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Sample records for nado kensho chosa

  1. 77 FR 42465 - Special Local Regulations, Cruce a Nado Internacional, Ponce Harbor; Ponce, PR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Public Participation and Request for... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public..., Puerto Rico during the Cruce a Nado Internacional, a swimming event. The event is scheduled to take...

  2. 78 FR 28167 - Special Local Regulation, Cruce a Nado Internacional de la Bahia de Ponce Puerto Rico, Bahia de...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... la Bahia de Ponce Puerto Rico, Bahia de Ponce; Ponce, PR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... waters of Bahia de Ponce in Ponce, Puerto Rico during the Cruce a Nado Internacional de la Bahia de Ponce Puerto Rico, a swimming event. The event is scheduled to take place on Sunday, September 1,...

  3. The effect of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid on microelements and silicon concentration, photosynthesis activity and yield of tomato grown under Mn stress.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, Tomasz; Calomme, Mario; Borowiak, Klaudia

    2015-11-01

    The aim of experiments was to assess the efficiency of choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid (ch-OSA; complex of orthosilicic acid with choline and a bioavailable source of silicon) application under increasing manganese (Mn) stress on the micronutritional composition and yielding of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. cvs. 'Alboney F1' and 'Emotion F1'). Plants were grown in rockwool with the application of a nutrient solution varied the Mn concentrations (in mg dm(-3)): 9.6 and 19.2 which cause strong oxidative stress of plants comparing with optimal concentration of that microelement in nutrient solution. The effect of ch-OSA application (at Si concentration of 0.3 mg dm(-3) nutrient solution) was investigated at both Mn-levels. Increasing Mn stress modified the concentration of microelements and silicon (Si) in tomato leaves. Application of ch-OSA also influenced the concentration of nutrients, but the determined changes were generally multidirectional and varied depending on Mn-level and cultivar. Under the increasing Mn stress a significant downward trend was observed for the mean concentration of Fe (in both cultivars) in fruits--but changes of Mn, Zn and Cu were varied depend on cultivar. In the case of cv. 'Alboney F1' ch-OSA application caused an increase the mean concentrations of Fe, Zn and Cu, while in the case of cv. 'Emotion F1' the reduction of mean concentrations of Zn and Cu was recorded. Ch-OSA treatment did not influence on the Mn concentrations in fruits. A beneficial role of ch-OSA was also found in photosynthesis activity. This was especially valid for lower levels of Mn. Application of ch-OSA improved significantly the marketable yield of tomato under stress by a low Mn level. PMID:26285179

  4. Participatory Exploration

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kathy Nado delivers a presentation on Participatory Exploration on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of this workshop was to present NASA'...

  5. The comparative absorption of silicon from different foods and food supplements.

    PubMed

    Sripanyakorn, Supannee; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Dissayabutr, Wacharee; Anderson, Simon H C; Thompson, Richard P H; Powell, Jonathan J

    2009-09-01

    Dietary Si (orthosilicic acid; OSA) appears important in connective tissue health, and although the sources and intakes of Si are well established, its absorption is not. Si absorption was measured from eight high-Si-containing sources: alcohol-free beer; OSA solution (positive control); bananas; green beans; supplemental choline-stabilised OSA (ChOSA); supplemental monomethyl silanetriol (MMST); supplemental colloidal silica (CS); magnesium trisilicate British Pharmacopoeia antacid (MTBP). Two of the supplements and the antacid were pre-selected following an in vitro dissolution assay. Fasting, healthy subjects (CS, n 3; others, n > or = 5) each ingested two of the sources separated by a 1-week wash-out period. Blood and urine were collected and measured for total Si concentrations by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Absorption, based on urinary Si excretion, was highest for MMST and alcohol-free beer (64% of dose), followed by green beans (44%), OSA (43%), ChOSA (17%), bananas and MTBP (4%) and CS (1%). Peak serum concentrations occurred by 0.5 h for MMST and green beans, 1.5 h for OSA and alcohol-free beer, 2 h for ChOSA and CS, and 4 h for MTBP. Area under the serum curves correlated positively with urinary Si output (r 0.82; P < 0.0001). Absorption of Si from supplements and antacids was consistent with their known chemical speciation and kinetics of dissolution under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Monomeric silicates were readily absorbed, while particulate silicates were decreasingly well absorbed with increasing polymerisation. The present results highlight the need to allow for relative absorption of Si from different foods or supplements in subsequent epidemiological and intervention studies. PMID:19356271

