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Sample records for nadph-dependent oxidoreductase genes

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of two YGL039w genes encoding broad specificity NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductases from Kluyveromyces marxianus strain DMB1.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hironaga; Watanabe, Masahiro; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-08-01

    Two genes from Kluyveromyces marxianus strain DMB1, YGL039w1 and YGL039w2, encode putative uncharacterized oxidoreductases that respectively share 42 and 44% identity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c NADPH-dependent methylglyoxal reductase (EC 1.1.1.283). To determine the enzymatic characteristics of their products, the two genes were expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli cells, after which the YGL039w1 and YGL039w2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. In the presence of NADPH, both enzymes showed reductive activities toward at least nine aldehyde substrates, but no NADP(+)-dependent oxidative activities. These two YGL039w proteins thus appear to be aldehyde reductases. In addition, although both enzymes retained more than 70% of their activities after incubation for 30 min at temperatures below 40C or at pHs between 5.5 and 11.3, YGL039w2 was slightly more thermostable than YGL039w1. PMID:26223585

  2. Characterization of the Kluyveromyces marxianus strain DMB1 YGL157w gene product as a broad specificity NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hironaga; Watanabe, Masahiro; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-01-01

    The open reading frame YGL157w in the genome of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus strain DMB1 encodes a putative uncharacterized oxidoreductase. However, this protein shows 46% identity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c NADPH-dependent methylglyoxal reductase, which exhibits broad substrate specificity for aldehydes. In the present study, the YGL157w gene product (KmGRE2) was purified to homogeneity from overexpressing Escherichia coli cells and found to be a monomer. The enzyme was strictly specific for NADPH and was active with a wide variety of substrates, including aliphatic (branched-chain and linear) and aromatic aldehydes. The optimal pH for methylglyoxal reduction was 5.5. With methylglyoxal as a substrate, the optimal temperature for enzyme activity at pH5.5 was 45C. The enzyme retained more than 70% of its activity after incubation for 30min at temperatures below 35C or at pHs between 5.5 and 9.0. In addition, the KmGRE2-overexpressing E. coli showed improved growth when cultivated in cedar hydrolysate, as compared to cells not expressing the enzyme. Taken together, these results indicate that KmGRE2 is potentially useful as an inhibit decomposer in E. coli cells. PMID:25852994

  3. A novel NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-12632 involved in the detoxification of aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Lewis; Moon, Jaewoong

    2009-10-01

    Aldehyde inhibitors such as furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, anisaldehyde, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and phenylaldehyde are commonly generated during lignocellulosic biomass conversion process for low-cost cellulosic ethanol production that interferes with subsequent microbial growth and fermentation. In situ detoxification of the aldehyde inhibitors is possible by the tolerant ethanologenic yeast that involves multiple genes including numerous functional reductases. In this study, we report a novel aldehyde reductase gene clone Y63 from ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y12632, representing the uncharacterized ORF YGL157W, which demonstrated NADPH-dependent reduction activities toward at least 14 aldehyde substrates. The identity of gene clone Y63 is the same with YGL157W of SGD since a variation of only 35 nucleotides in genomic sequence and three amino acid residues were observed between the two that share the same length of 347 residues in size. As one among the highly induced genes, YGL157W of Y-12632 showed significantly high levels of transcript abundance in response to furfural and HMF challenges. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence and the most conserved functional motif analyses including closely related reductases from five other yeast species to this date, YGL157W was identified as a member of the subclass 'intermediate' of the SDR (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase) superfamily with the following typical characteristics: the most conserved catalytic site to lie at Tyr(169)-X-X-X-Lys(173); an indispensable reduction catalytic triad at Ser(131), Tyr(169), and Lys(173), and an approved cofactor-binding motif at Gly(11)-X-X-Gly(14)-X-X-Ala(17) near the N-terminus. YGL039W, YDR541C, and YOL151W (GRE2) appeared to be the similar type of enzymes falling into the same category of the intermediate subfamily. PMID:19577617

  4. Characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YMR318C (ADH6) gene product as a broad specificity NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase: relevance in aldehyde reduction.

    PubMed

    Larroy, Carol; Fernndez, M Rosario; Gonzlez, Eva; Pars, Xavier; Biosca, Josep A

    2002-01-01

    YMR318C represents an open reading frame from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with unknown function. It possesses a conserved sequence motif, the zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) signature, specific to the medium-chain zinc-containing ADHs. In the present study, the YMR318C gene product has been purified to homogeneity from overexpressing yeast cells, and found to be a homodimeric ADH, composed of 40 kDa subunits and with a pI of 5.0-5.4. The enzyme was strictly specific for NADPH and was active with a wide variety of substrates, including aliphatic (linear and branched-chain) and aromatic primary alcohols and aldehydes. Aldehydes were processed with a 50-fold higher catalytic efficiency than that for the corresponding alcohols. The highest k(cat)/K(m) values were found with pentanal>veratraldehyde > hexanal > 3-methylbutanal >cinnamaldehyde. Taking into consideration the substrate specificity and sequence characteristics of the YMR318C gene product, we have proposed this gene to be called ADH6. The disruption of ADH6 was not lethal for the yeast under laboratory conditions. Although S. cerevisiae is considered a non lignin-degrading organism, the catalytic activity of ADHVI can direct veratraldehyde and anisaldehyde, arising from the oxidation of lignocellulose by fungal lignin peroxidases, to the lignin biodegradation pathway. ADHVI is the only S. cerevisiae enzyme able to significantly reduce veratraldehyde in vivo, and its overexpression allowed yeast to grow under toxic concentrations of this aldehyde. The enzyme may also be involved in the synthesis of fusel alcohols. To our knowledge this is the first NADPH-dependent medium-chain ADH to be characterized in S. cerevisiae. PMID:11742541

  5. NADPH-dependent reductive biotransformation with Escherichia coli and its pfkA deletion mutant: influence on global gene expression and role of oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Siedler, Solvej; Bringer, Stephanie; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2014-10-01

    An Escherichia coli ?pfkA mutant lacking the major phosphofructokinase possesses a partially cyclized pentose phosphate pathway leading to an increased NADPH per glucose ratio. This effect decreases the amount of glucose required for NADPH regeneration in reductive biotransformations, such as the conversion of methyl acetoacetate (MAA) to (R)-methyl 3-hydroxybutyrate (MHB) by an alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis. Here, global transcriptional analyses were performed to study regulatory responses during reductive biotransformation. DNA microarray analysis revealed amongst other things increased expression of soxS, supporting previous results indicating that a high NADPH demand contributes to the activation of SoxR, the transcriptional activator of soxS. Furthermore, several target genes of the ArcAB two-component system showed a lower mRNA level in the reference strain than in the ?pfkA mutant, pointing to an increased QH2 /Q ratio in the reference strain. This prompted us to analyze yields and productivities of MAA reduction to MHB under different oxygen regimes in a bioreactor. Under anaerobic conditions, the specific MHB production rates of both strains were comparable (7.4??0.2?mmolMHB ?h(-1) ?gcdw (-1) ) and lower than under conditions of 15% dissolved oxygen, where those of the reference strain (12.8?mmol?h(-1) ?gcdw (-1) ) and of the ?pfkA mutant (11.0?mmol?h(-1) ?gcdw (-1) ) were 73% and 49% higher. While the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) of the reference strain increased after the addition of MAA, presumably due to the oxidation of the acetate accumulated before MAA addition, the OTR of the ?pfkA strain strongly decreased, indicating a very low respiration rate despite sufficient oxygen supply. The latter effect can likely be attributed to a restricted conversion of NADPH into NADH via the soluble transhydrogenase SthA, as the enzyme is outcompeted in the presence of MAA by the recombinant NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase. The differences in respiration rates can explain the suggested higher ArcAB activity in the reference strain. PMID:24771245

  6. Identification and characterization of NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase gene and cytochrome b₅ gene from Plutella xylostella: possible involvement in resistance to beta-cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi'en; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-03-10

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5 (b5) are essential for cytochrome P450 mediated biological reactions. CPR and b5 in several insects have been found to be associated with insecticide resistance. However, CPR and b5 in the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, are not characterized and their roles remain undefined. A full-length cDNA of CPR encoding 678 amino acids and a full-length cDNA of b5 encoding 127 amino acids were cloned from DBM. Their deduced amino acid sequences shared high identities with those of other insects and showed characteristics of classical CPRs and b5s, respectively. The mRNAs of both genes were detectable in all developmental stages with the highest expression levels occurring in the 4th instar larvae. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that their transcripts were most abundant in gut. Transcripts of CPR and b5 in the beta-cypermethrin resistant DBM strain were 13.2- and 2.84-fold higher than those in the beta-cypermethrin susceptible strain, respectively. The expression levels of CPR and b5 were enhanced by beta-cypermethrin at the concentration of 12 mg L(-1) (~LC10). The results indicate that CPR and b5 may play essential roles in the P450 mediated resistance of DBM to beta-cypermethrin or even other insecticides. PMID:25550052

  7. No associations between Parkinson's disease and polymorphisms of the quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1, NQO2) genes.

    PubMed

    Okada, Starlyn; Farin, Federico M; Stapleton, Patricia; Viernes, Hanna; Quigley, Sean D; Powers, Karen M; Smith-Weller, Terri; Franklin, Gary M; Longstreth, W T; Swanson, Phillip D; Checkoway, Harvey

    2005-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species derived from dopamine metabolism can induce oxidative stress and thus may contribute to Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. The quinone oxidoreductases, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD[P]H): quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and dihydronicotinamide riboside (NRH): quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) detoxify quinones and quinonoid compounds. We investigated associations of genetic polymorphisms of NQO1 (C609T) and NQO2 (I/D, 29 base pairs) with PD in a population-based case-control study of 190 idiopathic PD cases and 305 unrelated controls matched on age and sex. No associations were detected for either gene variant or for any allele combinations. PMID:15694256

  8. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE NADPH-CYTOCHROME P-450 OXIDOREDUCTASE GENE FROM CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene coding for the Candida tropicalis NADPH-cytochrome P-450 oxidoreductase (CPR, NADPH: ferricytochrome oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.2.4) was isolated by immunoscreening of a C. tropicalis gtll expression library and colony hybridization of a C. tropicalis genomic library. he C. ...

  9. A survey of genes encoding H2O2-producing GMC oxidoreductases in 10 Polyporales genomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patricia; Carro, Juan; Serrano, Ana; Martnez, Angel T

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) recently were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity and distribution of genes involved in degradation of plant polymers in this Basidiomycota order, which includes most wood-rotting fungi. Oxidases, including members of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, play a central role in the above degradative process because they generate extracellular H2O2 acting as the ultimate oxidizer in both white-rot and brown-rot decay. The survey was completed by analyzing the GMC genes in the available genomes of seven more species to cover the four Polyporales clades. First, an in silico search for sequences encoding members of the aryl-alcohol oxidase, glucose oxidase, methanol oxidase, pyranose oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase families was performed. The curated sequences were subjected to an analysis of their evolutionary relationships, followed by estimation of gene duplication/reduction history during fungal evolution. Second, the molecular structures of the near one hundred GMC oxidoreductases identified were modeled to gain insight into their structural variation and expected catalytic properties. In contrast to ligninolytic peroxidases, whose genes are present in all white-rot Polyporales genomes and absent from those of brown-rot species, the H2O2-generating oxidases are widely distributed in both fungal types. This indicates that the GMC oxidases provide H2O2 for both ligninolytic peroxidase activity (in white-rot decay) and Fenton attack on cellulose (in brown-rot decay), after the transition between both decay patterns in Polyporales occurred. PMID:26297778

  10. Tissue- and cell-specific expression of mouse xanthine oxidoreductase gene in vivo: regulation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaki, M; Li Calzi, M; Scanziani, E; Garattini, E; Terao, M

    1995-01-01

    The expression of the xanthine oxidoreductase gene was studied in various mouse organs and tissues, under basal conditions and on treatment with bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Levels of xanthine oxidoreductase protein and mRNA were compared in order to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating the expression of this enzyme system. The highest amounts of xanthine oxidoreductase and the respective mRNA are observed in the duodenum and jejunum, where the protein is present in an unusual form because of a specific proteolytic cleavage of the primary translation product present in all locations. Under basal conditions, multiple tissue-specific mechanisms of xanthine oxidoreductase regulation are evident. Lipopolysaccharide increases enzyme activity in some, but not all tissues, mainly via modulation of the respective transcript, although translational and post-translational mechanisms are also active. In situ hybridization studies on tissue sections obtained from mice under control conditions or with lipopolysaccharide treatment demonstrate that xanthine oxidoreductase is present in hepatocytes, predominantly in the proximal tubules of the kidney, epithelial layer of the gastrointestinal mucosa, the alveolar compartment of the lung, the pulpar region of the spleen and the vascular component of the heart. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7864814

  11. Cloning and characterization of the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase gene from the zygomycete fungus Cunninghamella.

    PubMed

    Yadav, J S; Loper, J C

    2000-02-16

    The filamentous fungus Cunninghamella utilizes cytochrome P450 system(s) in the metabolism of a broad range of polyaromatic and aliphatic pollutants and a variety of drugs, but prior attempts at isolation of P450 system components of this fungus have been generally unsuccessful. We report upon the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CPR) gene from two widely studied species, C. elegans and C. echinulata. The C. elegans CPR gene was obtained by screening a genomic library using as probe a PCR amplicon obtained with degenerate primers based on known CPRs. The 2420 bp coding region contained two apparent introns (149 bp and 138 bp). Northern blot analysis showed that the CPR gene is transcriptionally expressed in C. elegans and appears to be inducible by an alkane substrate, n-tetradecane. Phylogenetic comparison of the deduced C. elegans CPR (710 aa) suggested that it is more closely related to animal CPRs (41-42%) than to yeast (38-41%) and plant (35-36%) forms. A 2074 bp sequence containing most of the CPR gene homolog from C. echinulata was also isolated. PMID:10679206

  12. Coregulated Genes Link Sulfide:Quinone Oxidoreductase and Arsenic Metabolism in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Csaba I.; Vass, Imre; Rákhely, Gábor; Vass, István Zoltán; Tóth, András; Duzs, Ágnes; Peca, Loredana; Kruk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Although the biogeochemistry of the two environmentally hazardous compounds arsenic and sulfide has been extensively investigated, the biological interference of these two toxic but potentially energy-rich compounds has only been hypothesized and indirectly proven. Here we provide direct evidence for the first time that in the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 the two metabolic pathways are linked by coregulated genes that are involved in arsenic transport, sulfide oxidation, and probably in sulfide-based alternative photosynthesis. Although Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is an obligate photoautotrophic cyanobacterium that grows via oxygenic photosynthesis, we discovered that specific genes are activated in the presence of sulfide or arsenite to exploit the energy potentials of these chemicals. These genes form an operon that we termed suoRSCT, located on a transposable element of type IS4 on the plasmid pSYSM of the cyanobacterium. suoS (sll5036) encodes a light-dependent, type I sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase. The suoR (sll5035) gene downstream of suoS encodes a regulatory protein that belongs to the ArsR-type repressors that are normally involved in arsenic resistance. We found that this repressor has dual specificity, resulting in 200-fold induction of the operon upon either arsenite or sulfide exposure. The suoT gene encodes a transmembrane protein similar to chromate transporters but in fact functioning as an arsenite importer at permissive concentrations. We propose that the proteins encoded by the suoRSCT operon might have played an important role under anaerobic, reducing conditions on primordial Earth and that the operon was acquired by the cyanobacterium via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25022856

  13. Fur activates expression of the 2-oxoglutarate oxidoreductase genes (oorDABC) in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J; West, Abby L; Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Michel, Sarah; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen that colonizes the gastric mucosa of ?50% of the world's population. Within this colonization niche, the bacteria encounter large fluctuations in nutrient availability. As such, it is critical that this organism regulate expression of key metabolic enzymes so that they are present when environmental conditions are optimal for growth. One such enzyme is the 2-oxoglutarate (?-ketoglutarate) oxidoreductase (OOR), which catalyzes the conversion of ?-ketoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A (succinyl-CoA) and CO(2). Previous studies from our group suggested that the genes that encode the OOR are activated by iron-bound Fur (Fe-Fur); microarray analysis showed that expression of oorD, oorA, and oorC was altered in a fur mutant strain of H. pylori. The goal of the present work was to more thoroughly characterize expression of the oorDABC genes in H. pylori as well as to define the role of Fe-Fur in this process. Here we show that these four genes are cotranscribed as an operon and that expression of the operon is decreased in a fur mutant strain. Transcriptional start site mapping and promoter analysis revealed the presence of a canonical extended -10 element but a poorly conserved -35 element upstream of the +1. Additionally, we identified a conserved Fur binding sequence ?130 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Transcriptional analysis using promoter fusions revealed that this binding sequence was required for Fe-Fur-mediated activation. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy assays indicate that Fe-Fur specifically bound this Fur box with a relatively high affinity (dissociation constant [K(d)] = 200 nM). These findings provide novel insight into the genetic regulation of a key metabolic enzyme and add to our understanding of the diverse roles Fur plays in gene regulation in H. pylori. PMID:23002221

  14. Biochemical and physiological analyses of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase isozymes in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Shun; Maruta, Takanori; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Takahiro

    2015-07-01

    At least four peroxiredoxins that are coupled with the thioredoxin (Trx) system have been shown to play a key role in redox metabolism in the unicellular phytoflagellate Euglena gracilis. In order to clarify Trx-mediated redox regulation in this alga, we herein identified three NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) using a homologous search and characterized their enzymatic properties and physiological roles. Each Euglena NTR protein belonged to the small, large, and NTRC types, and were named EgNTR1, EgNTR2, and EgNTRC, respectively. EgNTR2 was phylogenetically different from the known NTRs in eukaryotic algae. EgNTR1 was predicted to be localized in mitochondria, EgNTR2 in the cytosol, and EgNTRC in plastids. The catalytic efficiency of EgNTR2 for NADPH was 30-46-fold higher than those of EgNTR1 and truncated form of EgNTRC, suggested that large type EgNTR2 reduced Trx more efficiently. The silencing of EgNTR2 gene expression resulted in significant growth inhibition and cell hypertrophy in Euglena cells. These results suggest that EgNTRs function in each cellular compartment and are physiologically important, particularly in the cytosol. PMID:26025518

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of the Human P450 Oxidoreductase Gene: Hormonal Regulation and Influence of Promoter Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Meng Kian; Huang, Ningwu; Damm, Izabella

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the flavoprotein that acts as the obligatory electron donor to all microsomal P450 enzymes, including those involved in hepatic drug metabolism as well as three steroidogenic P450 enzymes. The untranslated first exon of human POR was located recently, permitting analysis of human POR transcription. Expression of deletional mutants containing up to 3193 bp of the human POR promoter in human adrenal NCI-H295A and liver Hep-G2 cells located the proximal promoter at ?325/?1 bp from the untranslated exon. Common human POR polymorphisms at ?208 and ?173 had little influence on transcription, but the polymorphism at ?152 reduced transcription significantly in both cell lines. EMSA and supershift assays identified binding of Smad3/Smad4 between ?249 and ?261 and binding of thyroid hormone receptor-? (TR?) at ?240/?245. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Smad3, Smad4, TR?, TR?, and estrogen receptor-? were bound between ?374 and ?149. Cotransfection of vectors for these transcription factors and POR promoter-reporter constructs into both cell types followed by hormonal treatment showed that T3 exerts major tropic effects via TR?, with TR?, estrogen receptor-?, Smad3, and Smad4 exerting lesser, modulatory effects. T3 also increased POR mRNA in both cell lines. Thyroid hormone also is essential for rat liver POR expression but acts via different transcription factor complexes. These are the first data on human POR gene transcription, establishing roles for TR? and Smad3/4 in its expression and indicating that the common polymorphism at ?152 may play a role in genetic variation in steroid biosynthesis and drug metabolism. PMID:21393444

  16. Identification of five Rhodobacter capsulatus genes encoding the equivalent of ND subunits of the mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, A; Peinnequin, A; Chevallet, M; Lunardi, J; Darrouzet, E; Pierrard, B; Procaccio, V; Issartel, J P

    1995-12-29

    We previously reported the sequencing of two genes (ndhA and ndhI) encoding two of the subunits of the type-I NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc). The present paper deals with the cloning and characterization of a chromosomal fragment clustering five new Rc genes which encode subunits of this enzyme. This gene cluster is located immediately downstream from ndhA and ndhI, and also contains two unidentified open reading frames (urf2, urf3). The five genes, nuoJ, nuoK, nuoL, nuoM and nuoN, encode proteins related, respectively, to mitochondrial (mt) subunits ND6, ND4L, ND5, ND4 and ND2. The overall organization of the nuo genes identified in Rc shows similarity to that of the Paracoccus denitrificans (Pd) nqo gene cluster. PMID:8566820

  17. Clostridium scindens baiCD and baiH genes encode stereo-specific 7?/7?-hydroxy-3-oxo-?4-cholenoic acid oxidoreductases *

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dae-Joong; Ridlon, Jason M.; Moore, Doyle Ray; Barnes, Stephen; Hylemon, Phillip B.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary bile acids, formed by intestinal bacteria, are suggested to play a significant role in cancers of the gastrointestinal tract in humans. Bile acid 7?/?-dehydroxylation is carried out by a few species of intestinal clostridia which harbor a multi-gene bile acid inducible (bai) operon. Several genes encoding enzymes in this pathway have been cloned and characterized. However, no gene product(s) has yet been assigned to the production of 3-oxo-?4-cholenoic acid intermediates of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). We previously reported the baiH gene encodes an NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (NADH:FOR); however, the role of this protein in bile acid 7-dehydroxylation is unclear. Homology searches and secondary structural alignments suggest this protein to be similar to flavoproteins which reduce ?/?-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. The baiH gene product was expressed in E. coli, purified and discovered to be a stereospecific NAD(H)-dependent 7?-hydroxy-3-oxo-?4-cholenoic acid oxidoreductase. Additionally, high sequence similarity between the baiH and baiCD gene products suggests the baiCD gene may encode a 3-oxo-?4-cholenoic acid oxidoreductase specific for CDCA and CA. We tested this hypothesis using cell extracts prepared from E. coli overexpressing the baiCD gene and discovered that it encodes a stereo-specific NAD(H)-dependent 7?-hydroxy-3-oxo-?4-cholenoic acid oxidoreductase. PMID:18047844

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase 24-kDa gene

    SciTech Connect

    Coo, J. de; Buddiger, P.; Kessel, A.G. van

    1994-09-01

    The mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) of the respiratory chain is composed of at least 41 individual proteins. Seven are encoded for by the mitochondrial genome and 34 are of nuclear origin. Mutations in the mitochondrial encoded subunits have been observed in a number of different mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. In order to investigate the contribution of mutations in the nuclearly encoded subunits, we started to characterize the human gene for the 24 kDa flavoprotein fragment, one of the three key subunits of complex I. Two gene loci were detected with a human cDNA as a probe using somatic cell hybrids, one on chromosome 18 and one on chromosome 19. Cosmid clones were isolated containing the two genes. Using FISH analysis the map position was further refined to 18p11.2-18p11.31 and 19qter, respectively. RNA studies showed that only the chromosome 18 gene was expressed. This gene spans approximately 20 kb and consists of 8 exons. Exon and flanking intron sequences were characterized. The pseudogene differs from the intact cDNA by the lack of the methionine initiator codon. Currently, we are testing patients with complex I deficiencies for mutations in their 24 kDa gene.

  19. The Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Cluster Gene, aflX, Encodes an Oxidoreductase Involved in Conversion of Versicolorin A to Demethylsterigmatocystin

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Jeffrey W.; Ehrlich, Kenneth C.; Bland, John M.; Montalbano, Beverly G.

    2006-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the toxic and carcinogenic aflatoxins by the fungus Aspergillus flavus is a complicated process involving more that 27 enzymes and regulatory factors encoded by a clustered group of genes. Previous studies found that three enzymes, encoded by verA, ver-1, and aflY, are required for conversion of versicolorin A (VA), to demethylsterigmatocystin. We now show that a fourth enzyme, encoded by the previously uncharacterized gene, aflX (ordB), is also required for this conversion. A homolog of this gene, stcQ, is present in the A. nidulans sterigmatocystin (ST) biosynthesis cluster. Disruption of aflX in Aspergillus flavus gave transformants that accumulated ?4-fold more VA and fourfold less aflatoxin than the untransformed strain. Southern and Northern blot analyses confirmed that aflX was the only gene disrupted in these transformants. Feeding ST or O-methylsterigmatocystin, but not VA or earlier precursor metabolites, restored normal levels of AF production. The protein encoded by aflX is predicted to have domains typical of an NADH-dependent oxidoreductase. It has 27% amino acid identity to a protein encoded by the aflatoxin cluster gene, aflO (avfA). Some of domains in the protein are similar to those of epoxide hydrolases. PMID:16461654

  20. Diversity and Spatial Distribution of Hydrazine Oxidoreductase (hzo) Gene in the Oxygen Minimum Zone Off Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Liangliang; Jing, Hongmei; Kataoka, Takafumi; Buchwald, Carolyn; Liu, Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) as an important nitrogen loss pathway has been reported in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), but the community composition and spatial distribution of anammox bacteria in the eastern tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ are poorly determined. In this study, anammox bacterial communities in the OMZ off Costa Rica (CRD-OMZ) were analyzed based on both hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes and their transcripts assigned to cluster 1 and 2. The anammox communities revealed by hzo genes and proteins in CRD-OMZ showed a low diversity. Gene quantification results showed that hzo gene abundances peaked in the upper OMZs, associated with the peaks of nitrite concentration. Nitrite and oxygen concentrations may therefore colimit the distribution of anammox bacteria in this area. Furthermore, transcriptional activity of anammox bacteria was confirmed by obtaining abundant hzo mRNA transcripts through qRT-PCR. A novel hzo cluster 2x clade was identified by the phylogenetic analysis and these novel sequences were abundant and widely distributed in this environment. Our study demonstrated that both cluster 1 and 2 anammox bacteria play an active role in the CRD-OMZ, and the cluster 1 abundance and transcriptional activity were higher than cluster 2 in both free-living and particle-attached fractions at both gene and transcriptional levels. PMID:24205176

  1. Lung injury and oxidoreductases.

    PubMed Central

    Hoidal, J R; Xu, P; Huecksteadt, T; Sanders, K A; Pfeffer, K; Sturrock, A B

    1998-01-01

    Acute lung injury represents a wide spectrum of pathologic processes, the most severe end of the spectrum being the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Reactive oxygen intermediates have been implicated as important in the pathobiochemistry of acute lung injury. The endogenous sources that contribute to the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates in acute lung injury are poorly defined but probably include the molybdenum hydroxylases, NAD(P)H oxidoreductases, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and arachidonic acid-metabolizing enzymes. Our laboratory has focused, in particular, on the regulation of two of these enzyme systems, xanthine oxidoreductase (XDH/XO) and NAD(P)H oxidase. We observe that gene expression of XDH/XO is regulatory in a cell-specific manner and is markedly affected by inflammatory cytokines, steroids, and physiologic events such as hypoxia. Posttranslational processing is also important in regulating XDH/XO activity. More recently, the laboratory has characterized an NAD(P)H oxidase in vascular cells. The cytochrome components of the oxidase, gp91 and p22, appear similar to the components present in phagocytic cells that contribute to their respiratory burst. In human vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, oncostatin M potently induces gp91 expression. We believe that regulation of gp91 is a central controlling factor in expression of the vascular NAD(P)H oxidase. In summary, the studies support the concept that the oxidoreductases of vascular cells are expressed in a highly regulated and self-specific fashion. PMID:9788904

  2. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of a gene cluster from Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600 encoding nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase and NADH:flavin mononucleotide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Mortimer, M W; Fisher, T S; Kahn, M L; Brockman, F J; Xun, L

    1997-01-01

    Nitrilotriacetate (NTA) is an important chelating agent in detergents and has also been used extensively in processing radionuclides. In Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600, biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase that oxidizes NTA to iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. The NTA monooxygenase activity requires two component proteins, component A and component B, but the function of each component is unclear. We have cloned and sequenced a gene cluster encoding components A and B (nmoA and nmoB) and two additional open reading frames, nmoR and nmoT, downstream of nmoA. Based on sequence similarities, nmoR and nmoT probably encode a regulatory protein and a transposase, respectively. The NmoA sequence was similar to a monooxygenase that uses reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) as reductant; NmoB was similar to an NADH:flavin mononucleotide (FMN) oxidoreductase. On the basis of this information, we tested the function of each component. Purified component B was shown to be an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase, and its activity could be separated from that of component A. When the Photobacterium fischeri NADH:FMN oxidoreductase was substituted for component B in the complete reaction, NTA was oxidized, showing that the substrate specificity of the reaction resides in component A. Component A is therefore an NTA monooxygenase that uses FMNH2 and O2 to oxidize NTA, and component B is an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase that provides FMNH2 for NTA oxidation. PMID:9023192

  3. Randomly selected suppressor mutations in genes for NADH?:?quinone oxidoreductase-1, which rescue motility of a Salmonella ubiquinone-biosynthesis mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Barker, Clive S; Meshcheryakova, Irina V; Sasaki, Toshio; Roy, Michael C; Sinha, Prem Kumar; Yagi, Takao; Samatey, Fadel A

    2014-06-01

    The primary mobile electron-carrier in the aerobic respiratory chain of Salmonella is ubiquinone. Demethylmenaquinone and menaquinone are alternative electron-carriers involved in anaerobic respiration. Ubiquinone biosynthesis was disrupted in strains bearing deletions of the ubiA or ubiE genes. In soft tryptone agar both mutant strains swam poorly. However, the ubiA deletion mutant strain produced suppressor mutant strains with somewhat rescued motility and growth. Six independent suppressor mutants were purified and comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that they each bore a single new missense mutation, which localized to genes for subunits of NADH?:?quinone oxidoreductase-1. Four mutants bore an identical nuoG(Q297K) mutation, one mutant bore a nuoM(A254S) mutation and one mutant bore a nuoN(A444E) mutation. The NuoG subunit is part of the hydrophilic domain of NADH?:?quinone oxidoreductase-1 and the NuoM and NuoN subunits are part of the hydrophobic membrane-embedded domain. Respiration was rescued and the suppressed mutant strains grew better in Luria-Bertani broth medium and could use l-malate as a sole carbon source. The quinone pool of the cytoplasmic membrane was characterized by reversed-phase HPLC. Wild-type cells made ubiquinone and menaquinone. Strains with a ubiA deletion mutation made demethylmenaquinone and menaquinone and the ubiE deletion mutant strain made demethylmenaquinone and 2-octaprenyl-6-methoxy-1,4-benzoquinone; the total quinone pool was reduced. Immunoblotting found increased NADH?:?quinone oxidoreductase-1 levels for ubiquinone-biosynthesis mutant strains and enzyme assays measured electron transfer from NADH to demethylmenaquinone or menaquinone. Under certain growth conditions the suppressor mutations improved electron flow activity of NADH?:?quinone oxidoreductase-1 for cells bearing a ubiA deletion mutation. PMID:24692644

  4. Randomly selected suppressor mutations in genes for NADH : quinone oxidoreductase-1, which rescue motility of a Salmonella ubiquinone-biosynthesis mutant strain

    PubMed Central

    Meshcheryakova, Irina V.; Sasaki, Toshio; Roy, Michael C.; Sinha, Prem Kumar; Yagi, Takao

    2014-01-01

    The primary mobile electron-carrier in the aerobic respiratory chain of Salmonella is ubiquinone. Demethylmenaquinone and menaquinone are alternative electron-carriers involved in anaerobic respiration. Ubiquinone biosynthesis was disrupted in strains bearing deletions of the ubiA or ubiE genes. In soft tryptone agar both mutant strains swam poorly. However, the ubiA deletion mutant strain produced suppressor mutant strains with somewhat rescued motility and growth. Six independent suppressor mutants were purified and comparative genome sequence analysis revealed that they each bore a single new missense mutation, which localized to genes for subunits of NADH : quinone oxidoreductase-1. Four mutants bore an identical nuoG(Q297K) mutation, one mutant bore a nuoM(A254S) mutation and one mutant bore a nuoN(A444E) mutation. The NuoG subunit is part of the hydrophilic domain of NADH : quinone oxidoreductase-1 and the NuoM and NuoN subunits are part of the hydrophobic membrane-embedded domain. Respiration was rescued and the suppressed mutant strains grew better in Luria–Bertani broth medium and could use l-malate as a sole carbon source. The quinone pool of the cytoplasmic membrane was characterized by reversed-phase HPLC. Wild-type cells made ubiquinone and menaquinone. Strains with a ubiA deletion mutation made demethylmenaquinone and menaquinone and the ubiE deletion mutant strain made demethylmenaquinone and 2-octaprenyl-6-methoxy-1,4-benzoquinone; the total quinone pool was reduced. Immunoblotting found increased NADH : quinone oxidoreductase-1 levels for ubiquinone-biosynthesis mutant strains and enzyme assays measured electron transfer from NADH to demethylmenaquinone or menaquinone. Under certain growth conditions the suppressor mutations improved electron flow activity of NADH : quinone oxidoreductase-1 for cells bearing a ubiA deletion mutation. PMID:24692644

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of the active human mitochondrial NADH:Ubiquinone oxidoreductase 24-kDa gene (NDUFV2) and its pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Coo, R. de; Buddiger, P.; Smeets, H.

    1995-04-10

    Two distinct loci for the 24-kDa subunit of the mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I of the respiratory chain) were detected in the human genome: a transcribed gene from chromosome 18 and an inactive locus on chromosome 19. Cosmid clones containing the functional gene (NDUFV2) and the pseudogene (NDUFV2P1) were isolated. The NDUFV2 gene spans approximately 20 kb and contains 8 exons. Refined mapping of both NDUFV2 genes by FISH resulted in an assignment of the NDUFV2 gene to 18p11.2-p11.31 and of the NDUFV2P1 gene to 19q13.3-qter. The nucleotide sequence of the NDUFV2P1 pseudogene differs from the cDNA sequence by the lack of the methionine initiator codon, an additional 165 bp of the first intron sequence, and a 1-nucleotide deletion. 19 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Posttranslational Influence of NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C on Enzymes in Tetrapyrrole Synthesis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Andreas S.; Peter, Enrico; Rothbart, Maxi; Schlicke, Hagen; Toivola, Jouni; Rintamki, Eevi; Grimm, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is involved in redox-related regulatory processes in chloroplasts and nonphotosynthetic active plastids. Together with 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin, it forms a two-component peroxide-detoxifying system that acts as a reductant under stress conditions. NTRC stimulates in vitro activity of magnesium protoporphyrin IX monomethylester (MgPMME) cyclase, most likely by scavenging peroxides. Reexamination of tetrapyrrole intermediate levels of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) knockout ntrc reveals lower magnesium protoporphyrin IX (MgP) and MgPMME steady-state levels, the substrate and the product of MgP methyltransferase (CHLM) preceding MgPMME cyclase, while MgP strongly accumulates in mutant leaves after 5-aminolevulinic acid feeding. The ntrc mutant has a reduced capacity to synthesize 5-aminolevulinic acid and reduced CHLM activity compared with the wild type. Although transcript levels of genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis are not significantly altered in 2-week-old ntrc seedlings, the contents of glutamyl-transfer RNA reductase1 (GluTR1) and CHLM are reduced. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay confirms a physical interaction of NTRC with GluTR1 and CHLM. While ntrc contains partly oxidized CHLM, the wild type has only reduced CHLM. As NTRC also stimulates CHLM activity in vitro, it is proposed that NTRC has a regulatory impact on the redox status of conserved cysteine residues of CHLM. It is hypothesized that a deficiency of NTRC leads to a lower capacity to reduce cysteine residues of GluTR1 and CHLM, affecting the stability and, thereby, altering the activity in the entire tetrapyrrole synthesis pathway. PMID:23569108

  7. Reconstruction of an Acetogenic 2,3-Butanediol Pathway Involving a Novel NADPH-Dependent Primary-Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Gerth, Monica L.; Maddock, Danielle J.; Mueller, Alexander P.; Liew, FungMin

    2014-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria use CO and/or CO2 plus H2 as their sole carbon and energy sources. Fermentation processes with these organisms hold promise for producing chemicals and biofuels from abundant waste gas feedstocks while simultaneously reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions. The acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum is known to synthesize the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate and 2,3-butanediol during gas fermentation. Industrially, 2,3-butanediol is valuable for chemical production. Here we identify and characterize the C. autoethanogenum enzymes for lactate and 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. The putative C. autoethanogenum lactate dehydrogenase was active when expressed in Escherichia coli. The 2,3-butanediol pathway was reconstituted in E. coli by cloning and expressing the candidate genes for acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase. Under anaerobic conditions, the resulting E. coli strain produced 1.1 ± 0.2 mM 2R,3R-butanediol (23 μM h−1 optical density unit−1), which is comparable to the level produced by C. autoethanogenum during growth on CO-containing waste gases. In addition to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, we identified a strictly NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CaADH) that could reduce acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed that CaADH accepts a range of 2-, 3-, and 4-carbon substrates, including the nonphysiological ketones acetone and butanone. The high activity of CaADH toward acetone led us to predict, and confirm experimentally, that C. autoethanogenum can act as a whole-cell biocatalyst for converting exogenous acetone to isopropanol. Together, our results functionally validate the 2,3-butanediol pathway from C. autoethanogenum, identify CaADH as a target for further engineering, and demonstrate the potential of C. autoethanogenum as a platform for sustainable chemical production. PMID:24657865

  8. Recombinant expression and biochemical characterization of an NADPH:flavin oxidoreductase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Bruchhaus, I; Richter, S; Tannich, E

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding a putative NADPH:flavin oxidoreductase of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (Eh34) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant protein (recEh34) has a molecular mass of about 35 kDa upon SDS/PAGE analysis, exhibits a flavoprotein-like absorption spectrum and contains 1 mol of non-covalently bound FMN per mol of protein. RecEh34 reveals two different enzymic activities. It catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well as of disulphides such as 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and cystine. The disulphide reductase but not the H2O2-forming NADPH oxidase activity is inhibitable by sulphydryl-active compounds, indicating that a thiol component is part of the active site for the disulphide reductase activity, whereas for the H2O2-forming NADPH oxidase activity only the flavin is required. Compared with the recombinant protein, similar activities are present in amoebic extracts. Native Eh34 is active in a monomeric as well as in a dimeric state. In contrast to recEh34, no flavin was associated with the native protein. However, both NADPH oxidase as well as DTNB reductase activity were found to be dependent on the addition of FAD or FMN. PMID:9494088

  9. Electron Transfer Pathways and Dynamics of Chloroplast NADPH-dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C (NTRC)*

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Bayard, Pilar; Hervás, Manuel; Cejudo, Francisco J.; Navarro, José A.

    2012-01-01

    NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) contain a flavin cofactor and a disulfide as redox-active groups. The catalytic mechanism of standard NTR involves a large conformational change between two configurations. Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms possess a plastid-localized NTR, called NTRC, with a thioredoxin module fused at the C terminus. NTRC is an efficient reductant of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) and thus is involved in the protection against oxidative stress, among other functions. Although the mechanism of electron transfer of canonical NTRs is well established, it is not yet known in NTRC. By employing stopped-flow spectroscopy, we have carried out a comparative kinetic study of the electron transfer reactions involving NTRC, the truncated NTR module of NTRC, and NTRB, a canonical plant NTR. Whereas the three NTRs maintain the conformational change associated with the reductive cycle of catalysis, NTRC intramolecular electron transfer to the thioredoxin module presents two kinetic components (kET of ∼2 and 0.1 s−1), indicating the occurrence of additional dynamic motions. Moreover, the dynamic features associated with the electron transfer to the thioredoxin module are altered in the presence of 2-Cys Prx. NTRC shows structural constraints that may locate the thioredoxin module in positions with different efficiencies for electron transfer, the presence of 2-Cys Prx shifting the conformational equilibrium of the thioredoxin module to a specific position, which is not the most efficient. PMID:22833674

  10. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine G.; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Henriksen, Anette

    2009-09-01

    The first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, a protein involved in seed development and germination, has been determined. The structure is in a conformation that excludes NADPH binding and indicates that a domain reorientation facilitated by Trx binding precedes NADPH binding in the reaction mechanism. Thioredoxins (Trxs) are protein disulfide reductases that regulate the intracellular redox environment and are important for seed germination in plants. Trxs are in turn regulated by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), which provide reducing equivalents to Trx using NADPH to recycle Trxs to the active form. Here, the first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, HvNTR2 from Hordeum vulgare (barley), is presented, which is also the first structure of a monocot plant NTR. The structure was determined at 2.6 Å resolution and refined to an R{sub cryst} of 19.0% and an R{sub free} of 23.8%. The dimeric protein is structurally similar to the structures of AtNTR-B from Arabidopsis thaliana and other known low-molecular-weight NTRs. However, the relative position of the two NTR cofactor-binding domains, the FAD and the NADPH domains, is not the same. The NADPH domain is rotated by 25° and bent by a 38% closure relative to the FAD domain in comparison with AtNTR-B. The structure may represent an intermediate between the two conformations described previously: the flavin-oxidizing (FO) and the flavin-reducing (FR) conformations. Here, analysis of interdomain contacts as well as phylogenetic studies lead to the proposal of a new reaction scheme in which NTR–Trx interactions mediate the FO to FR transformation.

  11. Comparative study of the tissue distribution of NADH and NADPH-dependent chloral hydrate reducing enzymes in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Keiki; Hobara, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Haruo; Iwamoto, Susumu )

    1990-03-01

    Chloral hydrate (CH), an intermediate metabolite of trichloroethylene, is reduced to trichloroethanol (TCE) by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase. Alcohol dehydrogenase requires reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and aldehyde reductase requires reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). No reports have appeared concerning comparative studies of the tissue distribution of CH-reducing enzymes. In this report, NADH and NADPH-dependent CH-reducing activities were investigated in various organs of the rat.

  12. 1,4-Naphthoquinones and Others NADPH-Dependent Glutathione Reductase-Catalyzed Redox Cyclers as Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Belorgey, Didier; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The homodimeric flavoenzyme glutathione reductase catalyzes NADPH-dependent glutathione disulfide reduction. This reaction is important for keeping the redox homeostasis in human cells and in the human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. Different types of NADPH-dependent disulfide reductase inhibitors were designed in various chemical series to evaluate the impact of each inhibition mode on the propagation of the parasites. Against malaria parasites in cultures the most potent and specific effects were observed for redox-active agents acting as subversive substrates for both glutathione reductases of the Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. In their oxidized form, these redox-active compounds are reduced by NADPH-dependent flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions in the cytosol of infected erythrocytes. In their reduced forms, these compounds can reduce molecular oxygen to reactive oxygen species, or reduce oxidants like methemoglobin, the major nutrient of the parasite, to indigestible hemoglobin. Furthermore, studies on a fluorinated suicide-substrate of the human glutathione reductase indicate that the glutathione reductase-catalyzed bioactivation of 3-benzylnaphthoquinones to the corresponding reduced 3-benzoyl metabolites is essential for the observed antimalarial activity. In conclusion, the antimalarial lead naphthoquinones are suggested to perturb the major redox equilibria of the targeted cells. These effects result in development arrest of the parasite and contribute to the removal of the parasitized erythrocytes by macrophages. PMID:23116403

  13. Cloning and heterologous expression of the NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase genes from an industrial dicarboxylic acid-producing Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Chen, Yuan Tong

    2005-04-30

    NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CPR) catalyses the transfer of electrons during P450-mediated oxidation, which plays an important role in the omega-oxidation pathway of Candida tropicalis. Two putative allelic genes, CPR-a and CPR-b, were cloned from the long chain dicarboxylic acid-producing Candida tropicalis 1230, using cassette PCR methods. Both the identified open reading frames predict the gene products of 679 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of CPR-a and CPR-b are highly homologous to CPR genes from C. tropicalis ATCC 750 and Candida maltosa. Both genes were individually expressed in a cpr mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with high CPR activities, in which only a small distinction was observed between recombinant CPR-a and CPR-b. Both CPR-a and CPR-b contain one CTG codon, which codes for serine (amino acid 50) in C. tropicalis rather than universal leucine. A mutated cDNA of CPR-a with a TCG codon instead of CTG codon was constructed and expressed, resulting in little increase in CPR activity. This indicates that the alteration of Ser-50 has little effect on functional expression of CPR. Furthermore, high ketoconazole sensitivity for the cpr mutant was complemented by heterologous expression of the cloned CPR-a or CPR-b. PMID:15849785

  14. Toxic-Selenium and Low-Selenium Transcriptomes in Caenorhabditis elegans: Toxic Selenium Up-Regulates Oxidoreductase and Down-Regulates Cuticle-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Boehler, Christopher J.; Raines, Anna M.; Sunde, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an element that in trace quantities is both essential in mammals but also toxic to bacteria, yeast, plants and animals, including C. elegans. Our previous studies showed that selenite was four times as toxic as selenate to C. elegans, but that deletion of thioredoxin reductase did not modulate Se toxicity. To characterize Se regulation of the full transcriptome, we conducted a microarray study in C. elegans cultured in axenic media supplemented with 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mM Se as selenite. C. elegans cultured in 0.2 and 0.4 mM Se displayed a significant delay in growth as compared to 0, 0.05, or 0.1 mM Se, indicating Se-induced toxicity, so worms were staged to mid-L4 larval stage for these studies. Relative to 0.1 mM Se treatment, culturing C. elegans at these Se concentrations resulted in 1.9, 9.7, 5.5, and 2.3%, respectively, of the transcriptome being altered by at least 2-fold. This toxicity altered the expression of 295 overlapping transcripts, which when filtered against gene sets for sulfur and cadmium toxicity, identified a dataset of 182 toxic-Se specific genes that were significantly enriched in functions related to oxidoreductase activity, and significantly depleted in genes related to structural components of collagen and the cuticle. Worms cultured in low Se (0 mM Se) exhibited no signs of deficiency, but low Se was accompanied by a transcriptional response of 59 genes changed ≥2-fold when compared to all other Se concentrations, perhaps due to decreases in Se-dependent TRXR-1 activity. Overall, these results suggest that Se toxicity in C. elegans causes an increase in ROS and stress responses, marked by increased expression of oxidoreductases and reduced expression of cuticle-associated genes, which together underlie the impaired growth observed in these studies. PMID:24971995

  15. Deletion of chloroplast NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase results in inability to regulate starch synthesis and causes stunted growth under short-day photoperiods

    PubMed Central

    Lepist, Anna; Pakula, Eveliina; Toivola, Jouni; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Vignols, Florence; Rintamki, Eevi

    2013-01-01

    Plastid-localized NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a unique NTR enzyme containing both reductase and thioredoxin domains in a single polypeptide. Arabidopsis thaliana NTRC knockout lines (ntrc) show retarded growth, especially under short-day (SD) photoperiods. This study identified chloroplast processes that accounted for growth reduction in SD-acclimated ntrc. The strongest reduction in ntrc growth occurred under photoperiods with nights longer than 14h, whereas knockout of the NTRC gene did not alter the circadian-clock-controlled growth of Arabidopsis. Lack of NTRC modulated chloroplast reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism, but oxidative stress was not the primary cause of retarded growth of SD-acclimated ntrc. Scarcity of starch accumulation made ntrc leaves particularly vulnerable to photoperiods with long nights. Direct interaction of NTRC and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, a key enzyme in starch synthesis, was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis. The ntrc line was not able to maximize starch synthesis during the light period, which was particularly detrimental under SD conditions. Acclimation of Arabidopsis to SD conditions also involved an inductive rise of ROS production in illuminated chloroplasts that was not counterbalanced by the activation of plastidial anti-oxidative systems. It is proposed that knockout of NTRC challenges redox regulation of starch synthesis, resulting in stunted growth of the mutant lines acclimated to the SD photoperiod. PMID:23881397

  16. Overexpression of chloroplast NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase in Arabidopsis enhances leaf growth and elucidates in vivo function of reductase and thioredoxin domains

    PubMed Central

    Toivola, Jouni; Nikkanen, Lauri; Dahlstrm, Kthe M.; Salminen, Tiina A.; Lepist, Anna; Vignols, hb Florence; Rintamki, Eevi

    2013-01-01

    Plant chloroplasts have versatile thioredoxin systems including two thioredoxin reductases and multiple types of thioredoxins. Plastid-localized NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTRC) contains both reductase (NTRd) and thioredoxin (TRXd) domains in a single polypeptide and forms homodimers. To study the action of NTRC and NTRC domains in vivo, we have complemented the ntrc knockout line of Arabidopsis with the wild type and full-length NTRC genes, in which 2-Cys motifs either in NTRd, or in TRXd were inactivated. The ntrc line was also transformed either with the truncated NTRd or TRXd alone. Overexpression of wild-type NTRC promoted plant growth by increasing leaf size and biomass yield of the rosettes. Complementation of the ntrc line with the full-length NTRC gene containing an active reductase but an inactive TRXd, or vice versa, recovered wild-type chloroplast phenotype and, partly, rosette biomass production, indicating that the NTRC domains are capable of interacting with other chloroplast thioredoxin systems. Overexpression of truncated NTRd or TRXd in ntrc background did not restore wild-type phenotype. Modeling of the three-dimensional structure of the NTRC dimer indicates extensive interactions between the NTR domains and the TRX domains further stabilize the dimeric structure. The long linker region between the NTRd and TRXd, however, allows flexibility for the position of the TRXd in the dimer. Supplementation of the TRXd in the NTRC homodimer model by free chloroplast thioredoxins indicated that TRXf is the most likely partner to interact with NTRC. We propose that overexpression of NTRC promotes plant biomass yield both directly by stimulation of chloroplast biosynthetic and protective pathways controlled by NTRC and indirectly via free chloroplast thioredoxins. Our data indicate that overexpression of chloroplast thiol redox-regulator has a potential to increase biofuel yield in plant and algal species suitable for sustainable bioenergy production. PMID:24115951

  17. Dehydroepiandrosterone supplement increases malate dehydrogenase activity and decreases NADPH-dependent antioxidant enzyme activity in rat hepatocellular carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sook-Hee; Choi, Haymie

    2008-01-01

    Beneficial effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) supplement on age-associated chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and diabetes, have been reported. However, its mechanism of action in hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo has not been investigated in detail. We have previously shown that during hepatocellular carcinogenesis, DHEA treatment decreases formation of preneoplastic glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive foci in the liver and has antioxidant effects. Here we aimed to determine the mechanism of actions of DHEA, in comparison to vitamin E, in a chemically-induced hepatocellular carcinoma model in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with control diet without a carcinogen, diets with 1.5% vitamin E, 0.5% DHEA and both of the compounds with a carcinogen for 6 weeks. The doses were previously reported to have anti-cancer effects in animals without known toxicities. With DHEA treatment, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activities were significantly increased by ~5 fold and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were decreased by ~25% compared to carcinogen treated group. Activities of Se-glutathione peroxidase in the cytotol was decreased significantly with DHEA treatment, confirming its antioxidative effect. However, liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 content and NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 reductase activities were not altered with DHEA treatment. Vitamin E treatment decreased cytosolic Se-glutathione peroxidase activities in accordance with our previous reports. However, vitamin E did not alter glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase or malate dehydrogenase activities. Our results suggest that DHEA may have decreased tumor nodule formation and reduced lipid peroxidation as previously reported, possibly by increasing the production of NADPH, a reducing equivalent for NADPH-dependent antioxidant enzymes. DHEA treatment tended to reduce glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, which may have resulted in limited supply for de novo synthesis of DNA via inhibiting the hexose monophophaste pathway. Although both DHEA and vitamin E effectively reduced preneoplastic foci in this model, they seemed to function in different mechanisms. In conclusion, DHEA may be used to reduce hepatocellular carcinoma growth by targeting NADPH synthesis, cell proliferation and anti-oxidant enzyme activities during tumor growth. PMID:20126370

  18. Identification of a five-oxidoreductase-gene cluster from Acetobacter pasteurianus conferring ethanol-dependent acidification in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Armisen, Tamara; Vercammen, Ken; Rimaux, Tom; Vrancken, Gino; Vuyst, Luc De; Cornelis, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Acetobacter pasteurianus, a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the ?-divison of Proteobacteria, produces acetic acid through ethanol oxidation. A genomic bank of A. pasteurianus 386B DNA was cloned in the low-copy cosmid pRG930Cm vector and the resulting clones were screened for the production of protease using the skimmed-milk agar assay whereby a clearing zone around the inoculated spots indicates casein degradation. Several positive clones were selected and restriction analysis revealed that many contained the same inserts. One clone was further analyzed and the cosmid DNA subjected to in vitro transposon insertion. After electroporation, several clones having lost the capacity to cause casein degradation were isolated and the sequence of the transposon-flanking regions analyzed. The majority of insertions mapped to one gene encoding an NAD(P)+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) of the PNTB superfamily, whereas one insert was found upstream in a gene encoding an ethanol dehydrogenase. Addition of phenol red to the medium confirmed the ethanol-dependent acidification around the inoculated spots of the clones without transposon insertion, suggesting that casein degradation is due to the production of acetic acid as a result of the combined activities of the alcohol dehydrogenase and ALDH. Quantitative data and pH measurements confirmed a significant acidification, and the presence of acetic acid. PMID:22950009

  19. The effect of allopurinol administration on mitochondrial respiration and gene expression of xanthine oxidoreductase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and inflammatory cytokines in selected tissues of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Settle, T; Falkenstein, E; Klandorf, H

    2015-10-01

    Birds have a remarkable longevity for their body size despite an increased body temperature, higher metabolic rate, and increased blood glucose concentrations compared to most mammals. As the end-product of purine degradation, uric acid (UA) is generated in the xanthine/hypoxanthine reactions catalyzed by xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). In the first study, Cobb × Cobb broilers (n = 12; 4 weeks old) were separated into 2 treatments (n = 6); control (CON) and allopurinol (AL) 35 mg/kg BW (ALLO). The purpose of this study was to assess mitochondrial function in broiler chickens in response to potential oxidative stress generated from the administration of AL for 1 wk. There was a significant reduction in state 3 respiration (P = 0.01) and state 4 respiration (P = 0.007) in AL-treated birds compared to the controls. The purpose of the second study was to assess the effect of AL on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ (IFN)-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p35, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and XOR in liver tissue. Cobb × Cobb broilers were separated into two groups at 4 wk age (n = 10); CON and ALLO. After 1 wk AL treatment, half of the birds in each group (CON 1 and ALLO 1) were euthanized while the remaining birds continued on AL treatment for an additional week (CON 2 and ALLO 2). A significant increase in gene expression of XOR, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-12p35 in ALLO 2 birds as compared to birds in CON 2 was detected. Liver UA content was significantly decreased in both ALLO 1(P = 0.003) and ALLO 2 (P = 0.012) birds when compared to CON 1 and CON 2, respectively. The AL reduced liver UA concentrations and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. Additional studies are needed to determine if AL causes a direct effect on mitochondria or if mitochondrial dysfunction observed in liver mitochondria was due indirectly through increased oxidative stress or increased inflammation. PMID:26316336

  20. NADPH-dependent reductases in dog thyroid: comparison of a third enzyme "glyceraldehyde reductase" to dog thyroid aldehyde reductase.

    PubMed

    Schaffhauser, M A; Sato, S; Kador, P F

    1996-03-01

    The increased incidence of thyroiditis reported to occur in diabetes has also been observed in long-term galactose-fed dogs where it is reduced by the administration of aldose reductase inhibitors. Since this suggests that thyroidal changes are linked to the abnormal accumulation of sugar alcohols (polyols), present studies were conducted to confirm the presence of aldose and aldehyde reductases in dog thyroid through isolation and characterization. Aldose and aldehyde reductases were isolated from dog thyroid by a series of chromatographic steps which included gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, affinity chromatography on Matrex Gel Orange A and chromatofocusing on Mono P. A third, labile NADPH-reductase was partially purified by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, affinity chromatography on Matrex Green A and hydroxylapatite chromatography on BIO-GEL HT. The kinetic properties of aldose and aldehyde reductases and their susceptibility to inhibition by aldose reductase inhibitors are similar to those of dog kidney aldose and aldehyde reductases. However, the levels of aldose reductase present in thyroid are extremely low compared to the levels of aldehyde reductase. A third NADPH-dependent reductase, tentatively identified as glyceraldehyde reductase, is also present in dog thyroid. This novel enzyme utilizes NADPH to reduce DL-glyceraldehyde and is clearly distinct from the other aldo-keto reductases in molecular weight, substrate specificity, inhibition by aldose reductase inhibitors and immunological properties. In summary aldose reductase, aldehyde reductase and a third novel glyceraldehyde reductase, all of which can utilize glyceraldehyde as substrate, have been identified and characterized in dog thyroid. Only aldose and aldehyde reductases, which can catalyze the production of polyols and were inhibited by aldose reductase inhibitors, appear to be linked to thyroiditis. PMID:8920636

  1. Purification of NADPH-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase from rat liver and its identification with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Del Bello, B; Maellaro, E; Sugherini, L; Santucci, A; Comporti, M; Casini, A F

    1994-01-01

    Rat liver cytosol has been found to reduce dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) to ascorbic acid in the presence of NADPH. The enzyme responsible for such activity has been purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-Sepharose, Sephadex G-100 SF and Reactive Red column chromatography, with an overall recovery of 27%. SDS/PAGE of the purified enzyme showed one single protein band with an M(r) of 37,500. A similar value (36,800) was found by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 SF column. The results indicate that the enzyme is a homogeneous monomer. The Km for DHAA was 4.6 mM and the Vmax. was 1.55 units/mg of protein; for NADPH Km and Vmax. were 4.3 microM and 1.10 units/mg of protein respectively. The optimum pH was around 6.2. Several typical substrates and inhibitors of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily have been tested. The strong inhibition of DHAA reductase effected by steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, together with the ability to reduce 5 alpha-androstane-3,17-dione strongly, suggest the possibility that DHAA reductase corresponds to 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Microsequence analysis performed on the electro-transferred enzyme band shows that the N-terminus is blocked. Internal primary structure data were obtained from CNBr-derived fragments and definitely proved the identity of NADPH-dependent DHAA reductase with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7998972

  2. Conformational changes of the NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase in the course of electron transfer to cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Tomas; Jensen, Kenneth; Mller, Birger Lindberg

    2011-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is a key electron donor to eucaryotic cytochromes P450 (CYPs). CPR shuttles electrons from NADPH through the FAD and FMN-coenzymes into the iron of the prosthetic heme-group of the CYP. In the course of these electron transfer reactions, CPR undergoes large conformational changes. This mini-review discusses the new evidence provided for such conformational changes involving a combination of a "swinging" and "rotating" model and highlights the molecular mechanisms by which formation of these conformations are controlled and thereby enables CPR to serve as an effective electron transferring "nano-machine". PMID:20624491

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase I from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de; Discola, Karen Fulan; Alves, Simone Vidigal; Barbosa, Joo Alexandre Ribeiro Gonalves; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares; Guimares, Beatriz Gomes

    2005-04-01

    Thioredoxin reductase 1 (Trr1) from S. cerevisiae is a component of the thioredoxin system, which is involved in several biological processes, including the reduction of disulfide bonds and response to oxidative stress. The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of yeast Trr1 are reported. Thioredoxin reductase 1 (Trr1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a member of the family of pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductases capable of reducing the redox-active disulfide bond of the cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and thioredoxin 2 (Trx2). NADPH, Trr1 and Trx1 (or Trx2) comprise the thioredoxin system, which is involved in several biological processes, including the reduction of disulfide bonds and response to oxidative stress. Recombinant Trr1 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a His{sub 6}-tagged fusion protein and purified by nickel-affinity chromatography. The protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG 3000 as precipitant after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.4 using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal belongs to the centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 127.97, b = 135.41, c = 75.81 , ? = 89.95. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress.

  4. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J.; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP+ and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions. PMID:26338951

  5. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions.

    PubMed

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP(+) and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions. PMID:26338951

  6. Interaction of selenoprotein PA and the thioredoxin system, components of the NADPH-dependent reduction of glycine in Eubacterium acidaminophilum and Clostridium litorale [corrected

    PubMed Central

    Dietrichs, D; Meyer, M; Rieth, M; Andreesen, J R

    1991-01-01

    Purification of protein PA of the glycine reductase complex from Eubacterium acidaminophilum and Clostridium litorale [corrected] was monitored by a new spectrophotometric assay. The procedure depended on a specific two- to threefold stimulation of a dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity that is elicited by the interaction of a thioredoxin reductase-like flavoprotein and thioredoxin from both organisms. Protein PA isolated from E. acidaminophilum by 75Se labeling and monitoring of the dithioerythritol-dependent glycine reductase activity was identical in its biochemical, structural, and immunological properties to the protein isolated by using the stimulation assay. Proteins PA from both organisms were glycoproteins of Mr about 18,500 and exhibited very similar N-terminal amino acid sequences. Depletion of thioredoxin from crude extracts of E. acidaminophilum totally diminished the NADPH-dependent but not the dithioerythritol-dependent glycine reduction. The former activity could be fully restored by adding thioredoxin. Antibodies raised against the thioredoxin reductase-like flavoprotein or thioredoxin inhibited to a high extent NADPH-dependent but not dithioerythritol-dependent glycine reductase activity. These results indicate the involvement of the thioredoxin system in the electron flow from reduced pyridine nucleotides to glycine reductase. PMID:1917832

  7. Soil oxidoreductases and FDA hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The oxidoreductases (E.C. 1.) comprise the largest enzyme group and consist of enzymes that catalyze reactions between two compounds, one of which is oxidized (the donor) while reducing the other (the acceptor) (Dixon and Webb, 1979). In common with all redox reactions, the reaction mechanism involv...

  8. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L.; King, Paul W.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP+. Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  9. Beta Hydroxylation of Glycolipids from Ustilago maydis and Pseudozyma flocculosa by an NADPH-Dependent β-Hydroxylase▿

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, Beate; Lefebvre, François; Labbé, Caroline; Bölker, Michael; Linne, Uwe; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Flocculosin and ustilagic acid (UA), two highly similar antifungal cellobiose lipids, are respectively produced by Pseudozyma flocculosa, a biocontrol agent, and Ustilago maydis, a plant pathogen. Both glycolipids contain a short-chain fatty acid hydroxylated at the β position but differ in the long fatty acid, which is hydroxylated at the α position in UA and at the β position in flocculosin. In both organisms, the biosynthesis genes are arranged in large clusters. The functions of most genes have already been characterized, but those of the P. flocculosa fhd1 gene and its homolog from U. maydis, uhd1, have remained undefined. The deduced amino acid sequences of these genes show homology to those of short-chain dehydrogenases and reductases (SDR). We disrupted the uhd1 gene in U. maydis and analyzed the secreted UA. uhd1 deletion strains produced UA lacking the β-hydroxyl group of the short-chain fatty acid. To analyze the function of P. flocculosa Fhd1, the corresponding gene was used to complement U. maydis Δuhd1 mutants. Fhd1 was able to restore wild-type UA production, indicating that Fhd1 is responsible for β hydroxylation of the flocculosin short-chain fatty acid. We also investigated a P. flocculosa homolog of the U. maydis long-chain fatty-acid alpha hydroxylase Ahd1. The P. flocculosa ahd1 gene, which does not reside in the flocculosin gene cluster, was introduced into U. maydis Δahd1 mutant strains. P. flocculosa Ahd1 neither complemented the U. maydis Δahd1 phenotype nor resulted in the production of β-hydroxylated UA. This suggests that P. flocculosa Ahd1 is not involved in flocculosin hydroxylation. PMID:21926207

  10. Peroxiredoxins and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Systems in the Model Legume Lotus japonicus1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Méndez, Alejandro; Matamoros, Manuel A.; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Cejudo, Francisco Javier; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Becana, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs), thioredoxins (Trxs), and NADPH-thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) constitute central elements of the thiol-disulfide redox regulatory network of plant cells. This study provides a comprehensive survey of this network in the model legume Lotus japonicus. The aims were to identify and characterize these gene families and to assess whether the NTR-Trx systems are operative in nodules. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunological and proteomic approaches were used for expression profiling. We identified seven Prx, 14 Trx, and three NTR functional genes. The PrxQ1 gene was found to be transcribed in two alternative spliced variants and to be expressed at high levels in leaves, stems, petals, pods, and seeds and at low levels in roots and nodules. The 1CPrx gene showed very high expression in the seed embryos and low expression in vegetative tissues and was induced by nitric oxide and cytokinins. In sharp contrast, cytokinins down-regulated all other Prx genes, except PrxQ1, in roots and nodules, but only 2CPrxA and PrxQ1 in leaves. Gene-specific changes in Prx expression were also observed in response to ethylene, abscisic acid, and auxins. Nodules contain significant mRNA and protein amounts of cytosolic PrxIIB, Trxh1, and NTRA and of plastidic NTRC. Likewise, they express cytosolic Trxh3, Trxh4, Trxh8, and Trxh9, mitochondrial PrxIIF and Trxo, and plastidic Trxm2, Trxm4, and ferredoxin-Trx reductase. These findings reveal a complex regulation of Prxs that is dependent on the isoform, tissue, and signaling molecule and support that redox NTR-Trx systems are functional in the cytosol, mitochondria, and plastids of nodules. PMID:21562331

  11. Meta-Analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi Strain 195 Transcriptomic Profiles Identify a Respiration Rate-Related Gene Expression Transition Point and Interoperon Recruitment of a Key Oxidoreductase Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Rowe, Annette R.; Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6 0.6 ?M Cl?/h)- and fast (22.9 9.6 ?M Cl?/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n = 53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID:25063656

  12. Escherichia coli 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase aids in tellurite resistance by reducing the toxicant in a NADPH-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, J M; Arenas, F A; Garca, J A; Daz-Vsquez, W A; Valdivia-Gonzlez, M; Sabotier, M; Vsquez, C C

    2015-08-01

    Exposure to the tellurium oxyanion tellurite (TeO3(2-)) results in the establishment of an oxidative stress status in most microorganisms. Usually, bacteria growing in the presence of the toxicant turn black because of the reduction of tellurite (Te(4+)) to the less-toxic elemental tellurium (Te(0)). In vitro, at least part of tellurite reduction occurs enzymatically in a nicotinamide dinucleotide-dependent reaction. In this work, we show that TeO3(2-) reduction by crude extracts of Escherichia coli overexpressing the zwf gene (encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) takes place preferentially in the presence of NADPH instead of NADH. The enzyme responsible for toxicant reduction was identified as 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (Gnd). The gnd gene showed a subtle induction at short times after toxicant exposure while strains lacking gnd were more susceptible to the toxicant. These results suggest that both NADPH-generating enzymes from the pentose phosphate shunt may be involved in tellurite detoxification and resistance in E. coli. PMID:26211962

  13. A novel cytosolic NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Methanothermobacter marburgensis

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Eva; Tan, Tien Chye; Gundinger, Thomas; Herwig, Christoph; Divne, Christina; Spadiut, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Methanothermobacter marburgensis is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic methanogenic archaeon that uses methanogenesis to convert H2 and CO2 to energy. M. marburgensis is one of the best-studied methanogens, and all genes required for methanogenic metabolism have been identified. Nonetheless, the present study describes a gene (Gene ID 9704440) coding for a putative NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase that has not yet been identified as part of the metabolic machinery. The gene product, MmNQO, was successfully expressed, purified and characterized biochemically, as well as structurally. MmNQO was identified as a flavin-dependent NADH:quinone oxidoreductase with the capacity to oxidize NADH in the presence of a wide range of electron acceptors, whereas NADPH was oxidized with only three acceptors. The 1.50 Å crystal structure of MmNQO features a homodimeric enzyme where each monomer comprises 196 residues folding into flavodoxin-like α/β domains with non-covalently bound FMN (flavin mononucleotide). The closest structural homologue is the modulator of drug activity B from Streptococcus mutans with 1.6 Å root-mean-square deviation on 161 Cα atoms and 28% amino-acid sequence identity. The low similarity at sequence and structural level suggests that MmNQO is unique among NADH:quinone oxidoreductases characterized to date. Based on preliminary bioreactor experiments, MmNQO could provide a useful tool to prevent overflow metabolism in applications that require cells with high energy demand. PMID:25372605

  14. In the Nicotiana sylvestris CMSII mutant, a recombination-mediated change 5' to the first exon of the mitochondrial nad1 gene is associated with lack of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) NAD1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Gutierres, S; Combettes, B; De Paepe, R; Mirande, M; Lelandais, C; Vedel, F; Chtrit, P

    1999-04-01

    We previously reported that the Nicotiana sylvestris CMSII mutant mitochondrial DNA carried a large deletion. Several expressed sequences, most of which are duplicated, and the unique copy of the nad7 gene encoding the NAD7 subunit of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex (complex I) are found in the deletion. Here, we show that the orf87-nad3-nad1/A cotranscription unit transcribed from a unique promoter element in the wild-type, is disrupted in CMSII. Nad3, orf87 and the promoter element are part of the deleted sequence, whilst the nad1/A sequence is present and transcribed from a new promoter brought by the recombination event, as indicated by Northern and primer extension experiments. However, Western analyses of mitochondrial protein fractions and of complex I purified using anti-NAD9 affinity columns, revealed that NAD1 is lacking in CMSII mitochondria. Our results suggest that translation of nad1 transcripts rather than transcription itself could be altered in the mutant. Consequences of lack of this submit belonging the membrane arm of complex I and thought to contain the ubiquinone-binding site, are discussed. PMID:10215845

  15. Tungsten-containing aldehyde oxidoreductase of Eubacterium acidaminophilum.

    PubMed

    Rauh, David; Graentzdoerffer, Andrea; Granderath, Katrin; Andreesen, Jan R; Pich, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidoreductase of Eubacterium acidaminophilum was purified to homogeneity under strict anaerobic conditions using a four-step procedure. The purified enzyme was present as a monomer with an apparent molecular mass of 67 kDa and contained 6.0 +/- 0.1 iron, 1.1 +/- 0.2 tungsten, about 0.6 mol pterin cofactor and zinc, but no molybdenum. The enzyme activity was induced if a molar excess of electron donors, such as serine and/or formate, were supplied in the growth medium compared to readily available electron acceptors such as glycine betaine. Many aldehydes served as good substrates, thus enzyme activity obtained with acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, isovaleraldehyde and benzaldehyde differed by a factor of less than two. Kinetic parameters were determined for all substrates tested. Oligonucleotides deduced from the N-terminal amino acid sequence were used to isolate the encoding aorA gene and adjacent DNA regions. The deduced amino acid sequence of the aldehyde oxidoreductase exhibited high similarities to other tungsten-containing aldehyde oxidoreductases from archaea. Transcription of the aorA gene was monocistronic and started from a sigma 54-dependent promoter. Upstream of aorA, the gene aorR is localized whose product is similar to sigma 54-dependent transcriptional activator proteins and, thus, AorR is probably involved in the regulation of aorA expression. PMID:14686934

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YMR315W Gene Encodes an NADP(H)-Specific Oxidoreductase Regulated by the Transcription Factor Stb5p in Response to NADPH Limitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Engineered xylose-metabolizing cells grown on xylose show increased expression of YMR315W at both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, the YMR315W promoter contains a putative binding site for the transcription factor Stb5p, which has been shown to regulate genes involved in nicotinamide aden...

