability is measured and evaluated by asymptotic contact angles as a function of nanoparticle size, concentration, and substrate material. It is found that the variation of nanofluid concentration, nanoparticle size, and substrate modifies both the gas-liquid and solid surface tensions, which consequently affects the force balance at the triple line, the contact angle, and surface wettability. PMID:21338112

  17. Limiting Emission Angle for Improved Solar Cell

    E-print Network

    that limiting the emission angle of a high quality GaAs does indeed enhance photon recycling and cell voltage of merit, zT, have led to an efficiency too low for widespread use. Thermoelectric effects

  18. SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This final research report summarizes the scientific work performed by The Aerospace Corporation on SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions. The period of performance was from June 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001.

  19. SPACECRAFT LOCALIZATION VIA ANGLE MEASUREMENTS FOR AUTONOMOUS

    E-print Network

    Garulli, Andrea

    SPACECRAFT LOCALIZATION VIA ANGLE MEASUREMENTS FOR AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION IN DEEP SPACE MISSIONS deals with spacecraft autonomous navigation in deep space missions. The considered problem requirement for this type of missions. Localization of spacecrafts is usually very accurate when GPS range

  20. [Risk factors of primary angle closure glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Cui, Hong-ping

    2012-01-01

    Primary angle closure glaucoma is one of the common diseases causing blindness. The pathogenesis inducing primary angle closure glaucoma has not been entirely clear. Traditionally identified risk factors include shallow anterior chamber, short axial length and thicker lens. Recent studies begin to pay attention to other new risk factors, not only including static anatomical factors, such as anterior chamber volume, iris curvature and lens vault, but also including dynamic changing factors, such as dynamic dilation of iris volume and choroidal effusion. Comprehensive assessment of these risk factors is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of angle closure glaucoma. This article briefly reviews research advances in risk factors of primary angle closure glaucoma. PMID:22490921

  1. Finding a covering triangulation whose maximum angle is provably small

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.A.; Park, J.K.

    1993-03-03

    Given a planar straight-line graph, we find a covering triangulation whose maximum angle is as small as possible. A covering triangulation is a triangulation whose vertex set contains the input vertex set and whose edge set contains the input edge set. Such a triangulation differs from the usual Steiner triangulation in that we may not add a Steiner vertex on any input edge. Covering triangulations provide a convenient method for triangulating multiple regions sharing a common boundary, as each region can be triangulated independently. As it is possible that no finite covering triangulation is optimal in terms of its maximum angle, we propose an approximation algorithm. Our algorithm produces a covering triangulation whose maximum angle [gamma] is probably close to [gamma][sub opt], a lower bound on the maximum angle in any covering triangulation of the input graph. Note that we must have [gamma] [le] 3[gamma][sub opt], since we always have [gamma][sub opt] [ge] [pi]/3 and no triangulation can contain an angle of size greater than [pi]. We prove something significantly stronger. We show that [pi] [minus] [gamma] [ge] ([pi] [minus] [gamma][sub opt])/6, i.e., our [gamma] is not much closer to [pi] than is [gamma][sub opt]. This result represents the first nontrivial bound on a covering triangulation's maximum angle. We require a subroutine for the following problem: Given a polygon with holes, find a Steiner triangulation whose maximum angle is bounded away from [pi]. No angle larger than 8[pi]/9 is sufficient for the bound on [gamma] claimed above. The number of Steiner vertices added by our algorithm and its running time are highly dependent on the corresponding bounds for the subroutine. Given an n-vertex planar straight-line graph, we require O(n + S(n)) Steiner vertices and O(n log n + T(n)) time, where S(n) is the number of Steiner vertices added by the subroutine and T(n) is its running time for an O(n)-vertex polygon with holes.

  2. Finding a covering triangulation whose maximum angle is provably small

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.A.; Park, J.K.

    1993-03-03

    Given a planar straight-line graph, we find a covering triangulation whose maximum angle is as small as possible. A covering triangulation is a triangulation whose vertex set contains the input vertex set and whose edge set contains the input edge set. Such a triangulation differs from the usual Steiner triangulation in that we may not add a Steiner vertex on any input edge. Covering triangulations provide a convenient method for triangulating multiple regions sharing a common boundary, as each region can be triangulated independently. As it is possible that no finite covering triangulation is optimal in terms of its maximum angle, we propose an approximation algorithm. Our algorithm produces a covering triangulation whose maximum angle {gamma} is probably close to {gamma}{sub opt}, a lower bound on the maximum angle in any covering triangulation of the input graph. Note that we must have {gamma} {le} 3{gamma}{sub opt}, since we always have {gamma}{sub opt} {ge} {pi}/3 and no triangulation can contain an angle of size greater than {pi}. We prove something significantly stronger. We show that {pi} {minus} {gamma} {ge} ({pi} {minus} {gamma}{sub opt})/6, i.e., our {gamma} is not much closer to {pi} than is {gamma}{sub opt}. This result represents the first nontrivial bound on a covering triangulation`s maximum angle. We require a subroutine for the following problem: Given a polygon with holes, find a Steiner triangulation whose maximum angle is bounded away from {pi}. No angle larger than 8{pi}/9 is sufficient for the bound on {gamma} claimed above. The number of Steiner vertices added by our algorithm and its running time are highly dependent on the corresponding bounds for the subroutine. Given an n-vertex planar straight-line graph, we require O(n + S(n)) Steiner vertices and O(n log n + T(n)) time, where S(n) is the number of Steiner vertices added by the subroutine and T(n) is its running time for an O(n)-vertex polygon with holes.

  3. A model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR imaging sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Russo, Leonard E.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2005-10-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to develop a high-fidelity model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR Imaging Sensor systems. 3D Flash LADAR is the latest evolution of laser radar systems and provides unique capability in its ability to provide high-resolution LADAR imagery upon a single laser pulse; rather than constructing an image from multiple pulses as with conventional scanning LADAR systems. However, accurate methods to model and simulate performance from these 3D LADAR systems have been lacking, relying upon either single pixel LADAR performance or extrapolating from passive detection FPA performance. The model and simulation developed and reported here is expressly for 3D angle-angle-range imaging LADAR systems. To represent an accurate "real world" type environment, this model and simulation accounts for: 1) laser pulse shape; 2) detector array size; 3) atmospheric transmission; 4) atmospheric backscatter; 5) atmospheric turbulence; 6) obscurants, and; 7) obscurant path length. The angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR model and simulation accounts for all pixels in the detector array by modeling and accounting for the non-uniformity of each individual pixel in the array. Here, noise sources are modeled based upon their pixel-to-pixel statistical variation. A cumulative probability function is determined by integrating the normal distribution with respect to detector gain, and, for each pixel, a random number is compared with the cumulative probability function resulting in a different gain for each pixel within the array. In this manner very accurate performance is determined pixel-by-pixel. Model outputs are in the form of 3D images of the far-field distribution across the array as intercepted by the target, gain distribution, power distribution, average signal-to-noise, and probability of detection across the array. Other outputs include power distribution from a target, signal-to-noise vs. range, probability of target detection and identification, and NEP vs. gain.

  4. A model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash ladar imaging sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Russo, Leonard E.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-11-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to develop a high-fidelity model and simulation to predict the performance of angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR Imaging Sensor systems. 3D Flash LADAR is the latest evolution of laser radar systems and provides unique capability in its ability to provide high-resolution LADAR imagery upon a single laser pulse; rather than constructing an image from multiple pulses as with conventional scanning LADAR systems. However, accurate methods to model and simulate performance from these 3D LADAR systems have been lacking, relying upon either single pixel LADAR performance or extrapolating from passive detection FPA performance. The model and simulation developed and reported here is expressly for 3D angle-angle-range imaging LADAR systems. To represent an accurate "real world" type environment, this model and simulation accounts for: 1) laser pulse shape; 2) detector array size; 3) atmospheric transmission; 4) atmospheric backscatter; 5) atmospheric turbulence; 6) obscurants, and; 7) obscurant path length. The angle-angle-range 3D flash LADAR model and simulation accounts for all pixels in the detector array by modeling and accounting for the non-uniformity of each individual pixel in the array. Here, noise sources are modeled based upon their pixel-to-pixel statistical variation. A cumulative probability function is determined by integrating the normal distribution with respect to detector gain, and, for each pixel, a random number is compared with the cumulative probability function resulting in a different gain for each pixel within the array. In this manner very accurate performance is determined pixel-by-pixel. Model outputs are in the form of 3D images of the far-field distribution across the array as intercepted by the target, gain distribution, power distribution, average signal-to-noise, and probability of detection across the array. Other outputs include power distribution from a target, signal-to-noise vs. range, probability of target detection and identification, and NEP vs. gain.

  5. Eliminating Deadbands In Resistive Angle Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.; Allen, Russell O.; Marchetto, Carl A.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed shaft-angle-measuring circuit provides continuous indication of angle of rotation from 0 degree to 360 degrees. Sensing elements are two continuous-rotation potentiometers, and associated circuitry eliminates deadband that occurs when wiper contact of potentiometer crosses end contacts near 0 degree position of circular resistive element. Used in valve-position indicator or similar device in which long operating life and high angular precision not required.

  6. Nucleation of small-angle boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N.; Wilsdorf, D.K.

    1996-12-01

    The internal stresses induced by the strain gradients in an array of lattice cells delineated by low-angle dislocation boundaries are partially relieved by the creation of new low-angle boundaries. This is shown to be a first-order transition, the new boundaries having finite misorientations. The calculated misorientations both of the new boundaries and of the existing boundaries which provoke the transition agree well with observations.

  7. New angles on D-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Breckenridge, J.C.; Michaud, G.; Myers, R.C.

    1997-10-01

    A low-energy background field solution is presented which describes several D-membranes oriented at angles with respect to one another. The mass and charge densities for this configuration are computed and found to saturate the Bogomol{close_quote}nyi-Prasad-Sommerfeld bound, implying the preservation of one-quarter of the supersymmetries. T duality is exploited to construct new solutions with nontrivial angles from the basic one. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Harnessing Genetic Variation in Leaf Angle to Increase Productivity of Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Truong, Sandra K; McCormick, Ryan F; Rooney, William L; Mullet, John E

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency with which a plant intercepts solar radiation is determined primarily by its architecture. Understanding the genetic regulation of plant architecture and how changes in architecture affect performance can be used to improve plant productivity. Leaf inclination angle, the angle at which a leaf emerges with respect to the stem, is a feature of plant architecture that influences how a plant canopy intercepts solar radiation. Here we identify extensive genetic variation for leaf inclination angle in the crop plant Sorghum bicolor, a C4 grass species used for the production of grain, forage, and bioenergy. Multiple genetic loci that regulate leaf inclination angle were identified in recombinant inbred line populations of grain and bioenergy sorghum. Alleles of sorghum dwarf-3, a gene encoding a P-glycoprotein involved in polar auxin transport, are shown to change leaf inclination angle by up to 34° (0.59 rad). The impact of heritable variation in leaf inclination angle on light interception in sorghum canopies was assessed using functional-structural plant models and field experiments. Smaller leaf inclination angles caused solar radiation to penetrate deeper into the canopy, and the resulting redistribution of light is predicted to increase the biomass yield potential of bioenergy sorghum by at least 3%. These results show that sorghum leaf angle is a heritable trait regulated by multiple loci and that genetic variation in leaf angle can be used to modify plant architecture to improve sorghum crop performance. PMID:26323882

  9. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  10. Impact Angle Control of Interplanetary Shock Geoeffectiveness

    E-print Network

    Oliveira, D M

    2015-01-01

    We use OpenGGCM global MHD simulations to study the nightside magnetospheric, magnetotail, and ionospheric responses to interplanetary (IP) fa st forward shocks. Three cases are presented in this study: two inclined oblique shocks, here after IOS-1 and IOS-2, where the latter has a Mach number twice stronger than the former. Both shocks have impact angles of 30$^o$ in relation to the Sun-Earth line. Lastly, we choose a frontal perpendicular shock, FPS, whose shock normal is along the Sun-Earth line, with the same Mach number as IOS-1. We find that, in the IOS-1 case, due to the north-south asymmetry, the magnetotail is deflected southward, leading to a mild compression. The geomagnetic activity observed in the nightside ionosphere is then weak. On the other hand, in the head-on case, the FPS compresses the magnetotail from both sides symmetrically. This compression triggers a substorm allowing a larger amount of stored energy in the magnetotail to be released to the nightside ionosphere, resulting in stronger...

  11. LDEF yaw and pitch angle estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Gebauer, Linda

    1992-01-01

    Quantification of the LDEF yaw and pitch misorientations is crucial to the knowledge of atomic oxygen exposure of samples placed on LDEF. Video camera documentation of the LDEF spacecraft prior to grapple attachment, atomic oxygen shadows on experiment trays and longerons, and a pinhole atomic oxygen camera placed on LDEF provided sources of documentation of the yaw and pitch misorientation. Based on uncertainty-weighted averaging of data, the LDEF yaw offset was found to be 8.1 plus or minus 0.6 degrees, allowing higher atomic oxygen exposure of row 12 than initially anticipated. The LDEF pitch angle offset was found to be 0.8 plus or minus 0.4 degrees, such that the space end was tipped forward toward the direction of travel. The resulting consequences of the yaw and pitch misorientation of LDEF on the atomic oxygen fluence is a factor of 2.16 increase for samples located on row 12, and a factor of 1.18 increase for samples located on the space end compared to that which would be expected for perfect orientation.

  12. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, David J. (Principal Investigator)

    MISR views the sunlit Earth simultaneously at nine widely spaced angles and provides ongoing global coverage with high spatial detail. Its imagery is carefully calibrated to provide accurate measures of the brightness, contrast, and color of reflected sunlight. MISR provides new types of information for scientists studying Earth's climate, such as the regional and global distribution of different types of atmospheric particles and aerosols. The change in reflection at different view angles provides the means to distinguish aerosol types, cloud forms, and land surface cover. Combined with stereoscopic techniques, this enables construction of 3-D cloud models and estimation of the total amount of sunlight reflected by Earth's diverse environments. MISR was built for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. It is part of NASA's first Earth Observing System (EOS) spacecraft, the Terra spacecraft, which was launched into polar orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base on December 18, 1999. MISR has been continuously providing data since February 24, 2000. [Mission Objectives] The MISR instrument acquires systematic multi-angle measurements for global monitoring of top-of-atmosphere and surface albedos and for measuring the shortwave radiative properties of aerosols, clouds, and surface scenes in order to characterize their impact on the Earth's climate. The Earth's climate is constantly changing -- as a consequence of both natural processes and human activities. Scientists care a great deal about even small changes in Earth's climate, since they can affect our comfort and well-being, and possibly our survival. A few years of below-average rainfall, an unusually cold winter, or a change in emissions from a coal-burning power plant, can influence the quality of life of people, plants, and animals in the region involved. The goal of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is to increase our understanding of the climate changes that are occurring on our planet, and the reasons for these changes, so we are better equipped to anticipate and prepare for the future. The MISR instrument is a part of EOS. Its role is to measure the amount of sunlight scattered in different directions under natural conditions. These measurements will help quantify the amount of solar energy that heats the Earth's surface and atmosphere, and the changes that occur in them over the lifetime of the MISR instrument. From the MISR observations, we are also learning more about those components of the Earth's environment that scatter sunlight: particles in the atmosphere, the planet's surface, and clouds. MISR monitors changes in surface reflection properties, in atmospheric aerosol content and composition, and in cloudiness. Scientists use these data to study land use changes, air pollution, volcanic eruptions, as well as processes such as desertification, deforestation, and soil erosion. As part of the EOS program, computer models that predict future climate will be improved by the results of these studies. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=2000-02-24; Stop_Date=] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  13. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  14. Hip angle induced modulation of H reflex amplitude, latency and duration in spinal cord injured humans

    E-print Network

    Hip angle induced modulation of H reflex amplitude, latency and duration in spinal cord injured Abstract Objectives: To investigate the modulation of the soleus H reflex in spinal cord injured (SCI) subjects resulting from imposed changes in hip angle and to establish whether changes in H reflex amplitude

  15. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on thermocapillary droplet actuation Jian Z. Chen

    E-print Network

    Troian, Sandra M.

    Effect of contact angle hysteresis on thermocapillary droplet actuation Jian Z. Chen Department-dimensional droplet driven by thermocapillary stresses including contact angle hysteresis. The results of this study highlight the critical role of chemical or mechanical hysteresis and the need to reduce this retentive force

  16. Acquisition and analysis of angle-beam wavefield data

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Levine, Ross M.; Chen, Xin; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2014-02-18

    Angle-beam ultrasonic testing is a common practical technique used for nondestructive evaluation to detect, locate, and characterize a variety of material defects and damage. Greater understanding of the both the incident wavefield produced by an angle-beam transducer and the subsequent scattering from a variety of defects and geometrical features is anticipated to increase the reliability of data interpretation. The focus of this paper is on acquiring and analyzing propagating waves from angle-beam transducers in simple, defect-free plates as a first step in the development of methods for flaw characterization. Unlike guided waves, which excite the plate throughout its thickness, angle-beam bulk waves bounce back and forth between the plate surfaces, resulting in the well-known multiple “skips” or “V-paths.” The experimental setup consists of a laser vibrometer mounted on an XYZ scanning stage, which is programmed to move point-to-point on a rectilinear grid to acquire waveform data. Although laser vibrometry is now routinely used to record guided waves for which the frequency content is below 1 MHz, it is more challenging to acquire higher frequency bulk waves in the 1–10 MHz range. Signals are recorded on the surface of an aluminum plate that were generated from a 5 MHz, 65° refracted angle, shear wave transducer-wedge combination. Data are analyzed directly in the x-t domain, via a slant stack Radon transform in the ?-p (offset time-slowness) domain, and via a 2-D Fourier transform in the ?-k domain, thereby enabling identification of specific arrivals and modes. Results compare well to those expected from a simple ray tracing analysis except for the unexpected presence of a strong Rayleigh wave.

  17. Method on camouflaged target recognition using the angle of ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuansun, Xiao-bo; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Yan-hua; Li, Zhao-zhao

    2015-10-01

    Using polarimetric information of the camouflaged target surface to identify camouflage has been a hot research area in camouflage detecting. The main method is to use the difference in the degree of polarization(DOP) between background and target to add the contrast ratio of them. The measurement of the DOP has some requirements on the intensity of reflected radiation. In case of low reflected radiation intensity, the difference in the DOP for different materials is not so distinguishable. In addition, the linear degree of polarization is largely under the effects of detection angle and surface roughness, so it is hard to differentiate the degree of polarization when the targets with similar surface roughness are detected at the same detection angle. By analyzing the elements affecting the reflected electromagnetic radiation amplitudes and phase on the camouflaged target surface, this article makes a research on the polarization character of reflected radiation A method on camouflaged target recognition directly or indirectly by taking the angle of ellipsometry (AOE) imaging under the linear polarized light. The function model of the angle of incidence, complex refractive index and AOE was modeled, then the model was simulated by MATLAB and the results showed it can describe the distribution properties of AOE. A new thought for the approach of identifying camouflaged target recognition by detecting polarimetric information was proposed, and it has a deep theoretical and practical significance in camouflaged target recognition.

  18. Small-angle scattering and quasiclassical approximation beyond leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krachkov, P. A.; Lee, R. N.; Milstein, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper we examine the accuracy of the quasiclassical approach on the example of small-angle electron elastic scattering. Using the quasiclassical approach, we derive the differential cross section and the Sherman function for arbitrary localized potential at high energy. These results are exact in the atomic charge number and correspond to the leading and the next-to-leading high-energy small-angle asymptotics for the scattering amplitude. Using the small-angle expansion of the exact amplitude of electron elastic scattering in the Coulomb field, we derive the cross section and the Sherman function with a relative accuracy ?2 and ?1, respectively (? is the scattering angle). We show that the correction of relative order ?2 to the cross section, as well as that of relative order ?1 to the Sherman function, originates not only from the contribution of large angular momenta l ? 1, but also from that of l ? 1. This means that, in general, it is not possible to go beyond the accuracy of the next-to-leading quasiclassical approximation without taking into account the non-quasiclassical terms.

  19. Electron pitch-angle scattering by magnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, A. N.; Daligault, J.; Gary, S. P.; Lemons, D.; Liu, K.; Winske, D.

    2011-10-01

    Fluxes of relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's radiation belts and exhausted by loss-cone pitch-angle scattering through interaction with various magnetospheric plasma waves. The high temporal variability of the fluxes is poorly understood and routinely modeled using quasi-linear pitch-angle diffusion theory, which is strictly only applicable for rather low ratios ? of the wave energy to the earth's magnetic field energy. Here, we present a novel electron pitch-angle scattering theory valid for arbitrary ?. We concentrate on the simplest case of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, approximated with a set of time-independent transverse magnetic fluctuations, and obtain a general integro-differential evolution equation for a pitch-angle distribution f. If f evolves weakly on the correlation time scales, the equation reduces to a Fokker-Planck diffusion equation with a time-dependent diffusion coefficient D. Quasi-linear theory is recovered as a first-order truncation of the asymptotic expansion in ? of electron equations of motion and breaks down for ? >=10-4. In particular, D changes scaling around this point from D ~ ? to D ~?{ ?} and is found to be 16 times smaller that the quasi-linear result for ? =10-2 at time t = 30 electron gyroperiods. Work conducted as part of the DREAM project at LANL.

  20. Oscillations of relative inclination angles in compact extrasolar planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette C.; Adams, Fred C.