  6. Functions of Japanese Exemplifying Particles in Spoken and Written Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Yuki Io

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines how the Japanese particles "nado", "toka", and "tari" which all may be translated as "such as", "etc.", or "like" behave differently in written and spoken discourse. According to traditional analyses (e.g. Martin, 1987), these particles are assumed to be Exemplifying Particles (EP) used to provide concrete examples to…

  7. School Principals and Racism: Responding to Aveling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Claire; Mahoney, Caroline; Fox, Brandi; Halse, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study responds to Nado Aveling's call in "Anti-racism in Schools: A question of leadership?" ("Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education," 2007, 28(1), 69-85) for further investigation into racism in Australian schools. Aveling's interview study concluded that an overwhelming number of school principals…

  8. Zen and the brain: mutually illuminating topics.

    PubMed

    Austin, James H

    2013-01-01

    Zen Buddhist meditative practices emphasize the long-term, mindful training of attention and awareness during one's ordinary daily-life activities, the shedding of egocentric behaviors, and the skillful application of one's innate compassionate resources of insight-wisdom toward others and oneself. This review focuses on how such a comprehensive approach to training the brain could relate to a distinctive flavor of Zen: its emphasis on direct experience, with special reference to those major acute states of awakening that create deep transformations of consciousness and behavior. In Japanese, these advanced states are called kensho and satori. Ten key concepts are reviewed. They begin by distinguishing between the concentrative and receptive forms of meditation, noticing the complementary ways that they each train our normal "top-down" and "bottom-up" modes of attentive processing. Additional concepts distinguish between our two major processing pathways. The self-centered, egocentric frame of reference processes information in relation to our body (our soma) or to our mental functions (our psyche). The other-centered frame of reference processes information anonymously. Its prefix, allo- simply means "other" in Greek. Subsequent concepts consider how these useful Greek words-ego/allo, soma/psyche-correlate with the normal functional anatomy of important thalamo ↔ cortical connections. A plausible model then envisions how a triggering stimulus that captures attention could prompt the reticular nucleus to release GABA; how its selective inhibition of the dorsal thalamus could then block both our higher somatic and psychic cortical functions; so as to: (a) delete the maladaptive aspects of selfhood, while also (b) releasing the direct, all-inclusive, globally-unified experience of other. Two final concepts consider how the long-term meditative training of intuitive functions relates to certain kinds of word-free spatial tasks that involve insightful creative

  9. Zen and the brain: mutually illuminating topics

    PubMed Central

    Austin, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Zen Buddhist meditative practices emphasize the long-term, mindful training of attention and awareness during one's ordinary daily-life activities, the shedding of egocentric behaviors, and the skillful application of one's innate compassionate resources of insight-wisdom toward others and oneself. This review focuses on how such a comprehensive approach to training the brain could relate to a distinctive flavor of Zen: its emphasis on direct experience, with special reference to those major acute states of awakening that create deep transformations of consciousness and behavior. In Japanese, these advanced states are called kensho and satori. Ten key concepts are reviewed. They begin by distinguishing between the concentrative and receptive forms of meditation, noticing the complementary ways that they each train our normal “top–down” and “bottom–up” modes of attentive processing. Additional concepts distinguish between our two major processing pathways. The self-centered, egocentric frame of reference processes information in relation to our body (our soma) or to our mental functions (our psyche). The other-centered frame of reference processes information anonymously. Its prefix, allo- simply means “other” in Greek. Subsequent concepts consider how these useful Greek words—ego/allo, soma/psyche—correlate with the normal functional anatomy of important thalamo ↔ cortical connections. A plausible model then envisions how a triggering stimulus that captures attention could prompt the reticular nucleus to release GABA; how its selective inhibition of the dorsal thalamus could then block both our higher somatic and psychic cortical functions; so as to: (a) delete the maladaptive aspects of selfhood, while also (b) releasing the direct, all-inclusive, globally-unified experience of other. Two final concepts consider how the long-term meditative training of intuitive functions relates to certain kinds of word-free spatial tasks that involve

  10. Importance of Interaction between Integrin and Actin Cytoskeleton in Suspension Adaptation of CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Walther, Christa G; Whitfield, Robert; James, David C