  17. Purification and characterization of NADPH-dependent cytosolic 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine binding protein in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, K; Miyamoto, T; Ichikawa, K; Yamauchi, K; Kobayashi, M; Sakurai, A; Ohtsuka, H; Nishii, Y; Yamada, T

    1989-03-25

    The NADPH-dependent cytosolic 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine(T3)-binding protein (CTBP) has been purified over 30,000-fold from rat kidney by using charcoal extraction, Mono Q-Sepharose, Blue Sepharose CL-6B, and Sephacryl S-200 column chromatography. Purified CTBP had a sedimentation coefficient of 4.7 S, Stokes radius of 32.5A, and calculated molecular weight of 58,000. The apparently homogeneous protein consisted of a single polypeptide chain with Mr of 58,000 as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Scatchard analysis of T3 binding showed that NADPH increases maximal binding capacity without changes in the affinity constant (Ka = 2.43 X 10(9) M-1). Double reciprocal analysis of NADPH and binding capacity gave maximal binding capacity of 16,400 pmol/mg of CTBP, Mr = 58,000. The order of affinity of iodothyronine analogues to purified CTBP was as follows: L-T3 = D-T3 greater than triiodothyroacetic acid greater than L-thyroxine. [125I]T3 bound to purified CTBP spontaneously dissociated from CTBP at 20 degrees C (t 1/2 = 22 min) in the absence of NADPH, whereas the dissociation was not observed in the presence of NADPH. The optimal pH for T3 binding was 7.2-7.5 Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ (0-200 mM) did not influence T3 binding to CTBP. The purified CTBP did not bind to DNA and was not adsorbed to concanavalin A-Sepharose. PMID:2925671

  18. A Novel NADPH-Dependent Aldehyde Reductase Gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-12632 Involved in the Detoxification of Aldehyde Inhibitors Derived from Lignocellulosic Biomass Conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde inhibitors such as furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), anisaldehyde, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and phenylaldehyde are commonly generated during lignocellulosic biomass conversion process for low-cost cellulosic ethanol production that interferes with subsequent microbial growth and...

  19. Lactic acid-producing yeast cells having nonfunctional L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome C oxidoreductase cells

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Matthew; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Hause, Benjamin Matthew; Van Hoek, Pim; Dundon, Catherine Asleson

    2012-03-20

    Yeast cells having an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene ae modified by reducing L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity in the cell. This leads to reduced consumption of lactate by the cell and can increase overall lactate yields in a fermentation process. Cells having the reduced L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity can be screened for by resistance to organic acids such as lactic or glycolic acid.

  20. Increased Furfural Tolerance Due to Overexpression of NADH-Dependent Oxidoreductase FucO in Escherichia coli Strains Engineered for the Production of Ethanol and Lactate▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X.; Miller, E. N.; Yomano, L. P.; Zhang, X.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L. O.

    2011-01-01

    Furfural is an important fermentation inhibitor in hemicellulose sugar syrups derived from woody biomass. The metabolism of furfural by NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, such as YqhD (low Km for NADPH), is proposed to inhibit the growth and fermentation of xylose in Escherichia coli by competing with biosynthesis for NADPH. The discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural provided a new approach to improve furfural tolerance. Strains that produced ethanol or lactate efficiently as primary products from xylose were developed. These strains included chromosomal mutations in yqhD expression that permitted the fermentation of xylose broths containing up to 10 mM furfural. Expression of fucO from plasmids was shown to increase furfural tolerance by 50% and to permit the fermentation of 15 mM furfural. Product yields with 15 mM furfural were equivalent to those of control strains without added furfural (85% to 90% of the theoretical maximum). These two defined genetic traits can be readily transferred to enteric biocatalysts designed to produce other products. A similar strategy that minimizes the depletion of NADPH pools by native detoxification enzymes may be generally useful for other inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic sugar streams and with other organisms. PMID:21685167

  1. Discovering the electronic circuit diagram of life: structural relationships among transition metal binding sites in oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Dongun; Senn, Stefan; Harel, Arye; Jelen, Benjamin I; Falkowski, Paul G

    2013-07-19

    Oxidoreductases play a central role in catalysing enzymatic electron-transfer reactions across the tree of life. To first order, the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of these proteins are governed by protein folds associated with specific transition metals and ligands at the active site. A global analysis of holoenzyme structures and functions suggests that there are fewer than approximately 500 fundamental oxidoreductases, which can be further clustered into 35 unique groups. These catalysts evolved in prokaryotes early in the Earth's history and are largely responsible for the emergence of non-equilibrium biogeochemical cycles on the planet's surface. Although the evolutionary history of the amino acid sequences in the oxidoreductases is very difficult to reconstruct due to gene duplication and horizontal gene transfer, the evolution of the folds in the catalytic sites can potentially be used to infer the history of these enzymes. Using a novel, yet simple analysis of the secondary structures associated with the ligands in oxidoreductases, we developed a structural phylogeny of these enzymes. The results of this 'composome' analysis suggest an early split from a basal set of a small group of proteins dominated by loop structures into two families of oxidoreductases, one dominated by ?-helices and the second by ?-sheets. The structural evolutionary patterns in both clades trace redox gradients and increased hydrogen bond energy in the active sites. The overall pattern suggests that the evolution of the oxidoreductases led to decreased entropy in the transition metal folds over approximately 2.5 billion years, allowing the enzymes to use increasingly oxidized substrates with high specificity. PMID:23754810

  2. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H; Mller, Volker

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na(+)-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na(+)-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  3. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  4. Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase participates in nitric oxide consumption by rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Catherine N; Keynes, Robert G; Garthwaite, John

    2009-04-15

    In low nanomolar concentrations, NO (nitric oxide) functions as a transmitter in brain and other tissues, whereas near-micromolar NO concentrations are associated with toxicity and cell death. Control of the NO concentration, therefore, is critical for proper brain function, but, although its synthesis pathway is well-characterized, the major route of breakdown of NO in brain is unclear. Previous observations indicate that brain cells actively consume NO at a high rate. The mechanism of this consumption was pursued in the present study. NO consumption by a preparation of central glial cells was abolished by cell lysis and recovered by addition of NADPH. NADPH-dependent consumption of NO localized to cell membranes and was inhibited by proteinase K, indicating the involvement of a membrane-bound protein. Purification of this activity yielded CYPOR (cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase). Antibodies against CYPOR inhibited NO consumption by brain membranes and the amount of CYPOR in several cell types correlated with their rate of NO consumption. NO was also consumed by purified CYPOR but this activity was found to depend on the presence of the vitamin E analogue Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchromane-2-carboxylic acid), included in the buffer as a precaution against inadvertent NO consumption by lipid peroxidation. In contrast, NO consumption by brain membranes was independent of Trolox. Hence, it appears that, during the purification process, CYPOR becomes separated from a partner needed for NO consumption. Cytochrome P450 inhibitors inhibited NO consumption by brain membranes, making these proteins likely candidates. PMID:19152507

  5. Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase participates in nitric oxide consumption by rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Hall, CatherineN.; Keynes, RobertG.; Garthwaite, John

    2009-01-01

    In low nanomolar concentrations, NO (nitric oxide) functions as a transmitter in brain and other tissues, whereas near-micromolar NO concentrations are associated with toxicity and cell death. Control of the NO concentration, therefore, is critical for proper brain function, but, although its synthesis pathway is well-characterized, the major route of breakdown of NO in brain is unclear. Previous observations indicate that brain cells actively consume NO at a high rate. The mechanism of this consumption was pursued in the present study. NO consumption by a preparation of central glial cells was abolished by cell lysis and recovered by addition of NADPH. NADPH-dependent consumption of NO localized to cell membranes and was inhibited by proteinase K, indicating the involvement of a membrane-bound protein. Purification of this activity yielded CYPOR (cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase). Antibodies against CYPOR inhibited NO consumption by brain membranes and the amount of CYPOR in several cell types correlated with their rate of NO consumption. NO was also consumed by purified CYPOR but this activity was found to depend on the presence of the vitamin E analogue Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchromane-2-carboxylic acid), included in the buffer as a precaution against inadvertent NO consumption by lipid peroxidation. In contrast, NO consumption by brain membranes was independent of Trolox. Hence, it appears that, during the purification process, CYPOR becomes separated from a partner needed for NO consumption. Cytochrome P450 inhibitors inhibited NO consumption by brain membranes, making these proteins likely candidates. PMID:19152507

  6. The chloroplast membrane associated ceQORH putative quinone oxidoreductase reduces long-chain, stress-related oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Curien, Gilles; Giustini, Ccile; Montillet, Jean-Luc; Mas-Y-Mas, Sarah; Cobessi, David; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Matringe, Michel; Grechkin, Alexander; Rolland, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Under oxidative stress conditions the lipid constituents of cells can undergo oxidation whose frequent consequence is the production of highly reactive ?,?-unsaturated carbonyls. These molecules are toxic because they can add to biomolecules (such as proteins and nucleic acids) and several enzyme activities cooperate to eliminate these reactive electrophile species. CeQORH (chloroplast envelope Quinone Oxidoreductase Homolog, At4g13010) is associated with the inner membrane of the chloroplast envelope and imported into the organelle by an alternative import pathway. In the present study, we show that the recombinant ceQORH exhibits the activity of a NADPH-dependent ?,?-unsaturated oxoene reductase reducing the double bond of medium-chain (C?9) to long-chain (18 carbon atoms) reactive electrophile species deriving from poly-unsaturated fatty acid peroxides. The best substrates of ceQORH are 13-lipoxygenase-derived ?-ketols. ?-Ketols are spontaneously produced in the chloroplast from the unstable allene oxide formed in the biochemical pathway leading to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, a precursor of the defense hormone jasmonate. In chloroplasts, ceQORH could detoxify 13-lipoxygenase-derived ?-ketols at their production sites in the membranes. This finding opens new routes toward the understanding of ?-ketols role and detoxification. PMID:26678323

  7. The Study of NADPH-Dependent Flavoenzyme-Catalyzed Reduction of Benzo[1,2-c]1,2,5-oxadiazole N-Oxides (Benzofuroxans)

    PubMed Central

    arlauskas, Jonas; Misevi?ien?, Lina; Marozien?, Audron?; Karvelis, Laimonas; Stankevi?i?t?, Jonita; Kriktopaitis, Kastis; ??nas, Narimantas; Yantsevich, Aleksey; Lauryn?nas, Audrius; Anusevi?ius, ilvinas

    2014-01-01

    The enzymatic reactivity of a series of benzo[1,2-c]1,2,5-oxadiazole N-oxides (benzofuroxans; BFXs) towards mammalian single-electron transferring NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase (P-450R) and two-electron (hydride) transferring NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) was examined in this work. Since the =N+ (?O)O? moiety of furoxan fragments of BFXs bears some similarity to the aromatic nitro-group, the reactivity of BFXs was compared to that of nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) whose reduction mechanisms by these and other related flavoenzymes have been extensively investigated. The reduction of BFXs by both P-450R and NQO1 was accompanied by O2 uptake, which was much lower than the NADPH oxidation rate; except for annelated BFXs, whose reduction was followed by the production of peroxide. In order to analyze the possible quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) of the enzymatic reactivity of the compounds, their electron-accepting potency and other reactivity indices were assessed by quantum mechanical methods. In P-450R-catalyzed reactions, both BFXs and NACs showed the same reactivity dependence on their electron-accepting potency which might be consistent with an outer sphere electron transfer mechanism. In NQO1-catalyzed two-electron (hydride) transferring reactions, BFXs acted as more efficient substrates than NACs, and the reduction efficacy of BFXs by NQO1 was in general higher than by single-electron transferring P-450R. In NQO1-catalyzed reactions, QSARs obtained showed that the reduction efficacy of BFXs, as well as that of NACs, was determined by their electron-accepting potency and could be influenced by their binding mode in the active center of NQO1 and by their global softness as their electronic characteristic. The reductive conversion of benzofuroxan by both flavoenzymes yielded the same reduction product of benzofuroxan, 2,3-diaminophenazine, with the formation of o-benzoquinone dioxime as a putative primary reductive intermediate, which undergoes a further reduction process. Overall, the data obtained show that by contrast to NACs, the flavoenzyme-catalyzed reduction of BFXs is unlikely to initiate their redox-cycling, which may argue for a minor role of the redox-cycling-type action in the cytotoxicity of BFXs. PMID:25517035

  8. An oxidoreductase from 'Alphonso' mango catalyzing biosynthesis of furaneol and reduction of reactive carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ram; Chidley, Hemangi; Deshpande, Ashish; Schmidt, Axel; Pujari, Keshav; Giri, Ashok; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Gupta, Vidya

    2013-01-01

    Two furanones, furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone), are important constituents of flavor of the Alphonso cultivar of mango (Mangifera indica). To get insights into the biosynthesis of these furanones, we isolated an enone oxidoreductase gene from the Alphonso mango. It has high sequence similarity to an alkenal/one oxidoreductase from cucumber (79% identity) and enone oxidoreductases from tomato (73% identity) and strawberry (72% identity). The complete open reading frame was expressed in E. coli and the (his)6-tagged recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. The purified protein assayed with NADH as a reducing agent converted D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate into furaneol, the immediate precursor of mesifuran. The enzyme was also able to convert two highly reactive carbonyls, 3-buten-2-one and 1-penten-3-one, produced by lipid peroxidation in plants, into their saturated derivatives. Expression profiling in various ripening stages of Alphonso fruits depicted an expression maxima at 10 days after harvest stage, shortly before the appearance of the maximum amount of furanones (completely ripe stage, 15 days after harvest). Although no furanones were detected at the 0 day after harvest stage, significant expression of this gene was detected in the fruits at this stage. Overall, the results suggest that this oxidoreductase plays important roles in Alphonso mango fruits. PMID:24133645

  9. P450 oxidoreductase deficiency: a new disorder of steroidogenesis with multiple clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Walter L

    2004-09-01

    Combined partial deficiency of 17alpha-hydroxylase and 21-hydroxylase is well-described, but patients' genes for these enzymes lack mutations. Recent work has identified mutations in the gene for P450 oxidoreductase (POR) in such patients. POR-deficient individuals have a broad range of disorders, from infants with congenital malformations to women with the polycysic ovary syndrome. POR transfers electrons to all microsomal P450 enzymes: its deficiency affects steroidogenesis, drug metabolism and other processes. PMID:15350602

  10. Functional Analysis of Paralogous Thiol-disulfide Oxidoreductases in Streptococcus gordonii*

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Lauren; Ng, Crystal K. W.; Halperin, Scott A.; Lee, Song F.

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are important for the stability of many extracellular proteins, including bacterial virulence factors. Formation of these bonds is catalyzed by thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases (TDORs). Little is known about their formation in Gram-positive bacteria, particularly among facultative anaerobic Firmicutes, such as streptococci. To investigate disulfide bond formation in Streptococcus gordonii, we identified five putative TDORs from the sequenced genome. Each of the putative TDOR genes was insertionally inactivated with an erythromycin resistance cassette, and the mutants were analyzed for autolysis, extracellular DNA release, biofilm formation, bacteriocin production, and genetic competence. This analysis revealed a single TDOR, SdbA, which exhibited a pleiotropic mutant phenotype. Using an in silico analysis approach, we identified the major autolysin AtlS as a natural substrate of SdbA and showed that SdbA is critical to the formation of a disulfide bond that is required for autolytic activity. Analysis by BLAST search revealed homologs to SdbA in other Gram-positive species. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of an oxidoreductase, SdbA, that affects multiple phenotypes in a Gram-positive bacterium. SdbA shows low sequence homology to previously identified oxidoreductases, suggesting that it may belong to a different class of enzymes. Our results demonstrate that SdbA is required for disulfide bond formation in S. gordonii and indicate that this enzyme may represent a novel type of oxidoreductase in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23615907

  11. An Oxidoreductase Is Involved in Cercosporin Degradation by the Bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. zinniae

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Tanya V.; Mitchell, Thomas K.; Daub, Margaret E.

    2006-01-01

    The polyketide toxin cercosporin plays a key role in pathogenesis by fungal species of the genus Cercospora. The bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. zinniae is able to rapidly degrade this toxin. Growth of X. campestris pv. zinniae strains in cercosporin-containing medium leads to the breakdown of cercosporin and to the formation of xanosporic acid, a nontoxic breakdown product. Five non-cercosporin-degrading mutants of a strain that rapidly degrades cercosporin (XCZ-3) were generated by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis and were then transformed with a genomic library from the wild-type strain. All five mutants were complemented with the same genomic clone, which encoded a putative transcriptional regulator and an oxidoreductase. Simultaneous expression of these two genes was necessary to complement the mutant phenotype. Sequence analysis of the mutants showed that all five mutants had point mutations in the oxidoreductase gene and no mutations in the regulator. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) showed that the expression of both of these genes in the wild-type strain is upregulated after exposure to cercosporin. Both the oxidoreductase and transcriptional regulator genes were transformed into three non-cercosporin-degrading bacteria to determine if they are sufficient for cercosporin degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the oxidoreductase was expressed in all transconjugants. However, none of the transconjugants were able to degrade cercosporin, suggesting that additional factors are required for cercosporin degradation. Further study of cercosporin degradation in X. campestris pv. zinniae may allow for the engineering of Cercospora-resistant plants by using a suite of genes. PMID:16957231

  12. Thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system of Streptomyces clavuligerus: sequences, expression, and organization of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Yanko, M; Mislovati, M; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Av-Gay, Y; Aharonowitz, Y

    1993-01-01

    The genes that encode thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase of Streptomyces clavuligerus were cloned, and their DNA sequences were determined. Previously, we showed that S. clavuligerus possesses a disulfide reductase with broad substrate specificity that biochemically resembles the thioredoxin oxidoreductase system and may play a role in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics. It consists consists of two components, a 70-kDa NADPH-dependent flavoprotein disulfide reductase with two identical subunits and a 12-kDa heat-stable protein general disulfide reductant. In this study, we found, by comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences, that the 35-kDa protein is in fact thioredoxin reductase; it shares 48.7% amino acid sequence identity with Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase, the 12-kDa protein is thioredoxin, and it shares 28 to 56% amino acid sequence identity with other thioredoxins. The streptomycete thioredoxin reductase has the identical cysteine redox-active region--Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys--and essentially the same flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADPH dinucleotide-binding sites as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and is partially able to accept E. coli thioredoxin as a substrate. The streptomycete thioredoxin has the same cysteine redox-active segment--Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys--that is present in virtually all eucaryotic and procaryotic thioredoxins. However, in vivo it is unable to donate electrons to E. coli methionine sulfoxide reductase and does not serve as a substrate in vitro for E. coli thioredoxin reductase. The S. clavuligerus thioredoxin (trxA) and thioredoxin reductase (trxB) genes are organized in a cluster. They are transcribed in the same direction and separated by 33 nucleotides. In contrast, the trxA and trxB genes of E. coli, the only other organism in which both genes have been characterized, are physically widely separated. Images PMID:8349555

  13. Esculetin-induced protection of human hepatoma HepG2 cells against hydrogen peroxide is associated with the Nrf2-dependent induction of the NAD(P)H: Quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, Sudhakar R.; Ellis, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-15

    Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxy coumarin), is a potent antioxidant that is present in several plant species. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of protection of esculetin in human hepatoma HepG2 cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability, cell integrity, intracellular glutathione levels, generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of antioxidant enzymes were used as markers to measure cellular oxidative stress and response to ROS. The protective effect of esculetin was compared to a well-characterized chemoprotective compound quercetin. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with sub-lethal (10-25 {mu}M) esculetin for 8 h prevented cell death and maintained cell integrity following exposure to 0.9 mM hydrogen peroxide. An increase in the generation of ROS following hydrogen peroxide treatment was significantly attenuated by 8 h pre-treatment with esculetin. In addition, esculetin ameliorated the decrease in intracellular glutathione caused by hydrogen peroxide exposure. Moreover, treatment with 25 {mu}M esculetin for 8 h increased the expression of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) at both protein and mRNA levels significantly, by 12-fold and 15-fold, respectively. Esculetin treatment also increased nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8-fold indicating that increased NQO1 expression is Nrf2-mediated. These results indicate that esculetin protects human hepatoma HepG2 cells from hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative injury and that this protection is provided through the induction of protective enzymes as part of an adaptive response mediated by Nrf2 nuclear accumulation.

  14. FabG, an NADPH-Dependent 3-Ketoacyl Reductase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Provides Precursors for Medium-Chain-Length Poly-3-Hydroxyalkanoate Biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Qun; Sierro, Nicolas; Witholt, Bernard; Kessler, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli hosts expressing fabG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed 3-ketoacyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase activity toward R-3-hydroxyoctanoyl-CoA. Furthermore, E. coli recombinants carrying the poly-3-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymerase-encoding gene phaC in addition to fabG accumulated medium-chain-length PHAs (mcl-PHAs) from alkanoates. When E. coli fadB or fadA mutants, which are deficient in steps downstream or upstream of the 3-ketoacyl-CoA formation step during ?-oxidation, respectively, were transformed with fabG, higher levels of PHA were synthesized in E. coli fadA, whereas similar levels of PHA were found in E. coli fadB, compared with those of the corresponding mutants carrying phaC alone. These results strongly suggest that FabG of P. aeruginosa is able to reduce mcl-3-ketoacyl-CoAs generated by the ?-oxidation to 3-hydroxyacyl-CoAs to provide precursors for the PHA polymerase. PMID:10781572

  15. The P450 oxidoreductase, RedA, controls development beyond the mound stage in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Kristeller, Daniela C; Farage, Layla; Fiorini, Leonardo C; Loomis, William F; da Silva, Aline M

    2008-01-01

    Background NADPH-cytochrome-P450 oxidoreductase (CPR) is a ubiquitous enzyme that belongs to a family of diflavin oxidoreductases and is required for activity of the microsomal cytochrome-P450 monooxygenase system. CPR gene-disruption experiments have demonstrated that absence of this enzyme causes developmental defects both in mouse and insect. Results Annotation of the sequenced genome of D. discoideum revealed the presence of three genes (redA, redB and redC) that encode putative members of the diflavin oxidoreductase protein family. redA transcripts are present during growth and early development but then decline, reaching undetectable levels after the mound stage. redB transcripts are present in the same levels during growth and development while redC expression was detected only in vegetative growing cells. We isolated a mutant strain of Dictyostelium discoideum following restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) mutagenesis in which redA was disrupted. This mutant develops only to the mound stage and accumulates a bright yellow pigment. The mound-arrest phenotype is cell-autonomous suggesting that the defect occurs within the cells rather than in intercellular signaling. Conclusion The developmental arrest due to disruption of redA implicates CPR in the metabolism of compounds that control cell differentiation. PMID:18218133

  16. The protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN/DLC1/LC8) binding does not inhibit the NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, a key step in NO synthesis.

    PubMed

    Parhad, Swapnil S; Jaiswal, Deepa; Ray, Krishanu; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2016-03-25

    The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an essential enzyme involved in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter. Although previous studies have indicated that the dynein light chain 1 (DLC1) binding to nNOS could inhibit the NO synthesis, the claim is challenged by contradicting reports. Thus, the mechanism of nNOS regulation remained unclear. nNOS has a heme-bearing, Cytochrome P450 core, and the functional enzyme is a dimer. The electron flow from NADPH to Flavin, and finally to the heme of the paired nNOS subunit within a dimer, is facilitated upon calmodulin (CaM) binding. Here, we show that DLC1 binding to nNOS-CaM complex does not affect the electron transport from the reductase to the oxygenase domain. Therefore, it cannot inhibit the rate of NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, which results in l-Arginine oxidation. Also, the NO release activity does not decrease with increasing DLC1 concentration in the reaction mix, which further confirmed that DLC1 does not inhibit nNOS activity. These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell. PMID:26923072

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Families Resources for Health Professionals What glossary definitions help with understanding cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency? acne ; ... recessive ; reproduction ; stress ; syndrome ; testosterone You may find definitions for these and many other terms in the ...

  18. Protein Method for Investigating Mercuric Reductase Gene Expression in Aquatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ogunseitan, O. A.

    1998-01-01

    A colorimetric assay for NADPH-dependent, mercuric ion-specific oxidoreductase activity was developed to facilitate the investigation of mercuric reductase gene expression in polluted aquatic ecosystems. Protein molecules extracted directly from unseeded freshwater and samples seeded with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PU21(Rip64) were quantitatively assayed for mercuric reductase activity in microtiter plates by stoichiometric coupling of mercuric ion reduction to a colorimetric redox chain through NADPH oxidation. Residual NADPH was determined by titration with phenazine methosulfate-catalyzed reduction of methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium to produce visible formazan. Spectrophotometric determination of formazan concentration showed a positive correlation with the amount of NADPH remaining in the reaction mixture (r2 = 0.99). Mercuric reductase activity in the protein extracts was inversely related to the amount of NADPH remaining and to the amount of formazan produced. A qualitative nitrocellulose membrane-based version of the method was also developed, where regions of mercuric reductase activity remained colorless against a stained-membrane background. The assay detected induced mercuric reductase activity from 102 CFU, and up to threefold signal intensity was detected in seeded freshwater samples amended with mercury compared to that in mercury-free samples. The efficiency of extraction of bacterial proteins from the freshwater samples was (97 2)% over the range of population densities investigated (102 to 108 CFU/ml). The method was validated by detection of enzyme activity in protein extracts of water samples from a polluted site harboring naturally occurring mercury-resistant bacteria. The new method is proposed as a supplement to the repertoire of molecular techniques available for assessing specific gene expression in heterogeneous microbial communities impacted by mercury pollution. PMID:9464410

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperones and Oxidoreductases: Critical Regulators of Tumor Cell Survival and Immunorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Gutirrez, Toms; Simmen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones and oxidoreductases are abundant enzymes that mediate the production of fully folded secretory and transmembrane proteins. Resisting the Golgi and plasma membrane-directed bulk flow, ER chaperones and oxidoreductases enter retrograde trafficking whenever they are pulled outside of the ER by their substrates. Solid tumors are characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), combined with reduced blood flow that leads to low oxygen supply and ER stress. Under these conditions, hypoxia and the unfolded protein response upregulate their target genes. When this occurs, ER oxidoreductases and chaperones become important regulators of tumor growth. However, under these conditions, these proteins not only promote the folding of proteins, but also alter the properties of the plasma membrane and hence modulate tumor immune recognition. For instance, high levels of calreticulin serve as an eat-me signal on the surface of tumor cells. Conversely, both intracellular and surface BiP/GRP78 promotes tumor growth. Other ER folding assistants able to modulate the properties of tumor tissue include protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), Ero1? and GRP94. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of ER chaperones in regulating tumor cell functions and immunorecognition will lead to important insight for the development of novel cancer therapies. PMID:25386408

  20. Light-Dependent Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase: Phylogeny, Regulation, and Catalytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Gabruk, Michal; Mysliwa-Kurdziel, Beata

    2015-09-01

    This Current Topic focuses on light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR, EC 1.3.1.33). POR catalyzes the penultimate reaction of chlorophyll biosynthesis, i.e., the light-triggered reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide. In this reaction, the chlorin ring of the chlorophyll molecule is formed, which is crucial for photosynthesis. POR is one of very few enzymes that are driven by light; however, it is unique in the need for its substrate to absorb photons to induce the conformational changes in the enzyme, which are required for its catalytic activation. Moreover, the enzyme is also involved in the negative feedback of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway and controls chlorophyll content via its light-dependent activity. Even though it has been almost 70 years since the first isolation of active POR complexes, our knowledge of them has markedly advanced in recent years. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of POR, including the phylogenetic roots of POR, the mechanisms of the regulation of POR genes expression, the regulation of POR activity, the import of POR into plastids, the role of POR in PLB formation, and the molecular mechanism of protochlorophyllide reduction by POR. To the best of our knowledge, no previous review has compiled such a broad set of recent findings about POR. PMID:26230427

  1. Menaquinol-nitrate oxidoreductase of Bacillus halodenitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, P A; Denariaz, G; LeGall, J; Payne, W J

    1991-01-01

    When grown anaerobically on nitrate-containing medium, Bacillus halodenitrificans exhibited a membrane-bound nitrate reductase (NR) that was solubilized by 2% Triton X-100 but not by 1% cholate or deoxycholate. Purification on columns of DE-52, hydroxylapatite, and Sephacryl S-300 yielded reduced methyl viologen NR (MVH-NR) with specific activities of 20 to 35 U/mg of protein that was stable when stored in 40% sucrose at -20 degrees C for 6 weeks. 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-2-hydroxypropone-1-sulfonat e (CHAPSO) and dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside stimulated enzyme activity three- to fourfold. Membrane extractions yielded purified NR that separated after electrophoresis into a 145-kDa alpha subunit, a 58-kDa beta subunit, and a 23-kDa gamma subunit. The electronic spectrum of dithionite-reduced, purified NR displayed peaks at 424.6, 527, and 557 nm, indicative of the presence of a cytochrome b, an interpretation consistent with the pyridine hemochrome spectrum formed. Analyses revealed a molybdenum-heme-non-heme iron ratio of 1:1:8 for the NR and the presence of molybdopterin. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals characteristic of iron-sulfur centers were detected at low temperature. EPR also revealed a minor signal centered in the g = 2 region of the spectra. Upon reduction with dithionite, the enzyme displayed signals at g = 2.064, 2.026, 1.906, and 1.888, indicative of the presence of low-potential iron-sulfur centers, which resolve most probably as two [4Fe-4S]+1 clusters. With menadiol as the substrate for nitrate reduction, the Km for nitrate was 50-fold less than that seen when MVH was the electron donor. The cytochrome b557-containing enzyme from B. halodenitrificans is characterized as a menaquinol-nitrate:oxidoreductase. Images PMID:2013572

  2. The roles of thiol oxidoreductases in yeast replicative aging.

    PubMed

    Hacioglu, Elise; Esmer, Isil; Fomenko, Dmitri E; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Koc, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Thiol-based redox reactions are involved in the regulation of a variety of biological functions, such as protection against oxidative stress, signal transduction and protein folding. Some proteins involved in redox regulation have been shown to modulate life span in organisms from yeast to mammals. To assess the role of thiol oxidoreductases in aging on a genome-wide scale, we analyzed the replicative life span of yeast cells lacking known and candidate thiol oxidoreductases. The data suggest the role of several pathways in controlling yeast replicative life span, including thioredoxin reduction, protein folding and degradation, peroxide reduction, PIP3 signaling, and ATP synthesis. PMID:20934449

  3. Regulation of yeast replicative life span by thiol oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Hacioglu, Elise; Esmer, Isil; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Thiol-based redox reactions are involved in the regulation of a variety of biological functions, such as protection against oxidative stress, signal transduction and protein folding. Some proteins involved in redox regulation have been shown to modulate life span in organisms from yeast to mammals. To assess the role of thiol oxidoreductases in aging on a genome-wide scale, we analyzed the replicative life span of yeast cells lacking known and candidate thiol oxidoreductases. The data suggest the role of several pathways in regulation of yeast aging, including thioredoxin reduction, protein folding and degradation, peroxide reduction, PIP3 signaling, and ATP synthesis. PMID:20934449

  4. Regulation of MUC5AC expression by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shuo; Byrd, Angela S.; Fischer, Bernard M.; Grover, Amy R.; Ghio, Andrew J.; Voynow, Judith A.

    2007-01-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE), a potent neutrophil inflammatory mediator, increases MUC5AC mucin gene expression through undefined pathways involving reactive oxygen species. To determine the source of NE-generated reactive oxygen species, we used pharmacologic inhibitors of oxidoreductases to test whether they blocked NE-regulated MUC5AC mRNA expression. We found that dicumarol, an inhibitor of the NADP(H) quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), inhibited MUC5AC mRNA expression in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells and primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. We further tested the role of NQO1 in mediating NE-induced MUC5AC expression by inhibiting NQO1 expression using siRNA. Transfection with short interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for NQO1 suppressed NQO1 expression and significantly abrogated MUC5AC mRNA expression. NE treatment caused lipid peroxidation in A549 cells; this effect was inhibited by pretreatment with dicumarol, suggesting that NQO1 also regulates oxidant stress in A549 cells following NE exposure. NE exposure increased NQO1 protein and activity levels; NQO1 expression and activity were limited to the cytosol and did not translocate to the plasma membrane. Our results indicate that NQO1 has an important role as a key mediator of NE-regulated oxidant stress and MUC5AC mucin gene expression. PMID:17395013

  5. Archaeal Mo-Containing Glyceraldehyde Oxidoreductase Isozymes Exhibit Diverse Substrate Specificities through Unique Subunit Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wakagi, Takayoshi; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Miyake, Masayuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Archaea use glycolytic pathways distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes, where unique enzymes catalyze each reaction step. In this study, we isolated three isozymes of glyceraldehyde oxidoreductase (GAOR1, GAOR2 and GAOR3) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. GAOR1-3 belong to the xanthine oxidoreductase superfamily, and are composed of a molybdo-pyranopterin subunit (L), a flavin subunit (M), and an iron-sulfur subunit (S), forming an LMS hetero-trimer unit. We found that GAOR1 is a tetramer of the STK17810/STK17830/STK17820 hetero-trimer, GAOR2 is a dimer of the STK23390/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer, and GAOR3 is the STK24840/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer. GAOR1-3 exhibited diverse substrate specificities for their electron donors and acceptors, due to their different L-subunits, and probably participate in the non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway. We determined the crystal structure of GAOR2, as the first three-dimensional structure of an archaeal molybdenum-containing hydroxylase, to obtain structural insights into their substrate specificities and subunit assemblies. The gene arrangement and the crystal structure suggested that the M/S-complex serves as a structural scaffold for the binding of the L-subunit, to construct the three enzymes with different specificities. Collectively, our findings illustrate a novel principle of a prokaryotic multicomponent isozyme system. PMID:26808202

  6. Archaeal Mo-Containing Glyceraldehyde Oxidoreductase Isozymes Exhibit Diverse Substrate Specificities through Unique Subunit Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Masayuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Archaea use glycolytic pathways distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes, where unique enzymes catalyze each reaction step. In this study, we isolated three isozymes of glyceraldehyde oxidoreductase (GAOR1, GAOR2 and GAOR3) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. GAOR1–3 belong to the xanthine oxidoreductase superfamily, and are composed of a molybdo-pyranopterin subunit (L), a flavin subunit (M), and an iron-sulfur subunit (S), forming an LMS hetero-trimer unit. We found that GAOR1 is a tetramer of the STK17810/STK17830/STK17820 hetero-trimer, GAOR2 is a dimer of the STK23390/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer, and GAOR3 is the STK24840/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer. GAOR1–3 exhibited diverse substrate specificities for their electron donors and acceptors, due to their different L-subunits, and probably participate in the non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway. We determined the crystal structure of GAOR2, as the first three-dimensional structure of an archaeal molybdenum-containing hydroxylase, to obtain structural insights into their substrate specificities and subunit assemblies. The gene arrangement and the crystal structure suggested that the M/S-complex serves as a structural scaffold for the binding of the L-subunit, to construct the three enzymes with different specificities. Collectively, our findings illustrate a novel principle of a prokaryotic multicomponent isozyme system. PMID:26808202

  7. A unifying kinetic framework for modeling oxidoreductase-catalyzed reactions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ivan; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Oxidoreductases are a fundamental class of enzymes responsible for the catalysis of oxidation–reduction reactions, crucial in most bioenergetic metabolic pathways. From their common root in the ancient prebiotic environment, oxidoreductases have evolved into diverse and elaborate protein structures with specific kinetic properties and mechanisms adapted to their individual functional roles and environmental conditions. While accurate kinetic modeling of oxidoreductases is thus important, current models suffer from limitations to the steady-state domain, lack empirical validation or are too specialized to a single system or set of conditions. Results: To address these limitations, we introduce a novel unifying modeling framework for kinetic descriptions of oxidoreductases. The framework is based on a set of seven elementary reactions that (i) form the basis for 69 pairs of enzyme state transitions for encoding various specific microscopic intra-enzyme reaction networks (micro-models), and (ii) lead to various specific macroscopic steady-state kinetic equations (macro-models) via thermodynamic assumptions. Thus, a synergistic bridge between the micro and macro kinetics can be achieved, enabling us to extract unitary rate constants, simulate reaction variance and validate the micro-models using steady-state empirical data. To help facilitate the application of this framework, we make available RedoxMech: a Mathematica™ software package that automates the generation and customization of micro-models. Availability: The Mathematica™ source code for RedoxMech, the documentation and the experimental datasets are all available from: http://www.igb.uci.edu/tools/sb/metabolic-modeling. Contact: pfbaldi@ics.uci.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23613486

  8. Molybdenum Incorporation in Tungsten Aldehyde Oxidoreductase Enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus?

    PubMed Central

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria; Bevers, Loes E.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Krijger, Gerard C.; Wolterbeek, Hubert T.; Verhaert, Peter D. E. M.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon

    2010-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus expresses five aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR) enzymes, all containing a tungsto-bispterin cofactor. The growth of this organism is fully dependent on the presence of tungsten in the growth medium. Previous studies have suggested that molybdenum is not incorporated in the active site of these enzymes. Application of the radioisotope 99Mo in metal isotope native radioautography in gel electrophoresis (MIRAGE) technology to P. furiosus shows that molybdenum can in fact be incorporated in all five AOR enzymes. Mo(V) signals characteristic for molybdopterin were observed in formaldehyde oxidoreductase (FOR) in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-monitored redox titrations. Our finding that the aldehyde oxidation activity of FOR and WOR5 (W-containing oxidoreductase 5) correlates only with the residual tungsten content suggests that the Mo-containing AORs are most likely inactive. An observed W/Mo antagonism is indicative of tungstate-dependent negative feedback of the expression of the tungstate/molybdate ABC transporter. An intracellular selection mechanism for tungstate and molybdate processing has to be present, since tungsten was found to be preferentially incorporated into the AORs even under conditions with comparable intracellular concentrations of tungstate and molybdate. Under the employed growth conditions of starch as the main carbon source in a rich medium, no tungsten- and/or molybdenum-associated proteins are detected in P. furiosus other than the high-affinity transporter, the proteins of the metallopterin insertion machinery, and the five W-AORs. PMID:20562313

  9. Identification of six novel P450 oxidoreductase missense variants in Ashkenazi and Moroccan Jewish populations

    PubMed Central

    Tomkov, Mria; Marohnic, Christopher C; Gurwitz, David; eda, Ond?ej; Masters, Bettie Sue Siler; Martsek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Background The enzyme NADPHP450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the main electron donor to all microsomal CYPs. The possible contribution of common POR variants to inter- and intra-individual variability in drug metabolism is of great pharmacogenetic interest. Aim To search for POR polymorphic alleles and estimate their frequencies in a Jewish population. Materials & methods We analyzed the POR gene in 301 Ashkenazi and Moroccan Jews. Results A total of 30 POR SNPs were identified, nine in the noncoding regions and 21 in the protein-coding regions (ten synonymous, 11 missense). Six of these missense variants are previously undescribed (S102P, V164M, V191M, D344N, E398A and D648N). Conclusion The data collected in this study on missense POR SNPs, interpreted in light of the crystallographic structure of human POR, indicate that some POR missense variants may be potential biomarkers for future POR pharmacogenetic screening. PMID:22462747

  10. A male twin infant with skull deformity and elevated neonatal 17-hydroxyprogesterone: a prismatic case of P450 oxidoreductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wudy, Stefan A; Hartmann, Michaela F; Draper, Nicole; Stewart, Paul M; Arlt, Wiebke

    2004-11-01

    We report on a male twin infant who presented with brachy-turri-cephaly, frontal bossing, large anterior fontanelle, low set and malformed ears, and mild arachnodactyly. He had normal male genitalia. There was no evidence for maternal virilization during pregnancy. The pattern of malformations resembled Antley-Bixler-Syndrome (ABS). However, sequencing analysis of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2) did not reveal mutations. The boy's twin sister did not show any somatic or endocrine abnormalities. In the boy, neonatal screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia was positive with moderately elevated 17-hydroxyprogesterone. Sequence analysis of his CYP21 gene did not reveal any mutations. The short synacthen test revealed an exaggerated 17-hydroxyprogesterone and a blunted cortisol response. Urinary steroid profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed a unique steroid metabolome suggestive of impaired activity of both 17-hydroxylase and 21-hydroxylase. Clinical and metabolic findings therefore were compatible with the recently described variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (ORD). Subsequently, sequencing analysis of CPR, the gene encoding P450 oxidoreductase (OR), revealed a homozygous mutation in the patient, resulting in an amino acid exchange in position 284 of the OR protein (A284P). Both the female twin sister and the parents were heterozygous for the A284P mutation. P450 oxidoreductase deficiency represents a novel autosomal recessively inherited form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Its characteristic steroid metabolome can readily be detected by GC-MS analysis of spot urine. Clinical features may include an ABS phenotype, ambiguous genitalia (virilization in girls, feminization in boys), and glucocorticoid deficiency. If required, hydrocortisone replacement should be provided. PMID:15666853

  11. Biochemical and functional characterization of a periplasmic disulfide oxidoreductase from Neisseria meningitidis essential for meningococcal viability.

    PubMed

    Gand, Adeline; Selme-Roussel, Laure; Collin, Sabrina; Branlant, Guy; Jacob, Christophe; Boschi-Muller, Sandrine

    2015-06-01

    TlpAs (thioredoxin-like proteins) are bacterial thioredoxin-like periplasmic disulfide oxidoreductases generally involved in cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) process. They contain a characteristic CXXC active site motif involved in disulfide exchange reaction. In the human pathogenic Neisseria meningitidis species, no TlpA has been characterized so far. In the present study, using an in silico analysis, we identified a putative periplasmic TlpA, called TlpA2. Biochemical and kinetic characterizations of the soluble form of TlpA2, tTlpA2 (truncated TlpA2), were performed. A reduction potential of -0.230V at pH7 was calculated, suggesting that TlpA2 acts as a reductant in the oxidative environment of the periplasm. Using a second-order reactive probe, high pKapp (apparent pKa) values were determined for the two cysteines of the SCXXC motif. The tTlpA2 was shown to be efficiently reduced by the N-terminal domain of the DsbD, whereas tTlpA2 reduced a mimetic peptide of cytochrome c' with a catalytic efficiency similar to that observed with other disulfide oxidoreductase like ResA. Moreover, the corresponding gene tlpA2 was shown to be essential for the pathogen viability and able to partially complement a Bordetella pertussis CcsX mutant. Together, these data support an essential role of TlpA2in the Ccm process in N.meningitidis. PMID:25826614

  12. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  13. P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and Antley-Bixler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2007-12-01

    Antley-Bixler syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome that primarily manifests with craniofacial abnormalities but may include skeletal malformations. Some cases have been shown to be caused by fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 mutations and, recently, it was revealed that others are caused by mutations in the electron donor enzyme P450 oxidoreductase (POR). P450 oxidoreductase deficiency, however, is not only associated with the malformations but frequently presents with disordered sex development in affected patients of both sexes. Furthermore, biochemical work-up invariably reveals impairment of 17-hydroxylase and 21-hydroxylase activities, two steroidogenic enzymes dependent on electron transfer from POR. While we begin to gain insight into the pathogenesis of disease, detailed genotype-phenotype studies are still lacking and POR deficiency presents several challenges for research. Firstly, the exact pathogenesis of the skeletal malformations as a consequence of POR mutations is unclear, though impaired sterol biosynthesis has been implicated. Secondly, it needs to be explained, why the external genitalia in affected boys may appear undervirilized while affected girls can be severely virilized. Further evidence is required for the proposed alternative pathway in human androgen synthesis that might explain the apparently contradictory finding of low circulating androgens and severely virilised external genitalia in affected girls. Recent studies have provided evidence for a differential interaction of specific POR mutations with different electron-accepting P450 enzymes and this may provide the key for further understanding of the complex pathogenesis of this complex disease. PMID:17960482

  14. Electron transfer by human wild-type and A287P mutant P450 oxidoreductase assessed by transient kinetics: functional basis of P450 oxidoreductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Chen, Mo; Penning, Trevor M; Miller, Walter L

    2015-05-15

    Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a 2-flavin protein that transfers electrons from NADPH via its FAD and FMN moieties to all microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, including steroidogenic and drug-metabolizing P450s. Defects in the POR gene can cause POR deficiency (PORD), manifested clinically by disordered steroidogenesis, genital anomalies and skeletal malformations. We examined the POR mutant A287P, which is the most frequent cause of PORD in patients of European ancestry and partially disrupts most P450 activities in vitro. Flavin content analysis showed that A287P is deficient in FAD and FMN binding, although the mutation site is distant from the binding sites of both flavins. Externally added flavin partially restored the cytochrome c reductase activity of A287P, suggesting that flavin therapy may be useful for this frequent form of PORD. Transient kinetic dissection of the reaction of POR with NADPH and the reduction in cytochrome c by POR using stopped-flow techniques revealed defects in individual electron transfer steps mediated by A287P. A287P had impaired ability to accept electrons from NADPH, but was capable of a fast FMN ? cytochrome c electron donation reaction. Thus the reduced rates of P450 activities with A287P may be due to deficient flavin and impaired electron transfer from NADPH. PMID:25728647

  15. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase in neuronal injury and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsin-Tzu; Liu, Chan-Chuan; Chen, Shur-Tzu; Yap, Ye Vone; Chang, Nan-Shang; Sze, Chun-I

    2014-01-01

    The human and mouse WWOX/Wwox gene encodes a candidate tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase protein. This gene is located on a common fragile site FRA16D. WWOX participates in a variety of cellular events and acts as a transducer in the many signal pathways, including TNF, chemotherapeutic drugs, UV irradiation, Wnt, TGF-?, C1q, Hyal-2, sex steroid hormones, and others. While transiently overexpressed WWOX restricts relocation of transcription factors to the nucleus for suppressing cancer survival, physiological relevance of this regard in vivo has not been confirmed. Unlike many tumor suppressor genes, mutation of WWOX is rare, raising a question whether WWOX is a driver for cancer initiation. WWOX/Wwox was initially shown to play a crucial role in neural development and in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and neuronal injury. Later on, WWOX/Wwox was shown to participate in the development of epilepsy, mental retardation, and brain developmental defects in mice, rats and humans. Up to date, most of the research and review articles have focused on the involvement of WWOX in cancer. Here, we review the role of WWOX in neural injury and neurological diseases, and provide perspectives for the WWOX-regulated neurodegeneration. PMID:25537520

  16. Structure and function of Caulobacter crescentus aldose-aldose oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Taberman, Helena; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Hakulinen, Nina; Penttilä, Merja; Rouvinen, Juha; Parkkinen, Tarja

    2015-12-15

    Aldose-aldose oxidoreductase (Cc AAOR) is a recently characterized enzyme from the bacterial strain Caulobacter crescentus CB15 belonging to the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase/inositol dehydrogenase/rhizopine catabolism protein (Gfo/Idh/MocA) family. Cc AAOR catalyses the oxidation and reduction of a panel of aldose monosaccharides using a tightly bound NADP(H) cofactor that is regenerated in the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, Cc AAOR can also oxidize 1,4-linked oligosaccharides. In the present study, we present novel crystal structures of the dimeric Cc AAOR in complex with the cofactor and glycerol, D-xylose, D-glucose, maltotriose and D-sorbitol determined to resolutions of 2.0, 1.8, 1.7, 1.9 and 1.8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm), respectively. These complex structures allowed for a detailed analysis of the ligand-binding interactions. The structures showed that the C1 carbon of a substrate, which is either reduced or oxidized, is close to the reactive C4 carbon of the nicotinamide ring of NADP(H). In addition, the O1 hydroxy group of the substrate, which is either protonated or deprotonated, is unexpectedly close to both Lys(104) and Tyr(189), which may both act as a proton donor or acceptor. This led us to hypothesize that this intriguing feature could be beneficial for Cc AAOR to catalyse the reduction of a linear form of a monosaccharide substrate and the oxidation of a pyranose form of the same substrate in a reaction cycle, during which the bound cofactor is regenerated. PMID:26438878

  17. Recent progress on the characterization of aldonolactone oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Aboobucker, Siddique I; Lorence, Argelia

    2016-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid (ascorbate, AsA, vitamin C) is essential for animal and plant health. Despite our dependence on fruits and vegetables to fulfill our requirement for this vitamin, the metabolic network leading to its formation in plants is just being fully elucidated. There is evidence supporting the operation of at least four biosynthetic pathways leading to AsA formation in plants. These routes use d-mannose/l-galactose, l-gulose, d-galacturonate, and myo-inositol as the main precursors. This review focuses on aldonolactone oxidoreductases, a subgroup of the vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO; EC 1.1.3.38) superfamily, enzymes that catalyze the terminal step in AsA biosynthesis in bacteria, protozoa, animals, and plants. In this report, we review the properties of well characterized aldonolactone oxidoreductases to date. A shared feature in these proteins is the presence of a flavin cofactor as well as a thiol group. The flavin cofactor in many cases is bound to the N terminus of the enzymes or to a recently discovered HWXK motif in the C terminus. The binding between the flavin moiety and the protein can be either covalent or non-covalent. Substrate specificity and subcellular localization differ among the isozymes of each kingdom. All oxidases among these enzymes possess dehydrogenase activity, however, exclusive dehydrogenases are also found. We also discuss recent evidence indicating that plants have both l-gulono-1,4-lactone oxidases and l-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenases involved in AsA biosynthesis. PMID:26696130

  18. Thiol-disulfide Oxidoreductases TRX1 and TMX3 Decrease Neuronal Atrophy in a Lentiviral Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jonathan; Lu, Zhen; Barrows, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene (HTT) that results in expression of a polyglutamine-expanded mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). N-terminal fragments of mHTT accumulate in brain neurons and glia as soluble monomeric and oligomeric species as well as insoluble protein aggregates and drive the disease process. Decreasing mHTT levels in brain provides protection and reversal of disease signs in HD mice making mHTT a prime target for disease modification. There is evidence for aberrant thiol oxidation within mHTT and other proteins in HD models. Based on this, we hypothesized that a specific thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase exists that decreases mHTT levels in cells and provides protection in HD mice. We undertook an in-vitro genetic screen of key thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases then completed secondary screens to identify those with mHTT decreasing properties. Our in-vitro experiments identified thioredoxin 1 and thioredoxin-related transmembrane protein 3 as proteins that decrease soluble mHTT levels in cultured cells. Using a lentiviral mouse model of HD we tested the effect of these proteins in striatum. Both proteins decreased mHTT-induced striatal neuronal atrophy. Findings provide evidence for a role of dysregulated protein-thiol homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HD. PMID:26664998

  19. Neuronal expression of a single-subunit yeast NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Ndi1) extends Drosophila lifespan.

    PubMed

    Bahadorani, Sepehr; Cho, Jaehyoung; Lo, Thomas; Contreras, Heidy; Lawal, Hakeem O; Krantz, David E; Bradley, Timothy J; Walker, David W

    2010-04-01

    The 'rate of living' theory predicts that longevity should be inversely correlated with the rate of mitochondrial respiration. However, recent studies in a number of model organisms, including mice, have reported that interventions that retard the aging process are, in fact, associated with an increase in mitochondrial activity. To better understand the relationship between energy metabolism and longevity, we supplemented the endogenous respiratory chain machinery of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster with the alternative single-subunit NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Ndi1) of the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report that expression of Ndi1 in fly mitochondria leads to an increase in NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity, oxygen consumption, and ATP levels. In addition, exogenous Ndi1 expression results in increased CO2 production in living flies. Using an inducible gene-expression system, we expressed Ndi1 in different cells and tissues and examined the impact on longevity. In doing so, we discovered that targeted expression of Ndi1 in fly neurons significantly increases lifespan without compromising fertility or physical activity. These findings are consistent with the idea that enhanced respiratory chain activity in neuronal tissue can prolong fly lifespan. PMID:20089120

  20. Neuronal expression of a single-subunit yeast NADH–ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Ndi1) extends Drosophila lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Bahadorani, Sepehr; Cho, Jaehyoung; Lo, Thomas; Contreras, Heidy; Lawal, Hakeem O.; Krantz, David E.; Bradley, Timothy J; Walker, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The ‘rate of living’ theory predicts that longevity should be inversely correlated with the rate of mitochondrial respiration. However, recent studies in a number of model organisms, including mice, have reported that interventions that retard the aging process are, in fact, associated with an increase in mitochondrial activity. To better understand the relationship between energy metabolism and longevity, we supplemented the endogenous respiratory chain machinery of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster with the alternative single-subunit NADH–ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Ndi1) of the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report that expression of Ndi1 in fly mitochondria leads to an increase in NADH–ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity, oxygen consumption and ATP levels. In addition, exogenous Ndi1 expression results in increased CO2 production in living flies. Using an inducible gene expression system, we expressed Ndi1 in different cells and tissues and examined the impact on longevity. In doing so, we discovered that targeted expression of Ndi1 in fly neurons significantly increases lifespan without compromising fertility or physical activity. These findings are consistent with the idea that enhanced respiratory chain activity in neuronal tissue can prolong fly lifespan. PMID:20089120

  1. A Single-Electron Reducing Quinone Oxidoreductase Is Necessary to Induce Haustorium Development in the Root Parasitic Plant Triphysaria[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Pradeepa C.G.; Filappova, Tatiana; Tomilov, Alexey; Tomilova, Natalya B.; Jamison-McClung, Denneal; Ngo, Quy; Inoue, Kentaro; Yoder, John I.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae develop haustoria in response to contact with host roots or chemical haustoria-inducing factors. Experiments in this manuscript test the hypothesis that quinolic-inducing factors activate haustorium development via a signal mechanism initiated by redox cycling between quinone and hydroquinone states. Two cDNAs were previously isolated from roots of the parasitic plant Triphysaria versicolor that encode distinct quinone oxidoreductases. QR1 encodes a single-electron reducing NADPH quinone oxidoreductase similar to ζ-crystallin. The QR2 enzyme catalyzes two electron reductions typical of xenobiotic detoxification. QR1 and QR2 transcripts are upregulated in a primary response to chemical-inducing factors, but only QR1 was upregulated in response to host roots. RNA interference technology was used to reduce QR1 and QR2 transcripts in Triphysaria roots that were evaluated for their ability to form haustoria. There was a significant decrease in haustorium development in roots silenced for QR1 but not in roots silenced for QR2. The infrequent QR1 transgenic roots that did develop haustoria had levels of QR1 similar to those of nontransgenic roots. These experiments implicate QR1 as one of the earliest genes on the haustorium signal transduction pathway, encoding a quinone oxidoreductase necessary for the redox bioactivation of haustorial inducing factors. PMID:20424175

  2. The respiratory molybdo-selenoprotein formate dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli have hydrogen: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli synthesizes three membrane-bound molybdenum- and selenocysteine-containing formate dehydrogenases, as well as up to four membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the formate dehydrogenases (Fdh-N and Fdh-O) and two of the hydrogenases (Hyd-1 and Hyd-2) have their respective catalytic subunits located in the periplasm and these enzymes have been shown previously to oxidize formate and hydrogen, respectively, and thus function in energy metabolism. Mutants unable to synthesize the [NiFe]-hydrogenases retain a H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity. The aim of this study was to identify the enzyme or enzymes responsible for this activity. Results Here we report the identification of a new H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase enzyme activity in E. coli that is independent of the [NiFe]-hydrogenases. This enzyme activity was originally identified after non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualization of hydrogen-oxidizing activity by specific staining. Analysis of a crude extract derived from a variety of E. coli mutants unable to synthesize any [NiFe]-hydrogenase-associated enzyme activity revealed that the mutants retained this specific hydrogen-oxidizing activity. Enrichment of this enzyme activity from solubilised membrane fractions of the hydrogenase-negative mutant FTD147 by ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and size-exclusion chromatographies followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified the enzymes Fdh-N and Fdh-O. Analysis of defined mutants devoid of selenocysteine biosynthetic capacity or carrying deletions in the genes encoding the catalytic subunits of Fdh-N and Fdh-O demonstrated that both enzymes catalyze hydrogen activation. Fdh-N and Fdh-O can also transfer the electrons derived from oxidation of hydrogen to other redox dyes. Conclusions The related respiratory molybdo-selenoproteins Fdh-N and Fdh-O of Escherichia coli have hydrogen-oxidizing activity. These findings demonstrate that the energy-conserving selenium- and molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenases Fdh-N and Fdh-O exhibit a degree of promiscuity with respect to the electron donor they use and identify a new class of dihydrogen-oxidizing enzyme. PMID:21806784

  3. Dissecting the Diphenylene Iodonium-Sensitive NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase of Zucchini Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Trost, P.; Foscarini, S.; Preger, V.; Bonora, P.; Vitale, L.; Pupillo, P.

    1997-01-01

    Quinone oxidoreductase activities dependent on pyridine nucleotides are associated with the plasma membrane (PM) in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyls. In the presence of NADPH, lipophilic ubiquinone homologs with up to three isoprenoid units were reduced by intact PM vesicles with a Km of 2 to 7 [mu]M. Affinities for both NADPH and NADH were similar (Km of 62 and 51 [mu]M, respectively). Two NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase forms were identified. The first, labeled as peak I in gel-filtration experiments, behaves as an intrinsic membrane complex of about 300 kD, it slightly prefers NADH over NADPH, it is markedly sensitive to the inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, and it is active with lipophilic quinones. The second form (peak II) is an NADPH-preferring oxidoreductase of about 90 kD, weakly bound to the PM. Peak II is diphenylene iodonium-insensitive and resembles, in many properties, the soluble NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase that is also present in the same tissue. Following purification of peak I, however, the latter gave rise to a quinone oxidoreductase of the soluble type (peak II), based on substrate and inhibitor specificities and chromatographic and electrophoretic evidence. It is proposed that a redox protein of the same class as the soluble NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (F. Sparla, G. Tedeschi, and P. Trost [1996] Plant Physiol. 112:249-258) is a component of the diphenylene iodonium-sensitive PM complex capable of reducing lipophilic quinones. PMID:12223742

  4. Purification and characterization of malate:quinone oxidoreductase from thermophilic Bacillus sp. PS3.

    PubMed

    Kabashima, Yoshiki; Sone, Nobuhito; Kusumoto, Tomoichirou; Sakamoto, Junshi

    2013-02-01

    Several bacteria possess membrane-bound dehydrogenases other than cytosolic dehydrogenases in their respiratory chains. In many cases, the membrane-bound malate:quinone oxidoreductases (MQOs) are essential for growth. However, these MQOs are absent in mammalian mitochondria, and therefore may be a potential drug target for pathogenic bacteria. To characterize the kinetic properties of MQOs, we purified MQO from Bacillus sp. PS3, which is a gram-positive and thermophilic bacterium, and cloned the gene encoding MQO based on the obtained partial N-terminus sequence. Purified MQOs showed a molecular mass of ~90 kDa, which was estimated using gel filtration, and it consists of two subunits with a molecular mass of ~50 kDa. Phylogenetic analysis showed a high similarity to the MQO of the Geobacillus group rather than the Bacillus group. Additionally, the purified enzyme was thermostable and it retained menaquinol reduction activity at high temperatures. Although it is difficult to conduct experiments using menaquinol because of its instability, we were able to measure the oxidase activity of cytochrome bd-type quinol oxidase by using menaquinol-1 by coupling this molecule with the menaquinol reduction reaction using purified MQOs. PMID:23143325

  5. Assembly of the Escherichia coli NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I).

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Thorsten; Dekovic, Doris Kreuzer; Burschel, Sabrina

    2016-03-01

    Energy-converting NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, respiratory complex I, couples the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of four protons across the membrane. The Escherichia coli complex I is made up of 13 different subunits encoded by the so-called nuo-genes. The electron transfer is catalyzed by nine cofactors, a flavin mononucleotide and eight iron-sulfur (Fe/S)-clusters. The individual subunits and the cofactors have to be assembled together in a coordinated way to guarantee the biogenesis of the active holoenzyme. Only little is known about the assembly of the bacterial complex compared to the mitochondrial one. Due to the presence of so many Fe/S-clusters the assembly of complex I is intimately connected with the systems responsible for the biogenesis of these clusters. In addition, a few other proteins have been reported to be required for an effective assembly of the complex in other bacteria. The proposed role of known bacterial assembly factors is discussed and the information from other bacterial species is used in this review to draw an as complete as possible model of bacterial complex I assembly. In addition, the supramolecular organization of the complex in E. coli is briefly described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof. Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26682761

  6. Elementary tetrahelical protein design for diverse oxidoreductase functions

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Bruce R; Sheehan, Molly M; Fry, Bryan A; Bialas, Chris; Ennist, Nathan M; Siedlecki, Jessica A; Zhao, Zhenyu; Stetz, Matthew A; Valentine, Kathleen G; Anderson, J L Ross; Wand, A Joshua; Discher, Bohdana M; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Emulating functions of natural enzymes in man-made constructs has proven challenging. Here we describe a man-made protein platform that reproduces many of the diverse functions of natural oxidoreductases without importing the complex and obscure interactions common to natural proteins. Our design is founded on an elementary, structurally stable 4-α-helix protein monomer with a minimalist interior malleable enough to accommodate various light- and redox-active cofactors and with an exterior tolerating extensive charge patterning for modulation of redox cofactor potentials and environmental interactions. Despite its modest size, the construct offers several independent domains for functional engineering that targets diverse natural activities, including dioxygen binding and superoxide and peroxide generation, interprotein electron transfer to natural cytochrome c and light-activated intraprotein energy transfer and charge separation approximating the core reactions of photosynthesis, cryptochrome and photolyase. The highly stable, readily expressible and biocompatible characteristics of these open-ended designs promise development of practical in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24121554

  7. Xanthine oxidoreductase in atherosclerosis pathogenesis: not only oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Endothelial xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) together with NAD(P)H oxidase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase plays a physiologic role in inflammatory signalling, the regulation of NO production and vascular function. The oxidative stress generated by these enzymes may induce endothelial dysfunction, leading to atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome. XOR activity creates both oxidant and anti-oxidant products that are implicated in the development of hypertension, smoking vascular injury, dyslipidemia and diabetes, which are the main risk factors of atherosclerosis. In particular, uric acid may have a protective as well as a detrimental role in vascular alterations, thus justifying the multi-directional effects of XOR inhibition. Moreover, XOR products are associated with cell differentiation, leading to adipogenesis and foam cell formation, as well as to the production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 from arterial smooth muscle cells, after proliferation and migration. The role of XOR in adipogenesis is also connected with insulin resistance and obesity, two main features of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25463089

  8. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase in cardiac nitroso-redox imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Hare, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports the importance of nitroso-redox balance in the cardiovascular system. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is a major oxidative enzyme and increased XOR activity, leading to both increased production of reactive oxygen species and uric acid, is implicated in heart failure. Within the heart, XOR activity stimulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, apoptosis, and impairs matrix structure. The underpinnings of these derangements can be linked not solely to oxidative stress, but may also involve the process of nitroso-redox imbalance. In this regard, XOR interacts with nitric oxide signaling at numerous levels, including a direct protein-protein interaction with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Deficiency or translocation of NOS1 away from this microdomain leads to increased activity of XOR, which in turn impairs excitation-contraction coupling and myofilament calcium sensitivity. There is a mounting abundance of preclinical data supporting beneficial effects of inhibiting XOR, but translation to the clinic continues to be incomplete. A growing understanding of XOR and its role in nitroso-redox imbalance has great potential to lead to improved pathophysiologic insights and possibly therapeutic advances. PMID:19273066

  9. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes. PMID:26823950

  10. Elementary tetrahelical protein design for diverse oxidoreductase functions.

    PubMed

    Farid, Tammer A; Kodali, Goutham; Solomon, Lee A; Lichtenstein, Bruce R; Sheehan, Molly M; Fry, Bryan A; Bialas, Chris; Ennist, Nathan M; Siedlecki, Jessica A; Zhao, Zhenyu; Stetz, Matthew A; Valentine, Kathleen G; Anderson, J L Ross; Wand, A Joshua; Discher, Bohdana M; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie

    2013-12-01

    Emulating functions of natural enzymes in man-made constructs has proven challenging. Here we describe a man-made protein platform that reproduces many of the diverse functions of natural oxidoreductases without importing the complex and obscure interactions common to natural proteins. Our design is founded on an elementary, structurally stable 4-?-helix protein monomer with a minimalist interior malleable enough to accommodate various light- and redox-active cofactors and with an exterior tolerating extensive charge patterning for modulation of redox cofactor potentials and environmental interactions. Despite its modest size, the construct offers several independent domains for functional engineering that targets diverse natural activities, including dioxygen binding and superoxide and peroxide generation, interprotein electron transfer to natural cytochrome c and light-activated intraprotein energy transfer and charge separation approximating the core reactions of photosynthesis, cryptochrome and photolyase. The highly stable, readily expressible and biocompatible characteristics of these open-ended designs promise development of practical in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24121554

  11. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes. PMID:26823950

  12. Genetic and clinical features of p450 oxidoreductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scott, Rachel R; Miller, Walter L

    2008-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of steroidogenesis with multiple clinical manifestations. POR is the electron donor for all microsomal P450 enzymes, including the three steroidogenic enzymes P450c17 (17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase), P450c21 (21-hydroxylase), and P450aro (aromatase). Since the first description of POR mutations in 2004, about 50 patients have been reported. Serum steroid profiles indicate partial deficiencies in 21-hydroxylase, 17alpha-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase. The 17-OH progesterone levels are elevated, as in 21-hydroxylase deficiency, while androgen levels are low; cortisol may be normal but is poorly responsive to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Most patients also have associated skeletal malfor- mations (craniosynostosis, radio-ulnar synostosis, midface hypoplasia, bowed femora) termed Antley-Bixler syndrome. Antley-Bixler syndrome with normal steroidogenesis is caused by autosomal dominant gain-of-function mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. Males with POR deficiency are often undervirilized, while females can be virilized. The prognosis for patients with POR deficiency appears to depend on the severity of the bony malformations and their timely treatment. The potential impact of POR mutations on drug metabolism by other hepatic P450 enzymes requires further investigation. Given the varied physical and biochemical phenotype of POR deficiency and the risk of adrenal insufficiency, clinicians should be alert to this potential diagnosis. PMID:18259105

  13. œNADPH: Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase-Structure, Catalytic Function, and Role in Prolamellar Body Formation and Morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Michael P. Timko

    2013-02-01

    The biosynthesis of chlorophyll is a critical biochemical step in the development of photosynthetic vascular plants and green algae. From photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) to algae, non-vascular plants, gymnosperms and vascular plants, mechanisms have evolved for protochlorophyllide reduction a key step in chlorophyll synthesis. Protochlorophyllide reduction is carried out by both a light-dependent (POR) and light-independent (LIPOR) mechanisms. NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (EC 1.3.1.33, abbreviated POR) catalyzes the light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide (PChlide) to chlorophyllide (Chlide). In contrast, a light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase (LIPOR) involves three plastid gene products (chlL, chlN, and chlB) and several nuclear factors. Our work focused on characterization of both the POR and LIPOR catalyzed processes.