    2016-01-01

    The Kepler mission has detected dozens of compact planetary systems with more than four transiting planets. This sample provides a collection of close-packed planetary systems with relatively little spread in the inclination angles of the inferred orbits. A large fraction of the observational sample contains limited multiplicity, begging the question whether there is a true diversity of multitransiting systems, or if some systems merely possess high mutual inclinations, allowing them to appear as single-transiting systems in a transit-based survey. This paper begins an exploration of the effectiveness of dynamical mechanisms in exciting orbital inclination within exoplanetary systems of this class. For these tightly packed systems, we determine that the orbital inclination angles are not spread out appreciably through self-excitation. In contrast, the two Kepler multiplanet systems with additional non-transiting planets are susceptible to oscillations of their inclination angles, which means their currently observed configurations could be due to planet-planet interactions alone. We also provide constraints and predictions for the expected transit duration variations for each planet. In these multiplanet compact Kepler systems, oscillations of their inclination angles are remarkably hard to excite; as a result, they tend to remain continually mutually transiting (CMT-stable). We study this issue further by augmenting the planet masses and determining the enhancement factor required for oscillations to move the systems out of transit. The oscillations of inclination found here inform the recently suggested dichotomy in the sample of Solar systems observed by Kepler.

  1. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  2. Radiographic Relevance of the Distal Medial Cuneiform Angle in Hallux Valgus Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Daniel J; Smith, Abigail; Fowler, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The angle formed by the distal articular facet of the medial cuneiform has been evaluated and discussed by various investigators. However, no consistent method has been available to radiograph and measure this entity. The wide variability of the angle is not conducive to comparative analysis. Additionally, investigators have noted that the angles observed (obliquity) vary greatly because of changes in radiographic angle, foot position, rotation of the first ray, and declination of the first metatarsal. Recognizing that these variables exist, we propose a reproducible assessment using digital radiography and application of deformity of correction principles. Our results have indicated a mean distal medial cuneiform angle of 20.69° in normal feet, 23.51° with moderate hallux valgus, and 20.41° with severe hallux valgus deformity. The radiograph beam was kept at 15° from the coronal plane. An inverse relationship was found between the distal medial cuneiform angle and bunion severity. This was in contrast to our expected hypothesis. The overall angle of the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform did, however, correlate with the severity of the bunion deformity (p < .000). The obliquity values and intermetatarsal angles changed in direct relationship to the radiographic projection angle. This illustrates the importance of using standardized radiographic projection angles. We conclude that the 1-dimensional standard anteroposterior radiograph with assessment of the distal medial cuneiform angle cannot adequately demonstrate the pathologic features of hallux valgus. A better indicator appears to be the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform angle. This pathologic entity is a 3-dimensional one that incorporates the joint morphology of the first ray, triplane osseous positioning, and soft tissue imbalances. Perhaps, 3-dimensional computed tomography imaging will provide better insight into this entity. PMID:26359620

  3. Contact-angle of water drop on a sloped water repellent soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arye, Gilboa; Bachmann, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Soil water repellency is a well-known phenomenon worldwide and currently well documented in the scientific literature. Most methods used to characterize the magnitude and/or persistency of soil water repellency is directly or indirectly related to the initial advancing contact angle at the solid-liquid-vapor interface. These methods are commonly involved by placing a water (or solution) drops on horizontal surface of water repellent soil (WRS)particles attached to a plane surface. Under natural conditions, however, a soil surface layer is mostly sloped due to micro and/or macro topography. Therefore, the formation of advancing contact angle (downhill) and receding contact angle (uphill) should be considered, rather than a unique value of the contact angle. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angle values is defined as the contact angle hysteresis, commonly attributed to surface roughness and/or chemical heterogeneities. For a given tilt angle, a water drop exceeding a critical volume will slide downhill. Alternatively, for a given drop volume, a critical sliding angle can be defined. Measurements of advancing, receding and sliding angles on sloped WRS is indispensable for our understanding on water adhesion due to hysteresis and may provide critical values for predicting the initiation of water runoff in sloped landscapes on the micro and macro scales of WRS. Accordingly, the main objective of this study was to measure the advancing and receding contact angles on a sloped WRS as a function of: i) water drop volume, ii) particle size distribution and iii) surface slope. The measurements of contact angles on sloped WRS were taken with an advanced goniometer microscope (OCA20, DataPhysics) with external tilting device and SCA20 software for analyzing contact angles highly resolved with respect to time and spatial scales. The results obtained will be presented and the rolling-drop-criteria will be discussed.

  4. The angular distributions of ultraviolet spectral irradiance at different solar elevation angles under clear sky conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Hu, LiWen; Wang, Fang; Gao, YanYan; Zheng, Yang; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the angular distributions of UVA, UVB, and effective UV for erythema and vitamin D (vitD) synthesis, the UV spectral irradiances were measured at ten inclined angles (from 0° to 90°) and seven azimuths (from 0° to 180°) at solar elevation angle (SEA) that ranged from 18.8° to 80° in Shanghai (31.22° N, 121.55° E) under clear sky and the albedo of ground was 0.1. The results demonstrated that in the mean azimuths and with the back to the sun, the UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances increased with the inclined angles and an increase in SEA. When facing toward the sun at 0°-60° inclined angles, the UVA first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA; at other inclined angles, the UVA increased with SEA. At 0°-40° inclined angles, the UVB and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA, and their maximums were achieved at SEA 68.7°; at other inclined angles, the above three irradiances increased with an increase in SEA. The maximum UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances were achieved at an 80° inclined angle at SEA 80° (the highest in our measurements); the cumulative exposure of the half day achieved the maximum at a 60° inclined angle, but not on the horizontal. This study provides support for the assessment of human skin sun exposure. PMID:25994798

  5. Time-optimal rendezvous transfer trajectory for restricted cone-angle range solar sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jing; Gong, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Fang-Hua; Li, Jun-Feng

    2014-10-01

    The advantage of solar sails in deep space exploration is that no fuel consumption is required. The heliocentric distance is one factor influencing the solar radiation pressure force exerted on solar sails. In addition, the solar radiation pressure force is also related to the solar sail orientation with respect to the sunlight direction. For an ideal flat solar sail, the cone angle between the sail normal and the sunlight direction determines the magnitude and direction of solar radiation pressure force. In general, the cone angle can change from 0° to 90°. However, in practical applications, a large cone angle may reduce the efficiency of solar radiation pressure force and there is a strict requirement on the attitude control. Usually, the cone angle range is restricted less more than an acute angle (for example, not more than 40°) in engineering practice. In this paper, the time-optimal transfer trajectory is designed over a restricted range of the cone angle, and an indirect method is used to solve the two point boundary value problem associated to the optimal control problem. Relevant numerical examples are provided to compare with the case of an unrestricted case, and the effects of different maximum restricted cone angles are discussed. The results indicate that (1) for the condition of a restricted cone-angle range the transfer time is longer than that for the unrestricted case and (2) the optimal transfer time increases as the maximum restricted cone angle decreases.

  6. The angular distributions of ultraviolet spectral irradiance at different solar elevation angles under clear sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hu, LiWen; Wang, Fang; Gao, YanYan; Zheng, Yang; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the angular distributions of UVA, UVB, and effective UV for erythema and vitamin D (vitD) synthesis, the UV spectral irradiances were measured at ten inclined angles (from 0° to 90°) and seven azimuths (from 0° to 180°) at solar elevation angle (SEA) that ranged from 18.8° to 80° in Shanghai (31.22° N, 121.55° E) under clear sky and the albedo of ground was 0.1. The results demonstrated that in the mean azimuths and with the back to the sun, the UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances increased with the inclined angles and an increase in SEA. When facing toward the sun at 0°-60° inclined angles, the UVA first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA; at other inclined angles, the UVA increased with SEA. At 0°-40° inclined angles, the UVB and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA, and their maximums were achieved at SEA 68.7°; at other inclined angles, the above three irradiances increased with an increase in SEA. The maximum UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances were achieved at an 80° inclined angle at SEA 80° (the highest in our measurements); the cumulative exposure of the half day achieved the maximum at a 60° inclined angle, but not on the horizontal. This study provides support for the assessment of human skin sun exposure.

  7. Flight test of the X-29A at high angle of attack: Flight dynamics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey E.; Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has flight tested two X-29A aircraft at low and high angles of attack. The high-angle-of-attack tests evaluate the feasibility of integrated X-29A technologies. More specific objectives focus on evaluating the high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, defining multiaxis controllability limits, and determining the maximum pitch-pointing capability. A pilot-selectable gain system allows examination of tradeoffs in airplane stability and maneuverability. Basic fighter maneuvers provide qualitative evaluation. Bank angle captures permit qualitative data analysis. This paper discusses the design goals and approach for high-angle-of-attack control laws and provides results from the envelope expansion and handling qualities testing at intermediate angles of attack. Comparisons of the flight test results to the predictions are made where appropriate. The pitch rate command structure of the longitudinal control system is shown to be a valid design for high-angle-of-attack control laws. Flight test results show that wing rock amplitude was overpredicted and aileron and rudder effectiveness were underpredicted. Flight tests show the X-29A airplane to be a good aircraft up to 40 deg angle of attack.

  8. Low back pain and lumbar angles in Turkish coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya, S.; Ozdolap, S.; Gumustas, S.; Koc, U.

    2007-02-15

    This study was designed to assess the incidence of low back pain among Turkish coal miners and to investigate the relationship between angles of the lumbar spine and low back pain in coal miners. Fifty underground workers (Group I) and 38 age-matched surface workers (Group II) were included in the study. All the subjects were asked about low back pain in the past 5 years. The prevalence of low back pain was higher in Group I than in Group II (78.0%, 32.4%, respectively, P {lt} 0.001). The results of the study showed that low back pain occurred in 78.0% of Turkish coal miners. Although the nature of the occupation may have influenced coal miners' lumbar spinal curvature, lumbar angles are not a determinant for low back pain in this population. Further extensive studies involving ergonomic measurements are needed to validate our results for Turkish coal mining industry.

  9. Simultaneous Multi-angle Measurements of Plasma Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    We report the results from a recent series of experiments employing the HAARP HF transmitter to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at HAARP, the Super DARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control and suppression of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI). This allows the isolation of ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. For the first time, plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region displayed marked but contemporaneous differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Line (OPL) spectra, rarely observed in past experiments, occurred with sufficient regularity for experimentation. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  10. NORAD LOOK ANGLES AND PIO SATELLITE PACKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ANONYMOUS

    1994-01-01

    This program package consists of two programs. First is the NORAD Look Angles Program, which computes satellite look angles (azimuth, elevation, and range) as well as the subsatellite points (latitude, longitude, and height). The second program in this package is the PIO Satellite Program, which computes sighting directions, visibility times, and the maximum elevation angle attained during each pass of an earth-orbiting satellite. Computations take into consideration the observing location and the effect of the earth's shadow on the satellite visibility. Input consists of a magnetic tape prepared by the NORAD Look Angles Program and punched cards containing reference Julian date, right ascension, declination, mean sidereal time at zero hours universal time of the reference date, and daily changes of these quantities. Output consists of a tabulated listing of the satellite's rise and set times, direction, and the maximum elevation angle visible from each observing location. This program has been implemented on the GE 635. The program Assembler code can easily be replaced by FORTRAN statements.

  11. Rapid emission angle selection for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Yang Wenjun; Wu Xiaodong

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The authors present a rapid emission angle selection (REAS) method that enables the efficient selection of the azimuthal shield angle for rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). The REAS method produces a Pareto curve from which a potential RSBT user can select a treatment plan that balances the tradeoff between delivery time and tumor dose conformity. Methods: Two cervical cancer patients were considered as test cases for the REAS method. The RSBT source considered was a Xoft Axxent{sup TM} electronic brachytherapy source, partially shielded with 0.5 mm of tungsten, which traveled inside a tandem intrauterine applicator. Three anchor RSBT plans were generated for each case using dose-volume optimization, with azimuthal shield emission angles of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 270 Degree-Sign . The REAS method converts the anchor plans to treatment plans for all possible emission angles by combining neighboring beamlets to form beamlets for larger emission angles. Treatment plans based on exhaustive dose-volume optimization (ERVO) and exhaustive surface optimization (ERSO) were also generated for both cases. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that that high-risk clinical target volume D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. Results: By choosing three azimuthal emission angles out of 32 potential angles, the REAS method performs about 10 times faster than the ERVO method. By setting D{sub 90} to 85-100 Gy{sub 10}, the delivery times used by REAS generated plans are 21.0% and 19.5% less than exhaustive surface optimized plans used by the two clinical cases. By setting the delivery time budget to 5-25 and 10-30 min/fx, respectively, for two the cases, the D{sub 90} contributions for REAS are improved by 5.8% and 5.1% compared to the ERSO plans. The ranges used in this comparison were selected in order to keep both D{sub 90} and the delivery time within acceptable limits. Conclusions: The REAS method enables efficient RSBT treatment planning and delivery and provides treatment plans with comparable quality to those generated by exhaustive replanning with dose-volume optimization.

  12. Measurement of Capillary Radius and Contact Angle within Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Saitej; Dharmarajan, Ramanathan; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The pore radius (i.e., capillary radius) and contact angle determine the capillary pressure generated in a porous medium. The most common method to determine these two parameters is through measurement of the capillary pressure generated by a reference liquid (i.e., a liquid with near-zero contact angle) and a test liquid. The rate of rise technique, commonly used to determine the capillary pressure, results in significant uncertainties. In this study, we utilize a recently developed technique for independently measuring the capillary pressure and permeability to determine the equivalent minimum capillary radii and contact angle of water within micropillar wick structures. In this method, the experimentally measured dryout threshold of a wick structure at different wicking lengths is fit to Darcy's law to extract the maximum capillary pressure generated by the test liquid. The equivalent minimum capillary radii of different wick geometries are determined by measuring the maximum capillary pressures generated using n-hexane as the working fluid. It is found that the equivalent minimum capillary radius is dependent on the diameter of pillars and the spacing between pillars. The equivalent capillary radii of micropillar wicks determined using the new method are found to be up to 7 times greater than the current geometry-based first-order estimates. The contact angle subtended by water at the walls of the micropillars is determined by measuring the capillary pressure generated by water within the arrays and the measured capillary radii for the different geometries. This mean contact angle of water is determined to be 54.7°. PMID:26538412

  13. Large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beenakker, Wim; Passarino, Giampiero

    1998-04-01

    A critical assessment is given of the theoretical uncertainty in the predicted cross-sections for large-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP 1, with or without t-channel subtraction. To this end a detailed comparison is presented of the results obtained with the programs ALIBABA and TOPAZ0. Differences in the implementation of the radiative corrections and the effect of missing higher-order terms are critically discussed. © 1998

  14. Small-angle neutron scattering from micellar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswal, V. K.; Goyal, P. S.

    2004-07-01

    Micellar solutions are the suspension of the colloidal aggregates of the sur- factant molecules in aqueous solutions. The structure (shape and size) and the interaction of these aggregates, referred to as micelles, depend on the molecular architecture of the surfactant molecule, presence of additives and the solution conditions such as tempera- ture, concentration etc. This paper gives the usefulness of small-angle neutron scattering to the study of micellar solutions with some of our recent results.

  15. Optically derived elevation angle dependence of fading for satellite PCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akturan, R.; Vogel, Wolf J.

    1995-01-01

    Images of urban Japan taken vertically through a 180 deg fisheye lens were analyzed to derive, as a function of elevation the fraction of sky that is clear, shadowed by trees, or blocked by buildings. At 32 deg elevation, results match those derived from satellite measurements fit to a 3-state fade model. Using the same model, for the first time the elevation angle dependence of mobile satellite fading is predicted.

  16. High frequency impedance of small angle tapers and collimaters

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Pdobedov, B.

    2010-10-04

    Collimators and transitions in accelerator vacuum chambers often include small-angle tapering to lower the wakefields generated by the beam. While the low-frequency impedance is well described by Yokoya's formula (for axisymmetric geometry), much less is known about the behavior of the impedance in the high-frequency limit. In this paper we develop an analytical approach to the high-frequency regime for round collimators and tapers. Our analytical results are compared with computer simulations using the code ECHO.

  17. Measuring the angle $?$ from penguin decays at LHCb

    E-print Network

    Angelo Carbone

    2011-02-04

    In this paper we present first LHCb results on charmless charged two- and three-body $B$ meson decays. In particular, using the first picobarn of integrated luminosity, LHCb observed the $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B^{+}\\rightarrow K^{+}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ decays. Such decays provide an interesting way to determine the angle $\\gamma$ of the Unitary Triangle, thanks to the possible presence of New Physics in the penguin loops.

  18. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOEpatents

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  19. On the dip angle of subducting plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsui, Albert T.; Tang, Xiao-Ming; Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1990-01-01

    A new approximate analytic model is developed for the thermal structure of a subducting plate with a finite length. This model provides the capability of easily examining the thermal and mechanical structure of a subducting plate with different lengths and at different angles. Also, the torque balance of a descending plate can be examined, and effects such as the leading edge effect, the adiabatic compression effect, and the phase change effect can be incorporated. A comparison with observed data indicates that short slabs are likely under torque equilibrium at present, while long slabs are probably dominated by their gravitational torques such that their dip angles are transient, moving toward a steeper dip angle similar to that of the Mariana slab.

  20. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203?W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283?K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300??m, a cavity length of 5.8?mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8??m. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156?MW cm{sup ?2?}sr{sup ?1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  1. A heterodyne interferometer for angle metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, M.; Wang, X.; Goullioud, R.

    2010-04-15

    We have developed a compact, high-resolution, angle measurement instrument based on a heterodyne interferometer. Common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer set up, an optical mask is used to sample the laser beam reflecting back from four areas on a target surface. From the relative displacement measurements of the target surface areas, we can simultaneously determine angular rotations around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement beam propagation direction. The device is used in a testbed for a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw angle measurements of a flat mirror are performed. Angle noise measurement of the device shows 0.1 nrad/{radical}(Hz) at 1 Hz, at a working distance of 1 m. The operation range and nonlinearity of the device when used with a flat mirror is approximately {+-}0.15 mrad, and 3 {mu}rad rms, respectively.

  2. Angles of the CKM Unitarity Triangle Measured at Belle

    E-print Network

    Schwartz, A J

    2005-01-01

    The Belle experiment has used several methods to measure or constrain the angles phi_1, phi_2, and phi_3 (or beta, alpha, and gamma) of the CKM unitarity triangle. The results are sin(2phi_1) = 0.728 \\pm 0.056 (stat) \\pm 0.023 (syst) or phi_1= (23.4 +2.7 -2.4) degrees from B0 -> J/psi K0 decays (140 fb-1); phi_2 = 0-19 degrees or 71-180 degrees at 95.4% CL from B0 -> pi+pi- decays (253 fb-1); and phi_3 = [68 +14 -15 (stat) \\pm 13 (syst) \\pm 11 (model)] degrees from B+ -> (D0, D0bar) K+, (D0,D0bar) -> K0_S pi+ pi- decays (253 fb-1). These values satisfy the triangle relation phi_1 + phi_2 + phi_3 = 180 degrees within their uncertainties. The angle phi_1 is also determined from several b -> s qbar q penguin-dominated decay modes; the value obtained by taking a weighted average of the individual results differs from the B0 -> J/psi K0 result by more than two standard deviations. The angle phi_2 is constrained by measuring a CP asymmetry in the decay time distribution; the asymmetry observed is large, and the dif...

  3. Angles of the CKM Unitarity Triangle Measured at Belle

    E-print Network

    A. J. Schwartz

    2005-08-15

    The Belle experiment has used several methods to measure or constrain the angles phi_1, phi_2, and phi_3 (or beta, alpha, and gamma) of the CKM unitarity triangle. The results are sin(2phi_1) = 0.728 \\pm 0.056 (stat) \\pm 0.023 (syst) or phi_1= (23.4 +2.7 -2.4) degrees from B0 -> J/psi K0 decays (140 fb-1); phi_2 = 0-19 degrees or 71-180 degrees at 95.4% CL from B0 -> pi+pi- decays (253 fb-1); and phi_3 = [68 +14 -15 (stat) \\pm 13 (syst) \\pm 11 (model)] degrees from B+ -> (D0, D0bar) K+, (D0,D0bar) -> K0_S pi+ pi- decays (253 fb-1). These values satisfy the triangle relation phi_1 + phi_2 + phi_3 = 180 degrees within their uncertainties. The angle phi_1 is also determined from several b -> s qbar q penguin-dominated decay modes; the value obtained by taking a weighted average of the individual results differs from the B0 -> J/psi K0 result by more than two standard deviations. The angle phi_2 is constrained by measuring a CP asymmetry in the decay time distribution; the asymmetry observed is large, and the difference in the yields of B0,B0bar -> pi+ pi- decays constitutes the first evidence for direct CP violation in the B system.

  4. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Thomas; Palczynski, Karol; Dzubiella, Joachim; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  5. Effect of the collimator angle on dosimetric verification of volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Ho; Park, Ha Ryung; Kim, Won Taek; Kim, Dong Won; Ki, Yongkan; Lee, Juhye; Bae, Jinsuk; Park, Dahl; Jeon, Hosang; Nam, Ji Ho

    2015-07-01

    The collimator is usually rotated when planning volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) due to the leakage of radiation between the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves. We studied the effect of the collimator angle on the results of dosimetric verification of VMAT plans for head and neck patients. We studied VMAT plans for 10 head and neck patients. We made two sets of VMAT plans for each patient. Each set was composed of 10 plans with collimator angles of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 degrees. Plans in the first set were optimized individually, and plans in the second set shared the 30-degree collimator-angle optimization. The two sets of plans were verified by using the 2-dimensional ion chamber array MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany). The comparisons between the calculation and the measurements were made by using a ?-index analysis. The ?-index (2%/2 mm) and (3%/3 mm) passing rates had negative correlations with the collimator angle. The maximum difference between ?-index (3%/3 mm) passing rates of different collimator angles for each patient ranged from 1.46% to 5.60% with an average of 3.67%. There were significant differences (maximum 5.6%) in the passing rates for different collimator angles. The results suggested that the accuracy of the delivered dose depended on the collimator angle. These findings are informative when choosing a collimator angle for VMAT plans.