    2016-04-01

    The biopharmaceutical production process relies upon mammalian cell technology where single cells proliferate in suspension in a chemically defined synthetic environment. This environment lacks exogenous growth factors, usually contributing to proliferation of fibroblastic cell types such as Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Use of CHO cells for production hence requires a lengthy 'adaptation' process to select clones capable of proliferation as single cells in suspension. The underlying molecular changes permitting proliferation in suspension are not known. Comparison of the non-suspension-adapted clone CHO-AD and a suspension-adapted propriety cell line CHO-SA by flow cytometric analysis revealed a highly variable bi-modal expression pattern for cell-to-cell contact proteins in contrast to the expression pattern seen for integrins. Those have a uni-modal expression on suspension and adherent cells. Integrins showed a conformation distinguished by regularly distributed clusters forming a sphere on the cell membrane of suspension-adapted cells. Actin cytoskeleton analysis revealed reorganisation from the typical fibrillar morphology found in adherent cells to an enforced spherical subcortical actin sheath in suspension cells. The uni-modal expression and specific clustering of integrins could be confirmed for CHO-S, another suspension cell line. Cytochalasin D treatment resulted in breakdown of the actin sheath and the sphere-like integrin conformation demonstrating the link between integrins and actin in suspension-adapted CHO cells. The data demonstrates the importance of signalling changes, leading to an integrin rearrangement on the cell surface, and the necessity of the reinforcement of the actin cytoskeleton for proliferation in suspension conditions. PMID:26679704

  11. Neurobiología de la impulsividad y los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria*

    PubMed Central

    Orozco-Cabal, Luis Felipe; Herin, David

    2009-01-01

    Resumen Introducción La impulsividad es un rasgo de personalidad multidimensional relacionado con el control del comportamiento y las emociones. Está presente de manera diversa en los trastornos de la conducta alimentaria, particularmente, en la bulimia nerviosa (BN). Aunque la relación entre la impulsividad y BN ha sido objeto de numerosas investigaciones, en la actualidad se desconocen los sustratos neurobiológicos de esta relación. Objetivos Discutir críticamente la evidencia que sugiere que las alteraciones en los sistemas neuronales relacio-nados con las funciones ejecutivas, con la formación de preferencias y con la regulación de los estados emocionales sirven como base para el rasgo de personalidad impulsiva, así como su estado en subgrupos de pacientes con BN. Métodos Búsqueda selectiva de la literatura relevante. Resultados y conclusiones Esta discusión ilustra la complejidad de la relación entre la impulsividad y BN, donde la impulsividad actúa como un factor de vulnerabilidad que puede sensibilizar al sujeto con BN a estados emocionales negativos, durante los cuales modifica el impacto de estímulos internos y externos sobre el comportamiento y su regulación, favoreciendo así patrones de comportamiento maladaptativos e inflexibles. PMID:19838321

  12. Blood pressure, intraerythrocyte content, and transmembrane fluxes of sodium during normal and high salt intake in subjects with and without a family history of hypertension: evidence against a sodium transport inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, O; Andersson, O; Herlitz, H; Jonsson, O; Nauclér, J; Wikstrand, J; Berglund, G

    1984-01-01

    Seventeen young normotensive men with a family history of hypertension in two generations (H) and 15 age-matched control subjects (C) were studied with respect to blood pressure (BP), intraerythrocyte sodium content (IeNa), sodium influx, and rate of sodium efflux. The investigations were done during normal salt intake and after 4 weeks of ordinary intake plus 12 g NaCl daily. BP did not increase significantly in either of the two groups during increased salt intake. During normal salt intake H had a significantly (p less than 0.01) higher IeNa (9.5 +/- 1.5 mmol/L) compared with C (8.2 +/- 1.4 mmol/L). During high salt intake IeNa in H decreased significantly to 8.1 +/- 1.2 mmol/L, the difference from C (7.6 +/- 1.2 mmol/L) not being significant. While the Na influx was similar in the two groups, the rate constant for Na efflux was significantly lower during normal salt intake in H (0.23 +/- 0.08 vs 0.29 +/- 0.1 h-1, p less than 0.05). Salt intake increased the efflux rate constant significantly in H (0.28 +/- 0.08 h-1, p less than 0.05), while it did not change significantly in C (0.32 +/- 0.08 h-1) compared with the value for normal salt intake. Our results suggest that young men with a hereditary predisposition to hypertension have a higher IeNa secondary to a lower rate of Na efflux, while a normal Na influx indicates normal cell permeability to Na. The findings in H during high Na intake--a decreased IeNa and an increased efflux rate of Na--do not favor the existence of a sodium transport inhibitor, in subjects predisposed to hypertension, increasing during high salt intake and volume expansion and acting through inhibition of the Na efflux. PMID:6204156