  14. Disarming Burkholderia pseudomallei: Structural and Functional Characterization of a Disulfide Oxidoreductase (DsbA) Required for Virulence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Risn M.; Marshall, Laura E.; Halili, Maria; Furlong, Emily; Tay, Stephanie; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the disease melioidosis, a major source of morbidity and mortality in southeast Asia and northern Australia. The need to develop novel antimicrobials is compounded by the absence of a licensed vaccine and the bacterium's resistance to multiple antibiotics. In a number of clinically relevant Gram-negative pathogens, DsbA is the primary disulfide oxidoreductase responsible for catalyzing the formation of disulfide bonds in secreted and membrane-associated proteins. In this study, a putative B. pseudomallei dsbA gene was evaluated functionally and structurally and its contribution to infection assessed. Results: Biochemical studies confirmed the dsbA gene encodes a protein disulfide oxidoreductase. A dsbA deletion strain of B. pseudomallei was attenuated in both macrophages and a BALB/c mouse model of infection and displayed pleiotropic phenotypes that included defects in both secretion and motility. The 1.9 resolution crystal structure of BpsDsbA revealed differences from the classic member of this family Escherichia coli DsbA, in particular within the region surrounding the active site disulfide where EcDsbA engages with its partner protein E. coli DsbB, indicating that the interaction of BpsDsbA with its proposed partner BpsDsbB may be distinct from that of EcDsbA-EcDsbB. Innovation: This study has characterized BpsDsbA biochemically and structurally and determined that it is required for virulence of B. pseudomallei. Conclusion: These data establish a critical role for BpsDsbA in B. pseudomallei infection, which in combination with our structural characterization of BpsDsbA will facilitate the future development of rationally designed inhibitors against this drug-resistant organism. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 606617. PMID:23901809

  15. Chlorophyllide a Oxidoreductase Works as One of the Divinyl Reductases Specifically Involved in Bacteriochlorophyll a Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Yokono, Makio; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a is widely distributed among anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. In bacteriochlorophyll a biosynthesis, the reduction of the C8 vinyl group in 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a is catalyzed to produce chlorophyllide a by an 8-vinyl reductase called divinyl reductase (DVR), which has been classified into two types, BciA and BciB. However, previous studies demonstrated that mutants lacking the DVR still synthesize normal bacteriochlorophyll a with the C8 ethyl group and suggested the existence of an unknown third DVR. Meanwhile, we recently observed that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase (COR) of a purple bacterium happened to show the 8-vinyl reduction of 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a in vitro. In this study, we made a double mutant lacking BciA and COR of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides in order to investigate whether the mutant still produces pigments with the C8 ethyl group or if COR actually works as the third DVR. The single mutant deleting BciA or COR showed production of the C8 ethyl group pigments, whereas the double mutant accumulated 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide, indicating that there was no enzyme other than BciA and COR functioning as the unknown third DVR in Rhodobacter sphaeroides (note that this bacterium has no bciB gene). Moreover, some COR genes derived from other groups of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria were introduced into the double mutant, and all of the complementary strains produced normal bacteriochlorophyll a. This observation indicated that COR of these bacteria performs two functions, reductions of the C8 vinyl group and the C7=C8 double bond, and that such an activity is probably conserved in the widely ranging groups. PMID:24637023

  16. Chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase works as one of the divinyl reductases specifically involved in bacteriochlorophyll a biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Yokono, Makio; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a is widely distributed among anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. In bacteriochlorophyll a biosynthesis, the reduction of the C8 vinyl group in 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a is catalyzed to produce chlorophyllide a by an 8-vinyl reductase called divinyl reductase (DVR), which has been classified into two types, BciA and BciB. However, previous studies demonstrated that mutants lacking the DVR still synthesize normal bacteriochlorophyll a with the C8 ethyl group and suggested the existence of an unknown "third" DVR. Meanwhile, we recently observed that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase (COR) of a purple bacterium happened to show the 8-vinyl reduction of 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a in vitro. In this study, we made a double mutant lacking BciA and COR of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides in order to investigate whether the mutant still produces pigments with the C8 ethyl group or if COR actually works as the third DVR. The single mutant deleting BciA or COR showed production of the C8 ethyl group pigments, whereas the double mutant accumulated 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide, indicating that there was no enzyme other than BciA and COR functioning as the unknown third DVR in Rhodobacter sphaeroides (note that this bacterium has no bciB gene). Moreover, some COR genes derived from other groups of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria were introduced into the double mutant, and all of the complementary strains produced normal bacteriochlorophyll a. This observation indicated that COR of these bacteria performs two functions, reductions of the C8 vinyl group and the C7=C8 double bond, and that such an activity is probably conserved in the widely ranging groups. PMID:24637023

  17. Escherichia coli pyruvate:flavodoxin oxidoreductase, YdbK - regulation of expression and biological roles in protection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takayuki; Yonekura, Shin-Ichiro; Yonei, Shuji; Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei

    2013-01-01

    E. coli YdbK is predicted to be a pyruvate:flavodoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). However, enzymatic activity and the regulation of gene expression of it are not well understood. In this study, we found that E. coli cells overexpressing the ydbK gene had enhanced PFOR activity, indicating the product of ydbK to be a PFOR. The PFOR was labile to oxygen. The expression of ydbK was induced by superoxide generators such as methyl viologen (MV) in a SoxS-dependent manner after a lag period. We identified a critical element upstream of ydbK gene required for the induction by MV and proved direct binding of SoxS to the element. E. coli ydbK mutant was highly sensitive to MV, which was enhanced by additional inactivation of fpr gene encoding ferredoxin (flavodoxin):NADP(H) reductase (FPR). Aconitase activity, a superoxide sensor, was more extensively decreased by MV in the E. coli ydbK mutant than in wild-type strain. The induction level of soxS gene was higher in E. coli ydbK fpr double mutant than in wild-type strain. These results indicate that YdbK helps to protect cells from oxidative stress. It is possible that YdbK maintains the cellular redox state together with FPR and is involved in the reduction of oxidized proteins including SoxR in the late stages of the oxidative stress response in E. coli. PMID:24025246

  18. Protein Conformational Gating of Enzymatic Activity in Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Eger, Bryan T.; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi; Pai, Emil F.

    2012-05-24

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase can exist as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The two enzymes possess common redox active cofactors, which form an electron transfer (ET) pathway terminated by a flavin cofactor. In spite of identical protein primary structures, the redox potential difference between XDH and XO for the flavin semiquinone/hydroquinone pair (E{sub sq/hq}) is {approx}170 mV, a striking difference. The former greatly prefers NAD{sup +} as ultimate substrate for ET from the iron-sulfur cluster FeS-II via flavin while the latter only accepts dioxygen. In XDH (without NAD{sup +}), however, the redox potential of the electron donor FeS-II is 180 mV higher than that for the acceptor flavin, yielding an energetically uphill ET. On the basis of new 1.65, 2.3, 1.9, and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures for XDH, XO, the NAD{sup +}- and NADH-complexed XDH, E{sub sq/hq} were calculated to better understand how the enzyme activates an ET from FeS-II to flavin. The majority of the E{sub sq/hq} difference between XDH and XO originates from a conformational change in the loop at positions 423-433 near the flavin binding site, causing the differences in stability of the semiquinone state. There was no large conformational change observed in response to NAD{sup +} binding at XDH. Instead, the positive charge of the NAD{sup +} ring, deprotonation of Asp429, and capping of the bulk surface of the flavin by the NAD{sup +} molecule all contribute to altering E{sub sq/hq} upon NAD{sup +} binding to XDH.

  19. Xanthine Oxidoreductase Function Contributes to Normal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Michael C; McEnaney, Ryan M; Shukla, Ankur J; Hong, Guiying; Kelley, Eric E; Tarpey, Margaret M; Gladwin, Mark; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Tzeng, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, nonhealing wounds result in patient morbidity and disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are both required for normal wound repair, and derangements of these result in impaired healing. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has the unique capacity to produce both ROS and NO. We hypothesize that XOR contributes to normal wound healing. Cutaneous wounds were created in C57Bl6 mice. XOR was inhibited with dietary tungsten or allopurinol. Topical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 0.15%) or allopurinol (30 ?g) was applied to wounds every other day. Wounds were monitored until closure or collected at d 5 to assess XOR expression and activity, cell proliferation and histology. The effects of XOR, nitrite, H2O2 and allopurinol on keratinocyte cell (KC) and endothelial cell (EC) behavior were assessed. We identified XOR expression and activity in the skin and wound edges as well as granulation tissue. Cultured human KCs also expressed XOR. Tungsten significantly inhibited XOR activity and impaired healing with reduced ROS production with reduced angiogenesis and KC proliferation. The expression and activity of other tungsten-sensitive enzymes were minimal in the wound tissues. Oral allopurinol did not reduce XOR activity or alter wound healing but topical allopurinol significantly reduced XOR activity and delayed healing. Topical H2O2 restored wound healing in tungsten-fed mice. In vitro, nitrite and H2O2 both stimulated KC and EC proliferation and EC migration. These studies demonstrate for the first time that XOR is abundant in wounds and participates in normal wound healing through effects on ROS production. PMID:25879627

  20. Genome-wide profile of oxidoreductases in viruses, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kho, Richard; Newman, Joseph V; Jack, Richard M; Villar, Hugo O; Hansen, Mark R

    2003-01-01

    Enzymes that utilize nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) or its 2'-phosphate derivative (NADP) are found throughout the kingdoms of life. These enzymes are fundamental to many biochemical pathways, including central intermediary metabolism and mechanisms for cell survival and defense. The complete genomes of 25 organisms representing bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals, and 811 viruses, were mined to identify and classify NAD(P)-dependent enzymes. An average of 3.4% of the proteins in these genomes was categorized as NAD(P)-utilizing proteins, with highest prevalence in the medium-chain oxidoreductase and short-chain oxidoreductase families. In general, the distribution of these enzymes by oxidoreductase family was correlated to the number of different catalytic mechanisms in each family. Organisms with smaller genomes encoded a larger proportion of NAD(P)-dependent enzymes in their proteome (approximately 6%) as compared to the larger genomes of eukaryotes (approximately 3%). Among viruses, those with large, double-strand DNA genomes were shown to encode oxidoreductases. Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria showed some differences in the distribution of NAD(P)-dependent proteins. Several organisms such as M. tuberculosis, P. falciparum, and A. thaliana showed unique distributions of oxidoreductases corresponding to some phenotypic features. PMID:14692456

  1. Combinatorial application of two aldehyde oxidoreductases on isobutanol production in the presence of furfural.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyung-Min; Jeon, Jong-Min; Lee, Ju Hee; Song, Hun-Suk; Joo, Han-Byul; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Kyungmoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Lee, Hongweon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Furfural is a toxic by-product formulated from pretreatment processes of lignocellulosic biomass. In order to utilize the lignocellulosic biomass on isobutanol production, inhibitory effect of the furfural on isobutanol production was investigated and combinatorial application of two oxidoreductases, FucO and YqhD, was suggested as an alternative strategy. Furfural decreased cell growth and isobutanol production when only YqhD or FucO was employed as an isobutyraldehyde oxidoreductase. However, combinatorial overexpression of FucO and YqhD could overcome the inhibitory effect of furfural giving higher isobutanol production by 110% compared with overexpression of YqhD. The combinatorial oxidoreductases increased furfural detoxification rate 2.1-fold and also accelerated glucose consumption 1.4-fold. When it compares to another known system increasing furfural tolerance, membrane-bound transhydrogenase (pntAB), the combinatorial aldehyde oxidoreductases were better on cell growth and production. Thus, to control oxidoreductases is important to produce isobutanol using furfural-containing biomass and the combinatorial overexpression of FucO and YqhD can be an alternative strategy. PMID:26660478

  2. Cooperative Protein Folding by Two Protein Thiol Disulfide Oxidoreductases and 1 in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Matsusaki, Motonori; Okuda, Aya; Masuda, Taro; Koishihara, Katsunori; Mita, Ryuta; Iwasaki, Kensuke; Hara, Kumiko; Naruo, Yurika; Hirose, Akiho; Tsuchi, Yuichiro; Urade, Reiko

    2016-02-01

    Most proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells fold via disulfide formation (oxidative folding). Oxidative folding is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDI-related ER protein thiol disulfide oxidoreductases (ER oxidoreductases). In yeast and mammals, ER oxidoreductin-1s (Ero1s) supply oxidizing equivalent to the active centers of PDI. In this study, we expressed recombinant soybean Ero1 (GmERO1a) and found that GmERO1a oxidized multiple soybean ER oxidoreductases, in contrast to mammalian Ero1s having a high specificity for PDI. One of these ER oxidoreductases, GmPDIM, associated in vivo and in vitro with GmPDIL-2, was unable to be oxidized by GmERO1a. We therefore pursued the possible cooperative oxidative folding by GmPDIM, GmERO1a, and GmPDIL-2 in vitro and found that GmPDIL-2 synergistically accelerated oxidative refolding. In this process, GmERO1a preferentially oxidized the active center in the A': domain among the A: , A': , and B: domains of GmPDIM. A disulfide bond introduced into the active center of the A': domain of GmPDIM was shown to be transferred to the active center of the A: domain of GmPDIM and the A: domain of GmPDIM directly oxidized the active centers of both the A: or A': domain of GmPDIL-2. Therefore, we propose that the relay of an oxidizing equivalent from one ER oxidoreductase to another may play an essential role in cooperative oxidative folding by multiple ER oxidoreductases in plants. PMID:26645455

  3. Cooperative Protein Folding by Two Protein Thiol Disulfide Oxidoreductases and ERO1 in Soybean1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Aya; Masuda, Taro; Koishihara, Katsunori; Mita, Ryuta; Iwasaki, Kensuke; Hara, Kumiko; Naruo, Yurika; Hirose, Akiho; Tsuchi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells fold via disulfide formation (oxidative folding). Oxidative folding is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDI-related ER protein thiol disulfide oxidoreductases (ER oxidoreductases). In yeast and mammals, ER oxidoreductin-1s (Ero1s) supply oxidizing equivalent to the active centers of PDI. In this study, we expressed recombinant soybean Ero1 (GmERO1a) and found that GmERO1a oxidized multiple soybean ER oxidoreductases, in contrast to mammalian Ero1s having a high specificity for PDI. One of these ER oxidoreductases, GmPDIM, associated in vivo and in vitro with GmPDIL-2, was unable to be oxidized by GmERO1a. We therefore pursued the possible cooperative oxidative folding by GmPDIM, GmERO1a, and GmPDIL-2 in vitro and found that GmPDIL-2 synergistically accelerated oxidative refolding. In this process, GmERO1a preferentially oxidized the active center in the a′ domain among the a, a′, and b domains of GmPDIM. A disulfide bond introduced into the active center of the a′ domain of GmPDIM was shown to be transferred to the active center of the a domain of GmPDIM and the a domain of GmPDIM directly oxidized the active centers of both the a or a′ domain of GmPDIL-2. Therefore, we propose that the relay of an oxidizing equivalent from one ER oxidoreductase to another may play an essential role in cooperative oxidative folding by multiple ER oxidoreductases in plants. PMID:26645455

  4. NADPH:Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 Regulates Host Susceptibility to Ozone via Isoprostane Generation*

    PubMed Central

    Kummarapurugu, Apparao B.; Fischer, Bernard M.; Zheng, Shuo; Milne, Ginger L.; Ghio, Andrew J.; Potts-Kant, Erin N.; Foster, W. Michael; Soderblom, Erik J.; Dubois, Laura G.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Thompson, J. Will; Voynow, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is recognized as a major susceptibility gene for ozone-induced pulmonary toxicity. In the absence of NQO1 as can occur by genetic mutation, the human airway is protected from harmful effects of ozone. We recently reported that NQO1-null mice are protected from airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary inflammation following ozone exposure. However, NQO1 regenerates intracellular antioxidants and therefore should protect the individual from oxidative stress. To explain this paradox, we tested whether in the absence of NQO1 ozone exposure results in increased generation of A2-isoprostane, a cyclopentenone isoprostane that blunts inflammation. Using GC-MS, we found that NQO1-null mice had greater lung tissue levels of D2- and E2-isoprostanes, the precursors of J2- and A2-isoprostanes, both at base line and following ozone exposure compared with congenic wild-type mice. We confirmed in primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells that A2-isoprostane inhibited ozone-induced NF-κB activation and IL-8 regulation. Furthermore, we determined that A2-isoprostane covalently modified the active Cys179 domain in inhibitory κB kinase in the presence of ozone in vitro, thus establishing the biochemical basis for A2-isoprostane inhibition of NF-κB. Our results demonstrate that host factors may regulate pulmonary susceptibility to ozone by regulating the generation of A2-isoprostanes in the lung. These observations provide the biochemical basis for the epidemiologic observation that NQO1 regulates pulmonary susceptibility to ozone. PMID:23275341

  5. Homologous expression of a subcomplex of Pyrococcus furiosus hydrogenase that interacts with pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, R Christopher; Sun, Junsong; Jenney, Francis E; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen gas is an attractive alternative fuel as it is carbon neutral and has higher energy content per unit mass than fossil fuels. The biological enzyme responsible for utilizing molecular hydrogen is hydrogenase, a heteromeric metalloenzyme requiring a complex maturation process to assemble its O(2)-sensitive dinuclear-catalytic site containing nickel and iron atoms. To facilitate their utility in applied processes, it is essential that tools are available to engineer hydrogenases to tailor catalytic activity and electron carrier specificity, and decrease oxygen sensitivity using standard molecular biology techniques. As a model system we are using hydrogen-producing Pyrococcus furiosus, which grows optimally at 100C. We have taken advantage of a recently developed genetic system that allows markerless chromosomal integrations via homologous recombination. We have combined a new gene marker system with a highly-expressed constitutive promoter to enable high-level homologous expression of an engineered form of the cytoplasmic NADP-dependent hydrogenase (SHI) of P. furiosus. In a step towards obtaining 'minimal' hydrogenases, we have successfully produced the heterodimeric form of SHI that contains only two of the four subunits found in the native heterotetrameric enzyme. The heterodimeric form is highly active (150 units mg(-1) in H(2) production using the artificial electron donor methyl viologen) and thermostable (t(1/2) ?0.5 hour at 90C). Moreover, the heterodimer does not use NADPH and instead can directly utilize reductant supplied by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase from P. furiosus. The SHI heterodimer and POR therefore represent a two-enzyme system that oxidizes pyruvate and produces H(2) in vitro without the need for an intermediate electron carrier. PMID:22039508

  6. Structural basis for human NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Chuanwu; Panda, Satya P.; Marohnic, Christopher C.; Martásek, Pavel; Masters, Bettie Sue; Kim, Jung-Ja P.

    2012-03-15

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is essential for electron donation to microsomal cytochrome P450-mediated monooxygenation in such diverse physiological processes as drug metabolism (approximately 85-90% of therapeutic drugs), steroid biosynthesis, and bioactive metabolite production (vitamin D and retinoic acid metabolites). Expressed by a single gene, CYPOR's role with these multiple redox partners renders it a model for understanding protein-protein interactions at the structural level. Polymorphisms in human CYPOR have been shown to lead to defects in bone development and steroidogenesis, resulting in sexual dimorphisms, the severity of which differs significantly depending on the degree of CYPOR impairment. The atomic structure of human CYPOR is presented, with structures of two naturally occurring missense mutations, V492E and R457H. The overall structures of these CYPOR variants are similar to wild type. However, in both variants, local disruption of H bonding and salt bridging, involving the FAD pyrophosphate moiety, leads to weaker FAD binding, unstable protein, and loss of catalytic activity, which can be rescued by cofactor addition. The modes of polypeptide unfolding in these two variants differ significantly, as revealed by limited trypsin digestion: V492E is less stable but unfolds locally and gradually, whereas R457H is more stable but unfolds globally. FAD addition to either variant prevents trypsin digestion, supporting the role of the cofactor in conferring stability to CYPOR structure. Thus, CYPOR dysfunction in patients harboring these particular mutations may possibly be prevented by riboflavin therapy in utero, if predicted prenatally, or rescued postnatally in less severe cases.

  7. P450 oxidoreductase deficiency: a disorder of steroidogenesis with multiple clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Walter L

    2012-10-23

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of steroid hormones and metabolize drugs. There are seven human type I P450 enzymes in mitochondria and 50 type II enzymes in endoplasmic reticulum. Type II enzymes, including both drug-metabolizing and some steroidogenic enzymes, require electron donation from a two-flavin protein, P450 oxidoreductase (POR). Although knockout of the POR gene causes embryonic lethality in mice, we discovered human POR deficiency as a disorder of steroidogenesis associated with the Antley-Bixler skeletal malformation syndrome and found mild POR mutations in phenotypically normal adults with infertility. Assay results of mutant forms of POR using the traditional but nonphysiologic assay (reduction of cytochrome c) did not correlate with patient phenotypes; assays based on the 17,20 lyase activity of P450c17 (CYP17) correlated with clinical phenotypes. The POR sequence in 842 normal individuals revealed many polymorphisms; amino acid sequence variant A503V is encoded by ~28% of human alleles. POR A503V has about 60% of wild-type activity in assays with CYP17, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4, but nearly wild-type activity with P450c21, CYP1A2, and CYP2C19. Activity of a particular POR variant with one P450 enzyme will not predict its activity with another P450 enzyme: Each POR-P450 combination must be studied individually. Human POR transcription, initiated from an untranslated exon, is regulated by Smad3/4, thyroid receptors, and the transcription factor AP-2. A promoter polymorphism reduces transcription to 60% in liver cells and to 35% in adrenal cells. POR deficiency is a newly described disorder of steroidogenesis, and POR variants may account for some genetic variation in drug metabolism. PMID:23092891

  8. Clinical, Genetic, and Enzymatic Characterization of P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency in Four Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahakitrungruang, Taninee; Huang, Ningwu; Tee, Meng Kian; Agrawal, Vishal; Russell, William E.; Crock, Patricia; Murphy, Nuala; Migeon, Claude J.; Miller, Walter L.

    2009-01-01

    Context: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency causes disordered steroidogenesis; severe mutations cause genital ambiguity in both sexes plus the Antley-Bixler skeletal malformation syndrome, whereas mild mutations can cause adult infertility. Objective: We describe four patients with POR deficiency and identify and characterize the activities of their mutations. A 46,XY male with micropenis and two 46,XX female infants with genital ambiguity presented with skeletal malformations, and a 46,XX adolescent presented with primary amenorrhea, elevated 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, and low sex steroids. Methods: The coding regions of the POR gene were sequenced, and the identified mutations were recreated in human POR cDNA expression vectors lacking 27 N-terminal residues. POR and human P450c17 were expressed in bacteria. POR activity was measured by four assays: reduction of cytochrome c, oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, and support of the 17α-hydroxylase and 17,20 lyase activities of P450c17. Results: All four patients were compound heterozygotes for POR mutations, including five novel mutations: L577R, N185K, delE217, and frameshift mutations 1363delC and 697–698insGAAC. N185K and delE217 lacked measurable activity in the assays based on P450c17 but retained partial activity in the assays based on cytochrome c. As assessed by Vmax/Km, L577R supported 46% of 17α-hydroxylase activity but only 27% of 17,20 lyase activity. Computational modeling of these novel mutants revealed the structural basis for their reduced or absent activities. Conclusion: These patients illustrate the broad clinical spectrum of POR deficiency, including amenorrhea and infertility as the sole manifestation. POR assays based on P450c17 correlate well with hormonal and clinical phenotypes. PMID:19837910

  9. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  10. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  11. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  12. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  13. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  14. Oxoester oxidoreductase activities in new isolates of Pichia anomala from apple, grape and cane juices.

    PubMed

    Prez-Mendoza, Francisco; Ruiz-Tern, Francisco; Abarca, Blanca Escudero; Navarro-Ocaa, Arturo; Aguilar-Uscanga, Guadalupe; Valerio-Alfaro, Gerardo

    2005-04-01

    Thirty-nine yeasts isolated from apple, grape and cane juices were screened for their oxidoreductase activity. The two strains of Pichia, one isolated from apple and one from cane juices, appear to be promising strains for oxidoreductase activity on alpha-oxoesters. They showed similar high yields in converting ethyl pyruvate to ethyl lactate as Saccharomyces spp. (86.6% and 85.3% versus 86.6%), and higher yields in the reduction of alpha-oxocarboxylic esters (ketopantolactone to pantolactone: 74% and 73.3%, respectively) compared to Saccharomyces spp. (yield 60%). PMID:15780669

  15. Preliminary crystallographic data of the three homologues of the thiol–disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA in Neisseria meningitidis

    SciTech Connect

    Lafaye, Céline; Griat, Mickael; Serre, Laurence

    2008-02-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis genome possesses three genes encoding active DsbAs. To throw light on the reason for this genetic multiplicity, the three enzymes have been purified and crystallized. Bacterial virulence depends on the correct folding of surface-exposed proteins, a process that is catalyzed by the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA, which facilitates the synthesis of disulfide bonds in Gram-negative bacteria. Uniquely among bacteria, the Neisseria meningitidis genome possesses three genes encoding active DsbAs: DsbA1, DsbA2 and DsbA3. DsbA1 and DsbA2 have been characterized as lipoproteins involved in natural competence and in host-interactive biology, while the function of DsbA3 remains unknown. In an attempt to shed light on the reason for this multiplicity of dsbA genes, the three enzymes from N. meningitidis have been purified and crystallized in the presence of high concentrations of ammonium sulfate. The best crystals were obtained using DsbA1 and DsbA3; they belong to the orthorhombic and tetragonal systems and diffract to 1.5 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively.

  16. The Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Oxidative Stress Markers following Global Brain Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Matsuda, Yoko; Suzuki, Go; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels in mouse brain were elevated from 1 h until 8 h after global brain ischemia for 14 min induced with the 3-vessel occlusion model; this result indicates that ischemia reperfusion injury generated oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species production was observed not only in the hippocampal region, but also in the cortical region. We further evaluated the neuroprotective effect of xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitors in the mouse 3-vessel occlusion model by analyzing changes in the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (including pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), matrix metalloproteinase-9 and intercellular adhesion molecules-1). Administration of allopurinol resulted in a statistically significant decrease in IL-1? and TNF-? mRNA expression, whereas febuxostat had no significant effect on expression of these genes; nevertheless, both inhibitors effectively reduced serum uric acid concentration. It is suggested that the neuroprotective effect of allopurinol is derived not from inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by xanthine oxidoreductase, but rather from a direct free-radical-scavenging effect. PMID:26230326

  17. Independently recruited oxidases from the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enabled chemical defences in leaf beetle larvae (subtribe Chrysomelina) to evolve.

    PubMed

    Rahfeld, Peter; Kirsch, Roy; Kugel, Susann; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-08-01

    Larvae of the leaf beetle subtribe Chrysomelina sensu stricto repel their enemies by displaying glandular secretions that contain defensive compounds. These repellents can be produced either de novo (iridoids) or by using plant-derived precursors (e.g. salicylaldehyde). The autonomous production of iridoids, as in Phaedon cochleariae, is the ancestral chrysomeline chemical defence and predates the evolution of salicylaldehyde-based defence. Both biosynthesis strategies include an oxidative step of an alcohol intermediate. In salicylaldehyde-producing species, this step is catalysed by salicyl alcohol oxidases (SAOs) of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, but the enzyme oxidizing the iridoid precursor is unknown. Here, we show by in vitro as well as in vivo experiments that P. cochleariae also uses an oxidase from the GMC superfamily for defensive purposes. However, our phylogenetic analysis of chrysomeline GMC oxidoreductases revealed that the oxidase of the iridoid pathway originated from a GMC clade different from that of the SAOs. Thus, the evolution of a host-independent chemical defence followed by a shift to a host-dependent chemical defence in chrysomeline beetles coincided with the utilization of genes from different GMC subfamilies. These findings illustrate the importance of the GMC multi-gene family for adaptive processes in plant-insect interactions. PMID:24943369

  18. Similarity of Escherichia coli propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO product) and an unusual alcohol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T. ); Ingram, L.O. )

    1989-07-01

    The gene that encodes 1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO) from Escherichia coli was sequenced. The reading frame specified a protein of 383 amino acids (including the N-terminal methionine), with an aggregate molecular weight of 40,642. The induction of fucO transcription, which occurred in the presence of fucose, was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. In E. coli, the primary fucO transcript was approximately 2.1 kilobases in length. The 5{prime} end of the transcript began more than 0.7 kilobase upstream of the fucO start codon within or beyond the fucA gene. Propanediol oxidoreductase exhibited 41.7% identity with the iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase II from Zymomonas mobilis and 39.5% identity with ADH4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These three proteins did not share homology with either short-chain or long-chain zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes. We propose that these three unusual alcohol dehydrogenases define a new family of enzymes.

  19. Specificity of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases, NAD(P)H: Quinone Oxidoreductase and Carbonyl Reductases to Redox-Cycle Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Diones and 4-Hydroxyequilenin-o-Quinone

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Carol A.; Quinn, Amy M.; Park, Jong-Heum; Harvey, Ronald G.; Bolton, Judy L; Maser, Edmund; Penning, Trevor M.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are suspect human lung carcinogens and can be metabolically activated to remote quinones, e.g. benzo[a]pyrene-1,6-dione (B[a]P-1,6-dione) and B[a]P-3,6-dione by the action of either P450 monooxygenase or peroxidases and to non-K region o-quinones by aldo-keto reductases (AKRs). B[a]P-7,8-dione also structurally resembles 4-hydroxyequilenin o-quinone. These three classes of quinones can redox cycle, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and produce the mutagenic lesion 8-oxo-dGuo, and may contribute to PAH- and estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. We compared the ability of a complete panel of human recombinant AKRs to catalyze reduction of PAH o-quinones in the phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene and anthracene series. The specific activities for NADPH-dependent quinone reduction were often 100-1,000 times greater than the ability of the same AKR isoform to oxidize the cognate PAH-trans-dihydrodiol. However, the AKR with the highest quinone reductase activity for a particular PAH o-quinone was not always identical to the AKR isoform with the highest dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity for the respective PAH-trans-dihydrodiol. Discrete AKRs also catalyzed the reduction of B[a]P-1,6-dione, B[a]P-3,6-dione and 4-hydroxyequilenin o-quinone. Concurrent measurements of oxygen consumption, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide formation established that ROS were produced as a result of the redox-cycling. When compared with human recombinant NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and carbonyl reductases (CBR1 and CBR3), NQO1 was a superior catalyst of these reactions followed by AKRs and lastly CBR1 and CBR3. In A549 cells two-electron reduction of PAH o-quinones causes intracellular ROS formation. ROS formation was unaffected by the addition of dicumarol suggesting that NQO1 is not responsible for the two-electron reduction observed and does not offer protection against ROS formation from PAH o-quinones. PMID:21910479

  20. Specificity of human aldo-keto reductases, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, and carbonyl reductases to redox-cycle polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon diones and 4-hydroxyequilenin-o-quinone.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Carol A; Quinn, Amy M; Park, Jong-Heum; Harvey, Ronald G; Bolton, Judy L; Maser, Edmund; Penning, Trevor M

    2011-12-19

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are suspect human lung carcinogens and can be metabolically activated to remote quinones, for example, benzo[a]pyrene-1,6-dione (B[a]P-1,6-dione) and B[a]P-3,6-dione by the action of either P450 monooxygenase or peroxidases, and to non-K region o-quinones, for example B[a]P-7,8-dione, by the action of aldo keto reductases (AKRs). B[a]P-7,8-dione also structurally resembles 4-hydroxyequilenin o-quinone. These three classes of quinones can redox cycle, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and produce the mutagenic lesion 8-oxo-dGuo and may contribute to PAH- and estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. We compared the ability of a complete panel of human recombinant AKRs to catalyze the reduction of PAH o-quinones in the phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene, and anthracene series. The specific activities for NADPH-dependent quinone reduction were often 100-1000 times greater than the ability of the same AKR isoform to oxidize the cognate PAH-trans-dihydrodiol. However, the AKR with the highest quinone reductase activity for a particular PAH o-quinone was not always identical to the AKR isoform with the highest dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity for the respective PAH-trans-dihydrodiol. Discrete AKRs also catalyzed the reduction of B[a]P-1,6-dione, B[a]P-3,6-dione, and 4-hydroxyequilenin o-quinone. Concurrent measurements of oxygen consumption, superoxide anion, and hydrogen peroxide formation established that ROS were produced as a result of the redox cycling. When compared with human recombinant NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and carbonyl reductases (CBR1 and CBR3), NQO1 was a superior catalyst of these reactions followed by AKRs and last CBR1 and CBR3. In A549 cells, two-electron reduction of PAH o-quinones causes intracellular ROS formation. ROS formation was unaffected by the addition of dicumarol, suggesting that NQO1 is not responsible for the two-electron reduction observed and does not offer protection against ROS formation from PAH o-quinones. PMID:21910479

  1. Thiol-disulphide oxidoreductase modules in the low-GC Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kouwen, Thijs R H M; van der Goot, Annemieke; Dorenbos, Ronald; Winter, Theresa; Antelmann, Haike; Plaisier, Marie-Claire; Quax, Wim J; van Dijl, January Maarten; Dubois, Jean-Yves F

    2007-05-01

    Disulphide bond formation catalysed by thiol-disulphide oxidoreductases (TDORs) is a universally conserved mechanism for stabilizing extracytoplasmic proteins. In Escherichia coli, disulphide bond formation requires a concerted action of distinct TDORs in thiol oxidation and subsequent quinone reduction. TDOR function in other bacteria has remained largely unexplored. Here we focus on TDORs of low-GC Gram-positive bacteria, in particular DsbA of Staphylococcus aureus and BdbA-D of Bacillus subtilis. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the homologues DsbA and BdbD cluster in distinct groups typical for Staphylococcus and Bacillus species respectively. To compare the function of these TDORs, DsbA was produced in various bdb mutants of B. subtilis. Next, we assessed the ability of DsbA to sustain different TDOR-dependent processes, including heterologous secretion of E. coli PhoA, competence development and bacteriocin (sublancin 168) production. The results show that DsbA can function in all three processes. While BdbD needs a quinone oxidoreductase for activity, DsbA activity appears to depend on redox-active medium components. Unexpectedly, both quinone oxidoreductases of B. subtilis are sufficient to sustain production of sublancin. Moreover, DsbA can functionally replace these quinone oxidoreductases in sublancin production. Taken together, our unprecedented findings imply that TDOR systems of low-GC Gram-positive bacteria have a modular composition. PMID:17501922

  2. Benzofuran-, benzothiophene-, indazole- and benzisoxazole- quinones: excellent substrates for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Jeffery J.; Hassani, Mary; Swann, Elizabeth; Bibby, Jane M.; Beall, Howard D.; Moody, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    A series of heterocyclic quinones based on benzofuran, benzothiophene, indazole and benzisoxazole has been synthesized, and evaluated for their ability to function as substrates for recombinant human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), a two-electron reductase upregulated in tumor cells. Overall, the quinones are excellent substrates for NQO1, approaching the reduction rates observed for menadione PMID:23635904

  3. Reduced Ferredoxin: CO2 Oxidoreductase from Clostridium pasteurianum: Its Role in Formate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Thauer, R. K.; Fuchs, G.; Jungermann, K.

    1974-01-01

    The activity of reduced ferredoxin: CO2 oxidoreductase in Clostridium pasteurianum was correlated with the accumulation of formate in the growth medium. The data indicate that the in vivo function of the enzyme is to mediate formate synthesis rather than its degradation. PMID:4597459

  4. NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase 1 inducer activity of some Saudi Arabian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Alsaid, Mansour S; Alyahya, Muhammad A; Higgins, Maureen; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T

    2013-04-01

    Medicinal plants are a rich source of biologically-active phytochemicals and have been used in traditional medicine for centuries. Specific phytochemicals and extracts of their plant sources have the ability to reduce the risk for chronic degenerative diseases by induction of enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, many of which also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. One such multifunctional cytoprotective enzyme is NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase. In this study, we prepared extracts of 27 Saudi Arabian medicinal plants which belong to 18 different plant families and tested their ability to induce NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase in murine hepatoma cells grown in microtiter plate wells. In addition to the Brassicaceae, a known source of NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase inducer activity, we found substantial inducer activity in extracts from the Apiaceae, Apocynaceae, and the Asteraceae families. Five out of a total of eight active extracts are from plants which belong to the Asteraceae family. We further show that artemisinin, an agent which is used clinically for the treatment of malaria, contributes but does not fully account for the inducer activity of the extract of Artemisia monosperma. In contrast to artemisinin, deoxyartemisinin is inactive in this assay, demonstrating the critical role of the endoperoxide moiety of artemisinin for inducer activity. Thus, the NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase inducer activity of extracts of some Saudi Arabian medicinal plants indicates the presence of specific phytochemicals which have the potential to protect against chronic degenerative diseases. PMID:23512501

  5. Regulation of P450 oxidoreductase by gonadotropins in rat ovary and its effect on estrogen production

    PubMed Central

    Inaoka, Yoshihiko; Yazawa, Takashi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kokame, Koichi; Kangawa, Kenji; Uesaka, Miki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2008-01-01

    Background P450 oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes electron transfer to microsomal P450 enzymes. Its deficiency causes Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS), and about half the patients with ABS have ambiguous genitalia and/or impaired steroidogenesis. POR mRNA expression is up-regulated when mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into steroidogenic cells, suggesting that the regulation of POR gene expression is important for steroidogenesis. In this context we examined the regulation of POR expression in ovarian granulosa cells by gonadotropins, and its possible role in steroidogenesis. Methods Changes in gene expression in MSCs during differentiation into steroidogenic cells were examined by DNA microarray analysis. Changes in mRNA and protein expression of POR in the rat ovary or in granulosa cells induced by gonadotropin treatment were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Effects of transient expression of wild-type or mutant (R457H or V492E) POR proteins on the production of estrone in COS-7 cells were examined in vitro. Effects of POR knockdown were also examined in estrogen producing cell-line, KGN cells. Results POR mRNA was induced in MSCs following transduction with the SF-1 retrovirus, and was further increased by cAMP treatment. Expression of POR mRNA, as well as Cyp19 mRNA, in the rat ovary were induced by equine chorionic gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin. POR mRNA and protein were also induced by follicle stimulating hormone in primary cultured rat granulosa cells, and the induction pattern was similar to that for aromatase. Transient expression of POR in COS-7 cells, which expressed a constant amount of aromatase protein, greatly increased the rate of conversion of androstenedione to estrone, in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of mutant POR proteins (R457H or V492E), such as those found in ABS patients, had much less effect on aromatase activity than expression of wild-type POR proteins. Knockdown of endogenous POR protein in KGN human granulosa cells led to reduced estrone production, indicating that endogenous POR affected aromatase activity. Conclusion We demonstrated that the expression of POR, together with that of aromatase, was regulated by gonadotropins, and that its induction could up-regulate aromatase activity in the ovary, resulting in a coordinated increase in estrogen production. PMID:19077323

  6. NAD(P)H: Quinone oxidoreductase 1, glutathione S-transferase M1, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Fen; Tseng, Pei-Jung; Lin, Che-Chen; Hung, Chiao-Ling; Lin, Sheng-Che; Su, Wan-Cing; Huang, Yi-Ling; Sung, Fung-Chang; Tai, Chien-Kuo

    2009-08-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure might increase the risk for childhood asthma, and we hypothesized the effect may be modified by the phase II genes NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1. To investigate the genetic and environmental associations with asthma, GSTM1 and NQO1 functional polymorphisms and ETS were analyzed in a two-staged cross-sectional study among elementary schoolchildren in Taiwan. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between the Ser allele of the NQO1 Pro187Ser polymorphism and asthma (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.3-1.8). Although GSTM1 genotype itself was not significantly associated with asthma (OR=1.0, 95% CI 0.8-1.1), the GSTM1 genotype modified the association between the NQO1 polymorphism and asthma in children exposed to ETS (p=0.0002). The NQO1 gene might be involved in the development of asthma, especially in children carrying the GSTM1 null genotype who are exposed to ETS. PMID:19591959

  7. The human B22 subunit of the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase maps to the region of chromosome 8 involved in Branchio-oto-renal syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.Z.; Lin, Xin; Wells, D.E.

    1996-07-01

    To identify candidate genes for Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome, we have made use of a set of cosmids that map to 8q13.3, which has previously been shown to be involved in this syndrome. These cosmids were used as genomic clones in the attempts to isolate corresponding cDNAs using a modified hybrid selection technique. cDNAs using a modified hybrid selection technique. cDNAs from the region were identified and used to search for sequence similarity in human or other species. One cDNA clone was found to have 89% sequence similarity to the bovine B22 subunit of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase, a mitochondrial protein in the respiratory electron transport chain. Given the history of other mitochondrial mutations being involved in hearing loss syndromes, this gene should be considered a strong candidate for involvement in BOR.

  8. Thiol-disulfide Oxidoreductases TRX1 and TMX3 Decrease Neuronal Atrophy in a Lentiviral Mouse Model of Huntingtons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jonathan; Lu, Zhen; Barrows, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Huntingtons disease (HD) is caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene (HTT) that results in expression of a polyglutamine-expanded mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT). N-terminal fragments of mHTT accumulate in brain neurons and glia as soluble monomeric and oligomeric species as well as insoluble protein aggregates and drive the disease process. Decreasing mHTT levels in brain provides protection and reversal of disease signs in HD mice making mHTT a prime target for disease modification. There is evidence for aberrant thiol oxidation within mHTT and other proteins in HD models. Based on this, we hypothesized that a specific thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase exists that decreases mHTT levels in cells and provides protection in HD mice. We undertook an in-vitro genetic screen of key thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases then completed secondary screens to identify those with mHTT decreasing properties. Our in-vitro experiments identified thioredoxin 1 and thioredoxin-related transmembrane protein 3 as proteins that decrease soluble mHTT levels in cultured cells. Using a lentiviral mouse model of HD we tested the effect of these proteins in striatum. Both proteins decreased mHTT-induced striatal neuronal atrophy. Findings provide evidence for a role of dysregulated protein-thiol homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HD. PMID:26664998

  9. Opposing mechanisms of NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase regulation by peroxisome proliferators.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Qun; Coley, Jackie; Miller, Richard T; Cattley, Russell C; Corton, J Christopher

    2003-03-15

    Peroxisome proliferators (PPs) regulate a battery of rodent P450 genes, including CYP2B, CYP2C, and CYP4A family members. We hypothesized that other components of the P450-metabolizing system are altered by exposure to PPs, including NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (P450R), an often rate-limiting component in P450-dependent reactions. In this study, we determined whether exposure to structurally diverse PPs alters the expression of P450R mRNA and protein. Increases in P450R mRNA levels were observed in male and female F-344 rat livers and in male rat kidneys after chronic exposure of the animals to PPs. Paradoxically, under the same treatment conditions in male rats, liver P450R protein levels decreased after exposure to the PPs Wy-14,643 ([4-chloro-6-(2,3-xylidino)pyrimidynylthio]acetic acid) (WY) or gemfibrozil (GEM). The down-regulation of the P450R protein was sex- and tissue-specific in that exposure to PPs led to increases in P450R protein in female rat livers [di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) only] and male rat kidneys (WY, GEM, DBP). In male wild-type SV129 mice, P450R mRNA levels increased in livers after exposure to WY and diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and in male kidneys after exposure to DEHP. Induction of mRNA by PPs was not observed in the liver or kidneys of mice, which lack a functional peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha), the central mediator of the effects of PPs in the rodent liver. In wild-type male mice, P450R protein was decreased in liver after WY and DEHP treatment and in kidneys after WY treatment. The down-regulation of the P450R protein was not observed in PPAR alpha-null mice. These studies demonstrate the complex regulation of P450R expression by PPs at two different levels, both of which are dependent upon PPAR alpha: up-regulation of transcript levels in liver and kidneys and down-regulation of protein levels in male rat and mouse liver by a novel posttranscriptional mechanism. PMID:12623126

  10. Role for Ferredoxin:NAD(P)H Oxidoreductase (FprA) in Sulfate Assimilation and Siderophore Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Glassing, Angela; Harper, Justin; Franklin, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylate) (PDTC), produced by certain pseudomonads, is a sulfur-containing siderophore that binds iron, as well as a wide range of transition metals, and it affects the net hydrolysis of the environmental contaminant carbon tetrachloride. The pathway of PDTC biosynthesis has not been defined. Here, we performed a transposon screen of Pseudomonas putida DSM 3601 to identify genes necessary for PDTC production (Pdt phenotype). Transposon insertions within genes for sulfate assimilation (cysD, cysNC, and cysG [cobA2]) dominated the collection of Pdt mutations. In addition, two insertions were within the gene for the LysR-type transcriptional activator FinR (PP1637). Phenotypic characterization indicated that finR mutants were cysteine bradytrophs. The Pdt phenotype of finR mutants could be complemented by the known target of FinR regulation, fprA (encoding ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase), or by Escherichia coli cysJI (encoding sulfite reductase). These data indicate that fprA is necessary for effective sulfate assimilation by P. putida and that the effect of finR mutation on PDTC production was due to deficient expression of fprA and sulfite reduction. fprA expression in both P. putida and P. aeruginosa was found to be regulated by FinR, but in a manner dependent upon reduced sulfur sources, implicating FinR in sulfur regulatory physiology. The genes and phenotypes identified in this study indicated a strong dependence upon intracellular reduced sulfur/cysteine for PDTC biosynthesis and that pseudomonads utilize sulfite reduction enzymology distinct from that of E. coli and possibly similar to that of chloroplasts and other proteobacteria. PMID:23794620

  11. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance structure of a protein disulfide oxidoreductase from Methanococcus jannaschii

    PubMed Central

    Cave, John W.; Cho, Ho S.; Batchelder, Abigail M.; Yokota, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Wemmer, David E.

    2001-01-01

    The solution structure of the protein disulfide oxidoreductase Mj0307 in the reduced form has been solved by nuclear magnetic resonance. The secondary and tertiary structure of this protein from the archaebacterium Methanococcus jannaschii is similar to the structures that have been solved for the glutaredoxin proteins from Escherichia coli, although Mj0307 also shows features that are characteristic of thioredoxin proteins. Some aspects of Mj0307's unique behavior can be explained by comparing structure-based sequence alignments with mesophilic bacterial and eukaryotic glutaredoxin and thioredoxin proteins. It is proposed that Mj0307, and similar archaebacterial proteins, may be most closely related to the mesophilic bacterial NrdH proteins. Together these proteins may form a unique subgroup within the family of protein disulfide oxidoreductases. PMID:11266624

  12. Quinone reduction by Rhodothermus marinus succinate:menaquinone oxidoreductase is not stimulated by the membrane potential

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Andreia S.; Konstantinov, Alexander A.; Teixeira, Miguel; Pereira, Manuela M. . E-mail: mpereira@itqb.unl.pt

    2005-05-06

    Succinate:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), a di-haem enzyme purified from Rhodothermus marinus, reveals an HQNO-sensitive succinate:quinone oxidoreductase activity with several menaquinone analogues as electron acceptors that decreases with lowering the redox midpoint potential of the quinones. A turnover with the low-potential 2,3-dimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone that is the closest analogue of menaquinone, although low, can be detected in liposome-reconstituted SQR. Reduction of the quinone is not stimulated by an imposed K{sup +}-diffusion membrane potential of a physiological sign (positive inside the vesicles). Nor does the imposed membrane potential increase the reduction level of the haems in R. marinus SQR poised with the succinate/fumarate redox couple. The data do not support a widely discussed hypothesis on the electrogenic transmembrane electron transfer from succinate to menaquinone catalysed by di-haem SQRs. The role of the membrane potential in regulation of the SQR activity is discussed.

  13. Plant science. Morphinan biosynthesis in opium poppy requires a P450-oxidoreductase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Thilo; Kern, Marcelo; King, Andrew J; Larson, Tony R; Teodor, Roxana I; Donninger, Samantha L; Li, Yi; Dowle, Adam A; Cartwright, Jared; Bates, Rachel; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry; Walker, Carol; Bowser, Tim A; Graham, Ian A

    2015-07-17

    Morphinan alkaloids from the opium poppy are used for pain relief. The direction of metabolites to morphinan biosynthesis requires isomerization of (S)- to (R)-reticuline. Characterization of high-reticuline poppy mutants revealed a genetic locus, designated STORR [(S)- to (R)-reticuline] that encodes both cytochrome P450 and oxidoreductase modules, the latter belonging to the aldo-keto reductase family. Metabolite analysis of mutant alleles and heterologous expression demonstrate that the P450 module is responsible for the conversion of (S)-reticuline to 1,2-dehydroreticuline, whereas the oxidoreductase module converts 1,2-dehydroreticuline to (R)-reticuline rather than functioning as a P450 redox partner. Proteomic analysis confirmed that these two modules are contained on a single polypeptide in vivo. This modular assembly implies a selection pressure favoring substrate channeling. The fusion protein STORR may enable microbial-based morphinan production. PMID:26113639

  14. Cholesterol Metabolism: the Main Pathway Acting Downstream of Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase in Skeletal Development of the Limb?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Katy; Hughes, Catherine; Chudek, J. A.; Goodyear, Simon R.; Aspden, Richard M.; Talbot, Richard; Gundersen, Thomas E.; Blomhoff, Rune; Henderson, Colin; Wolf, C. Roland; Tickle, Cheryll

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the obligate electron donor for all microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, which catalyze the metabolism of a wide spectrum of xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds. Point mutations in POR have been found recently in patients with Antley-Bixler-like syndrome, which includes limb skeletal defects. In order to study P450 function during limb and skeletal development, we deleted POR specifically in mouse limb bud mesenchyme. Forelimbs and hind limbs in conditional knockout (CKO) mice were short with thin skeletal elements and fused joints. POR deletion occurred earlier in forelimbs than in hind limbs, leading additionally to soft tissue syndactyly and loss of wrist elements and phalanges due to changes in growth, cell death, and skeletal segmentation. Transcriptional analysis of E12.5 mouse forelimb buds demonstrated the expression of P450s involved in retinoic acid, cholesterol, and arachidonic acid metabolism. Biochemical analysis of CKO limbs confirmed retinoic acid excess. In CKO limbs, expression of genes throughout the whole cholesterol biosynthetic pathway was upregulated, and cholesterol deficiency can explain most aspects of the phenotype. Thus, cellular POR-dependent cholesterol synthesis is essential during limb and skeletal development. Modulation of P450 activity could contribute to susceptibility of the embryo and developing organs to teratogenesis. PMID:19273610

  15. Role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in voltage generation and Na(+) extrusion in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vorburger, Thomas; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Brosig, Alexander; Bok, Eva; Schunke, Emina; Steffen, Wojtek; Mayer, Sonja; Götz, Friedrich; Möller, Heiko M; Steuber, Julia

    2016-04-01

    For Vibrio cholerae, the coordinated import and export of Na(+) is crucial for adaptation to habitats with different osmolarities. We investigated the Na(+)-extruding branch of the sodium cycle in this human pathogen by in vivo (23)Na-NMR spectroscopy. The Na(+) extrusion activity of cells was monitored after adding glucose which stimulated respiration via the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR). In a V. cholerae deletion mutant devoid of the Na(+)-NQR encoding genes (nqrA-F), rates of respiratory Na(+) extrusion were decreased by a factor of four, but the cytoplasmic Na(+) concentration was essentially unchanged. Furthermore, the mutant was impaired in formation of transmembrane voltage (ΔΨ, inside negative) and did not grow under hypoosmotic conditions at pH8.2 or above. This growth defect could be complemented by transformation with the plasmid encoded nqr operon. In an alkaline environment, Na(+)/H(+) antiporters acidify the cytoplasm at the expense of the transmembrane voltage. It is proposed that, at alkaline pH and limiting Na(+) concentrations, the Na(+)-NQR is crucial for generation of a transmembrane voltage to drive the import of H(+) by electrogenic Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. Our study provides the basis to understand the role of the Na(+)-NQR in pathogenicity of V. cholerae and other pathogens relying on this primary Na(+) pump for respiration. PMID:26721205

  16. Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants overexpressing chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase of Blastochloris viridis elucidate functions of enzymes in late bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Harada, Jiro; Nomata, Jiro; Yamamoto, Haruki; Fujita, Yuichi; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductases (CORs) from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-producing Rhodobacter species and BChl b-producing Blastochloris viridis show distinct substrate recognition and different catalytic hydrogenation reactions, and that these two types of CORs therefore cause committed steps for BChls a and b biosynthesis. In this study, COR genes from B.?viridis were incorporated and overexpressed in a series of Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants. We found that the following two factors are essential in making R. sphaeroides produce BChl b: the loss of functions of both intrinsic COR and 8-vinyl reductase (BciA) in the host R. sphaeroides strain; and expression of the BchYZ catalytic components of COR from B. viridis, not the complete set of COR (BchXYZ), in the host strain. In addition, we incorporated bchYZ of B. viridis into the R. sphaeroides mutant lacking BchJ and BciA, resulting in the strain accumulating both BChl a and BChl b. This is the first example of an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium producing BChls a and b together. The results suggest that BchJ enhances activity of the intrinsic COR. The physiological significance of BchJ in pigment biosynthetic pathways will be discussed. PMID:25978726

  17. Deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein or electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase in glutaric acidemia type II fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Frerman, F E; Goodman, S I

    1985-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II (GA II) is a human genetic disorder. It has been suggested that the primary defect in this disorder is a deficiency of a protein involved in electron transport between the acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and the bc1 complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Antisera were raised to purified porcine electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO). The antisera were used to detect the two electron transferases in control and GA II fibroblasts by immunoblotting. Fibroblasts from three unrelated GA II patients were deficient in immunologically detectable ETF:QO and extracts from these three fibroblast lines contained no detectable ETF:QO catalytic activity. Fibroblasts from parents of two of these patients had ETF:QO activity intermediate between activities in control fibroblasts and fibroblasts from the patients. These data indicate that the primary defect in these patients is a deficiency of ETF:QO and that the mode of transmission of the gene is autosomal recessive. Fibroblasts from two other patients with severe GA II had normal levels of ETF-QO activity and antigen but were deficient in immunoreactive ETF. These findings show that GA II results from a deficiency of ETF in some patients and ETF:QO in others. In addition, these investigations provide strong evidence for the specificity and physiological function of the iron-sulfur flavoprotein ETF:QO. Images PMID:2989828

  18. ArxA, a new clade of arsenite oxidase within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum oxidoreductases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zargar, Kamrun; Conrad, Alison; Bernick, David L.; Lowe, Todd M.; Stolc, Viktor; Hoeft, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenotrophy, growth coupled to autotrophic arsenite oxidation or arsenate respiratory reduction, occurs only in the prokaryotic domain of life. The enzymes responsible for arsenotrophy belong to distinct clades within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum-containing oxidoreductases: specifically arsenate respiratory reductase, ArrA, and arsenite oxidase, AioA (formerly referred to as AroA and AoxB). A new arsenite oxidase clade, ArxA, represented by the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1 was also identified in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain PHS-1. A draft genome sequence of PHS-1 was completed and an arx operon similar to MLHE-1 was identified. Gene expression studies showed that arxA was strongly induced with arsenite. Microbial ecology investigation led to the identification of additional arxA-like sequences in Mono Lake and Hot Creek sediments, both arsenic-rich environments in California. Phylogenetic analyses placed these sequences as distinct members of the ArxA clade of arsenite oxidases. ArxA-like sequences were also identified in metagenome sequences of several alkaline microbial mat environments of Yellowstone National Park hot springs. These results suggest that ArxA-type arsenite oxidases appear to be widely distributed in the environment presenting an opportunity for further investigations of the contribution of Arx-dependent arsenotrophy to the arsenic biogeochemical cycle.

  19. ArxA, a new clade of arsenite oxidase within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Zargar, Kamrun; Conrad, Alison; Bernick, David L; Lowe, Todd M; Stolc, Viktor; Hoeft, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S; Stolz, John; Saltikov, Chad W

    2012-07-01

    Arsenotrophy, growth coupled to autotrophic arsenite oxidation or arsenate respiratory reduction, occurs only in the prokaryotic domain of life. The enzymes responsible for arsenotrophy belong to distinct clades within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum-containing oxidoreductases: specifically arsenate respiratory reductase, ArrA, and arsenite oxidase, AioA (formerly referred to as AroA and AoxB). A new arsenite oxidase clade, ArxA, represented by the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1 was also identified in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain PHS-1. A draft genome sequence of PHS-1 was completed and an arx operon similar to MLHE-1 was identified. Gene expression studies showed that arxA was strongly induced with arsenite. Microbial ecology investigation led to the identification of additional arxA-like sequences in Mono Lake and Hot Creek sediments, both arsenic-rich environments in California. Phylogenetic analyses placed these sequences as distinct members of the ArxA clade of arsenite oxidases. ArxA-like sequences were also identified in metagenome sequences of several alkaline microbial mat environments of Yellowstone National Park hot springs. These results suggest that ArxA-type arsenite oxidases appear to be widely distributed in the environment presenting an opportunity for further investigations of the contribution of Arx-dependent arsenotrophy to the arsenic biogeochemical cycle. PMID:22404962

  20. NAD(P)H cytochrome b5 oxidoreductase deficiency in Leishmania major results in impaired linoleate synthesis followed by increased oxidative stress and cell death.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Supratim; Sen Santara, Sumit; Das, Shantanabha; Bose, Moumita; Roy, Jayasree; Adak, Subrata

    2012-10-12

    NAD(P)H cytochrome b(5) oxidoreductase (Ncb5or), comprising cytochrome b(5) and cytochrome b(5) reductase domains, is widely distributed in eukaryotic organisms. Although Ncb5or plays a crucial role in lipid metabolism of mice, so far no Ncb5or gene has been reported in the unicellular parasitic protozoa Leishmania species. We have cloned, expressed, and characterized Ncb5or gene from Leishmania major. Steady state catalysis and spectral studies show that NADH can quickly reduce the ferric state of the enzyme to the ferrous state and is able to donate an electron(s) to external acceptors. To elucidate its exact physiological role in Leishmania, we attempted to create NAD(P)H cytochrome b(5) oxidoreductase from L. major (LmNcb5or) knock-out mutants by targeted gene replacement technique. A free fatty acid profile in knock-out (KO) cells reveals marked deficiency in linoleate and linolenate when compared with wild type (WT) or overexpressing cells. KO culture has a higher percentage of dead cells compared with both WT and overexpressing cells. Increased O(2) uptake, uncoupling and ATP synthesis, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential are evident in KO cells. Flow cytometric analysis reveals the presence of a higher concentration of intracellular H(2)O(2), indicative of increased oxidative stress in parasites lacking LmNcb5or. Cell death is significantly reduced when the KO cells are pretreated with BSA bound linoleate. Real time PCR studies demonstrate a higher Δ12 desaturase, superoxide dismutase, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA with a concomitant fall in Δ9 desaturase mRNA expression in LmNcb5or null cell line. Together these findings suggest that decreased linoleate synthesis, and increased oxidative stress and apoptosis are the major consequences of LmNcb5or deficiency in Leishmania. PMID:22923617

  1. Respiratory enzymes of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Kinetic properties of an acid-stable iron:rusticyanin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Blake, R C; Shute, E A

    1994-08-01

    Rusticyanin is an acid-stable, soluble blue copper protein found in abundance in the periplasmic space of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, an acidophilic bacterium capable of growing autotrophically on soluble ferrous sulfate. An acid-stable iron:rusticyanin oxidoreductase activity was partially purified from cell-free extracts of T. ferrooxidans. The enzyme-catalyzed, iron-dependent reduction of the rusticyanin exhibited three kinetic properties characteristic of aerobic iron oxidation by whole cells. (i) A survey of 14 different anions indicated that catalysis by the oxidoreductase occurred only in the presence of sulfate or selenate, an anion specificity identical to that of whole cells. (ii) Saturation with both sulfatoiron(II) and the catalyst produced a concentration-independent rate constant of 3 s-1 for the reduction of the rusticyanin, which is an electron transfer reaction sufficiently rapid to account for the flux of electrons through the iron respiratory chain. (iii) Values for the enzyme-catalyzed pseudo-first-order rate constants for the reduction of the rusticyanin showed a hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of sulfatoiron(II) with a half-maximal effect at 300 microM, a value similar to the apparent KM for iron shown by whole cells. On the basis of these favorable comparisons between the behavior patterns of isolated biomolecules and those of whole cells, this iron:rusticyanin oxidoreductase is postulated to be the primary cellular oxidant of ferrous ions in the iron respiratory electron transport chain of T. ferrooxidans. PMID:8049223

  2. Novel NADP-linked alcohol--aldehyde/ketone oxidoreductase in thermophilic ethanologenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lamed, R J; Zeikus, J G

    1981-04-01

    An NADP-specific alcohol--aldehyde/ketone oxidoreductase was detected in cell extracts of Thermoanaerobium brockii and Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum, but not in Thermobacteroides acetoethylicus or Clostridium thermocellum. The enzyme was purified from Ta. brockii by differential procedures that included heat treatment and an affinity-chromatography step on Blue Dextran--Sepharose. The 44-fold-purified enzyme displayed one band (mol.wt. approx. 40000) after sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The enzyme had a broad substrate specificity that included linear and branched primary alcohols, linear and cyclic secondary alcohols, linear and cyclic ketones, and acetaldehyde. The NADP-specific alcohol--aldehyde/ketone oxidoreductase was considerably more active towards secondary alcohols than towards other substrates. The enzyme had remarkable stability to heating at 86 degrees C for 70 min, but was rapidly denatured on boiling. Secondary-alcohol dehydrogenase activity displayed a noticeable inflexion point at 50 degrees C in Arrhenius plots and a high Q10 value (greater than 2.0). The enzyme was inactivated by the thiol-blocking reagent p-chloromercuribenzoate, but was not significantly inhibited by common metal-ion-binding agents. The NADP-linked alcohol--aldehyde/ketone oxidoreductase of Ta. brockii appears to have properties distinct from those of previously described primary- and secondary-alcohol dehydrogenases. PMID:7030321

  3. The Structure of an Oxalate Oxidoreductase Provides Insight into Microbial 2-Oxoacid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Marcus I; Brignole, Edward J; Pierce, Elizabeth; Can, Mehmet; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Drennan, Catherine L

    2015-07-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is a versatile and ubiquitous cofactor. When coupled with [4Fe-4S] clusters in microbial 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (OFORs), TPP is involved in catalyzing low-potential redox reactions that are important for the synthesis of key metabolites and the reduction of N2, H(+), and CO2. We have determined the high-resolution (2.27 ) crystal structure of the TPP-dependent oxalate oxidoreductase (OOR), an enzyme that allows microbes to grow on oxalate, a widely occurring dicarboxylic acid that is found in soil and freshwater and is responsible for kidney stone disease in humans. OOR catalyzes the anaerobic oxidation of oxalate, harvesting the low-potential electrons for use in anaerobic reduction and fixation of CO2. We compare the OOR structure to that of the only other structurally characterized OFOR family member, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. This side-by-side structural analysis highlights the key similarities and differences that are relevant for the chemistry of this entire class of TPP-utilizing enzymes. PMID:26061898

  4. Vitamin D affects Krebs cycle NAD-linked oxidoreductases from chick intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Pérez, A; Díaz de Barboza, G; Pereira, R; Tolosa de Talamoni, N

    1995-07-01

    Vitamin D3 administration affects the NAD-linked oxidoreductase activities of Krebs cycle from intestinal mucosa of vitamin D-deficient chicks. Vmax values were increased in all of them, while K0.5 for substrate remained unchanged except for 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, which showed lower affinity for oxoglutarate. Addition of Ca2+ to the incubation medium increased the affinity of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and NAD-isocitrate dehydrogenase for their substrates either in the vitamin D3 treated group or in the control one. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase, a FMN-dependent oxidoreductase, was not modified by vitamin D3 administration. The oxygen consumption of the intestinal mitochondria was not altered by cholecalciferol treatment to vitamin D-deficient chicks. The reason why vitamin D3 selectively affects the NAD-linked oxidoreductase activities of the Krebs cycle remains unknown. The vitamin D hormone, 1,25(OH)2D3, appears to be the mediator of the response. PMID:7549952

  5. Transcriptional regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate: quinone oxidoreductase in murine hepatoma cells by 6-(methylsufinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate, an active principle of wasabi (Eutrema wasabi Maxim).