  6. Simultaneous Multi-angle Observations of Strong Langmuir Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James P.; Watkins, Brenton J.

    2015-10-01

    We report results from a recent series of experiments employing the HF transmitter of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. The Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at the HAARP facility is used as the primary diagnostic. Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments are used to avoid generation of artificial field-aligned irregularities and isolate ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. The HF pump frequency is close to the 3rd gyro-harmonic frequency and the HF pointing angle and MUIR look angle are between the HF Spitze angle and Magnetic Zenith angle. Plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region display differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam in the boresight direction and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Lines, cascade, collapse, coexistence, spectra are observed in agreement with existing theory and simulation results of Strong Langmuir Turbulence in ionospheric interaction experiments. It is found that SLT at HAARP is most readily observed at a HF pointing angle of 11° and UHF observation angle of 15°, which is consistent with the magnetic zenith effect as documented in previous works and optimal orientation of the refracted HF electric field vector.

  7. Understanding Angle and Angle Measure: A Design-Based Research Study Using Context Aware Ubiquitous Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies are quickly becoming tools found in the educational environment. The researchers in this study use a form of mobile learning to support students in learning about angle concepts. Design-based research is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated local instruction theory about students' develop of angle and…

  8. Optimization of Wind Farm Performance Based on Yaw Angle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Dios Romero, Isabel

    2014-05-01

    Inside wind farms, the wakes of upwind turbines result in a significant reduction in power production. Yawing upwind turbines can be used to deflect the wakes away from turbines. Even though this reduces the power production of upwind turbines, it can potentially result in increasing the power production of the whole wind farm. The present work aims to investigate the possibility of improving the performance of wind farms by controlling the yaw angle of turbines. In this regard, wind-tunnel experiments were carried out to study the wake interactions of model turbines and their performance at different yaw angles and different layout configurations. First, it is observed that the power production of the two model turbines, located in a line parallel to the wind, is not considerably improved by yawing the first one. Next, the effect of yaw angle on the performance of a row of ten model turbines parallel to the wind flow, leading to full-wake conditions, was studied. Two configurations were considered: (a) turbines are yawed to the same direction with respect to the wind flow, and (b) each two consecutive turbines are yawed to different directions. The first configuration is found to have a better performance in terms of power production, whereas fatigue loads are lower in the second one. In the first configuration, the best power production is observed when the first turbine has a large yaw angle, and it progressively decreases for the next turbines. Yaw angle control was also considered for the case that turbines are located in partial-wake conditions. These conditions, which commonly occur in real-scale wind farms, are achieved in the wind tunnel by shifting the downwind turbines laterally with respect to the first turbine. In this case, not only can yawing upwind turbines potentially increase the power production of wind farms, but also it can decrease the fatigue loads on downwind turbines by totally deflecting the wake away from them. In general, it is found that the control of the yaw angle in this situation can significantly improve the power even for just two turbines, unlike the case in which the wind flow is exactly parallel to the row of turbines.

  9. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem.

    PubMed

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-10-21

    The beam angle selection (BAS) problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy is often interpreted as a combinatorial optimization problem, i.e. finding the best combination of ? beams in a discrete set of candidate beams. It is well established that the combinatorial BAS problem may be solved efficiently with metaheuristics such as simulated annealing or genetic algorithms. However, the underlying parameters of the optimization process, such as the inclusion of non-coplanar candidate beams, the angular resolution in the space of candidate beams, and the number of evaluated beam ensembles as well as the relative performance of different metaheuristics have not yet been systematically investigated. We study these open questions in a meta-analysis of four strategies for combinatorial optimization in order to provide a reference for future research related to the BAS problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. We introduce a high-performance inverse planning engine for BAS. It performs a full fluence optimization for ?3600 treatment plans per hour while handling up to 50?GB of dose influence data (?1400 candidate beams). For three head and neck patients, we compare the relative performance of a genetic, a cross-entropy, a simulated annealing and a naive iterative algorithm. The selection of ensembles with 5, 7, 9 and 11 beams considering either only coplanar or all feasible candidate beams is studied for an angular resolution of 5°, 10°, 15° and 20° in the space of candidate beams. The impact of different convergence criteria is investigated in comparison to a fixed termination after the evaluation of 10?000 beam ensembles. In total, our simulations comprise a full fluence optimization for about 3000?000 treatment plans. All four combinatorial BAS strategies yield significant improvements of the objective function value and of the corresponding dose distributions compared to standard beam configurations with equi-spaced coplanar beams. The genetic and the cross-entropy algorithms showed faster convergence in the very beginning of the optimization but the simulated annealing algorithm eventually arrived at almost the same objective function values. These three strategies typically yield clinically equivalent treatment plans. The iterative algorithm showed the worst convergence properties. The choice of the termination criterion had a stronger influence on the performance of the simulated annealing algorithm than on the performance of the genetic and the cross-entropy algorithms. We advocate to terminate the optimization process after the evaluation of 1000 beam combinations without objective function decrease. For our simulations, this resulted in an average deviation of the objective function from the reference value after 10?000 evaluated beam ensembles of 0.5% for all metaheuristics. On average, there was only a minor improvement when increasing the angular resolution in the space of candidate beam angles from 20° to 5°. However, we observed significant improvements when considering non-coplanar candidate beams for challenging head and neck cases. PMID:23023092

  10. Comparison of Factors Associated With Occludable Angle Between American Caucasians and Ethnic Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye Elaine; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Dandan; He, Mingguang; Lin, Shan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if factors associated with gonioscopy-determined occludable angle among American Caucasians are similar to those found in ethnic Chinese. Methods. This is a prospective cross-sectional study with 120 American Caucasian, 116 American Chinese, and 116 mainland Chinese subjects. All three groups were matched for sex and age (40–80 years). Gonioscopy was performed for each subject (occludable angles = posterior trabecular meshwork not visible for ?2 quadrants). Anterior segment optical coherence tomography and customized software was used to measure anterior segment biometry and iris parameters, including anterior chamber depth/width (ACD, ACW), lens vault (LV), and iris thickness/area/curvature. Results. In both Chinese and Caucasians, eyes with occludable angles had smaller ACD and ACW, and larger LV and iris curvature than eyes with open angles (all P < 0.005). Chinese eyes had smaller ACD and ACW than Caucasian eyes (both P < 0.01) in the occludable angle cohort. Iris characteristics did not differ significantly between Chinese and Caucasians in the occludable angle cohort. Based on multivariate logistic regression, gonioscopy-determined occludable angle was significantly associated with LV, iris area, and sex (all P < 0.03) in Chinese; and with LV, ACD, iris thickness, age, and sex (all P < 0.04) in Caucasians. Conclusions. Several factors associated with occludable angle differed between Caucasians and Chinese, suggesting potentially different mechanisms in occludable angle development in the two racial groups. This is the first study to demonstrate that lens vault is an important anterior segment optical coherence tomography parameter in the screening for angle closure in Caucasians. In addition, iris thickness was a significant predictor for occludable angles in Caucasians but was not in ethnic Chinese. PMID:24168992

  11. Sunspot group tilt angles and the strength of the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi-Espuig, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Krivova, N. A.; Cameron, R.; Peñuela, T.

    2010-07-01

    Context. It is well known that the tilt angles of active regions increase with their latitude (Joy's law). It has never been checked before, however, whether the average tilt angles change from one cycle to the next. Flux transport models show the importance of tilt angles for the reversal and build up of magnetic flux at the poles, which is in turn correlated to the strength of the next cycle. Aims: Here we analyse time series of tilt angle measurements and look for a possible relationship of the tilt angles with other solar cycle parameters, in order to glean information on the solar dynamo and to estimate their potential for predicting solar activity. Methods: We employed tilt angle data from Mount Wilson and Kodaikanal observatories covering solar cycles 15 to 21. We analyse the latitudinal distribution of the tilt angles (Joy's law), their variation from cycle to cycle, and their relationship to other solar cycle parameters, such as the strength (or total area covered by sunspots in a cycle), amplitude, and length. Results: The two main results of our analysis follow. 1. We find an anti-correlation between the mean normalised tilt angle of a given cycle and the strength (or amplitude) of that cycle, with a correlation coefficient of rc = -0.95 (99.9% confidence level) and rc = -0.93 (99.76% confidence level) for Mount Wilson and Kodaikanal data, respectively. 2. The product of the cycle's averaged tilt angle and the strength of the same cycle displays a significant correlation with the strength of the next cycle (rc = 0.65 at 89% confidence level and rc = 0.70 at 92% confidence level for Mount Wilson and Kodaikanal data, respectively). An even better correlation is obtained between the source term of the poloidal flux in Babcock-Leighton-type dynamos (which contains the tilt angle) and the amplitude of the next cycle. Further we confirm the linear relationship (Joy's law) between the tilt angle and latitude with slopes of 0.26 and 0.28 for Mount Wilson and Kodaikanal data, respectively. In addition, we obtain good positive correlations between the normalised-area-weighted tilt angle and the length of the following cycle, whereas the strength or the amplitude of the next cycle does not appear to be correlated to the tilt angles of the current cycle alone. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that, in combination with the cycle strength, the active region tilt angles play an important role in building up the polar fields at cycle minimum.

  12. View Angle Effects on MODIS Snow Mapping in Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xin, Qinchuan; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Liu, Jicheng; Tan, Bin; Melloh, Rae A.; Davis, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Binary snow maps and fractional snow cover data are provided routinely from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). This paper investigates how the wide observation angles of MODIS influence the current snow mapping algorithm in forested areas. Theoretical modeling results indicate that large view zenith angles (VZA) can lead to underestimation of fractional snow cover (FSC) by reducing the amount of the ground surface that is viewable through forest canopies, and by increasing uncertainties during the gridding of MODIS data. At the end of the MODIS scan line, the total modeled error can be as much as 50% for FSC. Empirical analysis of MODIS/Terra snow products in four forest sites shows high fluctuation in FSC estimates on consecutive days. In addition, the normalized difference snow index (NDSI) values, which are the primary input to the MODIS snow mapping algorithms, decrease as VZA increases at the site level. At the pixel level, NDSI values have higher variances, and are correlated with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in snow covered forests. These findings are consistent with our modeled results, and imply that consideration of view angle effects could improve MODIS snow monitoring in forested areas.

  13. Brewster angle of shock-compressed xenon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, G. E.; Saitov, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental results for Brewster angle measurements are used to estimate the width of the shock front in xenon. The possible influence of the shock front width on the dense xenon reflectivity is discussed. The calculated values of the Brewster angle are shifted with respect to the experimental values. It may be partially related to the nonzero width of the wave front. The estimated values of the widths are 161, 154, and 145 nm for the wavelengths 1064, 694, and 532 nm respectively. These values are obtained within the framework of the Drude theory of reflection in the optically nonuniform media. The density functional theory (DFT) is applied to calculate values of the dielectric function and refraction. The effect is discussed if the widths found could influence the normal reflectivity obtained in the framework of the DFT.

  14. A novel high resolution ion wide angle spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D.; Hörlein, R.; Gautier, D. C.; Letzring, S.; Kiefer, D.; Allinger, K.; Albright, B. J.; Shah, R.; Palaniyappan, S.; Yin, L.; Fernández, J. C.; Habs, D.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-04-01

    A novel ion wide angle spectrometer (iWASP) has been developed, which is capable of measuring angularly resolved energy distributions of protons and a second ion species, such as carbon C6 +, simultaneously. The energy resolution for protons and carbon ions is better than 10% at ˜50 MeV/nucleon and thus suitable for the study of novel laser-ion acceleration schemes aiming for ultrahigh particle energies. A wedged magnet design enables an acceptance angle of 30°(˜524 mrad) and high angular accuracy in the ?rad range. First, results obtained at the LANL Trident laser facility are presented demonstrating high energy and angular resolution of this novel iWASP.

  15. A novel high resolution ion wide angle spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Jung, D; Hörlein, R; Gautier, D C; Letzring, S; Kiefer, D; Allinger, K; Albright, B J; Shah, R; Palaniyappan, S; Yin, L; Fernández, J C; Habs, D; Hegelich, B M

    2011-04-01

    A novel ion wide angle spectrometer (iWASP) has been developed, which is capable of measuring angularly resolved energy distributions of protons and a second ion species, such as carbon C(6 +), simultaneously. The energy resolution for protons and carbon ions is better than 10% at ?50 MeV/nucleon and thus suitable for the study of novel laser-ion acceleration schemes aiming for ultrahigh particle energies. A wedged magnet design enables an acceptance angle of 30°(?524 mrad) and high angular accuracy in the ?rad range. First, results obtained at the LANL Trident laser facility are presented demonstrating high energy and angular resolution of this novel iWASP. PMID:21528999

  16. Broadband and wide angle infrared wire-grid polarizer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming; Wan, Weiwei; Zhu, Xueyi; Song, Baosheng; Liu, Xiaoping; Lu, Minghui; Cui, Bo; Chen, Yanfeng

    2015-06-15

    An infrared polarizer consisting of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) gratings is designed with transmittance exceeding 85% and polarization extinction ratio (ER) higher than 70 dB in the wavelength range from 1.5 to 8 ?m. Moreover, the polarizer retains excellent performance even when the incident angle increases to as large as 80°. The MIM gratings support magnetic polariton (MP) in the near-infrared regime and operate non-resonantly in the mid-infrared regime, both of which result in the advantages of high extinction ratio, broadband, and wide angle. The proposed structure can find applications in polarizer, beam-splitter, filter, and isolator in the infrared range. PMID:26193519

  17. Crack depth profiling using guided wave angle dependent reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Volker, Arno Pahlavan, Lotfollah Blacquiere, Gerrit

    2015-03-31

    Tomographic corrosion monitoring techniques have been developed, using two rings of sensors around the circumference of a pipe. This technique is capable of providing a detailed wall thickness map, however this might not be the only type of structural damage. Therefore this concept is expanded to detect and size cracks and small corrosion defects like root corrosion. The expanded concept uses two arrays of guided-wave transducers, collecting both reflection and transmission data. The data is processed such that the angle-dependent reflectivity is obtained without using a baseline signal of a defect-free situation. The angle-dependent reflectivity is the input of an inversion scheme that calculates a crack depth profile. From this profile, the depth and length of the crack can be determined. Preliminary experiments show encouraging results. The depth sizing accuracy is in the order of 0.5 mm.

  18. Effects of Hierarchical Surface Roughness on Droplet Contact Angle.

    PubMed

    Bell, Michael S; Shahraz, Azar; Fichthorn, Kristen A; Borhan, Ali

    2015-06-23

    Superhydrophobic surfaces often incorporate roughness on both micron and nanometer length scales, although a satisfactory understanding of the role of this hierarchical roughness in causing superhydrophobicity remains elusive. We present a two-dimensional thermodynamic model to describe wetting on hierarchically grooved surfaces by droplets for which the influence of gravity is negligible. By creating wetting phase diagrams for droplets on surfaces with both single-scale and hierarchical roughness, we find that hierarchical roughness leads to greatly expanded superhydrophobic domains in phase space over those for a single scale of roughness. Our results indicate that an important role of the nanoscale roughness is to increase the effective Young's angle of the microscale features, leading to smaller required aspect ratios (height to width) for the surface structures. We then show how this idea may be used to design a hierarchically rough surface with optimally high contact angles. PMID:26030089

  19. Shallow-angle water entry of ballistic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Gomez, Jason T.; Beal, David N.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2008-11-01

    The water-entry of ballistic projectiles is investigated using high-speed digital imaging. Projectiles enter the water at shallow angles to the free surface, 5^o-15^o, without ricochet at Mach numbers between 0.3 and 2.0. Projectile dynamics, critical entry angle, and cavity growth are discussed. Geometric modifications to a projectile allow it to travel large distances underwater assuming a sufficiently large air-cavity is formed after impact, which dramatically decreases drag on the projectile. Results show that successful water-entry occurs for projectiles with modified tip geometries at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 2; these projectile modifications include tip geometry and material properties. A theoretical cavity model compares well with the experimental data and will be discussed for a range of experimental conditions.

  20. XFEL OSCILLATOR SIMULATION INCLUDING ANGLE-DEPENDENT CRYSTAL REFLECTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Lindberg, Ryan; Kim, K-J; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2010-08-23

    The oscillator package within the GINGER FEL simulation code has now been extended to include angle-dependent reflectivity properties of Bragg crystals. Previously, the package was modified to include frequencydependent reflectivity in order to model x-ray FEL oscillators from start-up from shot noise through to saturation. We present a summary of the algorithms used for modeling the crystal reflectivity and radiation propagation outside the undulator, discussing various numerical issues relevant to the domain of high Fresnel number and efficient Hankel transforms. We give some sample XFEL-O simulation results obtained with the angle-dependent reflectivity model, with particular attention directed to the longitudinal and transverse coherence of the radiation output.

  1. Chile Sorting Using Measurement of Specular Reflection at Brewster's Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbon, Ryan; Michael, Deantonio; Jeff, Montgomery

    2003-10-01

    Chile growers in New Mexico have requested improvement to a machine that can sort mechanically harvested red chile from unwanted material which is introduced in the harvest. A device is being developed that measures the amount of specular reflection from the chile and other material. This device should increase the efficiency of current crop sorters, at little extra cost. Testing is still in progress, and will continue throughout the chile harvesting season. However, initial results are promising. The talk will focus on the method of determining the Brewster angle for the chile pod. This is the angle that provides the greatest difference between the pod, which reflects specularly, and the unwanted material, most of which reflects diffusely. We will also examine photographic data to demonstrate the method and its promise for the chile sorting device. Finally, we will discuss several possible mechanisms for a commercial device and their advantages and disadvantages.

  2. Upper limb joint angle measurement in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Diego; Alvarez, Juan C; González, Rafael C; López, Antonio M

    2016-02-01

    Usual human motion capture systems are designed to work in controlled laboratory conditions. For occupational health, instruments that can measure during normal daily life are essential, as the evaluation of the workers' movements is a key factor to reduce employee injury- and illness-related costs. In this paper, we present a method for joint angle measurement, combining inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) and magnetic sensors. This method estimates wrist flexion, wrist lateral deviation, elbow flexion, elbow pronation, shoulder flexion, shoulder abduction and shoulder internal rotation. The algorithms avoid numerical integration of the signals, which allows for long-time estimations without angle estimation drift. The system has been tested both under laboratory and field conditions. Controlled laboratory tests show mean estimation errors between 0.06° and of 1.05°, and standard deviation between 2.18° and 9.20°. Field tests seem to confirm these results when no ferromagnetic materials are close to the measurement system. PMID:25573165

  3. Pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles with adiabatic focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, R. C.; Shalchi, A.; Dosch, A. E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com

    2014-10-20

    Understanding turbulent transport of charged particles in magnetized plasmas often requires a model for the description of random variations in the particle's pitch angle. The Fokker-Planck coefficient of pitch-angle scattering, which is used to describe scattering parallel to the mean magnetic field, is therefore of central importance. Whereas quasi-linear theory assumes a homogeneous mean magnetic field, such a condition is often not fulfilled, especially for high-energy particles. Here, a new derivation of the quasi-linear approach is given that is based on the unperturbed orbit found for an adiabatically focused mean magnetic field. The results show that, depending on the ratio of the focusing length and the particle's Larmor radius, the Fokker-Planck coefficient is significantly modified but agrees with the classical expression in the limit of a homogeneous mean magnetic field.

  4. Cardinality bounds for triangulations with bounded minimum angle

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.A.

    1994-05-01

    We consider bounding the cardinality of an arbitrary triangulation with smallest angle {alpha}. We show that if the local feature size (i.e. distance between disjoint vertices or edges) of the triangulation is within a constant factor of the local feature size of the input, then N < O(1/{alpha})M, where N is the cardinality of the triangulation and M is the cardinality of any other triangulation with smallest angle at least {alpha}. Previous results had an O(1/{alpha}{sup 1/{alpha}}) dependence. Our O(1/{alpha}) dependence is tight for input with a large length to height ratio, in which triangles may be oriented along the long dimension.

  5. Interference-induced angle-independent acoustical transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Lehua; Yu, Gaokun Wang, Ning; Wang, Xinlong; Wang, Guibo

    2014-12-21

    It is revealed that the Fano-like interference leads to the extraordinary acoustic transmission through a slab metamaterial of thickness much smaller than the wavelength, with each unit cell consisting of a Helmholtz resonator and a narrow subwavelength slit. More importantly, both the theoretical analysis and experimental measurement show that the angle-independent acoustical transparency can be realized by grafting a Helmholtz resonator and a quarter-wave resonator to the wall of a narrow subwavelength slit in each unit cell of a slit array. The observed phenomenon results from the interferences between the waves propagating in the slit, those re-radiated by the Helmholtz resonator, and those re-radiated by the quarter-wave resonator. The proposed design may find its applications in designing angle-independent acoustical filters and controlling the phase of the transmitted waves.

  6. Precision measurement of the weak mixing angle in Moller scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, P.L.; Arnold, R.G.; Arroyo, C.; Bega, K.; Biesiada, J.; Bosted, P.E.; Bower, G.; Cahoon, J.; Carr, R.; Cates, G.D.; Chen, J-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cooke, M.; Decowski, P.; Deur, A.; Emam, W.; Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Field, C.; Gao, J.; Gary, M.; /UC, Berkeley /Caltech /Massachusetts U., Amherst /Princeton U. /DAPNIA, Saclay /Smith Coll. /SLAC /Syracuse U. /Jefferson Lab /Virginia U.

    2005-05-04

    We report on a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in fixed target electron-electron (Moeller) scattering: A{sub PV} = (-131 {+-} 14 (stat.) {+-} 10 (syst.)) x 10{sup -9}, leading to the determination of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2397 {+-} 0.0010 (stat.) {+-} 0.0008 (syst.), evaluated at Q{sup 2} = 0.026 GeV{sup 2}. Combining this result with the measurements of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} at the Z{sup 0} pole, the running of the weak mixing angle is observed with over 6{sigma} significance. The measurement sets constraints on new physics effects at the TeV scale.