    PubMed

    Hou, D X; Fukuda, M; Fujii, M; Fuke, Y

    2000-12-20

    Wasabi is a very popular pungent spice in Japan. This study examined the ability of 6-(methylsufinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MITC), an active principle of wasabi, to induce the cellular expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate: quinone oxidoreductase (QR) in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. The cells were treated with various concentrations of 6-MITC, and were then assessed for cell growth, QR activity and QR mRNA expression. The induction of QR activity and QR mRNA expression was time- and dose-responsive over a narrow range of 0.1-5 microM, with declining induction at higher concentrations due to cell toxicity. Furthermore, transfection studies demonstrated that the induction of transcription of the QR gene by 6-MITC involved an antioxidant/electrophile-responsive element (ARE/EpRE) activation. Our results suggest a novel mechanism by which dietary wasabi 6-MITC may be implicated in cancer chemoprevention. PMID:11090969

  6. Comparative Genomics of Thiol Oxidoreductases Reveals Widespread and Essential Functions of Thiol-based Redox Control of Cellular Processes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Redox regulation of cellular processes is an important mechanism that operates in organisms from bacteria to mammals. Much of the redox control is provided by thiol oxidoreductases: proteins that employ cysteine residues for redox catalysis. We wanted to identify thiol oxidoreductases on a genome-wide scale and use this information to obtain insights into the general principles of thiol-based redox control. Results: Thiol oxidoreductases were identified by three independent methods that took advantage of the occurrence of selenocysteine homologs of these proteins and functional linkages among thiol oxidoreductases revealed by comparative genomics. Based on these searches, we describe thioredoxomes, which are sets of thiol oxidoreductases in organisms. Their analyses revealed that these proteins are present in all living organisms, generally account for 0.5%1% of the proteome and that their use correlates with proteome size, distinguishing these proteins from those involved in core metabolic functions. We further describe thioredoxomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, including proteins which have not been characterized previously. Thiol oxidoreductases occur in various cellular compartments and are enriched in the endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol. Innovation: We developed bioinformatics methods and used them to characterize thioredoxomes on a genome-wide scale, which in turn revealed properties of thioredoxomes. Conclusion: These data provide information about organization and properties of thiol-based redox control, whose use is increased with the increase in complexity of organisms. Our data also show an essential combined function of a set of thiol oxidoreductases, and of thiol-based redox regulation in general, in all living organisms. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 193201. PMID:21902454

  7. Molecular evolution of the aldo-keto reductase gene superfamily.

    PubMed

    Seery, L T; Nestor, P V; FitzGerald, G A

    1998-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductase enzymes comprise a functionally diverse gene family which catalyze the NADPH-dependant reduction of a variety of carbonyl compounds. The protein sequences of 45 members of this family were aligned and phylogenetic trees were deduced from this alignment using the neighbor-joining and Fitch algorithms. The branching order of these trees indicates that the vertebrate enzymes cluster in three groups, which have a monophyletic origin distinct from the bacterial, plant, and invertebrate enzymes. A high level of conservation was observed between the vertebrate hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes, prostaglandin F synthase, and rho-crystallin of Xenopus laevis. We infer from the phylogenetic analysis that prostaglandin F synthase may represent a recent recruit to the eicosanoid biosynthetic pathway from the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase pathway and furthermore that, in the context of gene recruitment, Xenopus laevis rho-crystallin may represent a shared gene. PMID:9452515

  8. A Structure-Based Approach for Detection of Thiol Oxidoreductases and Their Catalytic Redox-Active Cysteine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine (Cys) residues often play critical roles in proteins, for example, in the formation of structural disulfide bonds, metal binding, targeting proteins to the membranes, and various catalytic functions. However, the structural determinants for various Cys functions are not clear. Thiol oxidoreductases, which are enzymes containing catalytic redox-active Cys residues, have been extensively studied, but even for these proteins there is little understanding of what distinguishes their catalytic redox Cys from other Cys functions. Herein, we characterized thiol oxidoreductases at a structural level and developed an algorithm that can recognize these enzymes by (i) analyzing amino acid and secondary structure composition of the active site and its similarity to known active sites containing redox Cys and (ii) calculating accessibility, active site location, and reactivity of Cys. For proteins with known or modeled structures, this method can identify proteins with catalytic Cys residues and distinguish thiol oxidoreductases from the enzymes containing other catalytic Cys types. Furthermore, by applying this procedure to Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins containing conserved Cys, we could identify the majority of known yeast thiol oxidoreductases. This study provides insights into the structural properties of catalytic redox-active Cys and should further help to recognize thiol oxidoreductases in protein sequence and structure databases. PMID:19424433

  9. Gene replacement in Penicillium roqueforti.

    PubMed

    Goarin, Anne; Silar, Philippe; Malagnac, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    Most cheese-making filamentous fungi lack suitable molecular tools to improve their biotechnology potential. Penicillium roqueforti, a species of high industrial importance, would benefit from functional data yielded by molecular genetic approaches. This work provides the first example of gene replacement by homologous recombination in P. roqueforti, demonstrating that knockout experiments can be performed in this fungus. To do so, we improved the existing transformation method to integrate transgenes into P. roqueforti genome. In the meantime, we cloned the PrNiaD gene, which encodes a NADPH-dependent nitrate reductase that reduces nitrate to nitrite. Then, we performed a deletion of the PrNiaD gene from P. roqueforti strain AGO. The ΔPrNiaD mutant strain is more resistant to chlorate-containing medium than the wild-type strain, but did not grow on nitrate-containing medium. Because genomic data are now available, we believe that generating selective deletions of candidate genes will be a key step to open the way for a comprehensive exploration of gene function in P. roqueforti. PMID:25315520

  10. Single molecule activity measurements of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase reveal the existence of two discrete functional states.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Tomas; Singha, Aparajita; Rantzau, Nicolai; Tutkus, Marijonas; Borch, Jonas; Hedegrd, Per; Stamou, Dimitrios; Mller, Birger Lindberg; Hatzakis, Nikos S

    2014-03-21

    Electron transfer between membrane spanning oxidoreductase enzymes controls vital metabolic processes. Here we studied for the first time with single molecule resolution the function of P450 oxidoreductase (POR), the canonical membrane spanning activator of all microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes. Measurements and statistical analysis of individual catalytic turnover cycles shows POR to sample at least two major functional states. This phenotype may underlie regulatory interactions with different cytochromes P450 but to date has remained masked in bulk kinetics. To ensure that we measured the inherent behavior of POR, we reconstituted the full length POR in "native like" membrane patches, nanodiscs. Nanodisc reconstitution increased stability by ?2-fold as compared to detergent solubilized POR and showed significantly increased activity at biologically relevant ionic strength conditions, highlighting the importance of studying POR function in a membrane environment. This assay paves the way for studying the function of additional membrane spanning oxidoreductases with single molecule resolution. PMID:24359083

  11. Human sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase catalyzes the first step in hydrogen sulfide metabolism and produces a sulfane sulfur metabolite.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael R; Melideo, Scott L; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2012-08-28

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQOR) is a membrane-bound enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the mitochondrial metabolism of H(2)S. Human SQOR is successfully expressed at low temperature in Escherichia coli by using an optimized synthetic gene and cold-adapted chaperonins. Recombinant SQOR contains noncovalently bound FAD and catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of H(2)S to S(0) (sulfane sulfur) using CoQ(1) as an electron acceptor. The prosthetic group is reduced upon anaerobic addition of H(2)S in a reaction that proceeds via a long-wavelength-absorbing intermediate (?(max) = 673 nm). Cyanide, sulfite, or sulfide can act as the sulfane sulfur acceptor in reactions that (i) exhibit pH optima at 8.5, 7.5, or 7.0, respectively, and (ii) produce thiocyanate, thiosulfate, or a putative sulfur analogue of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)S(2)), respectively. Importantly, thiosulfate is a known intermediate in the oxidation of H(2)S by intact animals and the major product formed in glutathione-depleted cells or mitochondria. Oxidation of H(2)S by SQOR with sulfite as the sulfane sulfur acceptor is rapid and highly efficient at physiological pH (k(cat)/K(m,H(2)S) = 2.9 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). A similar efficiency is observed with cyanide, a clearly artificial acceptor, at pH 8.5, whereas a 100-fold lower value is seen with sulfide as the acceptor at pH 7.0. The latter reaction is unlikely to occur in healthy individuals but may become significant under certain pathological conditions. We propose that sulfite is the physiological acceptor of the sulfane sulfur and that the SQOR reaction is the predominant source of the thiosulfate produced during H(2)S oxidation by mammalian tissues. PMID:22852582

  12. Tenebrionid secretions and a fungal benzoquinone oxidoreductase form competing components of an arms race between a host and pathogen.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Nicols; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Huarte-Bonnet, Carla; Fan, Yanhua; Jurez, M Patricia; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2015-07-14

    Entomopathogenic fungi and their insect hosts represent a model system for examining invertebrate-pathogen coevolutionary selection processes. Here we report the characterization of competing components of an arms race consisting of insect protective antimicrobial compounds and evolving fungal mechanisms of detoxification. The insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana has a remarkably wide host range; however, some insects are resistant to fungal infection. Among resistant insects is the tenebrionid beetle Tribolium castaneum that produces benzoquinone-containing defensive secretions. Reduced fungal germination and growth was seen in media containing T. castaneum dichloromethane extracts or synthetic benzoquinone. In response to benzoquinone exposure, the fungus expresses a 1,4-benzoquinone oxidoreductase, BbbqrA, induced >40-fold. Gene knockout mutants (?BbbqrA) showed increased growth inhibition, whereas B. bassiana overexpressing BbbqrA (Bb::BbbqrA(O)) displayed increased resistance to benzoquinone compared with wild type. Increased benzoquinone reductase activity was detected in wild-type cells exposed to benzoquinone and in the overexpression strain. Heterologous expression and purification of BbBqrA in Escherichia coli confirmed NAD(P)H-dependent benzoquinone reductase activity. The ?BbbqrA strain showed decreased virulence toward T. castaneum, whereas overexpression of BbbqrA increased mortality versus T. castaneum. No change in virulence was seen for the ?BbbqrA or Bb::BbbqrA(O) strains when tested against the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella or the beetle Sitophilus oryzae, neither of which produce significant amounts of cuticular quinones. The observation that artificial overexpression of BbbqrA results in increased virulence only toward quinone-secreting insects implies the lack of strong selection or current failure of B. bassiana to counteradapt to this particular host defense throughout evolution. PMID:26056261

  13. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Chloroplasts Contain a Homodimeric Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase That Functions with FDX11[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    van Lis, Robert; Baffert, Carole; Cout, Yohann; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Atteia, Ariane

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic algae have long been known to live in anoxic environments, but interest in their anaerobic energy metabolism has only recently gained momentum, largely due to their utility in biofuel production. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii figures remarkably in this respect, because it efficiently produces hydrogen and its genome harbors many genes for anaerobic metabolic routes. Central to anaerobic energy metabolism in many unicellular eukaryotes (protists) is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), which decarboxylates pyruvate and forms acetyl-coenzyme A with concomitant reduction of low-potential ferredoxins or flavodoxins. Here, we report the biochemical properties of the homodimeric PFO of C. reinhardtii expressed in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the recombinant enzyme (Cr-rPFO) showed three distinct [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur clusters and a thiamine pyrophosphate radical upon reduction by pyruvate. Purified Cr-rPFO exhibits a specific decarboxylase activity of 12 mol pyruvate min?1 mg?1 protein using benzyl viologen as electron acceptor. Despite the fact that the enzyme is very oxygen sensitive, it localizes to the chloroplast. Among the six known chloroplast ferredoxins (FDX1FDX6) in C. reinhardtii, FDX1 and FDX2 were the most efficient electron acceptors from Cr-rPFO, with comparable apparent Km values of approximately 4 m. As revealed by immunoblotting, anaerobic conditions that lead to the induction of CrPFO did not increase levels of either FDX1 or FDX2. FDX1, being by far the most abundant ferredoxin, is thus likely the partner of PFO in C. reinhardtii. This finding postulates a direct link between CrPFO and hydrogenase and provides new opportunities to better study and engineer hydrogen production in this protist. PMID:23154536

  14. The End of the Line: Can Ferredoxin and Ferredoxin NADP(H) Oxidoreductase Determine the Fate of Photosynthetic Electrons?

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Tatjana; Hanke, Guy

    2014-01-01

    At the end of the linear photosynthetic electron transfer (PET) chain, the small soluble protein ferredoxin (Fd) transfers electrons to Fd:NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR), which can then reduce NADP+ to support C assimilation. In addition to this linear electron flow (LEF), Fd is also thought to mediate electron flow back to the membrane complexes by different cyclic electron flow (CEF) pathways: either antimycin A sensitive, NAD(P)H complex dependent, or through FNR located at the cytochrome b6f complex. Both Fd and FNR are present in higher plant genomes as multiple gene copies, and it is now known that specific Fd iso-proteins can promote CEF. In addition, FNR iso-proteins vary in their ability to dynamically interact with thylakoid membrane complexes, and it has been suggested that this may also play a role in CEF. We will highlight work on the different Fd-isoproteins and FNR-membrane association found in the bundle sheath (BSC) and mesophyll (MC) cell chloroplasts of the C4 plant maize. These two cell types perform predominantly CEF and LEF, and the properties and activities of Fd and FNR in the BSC and MC are therefore specialized for CEF and LEF respectively. A diversity of Fd isoproteins and dynamic FNR location has also been recorded in C3 plants, algae and cyanobacteria. This indicates that the principles learned from the extreme electron transport situations in the BSC and MC of maize might be usefully applied to understanding the dynamic transition between these states in other systems. PMID:24678667

  15. Tenebrionid secretions and a fungal benzoquinone oxidoreductase form competing components of an arms race between a host and pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Nicolás; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Huarte-Bonnet, Carla; Fan, Yanhua; Juárez, M. Patricia; Keyhani, Nemat O.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi and their insect hosts represent a model system for examining invertebrate-pathogen coevolutionary selection processes. Here we report the characterization of competing components of an arms race consisting of insect protective antimicrobial compounds and evolving fungal mechanisms of detoxification. The insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana has a remarkably wide host range; however, some insects are resistant to fungal infection. Among resistant insects is the tenebrionid beetle Tribolium castaneum that produces benzoquinone-containing defensive secretions. Reduced fungal germination and growth was seen in media containing T. castaneum dichloromethane extracts or synthetic benzoquinone. In response to benzoquinone exposure, the fungus expresses a 1,4-benzoquinone oxidoreductase, BbbqrA, induced >40-fold. Gene knockout mutants (ΔBbbqrA) showed increased growth inhibition, whereas B. bassiana overexpressing BbbqrA (Bb::BbbqrAO) displayed increased resistance to benzoquinone compared with wild type. Increased benzoquinone reductase activity was detected in wild-type cells exposed to benzoquinone and in the overexpression strain. Heterologous expression and purification of BbBqrA in Escherichia coli confirmed NAD(P)H-dependent benzoquinone reductase activity. The ΔBbbqrA strain showed decreased virulence toward T. castaneum, whereas overexpression of BbbqrA increased mortality versus T. castaneum. No change in virulence was seen for the ΔBbbqrA or Bb::BbbqrAO strains when tested against the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella or the beetle Sitophilus oryzae, neither of which produce significant amounts of cuticular quinones. The observation that artificial overexpression of BbbqrA results in increased virulence only toward quinone-secreting insects implies the lack of strong selection or current failure of B. bassiana to counteradapt to this particular host defense throughout evolution. PMID:26056261

  16. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a Single Player Disulfide-Bond Oxidoreductase System to Manage Disulfide Bond Formation and Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z.; Day, Shandra R.; Mills, Brandy W.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared to E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2. PMID:25534767

  17. Simultaneous Involvement of a Tungsten-Containing Aldehyde:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase and a Phenylacetaldehyde Dehydrogenase in Anaerobic Phenylalanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Debnar-Daumler, Carlotta; Seubert, Andreas; Schmitt, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic phenylalanine metabolism in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum is initiated by conversion of phenylalanine to phenylacetate, which is further metabolized via benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA). The formation of phenylacetate is catalyzed by phenylalanine transaminase, phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, and a phenylacetaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme. The presence of these enzymes was detected in extracts of cells grown with phenylalanine and nitrate. We found that two distinct enzymes are involved in the oxidation of phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetate, an aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and a phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase (PDH). Based on sequence comparison, growth studies with various tungstate concentrations, and metal analysis of the enriched enzyme, AOR was shown to be a tungsten-containing enzyme, necessitating specific cofactor biosynthetic pathways for molybdenum- and tungsten-dependent enzymes simultaneously. We predict from the genome sequence that most enzymes of molybdopterin biosynthesis are shared, while the molybdate/tungstate uptake systems are duplicated and specialized paralogs of the sulfur-inserting MoaD and the metal-inserting MoeA proteins seem to be involved in dedicating biosynthesis toward molybdenum or tungsten cofactors. We also characterized PDH biochemically and identified both NAD+ and NADP+ as electron acceptors. We identified the gene coding for the enzyme and purified a recombinant Strep-tagged PDH variant. The homotetrameric enzyme is highly specific for phenylacetaldehyde, has cooperative kinetics toward the substrate, and shows considerable substrate inhibition. Our data suggest that A. aromaticum utilizes PDH as the primary enzyme during anaerobic phenylalanine degradation, whereas AOR is not essential for the metabolic pathway. We hypothesize a function as a detoxifying enzyme if high aldehyde concentrations accumulate in the cytoplasm, which would lead to substrate inhibition of PDH. PMID:24214948

  18. Cell growth defect factor 1 is crucial for the plastid import of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Reinbothe, Steffen; Gray, John; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-05-01

    Tetrapyrroles such as chlorophyll, heme, and bacteriochlorophyll play fundamental roles in the energy absorption and transduction of all photosynthetic organisms. They are synthesized via a complex pathway taking place in chloroplasts. Chlorophyll biosynthesis in angiosperms involves 16 steps of which only one is light-requiring and driven by the NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR). Three POR isoforms have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana--designated PORA, PORB, and PORC--that are differentially expressed in etiolated, light-exposed, and light-adapted plants. All three isoforms are encoded by nuclear genes, are synthesized as larger precursors in the cytosol (pPORs), and are imported posttranslationally into the plastid compartment. Import of the precursor to the dark-specific isoform PORA (pPORA) is protochlorophyllide (Pchlide)-dependent and due to the operation of a unique translocon complex dubbed PTC (Pchlide-dependent translocon complex) in the plastid envelope. Here, we identified a ?30-kDa protein that participates in pPORA import. The ?30-kDa protein is identical to the previously identified CELL GROWTH DEFECT FACTOR 1 (CDF1) in Arabidopsis that is conserved in higher plants and Synechocystis. CDF1 operates in pPORA import and stabilization and hereby acts as a chaperone for PORA protein translocation. CDF1 permits tight interactions between Pchlide synthesized in the plastid envelope and the importing PORA polypeptide chain such that no photoexcitative damage occurs through the generation of singlet oxygen operating as a cell death inducer. Together, our results identify an ancient mechanism dating back to the endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts as a key element of Pchlide-dependent pPORA import. PMID:25901327

  19. Cell growth defect factor 1 is crucial for the plastid import of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase A in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Reinbothe, Steffen; Gray, John; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles such as chlorophyll, heme, and bacteriochlorophyll play fundamental roles in the energy absorption and transduction of all photosynthetic organisms. They are synthesized via a complex pathway taking place in chloroplasts. Chlorophyll biosynthesis in angiosperms involves 16 steps of which only one is light-requiring and driven by the NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR). Three POR isoforms have been identified in Arabidopsis thalianadesignated PORA, PORB, and PORCthat are differentially expressed in etiolated, light-exposed, and light-adapted plants. All three isoforms are encoded by nuclear genes, are synthesized as larger precursors in the cytosol (pPORs), and are imported posttranslationally into the plastid compartment. Import of the precursor to the dark-specific isoform PORA (pPORA) is protochlorophyllide (Pchlide)-dependent and due to the operation of a unique translocon complex dubbed PTC (Pchlide-dependent translocon complex) in the plastid envelope. Here, we identified a ?30-kDa protein that participates in pPORA import. The ?30-kDa protein is identical to the previously identified CELL GROWTH DEFECT FACTOR 1 (CDF1) in Arabidopsis that is conserved in higher plants and Synechocystis. CDF1 operates in pPORA import and stabilization and hereby acts as a chaperone for PORA protein translocation. CDF1 permits tight interactions between Pchlide synthesized in the plastid envelope and the importing PORA polypeptide chain such that no photoexcitative damage occurs through the generation of singlet oxygen operating as a cell death inducer. Together, our results identify an ancient mechanism dating back to the endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts as a key element of Pchlide-dependent pPORA import. PMID:25901327

  20. Xanthine oxidoreductase: a journey from purine metabolism to cardiovascular excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Banerjee, Avik; Banerjee, U C

    2011-09-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is a ubiquitous complex cytosolic molybdoflavoprotein which controls the rate limiting step of purine catabolism by converting xanthine to uric acid. It is known that optimum concentrations of uric acid (UA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary for normal functioning of the body. The ability of XOR to perform detoxification reactions, and to synthesize UA and reactive oxygen species (ROS) makes it a versatile intra- and extra-cellular protective "housekeeping enzyme". It is also an important component of the innate immune system. The enzyme is a target of drugs against gout and hyperuricemia and the protein is of major interest as it is associated with ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury, vascular disorders in diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, adipogenesis, metabolic syndrome, cancer, and many other disease conditions. Xanthine oxidoreductase in conjugation with antibodies has been shown to have an anti-tumor effect due to its ability to produce ROS, which in turn reduces the growth of cancer tissues. Apart from this, XOR in association with nitric oxide synthase also participates in myocardial excitation-contraction coupling. Although XOR was discovered over 100 years ago, its physiological and pathophysiological roles are still not clearly elucidated. In this review, various physiological and pathophysiological functional aspects of XOR and its association with various forms of cancer are discussed in detail. PMID:21774633

  1. Another Unusual Type of Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme in Helicobacter pylori: the Malate:Quinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Kather, Birgit; Stingl, Kerstin; van der Rest, Michel E.; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Molenaar, Douwe

    2000-01-01

    The only enzyme of the citric acid cycle for which no open reading frame (ORF) was found in the Helicobacter pylori genome is the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Here, it is shown that in this organism the oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate is catalyzed by a malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO). This flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent membrane-associated enzyme donates electrons to quinones of the electron transfer chain. Similar to succinate dehydrogenase, it is part of both the electron transfer chain and the citric acid cycle. MQO activity was demonstrated in isolated membranes of H. pylori. The enzyme is encoded by the ORF HP0086, which is shown by the fact that expression of the HP0086 sequence from a plasmid induces high MQO activity in mqo deletion mutants of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum. Furthermore, this plasmid was able to complement the phenotype of the C. glutamicum mqo deletion mutant. Interestingly, the protein predicted to be encoded by this ORF is only distantly related to known or postulated MQO sequences from other bacteria. The presence of an MQO shown here and the previously demonstrated presence of a 2-ketoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetoacetyl-CoA transferase indicate that H. pylori possesses a complete citric acid cycle, but one which deviates from the standard textbook example in three steps. PMID:10809701

  2. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  3. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae quinone oxidoreductase Lot6p: stability, inhibition and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Megarity, Clare F; Looi, Hong Keat; Timson, David J

    2014-08-01

    Lot6p (EC 1.5.1.39; Ylr011wp) is the sole quinone oxidoreductase in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using hexahistidine tagged, recombinant Lot6p, we determined the steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters with both NADH and NADPH as electron donors; no cooperativity was observed with these substrates. The NQO1 inhibitor curcumin, the NQO2 inhibitor resveratrol, the bacterial nitroreductase inhibitor nicotinamide and the phosphate mimic vanadate all stabilise the enzyme towards thermal denaturation as judged by differential scanning fluorimetry. All except vanadate have no observable effect on the chemical cross-linking of the two subunits of the Lot6p dimer. These compounds all inhibit Lot6p's oxidoreductase activity, and all except nicotinamide exhibit negative cooperativity. Molecular modelling suggests that curcumin, resveratrol and nicotinamide all bind over the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in Lot6p. Resveratrol was predicted to contact an α-helix that links the two active sites. Mutation of Gly-142 (which forms part of this helix) to serine does not greatly affect the thermal stability of the enzyme. However, this variant shows less cooperativity towards resveratrol than the wild type. This suggests a plausible hypothesis for the transmission of information between the subunits and, thus, the molecular mechanism of negative cooperativity in Lot6p. PMID:24866129

  4. Homology modeling and in silico site directed mutagenesis of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Saranyah, Kannuchamy; Kalva, Sukesh; Mukund, Nisha; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Saleena, Lilly M

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase is the crucial enzyme that involves in bioethanol synthesis pathway of Clostridium thermocellum. It is an ethanologenic organism but has been investigated less on its enzyme structure. The amino acid sequence of Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase was derived from UNIPROT and the screened crystal structure was taken as the template for homology modeling using MODELLER 9V11. The model was loop refined and was validated using RMSD, ProSA and PROCHECK. The docking and per residue interaction studies were carried out to elucidate the interaction energies of amino acid residues with pyruvate. To enhance the binding of pyruvate with the enzyme, mutation studies were carried out by replacing Thr31 as it had a less interaction energy. Out of 10 mutants, T31N, T31Q and T31G were selected using potential energy and the residual energy calculations. Five nanoseconds explicit MD simulations were run for apo, wild type and mutants T31N, T31Q and T31G using Desmond. RMSD, RMSF, distance plots and H-bonds analysis proved T31G to be a favorable mutant for binding of pyruvate. Thus, modeling PFOR would help in profound understanding of its structural clefts and mutation studies would aid in improving the enzyme efficiency. PMID:26369404

  5. Crystal structures of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 quinone oxidoreductase and its complex with NADPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiaowei; Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Zhang, Hongmei; Gao, Yu; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2009-12-18

    Zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase is NAD(P)H-dependent and catalyzes one-electron reduction of certain quinones to generate semiquinone. Here we present the crystal structures of zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoQOR) and its complexes with NADPH determined at 2.4 and 2.01 A resolutions, respectively. PtoQOR forms as a homologous dimer, each monomer containing two domains. In the structure of the PtoQOR-NADPH complex, NADPH locates in the groove between the two domains. NADPH binding causes obvious conformational changes in the structure of PtoQOR. The putative substrate-binding site of PtoQOR is wider than that of Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus HB8. Activity assays show that PtoQOR has weak 1,4-benzoquinone catalytic activity, and very strong reduction activity towards large substrates such as 9,10-phenanthrenequinone. We propose a model to explain the conformational changes which take place during reduction reactions catalyzed by PtoQOR.

  6. Structure modeling and inhibitor prediction ofNADP oxidoreductase enzyme from Methanobrevibacter smithii.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Sirohi, Sunil Kumar; Saxena, Jyoti

    2011-01-01

    The F420-dependent NADP oxidoreductase enzyme from Methanobrevibacter smithii catalyzes the important electron transfer step during methanogenesis. Therefore, it may act as potential target for blocking the process of methane formation. Its protein sequence is available in GenBank (accession number: ABQ86254.1) however no report has been found about its 3D protein structure. In this work, we first time claim 3D model structure of F420-dependent NADP oxidoreductase enzyme from Methanobrevibacter smithii by comparative homology modeling method. Swiss model and ESyPred3d (via Modeller 6v2) software's were generated the 3D model by detecting 1JAX (A) as template along with sequence identities of 34.272% and 35.40%. Furthermore, PROCHECK with Ramachandran plot and ProSA analysis revealed that swiss model produced better model than Modeller6v2 with 98.90% of residues in favored and additional allowed regions (RM plot) as well as with ProSA Z score of -7.26. In addition, we investigated that the substrate F420 bound at the cavity of the model. Subsequently, inhibitor prediction study revealed that Lovastatin (-22.07 Kcal/mol) and Compactin (Mevastatin) (-21.91 Kcal/mol) produced more affinity for model structure of NADP oxidoreducatse as compared to F420 (-14.40 Kcal/mol). It indicates that the Lovastatin and Compactin (Mevastatin) compounds (Negative regulator) may act as potential inhibitor of F420 dependent NADP oxidoreducatse protein. PMID:21464839

  7. Energization of Bacillus subtilis membrane vesicles increases catalytic activity of succinate:menaquinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Azarkina, N V; Konstantinov, A A

    2010-01-01

    In this work, high DeltamicroH+-dependent succinate oxidase activity has been demonstrated for the first time with membrane vesicles isolated from Bacillus subtilis. The maximal specific rate of succinate oxidation by coupled inside-out membrane vesicles isolated from a B. subtilis strain overproducing succinate:menaquinone oxidoreductase approaches the specific rate observed with the intact cells. Deenergization of the membrane vesicles with ionophores or alamethicin brings about an almost complete inhibition of succinate oxidation. An apparent K(m) for succinate during the energy-dependent succinate oxidase activity of the vesicles (2.2 mM) is higher by an order of magnitude than the K(m) value measured for the energy-independent reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol. The data reveal critical importance of DeltamicroH+ for maintaining active electron transfer by succinate:menaquinone oxidoreductase. The role of DeltamicroH+ might consist in providing energy for thermodynamically unfavorable menaquinone reduction by succinate by virtue of transmembrane electron transport within the enzyme down the electric field; alternatively, DeltamicroH+ could play a regulatory role by maintaining the electroneutrally operating enzyme in a catalytically active conformation. PMID:20331424

  8. Evaluation of Neuronal Protective Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Severe Whole-brain Ischemia in Mouse Model and Analysis of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Activity in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Go; OKAMOTO, Ken; KUSANO, Teruo; MATSUDA, Yoko; FUSE, Akira; YOKOTA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) often result in high mortality. Free radicals play an important role in global cerebral I/R. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitors, such as allopurinol, have been reported to protect tissues from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting its production through XOR inhibition. The recently introduced XOR inhibitor febuxostat, which is a more potent inhibitor than allopurinol, is expected to decrease free radical production more effectively. Here, we analyzed the effects of allopurinol and febuxostat in decreasing global severe cerebral I/R damage in mice. Mice were divided into three groups: a placebo group, an allopurinol group, and a febuxostat group. Pathological examinations, which were performed in each group in the CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus 4 days after I/R surgery, revealed that there was a decrease in the number of neuronal cells in the 14-min occlusion model in both regions and that drugs that were administered to prevent this damage were not effective. The enzymatic activity was extremely low in the mouse brain, and XOR could not be detected in the nonischemic and ischemic mice brains with western blot analyses. Thus, one of the reasons for the decreased effectiveness of XOR inhibitors in controlling severe whole-brain ischemia in a mouse model was the low levels of expression of XOR in the mouse brain. PMID:25744353

  9. Disulfide Bond Oxidoreductase DsbA2 of Legionella pneumophila Exhibits Protein Disulfide Isomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z.; Jameson-Lee, Max; Yeh, Anthony J.; Chertihin, Olga; Shumilin, Igor A.; Dey, Rafik; Day, Shandra R.

    2013-01-01

    The extracytoplasmic assembly of the Dot/Icm type IVb secretion system (T4SS) of Legionella pneumophila is dependent on correct disulfide bond (DSB) formation catalyzed by a novel and essential disulfide bond oxidoreductase DsbA2 and not by DsbA1, a second nonessential DSB oxidoreductase. DsbA2, which is widely distributed in the microbial world, is phylogenetically distinct from the canonical DsbA oxidase and the DsbC protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)/reductase of Escherichia coli. Here we show that the extended N-terminal amino acid sequence of DsbA2 (relative to DsbA proteins) contains a highly conserved 27-amino-acid dimerization domain enabling the protein to form a homodimer. Complementation tests with E. coli mutants established that L. pneumophila dsbA1, but not the dsbA2 strain, restored motility to a dsbA mutant. In a protein-folding PDI detector assay, the dsbA2 strain, but not the dsbA1 strain, complemented a dsbC mutant of E. coli. Deletion of the dimerization domain sequences from DsbA2 produced the monomer (DsbA2N), which no longer exhibited PDI activity but complemented the E. coli dsbA mutant. PDI activity was demonstrated in vitro for DsbA2 but not DsbA1 in a nitrocefin-based mutant TEM β-lactamase folding assay. In an insulin reduction assay, DsbA2N activity was intermediate between those of DsbA2 and DsbA1. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 was maintained as a mixture of thiol and disulfide forms, while in E. coli, DsbA2 was present as the reduced thiol. Our studies suggest that DsbA2 is a naturally occurring bifunctional disulfide bond oxidoreductase that may be uniquely suited to the majority of intracellular bacterial pathogens expressing T4SSs as well as in many slow-growing soil and aquatic bacteria. PMID:23435972

  10. Towards a systematic analysis of human short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR): Ligand identification and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Chitra; Oerum, Stephanie; Bray, James; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Shafqat, Naeem; Yue, Wyatt; Oppermann, Udo

    2015-06-01

    Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) constitute a large, functionally diverse branch of enzymes within the class of NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases. In humans, over 80 genes have been identified with distinct metabolic roles in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, retinoid and steroid hormone metabolism, frequently associated with inherited genetic defects. Besides metabolic functions, a subset of atypical SDR proteins appears to play critical roles in adapting to redox status or RNA processing, and thereby controlling metabolic pathways. Here we present an update on the human SDR superfamily and a ligand identification strategy using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) with a focused library of oxidoreductase and metabolic ligands to identify substrate classes and inhibitor chemotypes. This method is applicable to investigate structure-activity relationships of oxidoreductases and ultimately to better understand their physiological roles. PMID:25526675

  11. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  12. Functional diversity of cysteine residues in proteins and unique features of catalytic redox-active cysteines in thiol oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Fomenko, Dmitri E; Marino, Stefano M; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2008-09-30

    Thiol-dependent redox systems are involved in regulation of diverse biological processes, such as response to stress, signal transduction, and protein folding. The thiol-based redox control is provided by mechanistically similar, but structurally distinct families of enzymes known as thiol oxidoreductases. Many such enzymes have been characterized, but identities and functions of the entire sets of thiol oxidoreductases in organisms are not known. Extreme sequence and structural divergence makes identification of these proteins difficult. Thiol oxidoreductases contain a redox-active cysteine residue, or its functional analog selenocysteine, in their active sites. Here, we describe computational methods for in silico prediction of thiol oxidoreductases in nucleotide and protein sequence databases and identification of their redox-active cysteines. We discuss different functional categories of cysteine residues, describe methods for discrimination between catalytic and noncatalytic and between redox and non-redox cysteine residues and highlight unique properties of the redox-active cysteines based on evolutionary conservation, secondary and three-dimensional structures, and sporadic replacement of cysteines with catalytically superior selenocysteine residues. PMID:18648218

  13. Functional Diversity of Cysteine Residues in Proteins and Unique Features of Catalytic Redox-active Cysteines in Thiol Oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Marino, Stefano M.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    Thiol-dependent redox systems are involved in regulation of diverse biological processes, such as response to stress, signal transduction, and protein folding. The thiol-based redox control is provided by mechanistically similar, but structurally distinct families of enzymes known as thiol oxidoreductases. Many such enzymes have been characterized, but identities and functions of the entire sets of thiol oxidoreductases in organisms are not known. Extreme sequence and structural divergence makes identification of these proteins difficult. Thiol oxidoreductases contain a redox-active cysteine residue, or its functional analog selenocysteine, in their active sites. Here, we describe computational methods for in silico prediction of thiol oxidoreductases in nucleotide and protein sequence databases and identification of their redox-active cysteines. We discuss different functional categories of cysteine residues, describe methods for discrimination between catalytic and noncatalytic and between redox and non-redox cysteine residues and highlight unique properties of the redox-active cysteines based on evolutionary conservation, secondary and three-dimensional structures, and sporadic replacement of cysteines with catalytically superior selenocysteine residues. PMID:18648218

  14. Oxidoreductases provide a more generic response to metallic stressors (Cu and Cd) than hydrolases in soil fungi: new ecotoxicological insights.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Jérémie D; Demont-Caulet, Nathalie; Cheviron, Nathalie; Laval, Karine; Trinsoutrot-Gattin, Isabelle; Mougin, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigates the effect of metals on the secretion of enzymes from12 fungal strains maintained in liquid cultures. Hydrolases (acid phosphatase, β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase) and ligninolytic oxidoreductases (laccase, Mn, and lignin peroxidases) activities, as well as biomass production, were measured in culture fluids from fungi exposed to Cu or Cd. Our results showed that all fungi secreted most of the selected hydrolases and that about 50 % of them produced a partial oxidative system in the absence of metals. Then, exposure of fungi to metals led to the decrease in biomass production. At the enzymatic level, Cu and Cd modified the secretion profiles of soil fungi. The response of hydrolases to metals was contrasted and complex and depended on metal, enzyme, and fungal strain considered. By contrast, the metals always stimulated the activity of ligninolytic oxidoreductases in fungal strains. In some of them, oxidoreductases were specifically produced following metal exposure. Fungal oxidoreductases provide a more generic response than hydrolases, constituting thus a physiological basis for their use as biomarkers of metal exposure in soils. PMID:26310699

  15. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product. PMID:26264136

  16. Adaptive Hepatic and Intestinal Alterations in Mice after Deletion of NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase (Cpr) in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xingguo; Gu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450) play an important role in first-pass metabolism in both the intestine and liver. NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Cpr) is an essential electron transfer protein required for microsomal P450 activity. Mice with conditional knockout of Cpr in hepatocytes develop normally and survive even with complete loss of liver microsomal P450 activity. Our current studies were performed to determine whether alternative drug-metabolizing pathways increase in an attempt to maintain whole-body homeostasis. In addition to the liver, Cpr is mainly expressed in tissues such as lung, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract. In livers of H-Cpr-null mice, there is a marked increase in mRNA expression of phase I enzymes (Aldh1a1, 1a7, 3a2; Ces1b2, 2a6, and 2a12), antioxidant enzymes (Ho-1, Nqo1, and epoxide hydrolase), phase II enzymes (Ugt1a9; Gsta1/2, m3, m4, m6, t1, and t3; and Sult1a1 and 1d1), and drug transporters (Oatp1a4, Oct3, Mate1, Mdr1a, and Mrp3 and 4). In addition, glucuronide-conjugated bilirubin concentrations are doubled in serum of H-Cpr-null mice. Both constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein in nuclei are higher in the livers of H-Cpr-null mice, indicating that CAR and Nrf2 are activated. In the small intestine of H-Cpr-null mice, mRNA expression of Cyp3a11 and Mdr1a, two genes critical for intestinal first-pass metabolism, are markedly up-regulated. In addition, nutrient (Pept1) and cholesterol (Npc1l1) transporters are induced in the small intestine of H-Cpr-null mice. In conclusion, in H-Cpr-null mice, adaptive regulation of alternative detoxification genes in liver and small intestine appear to partially compensate for the loss of microsomal P450 function in liver. PMID:25147274

  17. Pyruvate Oxidoreductases Involved in Glycolytic Anaerobic Metabolism of Polychaetes from the Continental Shelf off Central-South Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzlez, R. R.; Quiones, R. A.

    2000-10-01

    The presence of low oxygen conditions in extensive areas of the continental shelf off central-south Chile has important effects on the biochemical adaptations of the organisms living in this ecosystem. Polychaetes assemblages cohabit on the shelf with an extensively distributed prokaryotic community made up of giant filamentous sulfur bacteria (mainly Thioploca sp.). The aim of this research was to characterize the pyruvate oxidoreductases enzymes involved in the biochemical adaptation of these benthic polychaetes. Nine polychaete species ( Paraprionospio pinnata, Nephtys ferruginea, Glycera americana, Haploscoloplos sp., Lumbrineris composita, Sigambra bassi, Aricidea pigmentata , Cossura chilensis, and Pectinaria chilensis) were assayed for lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), octopine dehydrogenase (OPDH), strombine dehydrogenase (STRDH) and alanopine dehydrogenase (ALPDH). Each species had a characteristic number of the pyruvate oxidoreductases assayed ranging from 4 in Paraprionospio pinnata to 1 in Pectinaria chilensis . The pyruvate saturation curves obtained for the enzymes from all species analysed, except L. composita, suggest that NADH can be oxidized at different rates depending on the amino acid used in the reaction with pyruvate. Our results indicate that organisms having more that one pyruvate oxidoreductase present a greater metabolic capacity to cope with functional and environmental hypoxia because these enzymes would better regulate the pyruvate consumption rate during the transition period. Thus, the dominance of Paraprionospio pinnata in the study area and its worldwide distribution is consistent with its higher number of pyruvate oxidoreductases with different pyruvate consumption rates involved in anaerobic metabolism. Finally, a positive allometric relationship was found between body size and the specific activity of ALPDH, STRDH, and maximum pyruvate oxidoreductase specific activity. This latter result suggests a positive scaling of the specific anaerobic metabolism in polychaetes.

  18. Cytosolic localization of NADH cytochrome b5 oxidoreductase (Ncb5or).

    PubMed

    Zmb, Veronika; Tth, Mnika; Schlachter, Krisztina; Szelnyi, Pter; Sarnyai, Farkas; Lotz, Gbor; Csala, Mikls; Kereszturi, va

    2016-03-01

    Acyl-CoA desaturation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane depends on cytosolic NADH or NADPH, whereas NADPH in the ER lumen is utilized by prereceptor glucocorticoid production. It was assumed that NADH cytochrome b5 oxidoreductase (Ncb5or) might connect Acyl-CoA desaturation to ER luminal redox. We aimed to clarify the ambiguous compartmentalization of Ncb5or and test the possible effect of stearoyl-CoA on microsomal NADPH level. Amino acid sequence analysis, fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged protein, immunocytochemistry, and western blot analysis of subcellular fractions unequivocally demonstrated that Ncb5or, either endogenous or exogenous, is localized in the cytoplasm and not in the ER lumen in cultured cells and liver tissue. Moreover, the involvement of ER-luminal reducing equivalents in stearoyl-CoA desaturation was excluded. PMID:26878259

  19. Characterization of a unique Caulobacter crescentus aldose-aldose oxidoreductase having dual activities.

    PubMed

    Andberg, Martina; Maaheimo, Hannu; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Boer, Harry; Toivari, Mervi; Penttilä, Merja; Koivula, Anu

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the characterization of a novel enzyme called aldose-aldose oxidoreductase (Cc AAOR; EC 1.1.99) from Caulobacter crescentus. The Cc AAOR exists in solution as a dimer, belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA family and shows homology with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis. However, unlike other known members of this protein family, Cc AAOR is specific for aldose sugars and can be in the same catalytic cycle both oxidise and reduce a panel of monosaccharides at the C1 position, producing in each case the corresponding aldonolactone and alditol, respectively. Cc AAOR contains a tightly-bound nicotinamide cofactor, which is regenerated in this oxidation-reduction cycle. The highest oxidation activity was detected on D-glucose but significant activity was also observed on D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-galactose, revealing that both hexose and pentose sugars are accepted as substrates by Cc AAOR. The configuration at the C2 and C3 positions of the saccharides was shown to be especially important for the substrate binding. Interestingly, besides monosaccharides, Cc AAOR can also oxidise a range of 1,4-linked oligosaccharides having aldose unit at the reducing end, such as lactose, malto- and cello-oligosaccharides as well as xylotetraose. (1)H NMR used to monitor the oxidation and reduction reaction simultaneously, demonstrated that although D-glucose has the highest affinity and is also oxidised most efficiently by Cc AAOR, the reduction of D-glucose is clearly not as efficient. For the overall reaction catalysed by Cc AAOR, the L-arabinose, D-xylose and D-galactose were the most potent substrates. PMID:26428243

  20. Iron-Sulfur Cluster-dependent Catalysis of Chlorophyllide a Oxidoreductase from Roseobacter denitrificans*

    PubMed Central

    Kiesel, Svenja; Wätzlich, Denise; Lange, Christiane; Reijerse, Edward; Bröcker, Markus J.; Rüdiger, Wolfhart; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Scheer, Hugo; Moser, Jürgen; Jahn, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a biosynthesis requires the stereo- and regiospecific two electron reduction of the C7-C8 double bond of chlorophyllide a by the nitrogenase-like multisubunit metalloenzyme, chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase (COR). ATP-dependent COR catalysis requires interaction of the protein subcomplex (BchX)2 with the catalytic (BchY/BchZ)2 protein to facilitate substrate reduction via two redox active iron-sulfur centers. The ternary COR enzyme holocomplex comprising subunits BchX, BchY, and BchZ from the purple bacterium Roseobacter denitrificans was trapped in the presence of the ATP transition state analog ADP·AlF4−. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments revealed a [4Fe-4S] cluster of subcomplex (BchX)2. A second [4Fe-4S] cluster was identified on (BchY/BchZ)2. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that the latter is ligated by four cysteines, which is in contrast to the three cysteine/one aspartate ligation pattern of the closely related dark-operative protochlorophyllide a oxidoreductase (DPOR). In subsequent mutagenesis experiments a DPOR-like aspartate ligation pattern was implemented for the catalytic [4Fe-4S] cluster of COR. Artificial cluster formation for this inactive COR variant was demonstrated spectroscopically. A series of chemically modified substrate molecules with altered substituents on the individual pyrrole rings and the isocyclic ring were tested as COR substrates. The COR enzyme was still able to reduce the B ring of substrates carrying modified substituents on ring systems A, C, and E. However, substrates with a modification of the distantly located propionate side chain were not accepted. A tentative substrate binding mode was concluded in analogy to the related DPOR system. PMID:25422320

  1. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Caused by P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Reisch, Nicole; Idkowiak, Jan; Hughes, Beverly A.; Ivison, Hannah E.; Abdul-Rahman, Omar A.; Hendon, Laura G.; Olney, Ann Haskins; Nielsen, Shelly; Harrison, Rachel; Blair, Edward M.; Dhir, Vivek; Krone, Nils; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Mutations in the electron donor enzyme P450 oxidoreductase (POR) result in congenital adrenal hyperplasia with apparent combined 17?-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase and 21-hydroxylase deficiencies, also termed P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD). Major clinical features present in PORD are disordered sex development in affected individuals of both sexes, glucocorticoid deficiency, and multiple skeletal malformations. Objective: The objective of the study was to establish a noninvasive approach to prenatal diagnosis of PORD including assessment of malformation severity to facilitate optimized prenatal diagnosis and timely treatment. Design: We analyzed 20 pregnancies with children homozygous or compound heterozygous for disease-causing POR mutations and 1 pregnancy with a child carrying a heterozygous POR mutation by recording clinical and biochemical presentations and fetal ultrasound findings. In 4 of the pregnancies (3 homozygous and 1 heterozygous for disease-causing POR mutations), prenatal analysis of steroid metabolite excretion in maternal urine was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry during gestational weeks 1123. Results: Pregnancy complications in our cohort included maternal virilization (6 of 20) with onset in the second trimester. Seven pregnant women presented with low unconjugated estriol at prenatal screening (triple or quadruple antenatal screening test). Overt dysmorphic features were noted in 19 of the 20 babies at birth but observed in only 5 by prenatal ultrasound. These 5 had the most severe malformation phenotypes and poor outcome, whereas the other babies showed normal development. Steroid profiling of maternal urine revealed significantly increased steroids of fetal origin, namely the pregnenolone metabolite epiallopregnanediol and the androgen metabolite androsterone, with concomitant low values for estriol. Diagnostic steroid ratios conclusively indicated PORD as early as gestational week 12. In the heterozygous pregnancy, steroid ratios were only slightly elevated and estriol excretion was normal. Conclusion: Prenatal diagnosis in PORD is readily established via urinary steroid metabolite analysis of maternal urine. Visible malformations at prenatal ultrasound predict a severe malformation phenotype. PMID:23365120

  2. Regulation of gap junction function and Connexin 43 expression by cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Masters, Bettie Sue; Panda, Satya P.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Humans with severe forms of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) mutations show bone defects as observed in Antley-Bixler Syndrome. {yields} First report showing knockdown of CYPOR in osteoblasts decreased Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein levels. Cx43 is known to play an important role in bone modeling. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and hemichannel activity. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Cx43 in mouse primary calvarial osteoblasts. {yields} Decreased Cx43 expression was observed at the transcriptional level. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is a microsomal electron-transferring enzyme containing both FAD and FMN as co-factors, which provides the reducing equivalents to various redox partners, such as cytochromes P450 (CYPs), heme oxygenase (HO), cytochrome b{sub 5} and squalene monooxygenase. Human patients with severe forms of CYPOR mutation show bone defects such as cranio- and humeroradial synostoses and long bone fractures, known as Antley-Bixler-like Syndrome (ABS). To elucidate the role of CYPOR in bone, we knocked-down CYPOR in multiple osteoblast cell lines using RNAi technology. In this study, knock-down of CYPOR decreased the expression of Connexin 43 (Cx43), known to play a critical role in bone formation, modeling, and remodeling. Knock-down of CYPOR also decreased Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) and hemichannel activity. Promoter luciferase assays revealed that the decrease in expression of Cx43 in CYPOR knock-down cells was due to transcriptional repression. Primary osteoblasts isolated from bone specific Por knock-down mice calvariae confirmed the findings in the cell lines. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of gap junction function by CYPOR and suggests that Cx43 may play an important role(s) in CYPOR-mediated bone defects seen in patients.

  3. (The interaction of ferredoxin:NADP sup + oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase with substrates)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    We seek to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes located in spinach chloroplasts which utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +}oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase needs be determined, the amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. Related to an aim elucidate the binding sites for ferredoxin to determine whether there is a common binding site on all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. Additionally thioredoxin binding by FTR needs be determine to resolve whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress is reported on the prosthetic groups of glutamate synthase, in establishing the role of arginine and lysine residues in ferredoxin binding by, ferredoxin:nitrite oxidoreductase nitrite reductase, labelling carboxyl groups on ferredoxin with taurine and labelling lysine residues biotinylation, and low potential heme proteins have been isolated and characterized from a non-photosynthetic plant tissue. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out not to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADPinteraction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique. The techniques developed for differential chemical modification of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions.

  4. Over-expression of NADH-dependent oxidoreductase (fucO) for increasing furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Elliot N.; Zhang, Xueli; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Wang, Xuan; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2015-10-13

    The subject invention pertains to the discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural. This allows for a new approach to improve furfural tolerance in bacterial and/or yeast cells used to produce desired products. Thus, novel biocatalysts (bacterial, fungal or yeast cells) exhibiting increased tolerance to furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are provided as are methods of making and using such biocatalysts for the production of a desired product.

  5. Failure to detect delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase activity in the preimplantation rabbit embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Bleau, G.

    1981-02-01

    Preimplantation rabbit embryos were incubated with pregnenolone and dehydroisoandrosterone under conditions which gave formazan precipitation by the histochemical technique. The metabolic fate of the labeled steroids were assessed simultaneously. There was no concomitant transformation of pregnenolone to progesterone and dehydroisoandrosterone was not transformed to androstenedione. It is concluded that the formazan precipitation is coupled with an activity other than delta 5-3 beta-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase.

  6. Metabolic activities of metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori: repression of pyruvate oxidoreductase and expression of isocitrate lyase activity correlate with resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, P S; Goodwin, A; Johnsen, J; Magee, K; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we compared metronidazole (Mtz)-sensitive and -resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori for metabolic differences that might correlate with drug resistance. Included in this study was an isogenic Mtz(r) strain, HP1107, that was constructed by transforming genomic DNA from Mtz(r) strain HP439 into Mtz(s) strain HP500. Enzyme activities were also measured for Mtz(r) strains grown in the presence or absence of 18 micrograms of metronidazole per ml (ca. one-half of the MIC). These studies confirmed the presence of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas, Entner-Doudoroff, and pentose pathways. H. pylori strains expressed enzymatic activities indicative of a complete and active Krebs cycle. All strains expressed pyruvate oxidoreductase (POR) and alpha-ketoglutarate oxidoreductase (KOR) as measured with the redox-active dye benzyl viologen (30 to 96 nmol/min/mg of protein for POR and 30 nmol/min/mg of protein for KOR). When grown in the presence of Mtz at > or = 3.5 micrograms/ml, Mtz(r) strains expressed no detectable POR or KOR activity. The apparent repression of POR and KOR activities by Mtz affected bacterial growth as manifest by extended lag periods and growth yield reductions of > 30%. A dose-dependent relationship was demonstrated between the metronidazole concentration in the growth medium and the specific activity of POR measured in bacterial cell extracts. The observed repression was not due to inactivation of POR by Mtz. In addition to repression of POR and KOR activities, growth in the presence of Mtz also led to decreases in the activities of various Krebs cycle enzymes, including aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase. All of the Mtz(r) strains examined expressed isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities indicative of the glyoxylate bypass. No isocitrate lyase activity was detected in Mtz(s) strain HP500. Isocitrate lyase activity was expressed by HP500 following transformation to Mtz resistance (Mtz(r) strain HP1107) with DNA from an Mtz(r) strain. The results of this study suggest that Mtz resistance may be a recessive trait, possibly involving inactivation of a regulatory gene, that results in constitutive expression of isocitrate lyase. Repression of POR and KOR activities in response to low levels of Mtz may be a general response of H. pylori strains to Mtz, but only resistant strains manage to survive via activation of compensatory metabolic pathways. PMID:8759844

  7. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  8. DnaK dependence of mutant ethanol oxidoreductases evolved for aerobic function and protective role of the chaperone against protein oxidative damage in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Echave, Pedro; Esparza-Cern, M. Angel; Cabiscol, Elisa; Tamarit, Jordi; Ros, Joaquim; Membrillo-Hernndez, Jorge; Lin, E. C. C.

    2002-01-01

    The adhE gene of Escherichia coli encodes a multifunctional ethanol oxidoreductase (AdhE) that catalyzes successive reductions of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol reversibly at the expense of NADH. Mutant JE52, serially selected for acquired and improved ability to grow aerobically on ethanol, synthesized an AdhEA267T/E568K with two amino acid substitutions that sequentially conferred improved catalytic properties and stability. Here we show that the aerobic growth ability on ethanol depends also on protection of the mutant AdhE against metal-catalyzed oxidation by the chaperone DnaK (a member of the Hsp70 family). No DnaK protection of the enzyme is evident during anaerobic growth on glucose. Synthesis of DnaK also protected E. coli from H2O2 killing under conditions when functional AdhE is not required. Our results therefore suggest that, in addition to the known role of protecting cells against heat stress, DnaK also protects numerous kinds of proteins from oxidative damage. PMID:11917132

  9. Coordination between BrlA regulation and secretion of the oxidoreductase FmqD directs selective accumulation of fumiquinazoline C to conidial tissues in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Fang Yun; Ames, Brian; Walsh, Christopher; Keller, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Aerial spores, crucial for propagation and dispersal of the Kingdom Fungi, are commonly the initial inoculum of pathogenic fungi. Natural products (secondary metabolites) have been correlated with fungal spore development and enhanced virulence in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus but mechanisms for metabolite deposition in the spore are unknown. Metabolomic profiling of A. fumigatus deletion mutants of fumiquinazoline (Fq) cluster genes reveal that the first two products of the Fq cluster, FqF and FqA, are produced to comparable levels in all fungal tissues but the final enzymatically-derived product, FqC, predominantly accumulates in the fungal spore. Loss of the sporulation-specific transcription factor, BrlA, yields a strain unable to produce FqA or FqC. Fluorescence microscopy showed FmqD, the oxidoreductase required to generate FqC, was secreted via the Golgi apparatus to the cell wall in an actin-dependent manner. In contrast, all other members of the Fq pathway including the putative transporter, FmqE – which had no effect on Fq biosynthesis – were internal to the hyphae. The coordination of BrlA-mediated tissue specificity with FmqD secretion to the cell wall presents a previously undescribed mechanism to direct localization of specific secondary metabolites to spores of the differentiating fungus. PMID:24612080

  10. Two novel mutations of the FMO3 gene in a proband with trimethylaminuria.

    PubMed

    Akerman, B R; Forrest, S; Chow, L; Youil, R; Knight, M; Treacy, E P

    1999-01-01

    The mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases catalyze the NADPH-dependent N-oxygenation of nucleophilic nitrogen-, sulfur-, and phosphorus-containing chemicals, drugs, and xenobiotics, including trimethylamine. The FMO3 gene encodes the dominant catalytically active isoform present in human liver. We have identified two missense mutations in the coding region of the gene in a proband with trimethylaminuria (TMA): M66I and R492W. Whereas two mutations (P153L, E305X) accounted for TMA in our eight unrelated previously documented Australian families of British origin, the present report is the first evidence of compound heterozygosity for two rare mutations in a proband with this disorder. This suggests that other rarer alleles, also causing TMA, will be found in the same populations. PMID:10338091

  11. Influence of 120 kDa Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase on Pathogenicity of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan parasite and commonly infected the lower genital tract in women and men. Iron is a known nutrient for growth of various pathogens, and also reported to be involved in establishment of trichomoniasis. However, the exact mechanism was not clarified. In this study, the author investigated whether the 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis may be involved in pathogenicity of trichomonads. Antibodies against 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis, which was identified as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) by peptide analysis of MALDI-TOF-MS, were prepared in rabbits. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with anti-120 kDa Ab decreased the proliferation and adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (MS74) of T. vaginalis. Subcutaneous tissue abscess in anti-120 kDa Ab-treated T. vaginalis-injected mice was smaller in size than that of untreated T. vaginalis-infected mice. Collectively, the 120 kDa protein expressed by iron may be involved in proliferation, adhesion to host cells, and abscess formation, thereby may influence on the pathogenicity of T. vaginalis. PMID:26951982

  12. Nitro-oleic acid, a novel and irreversible inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Eric E; Batthyany, Carlos I; Hundley, Nicholas J; Woodcock, Steven R; Bonacci, Gustavo; Del Rio, J Mauricio; Schopfer, Francisco J; Lancaster, Jack R; Freeman, Bruce A; Tarpey, Margaret M

    2008-12-26

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) generates proinflammatory oxidants and secondary nitrating species, with inhibition of XOR proving beneficial in a variety of disorders. Electrophilic nitrated fatty acid derivatives, such as nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2), display anti-inflammatory effects with pleiotropic properties. Nitro-oleic acid inhibits XOR activity in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 0.6 microM, limiting both purine oxidation and formation of superoxide (O2.). Enzyme inhibition by OA-NO2 is not reversed by thiol reagents, including glutathione, beta-mercaptoethanol, and dithiothreitol. Structure-function studies indicate that the carboxylic acid moiety, nitration at the 9 or 10 olefinic carbon, and unsaturation is required for XOR inhibition. Enzyme turnover and competitive reactivation studies reveal inhibition of electron transfer reactions at the molybdenum cofactor accounts for OA-NO2-induced inhibition. Importantly, OA-NO2 more potently inhibits cell-associated XOR-dependent O2. production than does allopurinol. Combined, these data establish a novel role for OA-NO2 in the inhibition of XOR-derived oxidant formation. PMID:18974051

  13. Mitochondrial Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase Prevents Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response in Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Horsman, Joseph W; Miller, Dana L

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced gaseous molecule with important roles in cellular signaling. In mammals, exogenous H2S improves survival of ischemia/reperfusion. We have previously shown that exposure to H2S increases the lifespan and thermotolerance in Caenorhabditis elegans, and improves protein homeostasis in low oxygen. The mitochondrial SQRD-1 (sulfide quinone oxidoreductase) protein is a highly conserved enzyme involved in H2S metabolism. SQRD-1 is generally considered important to detoxify H2S. Here, we show that SQRD-1 is also required to maintain protein translation in H2S. In sqrd-1 mutant animals, exposure to H2S leads to phosphorylation of eIF2? and inhibition of protein synthesis. In contrast, global protein translation is not altered in wild-type animals exposed to lethally high H2S or in hif-1(ia04) mutants that die when exposed to low H2S. We demonstrate that both gcn-2 and pek-1 kinases are involved in the H2S-induced phosphorylation of eIF2?. Both ER and mitochondrial stress responses are activated in sqrd-1 mutant animals exposed to H2S, but not in wild-type animals. We speculate that SQRD-1 activity in H2S may coordinate proteostasis responses in multiple cellular compartments. PMID:26677221

  14. One-carbon chemistry of oxalate oxidoreductase captured by X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Marcus I; Chen, Percival Yang-Ting; Johnson, Aileen C; Pierce, Elizabeth; Can, Mehmet; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Drennan, Catherine L

    2016-01-12

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent oxalate oxidoreductase (OOR) metabolizes oxalate, generating two molecules of CO2 and two low-potential electrons, thus providing both the carbon and reducing equivalents for operation of the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway of acetogenesis. Here we present structures of OOR in which two different reaction intermediate bound states have been trapped: the covalent adducts between TPP and oxalate and between TPP and CO2. These structures, along with the previously determined structure of substrate-free OOR, allow us to visualize how active site rearrangements can drive catalysis. Our results suggest that OOR operates via a bait-and-switch mechanism, attracting substrate into the active site through the presence of positively charged and polar residues, and then altering the electrostatic environment through loop and side chain movements to drive catalysis. This simple but elegant mechanism explains how oxalate, a molecule that humans and most animals cannot break down, can be used for growth by acetogenic bacteria. PMID:26712008

  15. Secondary structure of NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase examined by circular dichroism and prediction methods.

    PubMed Central

    Birve, S J; Selstam, E; Johansson, L B

    1996-01-01

    To study the secondary structure of the enzyme NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (PCOR), a novel method of enzyme isolation was developed. The detergent isotridecyl poly-(ethylene glycol) ether (Genapol X-080) selectively solubilizes the enzyme from a prolamellar-body fraction isolated from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The solubilized fraction was further purified by ion-exchange chromatography. The isolated enzyme was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy at 77 K, and by CD spectroscopy. The fluorescence-emission spectra revealed that the binding properties of the substrate and co-substrate were preserved and that photo-reduction occurred. The CD spectra of PCOR were analysed for the relative amounts of the secondary structures, alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn and random coil. The secondary structure composition was estimated to be 33% alpha-helix, 19% beta-sheet, 20% turn and 28% random coil. These values are in agreement with those predicted by the Predict Heidelberg Deutschland and self-optimized prediction method from alignments methods. The enzyme has some amino acid identity with other NADPH-binding enzymes containing the Rossmann fold. The Rossmann-fold fingerprint motif is localized in the N-terminal region and at the expected positions in the predicted secondary structure. It is suggested that PCOR is anchored to the interfacial region of the membrane by either a beta-sheet or an alpha-helical region containing tryptophan residues. A hydrophobic loop-region could also be involved in membrane anchoring. PMID:8713084

  16. Dextran causes aggregation of mitochondria and influences their oxidoreductase activities and light scattering.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V; Solano, Sigifredo; López, Luis F; Rendón, Dairo A; Ghafourifar, Pedram; Gómez, Luis A

    2003-04-15

    It has been reported that dextrans diminish the intermembrane space of mitochondria, increase the number of contact sites between the inner and the outer mitochondrial membranes, decrease the outer membrane permeability to adenosine 5(')-diphosphate, and change the kinetic properties of mitochondrial kinases. In the present work the influence of dextran M40 (5% w/v) on the oxidoreductase activities of the inner and outer membranes of mitochondria, the interaction of cytochrome c with mitochondrial membranes, and the light scattering by rat liver mitochondria were studied. No influence of dextran on the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria or its interaction with mitochondrial membranes was observed. Decreases in the NADH-oxidase (to 80+/-2% of the control), NADH-cytochrome c reductase (to 26+/-2%), succinate-cytochrome c reductase (to 70+/-5%), and NADH-ferricyanide reductase (to 75+/-3%) activities induced by dextran, which may be due to the mitochondrial aggregation, were observed. The formation of aggregates was registered by light scattering, confirmed by light microscopy, and explained within the framework of the Gouy-Chapman theory of the electrical double layer. The observed mitochondrial aggregation seems to be useful also for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial condensation and perinuclear clustering during apoptosis. PMID:12667481

  17. Engineering the Respiratory Complex I to Energy-converting NADPH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase*

    PubMed Central

    Morina, Klaudia; Schulte, Marius; Hubrich, Florian; Drner, Katerina; Steimle, Stefan; Stolpe, Stefan; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    The respiratory complex I couples the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with a translocation of protons across the membrane. Its nucleotide-binding site is made up of a unique Rossmann fold to accommodate the binding of the substrate NADH and of the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide. Binding of NADH includes interactions of the hydroxyl groups of the adenosine ribose with a conserved glutamic acid residue. Structural analysis revealed that due to steric hindrance and electrostatic repulsion, this residue most likely prevents the binding of NADPH, which is a poor substrate of the complex. We produced several variants with mutations at this position exhibiting up to 200-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency with NADPH. The reaction of the variants with NAD(P)H is coupled with proton translocation in an inhibitor-sensitive manner. Thus, we have created an energy-converting NADPH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, an activity so far not found in nature. Remarkably, the oxidation of NAD(P)H by the variants leads to an enhanced production of reactive oxygen species. PMID:21832062

  18. Cation transport by the respiratory NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I): facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Wojtek; Steuber, Julia

    2013-10-01

    The respiratory complex I (electrogenic NADH:quinone oxidoreductase) has been considered to act exclusively as a H+ pump. This was questioned when the search for the NADH-driven respiratory Na+ pump in Klebsiella pneumoniae initiated by Peter Dimroth led to the discovery of a Na+-translocating complex in this enterobacterium. The 3D structures of complex I from different organisms support the idea that the mechanism of cation transport by complex I involves conformational changes of the membrane-bound NuoL, NuoM and NuoN subunits. In vitro methods to follow Na+ transport were compared with in vivo approaches to test whether complex I, or its individual NuoL, NuoM or NuoN subunits, extrude Na+ from the cytoplasm to the periplasm of bacterial host cells. The truncated NuoL subunit of the Escherichia coli complex I which comprises amino acids 1-369 exhibits Na+ transport activity in vitro. This observation, together with an analysis of putative cation channels in NuoL, suggests that there exists in NuoL at least one continuous pathway for cations lined by amino acid residues from transmembrane segments 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8. Finally, we discuss recent studies on Na+ transport by mitochondrial complex I with respect to its putative role in the cycling of Na+ ions across the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:24059520

  19. Reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein with electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, J.D.; Frerman, F.E.