  7. Contact Angle Changes Induced by Immunocomplex Formation†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Shen, Amy Q.; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Immunoassays analyzing interactions between antigens and antibodies can be affected by capillary action together with binding affinity. This paper studies contact-angle changes of bacterial suspensions on antibody immobilized surfaces. The capillary action and the dried pattern of the cell suspensions are analyzed and correlated with specific- and nonspecific bindings between bacteria and antibodies. PMID:24482797

  8. 1. INTRODUCTION Angle-Independent Doppler

    E-print Network

    Levanon, Nadav

    the target heading and the range vector is not known a priori, a Doppler velocity radar must estimate them parameters in a Doppler radar can be the Doppler frequency f or the Doppler count n. The Doppler frequency1. INTRODUCTION Angle-Independent Doppler Velocity Measurement NADAV LEVANON, Senior Member, IEEE

  9. Labelling Angles: Care, Indifference and Mathematical Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Julie

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I explore tensions of care in the context of school mathematics by examining two accounts of a classroom moment involving labelling an angle. In particular, I draw attention to how caring for students and caring for mathematical ideas interplay in complex ways by inquiring into the two accounts through ideas of care and…

  10. Partitioning Pythagorean Triangles Using Pythagorean Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swenson, Carl E.; Yandl, Andre L.

    2012-01-01

    Inside any Pythagorean right triangle, it is possible to find a point M so that drawing segments from M to each vertex of the triangle yields angles whose sines and cosines are all rational. This article describes an algorithm that generates an infinite number of such points.

  11. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  12. Marine Fisheries Marine recreational angling. Florida

    E-print Network

    Marine Fisheries ~~WD~W Marine recreational angling. Florida News Bureau photo by Jack Fortune 1980 Jay D. Andrews 1 Social Considerations Associated With Marine Recreational Fishing Under FCMA/NMFS Developments Index, 1980 Papers in Marine Fisheries Review, 1980 Chad P. Dawson and Bruce T. Wilkins 12 Charles

  13. Imaging properties of supercritical angle fluorescence optics

    E-print Network

    Enderlein, Jörg

    ). 4. T. Ruckstuhl and S. Seeger, "Confocal total-internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopes," Opt. Commun. 148, 300­315 (1998). 9. M. Leutenegger, R. Rao, R. Leitgeb, and T the critical angle of total internal reflection. Prominent examples are solid-immersion lenses and paraboloid

  14. Right-Angle Mechanized Electrical Connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Clint A.; Blackler, David T.

    1996-01-01

    Right-angle electrical connector embedded in mechanism accommodates some initial misalignment and aligns itself. Connection and disconnection effected with relatively small forces and torques and simple movements. Actuated by one gloved hand or by robotic manipulator. Useful in underwater, nuclear, hot, cold, or toxic environments in which connections made or broken by heavily clothed technicians or by robots.

  15. Numerical investigation of cone angle effect on the flow field and separation efficiency of deoiling hydrocyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Maysam; Maddahian, Reza; Farhanieh, Bijan

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the effect of cone angle on the flow field and separation efficiency of deoiling hydrocyclones is investigated taking advantage of large eddy simulation. The dynamic Smagorinsky is employed to determine the residual stress tensor of the continuous phase. The method of Lagrangian particle tracking with an optimized search algorithm (closest cell) is applied to evaluate the separation efficiency of deoiling hydrocyclone. Simulations are performed on a 35-mm deoiling hydrocyclone with the three different cone angles of 6, 10 and 20 degree. The numerical results revealed that the changes in the cone angle would affect the velocity and pressure distribution inside hydrocyclone, and lead to changes in the separation efficiency. However, the large cone angle increases the tangential velocity and pressure gradient inside the hydrocyclone, but reduces the separation efficiency. The reasons behind the decrease in the separation efficiency are the flow structure and reduction of oil droplets residence time in hydrocyclones with large cone angles.

  16. A liquid crystal display with consistent moving image quality regardless of viewing angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Seung-Ryul; Kim, Jongbin; Kim, Minkoo; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new overdrive (OD) technology to precisely compensate for the viewing angle dependent characteristics of LCDs. This paper reports that optical response of liquid crystal displays (LCDs) is considerably dependent on viewing angles for the first time. The new OD technology applies different OD look-up tables (LUTs) depending on the viewing angles. In addition, we combine a new OD technology with an eye tracker that is usually adopted for autostereoscopic 3D LCD systems. The application results show that a new OD technology improves the motion image quality perfectly regardless of viewing angles. We expect that our proposed method will definitely enable the LCD products to have consistent motion image quality regardless of viewing angles.

  17. High-speed angle-resolved imaging of a single gold nanorod with microsecond temporal resolution and one-degree angle precision.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Sawako; Iino, Ryota; Niitani, Yamato; Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Tomishige, Michio; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-17

    We developed two types of high-speed angle-resolved imaging methods for single gold nanorods (SAuNRs) using objective-type vertical illumination dark-field microscopy and a high-speed CMOS camera to achieve microsecond temporal and one-degree angle resolution. These methods are based on: (i) an intensity analysis of focused images of SAuNR split into two orthogonally polarized components and (ii) the analysis of defocused SAuNR images. We determined the angle precision (statistical error) and accuracy (systematic error) of the resultant SAuNR (80 nm × 40 nm) images projected onto a substrate surface (azimuthal angle) in both methods. Although both methods showed a similar precision of ?1° for the azimuthal angle at a 10 ?s temporal resolution, the defocused image analysis showed a superior angle accuracy of ?5°. In addition, the polar angle was also determined from the defocused SAuNR images with a precision of ?1°, by fitting with simulated images. By taking advantage of the defocused image method's full revolution measurement range in the azimuthal angle, the rotation of the rotary molecular motor, F1-ATPase, was measured with 3.3 ?s temporal resolution. The time constants of the pauses waiting for the elementary steps of the ATP hydrolysis reaction and the torque generated in the mechanical steps have been successfully estimated. The high-speed angle-resolved SAuNR imaging methods will be applicable to the monitoring of the fast conformational changes of many biological molecular machines. PMID:25647635

  18. A nonlinear theory of cosmic ray pitch angle diffusion in homogeneous magnetostatic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    A plasma strong turbulence, weak coupling, theory is applied to the problem of cosmic ray pitch angle scattering in magnetostatic turbulence. The theory used is a rigorous generalization of Weinstock's resonance-broadening theory and contains no ad hoc approximations. A detailed calculation is presented for a model of slab turbulence with an exponential correlation function. The results agree well with numerical simulations. The rigidity dependence of the pitch angle scattering coefficient differs from that found by previous researchers. The differences result from an inadequate treatment of particle trajectories near 90 deg pitch angle in earlier work.

  19. Probe Without Moving Parts Measures Flow Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Vachon, M. Jake

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of local flow angle is critical in many fluid-dynamic applications, including the aerodynamic flight testing of new aircraft and flight systems. Flight researchers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center have recently developed, flight-tested, and patented the force-based flow-angle probe (FLAP), a novel, force-based instrument for the measurement of local flow direction. Containing no moving parts, the FLAP may provide greater simplicity, improved accuracy, and increased measurement access, relative to conventional moving vane-type flow-angle probes. Forces in the FLAP can be measured by various techniques, including those that involve conventional strain gauges (based on electrical resistance) and those that involve more advanced strain gauges (based on optical fibers). A correlation is used to convert force-measurement data to the local flow angle. The use of fiber optics will enable the construction of a miniature FLAP, leading to the possibility of flow measurement in very small or confined regions. This may also enable the tufting of a surface with miniature FLAPs, capable of quantitative flow-angle measurements, similar to attaching yarn tufts for qualitative measurements. The prototype FLAP was a small, aerodynamically shaped, low-aspect-ratio fin about 2 in. (approximately equal to 5 cm) long, 1 in. (approximately equal to 2.5 cm) wide, and 0.125 in. (approximately equal to 0.3 cm) thick (see Figure 1). The prototype FLAP included simple electrical-resistance strain gauges for measuring forces. Four strain gauges were mounted on the FLAP; two on the upper surface and two on the lower surface. The gauges were connected to form a full Wheatstone bridge, configured as a bending bridge. In preparation for a flight test, the prototype FLAP was mounted on the airdata boom of a flight-test fixture (FTF) on the NASA Dryden F-15B flight research airplane.

  20. Competitive growth of Ta nanopillars during glancing angle deposition: Effect of surface diffusion

    E-print Network

    Gall, Daniel

    % , and an increased probability 20% for the merging of neighboring pillars. © 2007 American Vacuum Society. DOI: 10 a glancing angle 80°, resulting in highly under- dense columnar thin film microstructures due to atomic shad

  1. Age-related Changes in Maximum Pelvic Anteversion and Retroversion Angles Measured in the Sitting Position

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Hitoshi; Tsuchiyama, Hiroyuki; Hatakeyama, Tomoyuki; Inaoka, Pleiades Tiharu; Murata, Kanichirou

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between age and the maximum pelvic anteversion and retroversion angles, as well as the associated pelvic range of motion, measured in a sitting position with free knee movement. [Subjects] A total of 132 healthy volunteers (74 women, 58 men; age range, 20–79 years) were divided into six groups based on age (20–29, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, 60–69, and 70–79 years). [Methods] The maximum pelvic anteversion and retroversion angles were measured manually five times by a goniometer in a sitting position that allowed free movement of the knee joints. [Results] There was a significant effect of age group on the maximum pelvic anteversion and retroversion angles and pelvic range of motion (the difference between these angles). There was a significant correlation between age and the maximum pelvic anteversion angle, maximum pelvic retroversion angle, and pelvic range of motion. [Conclusion] The maximum pelvic anteversion and retroversion angles and pelvic range of motion were significantly correlated with age. The maximum pelvic anteversion angle and pelvic range of motion were most affected by age. PMID:25540507

  2. Simulations of Seasonal and Latitudinal Variations in Leaf Inclination Angle Distribution: Implications for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huemmrich, Karl F.

    2013-01-01

    The leaf inclination angle distribution (LAD) is an important characteristic of vegetation canopy structure affecting light interception within the canopy. However, LADs are difficult and time consuming to measure. To examine possible global patterns of LAD and their implications in remote sensing, a model was developed to predict leaf angles within canopies. Canopies were simulated using the SAIL radiative transfer model combined with a simple photosynthesis model. This model calculated leaf inclination angles for horizontal layers of leaves within the canopy by choosing the leaf inclination angle that maximized production over a day in each layer. LADs were calculated for five latitude bands for spring and summer solar declinations. Three distinct LAD types emerged: tropical, boreal, and an intermediate temperate distribution. In tropical LAD, the upper layers have a leaf angle around 35 with the lower layers having horizontal inclination angles. While the boreal LAD has vertical leaf inclination angles throughout the canopy. The latitude bands where each LAD type occurred changed with the seasons. The different LADs affected the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) with similar relationships between fAPAR and leaf area index (LAI), but different relationships between NDVI and LAI for the different LAD types. These differences resulted in significantly different relationships between NDVI and fAPAR for each LAD type. Since leaf inclination angles affect light interception, variations in LAD also affect the estimation of leaf area based on transmittance of light or lidar returns.

  3. Agreement Between Panoramic and Lateral Cephalometric Radiographs for Measuring the Gonial Angle

    PubMed Central

    Zangouei-Booshehri, Maryam; Aghili, Hossein-Agha; Abasi, Mojtaba; Ezoddini-Ardakani, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Background The gonial angle is one of the most important measurements required for orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery. It is difficult to determine the accurate measurement of each gonial angle on cephalometric radiographs because of superimposition of the left and right angles. Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the right and left gonial angles on panoramic radiographs and to compare them with an evaluated cephalometric sample. Patients and Methods A total of 80 panoramic and 80 cephalometric radiographs were obtained from 6 to 12-year-old children and the gonial angle was determined by the tangent of the inferior border of the mandible and the most distal aspect of the ascending ramus and the condyleon both panoramic and cephalometric radiographs. We used Pearson’s correlation coefficient and paired t-test for comparison. Results The mean gonial angle was 127.07 ± 6.10 and 127.5 ± 6.67 degrees on panoramic and cephalometric radiographs, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the measured gonial angles on panoramic and cephalometric radiographs and also no difference between the right and left (both Ps = 0.18) Conclusion The value of the gonial angle measured on panoramic radiography was the same as that measured on the routinely used cephalometric radiography. PMID:23407613

  4. Gantry-angle resolved VMAT pretreatment verification using EPID image prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, Henry C.; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Fuangrod, Todsaporn; McCurdy, Boyd M. C.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2; Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 ; Greer, Peter B.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Pretreatment verification of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) dose delivery with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) uses images integrated over the entire delivery or over large subarcs. This work aims to develop a new method for gantry-angle-resolved verification of VMAT dose delivery using EPID.Methods: An EPID dose prediction model was used to calculate EPID images as a function of gantry angle for eight prostate patient deliveries. EPID image frames at 7.5 frames per second were acquired during delivery via a frame-grabber system. The gantry angle for each image was encoded in kV frames which were synchronized to the MV frames. Gamma analysis results as a function of gantry angle were assessed by integrating the frames over 2° subarcs with an angle-to-agreement tolerance of 0.5° about the measured image angle.Results: The model agreed with EPID images integrated over the entire delivery with average Gamma pass-rates at 2%, 2 mm of 99.7% (10% threshold). The accuracy of the kV derived gantry angle for each image was found to be 0.1° (1 SD) using a phantom test. For the gantry-resolved analysis all Gamma pass-rates were greater than 90% at 3%, 3 mm criteria (with only two exceptions), and more than 90% had a 95% pass-rate, with an average of 97.3%. The measured gantry angle lagged behind the predicted angle by a mean of 0.3°± 0.3°, with a maximum lag of 1.3°.Conclusions: The method provides a comprehensive and highly efficient pretreatment verification of VMAT delivery using EPID. Dose delivery accuracy is assessed as a function of gantry angle to ensure accurate treatment.

  5. An algorithm for selecting the most accurate protocol for contact angle measurement by drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z N

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an error analysis is performed to study real water drop images and the corresponding numerically generated water drop profiles for three widely used static contact angle algorithms: the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms and the axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) algorithm. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the numerically generated drop profiles based on the Laplace equation. A significant number of water drop profiles with different volumes, contact angles, and noise levels are generated, and the influences of the three factors on the accuracies of the three algorithms are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the above-mentioned three algorithms are complementary. In fact, the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms show low errors and are highly resistant to noise for water drops with small/medium volumes and contact angles, while for water drop with large volumes and contact angles just the ADSA-P algorithm can meet accuracy requirement. However, this algorithm introduces significant errors in the case of small volumes and contact angles because of its high sensitivity to noise. The critical water drop volumes of the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms corresponding to a certain contact angle error are obtained through a significant amount of computation. To improve the precision of the static contact angle measurement, a more accurate algorithm based on a combination of the three algorithms is proposed. Following a systematic investigation, the algorithm selection rule is described in detail, while maintaining the advantages of the three algorithms and overcoming their deficiencies. In general, static contact angles over the entire hydrophobicity range can be accurately evaluated using the proposed algorithm. The ease of erroneous judgment in static contact angle measurements is avoided. The proposed algorithm is validated by a static contact angle evaluation of real and numerically generated water drop images with different hydrophobicity values and volumes. PMID:25554326

  6. SU-E-T-604: Dosimetric Dependence On the Collimator Angle in Prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M; Rehman, J; Khan, M; Chow, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) when using different collimator angles. It is because collimator angle awareness is essential for planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a rational time. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o) were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. For each change of collimator angle, a new plan was re-optimized for that angle. The prescription dose was 78 Gy per 39 fractions. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index, machine monitor unit, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans. Results: There was no significance difference, based on the plan dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. Higher CI and lower HI were found for the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided lower HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. The 75o and 90o collimator angle were found good for the rectum sparing, and the 75o and 30o collimator angle were found good for the right and left femur sparing, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: The dosimetric results in this study are useful to the planner to select different collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OAR sparing in prostate VMAT.

  7. An Application of Ptolemy's Theorem:Integral triangles with a 120 degree angle and the bisector(of the 120degree angle)also of integral length

    E-print Network

    Zelator, Konstantine

    2012-01-01

    In one of the three 2010/2011 issues of the journal 'MathematicalSpectrum', this author gave a three-parameter description of the entire set of integral triangles(i.e. triangles with integer side lengths)and with a 120 degree angle.This entire set expressed as a union of four families, see reference[5]. In this work we describe, in terms of three parameters again, the set of all integral with a 120 degree angle, and whose bisectors of their 120 degree angles; is also of integral length. To do so, we use the well known historic theorem of Ptolemy for cyclic quadrilaterals, in conjunction with the general positive integer solution of the equation, 1/z=1/x +1/y; and of course in combination with the parametric description of the set of integral triangles with a 120 degree angle mentioned above,The final results of this paper are found in section8.

  8. An Application of Ptolemy's Theorem:Integral triangles with a 120 degree angle and the bisector(of the 120degree angle)also of integral length

    E-print Network

    Konstantine Zelator

    2012-03-12

    In one of the three 2010/2011 issues of the journal 'MathematicalSpectrum', this author gave a three-parameter description of the entire set of integral triangles(i.e. triangles with integer side lengths)and with a 120 degree angle.This entire set expressed as a union of four families, see reference[5]. In this work we describe, in terms of three parameters again, the set of all integral with a 120 degree angle, and whose bisectors of their 120 degree angles; is also of integral length. To do so, we use the well known historic theorem of Ptolemy for cyclic quadrilaterals, in conjunction with the general positive integer solution of the equation, 1/z=1/x +1/y; and of course in combination with the parametric description of the set of integral triangles with a 120 degree angle mentioned above,The final results of this paper are found in section8.

  9. Shuttle Program. Euler angles, quaternions, and transformation matrices working relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A brief mathematical development of the relationship between the Euler angles and the transformation matrix, the quaternion and the transformation matrix, and the Euler angles and the quaternion is presented. The analysis and equations presented apply directly to current space shuttle problems. The twelve three-axis Euler transformation matrices are given as functions of the Euler angles, the equations for the quaternion as a funtion of the Euler angles, and the Euler angles as a function of the transformation matrix elements.

  10. Pitch perfect: how fruit flies control their body pitch angle.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Samuel C; Beatus, Tsevi; Canale, Luca; Cohen, Itai

    2015-11-01

    Flapping insect flight is a complex and beautiful phenomenon that relies on fast, active control mechanisms to counter aerodynamic instability. To directly investigate how freely flying Drosophila melanogaster control their body pitch angle against such instability, we perturbed them using impulsive mechanical torques and filmed their corrective maneuvers with high-speed video. Combining experimental observations and numerical simulation, we found that flies correct for pitch deflections of up to 40 deg in 29±8?ms by bilaterally modulating their wings' front-most stroke angle in a manner well described by a linear proportional-integral (PI) controller. Flies initiate this corrective process only 10±2?ms after the perturbation onset, indicating that pitch stabilization involves a fast reflex response. Remarkably, flies can also correct for very large-amplitude pitch perturbations - greater than 150 deg - providing a regime in which to probe the limits of the linear-response framework. Together with previous studies regarding yaw and roll control, our results on pitch show that flies' stabilization of each of these body angles is consistent with PI control. PMID:26385332

  11. Influence of inflow angle on flexible flap aerodynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Zhao, H.; Ye, Z.; Li, Z. M.; Li, C.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale wind turbines have larger blade lengths and weights, which creates new challenges for blade design. This paper selects NREL S809 airfoil, and uses the parameterized technology to realize the flexible trailing edge deformation, researches the dynamic aerodynamic characteristics in the process of continuous flexible deformation, analyses the influence of inflow angle on flexible flap aerodynamic performance, in order to further realize the flexible wind turbine blade design and provides some references for the active control scheme. The results show that compared with the original airfoil, proper trailing edge deformation can improve the lift coefficient, reduce the drag coefficient, and thereby more efficiently realize flow field active control. With inflow angle increases, dynamic lift-drag coefficient hysteresis loop shape deviation occurs, even turns into different shapes. Appropriate swing angle can improve the flap lift coefficient, but may cause early separation of flow. To improve the overall performance of wind turbine blades, different angular control should be used at different cross sections, in order to achieve the best performance.

  12. Impact angle control of interplanetary shock geoeffectiveness: A statistical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Raeder, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    We present a survey of interplanetary (IP) shocks using Wind and ACE satellite data from January 1995 to December 2013 to study how IP shock geoeffectiveness is controlled by IP shock impact angles. A shock list covering one and a half solar cycle is compiled. The yearly number of IP shocks is found to correlate well with the monthly sunspot number. We use data from SuperMAG, a large chain with more than 300 geomagnetic stations, to study geoeffectiveness triggered by IP shocks. The SuperMAG SML index, an enhanced version of the familiar AL index, is used in our statistical analysis. The jumps of the SML index triggered by IP shock impacts on the Earth's magnetosphere are investigated in terms of IP shock orientation and speed. We find that, in general, strong (high speed) and almost frontal (small impact angle) shocks are more geoeffective than inclined shocks with low speed. The strongest correlation (correlation coefficient R = 0.78) occurs for fixed IP shock speed and for varied IP shock impact angle. We attribute this result, predicted previously with simulations, to the fact that frontal shocks compress the magnetosphere symmetrically from all sides, which is a favorable condition for the release of magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail, which in turn can produce moderate to strong auroral substorms, which are then observed by ground-based magnetometers.

  13. Sparse Representation Based SAR Vehicle Recognition along with Aspect Angle

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Kefeng; Zou, Huanxin; Sun, Jixiang

    2014-01-01

    As a method of representing the test sample with few training samples from an overcomplete dictionary, sparse representation classification (SRC) has attracted much attention in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) automatic target recognition (ATR) recently. In this paper, we develop a novel SAR vehicle recognition method based on sparse representation classification along with aspect information (SRCA), in which the correlation between the vehicle's aspect angle and the sparse representation vector is exploited. The detailed procedure presented in this paper can be summarized as follows. Initially, the sparse representation vector of a test sample is solved by sparse representation algorithm with a principle component analysis (PCA) feature-based dictionary. Then, the coefficient vector is projected onto a sparser one within a certain range of the vehicle's aspect angle. Finally, the vehicle is classified into a certain category that minimizes the reconstruction error with the novel sparse representation vector. Extensive experiments are conducted on the moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition (MSTAR) dataset and the results demonstrate that the proposed method performs robustly under the variations of depression angle and target configurations, as well as incomplete observation. PMID:25161398

  14. Elastic impedance variation with angle inversion for elastic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2012-06-01

    Elastic impedance (EI) and amplitude variation with offset or angle (AVO/AVA) inversion are two cardinal methods to estimate elastic parameters underground with reflection seismic data. Conventional EI inversion as a kind of pre-stack and post-stack joint inversion method has been widely applied in the industry because of its high efficiency and high stability of wavelet extraction; however, the robustness of extracting elastic parameters in conventional EI inversion is still controversial. The robustness of three-term AVO inversion has improved a lot; however, it is still challenging to extract reasonable space variant wavelets for each offset or incident angle. In this paper, a robust three-parameter estimation method, named elastic impedance variation with angle (EVA) inversion, is proposed in the Bayesian framework, which can estimate elastic parameters directly from EI. This method supposes that the parameters to be inverted are Cauchy distributed and it is implemented based on a normalized EI equation in a logarithmic domain which can reduce the nonlinearity of inversion. Application of a covariance matrix to decorrelate the parameters and constraint of well log curves introduced in an objective function enhances the robustness of EVA inversion. A model test shows that the proposed EVA inversion method enables one to estimate reasonable elastic parameters with extremely smooth initial models and moderate Gaussian noise. A real data example shows that the inverted P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density are identical to well log interpretation results, which shows the validity of the proposed method.

  15. Bank Angle of a V-Type 12-Cylinder Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Norio; Nakagawa, Akihito; Kitamura, Ryuji

    As the automobile engine advances towards higher performance and higher power, the increase in displacement and the number of cylinders in the engine has led to larger engines. As a result, the need for rigidity countermeasures and reductions in size and weight have brought about the switch from in-line type engines to V-type engines. Currently, most of the V-type automobile engines produced have six or eight cylinders, and some large passenger cars produced in Europe and America have V-type engines with 10 or 12 cylinders. The bank angles of engines in these passenger are almost fixed based on the cylinder number. Therefore, the form of the V-type engine is limited according to the number of cylinders. The present study examines the bank angle of a V-12 engine by performing a detailed analysis of the relationship between the cylinder arrangement and the exciting moment. The goal of the present study is to find a bank angle that has as of yet not been applied to the V-type engine so that the layouts of the absorption and exhaust systems, as well as the attached apparatuses, can be reconfigured.

  16. Design and manufacture of angle modulated surface plasmon resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinlei; Chen, Ke; Mao, Xuefeng; Yu, Qingxu; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    As an emerging biosensing technology, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique, characterized by high sensitivity, label-free detection and real-time monitoring, has been extensively applied in biochemical analysis, environmental monitoring and refractive index measurement. In this paper, an angle modulated SPR spectrometer with high resolution is designed and manufactured. First, according to the modeling and simulation for the SPR spectrometer, several key parameters such as the light source, the thickness of golden film and Cr film are determined. Then, an angle modulated SPR spectrometer system based on 5-layers Kretchmann prism structure is developed for biochemical analysis. System performance is tested after the SPR spectrometer established. We test the power stability of the laser first, which is up to 1.504% (5min). Different concentrations of glycerol are measured to demarcate the system. Then, we measured the deionized water ten times continuously, and a resolution of 1.5×10-5 RIU is achieved. At last, different concentrations of glucose solution are measured, and the resonance angles are used to calculate the refractive index of the glucose solutions, which is more accurate than the result of Abbe refractometer. The relationship between concentration and refractive index is presented by liner fitting.

  17. Low-angle X-ray scattering from spices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.; Abdullah, Mohamed I.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2002-07-01

    Low-angle scattering of X-rays is characterized by the presence of one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are due to the interference of photons coherently scattered from the molecules of the medium. Thus these patterns are closely linked to the molecular structure of the investigated medium. In this work, low-angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) profiles of five spices; pimpinella anisum (anise), coriandrum sativum (coriander), cuminum cyminum (cumin), foenculum vulgare (fennel) and nigella sativa (nigella or black cumin) are presented after extensive measurements. It is found that all spices exhibit one characteristic peak at a scattering angle around 10°. This is equivalent to a value x=0.0565 Å -1, where x=sin( ??2)? ?. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak is found to be characteristic for each type of the investigated spices. The possibility to detect the irradiation of these spices from their LAXS profiles is also examined after 10, 20, 30 and 40 kGy doses of gamma radiation. Except for anise, coriander and cumin at 40 kGy, there are no detectable deviations from the control samples in the scattering profiles of irradiated samples. These results comply with the recommendations of the FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) which defines 30 kGy as the maximum dose for irradiation of spices. The present technique could be used to detect over-irradiation, which causes damage to the molecular structure of some spices.

  18. Physics of pitch angle scattering and velocity diffusion. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimabadi, H.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Terasawa, T.

    1992-01-01

    A general theory for the pitch angle scattering and velocity diffusion of particles in the field of a spectrum of waves in a magnetized plasma is presented. The test particle theory is used to analyze the particle motion. The form of diffusion surfaces is examined, and analytical expressions are given for the resonance width and bounce frequency. The resonance widths are found to vary strongly as a function of harmonic number. The resulting diffusion can be quite asymmetric with respect to pitch angle of 90 deg. The conditions for the onset of pitch angle scattering and energy diffusion are explained in detail. Some of the known shortcomings of the standard quasi-linear theory are also addressed, and ways to overcome them are shown. In particular, the often stated quasi-linear gap at 90 deg is found to exist only under very special cases. For instance, oblique wave propagation can easily remove the gap. The conditions for the existence of the gap are described in great detail. A new diffusion equation which takes into account the finite resonance widths is also discussed. The differences between this new theory and the standard resonance broadening theory is explained.

  19. Sparse representation based SAR vehicle recognition along with aspect angle.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiangwei; Ji, Kefeng; Zou, Huanxin; Sun, Jixiang

    2014-01-01

    As a method of representing the test sample with few training samples from an overcomplete dictionary, sparse representation classification (SRC) has attracted much attention in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) automatic target recognition (ATR) recently. In this paper, we develop a novel SAR vehicle recognition method based on sparse representation classification along with aspect information (SRCA), in which the correlation between the vehicle's aspect angle and the sparse representation vector is exploited. The detailed procedure presented in this paper can be summarized as follows. Initially, the sparse representation vector of a test sample is solved by sparse representation algorithm with a principle component analysis (PCA) feature-based dictionary. Then, the coefficient vector is projected onto a sparser one within a certain range of the vehicle's aspect angle. Finally, the vehicle is classified into a certain category that minimizes the reconstruction error with the novel sparse representation vector. Extensive experiments are conducted on the moving and stationary target acquisition and recognition (MSTAR) dataset and the results demonstrate that the proposed method performs robustly under the variations of depression angle and target configurations, as well as incomplete observation. PMID:25161398

  20. Laser Tracker Calibration - Testing the Angle Measurement System -

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, Georg; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2008-12-05

    Physics experiments at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) usually require high accuracy positioning, e. g. 100 {micro}m over a distance of 150 m or 25 {micro}m in a 10 x 10 x 3 meter volume. Laser tracker measurement systems have become one of the most important tools for achieving these accuracies when mapping components. The accuracy of these measurements is related to the manufacturing tolerances of various individual components, the resolutions of measurement systems, the overall precision of the assembly, and how well imperfections can be modeled. As with theodolites and total stations, one can remove the effects of most assembly and calibration errors by measuring targets in both direct and reverse positions and computing the mean to obtain the result. However, this approach does not compensate for errors originating from the encoder system. In order to improve and gain a better understanding of laser tracker angle measurement tolerances we extended our laboratory's capabilities with the addition of a horizontal angle calibration test stand. This setup is based on the use of a high precision rotary table providing an angular accuracy of better than 0.2 arcsec. Presently, our setup permits only tests of the horizontal angle measurement system. A test stand for vertical angle calibration is under construction. Distance measurements (LECOCQ & FUSS, 2000) are compared to an interferometer bench for distances of up to 32 m. Together both tests provide a better understanding of the instrument and how it should be operated. The observations also provide a reasonable estimate of covariance information of the measurements according to their actual performance for network adjustments.

  1. Rotation spacing and multiplexing number in angle-peristrophic multiplexing holographic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Masamitsu; Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Motohashi, Mitsuya; Saito, Nobuo

    2015-09-01

    Holographic memory is expected to be the next-generation optical memory with several advantages including high data transfer rate and high recording density. Holographic memory enables the storage of holograms in the same location in a holographic medium typically using the angle multiplexing method. The multiplexing number is an important factor that determines the recording density when using this method. To increase the multiplexing number, it is known as an effective method to combine peristrophic (or rotation) multiplexing with angle multiplexing. We use the k-sphere to describe that the rotation spacing for peristrophic multiplexing depends on both the numerical aperture in the signal beam path and the angle between the reference and signal beams. We then formulate the rotation spacing and compare the results obtained using the theoretical formula with the measured results. Finally, we estimate the maximum multiplexing number for our experimental system using the angle-peristrophic multiplexing method on the basis of the measured results.

  2. SU-E-T-195: Gantry Angle Dependency of MLC Leaf Position Error

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, S; Hong, C; Kim, M; Chung, K; Kim, J; Han, Y; Ahn, S; Chung, S; Shin, E; Shin, J; Kim, H; Kim, D; Choi, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the gantry angle dependency of the multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position error. Methods: An automatic MLC quality assurance system (AutoMLCQA) was developed to evaluate the gantry angle dependency of the MLC leaf position error using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To eliminate the EPID position error due to gantry rotation, we designed a reference maker (RM) that could be inserted into the wedge mount. After setting up the EPID, a reference image was taken of the RM using an open field. Next, an EPID-based picket-fence test (PFT) was performed without the RM. These procedures were repeated at every 45° intervals of the gantry angle. A total of eight reference images and PFT image sets were analyzed using in-house software. The average MLC leaf position error was calculated at five pickets (-10, -5, 0, 5, and 10 cm) in accordance with general PFT guidelines using in-house software. This test was carried out for four linear accelerators. Results: The average MLC leaf position errors were within the set criterion of <1 mm (actual errors ranged from -0.7 to 0.8 mm) for all gantry angles, but significant gantry angle dependency was observed in all machines. The error was smaller at a gantry angle of 0° but increased toward the positive direction with gantry angle increments in the clockwise direction. The error reached a maximum value at a gantry angle of 90° and then gradually decreased until 180°. In the counter-clockwise rotation of the gantry, the same pattern of error was observed but the error increased in the negative direction. Conclusion: The AutoMLCQA system was useful to evaluate the MLC leaf position error for various gantry angles without the EPID position error. The Gantry angle dependency should be considered during MLC leaf position error analysis.

  3. Network-centric angle only tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yosinski, Jason; Coult, Nick; Paffenroth, Randy

    2009-08-01

    The coordinated use of multiple distributed sensors by network communication has the potential to substantially improve track state estimates even in the presence of enemy countermeasures. In the modern electronic warfare environment, a network-centric tracking system must function in a variety of jamming scenarios. In some scenarios hostile electronic countermeasures (ECM) will endeavor to deny range and range rate information, leaving friendly sensors to depend on passive angle information for tracking. In these cases the detrimental effects of ECM can be at least partially ameliorated through the use of multiple networked sensors, due to the inability of the ECM to deny angle measurements and the geometric diversity provided by having sensors in distributed locations. Herein we demonstrate algorithms for initiating and maintaining tracks in such hostile operating environments with a focus on maximum likelihood estimators and provide Cramer-Rao bounds on the performance one can expect to achieve.

  4. Fan Stagger Angle for Dirt Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Rose, Becky E. (Inventor); Brilliant, Lisa I. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, a propulsor coupled to be rotated about an axis by the turbine through the spool, and a gear assembly coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extend from the hub. Each of the propulsor blades has a span between a root at the hub and a tip, and a chord between a leading edge and a trailing edge. The chord forms a stagger angle alpha with the axis, and the stagger angle alpha is less than 15 deg. at a position along the propulsor blade that is within an inboard 20% of the span.

  5. Ray-tracing studies for a whole-viewing-angle retroreflector

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Friedsam, H.

    2000-02-02

    The APS Survey and Alignment team uses LEICA laser trackers for the majority of their alignment tasks. These instruments utilize several different retroreflectors for tracking the path of the laser interferometer. Currently in use are open-air corner cubes with an acceptance angle of {+-}20{degree}, corner cube prisms with an acceptance angle of {+-}50{degree}, and a Cat's eye with an acceptance angle of {+-}60{degree}. Best measurement results can be achieved by using an open-air corner cube that eliminates the need for the laser beam to travel through a different medium before it returns to the instrument detector. However, the trade off is a small acceptance angle. In order to overcome the limitations of the small acceptance angles, Takatsuji et al. has proposed the creation of a full-viewing-angle retroreflector. Based on the notion that the radius R{sub 1} of a common Cat's eye is proportional to R{sub 2}, one can write: R{sub 1} = (n {minus} 1)R{sub 2}. In the case that n, the refractive index of glass, equals 2, the radii R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} are identical, and one can create a solid sphere Cat's eye. This design has the advantages that no adhesives are used to bond the two hemispheres together, misalignments between the hemispheres are not an issue, and most importantly, larger acceptance angles are possible. This paper shows the results of their ray tracing calculations characterizing the geometrical optics.

  6. Contact angle hysteresis and phase separation in dry phospholipid films with cholesterol deposited on mica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurak, Ma?gorzata

    2015-02-01

    A series of apparent advancing and receding contact angles of water and diiodomethane was measured on the phospholipid/cholesterol monolayers physisorbed on the mica surfaces. It was found that the contact angles and their hystereses vary significantly depending on the lipid film composition and mutual miscibility of both components. These changes were much greater for water than diiodomethane. When the phase separation occurred, the hysteresis of water contact angle significantly decreased whereas the diiodomethane contact angle hysteresis increased considerably. Different behavior of both liquids may result from different mechanisms of the liquid droplets penetration/retention and points to structural changes that occur within the monolayers, including molecules rearrangement when exposed to water. The structure of the studied monolayer surfaces was confirmed by means of the microscopic techniques. The images are a visual evidence of cholesterol precipitation out the binary films at their specific stoichiometry. The results provide a new insight into the advancing/receding contact angles origin (and contact angle hysteresis) of polar and apolar liquids depending on the phospholipid/cholesterol monolayer composition, as well explanation of the origin of the contact angle hysteresis on the model biological surfaces, which are molecularly smooth.

  7. Wireless Orbiter Hang-Angle Inclinometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucena, Angel; Perotti, Jose; Green, Eric; Byon, Jonathan; Burns, Bradley; Mata, Carlos; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman

    2011-01-01

    A document describes a system to reliably gather the hang-angle inclination of the orbiter. The system comprises a wireless handheld master station (which contains the main station software) and a wireless remote station (which contains the inclinometer sensors, the RF transceivers, and the remote station software). The remote station is designed to provide redundancy to the system. It includes two RF transceivers, two power-management boards, and four inclinometer sensors.

  8. Manifold angles, the concept of self-similarity, and angle-enhanced bifurcation diagrams.

    PubMed

    Beims, Marcus W; Gallas, Jason A C

    2016-01-01

    Chaos and regularity are routinely discriminated by using Lyapunov exponents distilled from the norm of orthogonalized Lyapunov vectors, propagated during the temporal evolution of the dynamics. Such exponents are mean-field-like averages that, for each degree of freedom, squeeze the whole temporal evolution complexity into just a single number. However, Lyapunov vectors also contain a step-by-step record of what exactly happens with the angles between stable and unstable manifolds during the whole evolution, a big-data information permanently erased by repeated orthogonalizations. Here, we study changes of angles between invariant subspaces as observed during temporal evolution of Hénon's system. Such angles are calculated numerically and analytically and used to characterize self-similarity of a chaotic attractor. In addition, we show how standard tools of dynamical systems may be angle-enhanced by dressing them with informations not difficult to extract. Such angle-enhanced tools reveal unexpected and practical facts that are described in detail. For instance, we present a video showing an angle-enhanced bifurcation diagram that exposes from several perspectives the complex geometrical features underlying the attractors. We believe such findings to be generic for extended classes of systems. PMID:26732416

  9. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhyuk; Johnson, Ben; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-01

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  10. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOEpatents

    Hessler, Jan P. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  11. Emission-angle-dependent photoluminescence of rubrene thin films on silver.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Takashi

    2014-07-20

    Rubrene layers with thickness comparable to a visible light wavelength on silver thin film exhibit anomalous photoluminescence (PL) spectra that depend strongly on emission angle. The PL properties demonstrated for rubrene (500 nm)/Ag (50 nm) were modulated from yellow green to red luminescence with an increasing emission angle. The factors influencing the emission-angle-dependent PL spectra are discussed from two viewpoints: spectral modulation of rubrene PL by loss of fluorescence photon energy and additional luminescence resulting from optical interference in the rubrene layer or optical modes excited by rubrene molecules. PMID:25090212

  12. The effect of low angle quasi - particles on the laser damage

    SciTech Connect

    Salo, V.I.; Tkachenko, V.F.; Rom, M.A.

    1997-12-01

    The thin structure of KDP crystals was studied using multicrystal X-ray diffraction analysis of high resolution and two-crystal topography for reflection. KDP crystals grown from aqueous solutions are characterized by the impurity striated structure caused by the fluctuation of the growth processes, the latter results in the nonuniform penetration and distribution of impurities and formation of low angle turns during a layer-by-layer growth. Low angle quasi - boundaries separating the, strips of the normal growth are perhaps of a nondislocational origin. A qualitative, correlation between the concentration of low angle quasi - boundaries in the crystal and the value of bulk laser damage threshold has been found.

  13. SU-E-T-618: Dosimetric Comparison of Manual and Beam Angle Optimization of Gantry Angles in IMRT for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, X; Sun, T; Liu, T; Zhang, G; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plan with beam angle optimization. Methods: Ten post-operation patients with cervical cancer were included in this analysis. Two IMRT plans using seven beams were designed in each patient. A standard coplanar equi-space beam angles were used in the first plan (plan 1), whereas the selection of beam angle was optimized by beam angle optimization algorithm in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for the same number of beams in the second plan (plan 2). Two plans were designed for each patient with the same dose-volume constraints and prescription dose. All plans were normalized to the mean dose to PTV. The dose distribution in the target, the dose to the organs at risk and total MU were compared. Results: For conformity and homogeneity in PTV, no statistically differences were observed in the two plans. For the mean dose in bladder, plan 2 were significantly lower than plan 1(p<0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed between two plans for the mean doses in rectum, left and right femur heads. Compared with plan1, the average monitor units reduced 16% in plan 2. Conclusion: The IMRT plan based on beam angle optimization for cervical cancer could reduce the dose delivered to bladder and also reduce MU. Therefore there were some dosimetric advantages in the IMRT plan with beam angle optimization for cervical cancer.

  14. Two Years of Digital Terrain Model Production Using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Narrow Angle Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K.; Robinson, M. S.; Speyerer, E.; LROC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) is to gather stereo observations with the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC). These stereo observations are used to generate digital terrain models (DTMs). The NAC has a pixel scale of 0.5 to 2.0 meters but was not designed for stereo observations and thus requires the spacecraft to roll off-nadir to acquire these images. Slews interfere with the data collection of the other instruments, so opportunities are currently limited to four per day. Arizona State University has produced DTMs from 95 stereo pairs for 11 Constellation Project (CxP) sites (Aristarchus, Copernicus crater, Gruithuisen domes, Hortensius domes, Ina D-caldera, Lichtenberg crater, Mare Ingenii, Marius hills, Reiner Gamma, South Pole-Aitkin Rim, Sulpicius Gallus) as well as 30 other regions of scientific interest (including: Bhabha crater, highest and lowest elevation points, Highland Ponds, Kugler Anuchin, Linne Crater, Planck Crater, Slipher crater, Sears Crater, Mandel'shtam Crater, Virtanen Graben, Compton/Belkovich, Rumker Domes, King Crater, Luna 16/20/23/24 landing sites, Ranger 6 landing site, Wiener F Crater, Apollo 11/14/15/17, fresh craters, impact melt flows, Larmor Q crater, Mare Tranquillitatis pit, Hansteen Alpha, Moore F Crater, and Lassell Massif). To generate DTMs, the USGS ISIS software and SOCET SET° from BAE Systems are used. To increase the absolute accuracy of the DTMs, data obtained from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) is used to coregister the NAC images and define the geodetic reference frame. NAC DTMs have been used in examination of several sites, e.g. Compton-Belkovich, Marius Hills and Ina D-caldera [1-3]. LROC will continue to acquire high-resolution stereo images throughout the science phase of the mission and any extended mission opportunities, thus providing a vital dataset for scientific research as well as future human and robotic exploration. [1] B.L. Jolliff (2011) Nature Geoscience, in press. [2] Lawrence et al. (2011) LPSC XLII, Abst 2228. [3] Garry et al. (2011) LPSC XLII, Abst 2605.

  15. Interference effects of aircraft components on the local blade angle of attack of a wing-mounted propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The aerodynamic interference effects on a propeller operating in the presence of different wing-body-nacelle combinations was studied. The unsteady blade angle of attack variation with azimuth angle by varying the pitch and yaw of the nacelle was minimized. Results indicate for the particular configuration of interest the minimum blade angle of attack variation occurred with the nacelle pitched downward 4.5 deg and yawed inward 3.0 deg.