    1985-07-16

    The oxidative half-reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF), electron transfer from ETF to electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO), is dependent on complementary surface charges on the two proteins. ETF is the positively charged member of the redox pair. The evidence is based on the pH and ionic strength dependencies of the comproportionation of oxidized ETF and ETF hydroquinone catalyzed by ETF-QO and on the effects of chemical modification of ETF on the comproportionation reaction. Acetylation of one and five epsilon-amino groups of lysyl residues results in 3- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in the K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF but no change in V/sub max/. Amidination, which maintains positive charge at modified loci, has no effect on steady-state kinetic constants. These chemical modifications have no effect on the equilibrium constant for equilibration of ETF redox states. The K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF is pH dependent above pH 8.5, suggesting titration of lysyl residues. The ionic strength dependence of TN/KmETF for the reaction follows the limiting Bronsted equation. The ETF-QO-catalyzed comproportionation reaction exhibits a primary deuterium isotope effect in D2O, perhaps indicating the participation of solvent water in the electron-transfer reaction.

  20. Functional Characterization of the FoxE Iron Oxidoreductase from the Photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2*

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Ivo H.; Newman, Dianne K.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2012-01-01

    Photoferrotrophy is presumed to be an ancient type of photosynthetic metabolism in which bacteria use the reducing power of ferrous iron to drive carbon fixation. In this work the putative iron oxidoreductase of the photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 was cloned, purified, and characterized for the first time. This protein, FoxE, was characterized using spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and kinetic techniques. It is a c-type cytochrome that forms a trimer or tetramer in solution; the two hemes of each monomer are hexacoordinated by histidine and methionine. The hemes have positive reduction potentials that allow downhill electron transfer from many geochemically relevant ferrous iron forms to the photosynthetic reaction center. The reduction potentials of the hemes are different and are cross-assigned to fast and slow kinetic phases of ferrous iron oxidation in vitro. Lower reactivity was observed at high pH and may contribute to prevent ferric iron precipitation inside or at the surface of the cell. These results help fill in the molecular details of a metabolic process that likely contributed to the deposition of precambrian banded iron formations, globally important sedimentary rocks that are found on every continent today. PMID:22661703

  1. Characterization of two-step deglycosylation via oxidation by glycoside oxidoreductase and defining their subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Baek, Kiheon; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a two-step deglycosylation mediated by the oxidation of glycoside which is different from traditional glycoside hydrolase (GH) mechanism. Previously, we reported a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glycoside oxidoreductase (FAD-GO) having deglycosylation activity. Various features of the reaction of FAD-GO such as including mechanism and catalytic residue and substrate specificity were studied. In addition, classification of novel FAD-GO subfamily was attempted. Deglycosylation of glycoside was performed spontaneously via oxidation of 3-OH of glycone moiety by FAD-GO mediated oxidation reaction. His493 residue was identified as a catalytic residue for the oxidation step. Interestingly, this enzyme has broad glycone and aglycon specificities. For the classification of FAD-GO enzyme subfamily, putative FAD-GOs were screened based on the FAD-GO from Rhizobium sp. GIN611 (gi 365822256) using BLAST search. The homologs of R. sp. GIN611 included the putative FAD-GOs from Stenotrophomonas strains, Sphingobacterium strains, Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58, and etc. All the cloned FAD-GOs from the three strains catalyzed the deglycosylation via enzymatic oxidation. Based on their substrate specificities, deglycosylation and oxidation activities to various ginsenosides, the FAD-GO subfamily members can be utilized as novel biocatalysts for the production of various aglycones. PMID:26057169

  2. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Oxidoreductase NmDsbA3 from Neisseria meningitidis

    SciTech Connect

    Vivian, Julian P.; Scoullar, Jessica; Robertson, Amy L.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Horne, James; Chin, Yanni; Wielens, Jerome; Thompson, Philip E.; Velkov, Tony; Piek, Susannah; Byres, Emma; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Kahler, Charlene M.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2009-09-02

    DsbA is an enzyme found in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria that catalyzes the formation of disulfide bonds in a diverse array of protein substrates, many of which are involved in bacterial pathogenesis. Although most bacteria possess only a single essential DsbA, Neisseria meningitidis is unusual in that it possesses three DsbAs, although the reason for this additional redundancy is unclear. Two of these N. meningitidis enzymes (NmDsbA1 and NmDsbA2) play an important role in meningococcal attachment to human epithelial cells, whereas NmDsbA3 is considered to have a narrow substrate repertoire. To begin to address the role of DsbAs in the pathogenesis of N. meningitidis, we have determined the structure of NmDsbA3 to 2.3-{angstrom} resolution. Although the sequence identity between NmDsbA3 and other DsbAs is low, the NmDsbA3 structure adopted a DsbA-like fold. Consistent with this finding, we demonstrated that NmDsbA3 acts as a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase in vitro and is reoxidized by Escherichia coli DsbB (EcDsbB). However, pronounced differences in the structures between DsbA3 and EcDsbA, which are clustered around the active site of the enzyme, suggested a structural basis for the unusual substrate specificity that is observed for NmDsbA3.

  3. Regulation of Gap Junction Function and Connexin 43 Expression by Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase (CYPOR)

    PubMed Central

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Masters, Bettie Sue; Panda, Satya P.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is a microsomal electron-transferring enzyme containing both FAD and FMN as co-factors, which provides the reducing equivalents to various redox partners, such as cytochromes P450 (CYPs), heme oxygenase (HO), cytochrome b5 and squalene monooxygenase. Human patients with severe forms of CYPOR mutation show bone defects such as cranio- and humeroradial synostoses and long bone fractures, known as Antley-Bixler-like Syndrome (ABS). To elucidate the role of CYPOR in bone, we knocked-down CYPOR in multiple osteoblast cell lines using RNAi technology. In this study, knock-down of CYPOR decreased the expression of Connexin43 (Cx43), known to play a critical role in bone formation, modeling, and remodeling. Knock-down of CYPOR also decreased Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) and hemichannel activity. Promoter luciferase assays revealed that the decrease in expression of Cx43 in CYPOR knock-down cells was due to transcriptional repression. Primary osteoblasts isolated from bone specific Por knock-down mice calvaria confirmed the findings in the cell lines. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of gap junction function by CYPOR and suggests that Cx43 may play an important role(s) in CYPOR-mediated bone defects seen in patients. PMID:21726529

  4. Iron (III) reduction: A novel activity of the human NAD(P)H:oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Onyenwoke, Rob U.; Wiegel, Juergen . E-mail: jwiegel@uga.edu

    2007-02-09

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1; EC 1.6.99.2) catalyzes a two-electron transfer involved in the protection of cells from reactive oxygen species. These reactive oxygen species are often generated by the one-electron reduction of quinones or quinone analogs. We report here on the previously unreported Fe(III) reduction activity of human NQO1. Under steady state conditions with Fe(III) citrate, the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}{sup app}) was {approx}0.3nM and the apparent maximum velocity (V{sub max}{sup app}) was 16Umg{sup -1}. Substrate inhibition was observed above 5nM. NADH was the electron donor, K{sub m}{sup app}=340{mu}M and V{sub max}{sup app}=46Umg{sup -1}. FAD was also a cofactor with a K{sub m}{sup app} of 3.1{mu}M and V{sub max}{sup app} of 89Umg{sup -1}. The turnover number for NADH oxidation was 25s{sup -1}. Possible physiological roles of the Fe(III) reduction by this enzyme are discussed.

  5. Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency with Antley-Bixler syndrome: steroidogenic capacities.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shigeo; Ohishi, Akira; Ohzeki, Takehiko

    2009-05-01

    For patients with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD), steroid replacement is recommended at times of stress. However, it is unknown how hormones respond to actual physical stress in these patients. We report a female infant with PORD accompanied by the Antley-Bixler syndrome phenotype. Her urinary steroid profile revealed defective CYP17A1 and CYP21A2 activities, and an adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) stimulation test showed potential adrenal insufficiency. Hormonal responses to actual physical stress were as follows: Vigorous crying during blood sampling rarely affected the serum cortisol level. Acute viral gastroenteritis led to marked increases in blood ACTH and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone levels in proportion to the severity of the illness. The serum cortisol level also responded to this stress, but the response might have been blunted. Regarding peri-operative steroid replacement, intravenous hydrocortisone administration even at a dose of 6 mg/kg, which is lower than that recommended for congenital adrenal hyperplasia in Japan, proved to be excessive. PMID:19618668

  6. Sequence-Structure-Function Classification of a Catalytically Diverse Oxidoreductase Superfamily in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, F Hafna; Carr, Paul D; Lee, Brendon M; Afriat-Jurnou, Livnat; Mohamed, A Elaaf; Hong, Nan-Sook; Flanagan, Jack; Taylor, Matthew C; Greening, Chris; Jackson, Colin J

    2015-11-01

    The deazaflavin cofactor F420 enhances the persistence of mycobacteria during hypoxia, oxidative stress, and antibiotic treatment. However, the identities and functions of the mycobacterial enzymes that utilize F420 under these conditions have yet to be resolved. In this work, we used sequence similarity networks to analyze the distribution of the largest F420-dependent protein family in mycobacteria. We show that these enzymes are part of a larger split ?-barrel enzyme superfamily (flavin/deazaflavin oxidoreductases, FDORs) that include previously characterized pyridoxamine/pyridoxine-5'-phosphate oxidases and heme oxygenases. We show that these proteins variously utilize F420, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, and heme cofactors. Functional annotation using phylogenetic, structural, and spectroscopic methods revealed their involvement in heme degradation, biliverdin reduction, fatty acid modification, and quinone reduction. Four novel crystal structures show that plasticity in substrate binding pockets and modifications to cofactor binding motifs enabled FDORs to carry out a variety of functions. This systematic classification and analysis provides a framework for further functional analysis of the roles of FDORs in mycobacterial pathogenesis and persistence. PMID:26434506

  7. Density-functional theory models of xanthine oxidoreductase activity: comparison of substrate tautomerization and protonation.

    PubMed

    Bayse, Craig A

    2009-04-01

    The hydroxylation mechanism of the molybdoprotein xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been modelled using density-functional theory. High activation barriers are often obtained for models of this enzyme due to the absence of factors that stabilize the accumulation of charge on the substrate at the transition state. Xanthine provides much lower barriers than small model substrates such as formamide or imidazole due to charge delocalization to centers which appear to interact with key residues in the protein. Of the two mechanisms of stabilization discussed in the literature-tautomerization and protonation of xanthine-density-functional theory calculations suggest that proton transfer from Glu1261 to N9 reduces the activation barrier by approximately 30 kcal mol(-1) and leads to an intuitive product complex. Further, similar values for the activation barriers of methyl xanthine isomers lead to the conclusion that the wide variation in rates for substituted purines is due to interactions with key residues in the active site. In addition, the transition state for oxidation of xanthine can be superimposed over the X-ray structure of inhibitor-bound XO with high correlation suggesting that the enzyme active site orients the substrate into the ideal position for reaction. The activation barriers for models of a hypothetical tungsten-substituted XO are predicted to be approximately 10 kcal mol(-1) higher in energy due to the higher reduction potential of the metal and unfavourable electrostatic interactions for the hydride transfer. PMID:19290363

  8. Xanthine oxidoreductase activation is implicated in the onset of metabolic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aibibula, Zulipiya; Ailixiding, Maierhaba; Iwata, Munetaka; Piao, Jinying; Hara, Yasushi; Okawa, Atsushi; Asou, Yoshinori

    2016-03-25

    A metabolic syndrome (MetS) is accompanied by hyperuricemia, during which xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the production of uric acid. In the cohort study, a correlation between uric acid concentration in the synovial fluid and osteoarthritis (OA) incidence is observed. The purpose of our study was to elucidate XOR function in terms of correlation between MetS and OA. Seven week-old male C57BL6J mice were fed normal diet (ND) or high fat diet (HFD) with or without febuxostat (FEB), a XOR inhibitor. HFD stimulated xanthine oxidase activity in the IPFP and the visceral fat. OA changes at the site of the knee joints had progressed due to HFD, but these changes were reduced upon FEB administration. IL-1β expression in the HFD group was increased in accordance with the enhancement of NLRP3 or iNOS expression in the IPFP, whereas it was inhibited by FEB administration. In the organ culture system, when the IPFP was stimulated with insulin, IL-1β expression was increased in accordance with the increase of NLRP3 expression; however, they were reduced by FEB administration. Based on the above results, we showed that inflammasome activation accompanied by an increase in XOR activity contributed to IPFP inflammation followed by OA progression. PMID:26903297

  9. Excited state dynamics and catalytic mechanism of the light-driven enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Scrutton, Nigel S; Groot, Marie Louise; Heyes, Derren J

    2012-07-01

    The reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) to chlorophyllide, catalysed by the enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR), is the penultimate step in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway and is a key light-driven reaction that triggers a profound transformation in plant development. As POR is light-activated it can provide new information on the way in which light energy can be harnessed to power enzyme reactions. Consequently, POR presents a unique opportunity to study catalysis at low temperatures and on ultrafast timescales, which are not usually accessible for the majority of enzymes. Recent advances in our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of POR illustrate why it is an important model for studying enzyme catalysis and reaction dynamics. The reaction involves the addition of one hydride and one proton, and catalysis is initiated by the absorption of light by the Pchlide substrate. As the reaction involves the Pchlide excited state, a variety of ultrafast spectroscopic measurements have shown that significant parts of the reaction occur on the picosecond timescale. A number of excited state Pchlide species, including an intramolecular charge transfer complex and a hydrogen bonded intermediate, are proposed to be required for the subsequent hydride and proton transfers, which occur on the microsecond timescale. Herein, we review spectroscopic investigations, with a particular focus on time-resolved transient absorption and fluorescence experiments that have been used to study the excited state dynamics and catalytic mechanism of POR. PMID:22419074

  10. NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase: roles in physiology, pharmacology, and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Riddick, David S; Ding, Xinxin; Wolf, C Roland; Porter, Todd D; Pandey, Amit V; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Gu, Jun; Finn, Robert D; Ronseaux, Sebastien; McLaughlin, Lesley A; Henderson, Colin J; Zou, Ling; Flück, Christa E

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and held at the Experimental Biology 2012 meeting in San Diego, California, on April 25, 2012. The symposium speakers summarized and critically evaluated our current understanding of the physiologic, pharmacological, and toxicological roles of NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR), a flavoprotein involved in electron transfer to microsomal cytochromes P450 (P450), cytochrome b(5), squalene mono-oxygenase, and heme oxygenase. Considerable insight has been derived from the development and characterization of mouse models with conditional Por deletion in particular tissues or partial suppression of POR expression in all tissues. Additional mouse models with global or conditional hepatic deletion of cytochrome b(5) are helping to clarify the P450 isoform- and substrate-specific influences of cytochrome b(5) on P450 electron transfer and catalytic function. This symposium also considered studies using siRNA to suppress POR expression in a hepatoma cell-culture model to explore the basis of the hepatic lipidosis phenotype observed in mice with conditional deletion of Por in liver. The symposium concluded with a strong translational perspective, relating the basic science of human POR structure and function to the impacts of POR genetic variation on human drug and steroid metabolism. PMID:23086197

  11. Influence of an 18-hydroxyl group on the interaction of oestrogens and hydroxysteroid oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, John K.; Breuer, Heinz

    1974-01-01

    1. Partially purified 17?-hydroxy steroidNAD+ oxidoreductases, prepared from Pseudomonas testosteroni (EC 1.1.1.51), human term placenta (EC 1.1.1.62) and the cytoplasmic fraction of rat liver (EC 1.1.1.) were tested for their ability to catalyse the oxidoreduction of 18-hydroxyoestradiol-17? and 18-hydroxyoestrone. The products of incubation were identified by chromatographic procedures and by mass spectrometry. 2. The Pseudomonas enzyme catalysed both the oxidation of 18-hydroxyoestradiol-17? and the reduction of 18-hydroxyoestrone; in contrast, the placental and rat liver enzymes only catalysed the reduction of 18-hydroxyoestrone. 3. These results were confirmed, by using a spectrophotometric assay; equimolar quantities of oestradiol-17? and 18-hydroxyoestradiol-17? were oxidized at approximately the same rate by the microbial enzyme. 4. These findings suggest that 18-hydroxyoestradiol-17? may be a normal oestrogen metabolite. 5. The differences in ability of the mammalian and microbial enzymes to metabolize 18-hydroxylated oestrogens is explained on the basis of recognition sites with different geometrical dimensions, characteristic of the placental (Descomps & Crastes de Paulet, 1969) and the microbial steroid enzymes (Fosset & Crastes de Paulet, 1967). PMID:4824210

  12. Posttranslational Modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M.; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T.; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A.; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants’ survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research. PMID:25301888

  13. Functional characterization of the FoxE iron oxidoreductase from the photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Ivo H; Newman, Dianne K; Louro, Ricardo O

    2012-07-20

    Photoferrotrophy is presumed to be an ancient type of photosynthetic metabolism in which bacteria use the reducing power of ferrous iron to drive carbon fixation. In this work the putative iron oxidoreductase of the photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 was cloned, purified, and characterized for the first time. This protein, FoxE, was characterized using spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and kinetic techniques. It is a c-type cytochrome that forms a trimer or tetramer in solution; the two hemes of each monomer are hexacoordinated by histidine and methionine. The hemes have positive reduction potentials that allow downhill electron transfer from many geochemically relevant ferrous iron forms to the photosynthetic reaction center. The reduction potentials of the hemes are different and are cross-assigned to fast and slow kinetic phases of ferrous iron oxidation in vitro. Lower reactivity was observed at high pH and may contribute to prevent ferric iron precipitation inside or at the surface of the cell. These results help fill in the molecular details of a metabolic process that likely contributed to the deposition of precambrian banded iron formations, globally important sedimentary rocks that are found on every continent today. PMID:22661703

  14. Localization-controlled specificity of FAD:threonine flavin transferases in Klebsiella pneumoniae and its implications for the mechanism of Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Bertsova, Yulia V; Kostyrko, Vitaly A; Baykov, Alexander A; Bogachev, Alexander V

    2014-07-01

    The Klebsiella pneumoniae genome contains genes for two putative flavin transferase enzymes (ApbE1 and ApbE2) that add FMN to protein Thr residues. ApbE1, but not ApbE2, has a periplasm-addressing signal sequence. The genome also contains genes for three target proteins with the Dxx(s/t)gAT flavinylation motif: two subunits of Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR), and a 99.5kDa protein, KPK_2907, with a previously unknown function. We show here that KPK_2907 is an active cytoplasmically-localized fumarate reductase. K. pneumoniae cells with an inactivated kpk_2907 gene lack cytoplasmic fumarate reductase activity, while retaining this activity in the membrane fraction. Complementation of the mutant strain with a kpk_2907-containing plasmid resulted in a complete recovery of cytoplasmic fumarate reductase activity. KPK_2907 produced in Escherichia coli cells contains 1mol/mol each of covalently bound FMN, noncovalently bound FMN and noncovalently bound FAD. Lesion in the ApbE1 gene in K. pneumoniae resulted in inactive Na(+)-NQR, but cytoplasmic fumarate reductase activity remained unchanged. On the contrary, lesion in the ApbE2 gene abolished the fumarate reductase but not the Na(+)-NQR activity. Both activities could be restored by transformation of the ApbE1- or ApbE2-deficient K. pneumoniae strains with plasmids containing the Vibrio cholerae apbE gene with or without the periplasm-directing signal sequence, respectively. Our data thus indicate that ApbE1 and ApbE2 bind FMN to Na(+)-NQR and fumarate reductase, respectively, and that, contrary to the presently accepted view, the FMN residues are on the periplasmic side of Na(+)-NQR. A new, "electron loop" mechanism is proposed for Na(+)-NQR, involving an electroneutral Na(+)/electron symport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. PMID:24361839

  15. Microbial metabolism of quinoline and related compounds. XX. Quinaldic acid 4-oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas sp. AK-2 compared to other procaryotic molybdenum-containing hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Sauter, M; Tshisuaka, B; Fetzner, S; Lingens, F

    1993-11-01

    Quinaldic acid 4-oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas sp. AK-2 catalyses the hydroxylation of quinoline 2-carboxylic (quinaldic acid) to 4-hydroxyquinoline 2-carboxylic acid (kynurenic acid) with concomitant reduction of a suitable electron acceptor. An analogous hydroxylation in para-position relative to the N-heteroatom was only recently described for quinaldine 4-oxidoreductase (de Beyer & Lingens, 1993, Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler 374, 101-110) and for quinaldic acid 4-oxidoreductase from Serratia marcescens 2CC-1 (Fetzner & Lingens, 1993, Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler 374, 363-376). Quinaldic acid 4-oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas putida AK-2 was purified 78-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity with a recovery of 22%. The native enzyme (300 kDa) was composed of three subunits with molecular masses of 90, 34 and 20 kDa, indicating an alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 structure. Quinaldic acid 4-oxidoreductase contained FAD, molybdenum, iron and acid-labile sulfur in a ratio of 2:2:8:8. Molybdenum is probably associated with molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as organic part of the pterin molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of quinaldic acid 4-oxido-reductase exhibited the typical features of a molybdo-iron/sulfur-flavoprotein, namely, maxima at 274 nm, 340 nm and 450 nm, a shoulder at 550 nm, a ratio A280/A450 of 4.7 and a ratio A450/A550 of 3.5. The enzyme was susceptible to inactivation by methanol, sodium m-arsenite, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, and potassium cyanide. Cyanide caused an alteration at 320 nm in the absorption spectrum, typical for the change in the coordination sphere of the molybdenum. Enzyme inactivated with cyanide was reactivated to 74% by incubation with sulfide. Thus, quinaldic acid 4-oxidoreductase possesses a monooxo-monosulfido-type molybdenum center. PMID:8292263

  16. Nitro-oleic Acid, a Novel and Irreversible Inhibitor of Xanthine Oxidoreductase*

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Eric E.; Batthyany, Carlos I.; Hundley, Nicholas J.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Del Rio, J. Mauricio; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Tarpey, Margaret M.

    2008-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) generates proinflammatory oxidants and secondary nitrating species, with inhibition of XOR proving beneficial in a variety of disorders. Electrophilic nitrated fatty acid derivatives, such as nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2), display anti-inflammatory effects with pleiotropic properties. Nitro-oleic acid inhibits XOR activity in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 0.6 ?m, limiting both purine oxidation and formation of superoxide \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}({\\mathrm{O}}_{2}^{{\\bar {{\\cdot}}}})\\end{equation*}\\end{document}. Enzyme inhibition by OA-NO2 is not reversed by thiol reagents, including glutathione, ?-mercaptoethanol, and dithiothreitol. Structure-function studies indicate that the carboxylic acid moiety, nitration at the 9 or 10 olefinic carbon, and unsaturation is required for XOR inhibition. Enzyme turnover and competitive reactivation studies reveal inhibition of electron transfer reactions at the molybdenum cofactor accounts for OA-NO2-induced inhibition. Importantly, OA-NO2 more potently inhibits cell-associated XOR-dependent \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2}^{{\\bar {{\\cdot}}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} production than does allopurinol. Combined, these data establish a novel role for OA-NO2 in the inhibition of XOR-derived oxidant formation. PMID:18974051

  17. Kinetic mechanism of quinone oxidoreductase 2 and its inhibition by the antimalarial quinolines.

    PubMed

    Kwiek, Jesse J; Haystead, Timothy A J; Rudolph, Johannes

    2004-04-20

    Quinone oxidoreductase 2 (QR2) purified from human red blood cells was recently shown to be a potential target of the quinoline antimalarial compounds [Graves et al., (2002) Mol. Pharmacol. 62, 1364]. QR2 catalyzes the two-electron reduction of menadione via the oxidation of N-alkylated or N-ribosylated nicotinamides. To investigate the mechanism and consequences of inhibition of QR2 by the quinolines further, we have used steady-state and transient-state kinetics to define the mechanism of QR2. Importantly, we have shown that QR2 when isolated from an overproducing strain of E. coli is kinetically equivalent to the enzyme from the native human red blood cell source. We observe ping-pong kinetics consistent with one substrate/inhibitor binding site that shows selectivity for the oxidation state of the FAD cofactor, suggesting that selective inhibition of the liver versus red blood cell forms of malaria may be possible. The reductant N-methyldihydronicotinamide and the inhibitor primaquine bind exclusively to the oxidized enzyme. In contrast, the inhibitors quinacrine and chloroquine bind exclusively to the reduced enzyme. The quinone substrate menadione, on the other hand, binds nonspecifically to both forms of the enzyme. Single-turnover kinetics of the reductive half-reaction are chemically and kinetically competent and confirm the inhibitor selectivity seen in the steady-state experiments. Our studies shed light on the possible in vivo potency of the quinolines and provide a foundation for future studies aimed at creating more potent QR2 inhibitors and at understanding the physiological significance of QR2. PMID:15078100

  18. Identification of a Lactate-Quinone Oxidoreductase in Staphylococcus aureus that is Essential for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, James R.; Vitko, Nicholas P.; Perkowski, Ellen F.; Scott, Eric; Khatri, Dal; Spontak, Jeffrey S.; Thurlow, Lance R.; Richardson, Anthony R.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen commonly infecting nearly every host tissue. The ability of S. aureus to resist innate immunity is critical to its success as a pathogen, including its propensity to grow in the presence of host nitric oxide (NO). Upon exogenous NO exposure, S. aureus immediately excretes copious amounts of L-lactate to maintain redox balance. However, after prolonged NO-exposure, S. aureus reassimilates L-lactate specifically and in this work, we identify the enzyme responsible for this L-lactate-consumption as a L-lactate-quinone oxidoreductase (Lqo, SACOL2623). Originally annotated as Mqo2 and thought to oxidize malate, we show that this enzyme exhibits no affinity for malate but reacts specifically with L-lactate (KM?=??330??M). In addition to its requirement for reassimilation of L-lactate during NO-stress, Lqo is also critical to respiratory growth on L-lactate as a sole carbon source. Moreover, ?lqo mutants exhibit attenuation in a murine model of sepsis, particularly in their ability to cause myocarditis. Interestingly, this cardiac-specific attenuation is completely abrogated in mice unable to synthesize inflammatory NO (iNOS?/?). We demonstrate that S. aureus NO-resistance is highly dependent on the availability of a glycolytic carbon sources. However, S. aureus can utilize the combination of peptides and L-lactate as carbon sources during NO-stress in an Lqo-dependent fashion. Murine cardiac tissue has markedly high levels of L-lactate in comparison to renal or hepatic tissue consistent with the NO-dependent requirement for Lqo in S. aureus myocarditis. Thus, Lqo provides S. aureus with yet another means of replicating in the presence of host NO. PMID:22919585

  19. Synergistic enhancement of antitumor effect of ?-Lapachone by photodynamic induction of quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1).

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Mara Julia; Vittar, Natalia Beln Rumie; da Silva, Fernando de Carvalho; Ferreira, Vitor Francisco; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2013-08-15

    ?-Lapachone is a phytochemotherapeutic originally isolated from Lapacho tree whose extract has been used medicinally for centuries. It is well known that NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) activity is the principal determinant of ?-Lapachone cytotoxicity. As NQO1 is overexpressed in most common carcinomas, recent investigations suggest its potential application against cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved and rapidly developing cancer treatment. PDT involves the administration of photosensitizer (PS) followed by local illumination with visible light of specific wavelength. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the light illumination of PS can lead to a series of photochemical reactions and consequently the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been reported that ?-Lapachone synergistically interacts with ionizing radiation, hyperthermia and cisplatin and that the sensitivity of cells to ?-Lapachone is closely related to the activity of NQO1. So, the present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of PDT to increase the anticancer effect of ?-Lapachone by up-regulating NQO1 expression on breast cancer MCF-7c3 cells. NQO1 expression was evaluated by Western blot analysis at different times after PDT using ME-ALA as PS. The cytotoxicity of the photodynamic treatment and ?-Lapachone alone or in combination was determined by MTT assay and the combination index (CI)-isobologram method and the dose reduction index (DRI) analysis were used to assess the effect of drug combinations. Our studies for the first time demonstrated that the expression of NQO1 is induced 24h after photodynamic treatment. The sensitivity of cancer cells to ?-Lapachone treatment increased 24h after PDT and a synergistic inhibitory effect on MCF-7c3 cells was showed. Taken together, these results lead us to conclude that the synergistic interaction between ?-Lapachone and PDT in killing cells was consistent with the up-regulation of NQO1. The combination of ?-Lapachone and PDT is a potentially promising modality for the treatment of cancer. PMID:23746950

  20. Unique amino acids cluster for switching from the dehydrogenase to oxidase form of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Yoshimitsu; Nishino, Tomoko; Okamoto, Ken; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Eger, Bryan T; Pai, Emil F; Nishino, Takeshi

    2003-07-01

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase is synthesized as a dehydrogenase (XDH) but can be readily converted to its oxidase form (XO) either by proteolysis or modification of cysteine residues. The crystal structures of bovine milk XDH and XO demonstrated that atoms in the highly charged active-site loop (Gln-423-Lys-433) around the FAD cofactor underwent large dislocations during the conversion, blocking the approach of the NAD+ substrate to FAD in the XO form as well as changing the electrostatic environment around FAD. Here we identify a unique cluster of amino acids that plays a dual role by forming the core of a relay system for the XDH/XO transition and by gating a solvent channel leading toward the FAD ring. A more detailed structural comparison and site-directed mutagenesis analysis experiments showed that Phe-549, Arg-335, Trp-336, and Arg-427 sit at the center of a relay system that transmits modifications of the linker peptide by cysteine oxidation or proteolytic cleavage to the active-site loop (Gln-423-Lys-433). The tight interactions of these residues are crucial in the stabilization of the XDH conformation and for keeping the solvent channel closed. Both oxidative and proteolytic generation of XO effectively leads to the removal of Phe-549 from the cluster causing a reorientation of the bulky side chain of Trp-336, which then in turn forces a dislocation of Arg-427, an amino acid located in the active-site loop. The conformational change also opens the gate for the solvent channel, making it easier for oxygen to reach the reduced FAD in XO. PMID:12817083

  1. Biotransformation of arsenic by bacterial strains mediated by oxido-reductase enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, N; Singh, D P

    2014-01-01

    The present study deals with the enzyme mediated biotransformation of arsenic in five arsenic tolerant strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus, Paenibacillus macerans and Escherichia coli). Biotransformation ability of these isolates was evaluated by monitoring arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. Results showed that arsenic oxidase activity was exclusively present in P. macerans and B. pumilus while B. subtilis, B. megaterium and E. coli strains showed presence of Arsenic oxido-reductase enzyme. The reversible nature of arsenic oxido- reductase suggested that same enzyme can carry out oxidation and reduction of arsenic depending upon the relative concentration of arsenic species. Lineweaver-Burk plot of the arsenite oxidase activity in P. macerans showed highest Km value (Km- 200 ?M) and lower Vmax (0.012 ?mol mg-1 protein min-1) indicating lowest affinity of the enzyme for arsenite. On the contrary, E. coli showed the lower Km value ( Km- 38.46 ?M) and higher Vmax (0.044 ?mol mg-1 protein min-1) suggesting for higher affinity for the arsenite. Lineweaver-Burk plot of arsenate reductase activity showed the presence of this enzyme in B. subtilis, B. megaterium and E. coli which were in the range of 200-360 ?M Km and Vmax value between 0.256- 0.129 mmol mg-1 protein min-1. These results suggested that affinity of the as reductase enzyme is lowest for arsenate than that for the arsenite. Thus, arsenite oxidase system appears to be a predominant mechanism of cellular defense in these bacterial strains. PMID:25535706

  2. Extensive horizontal gene transfer, duplication, and loss of chlorophyll synthesis genes in the algae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Randhawa, Tejinder; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-02-10

    Two non-homologous, isofunctional enzymes catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll a synthesis in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae and land plants: the light independent (LIPOR) and light-dependent (POR) protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases. Whereas the distribution of these enzymes in cyanobacteria and land plants is well understood, the presence, loss, duplication, and replacement of these genes have not been surveyed in the polyphyletic and remarkably diverse eukaryotic algal lineages.

  3. The yeast ζ-crystallin/NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (Zta1p) is under nutritional control by the target of rapamycin pathway and is involved in the regulation of argininosuccinate lyase mRNA half-life.

    PubMed

    Crosas, Eva; Sumoy, Lauro; González, Eva; Díaz, Maykelis; Bartolomé, Salvador; Farrés, Jaume; Parés, Xavier; Biosca, Josep Antoni; Fernández, María Rosario

    2015-05-01

    The yeast ζ-crystallin (Zta1p) is a quinone oxidoreductase belonging to the ζ-crystallin family, with activity in the reduction of alkenal/alkenone compounds. Various biological functions have been ascribed to the members of this protein family, such as their ability to interact specifically with AU-rich sequences in mRNA, and thus they have been proposed to act as AU-rich element-binding proteins (AREBPs). In this study, we evaluated the specificity of Zta1p for RNA versus DNA by means of a novel nonisotopic method for the in vitro quantitative detection of protein · RNA complexes. Through comparative transcriptomic analysis, we found that the lack of Zta1p negatively affects the expression of a group of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis, the argininosuccinate lyase (ARG4) gene being one of them. Here, we propose that Zta1p participates in the post-transcriptional regulation of ARG4 expression by increasing the ARG4 mRNA half-life. In addition, expression of the ζ-crystallin gene (ZTA1) is itself regulated by nutrient availability through the general amino acid control and target of rapamycin pathways. Our results shed new light on the ζ-crystallin family members from yeast to humans as stress response proteins with a bifunctional role in the detoxification of alkenal and alkenone compounds, and the regulation of gene expression. PMID:25715111

  4. Identification of NAD(P)H Quinone Oxidoreductase Activity in Azoreductases from P. aeruginosa: Azoreductases and NAD(P)H Quinone Oxidoreductases Belong to the Same FMN-Dependent Superfamily of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ali; Kaplan, Elise; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Polycarpou, Elena; Crescente, Vincenzo; Lowe, Edward; Preston, Gail M.; Sim, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Water soluble quinones are a group of cytotoxic anti-bacterial compounds that are secreted by many species of plants, invertebrates, fungi and bacteria. Studies in a number of species have shown the importance of quinones in response to pathogenic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. Two electron reduction is an important mechanism of quinone detoxification as it generates the less toxic quinol. In most organisms this reaction is carried out by a group of flavoenzymes known as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases. Azoreductases have previously been separate from this group, however using azoreductases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa we show that they can rapidly reduce quinones. Azoreductases from the same organism are also shown to have distinct substrate specificity profiles allowing them to reduce a wide range of quinones. The azoreductase family is also shown to be more extensive than originally thought, due to the large sequence divergence amongst its members. As both NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases and azoreductases have related reaction mechanisms it is proposed that they form an enzyme superfamily. The ubiquitous and diverse nature of azoreductases alongside their broad substrate specificity, indicates they play a wide role in cellular survival under adverse conditions. PMID:24915188

  5. High-Yield Expression of a Catalytically Active Membrane-Bound Protein: Human P450 Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Sandee, Duanpen

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a two-flavin protein that reduces microsomal P450 enzymes and some other proteins. Preparation of active bacterially expressed human POR for biochemical studies has been difficult because membrane-bound proteins tend to interact with column matrices. To reduce column-protein interactions and permit more vigorous washing, human POR lacking 27 N-terminal residues (N-27 POR) was modified to carry a C-terminal Gly3His6-tag (N-27 POR-G3H6). When expressed in Escherichia coli, N-27 POR-G3H6 could be purified to apparent homogeneity by a modified, single-step nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography, yielding 31 mg POR per liter of culture, whereas standard purification of native N-27 POR required multiple steps, yielding 5 mg POR per liter. Both POR proteins had absorption maxima at 375 and 453 nm and both reduced cytochrome c with indistinguishable specific activities. Using progesterone as substrate for bacterially expressed purified human P450c17, the Michaelis constant for 17?-hydroxylase activity supported by N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 were 1.73 or 1.49 ?m, and the maximal velocity was 0.029 or 0.026 pmol steroids per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Using 17-hydroxypregnenolone as the P450c17 substrate, the Michaelis constant for 17,20 lyase activity using N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 was 1.92 or 1.89 ?m and the maximal velocity was 0.041 or 0.042 pmol steroid per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Thus, N-27 POR-G3H6 is equally active as native N-27 POR. This expression and purification system permits the rapid preparation of large amounts of highly pure, biologically active POR and may be generally applicable for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:21586563

  6. Purification and characterization of the recombinant Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Barquera, Blanca; Hellwig, Petra; Zhou, Weidong; Morgan, Joel E; Hse, Claudia C; Gosink, Khoosheh K; Nilges, Mark; Bruesehoff, Peter J; Roth, Annette; Lancaster, C Roy D; Gennis, Robert B

    2002-03-19

    The nqr operon from Vibrio cholerae, encoding the entire six-subunit, membrane-associated, Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR), was cloned under the regulation of the P(BAD) promoter. The enzyme was successfully expressed in V. cholerae. To facilitate molecular genetics studies of this sodium-pumping enzyme, a host strain of V. cholerae was constructed in which the genomic copy of the nqr operon was deleted. By using a vector containing a six-histidine tag on the carboxy terminus of the NqrF subunit, the last subunit in the operon, the recombinant enzyme was readily purified by affinity chromatography in a highly active form from detergent-solubilized membranes of V. cholerae. The recombinant enzyme has a high specific activity in the presence of sodium. NADH consumption was assessed at a turnover number of 720 electrons per second. When purified using dodecyl maltoside (DM), the isolated enzyme contains approximately one bound ubiquinone, whereas if the detergent LDAO is used instead, the quinone content of the isolated enzyme is negligible. Furthermore, the recombinant enzyme, purified with DM, has a relatively low rate of reaction with O(2) (10-20 s(-1)). In steady state turnover, the isolated, recombinant enzyme exhibits up to 5-fold stimulation by sodium and functions as a primary sodium pump, as reported previously for Na(+)()-NQR from other bacterial sources. When reconstituted into liposomes, the recombinant Na(+)-NQR generates a sodium gradient and a Delta Psi across the membrane. SDS-PAGE resolves all six subunits, two of which, NqrB and NqrC, contain covalently bound flavin. A redox titration of the enzyme, monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy, reveals three n = 2 redox centers and one n = 1 redox center, for which the presence of three flavins and a 2Fe-2S center can account. The V. cholerae Na(+)-NQR is well-suited for structural studies and for the use of molecular genetics techniques in addressing the mechanism by which NADH oxidation is coupled to the pumping of Na(+) across the membrane. PMID:11888296

  7. High-yield expression of a catalytically active membrane-bound protein: human P450 oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Sandee, Duanpen; Miller, Walter L

    2011-07-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a two-flavin protein that reduces microsomal P450 enzymes and some other proteins. Preparation of active bacterially expressed human POR for biochemical studies has been difficult because membrane-bound proteins tend to interact with column matrices. To reduce column-protein interactions and permit more vigorous washing, human POR lacking 27 N-terminal residues (N-27 POR) was modified to carry a C-terminal Gly3His6-tag (N-27 POR-G3H6). When expressed in Escherichia coli, N-27 POR-G3H6 could be purified to apparent homogeneity by a modified, single-step nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography, yielding 31 mg POR per liter of culture, whereas standard purification of native N-27 POR required multiple steps, yielding 5 mg POR per liter. Both POR proteins had absorption maxima at 375 and 453 nm and both reduced cytochrome c with indistinguishable specific activities. Using progesterone as substrate for bacterially expressed purified human P450c17, the Michaelis constant for 17?-hydroxylase activity supported by N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 were 1.73 or 1.49 ?m, and the maximal velocity was 0.029 or 0.026 pmol steroids per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Using 17-hydroxypregnenolone as the P450c17 substrate, the Michaelis constant for 17,20 lyase activity using N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 was 1.92 or 1.89 ?m and the maximal velocity was 0.041 or 0.042 pmol steroid per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Thus, N-27 POR-G3H6 is equally active as native N-27 POR. This expression and purification system permits the rapid preparation of large amounts of highly pure, biologically active POR and may be generally applicable for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:21586563

  8. Comparison of the inhibitory action of synthetic capsaicin analogues with various NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Miyoshi, H; Sakamoto, K; Iwamura, H

    1996-01-11

    Capsaicin is a new naturally occurring inhibitor of proton-pumping NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1), that competitively acts against ubiquinone. A series of capsaicin analogues was synthesized to examine the structural factors required for the inhibitory action and to probe the structural property of the ubiquinone catalytic site of various NADH-ubiquinone reductases, including non-proton-pumping enzyme (NDH-2), from bovine heart mitochondria, potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum, L) mitochondria and Escherichia coli (GR 19N) plasma membranes. Some synthetic capsaicins were fairly potent inhibitors of each of the three NDH-1 compared with the potent rotenone and piericidin A. Synthetic capsaicin analogues inhibited all three NDH-1 activities in a competitive manner against an exogenous quinone. The modification both of the substitution pattern and of the number of methoxy groups on the benzene ring, which may be superimposable on the quinone ring of ubiquinone, did not drastically affect the inhibitory potency. In addition, alteration of the position of dipolar amide bond unit in the molecule and chemical modifications of this unit did not change the inhibitory potency, particularly with bovine heart and potato tuber NDH-1. These results might be explained assuming that the ubiquinone catalytic site of NDH-1 is spacious enough to accommodate a variety of structurally different capsaicin analogues in a dissimilar manner. Regarding the moiety corresponding to the alkyl side chain, a rigid diphenyl ether structure was more inhibitory than a flexible alkyl chain. Structure-activity studies and molecular orbital calculations suggested that a bent form is the active conformation of capsaicin analogues. On the other hand, poor correlations between the inhibitory potencies determined with the three NDH-1 suggested that the structural similarity of the ubiquinone catalytic sites of these enzymes is rather poor. The sensitivity to the inhibition by synthetic capsaicins remarkably differed between NDH-1 and NDH-2, supporting the notion that the sensitivity against capsaicin inhibition correlates well with the presence of an energy coupling site in the enzyme (Yagi, T. (1990) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 281, 305-311). It is noteworthy that several synthetic capsaicins discriminated between NDH-1 and NDH-2 much better than natural capsaicin. PMID:8573592

  9. Identification and characterization of the enzymatic activity of zeta-crystallin from guinea pig lens. A novel NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Rao, P V; Krishna, C M; Zigler, J S

    1992-01-01

    zeta-Crystallin is a major protein in the lens of certain mammals. In guinea pigs it comprises 10% of the total lens protein, and it has been shown that a mutation in the zeta-crystallin gene is associated with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. As with several other lens crystallins of limited phylogenetic distribution, zeta-crystallin has been characterized as an "enzyme/crystallin" based on its ability to reduce catalytically the electron acceptor 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol. We report here that certain naturally occurring quinones are good substrates for the enzymatic activity of zeta-crystallin. Among the various quinones tested, the orthoquinones 1,2-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone were the best substrates whereas menadione, ubiquinone, 9,10-anthraquinone, vitamins K1 and K2 were inactive as substrates. This quinone reductase activity was NADPH specific and exhibited typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Activity was sensitive to heat and sulfhydryl reagents but was very stable on freezing. Dicumarol (Ki = 1.3 x 10(-5) M) and nitrofurantoin (Ki = 1.4 x 10(-5) M) inhibited the activity competitively with respect to the electron acceptor, quinone. NADPH protected the enzyme against inactivation caused by heat, N-ethylmaleimide, or H2O2. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the reaction products showed formation of a semiquinone radical. The enzyme activity was associated with O2 consumption, generation of O2- and H2O2, and reduction of ferricytochrome c. These properties indicate that the enzyme acts through a one-electron transfer process. The substrate specificity, reaction characteristics, and physicochemical properties of zeta-crystallin demonstrate that it is an active NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase distinct from quinone reductases described previously. PMID:1370456

  10. The stimulatory effects of asbestos on NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Fontecave, M; Mansuy, D; Jaouen, M; Pezerat, H

    1987-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes induced by asbestos fibres, crocidolite and chrysotile, is greatly increased in the presence of NADPH, leading to malondialdehyde levels comparable with those induced by CCl4, a very strong inducer of lipid peroxidation. This synergic effect only occurs during the first minutes and could be explained by an increase or a regeneration of the ferrous active sites of asbestos by NADPH, which in turn could rapidly be prevented by the adsorption of microsomal proteins on the surface of the fibres. It is not inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase and mannitol, indicating that oxygen radicals are not involved in the reaction. It is also not inhibited by desferrioxamine, indicating that it is not due to a release of free iron ions in solution from the fibres. Lipid peroxidation in NADPH-supplemented microsomes is also greatly increased upon addition of magnetite. This could be linked to the presence of ferrous ions in this solid iron oxide, since the ferric oxides haematite and goethite are completely inactive. PMID:3036068

  11. Probing the Transmembrane Structure and Dynamics of Microsomal NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Zhang, Meng; Popovych, Nataliya; Hung, Ivan; Im, Sang-Choul; Gan, Zhehong; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is an essential redox partner of the cytochrome P450 (cyt P450) superfamily of metabolic enzymes. In the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells, such enzymes metabolize ∼75% of the pharmaceuticals in use today. It is known that the transmembrane domain of CYPOR plays a crucial role in aiding the formation of a complex between CYPOR and cyt P450. Here we present the transmembrane structure, topology, and dynamics of the FMN binding domain of CYPOR in a native membrane-like environment. Our solid-state NMR results reveal that the N-terminal transmembrane domain of CYPOR adopts an α-helical conformation in the lipid membrane environment. Most notably, we also show that the transmembrane helix is tilted ∼13° from the lipid bilayer normal, and exhibits motions on a submillisecond timescale including rotational diffusion of the whole helix and fluctuation of the helical director axis. The approaches and the information reported in this study would enable further investigations on the structure and dynamics of the full-length NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase and its interaction with other membrane proteins in a membrane environment. PMID:24853741

  12. Purification and Characterization of a Ferredoxin-NADP+ Oxidoreductase-Like Enzyme from Radish Root Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Morigasaki, Susumu; Takata, Kinuyo; Suzuki, Takashi; Wada, Keishiro

    1990-01-01

    An enzyme able to reduce cytochrome c via ferredoxin in the presence of NADPH, was isolated, purified from radish (Raphanus sativus var acanthiformis cultivar miyashige) roots and characterized. The enzyme was purified by DEAE-cellulose, Blue-Cellulofine, Ferredoxin-Sepharose 4B, and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography. Molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 33,000 and 35,000 daltons by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, respectively. Its absorption spectrum suggested that the enzyme contains flavin as a prosthetic group. The Km values for NADPH and ferredoxin were calculated to be 9.2 and 1.2 micromolar, respectively. The enzyme required NADPH and did not use NADH as an electron donor. The optimal pH was 8.4. The enzyme also catalyzed the photoreduction of NADP+ in the spinach leaf thylakoid membranes depleted of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase. The effect of NaCl and MgCl2 concentration on the activity and amino acid composition of the enzyme were demonstrated. The results suggest that the enzyme is similar to ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase from chloroplasts and cyanobacteria and is the key enzyme catalyzing the electron transport between NADPH, generated by the pentose phosphate pathway, and ferredoxin in plastids of plant heterotrophic tissues. Images Figure 4 PMID:16667598

  13. Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase in junction with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: characteristics of an enzymatically active nanohybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepaniak, Krzysztof; Worch, Remigiusz; Grzyb, Joanna

    2013-05-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) is a plant and cyanobacterial photosynthetic enzyme, also found in non-photosynthetic tissues, where it is involved in redox reactions of biosynthetic pathways. In vivo it transfers electrons to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+), forming its reduced version, NADPH, while in vitro it can also use NADPH to reduce several substrates, such as ferricyanide, various quinones and nitriles. As an oxidoreductase catalyzing reaction of a broad range of substrates, FNR may be used in biotechnological processes. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals of a few to several nanometers diameter, having very useful luminescent properties. We present the spectroscopic and functional characteristics of a covalent conjugation of FNR and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. Two types of quantum dots, of different diameter and emission maximum (550 and 650 nm), were used for comparison. Steady-state fluorescence and gel electrophoresis confirmed efficient conjugation, while fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) allowed for determination of the conjugates radii. The nanohybrids sustained enzymatic activity; however, changes in maximal reaction rates and Michaelis constant were found. Detailed analysis of the kinetic parameters showed that the changes in the enzyme activity depend on the substrate used for activity measurement but also on the size of the quantum dots. The presented nanohybrids, as the first example using plant and photosynthetic enzyme as a protein partner, may became a tool to study photosynthesis as well as other biosynthetic and biotechnological processes, involving enzymatically catalyzed electron transfer.

  14. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, d-amino acid oxidase, and l-lactate oxidase was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  15. Screening of Microorganisms Producing Cold-Active Oxidoreductases to Be Applied in Enantioselective Alcohol Oxidation. An Antarctic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Arajo, Lidiane S.; Kagohara, Edna; Garcia, Thas P.; Pellizari, Vivian H.; Andrade, Leandro H.

    2011-01-01

    Several microorganisms were isolated from soil/sediment samples of Antarctic Peninsula. The enrichment technique using (RS)-1-(phenyl)ethanol as a carbon source allowed us to isolate 232 psychrophile/psychrotroph microorganisms. We also evaluated the enzyme activity (oxidoreductases) for enantioselective oxidation reactions, by using derivatives of (RS)-1-(phenyl)ethanol as substrates. Among the studied microorganisms, 15 psychrophile/psychrotroph strains contain oxidoreductases that catalyze the (S)-enantiomer oxidation from racemic alcohols to their corresponding ketones. Among the identified microorganisms, Flavobacterium sp. and Arthrobacter sp. showed excellent enzymatic activity. These new bacteria strains were selected for optimization study, in which the (RS)-1-(4-methyl-phenyl)ethanol oxidation was evaluated in several reaction conditions. From these studies, it was observed that Flavobacterium sp. has an excellent enzymatic activity at 10 C and Arthrobacter sp. at 15 and 25 C. We have also determined the growth curves of these bacteria, and both strains showed optimum growth at 25 C, indicating that these bacteria are psychrotroph. PMID:21673897

  16. Membrane-associated glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enzymes PhcC and PhcD are essential for enantioselective catabolism of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (-)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  17. Genes encoding mercuric reductases from selected gram-negative aquatic bacteria have a low degree of homology with merA of transposon Tn501.

    PubMed Central

    Barkay, T; Gillman, M; Liebert, C

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the Hg2+ resistance mechanism of four freshwater and four coastal marine bacteria that did not hybridize with a mer operonic probe was conducted (T. Barkay, C. Liebert, and M. Gillman, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 55:1196-1202, 1989). Hybridization with a merA probe, the gene encoding the mercuric reductase polypeptide, at a stringency of hybridization permitting hybrid formation between evolutionarily distant merA genes (as exists between gram-positive and -negative bacteria), detected merA sequences in the genomes of all tested strains. Inducible Hg2+ volatilization was demonstrated for all eight organisms, and NADPH-dependent mercuric reductase activities were detected in crude cell extracts of six of the strains. Because these strains represented random selections of bacteria from three aquatic environments, it is concluded that merA encodes a common molecular mechanism for Hg2+ resistance and volatilization in aerobic heterotrophic aquatic communities. Images PMID:2166470

  18. Cloning of the Alcaligenes eutrophus genes for synthesis of poly-beta-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and synthesis of PHB in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, P; Steinbchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1988-01-01

    Eight mutants of Alcaligenes eutrophus defective in the intracellular accumulation of poly-beta-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) were isolated after transposon Tn5 mutagenesis with the suicide vector pSUP5011. EcoRI fragments which harbor Tn5-mob were isolated from pHC79 cosmid gene banks. One of them, PPT1, was used as a probe to detect the intact 12.5-kilobase-pair EcoRI fragment PP1 in a lambda L47 gene bank of A. eutrophus genomic DNA. In six of these mutants (PSI, API, GPI, GPIV, GPV, and GPVI) the insertion of Tn5-mob was physically mapped within a region of approximately 1.2 kilobase pairs in PP1; in mutant API, cointegration of vector DNA has occurred. In two other mutants (GPII and GPIII), most probably only the insertion element had inserted into PP1. All PHB-negative mutants were completely impaired in the formation of active PHB synthase, which was measured by a radiometric assay. In addition, activities of beta-ketothiolase and of NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl coenzyme A (acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase were diminished, whereas the activity of NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase was unaffected. In all PHB-negative mutants the ability to accumulate PHB was restored upon complementation in trans with PP1. The PHB-synthetic pathway of A. eutrophus was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant strains of E. coli JM83 and K-12, which harbor pUC9-1::PP1, pSUP202::PP1, or pVK101::PP1, accumulated PHB up to 30% of the cellular dry weight. Crude extracts of these cells had significant activities of the enzymes PHB synthase, beta-ketothiolase, and NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase. Therefore, PP1 most probably encodes all three genes of the PHB-synthetic pathway in A. eutrophus. In addition to PHB-negative mutants, we isolated mutants which accumulate PHB at a much lower rate than the wild type does. These PHB-leaky mutants exhibited activities of all three PHB-synthetic enzymes; Tn5-mob had not inserted into PP1, and the phenotype of the wild type could not be restored with fragment PP1. The rationale for this mutant type remains unknown. PMID:2848014

  19. Anti-cancer analogues ME-143 and ME-344 exert toxicity by directly inhibiting mitochondrial NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I)

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sze Chern; Carey, Kirstyn T; McKenzie, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavonoids have been shown to inhibit tumor proliferation and metastasis by activating cell death pathways. As such, they have been widely studied as potential therapies for cancer prevention. The second generation synthetic isoflavan analogues ME-143 and ME-344 also exhibit anti-cancer effects, however their specific molecular targets have not been completely defined. To identify these targets, we examined the effects of ME-143 and ME-344 on cellular metabolism and found that they are potent inhibitors of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I (NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase) activity. In isolated HEK293T mitochondria, ME-143 and ME-344 reduced complex I activity to 14.3% and 28.6% of control values respectively. In addition to the inhibition of complex I, ME-344 also significantly inhibited mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol: ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase) activity by 10.8%. This inhibition of complex I activity (and to a lesser extent complex III activity) was associated with a reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. In permeabilized HEK293T cells, ME-143 and ME-344 significantly reduced the maximum ADP-stimulated respiration rate to 62.3% and 70.0% of control levels respectively in the presence of complex I-linked substrates. Conversely, complex II-linked respiration was unaffected by either drug. We also observed that the inhibition of complex I-linked respiration caused the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (??m). Blue native (BN-PAGE) analysis revealed that prolonged loss of ??m results in the destabilization of the native OXPHOS complexes. In particular, treatment of 143B osteosarcoma, HeLa and HEK293T human embryonic kidney cells with ME-344 for 4 h resulted in reduced steady-state levels of mature complex I. Degradation of the complex I subunit NDUFA9, as well as the complex IV (ferrocytochrome c: oxygen oxidoreductase) subunit COXIV, was also evident. The identification of OXPHOS complex I as a target of ME-143 and ME-344 advances our understanding of how these drugs induce cell death by disrupting mitochondrial metabolism, and will direct future work to maximize the anti-cancer capacity of these and other isoflavone-based compounds. PMID:25973307

  20. Anti-cancer analogues ME-143 and ME-344 exert toxicity by directly inhibiting mitochondrial NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I).

    PubMed

    Lim, Sze Chern; Carey, Kirstyn T; McKenzie, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavonoids have been shown to inhibit tumor proliferation and metastasis by activating cell death pathways. As such, they have been widely studied as potential therapies for cancer prevention. The second generation synthetic isoflavan analogues ME-143 and ME-344 also exhibit anti-cancer effects, however their specific molecular targets have not been completely defined. To identify these targets, we examined the effects of ME-143 and ME-344 on cellular metabolism and found that they are potent inhibitors of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I (NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase) activity. In isolated HEK293T mitochondria, ME-143 and ME-344 reduced complex I activity to 14.3% and 28.6% of control values respectively. In addition to the inhibition of complex I, ME-344 also significantly inhibited mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol: ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase) activity by 10.8%. This inhibition of complex I activity (and to a lesser extent complex III activity) was associated with a reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. In permeabilized HEK293T cells, ME-143 and ME-344 significantly reduced the maximum ADP-stimulated respiration rate to 62.3% and 70.0% of control levels respectively in the presence of complex I-linked substrates. Conversely, complex II-linked respiration was unaffected by either drug. We also observed that the inhibition of complex I-linked respiration caused the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (??m). Blue native (BN-PAGE) analysis revealed that prolonged loss of ??m results in the destabilization of the native OXPHOS complexes. In particular, treatment of 143B osteosarcoma, HeLa and HEK293T human embryonic kidney cells with ME-344 for 4 h resulted in reduced steady-state levels of mature complex I. Degradation of the complex I subunit NDUFA9, as well as the complex IV (ferrocytochrome c: oxygen oxidoreductase) subunit COXIV, was also evident. The identification of OXPHOS complex I as a target of ME-143 and ME-344 advances our understanding of how these drugs induce cell death by disrupting mitochondrial metabolism, and will direct future work to maximize the anti-cancer capacity of these and other isoflavone-based compounds. PMID:25973307

  1. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase encoded by Bacillus subtilis yumC

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Hirofumi; Seo, Daisuke; Sakurai, Takeshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2010-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase encoded by Bacillus subtilis yumC has been purified and successfully crystallized in complex with NADP+ in two forms. Diffraction data from crystals of these two forms were collected at resolutions of 1.8 and 1.9?. The former belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.90, b = 135.72, c = 39.19?, and the latter to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 207.47, b = 64.85, c = 61.12?, ?=105.82. The initial structure was determined by the molecular-replacement method using a thioredoxin reductase-like protein as a search model. PMID:20208166

  3. The two common polymorphic forms of human NRH-quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) have different biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Megarity, Clare F; Gill, James R E; Caraher, M Clare; Stratford, Ian J; Nolan, Karen A; Timson, David J

    2014-05-01

    There are two common forms of NRH-quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) in the human population resulting from SNP rs1143684. One has phenylalanine at position 47 (NQO2-F47) and the other leucine (NQO2-L47). Using recombinant proteins, we show that these variants have similar steady state kinetic parameters, although NQO2-L47 has a slightly lower specificity constant. NQO2-L47 is less stable towards proteolytic digestion and thermal denaturation than NQO2-F47. Both forms are inhibited by resveratrol, but NQO2-F47 shows negative cooperativity with this inhibitor. Thus these data demonstrate, for the first time, clear biochemical differences between the variants which help explain previous biomedical and epidemiological findings. PMID:24631540

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Tart Cherry (Prunus cerasus) Juice on Xanthine Oxidoreductase Activity and its Hypouricemic and Antioxidant Effects on Rats.

    PubMed

    Haidari, F; Mohammad Shahi, M; Keshavarz, S A; Rashidi, M R

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tart cherry juice on serum uric acid levels, hepatic xanthine oxidoreductase activity and two non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress (total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde concentration), in normal and hyperuricemic rats. Tart cherry juice (5 ml/kg) was given by oral gavage to rats for 2 weeks. Allopurinol (5 mg/kg) was used as a positive control and was also given by oral gavage. Data showed that tart cherry juice treatment did not cause any significant reduction in the serum uric acid levels in normal rats, but significantly reduced (P<0.05) the serum uric acid levels of hyperuricemic rats in a time-dependent manner. Tart cherry juice treatment also inhibited hepatic xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase activity. Moreover, a significant increase (P<0.05) in serum total antioxidant capacity was observed in tart cherry juice treated-rats in both normal and hyperuricemic groups. The oral administration of tart cherry juice also led to a significant reduction (P<0.05) in MDA concentration in the hyperuricemic rats. Although the hypouricemic effect of allopurinol, as a putative inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase, was much higher than that of tart cherry, it could not significantly change anti-oxidative parameters. These features of tart cherry make it an attractive candidate for the prophylactic treatment of hyperuricaemia, particularly if it is to be taken on a long-term basis. Further investigations to define its clinical efficacy would be highly desirable. PMID:22691805

  5. Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase type I (hNQO1) activation of quinone propionic acid trigger groups

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Maria F.; Hollabaugh, Nicole M.; Hettiarachchi, Suraj U.; McCarley, Robin L.

    2012-01-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase type I (NQO1) is a target enzyme for triggered delivery of drugs at inflamed tissue and tumor sites, particularly those that challenge traditional therapies. Prodrugs, macromolecules, and molecular assemblies possessing trigger groups that can be cleaved by environmental stimuli are vehicles with the potential to yield active drug only at prescribed sites. Furthermore, quinone propionic acids (QPAs) covalently attached to prodrugs or liposome surfaces can be removed by application of a reductive trigger stimulus, such as that from NQO1; their rates of reductive activation should be tunable via QPA structure. We explored in detail the recombinant human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase type I (rhNQO1)-catalyzed NADH reduction of a family of substituted QPAs and obtained high precision kinetic parameters. It is found that small changes in QPA structurein particular, single atom and function group substitutions on the quinone ring at R1lead to significant impacts on the Michaelis constant (Km), maximum velocity (Vmax), catalytic constant (kcat), and catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). Molecular docking simulations demonstrate that alterations in QPA structure result in large changes in QPA alignment and placement with respect to the flavin isoalloxazine ring in the active site of rhNQO1; a qualitative relationship exists between the kinetic parameters and the depth of QPA penetration into the rhNQO1 active site. From a quantitative perspective, a very good correlation is observed between log(kcat/Km) and the molecular-docking-derived distance between flavin hydride donor site and quinone hydride acceptor site in the QPAs, an observation that is in agreement with developing theories. The comprehensive kinetic and molecular modeling knowledge obtained for the interaction of recombinant human NQO1 with the quinone propionic acid analogues provides insight into the design and implementation of the QPA trigger groups for drug delivery applications. PMID:22989153

  6. [The interaction of ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase with substrates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    We seek to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes located in spinach chloroplasts which utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +}oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase needs be determined, the amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. Related to an aim elucidate the binding sites for ferredoxin to determine whether there is a common binding site on all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. Additionally thioredoxin binding by FTR needs be determine to resolve whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress is reported on the prosthetic groups of glutamate synthase, in establishing the role of arginine and lysine residues in ferredoxin binding by, ferredoxin:nitrite oxidoreductase nitrite reductase, labelling carboxyl groups on ferredoxin with taurine and labelling lysine residues biotinylation, and low potential heme proteins have been isolated and characterized from a non-photosynthetic plant tissue. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out not to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADPinteraction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique. The techniques developed for differential chemical modification of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions.