  16. High tip angle approximation based on a modified Bloch-Riccati equation.

    PubMed

    Boulant, Nicolas; Hoult, David I

    2012-02-01

    When designing a radio-frequency pulse to produce a desired dependence of magnetization on frequency or position, the small flip angle approximation is often used as a first step, and a Fourier relation between pulse and transverse magnetization is then invoked. However, common intuition often leads to linear scaling of the resulting pulse so as to produce a larger flip angle than the approximation warrants--with surprisingly good results. Starting from a modified version of the Bloch-Riccati equation, a differential equation in the flip angle itself, rather than in magnetization, is derived. As this equation has a substantial linear component that is an instance of Fourier's equation, the intuitive approach is seen to be justified. Examples of the accuracy of this higher tip angle approximation are given for both constant- and variable-phase pulses. PMID:22139869

  17. Measurement of two-dimensional small angle deviation with a prism interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Kumar, Y. Pavan

    2008-09-20

    A new technique for the measurement of two-dimensional small angular deviation is presented. A compound prism, which effectively produces a combination of two right-angled prisms in orthogonal directions, and plane reference surfaces have been utilized for the measurement of the orthogonal components of the angular tilt of an incident plane wavefront. Each orthogonal component of the angular tilt is separately measured from the angular rotation of the resultant wedge fringes between two plane wavefronts generated due to splitting of the incident plane wavefront by the corresponding set of right-angled prism and plane reference surface. The technique is shown to have high sensitivity for the measurement of small angle deviation. A monolithic prism interferometer, which is practically insensitive to vibration, is also proposed. Results obtained for the measurement of a known tilt angle are presented.

  18. Small-angle approximation to the transfer of narrow laser beams in anisotropic scattering media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    The broadening and the signal power detected of a laser beam traversing an anisotropic scattering medium were examined using the small-angle approximation to the radiative transfer equation in which photons suffering large-angle deflections are neglected. To obtain tractable answers, simple Gaussian and non-Gaussian functions for the scattering phase functions are assumed. Two other approximate approaches employed in the field to further simplify the small-angle approximation solutions are described, and the results obtained by one of them are compared with those obtained using small-angle approximation. An exact method for obtaining the contribution of each higher order scattering to the radiance field is examined but no results are presented.

  19. Gaze angle: a possible mechanism of visual stress in virtual reality headsets.

    PubMed

    Mon-Williams, M; Plooy, A; Burgess-Limerick, R; Wann, J

    1998-03-01

    It is known that some Virtual Reality (VR) head-mounted displays (HMDs) can cause temporary deficits in binocular vision. On the other hand, the precise mechanism by which visual stress occurs is unclear. This paper is concerned with a potential source of visual stress that has not been previously considered with regard to VR systems: inappropriate vertical gaze angle. As vertical gaze angle is raised or lowered the 'effort' required of the binocular system also changes. The extent to which changes in vertical gaze angle alter the demands placed upon the vergence eye movement system was explored. The results suggested that visual stress may depend, in part, on vertical gaze angle. The proximity of the display screens within an HMD means that a VR headset should be in the correct vertical location for any individual user. This factor may explain some previous empirical results and has important implications for headset design. Fortuitously, a reasonably simple solution exists. PMID:9520625

  20. Measurement of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Yeche, C.; /Saclay

    2006-04-14

    We present BABAR experiment studies to measure the CKM angle {alpha} of the Unitarity Triangle. The measurements are based on the B meson decays into the two-body state ({pi}{pi}), the quasi two-body state ({rho}{rho}), and the three-body state ({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}). The results are obtained from data samples of about 230 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected between 1999 and 2004 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC.

  1. Calculations of transonic boattail flow at small angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakayama, A.; Chow, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    A transonic flow past a boattailed afterbody under a small angle of attack was examined. It is known that the viscous effect offers significant modifications of the pressure distribution on the afterbody. Thus, the formulation for the inviscid flow was based on the consideration of a flow past a nonaxisymmetric body. The full three dimensional potential equation was solved through numerical relaxation, and quasi-axisymmetric boundary layer calculations were performed to estimate the displacement effect. It was observed again that the viscous effects were not negligible. The trend of the final results agreed well with the experimental data.

  2. SCDU (Spectral Calibration Development Unit) Testbed Narrow Angle Astrometric Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud; Nemati, Bijan; Shao, Michael; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Weilert, Mark A.; Werne, Thomas A.; Wu, Janet P.; Zhai, Chengxing

    2010-01-01

    The most stringent astrometric performance requirements on NASA's SIM(Space Interferometer Mission)-Lite mission will come from the so-called Narrow-Angle (NA) observing scenario, aimed at finding Earth-like exoplanets, where the interferometer chops between the target star and several nearby reference stars multiple times over the course of a single visit. Previously, about 20 pm NA error with various shifts was reported. Since then, investigation has been under way to understand the mechanisms that give rise to these shifts. In this paper we report our findings, the adopted mitigation strategies, and the resulting testbed performance.

  3. Improved wide-angle, fisheye and omnidirectional camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Steffen; Leitloff, Jens; Hinz, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper an improved method for calibrating wide-angle, fisheye and omnidirectional imaging systems is presented. We extend the calibration procedure proposed by Scaramuzza et al. by replacing the residual function and joint refinement of all parameters. In doing so, we achieve a more stable, robust and accurate calibration (up to factor 7) and can reduce the number of necessary calibration steps from five to three. After introducing the camera model and highlighting the differences from the current calibration procedure, we perform a comprehensive performance evaluation using several data sets and show the impact of the proposed calibration procedure on the calibration results.

  4. Anterior segment changes after pharmacologic mydriasis using Pentacam and optical coherence tomography in angle closure suspects

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing-Min; Li, Mu; Xu, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare the dynamic changes of anterior segment parameters especially iris morphology induced by pharmacologic mydriasis between angle closure suspects and normal controls. METHODS The study group comprised 19 eyes of 19 angle closure suspects and 19 eyes of 19 age- and sex-matched normal open-angle eyes. Pentacam and optical coherence tomography measurements before and 30min after instillation of compound tropicamide eye drop were performed and compared. Biometric evaluations of iris tomography and anterior chamber angle were estimated by a customized image-processing software. RESULTS Baseline axial length, iris cross sectional area and volume did not differ significantly between angle closure suspects and normal controls. Angle closure suspects had smaller pupil size, narrower anterior segment dimension and axial length, thinner iris with greater curve in comparison with normal controls. Pharmacologic mydriasis led to significant increments in iris thickness at 750 µm, anterior chamber depth and volume, whereas significant decrements in iris curve, cross sectional area and volume in both groups. Angle opening distance at 500 µm was increased significantly in normal controls (from 0.465±0.115 mm to 0.539±0.167 mm, P=0.009), but not in angle closure suspects (from 0.125±0.100 mm to 0.145±0.131 mm, P=0.326). Iris volume change per millimeter of pupil dilation (?IV/?PD) decreased significantly less in angle closure suspects than normal controls (?2.47±1.33 mm2 vs ?3.63±1.58 mm2, P=0.019). Linear regression analysis showed that the change of angle opening distance at 500 µm was associated most with the change of central anterior chamber depth (?=0.841, P=0.002) and ?IV/?PD (?=0.028, P=0.002), followed by gender (?=0.062, P=0.032). CONCLUSION Smaller iris volume decrement per millimeter of pupil dilation is related significantly with the less anterior angle opening in angle closure suspects after pharmacologic mydriasis. Dynamic iris change may be as a prospective indicator of iris compressibility and angle closure glaucoma. PMID:26558213

  5. Extraction of average neck flexion angle during swallowing in neutral and chin-tuck positions

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Delbert; Sejdi?, Ervin; Steele, Catriona M; Chau, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Background A common but debated technique in the management of swallowing difficulties is the chin tuck swallow, where the neck is flexed forward prior to swallowing. Natural variations in chin tuck angles across individuals may contribute to the differential effectiveness of the technique. Methodology To facilitate the study of chin tuck angle variations, we present a template tracking algorithm that automatically extracts neck angles from sagittal videos of individuals performing chin tuck swallows. Three yellow markers geometrically arranged on a pair of dark visors were used as tracking cues. Results The algorithm was applied to data collected from 178 healthy participants during neutral and chin tuck position swallows. Our analyses revealed no major influences of body mass index and age on neck flexion angles during swallowing, while gender influenced the average neck angle only during wet swallows in the neutral position. Chin tuck angles seem to be independent of anthropometry and gender in healthy adults, but deserve further study in pathological populations. Conclusion The proposed neck flexion angle extraction algorithm may be useful in future studies where strict participant compliance to swallowing task protocol can be assured. PMID:19811640

  6. Design and simulation of betavoltaic angle sensor Based on (63)Ni-Si.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi Nejad, Gholam Reza; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical design and simulation of betavoltaic angle sensor (beta-AS) based on (63)Ni-Si using MCNP code is presented in this article. It can measure the full angle of 0-360° in the temperature range of 233-353K. Beta-AS is composed of semicircular (63)Ni as the beta source, which rotates along the circular (four-quadrant) surface of Si as a semiconductor (in p-n structure), so that the change in the source angle in relation to Si surface can be measured based on the changes in Voc observed in each quadrant of Si. For better performance, characteristics of Si and (63)Ni have been optimized: ND and NA values of 8e19 and 4e18cm(-3) (donor and acceptor doping concentration in Si, respectively), source thickness and activity of 1.5µm and 18mCi, respectively. The relation between angle and Voc is also investigated. The maximum difference between measured and real values of angle (the worst case, i.e., 0.18° for the angle of 45°) occurs at 233K. It has been shown that sensitivity of the sensor decreases with an increase of angle. The results also show that the change in activity does not affect the sensitivity. PMID:26609684

  7. Determining Leaf-Angle Distribution of Vineyards in Delano, CA Using Terrestrial LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A.; Grigsby, S.; Harburger, A.; Ustin, S.

    2012-12-01

    Plants can regulate the solar exposure they receive by adjusting their leaf-angles, and as a result, leaf-angle can serve as an indicator for plant health and photosynthetic activity. Leaf-angle also serves as an important input parameter for the calculation of reflectance and transmittance in vegetation canopies. This study presents an indirect and nondestructive method to retrieve leaf-angle by calculating surface normal vectors of grapevine leaves using terrestrial LiDAR scanning (TLS). Three scans were performed in June of 2012 at a table grape vineyard located in Delano, CA. Data points collected were classified based on scan number, elevation, red-green-blue (RGB) values, and hue-saturation-value (HSV) values. Individual leaf-angles were found by calculating the surface normal of a subset of leaf points. Subsets were made up of all points within a 5cm spherical radius of the central point of each individual leaf, with the origin calculated as the mean of all points in the subset. This process was repeated for all leaf centroid points in order to define the distribution of leaf-angles. Leaf-angles and their distribution in canopies can now serve as better inputs into corresponding research and models determining plant productivity and health. Utilizing more accurate import parameters allows agriculturalists to better monitor plant stress and practice more sustainable water management policies.

  8. Large incidence angle and defocus influence cat's eye retro-reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lai-xian; Sun, Hua-yan; Zhao, Yan-zhong; Yang, Ji-guang; Zheng, Yong-hui

    2014-11-01

    Cat's eye lens make the laser beam retro-reflected exactly to the opposite direction of the incidence beam, called cat's eye effect, which makes rapid acquiring, tracking and pointing of free space optical communication possible. Study the influence of cat's eye effect to cat's eye retro-reflector at large incidence angle is useful. This paper analyzed the process of how the incidence angle and focal shit affect effective receiving area, retro-reflected beam divergence angle, central deviation of cat's eye retro-reflector at large incidence angle and cat's eye effect factor using geometrical optics method, and presented the analytic expressions. Finally, numerical simulation was done to prove the correction of the study. The result shows that the efficiency receiving area of cat's eye retro-reflector is mainly affected by incidence angle when the focal shift is positive, and it decreases rapidly when the incidence angle increases; the retro-reflected beam divergence and central deviation is mainly affected by focal shift, and within the effective receiving area, the central deviation is smaller than beam divergence in most time, which means the incidence beam can be received and retro-reflected to the other terminal in most time. The cat's eye effect factor gain is affected by both incidence angle and focal shift.

  9. Flow visualization for different port angles of a pulsatile ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Eiki; Lee, Hwansung; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Homma, Akihiko; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2012-06-01

    The "washout effect" inside a blood pump may depend in part on the configuration of the blood pump, including its "port angle." The port angle, which is primarily decided based on anatomical considerations, may also be important from the rheological viewpoint. In our department, a next-generation diaphragm-type blood pump is being developed. In this study, we examined the influence of the port angle on flow conditions inside our new blood pump. Acrylic resin mock pumps with three different port angles (0°, 30°, and 45°) were prepared for flow visualization. Mechanical monoleaflet valves were mounted on the inlet and outlet ports of the mock pumps. Flow conditions within the mock pumps were visualized by means of particle image velocimetry during a half stroke. As a result, a high flow velocity region was seen along the main circular flow from the inlet to the outlet port. This circular flow was almost uniform and parallel to the plane of the diaphragm-housing junction (DhJ) when viewed from the inlet and outlet sides. Moreover, the proportion of high flow velocity vectors in the plane in the vicinity of the DhJ decreased as the degree of the port angle increased. In conclusion, we found that the flow behavior in the plane in the vicinity of the DhJ changed with the port angle, and that a port angle of 0° may be suitable for our diaphragm-type blood pump in view of the washout effect. PMID:22038496

  10. Precision Determination of Electron Scattering Angle by Differential Nuclear Recoil Energy Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liyanage, Nilanga; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2015-09-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this article, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  11. Joint torque and angle estimation by using ultrasonic muscle activity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Yoichiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shun'ichi; Feng, Maria Q.

    2005-12-01

    We have proposed a brand-new noninvasive ultrasonic sensor for measuring muscle activities named as Ultrasonic Muscle Activity Sensor (UMS). In the previous paper, the authors achieved to accurately estimate joint torque by using UMS and electromyogram (EMG) which is one of the most popular sensors. This paper aims to realize to measure not only joint torque also joint angle by using UMS and EMG. In order to estimate torque and angle of a knee joint, muscle activities of quadriceps femoris and biceps femoris were measured by both UMS and EMG. These targeted muscles are related to contraction and extension of knee joint. Simultaneously, actual torque on the knee joint caused by these muscles was measured by using torque sensor. The knee joint angle was fixed by torque sensor in the experiment, therefore the measurement was in isometric state. In the result, we found that the estimated torque and angle have high correlation coefficient to actual torque and angle. This means that the sensor can be used for angle estimation as well torque estimation. Therefore, it is shown that the combined use of UMS and EMG is effective to torque and angle estimation.

  12. Sunspot group tilt angles and the strength of the solar cycle

    E-print Network

    Dasi-Espuig, Maria; Krivova, Natasha A; Cameron, Robert H; Peñuela, Tania

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the tilt angles of active regions increase with their latitude (Joy's law). It has never been checked before, however, whether the average tilt angles change from one cycle to another. Flux transport models show the importance of tilt angles for the reversal and build up of magnetic flux at the poles which is, in turn, correlated with the strength of the next cycle. Here we analyse time series of tilt angle measurements and look for a possible relationship of the tilt angles with other solar cycle parameters, in order to glean information on the solar dynamo and to estimate their potential for predictions of solar activity. We employ tilt angle data from Mount Wilson and Kodaikanal observatories covering solar cycles 15 to 21. We analyse the latitudinal distribution of the tilt angles (Joy's law), their variation from cycle to cycle and their relationship to other solar cycle parameters, such as the strength, amplitude and length. The two main results are: 1. An anti-correlation between the m...

  13. Precision determination of electron scattering angle by differential nuclear recoil energy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanage, N.; Saenboonruang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the scattered electron angle is crucial to electron scattering experiments, both with open-geometry large-acceptance spectrometers and ones with dipole-type magnetic spectrometers for electron detection. In particular, for small central-angle experiments using dipole-type magnetic spectrometers, in which surveys are used to measure the spectrometer angle with respect to the primary electron beam, the importance of the scattering angle determination is emphasized. However, given the complexities of large experiments and spectrometers, the accuracy of such surveys is limited and insufficient to meet demands of some experiments. In this paper, we present a new technique for determination of the electron scattering angle based on an accurate measurement of the primary beam energy and the principle of differential nuclear recoil. This technique was used to determine the scattering angle for several experiments carried out at the Experimental Hall A, Jefferson Lab. Results have shown that the new technique greatly improved the accuracy of the angle determination compared to surveys.

  14. Determination of Load Bearing Capacity for Spatial Joint with Steel Angle Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejkot, P.; Ormarsson, S.; Vessby, J.; Kuklík, P.

    2015-11-01

    The design of spatial connections in load bearing timber structures with steel angle brackets has insufficient support in the existing design standards. Therefore, research has been necessary to improve this state of the art. In the current paper an experimental study on two designs of angle brackets is presented and the results from full-scale experiments are compared to numerical and analytical computational models.

  15. The optimum value of the nozzle outlet angle of turbine stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosowski, Krzysztof

    1992-06-01

    The paper presents the results of theoretical research on the influence of the main design parameters on the optimum value of the nozzle outlet angle. The analysis was carried out for the stages with the disk and the drum rotors. The cascade losses were determined using Traupel's and Bammert's generalized cascade data. The calculations have proved that the blade height, the profile chord and the number of stages in the group are the most important factors influencing the optimum nozzle outlet angle.

  16. The natural frequencies of symmetric angle-ply laminates derived from eigensensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Robert; Ramachandran, S.; Qian, BO

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, a new closed-form approximate solution for the natural frequencies of symmetric rectangular angle-ply laminates simply supported on all four edges is derived. The solution, obtained from eigensensitivity analysis, is expressed as a truncated Fourier series in the ply angle. Results show that the prediction for the fundamental frequency is quite accurate for engineering applications, often within 1-2 percent of the true frequency.

  17. Simulations of Convection Zone Flows and Measurements from Multiple Viewing Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L.; Hanasoge, Shravan

    2011-01-01

    A deep-focusing time-distance measurement technique has been applied to linear acoustic simulations of a solar interior perturbed by convective flows. The simulations are for the full sphere for r/R greater than 0.2. From these it is straightforward to simulate the observations from different viewing angles and to test how multiple viewing angles enhance detectibility. Some initial results will be presented.

  18. Poly-periodic hole arrays for angle-invariant plasmonic filters.

    PubMed

    Do, Yun Seon; Choi, Kyung Cheol

    2015-08-15

    We suggest a plasmonic filter with novel hole arrays for an angle-invariant optical response. The suggested patterns consist of randomly distributed polycrystalline domains in which nano sized holes are arranged with the same period. While the microscopic area of periodicity determines the center wavelength and transmission intensity, the broken periodicity of each domain contributes to restrain the angle dependency. The results increase the possible use of nanohole-based filters in practical area. PMID:26274682

  19. Strong Pitch-Angle Diffusion of Ring Current Ions in Geomagnetic Storm-Associated Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Spann, J. F.

    2005-01-01

    Do electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves cause strong pitch-angle diffusion of RC ions? This question is the primary motivation of this paper and has been affirmatively answered from the theoretical point of view. The materials that are presented in the Results section show clear evidence that strong pitch-angle diffusion takes place in the inner magnetosphere indicating an important role for the wave-particle interaction mechanism in the formation of RC ions and EMIC waves.

  20. Introduction of Lens-angle Reconstruction Surgery in Rabbit Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hee; Hwang, Ho Sik; Park, Kyoung Jin; Hwang, Je Hyung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we examined the stability of the lens-angle supporter (LAS) for accommodation restoration by comparing intraocular lens (IOL) location, after-cataract and ciliary body damage after cataract surgery in rabbits. Methods Eight rabbits were divided into experimental and control groups of four rabbits each. Phacoemulsification and irrigation and aspiration were performed in all rabbits. This was followed by an LAS and IOL insertion in the four experimental rabbits. In the four control rabbits, only an IOL insertion was performed. Six months after the surgery, the location of the IOL, the conditions of the lens capsule and ciliary body were evaluated using a slitl-amp examination and Miyake-Apple view. Results For the experimental group, the ultrasound biomicroscope results showed normal LAS and IOL positioning in all four cases. According to the slitlamp examination and Miyake-Apple view, the IOL was positioned at the center, with less after-cataract and damage to the ciliary body. For the control group, ultrasound biomicroscope results indicated a higher IOL position than normal, as well as a single case of IOL decentering. According to the slit-lamp examination and Miyake-Apple view, the IOL was decentered with more severe after-cataract and ciliary body damage. Conclusions The LAS has the potential to maintain a stable IOL position while producing less after-cataract when used in lens-angle reconstruction for correction of presbyopia. Moreover, LAS implantation incurs less damage to the ciliary body. PMID:25435752

  1. Effects of film injection angle on turbine vane cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Film ejection from discrete holes in the suction surface of a turbine vane was studied for hole axes (1) slanted 30 deg to the surface in the streamwise direction and (2) slanted 30 deg to the surface and 45 deg from the streamwise direction toward the hub. The holes were near the throat area in a five-row staggered array with 8-diameter spacing. Mass flux ratios were as high as 1.2. The data were obtained in an annular sector cascade at conditions where both the ratio of the boundary layer momentum thickness-to-hole diameter and the momentum thickness Reynolds number were typical of an advanced turbofan engine at both takeoff and cruise. Wall temperatures were measured downstream of each of the rows of holes. Results of this study are expressed as a comparison of cooling effectiveness between the in-line angle injection and the compound-angle injection as a function of mass flux ratio. These heat transfer results are also compared with the results of a referenced flow visualization study. Also included is a closed-form analytical solution for temperature within the film cooled wall.

  2. Compact reflection holographic recording system with high angle multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayasu, Mayumi; Yamada, Takehumi; Takekawa, Shunsuke; Akieda, Kensuke; Goto, Akiyo; Yamamoto, Manabu

    2011-02-01

    Holographic memory systems have been widely researched since 1963. However, the size of the drives required and the deterioration of reconstructed data resulting from shrinkage of the medium have made practical use of a hologram memory difficult. In light of this, we propose a novel holographic recording/reconstructing system: a dual-reference beam reflection system that is smaller than conventional systems such as the off-axis or co-axis types, and which is expected to increase the number of multiplexing in angle multiplexed recording. In this multiplex recording system, two laser beams are used as reference beams, and the recorded data are reconstructed stably, even if there is shrinkage of the recording medium. In this paper, a reflection holographic memory system is explained in detail. In addition, the change in angle selectivity resulting from shrinkage of the medium is analyzed using the laminated film three-dimensional simulation method. As a result, we demonstrate that a dual-reference beam multiplex recording system is effective in reducing the influence of medium shrinkage.

  3. Research of misalignment between dithered ring laser gyro angle rate input axis and dither axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Geng; Wu, Wenqi; FAN, Zhenfang; LU, Guangfeng; Hu, Shaomin; Luo, Hui; Long, Xingwu

    2014-12-01

    The strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS), especially the SINS composed by dithered ring laser gyroscope (DRLG) is a kind of equipment, which providing high reliability and performance for moving vehicles. However, the mechanical dither which is used to eliminate the "Lock-In" effect can cause vibration disturbance to the INS and lead to dithering coupling problem in the inertial measurement unit (IMU) gyroscope triad, so its further application is limited. Among DRLG errors between the true gyro rotation rate and the measured rotation rate, the frequently considered one is the input axis misalignment between input reference axis which is perpendicular to the mounting surface and gyro angular rate input axis. But the misalignment angle between DRLG dither axis and gyro angular rate input axis is often ignored by researchers, which is amplified by dither coupling problem and that would lead to negative effects especially in high accuracy SINS. In order to study the problem more clearly, the concept of misalignment between DRLG dither axis and gyro angle rate input axis is researched. Considering the error of misalignment is of the order of 10-3 rad. or even smaller, the best way to measure it is using DRLG itself by means of an angle exciter as an auxiliary. In this paper, the concept of dither axis misalignment is explained explicitly firstly, based on this, the frequency of angle exciter is induced as reference parameter, when DRLG is mounted on the angle exciter in a certain angle, the projections of angle exciter rotation rate and mechanical oscillation rate on the gyro input axis are both sensed by DRLG. If the dither axis has misalignment error with the gyro input axis, there will be four major frequencies detected: the frequency of angle exciter, the dither mechanical frequency, sum and difference frequencies of the former two frequencies. Then the amplitude spectrum of DRLG output signal obtained by the using LabVIEW program. if there are only angle exciter and the dither mechanical frequencies, the misalignment may be too small to be detected, otherwise, the amplitude of the sum and difference frequencies will show the misalignment angle between the gyro angle rate input axis and the dither axis. Finally, some related parameters such as frequency and amplitude of the angle exciter and sample rate are calculated and the results are analyzed. The simulation and experiment result prove the effectiveness of the proposed method..

  4. The Effects of Elbow Joint Angle Changes on Elbow Flexor and Extensor Muscle Strength and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeongok; Lee, Joongsook; Lee, Bomjin; Kim, Seounghoon; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Younghyun; Lee, Jaeseok; Han, Dongwook; Choi, Sunkoung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This research investigated the relationship between elbow joint angle and elbow flexor and extensor strength and activation, taking into consideration the length-tension tension curve of the muscle. [Subjects] There were 30 research subjects in total, 15 male and 15 female college students from Busan S University who had no functional disabilities that might affect measurement of muscle strength and muscle activation, and none had they experienced any damage in their upper extremities or hands. [Methods] The elbow joint angles were positioned at angles of 56°, 70° and 84°, and then muscle strength and activation were compared. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis, and the paired t-test was used to identify the difference between each angle. We used the SPSS for windows (ver. 21.0) statistical software and a significance level of ?=0.05. [Results] The results showed that muscle strength and activation of the biceps was highest when the joint was placed at 56°. On the other hand, for the triceps, the result was highest when the joint angle was placed at 84°. [Conclusion] The tests confirmed that muscle strength and activation were highest at the joint angle at which the muscle was stretched to 20% more than the resting position in concentric contraction. PMID:25140101

  5. The effects of elbow joint angle changes on elbow flexor and extensor muscle strength and activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeongok; Lee, Joongsook; Lee, Bomjin; Kim, Seounghoon; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Younghyun; Lee, Jaeseok; Han, Dongwook; Choi, Sunkoung

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] This research investigated the relationship between elbow joint angle and elbow flexor and extensor strength and activation, taking into consideration the length-tension tension curve of the muscle. [Subjects] There were 30 research subjects in total, 15 male and 15 female college students from Busan S University who had no functional disabilities that might affect measurement of muscle strength and muscle activation, and none had they experienced any damage in their upper extremities or hands. [Methods] The elbow joint angles were positioned at angles of 56°, 70° and 84°, and then muscle strength and activation were compared. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for statistical analysis, and the paired t-test was used to identify the difference between each angle. We used the SPSS for windows (ver. 21.0) statistical software and a significance level of ?=0.05. [Results] The results showed that muscle strength and activation of the biceps was highest when the joint was placed at 56°. On the other hand, for the triceps, the result was highest when the joint angle was placed at 84°. [Conclusion] The tests confirmed that muscle strength and activation were highest at the joint angle at which the muscle was stretched to 20% more than the resting position in concentric contraction. PMID:25140101

  6. Regge calculus from a new angle

    E-print Network

    Benjamin Bahr; Bianca Dittrich

    2009-07-24

    In Regge calculus space time is usually approximated by a triangulation with flat simplices. We present a formulation using simplices with constant sectional curvature adjusted to the presence of a cosmological constant. As we will show such a formulation allows to replace the length variables by 3d or 4d dihedral angles as basic variables. Moreover we will introduce a first order formulation, which in contrast to using flat simplices, does not require any constraints. These considerations could be useful for the construction of quantum gravity models with a cosmological constant.

  7. Quantum Geometry Phenomenology: Angle and Semiclassical States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Seth A.

    2012-05-01

    The phenomenology for the deep spatial geometry of loop quantum gravity is discussed. In the context of a simple model of an atom of space, it is shown how purely combinatorial structures can affect observations. The angle operator is used to develop a model of angular corrections to local, continuum flat-space 3-geometries. The physical effects involve neither breaking of local Lorentz invariance nor Planck scale suppression, but rather only involve the combinatorics of SU(2) recoupling. Bhabha scattering is discussed as an example of how the effects might be observationally accessible.

  8. Imaging and investigating the effects of incision angle of clear corneal cataract surgery with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Zhang, Jun; Taban, Mehran; McDonnell, Peter J.; Chen, Zhongping

    2003-12-01

    Effects of incision angle in construction of clear corneal cataract incision are studied with optical coherence tomography (OCT). A stable incision angle range is found to be existent for single-planed, clear corneal cataract incisions. When well pressurized, incision angles within this stable range result in well-apposed incision edges that resist gapping while incision angles falling outside this range have a larger tendency for wound leakage. It is also shown that a two-planed incision can effectively expand the stable range. For incision angles outside the stable range, the farther the incision angle is away from stable range, the larger the gap between incision wound edges when well pressurized. These findings emphasize the significance of incision construction to the self-sealing property of clear corneal cataract incisions. Finally, we demonstrate that OCT could be an effective modality for imaging and monitoring corneal surgery.

  9. Phase Angle Effects on 3 ?m Absorption Band on Ceres: Implications for Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takir, D.; Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J. A.; Le Corre, L.; Hardersen, P. S.; Nathues, A.

    2015-05-01

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA’s Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in 2015 March. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) on board Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25-5.0 ?m. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 ?m due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals. We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3 ?m absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9-4.2 ?m) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.°7 to 22°. We found that the band center slightly increases from 3.06 ?m at lower phase angles (0.°7 and 6°) to 3.07 ?m at higher phase angles (11° and 22°), the band depth decreases by ˜20% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles, and the band area decreases by ˜25% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles. Our results will have implications for constraining the abundance of OH on the surface of Ceres from VIR spectral data, which will be acquired by Dawn starting spring 2015.

  10. Associations between Alpha Angle and Herniation Pit on MRI Revisited in 185 Asymptomatic Hip Joints

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunchae

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between alpha angle and herniation pit on MRI in asymptomatic hip joints and their associations with demographic variables. Materials and Methods Hip MRI of 185 asymptomatic hip joints of 105 adults (age 18 to 80 years) from September 2011 through December 2012 were retrospectively studied. Alpha angles were measured on oblique axial MR images by 2 observers. Herniation pit was determined by 1 observer. Size measures, prevalence, and statistical analyses were conducted regarding its association with age, gender, laterality (right or left hip). Intra- and inter-observer agreements were determined by intra-class correlation coefficient. Results The prevalence of herniation pit in asymptomatic hips was 21.6%. The range of alpha angle was 27.6-65.0 degrees. Seventeen and 16 out of 185 (9.1% and 8.6%) hip joints showed alpha angle of ? 55 degrees in first and second measurement sessions, respectively. There was no association between alpha angle ? 55 and presence of herniation pit. There was no association between alpha angle ? 55 and the size of herniation pit. Inter-observer agreement of alpha angle was 0.485 between first measurements of first vs. second observer, respectively. Intra-observer agreement of alpha angle was 0.654, respectively. Forty (21.6%) of 185 hip joints (35 of 105 patients, 33.3%) had herniation pit, with no difference according to age, gender, or laterality of hip joint. Conclusion There is no association between alpha angle ? 55 degrees and presence of herniation pit or demographic variables. PMID:26576122

  11. Flattening fixed-angle chains is strongly NP-hard

    E-print Network

    Demaine, Erik D.

    Planar configurations of fixed-angle chains and trees are well studied in polymer science and molecular biology. We prove that it is strongly NP-hard to decide whether a polygonal chain with fixed edge lengths and angles ...

  12. 46 CFR 151.03-3 - Angle of downflooding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...03-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-3 Angle of downflooding. The angle of...

  13. 14 CFR 27.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 27.1387 Section 27...STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 27.1387 Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 23.1387 Section 23...ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1387 Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 25.1387 Section 25...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1387 Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as...

  16. 14 CFR 29.1387 - Position light system dihedral angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Position light system dihedral angles. 29.1387 Section 29...STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 29.1387 Position light system dihedral angles. (a) Except as...

  17. EFFECT OF MODULE INCLINATION ANGLE ON AIR GAP MEMBRANE DISTILLATION

    E-print Network

    Warsinger, David Elan Martin

    Air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) experiments were performed with varied temperature and varied module inclination angles to characterize the effect of module angle on permeate production and thermal performance. While ...

  18. WIDE-ANGLE, NARROW-ANGLE, AND IMAGING BASELINES OF OPTICAL LONG-BASELINE INTERFEROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Woillez, J.; Lacour, S. E-mail: sylvestre.lacour@obspm.fr

    2013-02-10

    For optical interferometers, the baseline is typically defined as the vector joining two perfectly identical telescopes. However, when the telescopes are naturally different or when the requirements on the baseline vector challenge the telescope perfection, the baseline definition depends on how the interferometer is used. This is where the notions of wide-angle, narrow-angle, and imaging baselines come into play. This article explores this variety of baselines, with the purpose of presenting a coherent set of definitions, describing how they relate to each other, and suggesting baseline metrology requirements. Ultimately, this work aims at supporting upcoming long-baseline optical interferometers with narrow-angle astrometry and phase-referenced imaging capabilities at the microarcsecond level.

  19. Hidden Topological Angles in Path Integrals.

    PubMed

    Behtash, Alireza; Sulejmanpasic, Tin; Schäfer, Thomas; Ünsal, Mithat

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate the existence of hidden topological angles (HTAs) in a large class of quantum field theories and quantum mechanical systems. HTAs are distinct from theta parameters in the Lagrangian. They arise as invariant angles associated with saddle points of the complexified path integral and their descent manifolds (Lefschetz thimbles). Physical effects of HTAs become most transparent upon analytic continuation in n_{f} to a noninteger number of flavors, reducing in the integer n_{f} limit to a Z_{2} valued phase difference between dominant saddles. In N=1 super Yang-Mills theory we demonstrate the microscopic mechanism for the vanishing of the gluon condensate. The same effect leads to an anomalously small condensate in a QCD-like SU(N) gauge theory with fermions in the two-index representation. The basic phenomenon is that, contrary to folklore, the gluon condensate can receive both positive and negative contributions in a semiclassical expansion. In quantum mechanics, a HTA leads to a difference in semiclassical expansion of integer and half-integer spin particles. PMID:26252675

  20. RF sheaths for arbitrary B field angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, Daniel; Myra, James

    2014-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries and accelerate electrons out of the plasma. Sheath effects reduce the efficiency of ICRF heating, cause RF-specific impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and increase the plasma-facing component damage. The rf sheath potential is sensitive to the angle between the B field and the wall, the ion mobility and the ion magnetization. Here, we obtain a numerical solution of the non-neutral rf sheath and magnetic pre-sheath equations (for arbitrary values of these parameters) and attempt to infer the parametric dependences of the Child-Langmuir law. This extends previous work on the magnetized, immobile ion regime. An important question is how the rf sheath voltage distributes itself between sheath and pre-sheath for various B field angles. This will show how generally previous estimates of the rf sheath voltage and capacitance were reasonable, and to improve the RF sheath BC. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  1. Disequilibrium dihedral angles in dolerite sills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holness, Marian B.; Richardson, Chris; Helz, Rosalind T.

    2012-01-01

    The geometry of clinopyroxene-plagioclase-plagioclase junctions in mafic rocks, measured by the median dihedral angle ?cpp, is created during solidification. In the solidifying Kilauea Iki (Hawaii) lava lake, the wider junctions between plagioclase grains are the first to be filled by pyroxene, followed by the narrower junctions. The final ?cpp, attained when all clinopyroxene-plagioclase-plagioclase junctions are formed, is 78° in the upper crust of the lake, and 85° in the lower solidification front. ?cpp in the 3.5-m-thick Traigh Bhàn na Sgùrra sill (Inner Hebrides) is everywhere 78°. In the Whin Sill (northern England, 38 m thick) and the Portal Peak sill (Antarctica, 129 m thick), ?cpp varies symmetrically, with the lowest values at the margins. The 266-m-thick Basement Sill (Antarctica) has asymmetric variation of ?cpp, attributed to a complex filling history. The chilled margins of the Basement Sill are partially texturally equilibrated, with high ?cpp. The plagioclase grain size in the two widest sills varies asymmetrically, with the coarsest rocks found in the upper third. Both ?cpp and average grain size are functions of model crystallization times. ?cpp increases from 78° to a maximum of ?100° as the crystallization time increases from 1 to 500 yr. Because the use of grain size as a measure of crystallization time is dependent on an estimate of crystal growth rates, dihedral angles provide a more direct proxy for cooling rates in dolerites.

  2. Active limited-angle tomographic phase microscope.

    PubMed

    Kus, Arkadiusz; Krauze, Wojciech; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an active, holographic tomography system, working with limited angle of projections, realized by optical-only, diffraction-based beam steering. The system created for this purpose is a Mach–Zehnder interferometer modified to serve as a digital holographic microscope with a high numerical aperture illumination module and a spatial light modulator (SLM). Such a solution is fast and robust. Apart from providing an elegant solution to viewing angle shifting, it also adds new capabilities of the holographic microscope system. SLM, being an active optical element, allows wavefront correction in order to improve measurement accuracy. Integrated phase data captured with different illumination scenarios within a highly limited angular range are processed by a new tomographic reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed sensing technique: total variation minimization, which is applied here to reconstruct nonpiecewise constant samples. Finally, the accuracy of full measurement and the proposed processing path is tested for a calibrated three-dimensional micro-object as well as a biological object--C2C12 myoblast cell. PMID:26361341

  3. Atomic-resolution defect contrast in low angle annular dark-field STEM

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Patrick J.; De Graef, M.; Kovarik, Libor; Agrawal, A.; Windl, W.; Mills, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    While traditional high-resolution STEM is performed by exclusively collecting electrons which have been scattered to high angles (i.e., HAADF), the present contribution will focus on small-angle scattered electrons, as in low angle annular dark-field (LAADF) STEM. This unique imaging mode allows one to image defect contrast while maintaining directly interpretable atomic resolution. By simply adjusting the microscope camera length, and thus the acceptance angle of the annular detector, it is possible to transition between Z-contrast and defect contrast. Both LAADF and HAADF experimental and computational results are discussed in regards to zone axis imaging of a y/y1Ni-superalloy; various length scales are explored. Electron de-channeling is observed while the probe is placed over defected regions of crystal.

  4. Simultaneous Soft Sensing of Tissue Contact Angle and Force for Millimeter-scale Medical Robots

    PubMed Central

    Arabagi, Veaceslav; Gosline, Andrew; Wood, Robert J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel robotic sensor is proposed to measure both the contact angle and the force acting between the tip of a surgical robot and soft tissue. The sensor is manufactured using a planar lithography process that generates microchannels that are subsequently filled with a conductive liquid. The planar geometry is then molded onto a hemispherical plastic scaffolding in a geometric configuration enabling estimation of the contact angle (angle between robot tip tangent and tissue surface normal) by the rotation of the sensor around its roll axis. Contact force can also be estimated by monitoring the changes in resistance in each microchannel. Bench top experimental results indicate that, on average, the sensor can estimate the angle of contact to within ±2° and the contact force to within ±5.3 g. PMID:24241496

  5. Multilayer-coated blazed grating with variable line spacing and a variable blaze angle.

    PubMed

    Voronov, D L; Warwick, T; Padmore, H A

    2014-11-01

    The blazing ability of multilayer-coated blazed gratings (MBGs) was systematically investigated via numerical calculation of the diffraction efficiency with a rigorous electromagnetic simulation code. It was found that the blazing condition is not exact and allows significant deviation from the ideal situation for ultra-dense MBGs. A mismatch of the interfaces of the multilayer (ML) stacks of adjacent grooves results in a modified effective blaze angle, which gives the opportunity to control and tune precisely the blaze angle via a proper choice of ML d-spacing. Also this allows a new kind of x-ray gratings that have a variable line spacing (VLS) as well as a variable blaze angle. Precise adjustment of a local blaze angle of a VLS MBG can be achieved with a laterally graded ML, providing very high diffraction efficiency for the whole area of the grating. PMID:25361297

  6. Influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Wang, Y. C.; Meng, G.; Qu, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps is analysed in the present paper. Three sets of blade angle distribution along leading edge for three blade inlet angles are chosen to design nine centrifugal pump impellers. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model are employed to simulate the cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps with different impellers and the same volute. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data, and the comparison proves that the numerical simulation can accurately predict the cavitation performance of centrifugal pumps. On the basis of the numerical simulations, the pump head variations with pump inlet pressure, and the flow details in centrifugal pump are revealed to demonstrate the influence of blade angle distribution along leading edge on cavitation performances of centrifugal pumps.

  7. A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Shi, Pan; Zhu, Lin; Ding, Jianfu; Chen, Qingmin; Wang, Qingjun

    2014-03-01

    In this work, a modification to the captive bubble method was proposed to test the advancing and receding contact angle. This modification is done by adding a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental system equipped with an optical angle mater equipped with a high speed CCD camera, a temperature control system and a computer. A series of samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared. The advancing and receding contact angles of these samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic surfaces through the new methods was comparable to the result tested by the traditional sessile drop method. It is proved that this method overcomes the limitation of the traditional captive bubble method and the modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. However, due to the nature of the captive bubble technique, this method is also only suitable for testing the surface with advancing or receding contact angle below 130°.

  8. Foveated fisheye lens design using an angle-variant distortion projection function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samy, Ahmed Mahmoud; Gao, Zhishan

    2015-11-01

    Light projection function is a major area of interest within the field of designing ultra-wide angle cameras. In this paper, we introduce a novel ultra-wide angle projection function that is characterized by an angle-variant distortion model similar to that of human retina space-variant resolution. The projection peculiarities were compared with the classical equidistant fisheye projection function to illustrate the benefits of our projection model on real-time tracking and ultra-wide angle imaging applications. The new projection model produced an accurate result with uncomplicated distortion control using Zemax user-defined macro program. The inverted model is also successfully used in correcting such distorted image. The paper shows as well the design of an original 170° fast foveated fisheye lens that provides more than 52 % undistorted image with a high-resolution performance over the entire lens field of view.

  9. Winding angle distributions for two-dimensional collapsing polymers

    E-print Network

    Prellberg, Thomas

    Winding angle distributions for two-dimensional collapsing polymers Arturo Narros School provide numerical support for a long-standing prediction of universal scaling of winding angle distributions. Simulations of interacting self-avoiding walks show that the winding angle distribution for N

  10. 46 CFR 151.03-3 - Angle of downflooding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Angle of downflooding. 151.03-3 Section 151.03-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-3 Angle of downflooding. The angle of heel of the vessel at which any opening in...

  11. Cubic Equations and the Ideal Trisection of the Arbitrary Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Marion B.

    2006-01-01

    In the year 1837 mathematical proof was set forth authoritatively stating that it is impossible to trisect an arbitrary angle with a compass and an unmarked straightedge in the classical sense. The famous proof depends on an incompatible cubic equation having the cosine of an angle of 60 and the cube of the cosine of one-third of an angle of 60 as…

  12. Visual Angle as Determinant Factor for Relative Distance Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsushima, Elton H.; de Oliveira, Artur P.; Ribeiro-Filho, Nilton P.; Da Silva, Jose A.