  7. Angelica sinensis and its Alkylphthalides Induce the Detoxification enzyme NAD(P)H: Quinone OxidoReductase 1 by Alkylating KEAP1

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Birgit M.; Liu, Dongting; Hagos, Ghenet K.; Yao, Ping; Schinkovitz, Andreas; Pro, Samuel M.; Deng, Shixin; Farnsworth, Norman R.; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2008-01-01

    The roots of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.), Diels (Dang Gui; Apiaceae) have a long history in traditional Chinese medicine as a remedy for women's disorders, and are often called “lady's ginseng”. Currently, extracts of A. sinensis are commonly included in numerous dietary supplements used for women's health and as anti-aging products. In the present study, we examined the potential chemopreventive activity of A. sinensis extracts by measuring the relative ability to induce the detoxification enzyme, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). The lipophilic partitions showed strong NQO1 induction with concentrations to double the enzyme activity (CD) of 5.5 ± 0.7 μg/mL (petroleum ether) and 3.9 ± 0.5 μg/mL (chloroform). Fractionation led to the isolation of phenolic esters and alkylphthalides, especially Z-ligustilide, the main lipophilic compound, which showed strong NQO1 inducing properties (CD = 6.9 ± 1.9 μM). Transcription of many detoxifying enzymes is regulated through the antioxidant response element (ARE) and its transcription factor Nrf2, which is repressed under basal conditions by Keap1. However, exposure to electrophilic inducers that alkylate Keap1 results in a higher concentrations of free Nrf2 and ARE activation. The ARE reporter activity was therefore analyzed in HepG2-ARE-C8 cells after incubation with lipophilic extracts of A. sinensis or ligustilide for 24 h. Under these conditions, both the extract and ligustilide increased ARE-luciferase reporter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of ligustilide with GSH and subsequent LC-MS-MS analysis revealed that ligustilide as well as oxidized ligustilide species covalently modified GSH. In addition, using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and LC-MS-MS, it was demonstrated that the lipophilic extracts, ligustilide, and monooxygenated ligustilide alkylated important cysteine residues in human Keap1 protein, thus activating Nrf2 and transcription of ARE regulated genes. These observations suggest that A. sinensis dietary supplements standardized to ligustilide have potential as chemopreventive agents through induction of detoxification enzymes. PMID:18808158

  8. High Ratio of Bacteriochlorophyll Biosynthesis Genes to Chlorophyll Biosynthesis Genes in Bacteria of Humic Lakes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Eiler, Alexander; Beier, Sara; Säwström, Christin; Karlsson, Jan; Bertilsson, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies highlight the diversity and significance of marine phototrophic microorganisms such as picocyanobacteria, phototrophic picoeukaryotes, and bacteriochlorophyll- and rhodopsin-holding phototrophic bacteria. To assess if freshwater ecosystems also harbor similar phototroph diversity, genes involved in the biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll and chlorophyll were targeted to explore oxygenic and aerobic anoxygenic phototroph composition in a wide range of lakes. Partial dark-operative protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (DPOR) and chlorophyllide oxidoreductase (COR) genes in bacteria of seven lakes with contrasting trophic statuses were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Out of 61 sequences encoding the L subunit of DPOR (L-DPOR), 22 clustered with aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, whereas 39 L-DPOR sequences related to oxygenic phototrophs, like cyanobacteria, were observed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed clear separation of these freshwater L-DPOR genes as well as 11 COR gene sequences from their marine counterparts. Terminal restriction fragment length analysis of L-DPOR genes was used to characterize oxygenic aerobic and anoxygenic photosynthesizing populations in 20 lakes differing in physical and chemical characteristics. Significant differences in L-DPOR community composition were observed between dystrophic lakes and all other systems, where a higher proportion of genes affiliated with aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria was observed than in other systems. Our results reveal a significant diversity of phototrophic microorganisms in lakes and suggest niche partitioning of oxygenic and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs in these systems in response to trophic status and coupled differences in light regime. PMID:19801478

  9. O2 and Reactive Oxygen Species Detoxification Complex, Composed of O2-Responsive NADH:Rubredoxin Oxidoreductase-Flavoprotein A2-Desulfoferrodoxin Operon Enzymes, Rubperoxin, and Rubredoxin, in Clostridium acetobutylicum?

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Shinji; Sakai, Yu; Takahashi, Tohru; Suzuki, Ippei; Niimura, Youichi

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium acetobutylicum, an obligate anaerobe, grows normally under continuous-O2-flow culture conditions, where the cells consume O2 proficiently. An O2-responsive NADH:rubredoxin oxidoreductase operon composed of three genes (nror, fprA2, and dsr), encoding NROR, functionally uncharacterized flavoprotein A2 (FprA2), and the predicted superoxide reductase desulfoferrodoxin (Dsr), has been proposed to participate in defense against O2 stress. To functionally characterize these proteins, native NROR from C. acetobutylicum, recombinant NROR (rNROR), FprA2, Dsr, and rubredoxin (Rd) expressed in Escherichia coli were purified. Purified native NROR and rNROR both exhibited weak H2O2-forming NADH oxidase activity that was slightly activated by Rd. A mixture of NROR, Rd, and FprA2 functions as an efficient H2O-forming NADH oxidase with a high affinity for O2 (the Km for O2 is 2.9 0.4 ?M). A mixture of NROR, Rd, and Dsr functions as an NADH-dependent O2? reductase. A mixture of NROR, Rd, and rubperoxin (Rpr, a rubrerythrin homologue) functions as an inefficient H2O-forming NADH oxidase but an efficient NADH peroxidase with a low affinity for O2 and a high affinity for H2O2 (the Kms for O2 and H2O2 are 303 39 ?M and ?1 ?M, respectively). A gene encoding Rd is dicistronically transcribed with a gene encoding a glutaredoxin (Gd) homologue, and the expression levels of the genes encoding Gd and Rd were highly upregulated upon exposure to O2. Therefore, nror operon enzymes, together with Rpr, efficiently function to scavenge O2, O2?, and H2O2 by using an O2-responsive rubredoxin as a common electron carrier protein. PMID:19124587

  10. Transmembrane topology of the NuoL, M and N subunits of NADH:quinone oxidoreductase and their homologues among membrane-bound hydrogenases and bona fide antiporters.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Cecilie; Hgerhll, Cecilia

    2002-12-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-reduced form (NADH):quinone oxidoreductase (respiratory Complex I), F420H2 oxidoreductase and complex, membrane-bound NiFe-hydrogenase contain protein subunits homologous to a certain type of bona fide antiporters. In Complex I, these polypeptides (NuoL/ND5, NuoM/ND4, NuoN/ND2) are most likely core components of the proton pumping mechanism, and it is thus important to learn more about their structure and function. In this work, we have determined the transmembrane topology of one such polypeptide, and built a 2D structural model of the protein valid for all the homologous polypeptides. The experimentally determined transmembrane topology was different from that predicted by majority vote hydrophobicity analyses of members of the superfamily. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of a large set of primary sequences shed light on the functional relatedness of these polypeptides. PMID:12460669

  11. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD(+) Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Dar, SA; Leang, C; Lovley, DR

    2012-12-26

    It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin: NAD(+) oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H-2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms for energy conservation in the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of its potential value as a chassis for the production of biocommodities with novel electron donors such as carbon monoxide, syngas, and electrons derived from electrodes. Characterizing the components implicated in the chemiosmotic ATP synthesis during acetogenesis by C. ljungdahlii is a prerequisite for the development of highly productive strains. The Rnf complex has been considered the prime candidate to be the pump responsible for the formation of an ion gradient coupled with ATP synthesis in multiple acetogens. However, experimental evidence for a proton-pumping Rnf complex has been lacking. This study establishes the C. ljungdahlii Rnf complex as a proton-translocating ferredoxin: NAD(+) oxidoreductase and demonstrates that C. ljungdahlii has the potential of becoming a model organism to study proton translocation, electron transport, and other functions of the Rnf complex in energy conservation or other processes.

  12. Mechanistic studies of the biosynthesis of 3,6-dideoxyhexoses in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Purification and stereochemical analysis of CDP-D-glucose oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Russell, R N; Thorson, J S; Liu, L D; Liu, H W

    1992-03-25

    An NAD(+)-dependent CDP-D-glucose oxidoreductase which catalyzes the first step of the biosynthesis of CDP-ascarylose (CDP-3,6-dideoxy-L-arabino-hexose), converting CDP-D-glucose to CDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-glucose, was isolated from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. A protocol consisting of DEAE-cellulose, Matrex Blue-A, hydroxylapatite, DEAE-Sephadex, Sephadex G-100, and NAD(+)-agarose column chromatography was used to purify this enzyme 6000-fold to homogeneity. This enzyme consists of two identical subunits, each with a molecular weight of 42,500. Using CDP-D-glucose as the substrate, the Km and Vmax of this catalysis were determined to be 222 microM and 8.3 mumols mg-1 min-1, respectively. Unlike most other oxidoreductases of its class which have a tightly bound NAD+, this highly purified CDP-D-glucose oxidoreductase showed an absolute requirement of NAD+ for its activity. Using chemically synthesized (6S)- and (6R)-CDP-D-[4-2H,6-3H]glucose as substrates, a stereochemical analysis showed this enzymatic reaction involves an intramolecular hydrogen migration from C-4 to C-6, and the displacement of C-6 hydroxyl group by the C-4 hydrogen occurs with inversion. Thus, despite the low cofactor affinity, this enzyme undergoes a mechanism consistent with that followed by other members of its type. Such a mechanistic and stereochemical convergency found for all sugar oxidoreductases so far characterized suggests the presence of a common progenitor of this class of enzyme. PMID:1556102

  13. The aerobic respiratory chain of Escherichia coli: from genes to supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pedro M F; Videira, Marco A M; Bohn, Andreas; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Goulao, Luis F; Melo, Ana M P

    2012-09-01

    In spite of the large number of reports on the aerobic respiratory chain of Escherichia coli, from gene transcription regulation to enzyme kinetics and structural studies, an integrative perspective of this pathway is yet to be produced. Here, a multi-level analysis of the aerobic respiratory chain of E. coli was performed to find correlations between gene transcription, enzyme activity, growth dynamics, and supercomplex formation and composition. The transcription level of all genes encoding the aerobic respiratory chain of E. coli varied significantly in response to bacterial growth. Coordinated expression patterns were observed between the genes encoding NADH?:?quinone oxidoreductase and complex I (NDH-1), alternative NADH?:?quinone oxidoreductase (NDH-2) and cytochrome bdI, and also between sdhA and appC, encoding succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome bdII, respectively. In general, the rates of the respiratory chain activities increased from mid-exponential to late-stationary phase, with no significant further variation occurring until the mid-stationary phase. Multi-level correlations between gene transcription, enzyme activity and growth dynamics were also found in this study. The previously reported NADH dehydrogenase and formate?:?oxygen oxidoreductase supercomplexes of E. coli were already assembled at mid-exponential phase and remained throughout growth. A new succinate oxidase supercomplex composed of succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome bdII was identified, in agreement with the suggestion provided by the coordinated transcription of sdhA and appC. PMID:22700653

  14. The disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA is active in Streptococcus gordonii using a single C-terminal cysteine of the CXXC motif.

    PubMed

    Davey, Lauren; Cohen, Alejandro; LeBlanc, Jason; Halperin, Scott A; Lee, Song F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel disulfide oxidoreductase, SdbA, in the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. Disulfide oxidoreductases form disulfide bonds in nascent proteins using a CXXC catalytic motif. Typically, the N-terminal cysteine interacts with substrates, whereas the C-terminal cysteine is buried and only reacts with the first cysteine of the motif. In this study, we investigated the SdbA C(86) P(87) D(88) C(89) catalytic motif. In vitro, SdbA single cysteine variants at the N or C-terminal position (SdbAC86P and SdbAC89A ) were active but displayed different susceptibility to oxidation, and N-terminal cysteine was prone to sulfenylation. In S. gordonii, mutants with a single N-terminal cysteine were inactive and formed unstable disulfide adducts with other proteins. Activity was partially restored by inactivation of pyruvate oxidase, a hydrogen peroxide generator. Presence of the C-terminal cysteine alone (in the SdbAC86P variant) could complement the ?sdbA mutant and restore disulfide bond formation in recombinant and natural protein substrates. These results provide evidence that certain disulfide oxidoreductases can catalyze disulfide bond formation using a single cysteine of the CXXC motif, including the buried C-terminal cysteine. PMID:26395460

  15. The structure of the periplasmic thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase SoxS from Paracoccus pantotrophus indicates a triple Trx/Grx/DsbC functionality in chemotrophic sulfur oxidation.

    PubMed

    Carius, Yvonne; Rother, Dagmar; Friedrich, Cornelius G; Scheidig, Axel J

    2009-03-01

    The periplasmic thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase SoxS is beneficial for the sulfur-oxidizing (Sox) phenotype of the facultative chemotrophic bacterium Paracoccus pantotrophus and is not part of the Sox enzyme system. SoxS combines features of thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases of the Dsb family in structure, target specificity and reaction. The structure of SoxS was solved in oxidized and reduced forms at 2.1 and 1.9 A resolution, respectively. SoxS revealed high structural homology to typical cytoplasmic bacterial thioredoxins. In contrast, SoxS contained the active-site motif Pro-Gly-Cys-Leu-Tyr-Cys that is not present in other thioredoxins. Interestingly, the sequence of this motif is closely related to the Pro-Gly-Cys-Pro-Tyr-Cys sequence of some glutaredoxins and to the Pro-Xaa-Cys-Xaa-Tyr-Cys sequences of some members of the DsbC and DsbG subfamilies of thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases. Furthermore, the proposed substrate of SoxS, the interprotein disulfide of SoxY, Cys110(Y)-Cys110(Y), is structurally similar to oxidized glutathione. However, SoxS is proposed to specifically reduce the interprotein disulfide between two SoxY subunits, releasing a heterodimeric SoxYZ as an active part of the sulfur-oxidation cycle. PMID:19237745

  16. Expression of WW Domain-Containing Oxidoreductase WOX1 in Human Nervous System Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ming-Fu; Chen, Shur-Tzu; Lo, Chen-Peng; Sze, Chun-I; Chang, Nan-Shan; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Background and ObjectiveS: We aimed to evaluate the expression levels of the tumor suppressor WOX1 in nervous system tumors and its co-expression with p53 and neurofibromatosis type 2/merlin (NF2) tumor suppressor gene products. Methods: Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and in situ hybridization were used for WOX1 protein and WWOX mRNA expression. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopical immunohistochemistry were performed for colocalization of gene products. Results: WOX1 expression is low in normal cortical neurons, mainly on the axon fibers, whereas there is moderate to high immunoreactivity in the cytosol and nuclei of certain tumor cells. In the microcystic (WHO grade I) and malignant (WHO grade III) meningiomas, WOX1 expression is intense, but various in transitional (WHO grade I) and atypical (WHO grade II) subtypes. WOX1 levels are moderate to high in the menigiotheliomatous area, but relatively low in the fibroblastic area. WOX1 and NF2/merlin, but not p53, colocalized in certain tumor cells, primarily at the borders of nuclei. Schwannoma and astrocytoma specimens stained moderately to strongly positive for the WOX1 protein. Interestingly, the expression of WOX1, NF2/merlin and mutant p53 is intense in high grade glioblastoma, but WOX1 expression is low in metastatic carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: The expression of WOX1 on different types of nervous system tumors, including primary and metastatic tumors, is differential. PMID:24503545

  17. Cryogenic and Laser Photoexcitation Studies Identify Multiple Roles for Active Site Residues in the Light-driven Enzyme Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase*

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Binuraj R. K.; Waltho, Jonathan P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Heyes, Derren J.

    2009-01-01

    The light-activated enzyme NADPH-protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the trans addition of hydrogen across the C-17C-18 double bond of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), a key step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Similar to other members of the short chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase family of enzymes, POR contains a conserved Tyr and Lys residue in the enzyme active site, which are implicated in a proposed reaction mechanism involving proton transfer from the Tyr hydoxyl group to Pchlide. We have analyzed a number of POR variant enzymes altered in these conserved residues using a combination of steady-state turnover, laser photoexcitation studies, and low temperature fluorescence spectroscopy. None of the mutations completely abolished catalytic activity. We demonstrate their importance to catalysis by defining multiple roles in the overall reaction pathway. Mutation of either residue impairs formation of the ground state ternary enzyme-substrate complex, pointing to a key role in substrate binding. By analyzing the most active variant (Y193F), we show that Tyr-193 participates in proton transfer to Pchlide and stabilizes the Pchlide excited state, enabling hydride transfer from NADPH to Pchilde. Thus, in addition to confirming the probable identity of the proton donor in Pchlide reduction, our work defines additional roles for these residues in facilitating hydride transfer through stabilization of the ground and excited states of the ternary enzyme complex. PMID:19439417

  18. Dark-operative protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase generates substrate radicals by an iron-sulphur cluster in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nomata, Jiro; Kondo, Toru; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Fujita, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts solar energy to chemical energy using chlorophylls (Chls). In a late stage of biosynthesis of Chls, dark-operative protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) oxidoreductase (DPOR), a nitrogenase-like enzyme, reduces the C17 = C18 double bond of Pchlide and drastically changes the spectral properties suitable for photosynthesis forming the parental chlorin ring for Chl a. We previously proposed that the spatial arrangement of the proton donors determines the stereospecificity of the Pchlide reduction based on the recently resolved structure of the DPOR catalytic component, NB-protein. However, it was not clear how the two-electron and two-proton transfer events are coordinated in the reaction. In this study, we demonstrate that DPOR initiates a single electron transfer reaction from a [4Fe-4S]-cluster (NB-cluster) to Pchlide, generating Pchlide anion radicals followed by a single proton transfer, and then, further electron/proton transfer steps transform the anion radicals into chlorophyllide (Chlide). Thus, DPOR is a unique iron-sulphur enzyme to form substrate radicals followed by sequential proton- and electron-transfer steps with the protein folding very similar to that of nitrogenase. This novel radical-mediated reaction supports the biosynthesis of Chl in a wide variety of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:24965831

  19. Crystallization of the NADH-oxidizing domain of the Na{sup +}-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Minli; Trk, Karin; Diez, Joachim; Grtter, Markus G.; Fritz, Gnter; Steuber, Julia

    2006-02-01

    The FAD domain of the NqrF subunit from the Na{sup +}-translocating NADH dehydrogenase from V. cholerae has been purified and crystallized. A complete data set was recorded at 3.1 . The Na{sup +}-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na{sup +}-NQR) from pathogenic and marine bacteria is a respiratory complex that couples the exergonic oxidation of NADH by quinone to the transport of Na{sup +} across the membrane. The NqrF subunit oxidizes NADH and transfers the electrons to other redox cofactors in the enzyme. The FAD-containing domain of NqrF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The purified NqrF FAD domain exhibited high rates of NADH oxidation and contained stoichiometric amounts of the FAD cofactor. Initial crystallization of the flavin domain was achieved by the sitting-drop technique using a Cartesian MicroSys4000 robot. Optimization of the crystallization conditions yielded yellow hexagonal crystals with dimensions of 30 30 70 m. The protein mainly crystallizes in long hexagonal needles with a diameter of up to 30 m. Crystals diffract to 2.8 and belong to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145.3, c = 90.2 , ? = ? = 90, ? = 120.

  20. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1. 1. 1. 146)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-10-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with /sup 3/H-cortisone and /sup 14/C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Insights into Flavin-based Electron Bifurcation via the NADH-dependent Reduced Ferredoxin:NADP Oxidoreductase Structure.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Julius K; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Shuning; Demmer, Ulrike; Thauer, Rudolf K; Ermler, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (NfnAB) is found in the cytoplasm of various anaerobic bacteria and archaea. The enzyme reversibly catalyzes the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADPH driven by the exergonic transhydrogenation from NADPH onto NAD(+). Coupling is most probably accomplished via the mechanism of flavin-based electron bifurcation. To understand this process on a structural basis, we heterologously produced the NfnAB complex of Thermotoga maritima in Escherichia coli, provided kinetic evidence for its bifurcating behavior, and determined its x-ray structure in the absence and presence of NADH. The structure of NfnAB reveals an electron transfer route including the FAD (a-FAD), the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NfnA and the FAD (b-FAD), and the two [4Fe-4S] clusters of NfnB. Ferredoxin is presumably docked onto NfnB close to the [4Fe-4S] cluster distal to b-FAD. NAD(H) binds to a-FAD and NADP(H) consequently to b-FAD, which is positioned in the center of the NfnAB complex and the site of electron bifurcation. Arg(187) is hydrogen-bonded to N5 and O4 of the bifurcating b-FAD and might play a key role in adjusting a low redox potential of the FADH()/FAD pair required for ferredoxin reduction. A mechanism of FAD-coupled electron bifurcation by NfnAB is proposed. PMID:26139605

  2. Molecular and biochemical characterization of bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylases and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Wong, Alton; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2015-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea produce ethanol as a metabolic end product, which is resulted from acetaldehyde reduction catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, the enzyme that is involved in the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate is not well characterized. An oxygen sensitive and coenzyme A-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity was found to be present in cell free extracts of T. maritima and T. hypogea. Both enzymes were purified and found to have pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activity, indicating their bifunctionality. Both PDC and POR activities from each of the purified enzymes were characterized in regards to their optimal assay conditions including pH dependency, oxygen sensitivity, thermal stability, temperature dependency and kinetic parameters. The close relatedness of the PORs that was shown by sequence analysis could be an indication of the presence of such bifunctionality in other hyperthermophilic bacteria. This is the first report of a bifunctional PDC/POR enzyme in hyperthermophilic bacteria. The PDC and the previously reported ADHs are most likely the key enzymes catalysing the production of ethanol from pyruvate in bacterial hyperthermophiles. PMID:26032540

  3. Acyclic monoterpene primary alcohol:NADP+ oxidoreductase of Rauwolfia serpentina cells: the key enzyme in biosynthesis of monoterpene alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, H; Esaki, N; Nakai, S; Hashimoto, K; Uesato, S; Soda, K; Fujita, T

    1991-02-01

    Acyclic monoterpene primary alcohol:NADP+ oxidoreductase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of monoterpene alcohols in plants, is unstable and has been only poorly characterized. However we have established conditions which stabilize the enzyme from Rauwolfia serpentina cells, and then purified it to homogeneity. It is a monomer with a molecular weight of about 44,000 and contains zinc ions. Various branched-chain allylic primary alcohols such as nerol, geraniol, and 10-hydroxygeraniol were substrates, but ethanol was inert. The enzyme exclusively requires NADP+ or NADPH as the cofactor. Steady-state kinetic studies showed that the nerol dehydrogenation proceeds by an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism. NADP+ binds the enzyme first and then NADPH is the second product released from it. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the reaction products showed that 10-hydroxygeraniol undergoes a reversible dehydrogenation to produce 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial, which are oxidized further to give 10-oxogeranial, the direct precursor of iridodial. The enzyme has been found to exclusively transfer the pro-R hydrogen of NADPH to neral. The N-terminal sequence of the first 21 amino acids revealed no significant homology with those of various other proteins including the NAD(P)(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases registered in a protein data bank. PMID:1864846

  4. Spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of the light-dependent enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) using monovinyl and divinyl substrates.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Derren J; Kruk, Jerzy; Hunter, C Neil

    2006-02-15

    The enzyme POR [Pchlide (protochlorophyllide) oxidoreductase] catalyses the reduction of Pchlide to chlorophyllide, which is a key step in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway. This light-dependent reaction has previously been studied in great detail but recent reports suggest that a mixture of MV (monovinyl) and DV (divinyl) Pchlides may have influenced some of these properties of the reaction. Low-temperature absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy have revealed several spectral differences between MV and DV Pchlides, which were purified from a Rhodobacter capsulatus strain that was shown to contain a mixture of the two pigments. A thorough steady-state kinetic characterization using both Pchlide forms demonstrates that neither pigment appears to affect the kinetic properties of the enzyme. The reaction has also been monitored following illumination at low temperatures and was shown to consist of an initial photochemical step followed by four 'dark' steps for both pigments. However, minor differences were observed in the spectral properties of some of the intermediates, although the temperature dependency of each step was nearly identical for the two pigments. This work provides the first detailed kinetic and spectroscopic study of this unique enzyme using biologically important MV and DV substrate analogues. It also has significant implications for the DV reductase enzyme, which is responsible for converting DV pigments into their MV counterparts, and its position in the sequence of reactions that comprise the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway. PMID:16274361

  5. The Crystal Structure and Mechanism of an Unusual Oxidoreductase, GilR, Involved in Gilvocarcin V Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bosserman, Mary A.; Schickli, M. Alexandra; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Kharel, Madan K.; Pahari, Pallab; Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jrgen

    2012-11-26

    GilR is a recently identified oxidoreductase that catalyzes the terminal step of gilvocarcin V biosynthesis and is a unique enzyme that establishes the lactone core of the polyketide-derived gilvocarcin chromophore. Gilvocarcin-type compounds form a small distinct family of anticancer agents that are involved in both photo-activated DNA-alkylation and histone H3 cross-linking. High resolution crystal structures of apoGilR and GilR in complex with its substrate pregilvocarcin V reveals that GilR belongs to the small group of a relatively new type of the vanillyl-alcohol oxidase flavoprotein family characterized by bicovalently tethered cofactors. GilR was found as a dimer, with the bicovalently attached FAD cofactor mediated through His-65 and Cys-125. Subsequent mutagenesis and functional assays indicate that Tyr-445 may be involved in reaction catalysis and in mediating the covalent attachment of FAD, whereas Tyr-448 serves as an essential residue initiating the catalysis by swinging away from the active site to accommodate binding of the 6R-configured substrate and consequently abstracting the proton of the hydroxyl residue of the substrate hemiacetal 6-OH group. These studies lay the groundwork for future enzyme engineering to broaden the substrate specificity of this bottleneck enzyme of the gilvocarcin biosynthetic pathway for the development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

  6. Purification and characterization of multiple forms of rat liver xanthine oxidoreductase expressed in baculovirus-insect cell system.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Tomoko; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Kawamoto, Susumu; Kashima, Yuji; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi

    2002-10-01

    cDNA of rat liver xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein, was expressed in a baculovirus-insect cell system. The expressed XOR consisted of a heterogeneous mixture of native dimeric, demolybdo-dimeric, and monomeric forms, each of which was separated and purified to homogeneity. All the expressed forms contained flavin, of which the semiquinone form was stable during dithionite titration after dithiothreitol treatment, indicating that the flavin domains of all the expressed molecules have the intact conformations interconvertible between NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenase (XDH) and O(2)-dependent oxidase (XO) types. The absorption spectrum and metal analyses showed that the monomeric form lacks not only molybdopterin but also one of the iron-sulfur centers. The reductive titration of the monomer with dithionite showed that the monomeric form required only three electrons for complete reduction, and the redox potential of the iron-sulfur center in the monomeric form is a lower value than that of FAD. In contrast to native or demolybdo-dimeric XDHs, the monomer showed a very slow reductive process with NADH under anaerobic conditions, although the conformation around FAD is a dehydrogenase form, suggesting the important role of the iron-sulfur center in the reductive process of FAD with the reduced pyridine nucleotide. PMID:12359075

  7. Insights into MHC class I peptide loading from the structure of the Tapasin-ERp57 thiol oxidoreductase heterodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, G.; Wearsch, P.A.; Peaper, D.R.; Cresswell, P.; Reinisch, K.M.

    2009-03-02

    Tapasin is a glycoprotein critical for loading major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with high-affinity peptides. It functions within the multimeric peptide-loading complex (PLC) as a disulfide-linked, stable heterodimer with the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57, and this covalent interaction is required to support optimal PLC activity. Here, we present the 2.6 {angstrom} resolution structure of the tapasin-ERp57 core of the PLC. The structure revealed that tapasin interacts with both ERp57 catalytic domains, accounting for the stability of the heterodimer, and provided an example of a protein disulfide isomerase family member interacting with substrate. Mutational analysis identified a conserved surface on tapasin that interacted with MHC class I molecules and was critical for peptide loading and editing functions of the tapasin-ERp57 heterodimer. By combining the tapasin-ERp57 structure with those of other defined PLC components, we present a molecular model that illuminates the processes involved in MHC class I peptide loading.

  8. Crystallization of the NADH-oxidizing domain of the Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Tao, Minli; Trk, Karin; Diez, Joachim; Grtter, Markus G; Fritz, Gnter; Steuber, Julia

    2006-02-01

    The Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from pathogenic and marine bacteria is a respiratory complex that couples the exergonic oxidation of NADH by quinone to the transport of Na+ across the membrane. The NqrF subunit oxidizes NADH and transfers the electrons to other redox cofactors in the enzyme. The FAD-containing domain of NqrF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The purified NqrF FAD domain exhibited high rates of NADH oxidation and contained stoichiometric amounts of the FAD cofactor. Initial crystallization of the flavin domain was achieved by the sitting-drop technique using a Cartesian MicroSys4000 robot. Optimization of the crystallization conditions yielded yellow hexagonal crystals with dimensions of 30 x 30 x 70 microm. The protein mainly crystallizes in long hexagonal needles with a diameter of up to 30 microm. Crystals diffract to 2.8 A and belong to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145.3, c = 90.2 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees. PMID:16511277

  9. A possible role for iron-sulfur cluster N2 in proton translocation by the NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Flemming, Dirk; Stolpe, Stefan; Schneider, Daniel; Hellwig, Petra; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2005-01-01

    The proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the respiratory complex I, couples the transfer of electrons from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of protons across the membrane. The enzyme mechanism is still unknown due to the lack of a high-resolution structure and its complicated composition. The complex from Escherichia coli is made up of 13 subunits called NuoA through NuoN and contains one FMN and nine iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters as redox groups. The pH dependence of the midpoint redox potential of the Fe/S cluster named N2 and its spin-spin interaction with ubiquinone radicals made it an ideal candidate for a key component in redox-driven proton translocation. During the past years we have assigned the subunit localization of cluster N2 to subunit NuoB by site-directed mutagenesis and predicted its ligation by molecular simulation. Redox-induced FT-IR spectroscopy has shown that its redox reaction is accompanied by the protonation and deprotonation of individual amino acid residues. These residues have been identified by site-directed mutagenesis. The enzyme catalytic activity depends on the presence of cluster N2 and is coupled with major conformational changes. From these data a model for redox-induced conformation-driven proton translocation has been derived. PMID:16645316

  10. Identification and Characterization of the Rhizobium sp. Strain GIN611 Glycoside Oxidoreductase Resulting in the Deglycosylation of Ginsenosides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Kim, Juhan; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Park, Jun-Seong; Kim, Duck-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Using enrichment culture, Rhizobium sp. strain GIN611 was isolated as having activity for deglycosylation of a ginsenoside, compound K (CK). The purified heterodimeric protein complex from Rhizobium sp. GIN611 consisted of two subunits with molecular masses of 63.5 kDa and 17.5 kDa. In the genome, the coding sequence for the small subunit was located right after the sequence for the large subunit, with one nucleotide overlapping. The large subunit showed CK oxidation activity, and the deglycosylation of compound K was performed via oxidation of ginsenoside glucose by glycoside oxidoreductase. Coexpression of the small subunit helped soluble expression of the large subunit in recombinant Escherichia coli. The purified large subunit also showed oxidation activity against other ginsenoside compounds, such as Rb1, Rb2, Rb3, Rc, F2, CK, Rh2, Re, F1, and the isoflavone daidzin, but at a much lower rate. When oxidized CK was extracted and incubated in phosphate buffer with or without enzyme, (S)-protopanaxadiol [PPD(S)] was detected in both cases, which suggests that deglycosylation of oxidized glucose is spontaneous. PMID:22020506

  11. Identification and characterization of the Rhizobium sp. strain GIN611 glycoside oxidoreductase resulting in the deglycosylation of ginsenosides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Kim, Juhan; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Park, Jun-Seong; Kim, Duck-Hee; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2012-01-01

    Using enrichment culture, Rhizobium sp. strain GIN611 was isolated as having activity for deglycosylation of a ginsenoside, compound K (CK). The purified heterodimeric protein complex from Rhizobium sp. GIN611 consisted of two subunits with molecular masses of 63.5 kDa and 17.5 kDa. In the genome, the coding sequence for the small subunit was located right after the sequence for the large subunit, with one nucleotide overlapping. The large subunit showed CK oxidation activity, and the deglycosylation of compound K was performed via oxidation of ginsenoside glucose by glycoside oxidoreductase. Coexpression of the small subunit helped soluble expression of the large subunit in recombinant Escherichia coli. The purified large subunit also showed oxidation activity against other ginsenoside compounds, such as Rb1, Rb2, Rb3, Rc, F2, CK, Rh2, Re, F1, and the isoflavone daidzin, but at a much lower rate. When oxidized CK was extracted and incubated in phosphate buffer with or without enzyme, (S)-protopanaxadiol [PPD(S)] was detected in both cases, which suggests that deglycosylation of oxidized glucose is spontaneous. PMID:22020506

  12. Depletion of the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57 in tumor cells inhibits proliferation and increases sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, Philip; Neumann, Fabian; Mersch, Evgenija; Baumann, Melanie; Goepelt, Kirsten; Brockmeier, Ulf; Metzen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing tumor cells must synthesize proteins at a high rate and therefore depend on an efficient folding and quality control system for nascent secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER resident thiol oxidoreductase ERp57 plays an important role in disulfide bond formation. Lentiviral, doxycycline-inducible ERp57 knockdown was combined with irradiation and treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. The knockdown of ERp57 significantly enhanced the apoptotic response to anticancer treatment in HCT116 colon cancer cells via a p53-dependent mechanism. Instead of a direct interaction with p53, depletion of ERp57 induced cell death via a selective activation of the PERK branch of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). In contrast, apoptosis was reduced in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells harboring mutant p53. Nevertheless, we observed a strong reduction of proliferation in response to ERp57 knockdown in both cell lines regardless of the p53 status. Depletion of ERp57 reduced the phosphorylation activity of the mTOR-complex1 (mTORC1) as demonstrated by reduction of p70S6K phosphorylation. Our data demonstrate that ERp57 is a promising target for anticancer therapy due to synergistic p53-dependent induction of apoptosis and p53-independent inhibition of proliferation. PMID:26513173

  13. Isolation and characterization of a Chinese hamster ovary cell line deficient in fatty alcohol:NAD sup + oxidoreductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    James, P.F.; Lee, J. ); Rizzo, W.B.; Zoeller, R.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have isolated a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line that is defective in long-chain fatty alcohol oxidation. The ability of the mutant cells to convert labeled hexadecanol to the corresponding fatty acid in vivo was reduced to 5% of the parent strain. Whole-cell homogenates from the mutant strain, FAA.1, were deficient in long-chain fatty alcohol:NAD{sup +} oxidoreductase activity, which catalyzes the oxidation of hexadecanol to hexadecanoic acid, although the intermediate fatty aldehyde was formed normally. A direct measurement of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase showed that the FAA.1, strain was defective in this component of FAO activity. FAA.1 is a two-stage mutant that was selected from a previously described parent strain, ZR-82, which is defective in ether lipid biosynthesis and peroxisome assembly. Because of combined defects in ether lipid biosynthesis and fatty alcohol oxidation, the ability of the FAA.1 cells to incorporate hexadecanol into complex lipids was greatly impaired, resulting in a 60-fold increase in cellular fatty alcohol levels. As the FAO deficiency in FAA.1 cells appears to be identical to the defect associated with the human genetic disorder Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome, the FAA.1 cell line may be useful in studying this disease.

  14. A New Class of Tungsten-Containing Oxidoreductase in Caldicellulosiruptor, a Genus of Plant Biomass-Degrading Thermophilic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Scott, Israel M; Rubinstein, Gabe M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J; Rhaesa, Amanda M; Lancaster, W Andrew; Poole, Farris L; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-10-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor bescii grows optimally at 78C and is able to decompose high concentrations of lignocellulosic plant biomass without the need for thermochemical pretreatment. C. bescii ferments both C5 and C6 sugars primarily to hydrogen gas, lactate, acetate, and CO2 and is of particular interest for metabolic engineering applications given the recent availability of a genetic system. Developing optimal strains for technological use requires a detailed understanding of primary metabolism, particularly when the goal is to divert all available reductant (electrons) toward highly reduced products such as biofuels. During an analysis of the C. bescii genome sequence for oxidoreductase-type enzymes, evidence was uncovered to suggest that the primary redox metabolism of C. bescii has a completely uncharacterized aspect involving tungsten, a rarely used element in biology. An active tungsten utilization pathway in C. bescii was demonstrated by the heterologous production of a tungsten-requiring, aldehyde-oxidizing enzyme (AOR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Furthermore, C. bescii also contains a tungsten-based AOR-type enzyme, here termed XOR, which is phylogenetically unique, representing a completely new member of the AOR tungstoenzyme family. Moreover, in C. bescii, XOR represents ca. 2% of the cytoplasmic protein. XOR is proposed to play a key, but as yet undetermined, role in the primary redox metabolism of this cellulolytic microorganism. PMID:26276113

  15. The secretome of Trametes versicolor grown on tomato juice medium and purification of the secreted oxidoreductases including a versatile peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Carabajal, Maira; Kellner, Harald; Levin, Laura; Jehmlich, Nico; Hofrichter, Martin; Ullrich, Ren

    2013-10-10

    The present work was carried out with the aim to analyze the secretome of Trametes versicolor BAFC 2234 grown on tomato juice medium supplemented with copper and manganese. T. versicolor BAFC 2234 was selected among diverse wood dwelling agaricomycetes from Argentina by its ability to cause a strong white rot on hardwood and in addition to show high tolerance toward phenolic compounds. A considerable number of the identified proteins were related to the degradation/modification of lignocelluloses. Hydrolases, peroxidases and phenoloxidases were the most abundant enzymes produced under the above-mentioned culture conditions. The lignin-modifying oxidoreductases laccase, manganese peroxidase (MnP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) were successfully purified - the latter for the first time from T. versicolor. The native VP protein has a molecular mass of 45kDa and an isoelectric point of pH 3.7. The study clearly shows that complex plant-based media being rich in phenolics, such as tomato juice, can stimulate the secretion of a broad set of extracellular lignocellulolytic enzymes. Using such natural products as fungal culture media may give the opportunity to investigate plant biomass decomposition as well as the biodegradation of organic pollutants in an environment close to nature. PMID:23948257

  16. Structure of Escherichia coli Succinate:Quinone Oxidoreductase with an Occupied and Empty Quinone-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Jonathan; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Maklashina, Elena; Iwata, So; Cecchini, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Three new structures of Escherichia coli succinate-quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) have been solved. One with the specific quinone-binding site (Q-site) inhibitor carboxin present has been solved at 2.4 Å resolution and reveals how carboxin inhibits the Q-site. The other new structures are with the Q-site inhibitor pentachlorophenol and with an empty Q-site. These structures reveal important details unresolved in earlier structures. Comparison of the new SQR structures shows how subtle rearrangements of the quinone-binding site accommodate the different inhibitors. The position of conserved water molecules near the quinone binding pocket leads to a reassessment of possible water-mediated proton uptake networks that complete reduction of ubiquinone. The dicarboxylate-binding site in the soluble domain of SQR is highly similar to that seen in high resolution structures of avian SQR (PDB 2H88) and soluble flavocytochrome c (PDB 1QJD) showing mechanistically significant structural features conserved across prokaryotic and eukaryotic SQRs. PMID:19710024

  17. Collapse of the native structure caused by a single amino acid exchange in human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Michael K.; Binter, Alexandra; Pulido, Sergio A.; Saf, Robert; Zangger, Klaus; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is essential for the antioxidant defense system, stabilization of tumor suppressors (e.g. p53, p33, and p73), and activation of quinone-based chemotherapeutics. Overexpression of NQO1 in many solid tumors, coupled with its ability to convert quinone-based chemotherapeutics into potent cytotoxic compounds, have made it a very attractive target for anticancer drugs. A naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism (C609T) leading to an amino acid exchange (P187S) has been implicated in the development of various cancers and poor survival rates following anthracyclin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite its importance for cancer prediction and therapy, the exact molecular basis for the loss of function in NQO1 P187S is currently unknown. Therefore, we solved the crystal structure of NQO1 P187S. Surprisingly, this structure is almost identical to NQO1. Employing a combination of NMR spectroscopy and limited proteolysis experiments, we demonstrated that the single amino acid exchange destabilized interactions between the core and C-terminus, leading to depopulation of the native structure in solution. This collapse of the native structure diminished cofactor affinity and led to a less competent FAD-binding pocket, thus severely compromising the catalytic capacity of the variant protein. Hence, our findings provide a rationale for the loss of function in NQO1 P187S with a frequently occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism. PMID:25143260

  18. Insights into MHC class I peptide loading from the structure of the tapasin-ERp57 thiol oxidoreductase heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gang; Wearsch, Pamela A; Peaper, David R; Cresswell, Peter; Reinisch, Karin M

    2009-01-16

    Tapasin is a glycoprotein critical for loading major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with high-affinity peptides. It functions within the multimeric peptide-loading complex (PLC) as a disulfide-linked, stable heterodimer with the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57, and this covalent interaction is required to support optimal PLC activity. Here, we present the 2.6 A resolution structure of the tapasin-ERp57 core of the PLC. The structure revealed that tapasin interacts with both ERp57 catalytic domains, accounting for the stability of the heterodimer, and provided an example of a protein disulfide isomerase family member interacting with substrate. Mutational analysis identified a conserved surface on tapasin that interacted with MHC class I molecules and was critical for peptide loading and editing functions of the tapasin-ERp57 heterodimer. By combining the tapasin-ERp57 structure with those of other defined PLC components, we present a molecular model that illuminates the processes involved in MHC class I peptide loading. PMID:19119025

  19. Enhanced crystal packing due to solvent reorganization through reductive methylation of lysine residues in oxidoreductase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yao

    2010-01-01

    Protein crystallization is in part driven by the changes in the entropy of the system, but opinions differ as to whether the solute (protein) or solvent (water) molecules make more of a contribution to the overall entropic change. Methylation of lysine residues in proteins has been used to enhance protein crystallization. We investigated using molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent molecules, the behavior of several native proteins and their methylated counterparts chosen from an earlier large-scale study. Methylated lysines are capable of making a variety of interactions including H-bonds with protein residues and solvent. We demonstrate that methylation on the lysine slightly increases its side chain conformational entropy by about 3.5 J mol?1 K?1. Analysis of the radial and spatial distributions of the water molecules around the methylated lysine surface in oxidoreductase from Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed a larger sphere of water molecules with low entropy, as compared with solvent associated with unmethylated lysine. If methylated lysine were to make interactions at the proteinprotein interface, the low-entropy water molecules associated with methylated lysines would be released, resulting in a gain of entropy. We show that this gain more than compensates for the loss of protein entropy. Therefore, we propose that lysine methylation favors the formation of crystals through solvent entropic gain. PMID:20127187

  20. Overproduction of stromal ferredoxin:NADPH oxidoreductase in H2O 2-accumulating Brassica napus leaf protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Satoh, Mamoru; Kado, Sayaka; Mishina, Kohei; Anma, Misato; Enami, Kazuhiko; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Masami

    2014-12-01

    The isolation of Brassica napus leaf protoplasts induces reactive oxygen species generation and accumulation in the chloroplasts. An activated isoform of NADPH oxidase-like protein was detected in the protoplasts and the protoplast chloroplasts. The purpose of this study is to define the NADH oxidase-like activities in the H2O2-accumulating protoplast chloroplasts. Proteomic analysis of this protein revealed an isoform of ferredoxin:NADPH oxidoreductase (FNR1). While leaves highly expressed the LFNR1 transcript, protoplasts decreased the expression significantly. The protoplast chloroplasts predominantly expressed soluble FNR1 proteins. While the albino leaves of white kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala f. tricolor cv. white pigeon) expressed FNR1 protein at the same level as B. napus leaves, the protoplasts of albino leaves displayed reduced FNR1 expression. The albino leaf protoplasts of white kale generated and accumulated H2O2 in the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane. Intracellular pH showed that the chloroplasts were acidic, which suggest that excess H(+) was generated in chloroplast stroma. NADPH content of the protoplast chloroplasts increased by over sixfold during the isolation of protoplasts. This study reports a possibility of mediating electrons to oxygen by an overproduced soluble FNR, and suggests that the FNR has a function in utilizing any excess reducing power of NADPH. PMID:25255860

  1. Copper radical oxidases and related extracellular oxidoreductases of wood-decay Agaricomycetes.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Phil; Cullen, Dan

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular peroxide generation, a key component of oxidative lignocellulose degradation, has been attributed to various enzymes including the copper radical oxidases. Encoded by a family of structurally related sequences, the genes are widely distributed among wood decay fungi including three recently completed polypore genomes. In all cases, core catalytic residues are conserved, but five subfamilies are recognized. Glyoxal oxidase, the most intensively studied representative, has been shown physiologically connected to lignin peroxidase. Relatively little is known about structure-function relationships among more recently discovered copper radical oxidases. Nevertheless, differences in substrate preferences have been observed in one case and the proteins have been detected in filtrates of various wood-grown cultures. Such diversity may reflect adaptations to host cell wall composition and changing environmental conditions. PMID:24915038

  2. Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Influences CYP2B6 Activity in Cyclophosphamide Bioactivation

    PubMed Central

    El-Serafi, Ibrahim; Afsharian, Parvaneh; Moshfegh, Ali; Hassan, Moustapha; Terelius, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cyclophosphamide is commonly used as an important component in conditioning prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, a curative treatment for several hematological diseases. Cyclophosphamide is a prodrug activated mainly by cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) in the liver. A high degree of inter- and intra-individual variation in cyclophosphamide kinetics has been reported in several studies. Materials and Methods Hydroxylation of cyclophosphamide was investigated in vitro using three microsomal batches of CYP2B6*1 with different ratios of POR/CYP expression levels. Twenty patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were also included in the study. All patients received an i.v. infusion of cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg/day, for two days) as a part of their conditioning. Blood samples were collected from each patient before cyclophosphamide infusion, 6 h after the first dose and before and 6 h after the second dose. POR gene expression was measured by mRNA analysis and the pharmacokinetics of cyclophosphamide and its active metabolite were determined. Results A strong correlation between the in vitro intrinsic clearance of cyclophosphamide and the POR/CYP ratio was found. The apparent Km for CYP2B6.1 was almost constant (3-4 mM), while the CLint values were proportional to the POR/CYP ratio (3-34 μL/min/nmol CYP). In patients, the average expression of the POR gene in blood was significantly (P <0.001) up-regulated after cyclophosphamide infusion, with high inter-individual variations and significant correlation with the concentration ratio of the active metabolite 4-hydroxy-cyclophosphamide/cyclophosphamide. Nine patients were carriers for POR*28; four patients had relatively high POR expression. Conclusions This investigation shows for the first time that POR besides CYP2B6 can influence cyclophosphamide metabolism. Our results indicate that not only CYPs are important, but also POR expression and/or activity may influence cyclophosphamide bioactivation, affecting therapeutic efficacy and treatment related toxicity and hence on clinical outcome. Thus, both POR and CYP genotype and expression levels may have to be taken into account when personalizing treatment schedules to achieve optimal therapeutic drug plasma concentrations of cyclophosphamide. PMID:26544874

  3. Discovery of the first light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase in anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kaschner, Marco; Loeschcke, Anita; Krause, Judith; Minh, Bui Quang; Heck, Achim; Endres, Stephan; Svensson, Vera; Wirtz, Astrid; von Haeseler, Arndt; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Drepper, Thomas; Krauss, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    In all photosynthetic organisms, chlorophylls function as light-absorbing photopigments allowing the efficient harvesting of light energy. Chlorophyll biosynthesis recurs in similar ways in anoxygenic phototrophic proteobacteria as well as oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacteria and plants. Here, the biocatalytic conversion of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide is catalysed by evolutionary and structurally distinct protochlorophyllide reductases (PORs) in anoxygenic and oxygenic phototrophs. It is commonly assumed that anoxygenic phototrophs only contain oxygen-sensitive dark-operative PORs (DPORs), which catalyse protochlorophyllide reduction independent of the presence of light. In contrast, oxygenic phototrophs additionally (or exclusively) possess oxygen-insensitive but light-dependent PORs (LPORs). Based on this observation it was suggested that light-dependent protochlorophyllide reduction first emerged as a consequence of increased atmospheric oxygen levels caused by oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the presence of an LPOR in the anoxygenic phototrophic α-proteobacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T). In vitro and in vivo functional assays unequivocally prove light-dependent protochlorophyllide reduction by this enzyme and reveal that LPORs are not restricted to cyanobacteria and plants. Sequence-based phylogenetic analyses reconcile our findings with current hypotheses about the evolution of LPORs by suggesting that the light-dependent enzyme of D. shibae DFL12(T) might have been obtained from cyanobacteria by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25039543

  4. Contribution of xanthine oxidoreductase to mammary epithelial and breast cancer cell differentiation in part modulates inhibitor of differentiation-1.

    PubMed

    Fini, Mehdi A; Monks, Jenifer; Farabaugh, Susan M; Wright, Richard M

    2011-09-01

    Loss of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been linked to aggressive breast cancer in vivo and to breast cancer cell aggressiveness in vitro. In the present study, we hypothesized that the contribution of XOR to the development of the normal mammary gland may underlie its capacity to modulate breast cancer. We contrasted in vitro and in vivo developmental systems by differentiation marker and microarray analyses. Human breast cancer microarray was used for clinical outcome studies. The role of XOR in differentiation and proliferation was examined in human breast cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft model. Our data show that XOR was required for functional differentiation of mammary epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Poor XOR expression was observed in a mouse ErbB2 breast cancer model, and pharmacologic inhibition of XOR increased breast cancer tumor burden in mouse xenograft. mRNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer revealed that low XOR expression was significantly associated with time to tumor relapse. The opposing expression of XOR and inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) during HC11 differentiation and mammary gland development suggested a potential functional relationship. While overexpression of Id1 inhibited HC11 differentiation and XOR expression, XOR itself modulated expression of Id1 in differentiating HC11 cells. Overexpression of XOR both inhibited Id1-induced proliferation and -stimulated differentiation of Heregulin-?1-treated human breast cancer cells. These results show that XOR is an important functional component of differentiation whose diminished expression contributes to breast cancer aggressiveness, and they support XOR as both a breast cancer biomarker and a target for pharmacologic activation in therapeutic management of aggressive breast cancer. PMID:21775420

  5. Substrate-specific modulation of CYP3A4 activity by genetic variants of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR)

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vishal; Choi, Ji Ha; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Miller, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives CYP3A4 receives electrons from P450 oxidoreductase (POR) to metabolize about 50% of clinically used drugs. There is substantial inter-individual variation in CYP3A4 catalytic activity that is not explained by CYP3A4 genetic variants. CYP3A4 is flexible and distensible, permitting it to accommodate substrates varying in shape and size. To elucidate mechanisms of variability in CYP3A4 catalysis, we examined the effects of genetic variants of POR, and explored the possibility that substrate-induced conformational changes in CYP3A4 differentially affect the ability of POR variants to support catalysis. Methods We expressed human CYP3A4 and four POR variants (Q153R, A287P, R457H, A503V) in bacteria, reconstituted them in vitro and measured the Michaelis constant and maximum velocity with testosterone, midazolam, quinidine and erythromycin as substrates. Results POR A287P and R457H had low activity with all substrates; Q153R had 7694% of wild type (WT) activity with midazolam and erythromycin, but 129150% activity with testosterone and quinidine. The A503V polymorphism reduced CYP3A4 activity to 6177% of wild type with testosterone and midazolam, but had nearly wild type activity with quinidine and erythromycin. Conclusion POR variants affect CYP3A4 activities. The impact of a POR variant on catalysis by CYP3A4 is substrate-specific, probably due to substrate-induced conformational changes in CYP3A4. PMID:20697309

  6. Differential Interaction of Maize Root Ferredoxin:NADP+ Oxidoreductase with Photosynthetic and Non-Photosynthetic Ferredoxin Isoproteins1

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Yayoi; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Sugiyama, Tatsuo; Hase, Toshiharu

    2000-01-01

    In higher plants ferredoxin (Fd):NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) and Fd are each distributed in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organs as distinct isoproteins. We have cloned cDNAs for leaf FNR (L-FNR I and L-FNR II) and root FNR (R-FNR) from maize (Zea mays L.), and produced recombinant L-FNR I and R-FNR to study their enzymatic functions through kinetic and Fd-binding analyses. The Km value obtained by assay for a diaphorase activity indicated that R-FNR had a 10-fold higher affinity for NADPH than L-FNR I. When we assayed for NADPH-cytochrome c reductase activity using maize photosynthetic Fd (Fd I) and non-photosynthetic Fd (Fd III), the R-FNR showed a marked difference in affinity between these two Fd isoproteins; the Km for Fd III was 3.0 μm and that for Fd I was 29 μm. Consistent with this, the dissociation constant for the R-FNR:Fd III complex was 10-fold smaller than that of the R-FNR:Fd I complex. This differential binding capacity was confirmed by an affinity chromatography of R-FNR on Fd-sepharose with stronger binding to Fd III. L-FNR I showed no such differential interaction with Fd I and Fd III. These data demonstrated that R-FNR has the ability to discriminate between these two types of Fds. We propose that the stronger interaction of R-FNR with Fd III is crucial for an efficient electron flux of NADPH-FNR-Fd cascade, thus supporting Fd-dependent metabolism in non-photosynthetic organs. PMID:10889253

  7. The Critical Role of Arabidopsis Electron-Transfer Flavoprotein:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase during Dark-Induced StarvationW?

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Larson, Tony R.; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Graham, Ian A.; Leaver, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETFQO) and electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) are functionally associated, and ETF accepts electrons from at least nine mitochondrial matrix flavoprotein dehydrogenases and transfers them to ubiquinone in the inner mitochondrial membrane. In addition, the mammalian ETF/ETFQO system plays a key role in ?-oxidation of fatty acids and catabolism of amino acids and choline. By contrast, nothing is known of the function of ETF and ETFQO in plants. Sequence analysis of the unique Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of ETFQO revealed high similarity to the mammalian ETFQO protein. Moreover, green fluorescent protein cellular localization experiments suggested a mitochondrial location for this protein. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that Arabidopsis ETFQO transcripts accumulated in long-term dark-treated leaves. Analysis of three independent insertional mutants of Arabidopsis ETFQO revealed a dramatic reduction in their ability to withstand extended darkness, resulting in senescence and death within 10 d after transfer, whereas wild-type plants remained viable for at least 15 d. Metabolite profiling of dark-treated leaves of the wild type and mutants revealed a dramatic decline in sugar levels. In contrast with the wild type, the mutants demonstrated a significant accumulation of several amino acids, an intermediate of Leu catabolism, and, strikingly, high-level accumulation of phytanoyl-CoA. These data demonstrate the involvement of a mitochondrial protein, ETFQO, in the catabolism of Leu and potentially of other amino acids in higher plants and also imply a novel role for this protein in the chlorophyll degradation pathway activated during dark-induced senescence and sugar starvation. PMID:16055629

  8. Deletion of P399{sub E}401 in NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase results in partial mixed oxidase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mallet, Delphine; Hofer, Gaby; Samara-Boustani, Dinane; Leger, Juliane; Polak, Michel; Morel, Yves; Pandey, Amit V.

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia. {yields} We are reporting a novel 3 amino acid deletion mutation in POR P399{sub E}401del. {yields} POR mutation P399{sub E}401del decreased P450 activities by 60-85%. {yields} Impairment of steroid metabolism may be caused by multiple hits. {yields} Severity of aromatase inhibition is related to degree of in utero virilization. -- Abstract: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the electron donor for all microsomal P450s including steroidogenic enzymes CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2. We found a novel POR mutation P399{sub E}401del in two unrelated Turkish patients with 46,XX disorder of sexual development. Recombinant POR proteins were produced in yeast and tested for their ability to support steroid metabolizing P450 activities. In comparison to wild-type POR, the P399{sub E}401del protein was found to decrease catalytic efficiency of 21-hydroxylation of progesterone by 68%, 17{alpha}-hydroxylation of progesterone by 76%, 17,20-lyase action on 17OH-pregnenolone by 69%, aromatization of androstenedione by 85% and cytochrome c reduction activity by 80%. Protein structure analysis of the three amino acid deletion P399{sub E}401 revealed reduced stability and flexibility of the mutant. In conclusion, P399{sub E}401del is a novel mutation in POR that provides valuable genotype-phenotype and structure-function correlation for mutations in a different region of POR compared to previous studies. Characterization of P399{sub E}401del provides further insight into specificity of different P450s for interaction with POR as well as nature of metabolic disruptions caused by more pronounced effect on specific P450s like CYP17A1 and aromatase.

  9. The Iron-Sulfur Cluster of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase Is the Electron Acceptor for Electron Transfer Flavoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Michael A.; Usselman, Robert J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) accepts electrons from electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the ubiquinone pool. It contains one [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and one FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. In the porcine protein, threonine 367 is hydrogen bonded to N1 and O2 of the flavin ring of the FAD. The analogous site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO is asparagine 338. Mutations N338T and N338A were introduced into the R. sphaeroides protein by site-directed mutagenesis to determine the impact of hydrogen bonding at this site on redox potentials and activity. The mutations did not alter the optical spectra, EPR g-values, spin-lattice relaxation rates, or the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ to FAD point-dipole interspin distances. The mutations had no impact on the reduction potential for the iron-sulfur cluster, which was monitored by changes in the continuous wave EPR signals of the [4Fe-4S]+ at 15 K. For the FAD semiquinone, significantly different potentials were obtained by monitoring the titration at 100 or 293 K. Based on spectra at 293 K the N338T mutation shifted the first and second midpoint potentials for the FAD from +47 and -30 mV for wild type to -11 and -19 mV, respectively. The N338A mutation decreased the potentials to -37 and -49 mV. Lowering the midpoint potentials resulted in a decrease in the quinone reductase activity and negligible impact on disproportionation of ETF1e- catalyzed by ETF-QO. These observations indicate that the FAD is involved in electron transfer to ubiquinone but not in electron transfer from ETF to ETF-QO. Therefore, the iron-sulfur cluster is the immediate acceptor from ETF. PMID:9585549

  10. NAD(P)H: Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 Deficiency Conjoint with Marginal Vitamin C Deficiency Causes Cigarette Smoke Induced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Archita; Dey, Neekkan; Ghosh, Arunava; Das, Tanusree; Chatterjee, Indu B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The etiology of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is largely unknown. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is reported to be associated with MDS risk. There is inconsistent evidence that deficiency of NAD(P)H-quinone: oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) increases the risk of MDS. Earlier we had shown that CS induces toxicity only in marginal vitamin C-deficient guinea pigs but not in vitamin C-sufficient ones. We therefore considered that NQO1 deficiency along with marginal vitamin C deficiency might produce MDS in CS-exposed guinea pigs. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we show that CS exposure for 21 days produces MDS in guinea pigs having deficiency of NQO1 (fed 3 mg dicoumarol/day) conjoint with marginal vitamin C deficiency (fed 0.5 mg vitamin C/day). As evidenced by morphology, histology and cytogenetics, MDS produced in the guinea pigs falls in the category of refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD): refractory anemia; refractory thrombocytopenia that is associated with ring sideroblasts, micromegakaryocytes, myeloid hyperplasia and aneuploidy. MDS is accompanied by increased CD34(+) cells and oxidative stress as shown by the formation of protein carbonyls and 8-oxodeoxyguanosine. Apoptosis precedes MDS but disappears later with marked decrease in the p53 protein. MDS produced in the guinea pigs are irreversible. MDS and all the aforesaid pathophysiological events do not occur in vitamin C-sufficient guinea pigs. However, after the onset of MDS vitamin C becomes ineffective. Conclusions and Significance CS exposure causes MDS in guinea pigs having deficiency of NQO1 conjoint with marginal vitamin C deficiency. The syndromes are not produced in singular deficiency of NQO1 or marginal vitamin C deficiency. Our results suggest that human smokers having NQO1 deficiency combined with marginal vitamin C deficiency are likely to be at high risk for developing MDS and that intake of a moderately large dose of vitamin C would prevent MDS. PMID:21655231

  11. Purification and characterization of the tungsten enzyme aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the hyperthermophilic denitrifier Pyrobaculum aerophilum.

    PubMed

    Hagedoorn, Peter L; Chen, Tianhong; Schrder, Imke; Piersma, Sander R; de Vries, Simon; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2005-05-01

    A tungsten-containing aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) has been purified to homogeneity from Pyrobaculum aerophilum. The N-terminal sequence of the isolated enzyme matches a single open reading frame in the genome. Metal analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy indicate that the P. aerophilum AOR contains one tungsten center and one [4Fe-4S](2+/1+) cluster per 68-kDa monomer. Native AOR is a homodimer. EPR spectroscopy of the purified enzyme that has been reduced with the substrate crotonaldehyde revealed a W(V) species with g(zyx) values of 1.952, 1.918, 1.872. The substrate-reduced AOR also contains a [4Fe-4S](1+) cluster with S=3/2 and zero field splitting parameters D=7.5 cm(-1) and E/D=0.22. Molybdenum was absent from the enzyme preparation. The P. aerophilum AOR lacks the amino acid sequence motif indicative for binding of mononuclear iron that is typically found in other AORs. Furthermore, the P. aerophilum AOR utilizes a 7Fe ferredoxin as the putative physiological redox partner, instead of a 4Fe ferredoxin as in Pyrococcus furiosus. This 7Fe ferredoxin has been purified from P. aerophilum, and the amino acid sequence has been identified using mass spectrometry. Direct electrochemistry of the ferredoxin showed two one-electron transitions, at -306 and -445 mV. In the presence of 55 microM ferredoxin the AOR activity is 17% of the activity obtained with 1 mM benzyl viologen as an electron acceptor. PMID:15772818

  12. Divergent Molecular Evolution of the Mitochondrial Sulfhydryl:Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase Erv in Opisthokonts and Parasitic Protists*

    PubMed Central

    Eckers, Elisabeth; Petrungaro, Carmelina; Gross, Dominik; Riemer, Jan; Hell, Kai; Deponte, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Mia40 and the sulfhydryl:cytochrome c oxidoreductase Erv1/ALR are essential for oxidative protein import into the mitochondrial intermembrane space in yeast and mammals. Although mitochondrial protein import is functionally conserved in the course of evolution, many organisms seem to lack Mia40. Moreover, except for in organello import studies and in silico analyses, nothing is known about the function and properties of protist Erv homologues. Here we compared Erv homologues from yeast, the kinetoplastid parasite Leishmania tarentolae, and the non-related malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Both parasite proteins have altered cysteine motifs, formed intermolecular disulfide bonds in vitro and in vivo, and could not replace Erv1 from yeast despite successful mitochondrial protein import in vivo. To analyze its enzymatic activity, we established the expression and purification of recombinant full-length L. tarentolae Erv and compared the mechanism with related and non-related flavoproteins. Enzyme assays indeed confirmed an electron transferase activity with equine and yeast cytochrome c, suggesting a conservation of the enzymatic activity in different eukaryotic lineages. However, although Erv and non-related flavoproteins are intriguing examples of convergent molecular evolution resulting in similar enzyme properties, the mechanisms of Erv homologues from parasitic protists and opisthokonts differ significantly. In summary, the Erv-mediated reduction of cytochrome c might be highly conserved throughout evolution despite the apparent absence of Mia40 in many eukaryotes. Nevertheless, the knowledge on mitochondrial protein import in yeast and mammals cannot be generally transferred to all other eukaryotes, and the corresponding pathways, components, and mechanisms remain to be analyzed. PMID:23233680

  13. Phylogenomic Analysis and Predicted Physiological Role of the Proton-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I) Across Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a multisubunit integral membrane enzyme found in the respiratory chains of both bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Although much research has focused on the enzymes central role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, comparatively little is known about its role in the diverse energetic lifestyles of different bacteria. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to better understand the distribution of complex I across bacteria, the evolution of this enzyme, and its potential roles in shaping the physiology of different bacterial groups. By surveying 970 representative bacterial genomes, we predict complex I to be present in ~50% of bacteria. While this includes bacteria with a wide range of energetic schemes, the presence of complex I is associated with specific lifestyles, including aerobic respiration and specific types of phototrophy (bacteria with only a type II reaction center). A phylogeny of bacterial complex I revealed five main clades of enzymes whose evolution is largely congruent with the evolution of the bacterial groups that encode complex I. A notable exception includes the gammaproteobacteria, whose members encode one of two distantly related complex I enzymes predicted to participate in different types of respiratory chains (aerobic versus anaerobic). Comparative genomic analyses suggest a broad role for complex I in reoxidizing NADH produced from various catabolic reactions, including the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Together, these findings suggest diverse roles for complex I across bacteria and highlight the importance of this enzyme in shaping diverse physiologies across the bacterial domain. PMID:25873378

  14. Suppression of NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase 1 enhanced the susceptibility of cholangiocarcinoma cells to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is highly resistant to most of the known chemotherapeutic treatments. NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is an antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme recently recognized as an important contributor to chemoresistance in some human cancers. However, the contribution of NQO1 to chemotherapy resistance in CCA is unknown. Methods Two CCA cell lines, KKU-100 and KKU-M214, with high and low NQO1 expression levels, respectively, were used to evaluate the sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents; 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin (Doxo), and gemcitabine (Gem). NQO1 and/or p53 expression in KKU-100 cells were knocked down by siRNA. NQO1 was over-expressed in KKU-M214 cells by transfection with pCMV6-XL5-NQO1 expression vector. CCA cells with modulated NQO1 and/or p53 expression were treated with chemotherapeutic agents, and the cytotoxicity was assessed by SRB assay. The mechanism of enhanced chemosensitivity was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results When NQO1 was knocked down, KKU-100 cells became more susceptible to all chemotherapeutic agents. Conversely, with over-expression of NQO1 made KKU-M214 cells more resistant to chemotherapeutic agents. Western blot analysis suggested that enhanced chemosensitivity was probably due to the activation of p53-mediated cell death. Enhanced susceptibility to chemotherapeutic agents by NQO1 silencing was abolished by knockdown of p53. Conclusions These results suggest that inhibition of NQO1 could enhance the susceptibility of CCA to an array of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24460787

  15. The Structural and Functional Basis of Catalysis Mediated by NAD(P)H:acceptor Oxidoreductase (FerB) of Paracoccus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Sedláček, Vojtěch; Klumpler, Tomáš; Marek, Jaromír; Kučera, Igor

    2014-01-01

    FerB from Paracoccus denitrificans is a soluble cytoplasmic flavoprotein that accepts redox equivalents from NADH or NADPH and transfers them to various acceptors such as quinones, ferric complexes and chromate. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements in solution reported here reveal a head-to-tail dimer with two flavin mononucleotide groups bound at the opposite sides of the subunit interface. The dimers tend to self-associate to a tetrameric form at higher protein concentrations. Amino acid residues important for the binding of FMN and NADH and for the catalytic activity are identified and verified by site-directed mutagenesis. In particular, we show that Glu77 anchors a conserved water molecule in close proximity to the O2 of FMN, with the probable role of facilitating flavin reduction. Hydride transfer is shown to occur from the 4-pro-S position of NADH to the solvent-accessible si side of the flavin ring. When using deuterated NADH, this process exhibits a kinetic isotope effect of about 6 just as does the NADH-dependent quinone reductase activity of FerB; the first, reductive half-reaction of flavin cofactor is thus rate-limiting. Replacing the bulky Arg95 in the vicinity of the active site with alanine substantially enhances the activity towards external flavins that obeys the standard bi-bi ping-pong reaction mechanism. The new evidence for a cryptic flavin reductase activity of FerB justifies the previous inclusion of this enzyme in the protein family of NADPH-dependent FMN reductases. PMID:24817153

  16. FaQR, Required for the Biosynthesis of the Strawberry Flavor Compound 4-Hydroxy-2,5-Dimethyl-3(2H)-Furanone, Encodes an Enone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Thomas; Lpez-Rez, Juan Antonio; Klein, Dorothe; Caballero, Jose Luis; Moyano, Enriqueta; Schwab, Wilfried; Muoz-Blanco, Juan

    2006-01-01

    The flavor of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa) fruit is dominated by an uncommon group of aroma compounds with a 2,5-dimethyl-3(H)-furanone structure. We report the characterization of an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF; Furaneol), the key flavor compound in strawberries. Protein extracts were partially purified, and the observed distribution of enzymatic activity correlated with the presence of a single polypeptide of ?37 kD. Sequence analysis of two peptide fragments showed total identity with the protein sequence of a strongly ripening-induced, auxin-dependent putative quinone oxidoreductase, Fragaria ananassa quinone oxidoreductase (FaQR). The open reading frame of the FaQR cDNA consists of 969 bp encoding a 322amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 34.3 kD. Laser capture microdissection followed by RNA extraction and amplification demonstrated the presence of FaQR mRNA in parenchyma tissue of the strawberry fruit. The FaQR protein was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the monomer catalyzed the formation of HDMF. After chemical synthesis and liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry analysis, 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2-methylene-3(2H)-furanone was confirmed as a substrate of FaQR and the natural precursor of HDMF. This study demonstrates the function of the FaQR enzyme in the biosynthesis of HDMF as enone oxidoreductase and provides a foundation for the improvement of strawberry flavor and the biotechnological production of HDMF. PMID:16517758

  17. FaQR, required for the biosynthesis of the strawberry flavor compound 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, encodes an enone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Raab, Thomas; Lpez-Rez, Juan Antonio; Klein, Dorothe; Caballero, Jose Luis; Moyano, Enriqueta; Schwab, Wilfried; Muoz-Blanco, Juan

    2006-04-01

    The flavor of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruit is dominated by an uncommon group of aroma compounds with a 2,5-dimethyl-3(H)-furanone structure. We report the characterization of an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF; Furaneol), the key flavor compound in strawberries. Protein extracts were partially purified, and the observed distribution of enzymatic activity correlated with the presence of a single polypeptide of approximately 37 kD. Sequence analysis of two peptide fragments showed total identity with the protein sequence of a strongly ripening-induced, auxin-dependent putative quinone oxidoreductase, Fragaria x ananassa quinone oxidoreductase (FaQR). The open reading frame of the FaQR cDNA consists of 969 bp encoding a 322-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 34.3 kD. Laser capture microdissection followed by RNA extraction and amplification demonstrated the presence of FaQR mRNA in parenchyma tissue of the strawberry fruit. The FaQR protein was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the monomer catalyzed the formation of HDMF. After chemical synthesis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2-methylene-3(2H)-furanone was confirmed as a substrate of FaQR and the natural precursor of HDMF. This study demonstrates the function of the FaQR enzyme in the biosynthesis of HDMF as enone oxidoreductase and provides a foundation for the improvement of strawberry flavor and the biotechnological production of HDMF. PMID:16517758

  18. Q-band ENDOR spectra of the Rieske protein from Rhodobacter capsulatus ubiquinol-cyctochrome c oxidoreductase show two histidines coordinated to the (2Fe-2S) cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Gurbiel, R.J. Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow ); Ohnishi, Tomoko; Robertson, D.E.; Daldal, F. ); Hoffman, B.M. )

    1991-12-10

    Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experiments were performed on {sup 14}N (natural abundance) and {sup 15}N-enriched iron-sulfur Rieske protein in the ubiquinol-cytochrome c{sub 2} oxidoreductase from Rhodobactor capsulatus. The experiments proved that two distinct nitrogenous ligands, histidines, are undoubtedly ligated to the Rieske (2Fe-2S) center. The calculations of hyperfine tensors give values similar but not identical to those of the Rieske-type cluster in phthalate dioxygenase of Pseudomonas cepacia and suggest a slightly different geometry of the iron-sulfur cluster in the two proteins.