    2005-01-01

    Visual angles are defined as the angle between line of sight up to the mean point of a relative distance and the relative distance itself. In one experiment, we examined the functional aspect of visual angle in relative distance perception using two different layouts composed by 14 stakes, one of them with its center 23 m away from the observation…

  13. Angle-Resolved Polarimetry of Antenna-Mediated Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtashami, Abbas; Osorio, Clara I.; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2015-11-01

    Optical phase-array antennas can be used to control not only the angular distribution but also the polarization of fluorescence from quantum emitters. The emission pattern of the resulting system is determined by the properties of the antenna, the properties of the emitters, and the strength of the antenna-emitter coupling. Here we show that Fourier polarimetry can be used to characterize these three contributions. To this end, we measure the angle- and Stokes-parameter-resolved emission of bullseye plasmon antennas as well as spiral antennas excited by an ensemble of emitters. We estimate the average antenna-emitter coupling on the basis of the degree of polarization and determine the effect of anisotropy in the intrinsic emitter orientation on polarization of the resulting emission pattern. Our results provide not only new insights into the behavior of bullseye and spiral antennas but also demonstrate the potential of Fourier polarimetry when characterizing antenna-mediated fluorescence.

  14. Penetrating head injury from angle grinder: A cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumaran, S; Balamurgan, N; Arthanari, K; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, P

    2010-01-01

    Penetrating cranial injury is a potentially life-threatening condition. Injuries resulting from the use of angle grinders are numerous and cause high-velocity penetrating cranial injuries. We present a series of two penetrating head injuries associated with improper use of angle grinder, which resulted in shattering of disc into high velocity missiles with reference to management and prevention. One of those hit on the forehead of the operator and the other on the occipital region of the co-worker at a distance of five meters. The pathophysiological consequence of penetrating head injuries depends on the kinetic energy and trajectory of the object. In the nearby healthcare center the impacted broken disc was removed without realising the consequences and the wound was packed. As the conscious level declined in both, they were referred. CT brain revealed fracture in skull and changes in the brain in both. Expeditious removal of the penetrating foreign body and focal debridement of the scalp, skull, dura, and involved parenchyma and Watertight dural closure were carried out. The most important thing is not to remove the impacted foreign body at the site of accident. Craniectomy around the foreign body, debridement and removal of foreign body without zigzag motion are needed. Removal should be done following original direction of projectile injury. The neurological sequelae following the non missile penetrating head injuries are determined by the severity and location of initial injury as well as the rapidity of the exploration and fastidious debridement. PMID:21799615

  15. Joint angle estimation with accelerometers for dynamic postural analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianting; Kharboutly, Haissam; Benali, Abderraouf; Benamar, Faïz; Bouzit, Mourad

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a new accelerometer based method for estimating the posture of a subject standing on a dynamic perturbation platform. The induced perturbation is used to study the control mechanisms as well as the balance requirements that regulate the upright standing. These perturbations are translated into different intensity levels of speed and acceleration along longitudinal and lateral directions of motion. In our method, the human posture is modeled by a tridimensional, three-segment inverted pendulum which simultaneously takes into account both the anterior-posterior and medio-lateral strategies of hip and ankle. Four tri-axial accelerometers are used her, one accelerometer is placed on the platform, and the other three are attached to a human subject. Based on the results, the joint angle estimated compare closely to measurements from magnetic encoders placed on an articulated arm joint. The results were also comparable to those found when using a high-end optical motion capture system coupled with advanced biomechanical simulation software. This paper presents the comparisons of our accelerometer-based method with encoder and optical marker based method of the estimated joint angles under different dynamics perturbations. PMID:26338097

  16. Influence of blade outlet angle on performance of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Baoling; Wang, Canfei; Zhu, Zuchao; Jin, Yingzi

    2013-04-01

    In order to analyze the influence of blade outlet angle on inner flow field and performance of low-specific-speed centrifugal pump, the flow field in the pump with different blade outlet angles 32.5° and 39° was numerically calculated. The external performance experiment was also carried out on the pump. Based on SIMPLEC algorithm, time-average N-S equation and the rectified k-? turbulent model were adopted during the process of computation. The distributions of velocity and pressure in pumps with different blade outlet angles were obtained by calculation. The numerical results show that backflow areas exist in the two impellers, while the inner flow has a little improvement in the impeller with larger blade outlet angle. Blade outlet angle has a certain influence on the static pressure near the long-blade leading edge and tongue, but it has little influence on the distribution of static pressure in the passages of impeller. The experiment results show that the low-specific-speed centrifugal pump with larger blade outlet angle has better hydraulic performance.

  17. On the Evolution of Jet Energy and Opening Angle in Strongly Coupled Plasma

    E-print Network

    Paul M. Chesler; Krishna Rajagopal

    2015-11-24

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in ${\\cal N}=4$ SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss $dE_{\\rm jet}/dx$ and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for $dE_{\\rm jet}/dx$ without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening angle that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that ${\\cal N}=4$ SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the ${\\cal N}=4$ SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. We close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 134305 (2012) Experimental evidence of zero-angle refraction and acoustic wave-phase control

    E-print Network

    Deymier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 134305 (2012) Experimental evidence of zero-angle refraction and acoustic/epoxy PC immersed in water refracts incident longitudinal waves by an angle of zero degrees. The waves of PCs result from passing bands with unique refractive characteristics, such as negative refraction

  19. EE 251 Project 1 Due: T 10/14/2014 Project 1: Find Launch Angle to Hit Target with Projectile

    E-print Network

    Wedeward, Kevin

    EE 251 Project 1 Due: T 10/14/2014 Project 1: Find Launch Angle to Hit Target with Projectile such that it hits our enemy mocking us at 25 m away. A simple model of the water balloon's dynamics is represented is to find the launch angle (to within 1 ) that results in the water balloon hitting our enemy. To solve

  20. Hip rotation angle is associated with frontal plane knee joint mechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Shimizu, Norifumi; Yanai, Toshimasa; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    Inability to control lower extremity segments in the frontal and transverse planes resulting in large knee abduction angle and increased internal knee abduction impulse has been associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP). However, the influence of hip rotation angles on frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore how hip rotation angles are related to frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics during running. Seventy runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions and ground reaction forces were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system and a force plate while subjects ran along a 25-m runway at a speed of 4m/s. Knee abduction, hip rotation and toe-out angles, frontal plane lever arm at the knee, internal knee abduction moment and impulse, ground reaction forces and the medio-lateral distance from the ankle joint center to the center of pressure (AJC-CoP) were quantified. The findings of this study indicate that greater hip external rotation angles were associated with greater toe-out angles, longer AJC-CoP distances, smaller internal knee abduction impulses with shorter frontal plane lever arms and greater knee abduction angles. Thus, there appears to exist a conflict between kinematic and kinetic risk factors of PFP, and hip external rotation angle may be a key factor to control frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics. These results may help provide an appropriate manipulation and/or intervention on running style to reduce the risk of PFP. PMID:25572723

  1. Sunspot areas and tilt angles for solar cycles 7-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamizh Pavai, V.; Arlt, R.; Dasi-Espuig, M.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: Extending the knowledge about the properties of solar cycles into the past is essential for understanding the solar dynamo. This paper aims to estimate areas of sunspots observed by Schwabe in 1825-1867 and to calculate the tilt angles of sunspot groups. Methods: The sunspot sizes in Schwabe's drawings are not to scale and need to be converted into physical sunspot areas. We employed a statistical approach assuming that the area distribution of sunspots was the same in the 19th century as it was in the 20th century. Results: Umbral areas for about 130 000 sunspots observed by Schwabe were obtained, as well as the tilt angles of sunspot groups assuming them to be bipolar. There is, of course, no polarity information in the observations. The annually averaged sunspot areas correlate reasonably with sunspot number. We derived an average tilt angle by attempting to exclude unipolar groups with a minimum separation of the two alleged polarities and an outlier rejection method which follows the evolution of each group and detects the moment it turns unipolar at its decay. As a result, the tilt angles, although displaying considerable scatter, average to 5?.85 ± 0, with the leading polarity located closer to the equator, in good agreement with tilt angles obtained from 20th century data sets. Sources of uncertainties in the tilt angle determination are discussed and need to be addressed whenever different data sets are combined. The sunspot area and tilt angle data are provided at the CDS. The sunspot area and tilt angle data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A73

  2. Calculation angle and amplitude spectrum of interferogram with FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaqing; Ding, Lei

    2013-08-01

    Historically,computationally-intensive data processing for space-borne instruments has heavily relied on groundbased processing system.But with recent advances in FPGAs such as Xilinx Virtex-4 and Virtex-5 series devices that including PowerPC processors and DSP blocks thereby provding a flexible hardware and software co-design architecture to meet computationally-intensive data processing need,So it is able to shift more processing on- board;for high data active and passive instruments,such as interferometer,Implementations of on-board processing algorithms to perform lossless data reductions can dramatically reduce the data rates,therefore relaxing the downlink data bandwidth requirements.The interferograms are performs the inverse fourier transform on-board in order to decrease the transmission rate.In [Revercomb et al.] paper show that only use the modulus of the complx spectrum will lead to big calibration errors.So the amplitude and angle of the complex spectrum is need for radiometric cablibration,but there have a big challenge for on board obtained the amplitude and angle of the complex spectrum.In this paper,we introduce the CORDIC algorithm to slove it. The CORDIC algorithm is an iterative convergence algorithm that performs a rotation iteratively using a series of specific incremental rotation angles selected so that each iteration is performed by shift and add operation,which fit for FPGA implementation,and can be parallel in a chip to fullfill different latency and throughput.Implemention results with Xilinx FPGA are summarized.

  3. Starlight emergence angle error analysis of star simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Guo-yu

    2015-10-01

    With continuous development of the key technologies of star sensor, the precision of star simulator have been to be further improved, for it directly affects the accuracy of star sensor laboratory calibration. For improving the accuracy level of the star simulator, a theoretical accuracy analysis model need to be proposed. According the ideal imaging model of star simulator, the theoretical accuracy analysis model can be established. Based on theoretically analyzing the theoretical accuracy analysis model we can get that the starlight emergent angle deviation is primarily affected by star position deviation, main point position deviation, focal length deviation, distortion deviation and object plane tilt deviation. Based on the above affecting factors, a comprehensive deviation model can be established. According to the model, the formula of each factors deviation model separately and the comprehensive deviation model can be summarized and concluded out. By analyzing the properties of each factors deviation model and the comprehensive deviation model formula, concluding the characteristics of each factors respectively and the weight relationship among them. According the result of analysis of the comprehensive deviation model, a reasonable designing indexes can be given by considering the star simulator optical system requirements and the precision of machining and adjustment. So, starlight emergence angle error analysis of star simulator is very significant to guide the direction of determining and demonstrating the index of star simulator, analyzing and compensating the error of star simulator for improving the accuracy of star simulator and establishing a theoretical basis for further improving the starlight angle precision of the star simulator can effectively solve the problem.

  4. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; Zagorodnov, I.; ,

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements significantly, especially for 3D problems, and can make the difference between being able to solve a problem or not. The method is based on the parabolic equation approach to solving Maxwell's equation developed in Refs. [1, 2].

  5. Optimal relative view angles for an object viewed multiple times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilani, Syed U.; Shende, Apoorva; Nguyen, Bao; Stilwell, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Typically, the detection of an object of interest improves as we view the object from multiple angles. For cases where viewing angle matters, object detection can be improved further by optimally selecting the relative angles of multiple views. This motivates the search for viewing angles that maximize the expected probability of detection. Although our work is motivated by applications in subsea sensing, our fundamental analysis is easily adapted for other classes of applications. The specific challenge that motivates our work is the selection of optimal viewing angles for subsea sensing in which sonar is used for bathymetric imaging.

  6. Measurement of dihedral angles by scanning electron microscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achutaramayya, G.; Scott, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    The extension of Hoover's (1971) technique to the case of dihedral-angle measurement is described. Dihedral angles are often determined by interferometry on thermally grooved grain boundaries to obtain information on relative interfacial energies. In the technique considered the measured angles approach the true angles as the tilt angle approaches 90 deg. It is pointed out that the scanning electron microscopy method provides a means of seeing the real root of a groove at a lateral magnification which is higher than that obtainable with interferometry.

  7. Two-dimensional cold-air cascade study of a film-cooled turbine stator blade. 5: Comparison of experimental and analytical aerodynamic results for blade with 12 rows of 0.038-centimeter-(0.015 inch) diameter coolant holes having streamwise ejection angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, H. W., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Published experimental aerodynamic efficiency results were compared with results predicted from two published analytical methods. This is the second of two such comparisons. One of the analytical methods was used as published; the other was modified for certain cases of coolant discharge from the blade suction surface. The results show that for 23 cases of single row and multirow discharge covering coolant fractions from 0 to about 9 percent, the difference between the experimental and predicted results was no greater than about 1 percent in any case and less than 1/2 percent in most cases.

  8. Effects of drift angle on model ship flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, J.; Stern, F.

    The effects of drift angle on model ship flow are investigated through towing tank tests for the Series 60 CB=0.6 cargo/container model ship. Resistance, side force, drift moment, sinkage, trim, and heel data are procured for a range of drift angles ? and Froude numbers (Fr) and the model free condition. Detailed free-surface and mean velocity and pressure flow maps are procured for high and low Fr=0.316 and 0.16 and ?=5° and 10° (free surface) and ?=10° (mean velocity and pressure) for the model fixed condition (i.e. fixed with zero sinkage, trim, and heel). Comparison of results at high and low Fr and previous data for ?=0° enables identification of important free-surface and drift effects. Geometry, conditions, data, and uncertainty analysis are documented in sufficient detail so as to be useful as a benchmark for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. The resistance increases linearly with ? with same slope for all Fr, whereas the increases in the side force, drift moment, sinkage, trim, and heel with ? are quadratic. The wave profile is only affected near the bow, i.e. the bow wave amplitude increases/decreases on the windward/leeward sides, whereas the wave elevations are affected throughout the entire wave field. However, the wave envelope angle on both sides is nearly the same as ?=0°, i.e. the near-field wave pattern rotates with the hull and remains within a similar wave envelope as ?=0°. The wave amplitudes are significantly increased/decreased on the windward/leeward sides. The wake region is also asymmetric with larger wedge angle on the leeward side. The boundary layer and wake are dominated by the hull vortex system consisting of fore body keel, bilge, and wave-breaking vortices and after body bilge and counter-rotating vortices. The occurrence of a wave-breaking vortex for breaking bow waves has not been previously documented in the literature. The trends for the maximum vorticity, circulation, minimum axial velocity, and trajectories are discussed for each vortex.

  9. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  10. Estimation of insertion depth angle based on cochlea diameter and linear insertion depth: a prediction tool for the CI422.

    PubMed

    Franke-Trieger, Annett; Mürbe, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Beside the cochlear size, the linear insertion depth (LID) influences the insertion depth angle of cochlear implant electrode arrays. For the specific implant CI422 the recommended LID is not fixed but can vary continuously between 20 and 25 mm. In the current study, the influence of cochlea size and LID on the final insertion depth angle was investigated to develop a prediction tool for the insertion depth angle by means of cochlea diameter and LID. Preoperative estimation of insertion depth angles might help surgeons avoid exceeding an intended insertion depth, especially with respect to low-frequency residual hearing preservation. Postoperative, high-resolution 3D-radiographs provided by Flat Panel Computed Volume Tomography (FPCT) were used to investigate the insertion depth angle in 37 CI422 recipients. Furthermore, the FPCT images were used to measure linear insertion depth and diameter of the basal turn of the cochlea. A considerable variation of measured insertion depth angles ranging from 306° to 579° was identified. The measured linear insertion depth ranged from -18.6 to 26.2 mm and correlated positively with the insertion depth angle. The cochlea diameter ranged from 8.11 to 10.42 mm and correlated negatively with the insertion depth angle. The results suggest that preoperatively measured cochlea diameter combined with the option of different array positions by means of LID may act as predictors for the final insertion depth angle. PMID:25361895

  11. Spherical Trigonometry of the Projected Baseline Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathar, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    The basic vector geometry of a stellar interferometer with two telescopes is defined by the right triangle of (i) the baseline vector between the telescopes, of (ii) the delay vector which points to the star, and of (iii) the projected baseline vector in the plane of the wavefront of the stellar light. The plane of this triangle intersects the celestial sphere at the position of the star; the intersection is a circular line segment. The interferometric angular resolution is high (diffraction limited to the ratio of the wavelength over the projected baseline length) in the two directions along this line segment, and low (diffraction limited to the ratio of the wavelength over the telescope diameter) perpendicular to these. The position angle of these characteristic directions in the sky is calculated here, given either local horizontal coordinates, or celestial equatorial coordinates.

  12. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Experimental Status of the CKM Angle {beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschauer, James F.

    2009-12-17

    We summarize measurements of the CKM angle {beta} at the B-factories emphasizing a comparison of {beta} measured in the B{sup 0}{yields}cc-barK{sup (*)0} decay channels and {beta}{sub eff} measured in b{yields}qq-bars decay channels, such as B{sup 0}{yields}{omega}K{sub S}{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}{eta}'K{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, and B{sup 0}{yields}{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}.

  14. The Spacelab Wide Angle Telescope (SWAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. M.; Gull, T. R.; Henize, K. G.; Bertola, F.

    1979-01-01

    A fast wide angle telescope that will be capable of imaging to the darker sky limit and in the ultraviolet wavelength region available above the atmosphere is described. The telescope (SWAT) has a resolution comparable to that of the large ground-based Schmidt telescope and a field of at least five degrees. A number of astrophysically important investigations can only be accomplished with such a telescope, e.g., detection of hidden, hot objects like hot white dwarfs and subwarfs in stellar binary systems, and energetic regions in globular clusters and galaxy nuclei. It permits unique studies of the UV-morphology of extended objects and allows discovery of very faint extensions, halos, jets, and filaments in galaxies. It can contribute to the investigation of dust in the Milky Way and in other galaxies and, with an objective prism, spectra of very faint objects can be obtained. The SWAT will localize objects for further study with the narrow-field Space Telescope.

  15. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Torti, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The component technologies were developed required for an advanced control moment gyro (CMG) type of slewing actuator for large payloads. The key component of the CMG is a large-angle magnetic suspension (LAMS). The LAMS combines the functions of the gimbal structure, torque motors, and rotor bearings of a CMG. The LAMS uses a single superconducting source coil and an array of cryoresistive control coils to produce a specific output torque more than an order of magnitude greater than conventional devices. The designed and tested LAMS system is based around an available superconducting solenoid, an array of twelve room-temperature normal control coils, and a multi-input, multi-output control system. The control laws were demonstrated for stabilizing and controlling the LAMS system.

  16. Wide Angle View of Arsia Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Arsia Mons (above) is one of the largest volcanoes known. This shield volcano is part of an aligned trio known as the Tharsis Montes--the others are Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons. Arsia Mons is rivaled only by Olympus Mons in terms of its volume. The summit of Arsia Mons is more than 9 kilometers (5.6 miles) higher than the surrounding plains. The crater--or caldera--at the volcano summit is approximately 110 km (68 mi) across. This view of Arsia Mons was taken by the red and blue wide angle cameras of the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) system. Bright water ice clouds (the whitish/bluish wisps) hang above the volcano--a common sight every martian afternoon in this region. Arsia Mons is located at 120o west longitude and 9o south latitude. Illumination is from the left.

  17. Image Reconstruction With Limited View Angle Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inouye, T.

    1982-11-01

    A new method for image reconstruction from smaller view angle projections less than 180 degrees, is reported. This method does not include any missing projection data estimating processes, which are often seriously jeopardized by the presence of a slight fluctuation component. In this algorithm, the projection function is expanded by using complete functions, which can compose an orthogonal set on the projection allowed data variable region. These orthogonal functions are analytically extended to the outside variable area, where the projection data are not available, and the whole object functions are obtained. Computer simulations were carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. Some practical algo-rithms for the real data calculations are also presented.

  18. Large angle magnetic suspension test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1993-01-01

    Progress made under the subject grant in the period from 1 Nov. 1992 to 31 May 1993 is presented. The research involves the continued development of the Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) and also the recommissioning of an additional piece of exisiting hardware. During the period in question, the initial configuration of LAMSTF was completed and made routinely and reliably operational. A digital phase advance controller was completed and documented. The goal of a controlled 360 deg rotation was achieved. Work started on the recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS). Work completed during the report period included: modeling; position sensing; controller; support of the Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology; and recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System.

  19. Transmission-type angle deviation microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, M.-H.; Lai, C.-W.; Tan, C.-T.; Lai, C.-F

    2008-10-10

    We present a new microscopy technique that we call transmission angle deviation microscopy (TADM). It is based on common-path heterodyne interferometry and geometrical optics. An ultrahigh sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angular sensor is used to expand dynamic measurement ranges and to improve the axial resolution in three-dimensional optical microscopy. When transmitted light is incident upon a specimen, the beam converges or diverges because of refractive and/or surface height variations. Advantages include high axial resolution ({approx}32 nm), nondestructive and noncontact measurement, and larger measurement ranges ({+-} 80 {mu}m) for a numerical aperture of 0.21in a transparent measurement medium. The technique can be used without conductivity and pretreatment.

  20. Novel therapies for open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wentz, Scott M.; Kim, Nathaniel J.; Wang, Jenny; Amireskandari, Annahita; Siesky, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Open-angle glaucoma is a multifactorial optic neuropathy characterized by progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. It is an irreversible disease with no established cure. The only currently approved treatment is aimed at lowering intraocular pressure, the most significant risk factor known to date. However, it is now clear that there are other risk factors involved in glaucoma's pathophysiology. To achieve future improvements in glaucoma management, new approaches to therapies and novel targets must be developed. Such therapies may include new tissue targets for lowering intraocular pressure, molecules influencing ocular hemodynamics, and treatments providing neuroprotection of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, novel drug delivery systems are in development that may improve patient compliance, increase bioavailability, and decrease adverse side effects. PMID:25580256