  19. Characterization of Escherichia coli thioredoxin variants mimicking the active-sites of other thiol/disulfide oxidoreductases.

    PubMed Central

    Mssner, E.; Huber-Wunderlich, M.; Glockshuber, R.

    1998-01-01

    Thiol/disulfide oxidoreductases like thioredoxin, glutaredoxin, DsbA, or protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) share the thioredoxin fold and a catalytic disulfide bond with the sequence Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys (Xaa corresponds to any amino acid). Despite their structural similarities, the enzymes have very different redox properties, which is reflected by a 100,000-fold difference in the equilibrium constant (K(eq)) with glutathione between the most oxidizing member, DsbA, and the most reducing member, thioredoxin. Here we present a systematic study on a series of variants of thioredoxin from Escherichia coli, in which the Xaa-Xaa dipeptide was exchanged by that of glutaredoxin, PDI, and DsbA. Like the corresponding natural enzymes, all thioredoxin variants proved to be stronger oxidants than the wild-type, with the order wild-type < PDI-type < DsbA-type < glutaredoxin-type. The most oxidizing, glutaredoxin-like variant has a 420-fold decreased value of K(eq), corresponding to an increase in redox potential by 75 mV. While oxidized wild-type thioredoxin is more stable than the reduced form (delta deltaG(ox/red) = 16.9 kJ/mol), both redox forms have almost the same stability in the variants. The pH-dependence of the reactivity with the alkylating agent iodoacetamide proved to be the best method to determine the pKa value of thioredoxin's nucleophilic active-site thiol (Cys32). A pKa of 7.1 was measured for Cys32 in the reduced wild-type. All variants showed a lowered pKa of Cys32, with the lowest value of 5.9 for the glutaredoxin-like variant. A correlation of redox potential and the Cys32 pKa value could be established on a quantitative level. However, the predicted correlation between the measured delta deltaG(ox/red) values and Cys32 pKa values was only qualitative. PMID:9605329

  20. Structural and Functional Insights into the Catalytic Inactivity of the Major Fraction of Buffalo Milk Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Gadave, Kaustubh S.; Panda, Santanu; Singh, Surender; Kalra, Shalini; Malakar, Dhruba; Mohanty, Ashok K.; Kaushik, Jai K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) existing in two interconvertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO), catabolises xanthine to uric acid that is further broken down to antioxidative agent allantoin. XOR also produces free radicals serving as second messenger and microbicidal agent. Large variation in the XO activity has been observed among various species. Both hypo and hyper activity of XOR leads to pathophysiological conditions. Given the important nutritional role of buffalo milk in human health especially in south Asia, it is crucial to understand the functional properties of buffalo XOR and the underlying structural basis of variations in comparison to other species. Methods and Findings Buffalo XO activity of 0.75 U/mg was almost half of cattle XO activity. Enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km) of 0.11 sec?1 M?1 of buffalo XO was 810 times smaller than that of cattle XO. Buffalo XOR also showed lower antibacterial activity than cattle XOR. A CD value (??430 nm) of 46,000 M?1 cm?1 suggested occupancy of 77.4% at Fe/S I centre. Buffalo XOR contained 0.31 molybdenum atom/subunit of which 48% existed in active sulfo form. The active form of XO in buffalo was only 16% in comparison to ?30% in cattle. Sequencing revealed 97.4% similarity between buffalo and cattle XOR. FAD domain was least conserved, while metal binding domains (Fe/S and Molybdenum) were highly conserved. Homology modelling of buffalo XOR showed several variations occurring in clusters, especially close to FAD binding pocket which could affect NAD+ entry in the FAD centre. The difference in XO activity seems to be originating from cofactor deficiency, especially molybdenum. Conclusion A major fraction of buffalo milk XOR exists in a catalytically inactive form due to high content of demolybdo and desulfo forms. Lower Fe/S content and structural factors might be contributing to lower enzymatic efficiency of buffalo XOR in a minor way. PMID:24498153

  1. Augmenter of Liver Regeneration: Substrate Specificity of a Flavin-dependent Oxidoreductase from the Mitochondrial Intermembrane Space

    PubMed Central

    Daithankar, Vidyadhar N.; Farrell, Scott R.; Thorpe, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) is both a growth factor and a sulfhydryl oxidase that binds FAD in an unusual helix-rich domain containing a redox-active CxxC disulfide proximal to the flavin ring. In addition to the cytokine form of ALR (sfALR) that circulates in serum, a longer form, lfALR, is believed to participate in oxidative trapping of reduced proteins entering the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). This longer form has an 80-residue N-terminal extension containing an additional, distal, CxxC motif. This work presents the first enzymological characterization of human lfALR. The N-terminal region conveys no catalytic advantage towards the oxidation of the model substrate dithiothreitol (DTT). In addition, C71A or C74A mutations of the distal disulfide do not increase the turnover number towards DTT. Unlike Erv1p, the yeast homolog of lfALR, static spectrophotometric experiments of the human oxidase provide no evidence for communication between distal and proximal disulfides. An N-terminal his-tagged version of human Mia40, a resident oxidoreductase of the IMS and a putative physiological reductant of lfALR, was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. Mia40, as isolated, shows a visible spectrum characteristic of an Fe/S center and contains 0.56 0.02 atoms of iron per subunit. Treatment of Mia40 with guanidine hydrochloride and triscarboxyethylphosphine hydrochloride during purification removed this chromophore. The resulting protein, with a reduced CxC motif, was a good substrate of lfALR. However, neither sfALR, nor lfALR mutants lacking the distal disulfide, could oxidize reduced Mia40 efficiently. Thus, catalysis involves a flow of reducing equivalents from the reduced CxC motif of Mia40, to distal- and then proximal CxxC motifs of lfALR, to the flavin ring, and, finally, to cytochrome c or molecular oxygen. PMID:19397338

  2. The transfer of reduced flavin mononucleotide from LuxG oxidoreductase to luciferase occurs via free diffusion.

    PubMed

    Tinikul, Ruchanok; Pitsawong, Warintra; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Nijvipakul, Sarayut; Ballou, David P; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial luciferase (LuxAB) is a two-component flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the oxidation of reduced FMN (FMNH(-)) and a long-chain aliphatic aldehyde by molecular oxygen to generate oxidized FMN, the corresponding aliphatic carboxylic acid, and concomitant emission of light. The LuxAB reaction requires a flavin reductase to generate FMNH(-) to serve as a luciferin in its reaction. However, FMNH(-) is unstable and can react with oxygen to generate H2O2, so that it is important to transfer it efficiently to LuxAB. Recently, LuxG has been identified as a NADH:FMN oxidoreductase that supplies FMNH(-) to luciferase in vivo. In this report, the mode of transfer of FMNH(-) between LuxG from Photobacterium leiognathi TH1 and LuxABs from both P. leiognathi TH1 and Vibrio campbellii (PlLuxAB and VcLuxAB, respectively) was investigated using single-mixing and double-mixing stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The oxygenase component of p-hydroxyphenylacetate hydroxylase (C2) from Acinetobacter baumannii, which has no structural similarity to LuxAB, was used to measure the kinetics of release of FMNH(-) from LuxG. With all FMNH(-) acceptors used (C2, PlLuxAB, and VcLuxAB), the kinetics of FMN reduction on LuxG were the same, showing that LuxG releases FMNH(-) with a rate constant of 4.5-6 s(-1). Our data showed that the kinetics of binding of FMNH(-)to PlLuxAB and VcLuxAB and the subsequent reactions with oxygen were the same with either free FMNH(-) or FMNH(-) generated in situ by LuxG. These results strongly suggest that no complexes between LuxG and the various species are necessary to transfer FMNH(-) to the acceptors. The kinetics of the overall reactions and the individual rate constants correlate well with a free diffusion model for the transfer of FMNH(-) from LuxG to either LuxAB. PMID:24004065

  3. Purification and properties of two oxidoreductases catalyzing the enantioselective reduction of diacetyl and other diketones from baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Heidlas, J; Tressl, R

    1990-02-22

    The NADPH-linked diacetyl reductase system from the cytosolic fraction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been resolved into two oxidoreductases catalyzing irreversibly the enantioselective reduction of diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) to (S)- and (R)-acetoin (3-hydroxy-2-butanone) [so-called (S)- and (R)-diacetyl reductases] (EC 1.1.1.5) which have been isolated to apparent electrophoretical purity. The clean-up procedures comprising streptomycin sulfate treatment, Sephadex G-25 filtration, DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography, affinity chromatography on Matrex Gel Red A and Superose 6 prep grade filtration led to 120-fold and 368-fold purifications, respectively. The relative molecular mass of the (R)-diacetyl reductase, estimated by means of HPLC filtration on Zorbax GF 250 and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was 36,000. The (R)-enzyme was most active at pH 6.4 and accepted in addition to diacetyl C5-, C6-2,3-diketones, 1,2-cyclohexanedione, 2-oxo aldehydes and short-chain 2- and 3-oxo esters as substrates. The enzyme was characterized by high enantioselectivity and regiospecificity. The Km values for diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione were determined as 2.0 mM. The Mr of the (S)-diacetyl reductase was determined as 75,000 by means of HPLC filtration of Zorbax GF 250. The enzyme decomposed into subunits of Mr 48,000 and 24,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum pH was 6.9. The purified (S)-enzyme reduced stereospecifically a broad spectrum of substrates, comprising 2,3-, 2,4- and 2,5-diketones, 2-oxo aldehydes, 1,2-cyclohexanedione and methyl ketones as well as 3-, 4- and 5-oxo esters. The 2,3- and 2,4-diketones are transformed to the corresponding (S)-2-hydroxy ketones; 2,5-hexanedione, however, was reduced to (S,S)-2,5-hexanediol. The Km values for diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione were estimated as 2.3 and 1.5 mM, respectively. Further characterization of the (S)-diacetyl reductase revealed that it is identical with the so-called '(S)-enzyme', involved in the enantioselective reduction of 3-, 4- and 5-oxo esters in baker's yeast. PMID:2180695

  4. Functional and Bioinformatics Analysis of Two Campylobacter jejuni Homologs of the Thiol-Disulfide Oxidoreductase, DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Grabowska, Anna D.; Wywiał, Ewa; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Łasica, Anna M.; Wösten, Marc M. S. M.; Nagy-Staroń, Anna; Godlewska, Renata; Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna; Pieńkowska, Katarzyna; Łaniewski, Paweł; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, E. Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial Dsb enzymes are involved in the oxidative folding of many proteins, through the formation of disulfide bonds between their cysteine residues. The Dsb protein network has been well characterized in cells of the model microorganism Escherichia coli. To gain insight into the functioning of the Dsb system in epsilon-Proteobacteria, where it plays an important role in the colonization process, we studied two homologs of the main Escherichia coli Dsb oxidase (EcDsbA) that are present in the cells of the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the most frequently reported bacterial cause of human enteritis in the world. Methods and Results Phylogenetic analysis suggests the horizontal transfer of the epsilon-Proteobacterial DsbAs from a common ancestor to gamma-Proteobacteria, which then gave rise to the DsbL lineage. Phenotype and enzymatic assays suggest that the two C. jejuni DsbAs play different roles in bacterial cells and have divergent substrate spectra. CjDsbA1 is essential for the motility and autoagglutination phenotypes, while CjDsbA2 has no impact on those processes. CjDsbA1 plays a critical role in the oxidative folding that ensures the activity of alkaline phosphatase CjPhoX, whereas CjDsbA2 is crucial for the activity of arylsulfotransferase CjAstA, encoded within the dsbA2-dsbB-astA operon. Conclusions Our results show that CjDsbA1 is the primary thiol-oxidoreductase affecting life processes associated with bacterial spread and host colonization, as well as ensuring the oxidative folding of particular protein substrates. In contrast, CjDsbA2 activity does not affect the same processes and so far its oxidative folding activity has been demonstrated for one substrate, arylsulfotransferase CjAstA. The results suggest the cooperation between CjDsbA2 and CjDsbB. In the case of the CjDsbA1, this cooperation is not exclusive and there is probably another protein to be identified in C. jejuni cells that acts to re-oxidize CjDsbA1. Altogether the data presented here constitute the considerable insight to the Epsilonproteobacterial Dsb systems, which have been poorly understood so far. PMID:25181355

  5. Pivotal roles of three conserved carboxyl residues of the NuoC (30k) segment in the structural integrity of proton-translocating NADH-quinone oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Castro-Guerrero, Norma; Sinha, Prem Kumar; Torres-Bacete, Jesus; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2010-11-30

    The prokaryotic proton-translocating NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1) is an L-shaped membrane-bound enzyme that contains 14 subunits (NuoA-NuoN or Nqo1-Nqo14). All subunits have their counterparts in the eukaryotic enzyme (complex I). NDH-1 consists of two domains: the peripheral arm (NuoB, -C, -D, -E, -F, -G, and -I) and the membrane arm (NuoA, -H, -J, -K, -L, -M, and -N). In Escherichia coli NDH-1, the hydrophilic subunits NuoC/Nqo5/30k and NuoD/Nqo4/49k are fused together in a single polypeptide as the NuoCD subunit. The NuoCD subunit is the only subunit that does not bear a cofactor in the peripheral arm. While some roles for inhibitor and quinone association have been reported for the NuoD segment, structural and functional roles of the NuoC segment remain mostly elusive. In this work, 14 highly conserved residues of the NuoC segment were mutated and 21 mutants were constructed using the chromosomal gene manipulation technique. From the enzymatic assays and immunochemical and blue-native gel analyses, it was found that residues Glu-138, Glu-140, and Asp-143 that are thought to be in the third ?-helix are absolutely required for the energy-transducing NDH-1 activities and the assembly of the whole enzyme. Together with available information for the hydrophobic subunits, we propose that Glu-138, Glu-140, and Asp-143 of the NuoC segment may have a pivotal role in the structural stability of NDH-1. PMID:20979355

  6. Pivotal Roles of Three Conserved Carboxyl Residues of NuoC (30k) Segment in the Structural Integrity of Proton-translocating NADH-Quinone Oxidoreductase (NDH-1) from Escherichia coli#

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Guerrero, Norma; Sinha, Prem Kumar; Torres-Bacete, Jesus; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2010-01-01

    The prokaryotic proton-translocating NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1) is an L-shaped membrane-bound enzyme that contains 14 subunits (NuoA-NuoN/Nqo1-Nqo14). All subunits have their counterparts in the eukaryotic enzyme (complex I). NDH-1 consists of two domains: the peripheral arm (NuoB,C,D,E,F,G, and I) and the membrane arm (NuoA,H,J,K,L,M, and N). In Escherichia coli NDH-1 the hydrophilic subunits NuoC/Nqo5/30k and NuoD/Nqo4/49k are fused together in a single polypeptide as the NuoCD subunit. The NuoCD subunit is the only subunit that does not bear a cofactor in the peripheral arm. While some roles for inhibitor- and quinone-association have been reported for the NuoD segment, structural and functional roles of the NuoC segment remain mostly elusive. In the current work, 14 highly conserved residues of the NuoC segment were mutated and 21 mutants were constructed using the chromosomal gene manipulation technique. From the enzymatic assays and immunochemical and blue-native gel analyses, it was found that residues Glu-138, Glu-140, and Asp-143 that are anticipated to be in the third ?-helix are absolutely required for the energy-transducing NDH-1 activities and the assembly of the whole enzyme. Together with available information for the hydrophobic subunits, it is proposed that Glu-138, Glu-140, and Asp-143 of the NuoC segment may have a pivotal role in structural stability of NDH-1. PMID:20979355

  7. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from bovine heart mitochondria. cDNA sequences of the import precursors of the nuclear-encoded 39 kDa and 42 kDa subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Fearnley, I M; Finel, M; Skehel, J M; Walker, J E

    1991-01-01

    The 39 kDa and 42 kDa subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from bovine heart mitochondria are nuclear-coded components of the hydrophobic protein fraction of the enzyme. Their amino acid sequences have been deduced from the sequences of overlapping cDNA clones. These clones were amplified from total bovine heart cDNA by means of the polymerase chain reaction, with the use of complex mixtures of oligonucleotide primers based upon fragments of protein sequence determined at the N-terminals of the proteins and at internal sites. The protein sequences of the 39 kDa and 42 kDa subunits are 345 and 320 amino acid residues long respectively, and their calculated molecular masses are 39,115 Da and 36,693 Da. Both proteins are predominantly hydrophilic, but each contains one or two hydrophobic segments that could possibly be folded into transmembrane alpha-helices. The bovine 39 kDa protein sequence is related to that of a 40 kDa subunit from complex I from Neurospora crassa mitochondria; otherwise, it is not related significantly to any known sequence, including redox proteins and two polypeptides involved in import of proteins into mitochondria, known as the mitochondrial processing peptidase and the processing-enhancing protein. Therefore the functions of the 39 kDa and 42 kDa subunits of complex I are unknown. The mitochondrial gene product, ND4, a hydrophobic component of complex I with an apparent molecular mass of about 39 kDa, has been identified in preparations of the enzyme. This subunit stains faintly with Coomassie Blue dye, and in many gel systems it is not resolved from the nuclearcoded 36 kDa subunit. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1832859

  8. Modulation of Biofilm-Formation in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium by the Periplasmic DsbA/DsbB Oxidoreductase System Requires the GGDEF-EAL Domain Protein STM3615

    PubMed Central

    Rmling, Ute; Rhen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), biofilm-formation is controlled by the cytoplasmic intracellular small-molecular second messenger cyclic 3?, 5?-di- guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) through the activities of GGDEF and EAL domain proteins. Here we describe that deleting either dsbA or dsbB, respectively encoding a periplasmic protein disulfide oxidase and a cytoplasmic membrane disulfide oxidoreductase, resulted in increased biofilm-formation on solid medium. This increased biofilm-formation, defined as a red, dry and rough (rdar) colony morphotype, paralleled with enhanced expression of the biofilm master regulator CsgD and the biofilm-associated fimbrial subunit CsgA. Deleting csgD in either dsb mutant abrogated the enhanced biofilm-formation. Likewise, overexpression of the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase YhjH, or mutationally inactivating the CsgD activator EAL-domain protein YdiV, reduced biofilm-formation in either of the dsb mutants. Intriguingly, deleting the GGDEF-EAL domain protein gene STM3615 (yhjK), previously not connected to rdar morphotype development, also abrogated the escalated rdar morphotype formation in dsb mutant backgrounds. Enhanced biofilm-formation in dsb mutants was furthermore annulled by exposure to the protein disulfide catalyst copper chloride. When analyzed for the effect of exogenous reducing stress on biofilm-formation, both dsb mutants initially showed an escalated rdar morphotype development that later dissolved to reveal a smooth mucoid colony morphotype. From these results we conclude that biofilm-development in S. Typhimurium is affected by periplasmic protein disulphide bond status through CsgD, and discuss the involvement of selected GGDEF/EAL domain protein(s) as signaling mediators. PMID:25153529

  9. Investigation of protein FTT1103 electroactivity using carbon and mercury electrodes. Surface-inhibition approach for disulfide oxidoreductases using silver amalgam powder.

    PubMed

    Ve?erkov, Renata; Hernychov, Lenka; Dobe, Petr; Vrba, Ji?; Josyp?uk, Bohdan; Bartok, Martin; Vacek, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Recently, it was shown that electrochemical methods can be used for analysis of poorly water-soluble proteins and for study of their structural changes and intermolecular (protein-ligand) interactions. In this study, we focused on complex electrochemical investigation of recombinant protein FTT1103, a disulfide oxidoreductase with structural similarity to well described DsbA proteins. This thioredoxin-like periplasmic lipoprotein plays an important role in virulence of bacteria Francisella tularensis. For electrochemical analyses, adsorptive transfer (ex situ) square-wave voltammetry with pyrolytic graphite electrode, and alternating-current voltammetry and constant-current chronopotentiometric stripping analysis with mercury electrodes, including silver solid amalgam electrode (AgSAE) were used. AgSAE was used in poorly water-soluble protein analysis for the first time. In addition to basic redox, electrocatalytic and adsorption/desorption characterization of FTT1103, electrochemical methods were also used for sensitive determination of the protein at nanomolar level and study of its interaction with surface of AgSA microparticles. Proposed electrochemical protocol and AgSA surface-inhibition approach presented here could be used in future for biochemical studies focused on proteins associated with membranes as well as on those with disulfide oxidoreductase activity. PMID:24856508

  10. Directed Evolution and Resolution Mechanism of 1, 3-Propanediol Oxidoreductase from Klebsiella pneumoniae toward Higher Activity by Error-Prone PCR and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhuang, Yuan; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-01-01

    1, 3-propanediol oxidoreductase (PDOR) is a key enzyme in glycerol bioconversion to 1,3-propanediol (1, 3-PD) which is a valuable chemical and one of the six new petrochemical products. We used error-prone PCR and activity screening to identify mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) PDOR with improved activity. The activity of one of the identified mutants, PDOR’-24, which includes a single mutation, A199S, was 48 U/mg, 4.9 times that of the wild-type enzyme. Molecular docking was performed to analyze the identified mutants; and amino acids S103, H271, N366, D106, N262 and D364 were predicted to bond with NADH. The origins of the improved activity of PDOR’-24, as well as three other mutants were analyzed by simulating the interaction mechanism of the mutants with the substrate and coenzyme, respectively. This research provides useful information about the use of safranine O plate screening for the directed evolution of oxidoreductases, identifies interesting sites for improving PDOR activity, and demonstrates the utility of using molecular docking to analyze the interaction mechanism of the mutants with the substrate and coenzyme, respectively. PMID:26528716

  11. A thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase of the Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae is essential for viability, pilus assembly, toxin production and virulence.

    PubMed

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Jooya, Neda; Chang, Chungyu; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-12-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae exports through the Sec apparatus many extracellular proteins that include the key virulence factors diphtheria toxin and the adhesive pili. How these proteins attain their native conformations after translocation as unfolded precursors remains elusive. The fact that the majority of these exported proteins contain multiple cysteine residues and that several membrane-bound oxidoreductases are encoded in the corynebacterial genome suggests the existence of an oxidative protein-folding pathway in this organism. Here we show that the shaft pilin SpaA harbors a disulfide bond in vivo and alanine substitution of these cysteines abrogates SpaA polymerization and leads to the secretion of degraded SpaA peptides. We then identified a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (MdbA), whose structure exhibits a conserved thioredoxin-like domain with a CPHC active site. Remarkably, deletion of mdbA results in a severe temperature-sensitive cell division phenotype. This mutant also fails to assemble pilus structures and is greatly defective in toxin production. Consistent with these defects, the ?mdbA mutant is attenuated in a guinea pig model of diphtheritic toxemia. Given its diverse cellular functions in cell division, pilus assembly and toxin production, we propose that MdbA is a component of the general oxidative folding machine in C. diphtheriae. PMID:26294390

  12. Altered patterns of gene duplication and differential gene gain and loss in fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Amy J; Conant, Gavin C; Brown, Douglas E; Carbone, Ignazio; Dean, Ralph A

    2008-01-01

    Background Duplication, followed by fixation or random loss of novel genes, contributes to genome evolution. Particular outcomes of duplication events are possibly associated with pathogenic life histories in fungi. To date, differential gene gain and loss have not been studied at genomic scales in fungal pathogens, despite this phenomenon's known importance in virulence in bacteria and viruses. Results To determine if patterns of gene duplication differed between pathogens and non-pathogens, we identified gene families across nine euascomycete and two basidiomycete species. Gene family size distributions were fit to power laws to compare gene duplication trends in pathogens versus non-pathogens. Fungal phytopathogens showed globally altered patterns of gene duplication, as indicated by differences in gene family size distribution. We also identified sixteen examples of gene family expansion and five instances of gene family contraction in pathogenic lineages. Expanded gene families included those predicted to be important in melanin biosynthesis, host cell wall degradation and transport functions. Contracted families included those encoding genes involved in toxin production, genes with oxidoreductase activity, as well as subunits of the vacuolar ATPase complex. Surveys of the functional distribution of gene duplicates indicated that pathogens show enrichment for gene duplicates associated with receptor and hydrolase activities, while euascomycete pathogens appeared to have not only these differences, but also significantly more duplicates associated with regulatory and carbohydrate binding functions. Conclusion Differences in the overall levels of gene duplication in phytopathogenic species versus non-pathogenic relatives implicate gene inventory flux as an important virulence-associated process in fungi. We hypothesize that the observed patterns of gene duplicate enrichment, gene family expansion and contraction reflect adaptation within pathogenic life histories. These adaptations were likely shaped by ancient, as well as contemporary, intimate associations with monocot hosts. PMID:18373860

  13. Expression of a heat-stable NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii results in furan aldehyde detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daehwan; Verbeke, Tobin J.; Cross, Karissa L.; Westpheling, Janet; Elkins, James G.

    2015-07-22

    Compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are generated through the dehydration of xylose and glucose, respectively, during dilute-acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and are also potent microbial growth and fermentation inhibitors. The enzymatic reduction of these furan aldehydes to their corresponding, and less toxic, alcohols is an engineering approach that has been successfully implemented in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ethanologenicEscherichia coli, but has not yet been investigated in thermophiles relevant to biofuel production through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). Developing CBP-relevant biocatalysts that are either naturally resistant to such inhibitors, or are amenable to engineered resistance, is therefore, an important component in making biofuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feasible.

  14. Expression of a heat-stable NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii results in furan aldehyde detoxification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chung, Daehwan; Verbeke, Tobin J.; Cross, Karissa L.; Westpheling, Janet; Elkins, James G.

    2015-07-22

    Compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are generated through the dehydration of xylose and glucose, respectively, during dilute-acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and are also potent microbial growth and fermentation inhibitors. The enzymatic reduction of these furan aldehydes to their corresponding, and less toxic, alcohols is an engineering approach that has been successfully implemented in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ethanologenicEscherichia coli, but has not yet been investigated in thermophiles relevant to biofuel production through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). Developing CBP-relevant biocatalysts that are either naturally resistant to such inhibitors, or are amenable to engineered resistance, is therefore, an important componentmore » in making biofuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feasible.« less

  15. Molecular Characterization of an NADPH-Dependent Acetoin Reductase/2,3-Butanediol Dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052

    PubMed Central

    Raedts, John; Siemerink, Marco A. J.; Levisson, Mark; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin reductase is an important enzyme for the fermentative production of 2,3-butanediol, a chemical compound with a very broad industrial use. Here, we report on the discovery and characterization of an acetoin reductase from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. An in silico screen of the C. beijerinckii genome revealed eight potential acetoin reductases. One of them (CBEI_1464) showed substantial acetoin reductase activity after expression in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme (C. beijerinckii acetoin reductase [Cb-ACR]) was found to exist predominantly as a homodimer. In addition to acetoin (or 2,3-butanediol), other secondary alcohols and corresponding ketones were converted as well, provided that another electronegative group was attached to the adjacent C-3 carbon. Optimal activity was at pH 6.5 (reduction) and 9.5 (oxidation) and around 68°C. Cb-ACR accepts both NADH and NADPH as electron donors; however, unlike closely related enzymes, NADPH is preferred (Km, 32 μM). Cb-ACR was compared to characterized close homologs, all belonging to the “threonine dehydrogenase and related Zn-dependent dehydrogenases” (COG1063). Metal analysis confirmed the presence of 2 Zn2+ atoms. To gain insight into the substrate and cofactor specificity, a structural model was constructed. The catalytic zinc atom is likely coordinated by Cys37, His70, and Glu71, while the structural zinc site is probably composed of Cys100, Cys103, Cys106, and Cys114. Residues determining NADP specificity were predicted as well. The physiological role of Cb-ACR in C. beijerinckii is discussed. PMID:24441158

  16. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (AtNTRC) confers freezing and cold shock tolerance to plants.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Chan; Lee, Sangmin; Shin, Su Young; Chae, Ho Byoung; Jung, Young Jun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Kyun Oh; Lee, Jung Ro; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2015-08-01

    Overexpression of AtNTRC (AtNTRC(OE)) in Arabidopsis thaliana led to a freezing and cold stress tolerance, whereas a knockout mutant (atntrc) showed a stress-sensitive phenotype. Biochemical analyses showed that the recombinant AtNTRC proteins exhibited a cryoprotective activity for malate dehydrogenase and lactic dehydrogenase. Furthermore, conclusive evidence of its interaction with nucleic acids invitro is provided here on the basis of gel shift and electron microscopy analysis. Recombinant AtNTRC efficiently protected RNA and DNA from RNase A and metal catalyzed oxidation damage, respectively. The C-terminal thioredoxin domain is required for the nucleic acid-protein complex formation. From these results, it can be hypothesized that AtNTRC, which is known to be an electron donor of peroxiredoxin, contributes the stability of macromolecules under cold stress. PMID:26086110

  17. Biosynthesis of the antimicrobial peptide epilancin 15X and its N-terminal lactate.

    PubMed

    Velsquez, Juan E; Zhang, Xingang; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2011-07-29

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified antimicrobial peptides. The recently discovered lantibiotic epilancin 15X produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis 15X154 contains an unusual N-terminal lactate group. To understand its biosynthesis, the epilancin 15X biosynthetic gene cluster was identified. The N-terminal lactate is produced by dehydration of a serine residue in the first position of the core peptide by ElxB, followed by proteolytic removal of the leader peptide by ElxP and hydrolysis of the resulting new N-terminal dehydroalanine. The pyruvate group thus formed is reduced to lactate by an NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase designated ElxO. The enzymatic activity of ElxB, ElxP, and ElxO were investigated invitro or invivo and the importance of the N-terminal modification for peptide stability against bacterial aminopeptidases was assessed. PMID:21802007

  18. Biosynthesis of the Antimicrobial Peptide Epilancin 15X and Its N-terminal Lactate

    PubMed Central

    Velásquez, Juan E.; Zhang, Xingang; van der Donk, Wilfred

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified antimicrobial peptides. The recently discovered lantibiotic epilancin 15X produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis 15X154 contains an unusual N-terminal lactate group. To understand its biosynthesis, the epilancin 15X biosynthetic gene cluster was identified. The N-terminal lactate is produced by dehydration of a Ser residue in the first position of the core peptide by ElxB, followed by proteolytic removal of the leader peptide by ElxP, and hydrolysis of the resulting new N-terminal dehydroalanine. The pyruvate group thus formed is reduced to lactate by an NADPH dependent oxidoreductase designated ElxO. The enzymatic activity of ElxB, ElxP, and ElxO were investigated in vitro or in vivo and the importance of the N-terminal modification for peptide stability against bacterial aminopeptidases was assessed. PMID:21802007

  19. Glycogen Metabolic Genes Are Involved in Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase-Mediated Regulation of Pathogenicity by the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard A.; Wang, Zheng-Yi; Kershaw, Michael J.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease. Here we show that glycogen metabolic genes play an important role in plant infection by M. oryzae. Targeted deletion of AGL1 and GPH1, which encode amyloglucosidase and glycogen phosphorylase, respectively, prevented mobilisation of glycogen stores during appressorium development and caused a significant reduction in the ability of M. oryzae to cause rice blast disease. By contrast, targeted mutation of GSN1, which encodes glycogen synthase, significantly reduced the synthesis of intracellular glycogen, but had no effect on fungal pathogenicity. We found that loss of AGL1 and GPH1 led to a reduction in expression of TPS1 and TPS3, which encode components of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase complex, that acts as a genetic switch in M. oryzae. Tps1 responds to glucose-6-phosphate levels and the balance of NADP/NADPH to regulate virulence-associated gene expression, in association with Nmr transcriptional inhibitors. We show that deletion of the NMR3 transcriptional inhibitor gene partially restores virulence to a Δagl1Δgph1 mutant, suggesting that glycogen metabolic genes are necessary for operation of the NADPH-dependent genetic switch in M. oryzae. PMID:24098112

  20. The ocean as a global reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Hatosy, Stephen M; Martiny, Adam C

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies of natural environments have revealed vast genetic reservoirs of antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Soil bacteria and human pathogens share AR genes, and AR genes have been discovered in a variety of habitats. However, there is little knowledge about the presence and diversity of AR genes in marine environments and which organisms host AR genes. To address this, we identified the diversity of genes conferring resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, nitrofurantoin, and sulfadimethoxine in diverse marine environments using functional metagenomics (the cloning and screening of random DNA fragments). Marine environments were host to a diversity of AR-conferring genes. Antibiotic-resistant clones were found at all sites, with 28% of the genes identified as known AR genes (encoding beta-lactamases, bicyclomycin resistance pumps, etc.). However, the majority of AR genes were not previously classified as such but had products similar to proteins such as transport pumps, oxidoreductases, and hydrolases. Furthermore, 44% of the genes conferring antibiotic resistance were found in abundant marine taxa (e.g., Pelagibacter, Prochlorococcus, and Vibrio). Therefore, we uncovered a previously unknown diversity of genes that conferred an AR phenotype among marine environments, which makes the ocean a global reservoir of both clinically relevant and potentially novel AR genes. PMID:26296734

  1. A light-dependent complementation system for analysis of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase: Identification and mutagenesis of two conserved residues that are essential for enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, H.M.; Timko, M.P.

    1995-01-31

    Protochlorophyllide reductase (NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase; EC 1.6.99.1) catalyzes the light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide, a key regulatory step in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. We have developed an expression system in which the protochlorophyllide reductase from pea (Pisum sativum L.) is used to complement protochlorophyllide reduction mutants in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, allowing analysis of wild-type and mutant forms of the enzyme. By protein sequence comparisons, we have identified the plant protochlorophyllide reductases as belonging to the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. Based on our protein sequence alignments, we have identified and mutated two conserved residues (Tyr-275 and Lys-279) within the proposed active site of the enzyme and shown that they are critical for activity. A model of the enzyme reaction mechanism for light-dependent protochlorophyllide reduction is proposed. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Chloroplast lipid droplet type II NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase is essential for prenylquinone metabolism and vitamin K1 accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Eugeni Piller, Lucia; Besagni, Cline; Ksas, Brigitte; Rumeau, Dominique; Brhlin, Claire; Glauser, Gatan; Kessler, Felix; Havaux, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous cellular structures in eukaryotes and are required for lipid metabolism. Little is currently known about plant lipid droplets other than oil bodies. Here, we define dual roles for chloroplast lipid droplets (plastoglobules) in energy and prenylquinone metabolism. The prenylquinonesplastoquinone, plastochromanol-8, phylloquinone (vitamin K1), and tocopherol (vitamin E)are partly stored in plastoglobules. This work shows that NAD(P)H dehydrogenase C1 (NDC1) (At5g08740), a type II NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase, associates with plastoglobules. NDC1 reduces a plastoquinone analog in vitro and affects the overall redox state of the total plastoquinone pool in vivo by reducing the plastoquinone reservoir of plastoglobules. Finally, NDC1 is required for normal plastochromanol-8 accumulation and is essential for vitamin K1 production. PMID:21844348

  3. Wiring of the aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC to electrode surfaces via entrapment in low potential phenothiazine-modified redox polymers.

    PubMed

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Ruff, Adrian; Pöller, Sascha; Alsaoub, Sabine; Leimkühler, Silke; Wollenberger, Ulla; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Phenothiazine-modified redox hydrogels were synthesized and used for the wiring of the aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC to electrode surfaces. The effects of the pH value and electrode surface modification on the biocatalytic activity of the layers were studied in the presence of vanillin as the substrate. The enzyme electrodes were successfully employed as bioanodes in vanillin/O2 biofuel cells in combination with a high potential bilirubin oxidase biocathode. Open circuit voltages of around 700mV could be obtained in a two compartment biofuel cell setup. Moreover, the use of a rather hydrophobic polymer with a high degree of crosslinking sites ensures the formation of stable polymer/enzyme films which were successfully used as bioanode in membrane-less biofuel cells. PMID:26775204

  4. Omeprazole induces NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 via aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent mechanisms: Role of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-11-13

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptionally induces phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1) and phase II (NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) detoxifying enzymes. The effects of the classical and nonclassical AhR ligands on phase I and II enzymes are well studied in human hepatocytes. Additionally, we observed that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole (OM), transcriptionally induces CYP1A1 in the human adenocarcinoma cell line, H441cells via AhR. Whether OM activates AhR and induces the phase II enzyme, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in fetal primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that OM will induce NQO1 in HPMEC via the AhR. The concentrations of OM used in our experiments did not result in cytotoxicity. OM activated AhR as evident by increased CYP1A1 mRNA expression. However, contrary to our hypothesis, OM increased NQO1 mRNA and protein via an AhR-independent mechanism as AhR knockdown failed to abrogate OM-mediated increase in NQO1 expression. Interestingly, OM activated Nrf2 as evident by increased phosphoNrf2 (S40) expression in OM-treated compared to vehicle-treated cells. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown abrogated OM-mediated increase in NQO1 expression. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OM induces NQO1 via AhR-independent, but Nrf2-dependent mechanisms. PMID:26441083

  5. FeS/S/FeS(2) redox system and its oxidoreductase-like chemistry in the iron-sulfur world.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Bin; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Su, Wenhui

    2011-06-01

    The iron-sulfur world (ISW) theory is an intriguing prediction regarding the origin of life on early Earth. It hypothesizes that life arose as a geochemical process from inorganic starting materials on the surface of sulfide minerals in the vicinity of deep-sea hot springs. During the last two decades, many experimental studies have been carried out on this topic, and some interesting results have been achieved. Among them, however, the processes of carbon/nitrogen fixation and biomolecular assembly on the mineral surface have received an inordinate amount of attention. To the present, an abiotic model for the oxidation-reduction of intermediates participating in metabolic pathways has been ignored. We examined the oxidation-reduction effect of a prebiotic FeS/S/FeS(2) redox system on the interconversion between several pairs of ?-hydroxy acids and ?-keto acids (i.e., lactate/pyruvate, malate/oxaloacetate, and glycolate/glyoxylate). We found that, in the absence of FeS, elemental sulfur (S) oxidized ?-hydroxy acids to form corresponding keto acids only at a temperature higher than its melting point (113C); in the presence of FeS, such reactions occurred more efficiently through a coupled reaction mechanism, even at a temperature below the phase transition point of S. On the other hand, FeS was shown to have the capacity to reversibly reduce the keto acids. Such an oxidoreductase-like chemistry of the FeS/S/FeS(2) redox system suggests that it can determine the redox homeostasis of metabolic intermediates in the early evolutionary phase of life. The results provide a possible pathway for the development of primordial redox biochemistry in the iron-sulfur world. Key Words: Iron-sulfur world-FeS/S/FeS(2) redox system-Oxidoreductase-like chemistry. Astrobiology 11, 471-476. PMID:21707387

  6. Time-lapse anomalous X-ray diffraction shows how Fe(2+) substrate ions move through ferritin protein nanocages to oxidoreductase sites.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Cecilia; Di Pisa, Flavio; Lalli, Daniela; Rosa, Camilla; Theil, Elizabeth; Turano, Paola; Mangani, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Ferritin superfamily protein cages reversibly synthesize internal biominerals, Fe2O3·H2O. Fe(2+) and O2 (or H2O2) substrates bind at oxidoreductase sites in the cage, initiating biomineral synthesis to concentrate iron and prevent potentially toxic reactions products from Fe(2+)and O2 or H2O2 chemistry. By freezing ferritin crystals of Rana catesbeiana ferritin M (RcMf) at different time intervals after exposure to a ferrous salt, a series of high-resolution anomalous X-ray diffraction data sets were obtained that led to crystal structures that allowed the direct observation of ferrous ions entering, moving along and binding at enzyme sites in the protein cages. The ensemble of crystal structures from both aerobic and anaerobic conditions provides snapshots of the iron substrate bound at different cage locations that vary with time. The observed differential occupation of the two iron sites in the enzyme oxidoreductase centre (with Glu23 and Glu58, and with Glu58, His61 and Glu103 as ligands, respectively) and other iron-binding sites (with Glu53, His54, Glu57, Glu136 and Asp140 as ligands) reflects the approach of the Fe(2+) substrate and its progression before the enzymatic cycle 2Fe(2+) + O2 → Fe(3+)-O-O-Fe(3+) → Fe(3+)-O(H)-Fe(3+) and turnover. The crystal structures also revealed different Fe(2+) coordination compounds bound to the ion channels located at the threefold and fourfold symmetry axes of the cage. PMID:25849404

  7. Myocardial Overexpression of Mecr, a Gene of Mitochondrial FAS II Leads to Cardiac Dysfunction in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhijun; Leskinen, Hanna; Liimatta, Erkki; Sormunen, Raija T.; Miinalainen, Ilkka J.; Hassinen, Ilmo E.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo

    2009-01-01

    It has been recently recognized that mammalian mitochondria contain most, if not all, of the components of fatty acid synthesis type II (FAS II). Among the components identified is 2-enoyl thioester reductase/mitochondrial enoyl-CoA reductase (Etr1/Mecr), which catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of trans-2-enoyl thioesters, generating saturated acyl-groups. Although the FAS type II pathway is highly conserved, its physiological role in fatty acid synthesis, which apparently occurs simultaneously with breakdown of fatty acids in the same subcellular compartment in mammals, has remained an enigma. To study the in vivo function of the mitochondrial FAS in mammals, with special reference to Mecr, we generated mice overexpressing Mecr under control of the mouse metallothionein-1 promoter. These Mecr transgenic mice developed cardiac abnormalities as demonstrated by echocardiography in vivo, heart perfusion ex vivo, and electron microscopy in situ. Moreover, the Mecr transgenic mice showed decreased performance in endurance exercise testing. Our results showed a ventricular dilatation behind impaired heart function upon Mecr overexpression, concurrent with appearance of dysmorphic mitochondria. Furthermore, the data suggested that inappropriate expression of genes of FAS II can result in the development of hereditary cardiomyopathy. PMID:19440339

  8. Identification of rice genes associated with cosmic-ray response via co-expression gene network analysis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun-Goo; Kim, Dong Sub; Hwang, Jung Eun; Han, A-Reum; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2014-05-15

    In order to better understand the biological systems that are affected in response to cosmic ray (CR), we conducted weighted gene co-expression network analysis using the module detection method. By using the Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) value, we evaluated complex gene-gene functional interactions between 680 CR-responsive probes from integrated microarray data sets, which included large-scale transcriptional profiling of 1000 microarray samples. These probes were divided into 6 distinct modules that contained 20 enriched gene ontology (GO) functions, such as oxidoreductase activity, hydrolase activity, and response to stimulus and stress. In particular, modules 1 and 2 commonly showed enriched annotation categories such as oxidoreductase activity, including enriched cis-regulatory elements known as ROS-specific regulators. These results suggest that the ROS-mediated irradiation response pathway is affected by CR in modules 1 and 2. We found 243 ionizing radiation (IR)-responsive probes that exhibited similarities in expression patterns in various irradiation microarray data sets. The expression patterns of 6 randomly selected IR-responsive genes were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction following treatment with CR, gamma rays (GR), and ion beam (IB); similar patterns were observed among these genes under these 3 treatments. Moreover, we constructed subnetworks of IR-responsive genes and evaluated the expression levels of their neighboring genes following GR treatment; similar patterns were observed among them. These results of network-based analyses might provide a clue to understanding the complex biological system related to the CR response in plants. PMID:24631263

  9. Reference genes for gene expression studies in wheat flag leaves grown under different farming conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Internal control genes with highly uniform expression throughout the experimental conditions are required for accurate gene expression analysis as no universal reference genes exists. In this study, the expression stability of 24 candidate genes from Triticum aestivum cv. Cubus flag leaves grown under organic and conventional farming systems was evaluated in two locations in order to select suitable genes that can be used for normalization of real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) reactions. The genes were selected among the most common used reference genes as well as genes encoding proteins involved in several metabolic pathways. Findings Individual genes displayed different expression rates across all samples assayed. Applying geNorm, a set of three potential reference genes were suitable for normalization of RT-qPCR reactions in winter wheat flag leaves cv. Cubus: TaFNRII (ferredoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductase; AJ457980.1), ACT2 (actin 2; TC234027), and rrn26 (a putative homologue to RNA 26S gene; AL827977.1). In addition of these three genes that were also top-ranked by NormFinder, two extra genes: CYP18-2 (Cyclophilin A, AY456122.1) and TaWIN1 (14-3-3 like protein, AB042193) were most consistently stably expressed. Furthermore, we showed that TaFNRII, ACT2, and CYP18-2 are suitable for gene expression normalization in other two winter wheat varieties (Tommi and Centenaire) grown under three treatments (organic, conventional and no nitrogen) and a different environment than the one tested with cv. Cubus. Conclusions This study provides a new set of reference genes which should improve the accuracy of gene expression analyses when using wheat flag leaves as those related to the improvement of nitrogen use efficiency for cereal production. PMID:21951810

  10. Tropine Forming Tropinone Reductase Gene from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha): Biochemical Characteristics of the Recombinant Enzyme and Novel Physiological Overtones of Tissue-Wide Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Amit Kumar; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Negi, Arvind Singh; Misra, Laxminarain; Sangwan, Rajender Singh

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera is one of the most reputed medicinal plants of Indian systems of medicine synthesizing diverse types of secondary metabolites such as withanolides, alkaloids, withanamides etc. Present study comprises cloning and E. coli over-expression of a tropinone reductase gene (WsTR-I) from W. somnifera, and elucidation of biochemical characteristics and physiological role of tropinone reductase enzyme in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in aerial tissues of the plant. The recombinant enzyme was demonstrated to catalyze NADPH-dependent tropinone to tropine conversion step in tropane metabolism, through TLC, GC and GC-MS-MS analyses of the reaction product. The functionally active homodimeric ∼60 kDa enzyme catalyzed the reaction in reversible manner at optimum pH 6.7. Catalytic kinetics of the enzyme favoured its forward reaction (tropine formation). Comparative 3-D models of landscape of the enzyme active site contours and tropinone binding site were also developed. Tissue-wide and ontogenic stage-wise assessment of WsTR-I transcript levels revealed constitutive expression of the gene with relatively lower abundance in berries and young leaves. The tissue profiles of WsTR-I expression matched those of tropine levels. The data suggest that, in W. somnifera, aerial tissues as well possess tropane alkaloid biosynthetic competence. In vivo feeding of U-[14C]-sucrose to orphan shoot (twigs) and [14C]-chasing revealed substantial radiolabel incorporation in tropinone and tropine, confirming the de novo synthesizing ability of the aerial tissues. This inherent independent ability heralds a conceptual novelty in the backdrop of classical view that these tissues acquire the alkaloids through transportation from roots rather than synthesis. The TR-I gene expression was found to be up-regulated on exposure to signal molecules (methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid) and on mechanical injury. The enzyme's catalytic and structural properties as well as gene expression profiles are discussed with respect to their physiological overtones. PMID:24086372

  11. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  12. Thermostable NADP+-Dependent Medium-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Acinetobacter sp. Strain M-1: Purification and Characterization and Gene Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Akio; Sakai, Yasuyoshi; Ishige, Takeru; Kato, Nobuo

    2000-01-01

    NADPH-dependent alkylaldehyde reducing enzyme, which was greatly induced by n-hexadecane, from Acinetobacter sp. strain M-1 was purified and characterized. The purified enzyme had molecular masses of 40 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 160 kDa as determined by gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme, which was shown to be highly thermostable, was most active toward n-heptanal and could use n-alkylaldehydes ranging from C2 to C14 and several substituted benzaldehydes, including the industrially important compounds cinnamyl aldehyde and anisaldehyde, as substrates. The alrA gene coding for this enzyme was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded by the alrA gene exhibited homology to the amino acid sequences of zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenases from various sources. The gene could be highly expressed in Escherichia coli, and the product was purified to homogeneity by simpler procedures from the recombinant than from the original host. Our results show that this enzyme can be used for industrial bioconversion of useful alcohols and aldehydes. PMID:11097895

  13. Gene expression of sternohyoid and diaphragm muscles in type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes differs from type 1 diabetes in its pathogenesis. Type 1 diabetic diaphragm has altered gene expression which includes lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, ubiquitination and oxidoreductase activity. The objectives of the present study were to assess respiratory muscle gene expression changes in type 2 diabetes and to determine whether they are greater for the diaphragm than an upper airway muscle. Methods Diaphragm and sternohyoid muscle from Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were analyzed with Affymetrix gene expression arrays. Results The two muscles had 97 and 102 genes, respectively, with at least ± 1.5-fold significantly changed expression with diabetes, and these were assigned to gene ontology groups based on over-representation analysis. Several significantly changed groups were common to both muscles, including lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, muscle contraction, ion transport and collagen, although the number of genes and the specific genes involved differed considerably for the two muscles. In both muscles there was a shift in metabolism gene expression from carbohydrate metabolism toward lipid metabolism, but the shift was greater and involved more genes in diabetic diaphragm than diabetic sternohyoid muscle. Groups present in only diaphragm were blood circulation and oxidoreductase activity. Groups present in only sternohyoid were immune & inflammation and response to stress & wounding, with complement genes being a prominent component. Conclusion Type 2 diabetes-induced gene expression changes in respiratory muscles has both similarities and differences relative to previous data on type 1 diabetes gene expression. Furthermore, the diabetic alterations in gene expression differ between diaphragm and sternohyoid. PMID:24199937

  14. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 activity reduces hypertrophy in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway responds to oxidative stress via control of the expression of several antioxidant genes. Recent efforts demonstrate that Nrf2 modulates development of adiposity and adipogenesis. However little is kno...

  15. Purification of the aldehyde oxidase homolog 1 (AOH1) protein and cloning of the AOH1 and aldehyde oxidase homolog 2 (AOH2) genes. Identification of a novel molybdo-flavoprotein gene cluster on mouse chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Terao, M; Kurosaki, M; Marini, M; Vanoni, M A; Saltini, G; Bonetto, V; Bastone, A; Federico, C; Saccone, S; Fanelli, R; Salmona, M; Garattini, E

    2001-12-01

    We report the cloning of the AOH1 and AOH2 genes, which encode two novel mammalian molybdo-flavoproteins. We have purified the AOH1 protein to homogeneity in its catalytically active form from mouse liver. Twenty tryptic peptides, identified or directly sequenced by mass spectrometry, confirm the primary structure of the polypeptide deduced from the AOH1 gene. The enzyme contains one molecule of FAD, one atom of molybdenum, and four atoms of iron per subunit and shows spectroscopic features similar to those of the prototypic molybdo-flavoprotein xanthine oxidoreductase. The AOH1 and AOH2 genes are 98 and 60 kilobases long, respectively, and consist of 35 coding exons. The AOH1 gene has the potential to transcribe an extra leader non-coding exon, which is located downstream of exon 26, and is transcribed in the opposite orientation relative to all the other exons. AOH1 and AOH2 map to chromosome 1 in close proximity to each other and to the aldehyde oxidase gene, forming a molybdo-flavoenzyme gene cluster. Conservation in the position of exon/intron junctions among the mouse AOH1, AOH2, aldehyde oxidase, and xanthine oxidoreductase loci indicates that these genes are derived from the duplication of an ancestral precursor. PMID:11562361

  16. Recombinant expression of four oxidoreductases in Phanerochaete chrysosporium improves degradation of phenolic and non-phenolic substrates.

    PubMed

    Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Ortiz-Vzquez, Elizabeth; Fernndez, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gmez-Lim, Miguel A

    2015-09-10

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium belongs to a group of lignin-degrading fungi that secretes various oxidoreductive enzymes, including lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP). Previously, we demonstrated that the heterologous expression of a versatile peroxidase (VP) in P. chrysosporium recombinant strains is possible. However, the production of laccases (Lac) in this fungus has not been completely demonstrated and remains controversial. In order to investigate if the co-expression of Lac and VP in P. chrysosporium would improve the degradation of phenolic and non-phenolic substrates, we tested the constitutive co-expression of the lacIIIb gene from Trametes versicolor and the vpl2 gene from Pleurotus eryngii, and also the endogenous genes mnp1 and lipH8 by shock wave mediated transformation. The co-overexpression of peroxidases and laccases was improved up to five-fold as compared with wild type species. Transformant strains showed a broad spectrum in phenolic/non-phenolic biotransformation and a high percentage in synthetic dye decolorization in comparison with the parental strain. Our results show that the four enzymes can be constitutively expressed in a single transformant of P. chrysosporium in minimal medium. These data offer new possibilities for an easy and efficient co-expression of laccases and peroxidases in suitable basidiomycete species. PMID:26113215

  17. Analysis of gene expression in poplar trees (Populus deltoides x nigra, DN34) exposed to the toxic explosive hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachiyo; Brentner, Laura B; Merchie, Kate M; Schnoor, Jerald L; Yoon, Jong Moon; Van Aken, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    Poplar plants (Populus deltoides x nigra, DN34) growing under hydroponic conditions were exposed to 50 mg L(-1) of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) for 24 h. The expression of genes potentially involved in the metabolism of toxic explosives was analyzed by reverse-transcriptase (RT) real-time PCR. Genes under study were selected by reference to corresponding genes that were previously shown to be upregulated in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana by exposure to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) (Ekman et al., 2003. Plant Physiol., 133, 1397-1406). The target genes investigated include several genes encoding for enzymes known to be involved in the detoxification of xenobiotic pollutants, such as glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), cytochrome P-450s (CYPs), NADPH-dependent reductases, and peroxidases. Starting from A. thaliana TNT-inducible genes, corresponding Populus sequences were retrieved from the JGI Poplar Genome Project database and were used to design gene-specific primers. 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used as an internal standard and recorded gene expression levels were normalized by reference to nonexposed plants. In three separate experiments, five genes were found to be significantly amplified in leaf tissues by exposure to RDX, including GST (9.7 fold), CYP (1.6 fold), reductases (1.6-1.7 fold), and peroxidase (1.7 fold). In root tissues, only a single GST gene was found to be significantly amplified by exposure to RDX (2.0 fold). These results show, for the first time, that the exposure of poplar plants to RDX results in the induction of several genes that are potentially involved in explosive detoxification. PMID:18246712

  18. PAH Particles Perturb Prenatal Processes and Phenotypes: Protection from Deficits in Object Discrimination Afforded by Dampening of Brain Oxidoreductase Following In Utero Exposure to Inhaled Benzo(a)pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Ramesh, Aramandla; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Maguire, Mark; Safe, Stephen; Rhoades, Raina E.; Clark, Ryan; Jules, George; McCallister, Monique; Aschner, Michael; Hood, Darryl B.

    2012-01-01

    The wild-type (WT) Cprlox/lox (cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, Cpr) mouse is an ideal model to assess the contribution of P450 enzymes to the metabolic activation and disposition of environmental xenobiotics. In the present study, we examined the effect of in utero exposure to benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] aerosol on Sp4 and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)dependent systems as well as a resulting behavioral phenotype (object discrimination) in Cpr offspring. Results from in utero exposure of WT Cprlox/lox mice were compared with in utero exposed brain-Cpr-null offspring mice. Null mice were used as they do not express brain cytochrome P4501B1associated NADPH oxidoreductase (CYP1B1-associated NADPH oxidoreductase), thus reducing their capacity to produce neural B(a)P metabolites. Subsequent to in utero (E14E17) exposure to B(a)P (100 ?g/m3), Cprlox/lox offspring exhibited: (1) elevated B(a)P metabolite and F2-isoprostane neocortical tissue burdens, (2) elevated concentrations of cortical glutamate, (3) premature developmental expression of Sp4, (4) decreased subunit ratios of NR2B:NR2A, and (5) deficits in a novelty discrimination phenotype monitored to in utero exposed brain-Cpr-null offspring. Collectively, these findings suggest that in situ generation of metabolites by CYP1B1-associated NADPH oxidoreductase promotes negative effects on NMDA-mediated signaling processes during the period when synapses are first forming as well as effects on a subsequent behavioral phenotype. PMID:21987461

  19. A periplasmic aldehyde oxidoreductase represents the first molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor containing molybdo-flavoenzyme from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Meina; Mittelstdt, Gerd; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Saggu, Miguel; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Hildebrandt, Peter; Leimkhler, Silke

    2009-05-01

    Three DNA regions carrying genes encoding putative homologs of xanthine dehydrogenases were identified in Escherichia coli, named xdhABC, xdhD, and yagTSRQ. Here, we describe the purification and characterization of gene products of the yagTSRQ operon, a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein from E. coli, which is located in the periplasm. The 135 kDa enzyme comprised a noncovalent (alpha beta gamma) heterotrimer with a large (78.1 kDa) molybdenum cofactor (Moco)-containing YagR subunit, a medium (33.9 kDa) FAD-containing YagS subunit, and a small (21.0 kDa) 2 x [2Fe2S]-containing YagT subunit. YagQ is not a subunit of the mature enzyme, and the protein is expected to be involved in Moco modification and insertion into YagTSR. Analysis of the form of Moco present in YagTSR revealed the presence of the molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide cofactor. Two different [2Fe2S] clusters, typical for this class of enzyme, were identified by EPR. YagTSR represents the first example of a molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide-containing protein in E. coli. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme revealed that YagTSR converts a broad spectrum of aldehydes, with a preference for aromatic aldehydes. Ferredoxin instead of NAD(+) or molecular oxygen was used as terminal electron acceptor. Complete growth inhibition of E. coli cells devoid of genes from the yagTSRQ operon was observed by the addition of cinnamaldehyde to a low-pH medium. This finding shows that YagTSR might have a role in the detoxification of aromatic aldehydes for E. coli under certain growth conditions. PMID:19368556

  20. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Carbohydrate metabolism genes and pathways in insects: insights from the honey bee genome

    PubMed Central

    Kunieda, T; Fujiyuki, T; Kucharski, R; Foret, S; Ament, S A; Toth, A L; Ohashi, K; Takeuchi, H; Kamikouchi, A; Kage, E; Morioka, M; Beye, M; Kubo, T; Robinson, G E; Maleszka, R

    2006-01-01

    Carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes may have particularly interesting roles in the honey bee, Apis mellifera, because this social insect has an extremely carbohydrate-rich diet, and nutrition plays important roles in caste determination and socially mediated behavioural plasticity. We annotated a total of 174 genes encoding carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes and 28 genes encoding lipid-metabolizing enzymes, based on orthology to their counterparts in the fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. We found that the number of genes for carbohydrate metabolism appears to be more evolutionarily labile than for lipid metabolism. In particular, we identified striking changes in gene number or genomic organization for genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, cellulase, glucose oxidase and glucose dehydrogenases, glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductases, fucosyltransferases, and lysozymes. PMID:17069632

  2. [Detection and analysis of sulfur metabolism genes in Sphaerotilus natans subsp. sulfidivorans representatives].

    PubMed

    Belousova, E V; Chernousova, E Iu; Dubinina, G A; Turova, T P; Grabovich, M Iu

    2013-01-01

    The lithotrophic capacity of the betaproteobacteria Sphaerotilus natans subsp. sulfidivorans was confirmed at genetic level: functional genes of sulfur metabolism were detected (aprBA, soxB, and sqr, coding for adenylyl phosphosulfate reductase, thiosulfate-cleaving enzyme, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, respectively), and the expression of aprA and soxB genes was demonstrated. An evolutionary scenario for soxB genes in Sphaerotilus representatives is suggested based on comparative analysis of codon occurrence frequency, DNA base composition (G + C content), and topology of phylogenetic trees. The ancestor bacterium of the Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group was capable of lithotrophic growth in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds. However, in the course of further evolution, the sulfur metabolism genes, including the soxB gene, were lost by some Sphaerotilus strains. As a result, the lithotrophic Sphaerotilus-Leptothrix group split into two phylogenetic lineages, lithotrophic and organotrophic ones. PMID:25509396

  3. Influence of Populus Genotype on Gene Expression by the Wood Decay Fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, Jill; Marty, Amber; Mozuch, Michael; Kersten, Philip J.; Splinter BonDurant, Sandra; Sabat, Grzegorz; Azarpira, Ali; Ralph, John; Skyba, Oleksandr; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Blanchette, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    We examined gene expression patterns in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium when it colonizes hybrid poplar (Populus alba × tremula) and syringyl (S)-rich transgenic derivatives. A combination of microarrays and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed detection of a total of 9,959 transcripts and 793 proteins. Comparisons of P. chrysosporium transcript abundance in medium containing poplar or glucose as a sole carbon source showed 113 regulated genes, 11 of which were significantly higher (>2-fold, P < 0.05) in transgenic line 64 relative to the parental line. Possibly related to the very large amounts of syringyl (S) units in this transgenic tree (94 mol% S), several oxidoreductases were among the upregulated genes. Peptides corresponding to a total of 18 oxidoreductases were identified in medium consisting of biomass from line 64 or 82 (85 mol% S) but not in the parental clone (65 mol% S). These results demonstrate that P. chrysosporium gene expression patterns are substantially influenced by lignin composition. PMID:25015893

  4. The two CcdA proteins of Bacillus anthracis differentially affect virulence gene expression and sporulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Hesong; Wilson, Adam C

    2013-12-01

    The cytochrome c maturation system influences the expression of virulence factors in Bacillus anthracis. B. anthracis carries two copies of the ccdA gene, encoding predicted thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases that contribute to cytochrome c maturation, while the closely related organism Bacillus subtilis carries only one copy of ccdA. To investigate the roles of the two ccdA gene copies in B. anthracis, strains were constructed without each ccdA gene, and one strain was constructed without both copies simultaneously. Loss of both ccdA genes results in a reduction of cytochrome c production, an increase in virulence factor expression, and a reduction in sporulation efficiency. Complementation and expression analyses indicate that ccdA2 encodes the primary CcdA in B. anthracis, active in all three pathways. While CcdA1 retains activity in cytochrome c maturation and virulence control, it has completely lost its activity in the sporulation pathway. In support of this finding, expression of ccdA1 is strongly reduced when cells are grown under sporulation-inducing conditions. When the activities of CcdA1 and CcdA2 were analyzed in B. subtilis, neither protein retained activity in cytochrome c maturation, but CcdA2 could still function in sporulation. These observations reveal the complexities of thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase function in pathways relevant to virulence and physiology. PMID:24056109

  5. Steady-State Kinetic Mechanism of the Proline:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase Activity of Proline Utilization A (PutA) from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Michael A.; Tanner, John J.; Becker, Donald F.

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme from Escherichia coli performs the oxidation of proline to glutamate in two catalytic steps using separate proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and ?1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase domains. In the first reaction, the oxidation of proline is coupled to the reduction of ubiquinone (CoQ) by the PRODH domain, which has a ?8?8-barrel structure that is conserved in bacterial and eukaryotic PRODH enzymes. The structural requirements of the benzoquinone moiety were examined by steady-state kinetics using CoQ analogs. PutA displayed activity with all the analogs tested; the highest kcat/Km was obtained with CoQ2. The kinetic mechanism of the PRODH reaction was investigated use a variety of steady-state approaches. Initial velocity patterns measured using proline and CoQ1, combined with dead-end and product inhibition studies, suggested a two-site ping-pong mechanism for PutA. The kinetic parameters for PutA were not strongly influenced by solvent viscosity suggesting that diffusive steps do not significantly limit the overall reaction rate. In summary, the kinetic data reported here, along with analysis of the crystal structure data for the PRODH domain, suggest that the proline:ubiquinone oxidoreductase reaction of PutA occurs via a rapid equilibrium ping-pong mechanism with proline and ubiquinone binding at two distinct sites. PMID:22040654

  6. NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase from the mosquito Anopheles minimus: kinetic studies and the influence of Leu86 and Leu219 on cofactor binding and protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Sarapusit, Songklod; Xia, Chuanwu; Misra, Ila; Rongnoparut, Pornpimol; Kim, Jung-Ja P.

    2008-01-01

    NADPH-cytochrome c oxidoreductase from the mosquito Anopheles minimus lacking the first 55 amino acid residues was expressed in E. coli. The purified enzyme loses FMN, leading to an unstable protein and subsequent aggregation. To understand the basis for the instability, we constructed single and triple mutants of L86F, L219F, and P456A, with the first two residues in the FMN domain and the third in the FAD domain. The triple mutant was purified in high yield with stoichiometries of 0.97 FMN and 0.55 FAD. Deficiency in FAD content was overcome by addition of exogenous FAD to the enzyme. Both the wild-type and the triple mutant follow a two-site Ping-Pong mechanism with similar kinetic constants arguing against any global structural changes. Analysis of the single mutants indicates that the proline to alanine substitution has no impact, but that both leucine to phenylalanine substitutions are essential for FMN binding and maximum stability of the enzyme. PMID:18539133

  7. The MoxR ATPase RavA and Its Cofactor ViaA Interact with the NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase I in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith S.; Snider, Jamie D.; Graham, Chris; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew; Babu, Mohan; Houry, Walid A.

    2014-01-01

    MoxR ATPases are widespread throughout bacteria and archaea. The experimental evidence to date suggests that these proteins have chaperone-like roles in facilitating the maturation of dedicated protein complexes that are functionally diverse. In Escherichia coli, the MoxR ATPase RavA and its putative cofactor ViaA are found to exist in early stationary-phase cells at 37C at low levels of about 350 and 90 molecules per cell, respectively. Both proteins are predominantly localized to the cytoplasm, but ViaA was also unexpectedly found to localize to the cell membrane. Whole genome microarrays and synthetic lethality studies both indicated that RavA-ViaA are genetically linked to Fe-S cluster assembly and specific respiratory pathways. Systematic analysis of mutant strains of ravA and viaA indicated that RavA-ViaA sensitizes cells to sublethal concentrations of aminoglycosides. Furthermore, this effect was dependent on RavA's ATPase activity, and on the presence of specific subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase I (Nuo Complex, or Complex I). Importantly, both RavA and ViaA were found to physically interact with specific Nuo subunits. We propose that RavA-ViaA facilitate the maturation of the Nuo complex. PMID:24454883

  8. Structural data on the periplasmic aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli: SAXS and preliminary X-ray crystallography analysis.

    PubMed

    Otrelo-Cardoso, Ana Rita; da Silva Correia, Mrcia Alexandra; Schwuchow, Viola; Svergun, Dmitri I; Romo, Maria Joo; Leimkhler, Silke; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The periplasmic aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli is a molybdenum enzyme involved in detoxification of aldehydes in the cell. It is an example of an ??? heterotrimeric enzyme of the xanthine oxidase family of enzymes which does not dimerize via its molybdenum cofactor binding domain. In order to structurally characterize PaoABC, X-ray crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) have been carried out. The protein crystallizes in the presence of 20% (w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 using the hanging-drop vapour diffusion method. Although crystals were initially twinned, several experiments were done to overcome twinning and lowering the crystallization temperature (293 K to 277 K) was the solution to the problem. The non-twinned crystals used to solve the structure diffract X-rays to beyond 1.80 and belong to the C2 space group, with cell parameters a = 109.42 , b = 78.08 , c = 151.77 , ? = 99.77, and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. A molecular replacement solution was found for each subunit separately, using several proteins as search models. SAXS data of PaoABC were also collected showing that, in solution, the protein is also an ??? heterotrimer. PMID:24492481

  9. Expression of rat liver NAD(P)H:quinone-acceptor oxidoreductase in Escherichia coli and mutagenesis in vitro at Arg-177.

    PubMed

    Chen, H H; Ma, J X; Forrest, G L; Deng, P S; Martino, P A; Lee, T D; Chen, S

    1992-06-15

    A prokaryotic expression plasmid, pKK-DT2, containing the cDNA of rat liver NAD(P)H:quinone-acceptor oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.2; DT-diaphorase) was constructed and used to transform Escherichia coli strain JM109. The rat liver quinone reductase was expressed in strain in JM109 and was inducible with isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The expressed rat protein was purified by affinity chromatography and had kinetic and physical properties identical with the protein purified from rat liver in that it could utilize either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor and its activity was inhibited by dicoumarol. In addition, we have generated four mutants, Arg-177----His (R177H), Arg-177----Ala (R177A), Arg-177----Cys (R177C) and Arg-177----Leu (R177L), using this expression system. Several of the mutants behaved anomalously on SDS/PAGE, but all of the mutant proteins had the expected M(r) as determined by electrospray m.s. These results and those obtained from enzyme kinetic analysis, u.v./visible absorption spectral analysis, and flavin and tryptophan fluorescence analysis of the wild-type enzyme and four mutants indicated that mutations at Arg-177 changed the conformation of the enzyme, resulting in a decrease in enzyme activity. Replacing Arg-177 with leucine altered the protein conformation and decreased FAD incorporation. PMID:1622401

  10. Possible Roles of Two Quinone Molecules in Direct and Indirect Proton Pumps of Bovine Heart NADH-quinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I)

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, S. Tsuyoshi; Salerno, John C.; Ohnishi, Tomoko

    2010-01-01

    In many energy transducing systems which couple electron and proton transport, for example, bacterial photosynthetic reaction center, cytochrome bc1-complex (complex III) and E. coli quinol-oxidase (cytochrome bo3 complex), two protein-associated quinone molecules are known to work together. T. Ohnishi and her collaborators reported that two distinct semiquinone species also play important roles in NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). They were called SQNf (fast relaxing semiquinone) and SQNs (slow relaxing semiquinone). It was proposed that QNf serves as a direct proton carrier in the semiquinone-gated proton pump (Ohnishi and Salerno, FEBS Letters 579 (2005) 4555), while QNs works as a converter between one-electron and two electron transport processes. This communication presents a revised hypothesis in which QNf plays a role in a direct redox-driven proton pump, while QNs triggers an indirect conformation-driven proton pump. QNf and Q together serve as (1e?/2e?) converter, for the transfer of reducing equivalent to the Q-pool. PMID:20599678

  11. Catalytic importance of acidic amino acids on subunit NuoB of the Escherichia coli NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Flemming, Dirk; Hellwig, Petra; Lepper, Simone; Kloer, Daniel P; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2006-08-25

    The NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) from Escherichia coli is composed of 13 subunits called NuoA through NuoN and contains one FMN and 9 iron-sulfur clusters as redox groups. Electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone is coupled with the translocation of protons across the membrane by a yet unknown mechanism. Redox-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy showed that the oxidation of iron-sulfur cluster N2 located on NuoB is accompanied by the protonation of acidic amino acid(s). Here, we describe the effect of mutating the conserved acidic amino acids on NuoB. The complex was assembled in all mutants but the electron transfer activity was completely abolished in the mutants E67Q, D77N, and D94N. The complex isolated from these mutants contained N2 although in diminished amounts. The protonation of acidic amino acid(s) coupled with the oxidation of N2 was not detectable in the complex from the mutant E67Q. However, the conservative mutations E67D and D77E did not disturb the enzymatic activity, and the signals because of the protonation of acidic amino acid(s) were detectable in the E67D mutant. We discuss the possible participation of Glu(67) in a proton pathway coupled with the redox reaction of N2. PMID:16807239

  12. Iron-sulfur cluster N7 of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is essential for stability but not involved in electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Thomas; Bauer, Theresa; Drner, Katerina; Stolpe, Stefan; Sell, Philipp; Zocher, Georg; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2007-06-01

    The NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) from Escherichia coli is composed of 13 subunits called NuoA through NuoN. It catalyzes the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone by a chain of redox groups consisting of one FMN and seven iron-sulfur clusters. The function of the additional, nonconserved cluster N7 located on NuoG is not known. It has been speculated that it is not involved in electron transfer, due to its distance of more than 20 A from the electron transfer chain. Dithionite-reduced minus NADH-reduced EPR difference spectra of complex I and of a soluble fragment containing NuoG revealed for the first time the EPR spectrum of N7 in the complex. Individual mutation of the cysteines ligating this cluster to alanine led to a decreased amount of complex I in the membrane without affecting the electron transfer activity. Sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed that the complex from the C230A and C233A mutants decayed in detergent solution while the C237A and C265A mutant complex was stable. Cluster N7 was detectable in the latter mutants but with shifted g-values, indicating a different ligation of N7. Thus, N7 is essential for the stability of the complex but is not involved in electron transfer. PMID:17489563

  13. The role and specificity of the catalytic and regulatory cation-binding sites of the Na+-pumping NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Jurez, Oscar; Shea, Michael E; Makhatadze, George I; Barquera, Blanca

    2011-07-29

    The Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase is the entry site for electrons into the respiratory chain and the main sodium pump in Vibrio cholerae and many other pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we have employed steady-state and transient kinetics, together with equilibrium binding measurements to define the number of cation-binding sites and characterize their roles in the enzyme. Our results show that sodium and lithium ions stimulate enzyme activity, and that Na(+)-NQR enables pumping of Li(+), as well as Na(+) across the membrane. We also confirm that the enzyme is not able to translocate other monovalent cations, such as potassium or rubidium. Although potassium is not used as a substrate, Na(+)-NQR contains a regulatory site for this ion, which acts as a nonessential activator, increasing the activity and affinity for sodium. Rubidium can bind to the same site as potassium, but instead of being activated, enzyme turnover is inhibited. Activity measurements in the presence of both sodium and lithium indicate that the enzyme contains at least two functional sodium-binding sites. We also show that the binding sites are not exclusively responsible for ion selectivity, and other steps downstream in the mechanism also play a role. Finally, equilibrium-binding measurements with (22)Na(+) show that, in both its oxidized and reduced states, Na(+)-NQR binds three sodium ions, and that the affinity for sodium is the same for both of these states. PMID:21652714

  14. Absence of periplasmic DsbA oxidoreductase facilitates export of cysteine-containing passenger proteins to the Escherichia coli cell surface via the Iga beta autotransporter pathway.

    PubMed

    Jose, J; Krmer, J; Klauser, T; Pohlner, J; Meyer, T F

    1996-10-31

    The Iga beta autotransporter function of IgA1 protease from Neisseria gonorrhoeae was assessed in Escherichia coli using the Vibrio cholerae toxin B subunit (CtxB) as a heterologous passenger. N-terminal fusions with Iga beta of native CtxB or mutant CtxB protein containing no cysteines were constructed and analysed in isogenic E. coli mutants carrying defects in either or both the ompT (outer membrane protease T) and dsbA (periplasmic disulfide oxidoreductase) determinants. While export of the cystein-less CtxB passenger was independent of the dsbA genotype, the native CtxB passenger was properly translocated across the outer membrane only in the dsbA mutant background. This effect was consistent in the presence and in the absence of the OmpT protease which rather determined the release of surface-bound CtxB into the medium. Therefore, in agreement with previous observations Iga beta-dependent protein secretion requires an unfolded conformation of the passenger domain and can be blocked by disulfide loop formation in the presence of DsbA. Since DsbA acts in the periplasm, this provides evidence for a periplasmic intermediate in the Iga beta-mediated export pathway. E. coli (dsbA ompT) is highly suitable as a strain for the surface display of recombinant proteins via Iga beta, whether or not they contain cysteine residues. PMID:8921899

  15. Detection of functional hydrogen-bonded water molecules with protonated/deprotonated key carboxyl side chains in the respiratory enzyme ba3-oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Antonis; Soulimane, Tewfik; Varotsis, Constantinos

    2015-03-28

    The protonation/deprotonation of active carboxyl side chains by water networks forming the proton loading and exit sites in proteins are important steps in protein catalysis. An excellent system to study such basic principles is the heme-copper ba3 from T. thermophilus because it utilizes one proton input channel and it delivers protons to the active site for both O2 chemistry and proton pumping. We report the interaction of the heme a3 Fe propionate-A and the Asp372-His376 pair which forms the valve for the exit pathway for the protons with internal water molecules in ba3 oxidoreductase by light minus dark FTIR spectroscopy in conjunction with H2O/H2(18)O/D2O exchange. The proton loading site consists of several water molecules including w941/w946 which are H-bonded to propionate-A-H(+), acting as the Zundel cation. The detection of two H2(18)O sensitive bands at 3640 and 3634 cm(-1) shows the existence of weakly H-bonded water molecules. PMID:25728291

  16. Evidence of Negative Cooperativity and Half-Site Reactivity within an F420-Dependent Enzyme: Kinetic Analysis of F420H2:NADP(+) Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Ebenezer; Le, Cuong Quang; Nguyen, Toan; Oyugi, Mercy; Hossain, Mohammad Shawkat; Foss, Frank W; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta

    2016-02-23

    Here, we report the very first example of half-site reactivity and negative cooperativity involving an important F420 cofactor-dependent enzyme. F420H2:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (Fno) is an F420 cofactor-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible reduction of NADP(+) through the transfer of a hydride from the reduced F420 cofactor. These catalytic processes are of major significance in numerous biochemical processes. While the steady-state kinetic analysis showed classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics with varying concentrations of the F420 redox moiety, FO, such plots revealed non-Michaelis-Menten kinetic behavior when NADPH was varied. The double reciprocal plot of the varying concentrations of NADPH displays a downward concave shape, suggesting that negative cooperativity occurs between the two identical monomers. The transient state kinetic data show a burst prior to entering steady-state turnover. The burst suggests that product release is rate-limiting, and the amplitude of the burst phase corresponds to production of product in only one of the active sites of the functional dimer. These results suggest either half-site reactivity or an alternate sites model wherein the reduction of the cofactor, FO occurs at one active site at a time followed by reduction at the second active site. Thus, the data imply that Fno may be a functional regulatory enzyme. PMID:26811861

  17. Inhibition of a major NAD(P)-linked oxidoreductase from rat liver cytosol by steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and by prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Penning, T M; Talalay, P

    1983-01-01

    A NAD(P)-linked 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [3 alpha-hydroxysteroid: NAD(P) oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.50], purified to homogeneity from male rat liver cytosol, accounts for most of the oxidative activity for 3 alpha-hydroxysteroids and for benzenedihydrodiol (trans-1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-cyclohexadiene) of this tissue. This enzyme, which also promotes the reduction of quinones and certain aromatic aldehydes and ketones, is powerfully inhibited by the major types of nonsteroidal and steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The IC50 values for indomethacin and for betamethasone are in the low micromolar range. The rank order of the inhibitory potencies of a series of these agents paralleled closely that reported for the inhibition of cyclooxygenase by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or the indirect inhibition of phospholipase A2 by anti-inflammatory steroids. A good correlation is found also between the logarithm of the concentrations of these drugs required to inhibit 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and the human anti-inflammatory dose. The suggestion that this enzyme may play a role in mediating inflammation is further strengthened by the observation that the dehydrogenase binds arachidonic acid and is also potentially inhibited by certain prostaglandins. This enzyme may be of use in the evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:6410393

  18. Correlated Changes in the Activity, Amount of Protein, and Abundance of Transcript of NADPH:Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase and Chlorophyll Accumulation during Greening of Cucumber Cotyledons.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K.; Chen, R. M.; Tanaka, A.; Teramoto, H.; Tanaka, R.; Timko, M. P.; Tsuji, H.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the activity and abundance of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (NPR) and the abundance of mRNA encoding it were examined during the greening of 5-d-old etiolated cucumber cotyledons under continuous illumination. To measure NPR activity in the extracts from fully greened tissues, we have developed an improved method of assay. Upon exposure of etiolated cotyledons to light, NPR activity decreased rapidly within the first 2 h of exposure. Thereafter, enzymatic activity increased transiently, reaching a submaximum level at 12 h, and decreased slowly. The level of immunodetectable NPR protein followed the same pattern of changes during 96 h of greening as observed for NPR activity. The NPR mRNA in etiolated cotyledons disappeared quickly in the 1st h of irradiation. However, the level of mRNA increased thereafter to reach 3-fold or more of the dark level at 12 h and then decreased. The changes in the activity, protein level, and mRNA level after the first rapid decreases corresponded chronologically and nearly paralleled the increase in the rate of chlorophyll accumulation. These findings suggest that the greening of cucumber cotyledons is regulated basically by the level of NPR protein without activation or repression of enzymatic activity and that NPR mRNA increased by light maintains the level of enzyme protein necessary for greening. PMID:12228591

  19. Characterization of the Type 2 NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductases from Staphylococcus aureus and the bactericidal action of phenothiazines

    PubMed Central

    Schurig-Briccio, Lici A.; Yano, Takahiro; Rubin, Harvey; Gennis, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is currently one of the principal multiply resistant bacterial pathogens causing serious infections, many of which are life-threatening. Consequently, new therapeutic targets are required to combat such infections. In the current work, we explore the type 2 NADH dehydrogenases (NDH-2s) as possible drug targets and look at the effects of phenothiazines, known to inhibit NDH-2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. NDH-2s are monotopic membrane proteins that catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADH via FAD to the quinone pool. They are required for maintaining the NADH/NAD+ redox balance and contribute indirectly to the generation of proton motive force. NDH-2s are not present in mammals, but are the only form of respiratory NADH dehydrogenase in several pathogens, including S. aureus. In this work, the two putative ndh genes present in the S. aureus genome were identified, cloned and expressed, and the proteins purified and characterized. Phenothiazines were shown to inhibit both of the S. aureus NDH-2s with IC50 values as low as 8 ?M. However, evaluating the effects of phenothiazines on whole cells of S. aureus was complicated by the fact that they are also acting as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:24709059

  20. Improved biocatalysts from a synthetic circular permutation library of the flavin-dependent oxidoreductase old yellow enzyme.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Ashley B; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Lutz, Stefan

    2013-09-25

    Members of the old yellow enzyme (OYE) family are widely used, effective biocatalysts for the stereoselective trans-hydrogenation of activated alkenes. To further expand their substrate scope and improve catalytic performance, we have applied a protein engineering strategy called circular permutation (CP) to enhance the function of OYE1 from Saccharomyces pastorianus. CP can influence a biocatalyst's function by altering protein backbone flexibility and active site accessibility, both critical performance features because the catalytic cycle for OYE1 is thought to involve rate-limiting conformational changes. To explore the impact of CP throughout the OYE1 protein sequence, we implemented a highly efficient approach for cell-free cpOYE library preparation by combining whole-gene synthesis with in vitro transcription/translation. The versatility of such an ex vivo system was further demonstrated by the rapid and reliable functional evaluation of library members under variable environmental conditions with three reference substrates ketoisophorone, cinnamaldehyde, and (S)-carvone. Library analysis identified over 70 functional OYE1 variants with several biocatalysts exhibiting over an order of magnitude improved catalytic activity. Although catalytic gains of individual cpOYE library members vary by substrate, the locations of new protein termini in functional variants for all tested substates fall within the same four distinct loop/lid regions near the active site. Our findings demonstrate the importance of these structural elements in enzyme function and support the hypothesis of conformational flexibility as a limiting factor for catalysis in wild type OYE. PMID:23987134

  1. Alternative splicing isoform in succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit C causes downregulation of succinate-coenzyme Q oxidoreductase activity in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    SATOH, NANA; YOKOYAMA, CHIKAKO; ITAMURA, NORIAKI; MIYAJIMA-NAKANO, YOSHIHARU; HISATOMI, HISASHI

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane and is responsible for the redox of succinic acid. SDH is a tetrameric iron-sulfur flavoprotein of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and respiratory chain. The SDH complex, subunit C (SDHC) transcript has deletion-type alternative splicing sites. Generally, alternative splicing produces variant proteins and expression patterns, as products of different genes. In certain cases, specific alternative splicing variants (ASVs) have been associated with human disease. Due to a frameshift mutation causing loss of the heme binding region, the SDHC ?5 isoform (lacking exon 5) exhibits no SDHC activity. To investigate whether the SDHC splicing variants can function as dominant-negative inhibitors, SDHC ASVs were overexpressed in HCT-15 human colorectal cancer cells. Using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, a dominant-negative effect of the ?5 isoform on SDHC mRNA was shown. In addition, ?5 overexpression increased the levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, in the ?5 isoform-overexpressing cells, SDH activity was reduced. SDHC activation is a significant event during the electron transport chain, and the function of the SDHC ?5 variant may be significant for the differentiation of tumor cells. PMID:25435987

  2. Defining redox centers in human electron transfer flavoprotein: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Frerman, F.E.; Beard, S.; Goodman, S.I.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in ETF or ETC:QO cause glutaric acidemia type II (GA2). ETF:QO is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein in the inner mitochondrial membrane which transfers electrons from ETF in the mitochondrial matrix to ubiquinone (Q). The human ETF:QO gene is on chromosome 4q32{r_arrow}qter, and encodes a 617 amino acid precursor which is processed to the 64 kDa mature form in the mitochondrion. One ETF:QO mutation in GA2 is a G{r_arrow}T transversion in a donor splice site, deleting the 222 bp upstream exon from the transcript. The deleted 74 amino acids are near the carboxyl terminus just beyond a predicted membrane helix, and include C561, one of four cysteine residues predicted to ligate the 4Fe4S cluster. The mutant protein is not stable in patient fibroblasts. We have expressed cDNAs encoding wild type (wt) ETF:QO, ETF:QO with the 74 amino acid deletion, and ETFF:QO with only a C561A mutation, in S cerevisiae. In all instances, precursor and mature ETF:QOs were stably inserted into the mitochondrial membrane. ETF:QO (C561A) is extracted from the membrane under the same conditions as wt ETF:QO, but ETF:QO with the deletion is much more difficult to extract. Wt ETF:QO accepts electrons from ETF and reduces Q but, while both mutant proteins accept electrons from ETF, neither of them reduces Q. This work demonstrates that C561 in human ETF:QO is essential for Q reduction (probably because it ligands the 4Fe4S cluster), that mutant proteins that are unstable in man may be stable in other systems, that cleavage of signal peptide from precursor proteins can occur within the inner mitochondrial membrane, and the general usefulness of expressing human mitochondrial proteins in yeast.

  3. ES936 stimulates DNA synthesis in HeLa cells independently on NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibition, through a mechanism involving p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    González-Aragón, David; Alcaín, Francisco J; Ariza, Julia; Jódar, Laura; Barbarroja, Nuria; López-Pedrera, Chary; Villalba, José M

    2010-07-30

    The indolequinone ES936 (5-methoxy-1,2-dimethyl-3-[(4-nitrophenol)methyl]-indole-4,7-dione) is a potent mechanism-based inhibitor of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Here, we report that ES936 significantly stimulated thymidine incorporation in sparse cultures of human adenocarcinoma HeLa cells, but was without effect in dense cultures. Stimulation of DNA synthesis was not related with a DNA repair response because an increase in thymidine incorporation was not observed in cells treated with 2,5 bis-[1-aziridyl]-1,4 benzoquinone, a well-established antitumor quinone that causes DNA damage. Conversely, it was related with an increase of cell growth. NQO1 inhibition was not involved in ES936 stimulation of DNA synthesis, because the same response was observed in cells where NQO1 expression had been knocked down by small interfering RNA. Stimulation of DNA synthesis was reverted by treatment with ambroxol, a SOD mimetic, and by pyruvate, an efficient peroxide scavenger, supporting the involvement of alterations in cellular redox state. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 with either SB203580 or PD169316 completely abolished ES936-stimulated DNA synthesis, indicating the requirement of p38 activity. This is the first report that demonstrates the existence of an ES936-sensitive system which is separate from NQO1, modulating the redox state and cell growth in HeLa cells through a p38-dependent mechanism. Our results show that the effect ES936 exerts on DNA synthesis may be either positive or negative depending on the cellular context and growth conditions. PMID:20433816

  4. Identification of the coupling step in Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from real-time kinetics of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Belevich, Nikolai P; Bertsova, Yulia V; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Baykov, Alexander A; Bogachev, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) uses a unique set of prosthetic redox groups-two covalently bound FMN residues, a [2Fe-2S] cluster, FAD, riboflavin and a Cys4[Fe] center-to catalyze electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in a reaction coupled with Na(+) translocation across the membrane. Here we used an ultra-fast microfluidic stopped-flow instrument to determine rate constants and the difference spectra for the six consecutive reaction steps of Vibrio harveyi Na(+)-NQR reduction by NADH. The instrument, with a dead time of 0.25ms and optical path length of 1cm allowed collection of visible spectra in 50-?s intervals. By comparing the spectra of reaction steps with the spectra of known redox transitions of individual enzyme cofactors, we were able to identify the chemical nature of most intermediates and the sequence of electron transfer events. A previously unknown spectral transition was detected and assigned to the Cys4[Fe] center reduction. Electron transfer from the [2Fe-2S] cluster to the Cys4[Fe] center and all subsequent steps were markedly accelerated when Na(+) concentration was increased from 20?M to 25mM, suggesting coupling of the former step with tight Na(+) binding to or occlusion by the enzyme. An alternating access mechanism was proposed to explain electron transfer between subunits NqrF and NqrC. According to the proposed mechanism, the Cys4[Fe] center is alternatively exposed to either side of the membrane, allowing the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NqrF and the FMN residue of NqrC to alternatively approach the Cys4[Fe] center from different sides of the membrane. PMID:26655930

  5. The potency of inducers of NAD(P)H:(quinone-acceptor) oxidoreductase parallels their efficiency as substrates for glutathione transferases. Structural and electronic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, S R; Xue, L A; Klenz, E M; Talalay, P

    1991-01-01

    Induction of glutathione transferases (EC. 2.5.1.18), NAD(P)H:(quinone-acceptor) oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.2; quinone reductase) and other detoxification enzymes is a major mechanism for protecting cells against the toxicities of electrophiles, including many carcinogens. Although inducers of these two enzymes belong to many different chemical classes, they nevertheless contain (or acquire by metabolism) electrophilic centres that appear to be essential for inclusive activity, and many inducers are Michael reaction acceptors [Talalay, De Long & Prochaska (1988) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 85, 8261-8265]. The inducers therefore share structural and electronic features with glutathione transferase substrates. To define these features more precisely, we examined the inductive potencies (by measuring quinone reductase in murine hepatoma cells) of two types of glutathione transferase substrates: a series of 1-chloro-2-nitrobenzenes bearing para-oriented electron-donating or -withdrawing substituents and a wide variety of other commonly used and structurally unrelated glutathione transferase substrates. We conclude that virtually all glutathione transferase substrates are inducers, and their potencies in the nitrobenzene series correlate linearly with the Hammett sigma or sigma- values of the aromatic substituents, precisely as previously reported for their efficiencies as glutathione transferase substrates. More detailed information on the electronic requirements for inductive activity was obtained with a series of methyl trans-cinnamates bearing electron-withdrawing or -donating substituents on the aromatic ring, and in which the electronic densities at the olefinic and adjacent carbon atoms were measured by 13C n.m.r. Electron-withdrawing meta-substituents markedly enhance inductive potency in parallel with their increased non-enzymic reactivity with GSH. Thus, methyl 3-bromo-, 3-nitro- and 3-chloro-cinnamates are 21, 14 and 8 times more potent inducers than the parent methyl cinnamate. This finding permits the design of more potent inducers, which are important for elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of induction. PMID:1900000

  6. Electrical Wiring of the Aldehyde Oxidoreductase PaoABC with a Polymer Containing Osmium Redox Centers: Biosensors for Benzaldehyde and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Dierich, Marlen; Stiba, Konstanze; Schwuchow, Viola; Leimkhler, Silke; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and ??aminobutyric acid (GABA) are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below ?0.15 V (vs. Ag|AgCl, 1 M KCl). The pH-dependence of benzaldehyde oxidation can be strongly influenced by the ionic strength. The effect is similar with the soluble osmium redox complex and therefore indicates a clear electrostatic effect on the bioelectrocatalytic efficiency of PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. At lower ionic strength, the pH-optimum is high and can be switched to low pH-values at high ionic strength. This offers biosensing at high and low pH-values. A reagentless biosensor has been formed with enzyme wired onto a screen-printed electrode in a flow cell device. The response time to addition of benzaldehyde is 30 s, and the measuring range is between 10150 M and the detection limit of 5 M (signal to noise ratio 3:1) of benzaldehyde. The relative standard deviation in a series (n = 13) for 200 M benzaldehyde is 1.9%. For the biosensor, a response to succinic semialdehyde was also identified. Based on this response and the ability to work at high pH a biosensor for GABA is proposed by coimmobilizing GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) and PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. PMID:25587431

  7. GLYCOLATE OXIDASE3, a Glycolate Oxidase Homolog of Yeast l-Lactate Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase, Supports l-Lactate Oxidation in Roots of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Engqvist, Martin K M; Schmitz, Jessica; Gertzmann, Anke; Florian, Alexandra; Jaspert, Nils; Arif, Muhammad; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Fernie, Alisdair R; Maurino, Veronica G

    2015-10-01

    In roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), l-lactate is generated by the reduction of pyruvate via l-lactate dehydrogenase, but this enzyme does not efficiently catalyze the reverse reaction. Here, we identify the Arabidopsis glycolate oxidase (GOX) paralogs GOX1, GOX2, and GOX3 as putative l-lactate-metabolizing enzymes based on their homology to CYB2, the l-lactate cytochrome c oxidoreductase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that GOX3 uses l-lactate with a similar efficiency to glycolate; in contrast, the photorespiratory isoforms GOX1 and GOX2, which share similar enzymatic properties, use glycolate with much higher efficiencies than l-lactate. The key factor making GOX3 more efficient with l-lactate than GOX1 and GOX2 is a 5- to 10-fold lower Km for the substrate. Consequently, only GOX3 can efficiently metabolize l-lactate at low intracellular concentrations. Isotope tracer experiments as well as substrate toxicity tests using GOX3 loss-of-function and overexpressor plants indicate that l-lactate is metabolized in vivo by GOX3. Moreover, GOX3 rescues the lethal growth phenotype of a yeast strain lacking CYB2, which cannot grow on l-lactate as a sole carbon source. GOX3 is predominantly present in roots and mature to aging leaves but is largely absent from young photosynthetic leaves, indicating that it plays a role predominantly in heterotrophic rather than autotrophic tissues, at least under standard growth conditions. In roots of plants grown under normoxic conditions, loss of function of GOX3 induces metabolic rearrangements that mirror wild-type responses under hypoxia. Thus, we identified GOX3 as the enzyme that metabolizes l-lactate to pyruvate in vivo and hypothesize that it may ensure the sustainment of low levels of l-lactate after its formation under normoxia. PMID:26246447

  8. Removal of naphthols and analogues by the combined use of an oxidoreductase polyphenol oxidase and a biopolymer chitosan from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuji; Gotoh, Asahi; Shinozaki, Fumiyoshi; Kashiwada, Ayumi; Yamada, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the combined use of an amino group-containing polymer chitosan and an oxidoreductase polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was applied to the removal of naphthols and dihydroxynaphthalenes (DHNs) from aqueous solutions. The process parameters, such as the pH value, temperature and enzyme dose, were discussed for PPO-catalysed oxidation of 1-naphthol. The optimum conditions of enzymatic oxidation of 1-naphthol were determined to be pH 8.0 and 40 °C. Under the optimum conditions, PPO-catalysed oxidation of 1-naphthol increased with an increase in the enzyme dose. Quinone derivatives enzymatically generated were chemisorbed on chitosan beads and the initial velocity of PPO-catalysed oxidation increased with an increase in the amount of added chitosan beads. A specific initial velocity of 0.0675 μmol/U·min was obtained in the PPO concentration range below 200 U/cm³ and 1-naphthol was completely removed within 24 h by quinone adsorption on chitosan beads (0.20 cm³/cm³) at a PPO concentration of 100 U/cm³. The removal time was shortened by increasing the enzyme dose or the amount of added chitosan beads. 2-Naphthol was also completely removed at an initial concentration of 0.05 mM or less by prolonging the reaction time, since PPO-catalysed oxidation of 2-naphthol was much slower than that of 1-naphthol. In addition, this procedure was also applied to the removal of DHNs. These results revealed that the procedure constructed in this study was an effective technique to remove naphthols and DHNs from the aqueous medium. PMID:25189838

  9. Arsenite pretreatment enhances the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in human cancer cell lines via increased NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Yiling; Ho, I-C.; Su, P.-F.; Lee, T.-C. . E-mail: bmtcl@ibms.sinica.edu.tw

    2006-08-01

    Arsenic is an effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. The use of arsenic for treating solid tumors, particularly in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents, has been extensively studied. Here, we report that arsenite-resistant human lung cancer CL3R15 cells constitutively overexpress NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), an enzyme responsible for activation of mitomycin C (MMC), and are more susceptible to MMC cytotoxicity than parental CL3 cells. The effects of arsenite pretreatment on NQO1 induction were examined in CL3, H1299, H460, and MC-T2 cells. Arsenite pretreatment significantly enhanced the expression of NQO1 and susceptibility to MMC in CL3, H1299, and MC-T2 cells, but not in H460 cells that express high endogenous levels of NQO1. Alternatively, arsenic pretreatment reduced adriamycin sensitivity of CL3 cells. Arsenite-mediated MMC susceptibility was abrogated by dicumarol (DIC), an NQO1 inhibitor, indicating that NQO1 is one of the key regulators of arsenite-mediated MMC susceptibility. Various cancer cell lines showed different basal levels of NQO1 activity and a different capacity for NQO1 induction in response to arsenite treatment. However, overall, there was a positive correlation between induced NQO1 activity and MMC susceptibility in cells pretreated with various doses of arsenite. These results suggest that arsenite may increase NQO1 activity and thus enhance the antineoplastic activity of MMC. In addition, our results also showed that inhibition of NQO1 activity by DIC reversed the arsenite resistance of CL3R15 cells.

  10. Regulation of etioplast pigment-protein complexes, inner membrane architecture, and protochlorophyllide a chemical heterogeneity by light-dependent NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases A and B.

    PubMed

    Franck, F; Sperling, U; Frick, G; Pochert, B; van Cleve, B; Apel, K; Armstrong, G A

    2000-12-01

    The etioplast of dark-grown angiosperms is characterized by the prolamellar body (PLB) inner membrane, the absence of chlorophyll, and the accumulation of divinyl and monovinyl derivatives of protochlorophyll(ide) a [Pchl(ide) a]. Either of two structurally related, but differentially expressed light-dependent NADPH:Pchlide oxidoreductases (PORs), PORA and PORB, can assemble the PLB and form dark-stable ternary complexes containing enzymatically photoactive Pchlide-F655. Here we have examined in detail whether these polypeptides play redundant roles in etioplast differentiation by manipulating the total POR content and the PORA-to-PORB ratio of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings using antisense and overexpression approaches. POR content correlates closely with PLB formation, the amounts, spectroscopic properties, and photoreduction kinetics of photoactive Pchlide, the ratio of photoactive Pchlide-F655 to non-photoactive Pchl(ide)-F632, and the ratio of divinyl- to monovinyl-Pchl(ide). This last result defines POR as the first endogenous protein factor demonstrated to influence the chemical heterogeneity of Pchl(ide) in angiosperms. It is intriguing that excitation energy transfer between different spectroscopic forms of Pchl(ide) in etiolated cotyledons remains largely independent of POR content. We therefore propose that the PLB contains a minimal structural unit with defined pigment stoichiometries, within which a small amount of non-photoactive Pchl(ide) transfers excitation energy to a large excess of photoactive Pchlide-F655. In addition, our data suggests that POR may bind not only stoichiometric amounts of photoactive Pchlide, but also substoichiometric amounts of non-photoactive Pchl(ide). We conclude that the typical characteristics of etioplasts are closely related to total POR content, but not obviously to the specific presence of PORA or PORB. PMID:11115885

  11. Mitochondrial Impairment May Increase Cellular NAD(P)H: Resazurin Oxidoreductase Activity, Perturbing the NAD(P)H-Based Viability Assays

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, Vasily A.; Artiukhov, Artem V.; Oppermann, Henry; Kazantsev, Alexey V.; Lukashev, Nikolay V.; Bunik, Victoria I.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase activity with artificial dyes (NAD(P)H-OR) is an indicator of viability, as the cellular redox state is important for biosynthesis and antioxidant defense. However, high NAD(P)H due to impaired mitochondrial oxidation, known as reductive stress, should increase NAD(P)H-OR yet perturb viability. To better understand this complex behavior, we assayed NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin (Alamar Blue) in glioblastoma cell lines U87 and T98G, treated with inhibitors of central metabolism, oxythiamin, and phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids. Targeting the thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes, the inhibitors are known to decrease the NAD(P)H production in the pentose phosphate shuttle and/or upon mitochondrial oxidation of 2-oxo acids. Nevertheless, the inhibitors elevated NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, suggesting impaired NAD(P)H oxidation rather than increased viability. In particular, inhibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes affects metabolism of malate, which mediates mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NAD(P)H. We showed that oxythiamin not only inhibited mitochondrial 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases, but also induced cell-specific changes in glutamate and malate dehydrogenases and/or malic enzyme. As a result, inhibition of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases compromises mitochondrial metabolism, with the dysregulated electron fluxes leading to increases in cellular NAD(P)H-OR. Perturbed mitochondrial oxidation of NAD(P)H may thus complicate the NAD(P)H-based viability assay. PMID:26308058

  12. Indolequinone Inhibitors of NRH:Quinone Oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2). Characterization of Mechanism of Inhibition in both Cell-free and Cellular Systems.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Dufour, Marine; Siegel, David; Reigan, Philip; Gomez, Joe; Shieh, Biehuoy; Moody, Christopher J.; Ross, David

    2011-01-01

    We describe a series of indolequinones as efficient mechanism-based inhibitors of NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) for use either in cellular or cell-free systems. Compounds were designed to be reduced in the active site of the enzyme leading to loss of a substituted phenol leaving group and generation of a reactive iminium electrophile. Inhibition of NQO2 activity was assessed in both cell-free systems and in the human leukemia K562 cell line. Inhibition of recombinant human NQO2 by the indolequinones was NRH-dependent with kinetic parameters characteristic of mechanism-based inhibition and partition ratios as low as 2.0. Indolequinones inhibited NQO2 activity in K562 cells at nanomolar concentrations which did not inhibit NQO1 and were non-toxic to cells. Computational-based molecular modeling simulations demonstrated favorable conformations of indolequinones positioned directly above and in parallel to the isoalloxazine ring of FAD and mass spectrometry extended our previous finding of adduction of the FAD in the active site of NQO2 by an indolequinone-derived iminium electrophile to the wider series of indolequinone inhibitors. Modeling combined with biochemical testing identified key structural parameters for effective inhibition including a 5-aminoalkyamino side chain. Hydrogen bonding of the terminal amine nitrogen in the aminoalkylamino side chain was found to be critical for correct orientation of the inhibitors in the active site. These indolequinones were irreversible inhibitors and were found to be at least an order of magnitude more potent than any previously documented competitive inhibitors of NQO2 and represent the first mechanism-based inhibitors of NQO2 to be characterized in cellular systems. PMID:21718050

  13. LEDGF/p75 Overexpression Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Necrosis and Upregulates the Oxidoreductase ERP57/PDIA3/GRP58 in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anamika; Cajigas-Du Ross, Christina K.; Rios-Colon, Leslimar; Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Leoh, Lai Sum; Rojas, Heather; Banerjee, Hiya; Martinez, Shannalee R.; Acevedo-Martinez, Stephanny; Casiano, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) mortality is driven by highly aggressive tumors characterized by metastasis and resistance to therapy, and this aggressiveness is mediated by numerous factors, including activation of stress survival pathways in the pro-inflammatory tumor microenvironment. LEDGF/p75, also known as the DFS70 autoantigen, is a stress transcription co-activator implicated in cancer, HIV-AIDS, and autoimmunity. This protein is targeted by autoantibodies in certain subsets of patients with PCa and inflammatory conditions, as well as in some apparently healthy individuals. LEDGF/p75 is overexpressed in PCa and other cancers, and promotes resistance to chemotherapy-induced cell death via the transactivation of survival proteins. We report in this study that overexpression of LEDGF/p75 in PCa cells attenuates oxidative stress-induced necrosis but not staurosporine-induced apoptosis. This finding was consistent with the observation that while LEDGF/p75 was robustly cleaved in apoptotic cells into a p65 fragment that lacks stress survival activity, it remained relatively intact in necrotic cells. Overexpression of LEDGF/p75 in PCa cells led to the upregulation of transcript and protein levels of the thiol-oxidoreductase ERp57 (also known as GRP58 and PDIA3), whereas its depletion led to ERp57 transcript downregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcription reporter assays showed LEDGF/p75 binding to and transactivating the ERp57 promoter, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly elevated co-expression of these two proteins in clinical prostate tumor tissues. Our results suggest that LEDGF/p75 is not an inhibitor of apoptosis but rather an antagonist of oxidative stress-induced necrosis, and that its overexpression in PCa leads to ERp57 upregulation. These findings are of significance in clarifying the role of the LEDGF/p75 stress survival pathway in PCa. PMID:26771192

  14. Down-regulation of the detoxifying enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 by vanadium in Hepa 1c1c7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.

    2009-05-01

    Recent data suggest that vanadium (V{sup 5+}) compounds exert protective effects against chemical-induced carcinogenesis, mainly through modifying various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. In fact, we have shown that V{sup 5+} down-regulates the expression of Cyp1a1 at the transcriptional level through an ATP-dependent mechanism. However, incongruously, there is increasing evidence that V{sup 5+} is found in higher amounts in cancer cells and tissues than in normal cells or tissues. Therefore, the current study aims to address the possible effect of this metal on the regulation of expression of an enzyme that helps maintain endogenous antioxidants used to protect tissues/cells from mutagens, carcinogens, and oxidative stress damage, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1). In an attempt to examine these effects, Hepa 1c1c7 cells and its AhR-deficient version, c12, were treated with increasing concentrations of V{sup 5+} in the presence of two distinct Nqo1 inducers, the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SUL). Our results showed that V{sup 5+} inhibits the TCDD- and SUL-mediated induction of Nqo1 at mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels. At transcriptional level, V{sup 5+} was able to decrease the TCDD- and SUL-induced nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the subsequent binding to antioxidant responsive element (ARE) without affecting Nrf2 protein levels. Looking at post-transcriptional level; we found that V{sup 5+} did not affect Nqo1 mRNA transcripts turn-over rates. However, at the post-translational level V{sup 5+} increased Nqo1 protein half-life. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that V{sup 5+} down-regulates Nqo1 at the transcriptional level, possibly through inhibiting the ATP-dependent activation of Nrf2.

  15. EPR signals assigned to Fe/S cluster N1c of the Escherichia coli NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) derive from cluster N1a.

    PubMed

    Uhlmann, Mareike; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2005-02-01

    The proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, which is also called respiratory complex I, transfers electrons from NADH to ubiquinone via one flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and up to nine iron-sulfur clusters. A structural minimal form of complex I consisting of 14 different subunits called NuoA to NuoN (or Nqo1 to Nqo14) is found in bacteria. The isolated Escherichia coli complex I can be split into a NADH dehydrogenase fragment, a connecting fragment, and a membrane fragment. The soluble NADH dehydrogenase fragment represents the electron input part of the complex and consists of the subunits NuoE, F, and G. The FMN and four iron-sulfur clusters have been detected in this fragment by means of EPR spectroscopy. One of the EPR signals, called N1c, has spectral properties, which are not found in preparations of the complex from other organisms. Therefore, it is attributed to an additional binding motif on NuoG, which is present only in a few bacteria including E. coli. Here, we show by means of EPR spectroscopic analysis of the NADH dehydrogenase fragment containing site-directed mutations on NuoG that the EPR signals in question derived from cluster N1a on NuoE. The mutations in NuoG disturbed the assembly of the overproduced NADH dehydrogenase fragment indicating that a yet undetected cluster might be bound to the additional motif. Thus, there is no third binuclear iron-sulfur "N1c" in the E. coli complex I but an additional tetranuclear cluster that may be coined N7. PMID:15683249

  16. Roles of Subunit NuoK (ND4L) in the Energy-transducing Mechanism of Escherichia coli NDH-1 (NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase)*

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Bacete, Jesus; Sinha, Prem Kumar; Sato, Motoaki; Patki, Gaurav; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial H+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1) catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with proton pumping across the cytoplasmic membrane. The NuoK subunit (counterpart of the mitochondrial ND4L subunit) is one of the seven hydrophobic subunits in the membrane domain and bears three transmembrane segments (TM13). Two glutamic residues located in the adjacent transmembrane helices of NuoK are important for the energy coupled activity of NDH-1. In particular, mutation of the highly conserved carboxyl residue (KGlu-36 in TM2) to Ala led to a complete loss of the NDH-1 activities. Mutation of the second conserved carboxyl residue (KGlu-72 in TM3) moderately reduced the activities. To clarify the contribution of NuoK to the mechanism of proton translocation, we relocated these two conserved residues. When we shifted KGlu-36 along TM2 to positions 32, 38, 39, and 40, the mutants largely retained energy transducing NDH-1 activities. According to the recent structural information, these positions are located in the vicinity of KGlu-36, present in the same helix phase, in an immediately before and after helix turn. In an earlier study, a double mutation of two arginine residues located in a short cytoplasmic loop between TM1 and TM2 (loop-1) showed a drastic effect on energy transducing activities. Therefore, the importance of this cytosolic loop of NuoK (KArg-25, KArg-26, and KAsn-27) for the energy transducing activities was extensively studied. The probable roles of subunit NuoK in the energy transducing mechanism of NDH-1 are discussed. PMID:23105119

  17. Compounds from the Fruits of the Popular European Medicinal Plant Vitex agnus-castus in Chemoprevention via NADP(H):Quinone Oxidoreductase Type 1 Induction.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenghong; Qiu, Shengxiang; Yao, Ping; Sun, Handong; Fong, Harry H S; Zhang, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    As part of our continuing efforts in the search for potential biologically active compounds from medicinal plants, we have isolated 18 compounds including two novel nitrogen containing diterpenes from extracts of the fruits of Vitex agnus-castus. These isolates, along with our previously obtained novel compound vitexlactam A (1), were evaluated for potential biological effects, including cancer chemoprevention. Chemically, the nitrogenous isolates were found to be two labdane diterpene alkaloids, each containing an ? , ? -unsaturated ? -lactam moiety. Structurally, they were elucidated to be 9 ? -hydroxy-13(14)-labden-16,15-amide (2) and 6 ? -acetoxy-9 ? -hydroxy-13(14)-labden-15,16-amide (3), which were named vitexlactams B and C, respectively. The 15 known isolates were identified as vitexilactone (4), rotundifuran (5), 8-epi-manoyl oxide (6), vitetrifolin D (7), spathulenol (8), cis-dihydro-dehydro-diconiferylalcohol-9-O- ? -D-glucoside (9), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (10), 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,4'-tetramethoxyflavone (11), casticin (12), artemetin (13), aucubin (14), agnuside (15), ? -sitosterol (16), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (17), and p-hydroxybenzoic acid glucose ester (18). All compound structures were determined/identified on the basis of 1D and/or 2D NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. Compounds 6, 8, 9, and 18 were reported from a Vitex spieces for the first time. The cancer chemopreventive potentials of these isolates were evaluated for NADP(H):quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1) induction activity. Compound 7 demonstrated promising QR1 induction effect, while the new compound vitexlactam (3) was only slightly active. PMID:23662135

  18. Compounds from the Fruits of the Popular European Medicinal Plant Vitex agnus-castus in Chemoprevention via NADP(H):Quinone Oxidoreductase Type 1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shenghong; Qiu, Shengxiang; Yao, Ping; Sun, Handong; Fong, Harry H. S.; Zhang, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    As part of our continuing efforts in the search for potential biologically active compounds from medicinal plants, we have isolated 18 compounds including two novel nitrogen containing diterpenes from extracts of the fruits of Vitex agnus-castus. These isolates, along with our previously obtained novel compound vitexlactam A (1), were evaluated for potential biological effects, including cancer chemoprevention. Chemically, the nitrogenous isolates were found to be two labdane diterpene alkaloids, each containing an ?, ?-unsaturated ?-lactam moiety. Structurally, they were elucidated to be 9?-hydroxy-13(14)-labden-16,15-amide (2) and 6?-acetoxy-9?-hydroxy-13(14)-labden-15,16-amide (3), which were named vitexlactams B and C, respectively. The 15 known isolates were identified as vitexilactone (4), rotundifuran (5), 8-epi-manoyl oxide (6), vitetrifolin D (7), spathulenol (8), cis-dihydro-dehydro-diconiferylalcohol-9-O-?-D-glucoside (9), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (10), 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,4?-tetramethoxyflavone (11), casticin (12), artemetin (13), aucubin (14), agnuside (15), ?-sitosterol (16), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (17), and p-hydroxybenzoic acid glucose ester (18). All compound structures were determined/identified on the basis of 1D and/or 2D NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. Compounds 6, 8, 9, and 18 were reported from a Vitex spieces for the first time. The cancer chemopreventive potentials of these isolates were evaluated for NADP(H):quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1) induction activity. Compound 7 demonstrated promising QR1 induction effect, while the new compound vitexlactam (3) was only slightly active. PMID:23662135

  19. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Aldehyde Oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas Reveal a Dithiolene-Based Chemistry for Enzyme Activation and Inhibition by H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Brondino, Carlos D.; Moura, Jos J. G.; Romo, Maria J.; Gonzlez, Pablo J.; Santos-Silva, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes of the xanthine oxidase (XO) family catalyze the oxidative hydroxylation of aldehydes and heterocyclic compounds. The molybdenum active site shows a distorted square-pyramidal geometry in which two ligands, a hydroxyl/water molecule (the catalytic labile site) and a sulfido ligand, have been shown to be essential for catalysis. The XO family member aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (DgAOR) is an exception as presents in its catalytically competent form an equatorial oxo ligand instead of the sulfido ligand. Despite this structural difference, inactive samples of DgAOR can be activated upon incubation with dithionite plus sulfide, a procedure similar to that used for activation of desulfo-XO. The fact that DgAOR does not need a sulfido ligand for catalysis indicates that the process leading to the activation of inactive DgAOR samples is different to that of desulfo-XO. We now report a combined kinetic and X-ray crystallographic study to unveil the enzyme modification responsible for the inactivation and the chemistry that occurs at the Mo site when DgAOR is activated. In contrast to XO, which is activated by resulfuration of the Mo site, DgAOR activation/inactivation is governed by the oxidation state of the dithiolene moiety of the pyranopterin cofactor, which demonstrates the non-innocent behavior of the pyranopterin in enzyme activity. We also showed that DgAOR incubation with dithionite plus sulfide in the presence of dioxygen produces hydrogen peroxide not associated with the enzyme activation. The peroxide molecule coordinates to molybdenum in a ?2 fashion inhibiting the enzyme activity. PMID:24391748

  20. Apoptosis-inducing Factor (AIF) and Its Family Member Protein, AMID, Are Rotenone-sensitive NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductases (NDH-2).

    PubMed

    Elguindy, Mahmoud M; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2015-08-21

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death) are flavoproteins. Although AIF was originally discovered as a caspase-independent cell death effector, bioenergetic roles of AIF, particularly relating to complex I functions, have since emerged. However, the role of AIF in mitochondrial respiration and redox metabolism has remained unknown. Here, we investigated the redox properties of human AIF and AMID by comparing them with yeast Ndi1, a type 2 NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-2) regarded as alternative complex I. Isolated AIF and AMID containing naturally incorporated FAD displayed no NADH oxidase activities. However, after reconstituting isolated AIF or AMID into bacterial or mitochondrial membranes, N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID displayed substantial NADH:O? activities and supported NADH-linked proton pumping activities in the host membranes almost as efficiently as Ndi1. NADH:ubiquinone-1 activities in the reconstituted membranes were highly sensitive to 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (IC?? = ?1 ?m), a quinone-binding inhibitor. Overexpressing N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID enhanced the growth of a double knock-out Escherichia coli strain lacking complex I and NDH-2. In contrast, C-terminally tagged AIF and NADH-binding site mutants of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID failed to show both NADH:O? activity and the growth-enhancing effect. The disease mutant AIF?R201 showed decreased NADH:O? activity and growth-enhancing effect. Furthermore, we surprisingly found that the redox activities of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID were sensitive to rotenone, a well known complex I inhibitor. We propose that AIF and AMID are previously unidentified mammalian NDH-2 enzymes, whose bioenergetic function could be supplemental NADH oxidation in cells. PMID:26063804

  1. Mitochondrial Impairment May Increase Cellular NAD(P)H: Resazurin Oxidoreductase Activity, Perturbing the NAD(P)H-Based Viability Assays.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Vasily A; Artiukhov, Artem V; Oppermann, Henry; Kazantsev, Alexey V; Lukashev, Nikolay V; Bunik, Victoria I

    2015-01-01

    Cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase activity with artificial dyes (NAD(P)H-OR) is an indicator of viability, as the cellular redox state is important for biosynthesis and antioxidant defense. However, high NAD(P)H due to impaired mitochondrial oxidation, known as reductive stress, should increase NAD(P)H-OR yet perturb viability. To better understand this complex behavior, we assayed NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin (Alamar Blue) in glioblastoma cell lines U87 and T98G, treated with inhibitors of central metabolism, oxythiamin, and phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids. Targeting the thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes, the inhibitors are known to decrease the NAD(P)H production in the pentose phosphate shuttle and/or upon mitochondrial oxidation of 2-oxo acids. Nevertheless, the inhibitors elevated NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, suggesting impaired NAD(P)H oxidation rather than increased viability. In particular, inhibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes affects metabolism of malate, which mediates mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NAD(P)H. We showed that oxythiamin not only inhibited mitochondrial 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases, but also induced cell-specific changes in glutamate and malate dehydrogenases and/or malic enzyme. As a result, inhibition of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases compromises mitochondrial metabolism, with the dysregulated electron fluxes leading to increases in cellular NAD(P)H-OR. Perturbed mitochondrial oxidation of NAD(P)H may thus complicate the NAD(P)H-based viability assay. PMID:26308058

  2. Cross-Species Analysis of Protein Dynamics Associated with Hydride and Proton Transfer in the Catalytic Cycle of the Light-Driven Enzyme Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Hoeven, Robin; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-02-16

    Experimental interrogation of the relationship between protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis is challenging. Light-activated protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) is an excellent model for investigating this relationship because photoinitiation of the reaction cycle enables coordinated turnover in a "dark-assembled" ternary enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic cycle involves sequential hydride and proton transfers (from NADPH and an active site tyrosine residue, respectively) to the substrate protochlorophyllide. Studies with a limited cross-species subset of POR enzymes (n = 4) have suggested that protein dynamics associated with hydride and proton transfer are distinct [Heyes, D. J., Levy, C., Sakuma, M., Robertson, D. L., and Scrutton, N. S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 11849-11854]. Here, we use steady-state assays and single-turnover laser flash spectroscopy to analyze hydride and proton transfer dynamics in an extended series of POR enzymes taken from many species, including cyanobacteria, algae, embryophytes, and angiosperms. Hydride/proton transfer in all eukaryotic PORs is faster compared to prokaryotic PORs, suggesting active site architecture has been optimized in eukaryotic PORs following endosymbiosis. Visible pump-probe spectroscopy was also used to demonstrate a common photoexcitation mechanism for representative POR enzymes from different branches of the phylogenetic tree. Dynamics associated with hydride transfer are localized to the active site of all POR enzymes and are conserved. However, dynamics associated with proton transfer are variable. Protein dynamics associated with proton transfer are also coupled to solvent dynamics in cyanobacterial PORs, and these networks are likely required to optimize (shorten) the donor-acceptor distance for proton transfer. These extended networks are absent in algal and plant PORs. Our analysis suggests that extended networks of dynamics are disfavored, possibly through natural selection. Implications for the evolution of POR and more generally for other enzyme catalysts are discussed. PMID:26807652

  3. Semiquinone and Cluster N6 Signals in His-tagged Proton-translocating NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I) from Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Madhavan; Gabrieli, David J.; Leung, Steven A.; Elguindy, Mahmoud M.; Glaser, Carl A.; Saju, Nitha; Sinha, Subhash C.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2013-01-01

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) pumps protons across the membrane using downhill redox energy. The Escherichia coli complex I consists of 13 different subunits named NuoA-N coded by the nuo operon. Due to the low abundance of the protein and some difficulty with the genetic manipulation of its large ∼15-kb operon, purification of E. coli complex I has been technically challenging. Here, we generated a new strain in which a polyhistidine sequence was inserted upstream of nuoE in the operon. This allowed us to prepare large amounts of highly pure and active complex I by efficient affinity purification. The purified complex I contained 0.94 ± 0.1 mol of FMN, 29.0 ± 0.37 mol of iron, and 1.99 ± 0.07 mol of ubiquinone/1 mol of complex I. The extinction coefficient of isolated complex I was 495 mm−1 cm−1 at 274 nm and 50.3 mm−1 cm−1 at 410 nm. NADH:ferricyanide activity was 219 ± 9.7 μmol/min/mg by using HEPES-Bis-Tris propane, pH 7.5. Detailed EPR analyses revealed two additional iron-sulfur cluster signals, N6a and N6b, in addition to previously assigned signals. Furthermore, we found small but significant semiquinone signal(s), which have been reported only for bovine complex I. The line width was ∼12 G, indicating its neutral semiquinone form. More than 90% of the semiquinone signal originated from the single entity with P½ (half-saturation power level) = 1.85 milliwatts. The semiquinone signal(s) decreased by 60% when with asimicin, a potent complex I inhibitor. The functional role of semiquinone and the EPR assignment of clusters N6a/N6b are discussed. PMID:23543743

  4. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  5. FeS/S/FeS2 Redox System and Its Oxidoreductase-like Chemistry in the Iron-Sulfur World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Bin; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Su, Wenhui

    2011-06-01

    The iron-sulfur world (ISW) theory is an intriguing prediction regarding the origin of life on early Earth. It hypothesizes that life arose as a geochemical process from inorganic starting materials on the surface of sulfide minerals in the vicinity of deep-sea hot springs. During the last two decades, many experimental studies have been carried out on this topic, and some interesting results have been achieved. Among them, however, the processes of carbon/nitrogen fixation and biomolecular assembly on the mineral surface have received an inordinate amount of attention. To the present, an abiotic model for the oxidation-reduction of intermediates participating in metabolic pathways has been ignored. We examined the oxidation-reduction effect of a prebiotic FeS/S/FeS2 redox system on the interconversion between several pairs of ±-hydroxy acids and ±-keto acids (i.e., lactate/pyruvate, malate/oxaloacetate, and glycolate/glyoxylate). We found that, in the absence of FeS, elemental sulfur (S) oxidized ±-hydroxy acids to form corresponding keto acids only at a temperature higher than its melting point (113°C); in the presence of FeS, such reactions occurred more efficiently through a coupled reaction mechanism, even at a temperature below the phase transition point of S. On the other hand, FeS was shown to have the capacity to reversibly reduce the keto acids. Such an oxidoreductase-like chemistry of the FeS/S/FeS2 redox system suggests that it can determine the redox homeostasis of metabolic intermediates in the early evolutionary phase of life. The results provide a possible pathway for the development of primordial redox biochemistry in the iron-sulfur world.

  6. Identification of pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter IM; Glaholt, Stephen; Colbourne, John K; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC

    2013-01-01

    Although cyanobacteria produce a wide range of natural toxins that impact aquatic organisms, food webs and water quality, the mechanisms of toxicity are still insufficiently understood. Here, we implemented a whole-genome expression microarray to identify pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families responsive to Microcystis stress in Daphnia pulex. Therefore, neonates of a sensitive isolate were given a diet contaminated with Microcystis to contrast with those given a control diet for sixteen days. The microarray revealed 2247 differentially expressed (DE) genes (7.6% of the array) in response to Microcystis, of which 17% are lineage specific( i.e., these genes have no detectable homology to any other gene in currently available databases) and 49% are gene duplicates (paralogs). We identified four pathways/gene networks and eight paralogous gene families affected by Microcystis. Differential regulation of the ribosome, including 3 paralogous gene families encoding 40S, 60S and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, suggests an impact of Microcystis on protein synthesis of D. pulex. In addition, differential regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (including the NADH ubquinone oxidoreductase gene family) and the trypsin paralogous gene family (a major component of the digestive system in D. pulex) could explain why fitness is reduced based on energy budget considerations. PMID:22799445

  7. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    SciTech Connect

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela; Nebert, Daniel W.; Phillips, David H.; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Stiborova, Marie

    2012-12-15

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(?/?), Cyp1a2(?/?) and Cyp1a1/1a2(?/?) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ? NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ? Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ? NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ? Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  8. A Testing Framework for Identifying Susceptibility Genes in the Presence of Epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Millstein, Joshua; Conti, David V.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Gauderman, W. James

    2006-01-01

    An efficient testing strategy called the focused interaction testing framework (FITF) was developed to identify susceptibility genes involved in epistatic interactions for case-control studies of candidate genes. In the FITF approach, likelihood-ratio tests are performed in stages that increase in the order of interaction considered. Joint tests of main effects and interactions are performed conditional on significant lower-order effects. A reduction in the number of tests performed is achieved by prescreening gene combinations with a goodness-of-fit ?2 statistic that depends on association among candidate genes in the pooled case-control group. Multiple testing is accounted for by controlling false-discovery rates. Simulation analysis demonstrated that the FITF approach is more powerful than marginal tests of candidate genes. FITF also outperformed multifactor dimensionality reduction when interactions involved additive, dominant, or recessive genes. In an application to asthma case-control data from the Childrens Health Study, FITF identified a significant multilocus effect between the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) reduced:quinone oxidoreductase gene (NQO1), myeloperoxidase gene (MPO), and catalase gene (CAT) (unadjusted P=.00026), three genes that are involved in the oxidative stress pathway. In an independent data set consisting primarily of African American and Asian American children, these three genes also showed a significant association with asthma status (P=.0008). PMID:16385446

  9. Characterization of Pseudomonas putida Genes Responsive to Nutrient Limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, Chris K.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Kingsley, Mark T.; Swarup, Sanjay

    2004-06-01

    The low bioavailability of nutrients and oxygen in the soil environment has hampered successful expression of biodegradation/biocontrol genes that are driven by promoters highly active during routine laboratory conditions of high nutrient- and oxygen-availability. Hence, in the present study, expression of the gus-tagged genes in 12 Tn5-gus mutants of the soil microbe Pseudomonas putida PNL-MK25 was examined under various conditions chosen to mimic the soil environment: low carbon, phosphate, nitrate, or oxygen, and in the rhizosphere. Based on their expression profiles, three nutrient-responsive mutant (NRM) strains, NRM5, NRM7, and NRM17, were selected for identification of the tagged genes. In the mutant strain NRM5, expression of the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA) gene was increased between 4.9- to 26.4-fold under various low nutrient conditions. In NRM7, expression of the novel NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-like (nql) gene was consistently amongst the highest and was synergistically upregulated by low nutrient and anoxic conditions. The cyoD gene in NRM17, which encodes the fourth subunit of the cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase complex, had decreased expression in low nutrient conditions but its absolute expression levels was still amongst the highest. Additionally, it was independent of oxygen availability, in contrast to that in E. coli.

  10. The Iron-Sulfur Cluster of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is the Electron Acceptor for Electron Transfer Flavoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Michael A.; Usselman, Robert J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the ubiquinone-pool. It contains one [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and one FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. In the porcine protein, threonine 367 is hydrogen bonded to N1 and O2 of the flavin ring of the FAD. The analogous site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO is asparagine 338. Mutations N338T and N338A were introduced into the R. sphaeroides protein by site-directed mutagenesis to determine the impact of hydrogen bonding at this site on redox potentials and activity. The mutations did not alter the optical spectra, EPR g-values, spin-lattice relaxation rates, or the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ to FAD point-dipole interspin distances. The mutations had no impact on the reduction potential for the iron-sulfur cluster, which was monitored by changes in the continuous wave EPR signals of the [4Fe-4S]+ at 15 K. For the FAD semiquinone, significantly different potentials were obtained by monitoring the titration at 100 or 293 K. Based on spectra at 293 K the N338T mutation shifted the first and second midpoint potentials for the FAD from +47 mV and ?30 mV for wild type to ?11 mV and ?19 mV, respectively. The N338A mutation decreased the potentials to ?37 mV and ?49 mV. Lowering the midpoint potentials resulted in a decrease in the quinone reductase activity and negligible impact on disproportionation of ETF1e? catalyzed by ETF-QO. These observations indicate that the FAD is involved in electron transfer to ubiquinone, but not in electron transfer from ETF to ETF-QO. Therefore the iron-sulfur cluster is the immediate acceptor from ETF. PMID:18672901

  11. Four structural subclasses of the antivirulence drug target disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA provide a platform for design of subclass-specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Risn M; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    By catalyzing oxidative protein folding, the bacterial disulfide bond protein A (DsbA) plays an essential role in the assembly of many virulence factors. Predictably, DsbA disruption affects multiple downstream effector molecules, resulting in pleiotropic effects on the virulence of important human pathogens. These findings mark DsbA as a master regulator of virulence, and identify the enzyme as a target for a new class of antivirulence agents that disarm pathogenic bacteria rather than killing them. The purpose of this article is to discuss and expand upon recent findings on DsbA and to provide additional novel insights into the druggability of this important disulfide oxidoreductase by comparing the structures and properties of 13 well-characterized DsbA enzymes. Our structural analysis involved comparison of the overall fold, the surface properties, the conformations of three loops contributing to the binding surface and the sequence identity of residues contributing to these loops. Two distinct structural classes were identified, classes I and II, which are differentiated by their central ?-sheet arrangements and which roughly separate the DsbAs produced by Gram-negative from Gram-positive organisms. The classes can be further subdivided into a total of four subclasses on the basis of surface features. Class Ia is equivalent to the Enterobacteriaceae class that has been defined previously. Bioinformatic analyses support the classification of DsbAs into 3 of the 4 subclasses, but did not pick up the 4th subclass which is only apparent from analysis of DsbA electrostatic surface properties. In the context of inhibitor development, the discrete structural subclasses provide a platform for developing DsbA inhibitory scaffolds with a subclass-wide spectrum of activity. We expect that more DsbA classes are likely to be identified, as enzymes from other pathogens are explored, and we highlight the issues associated with structure-based inhibitor development targeting this pivotal mediator of bacterial virulence. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Thiol-Based Redox Processes. PMID:24487020

  12. The thioredoxin system of Penicillium chrysogenum and its possible role in penicillin biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Mislovati, M; Aharonowitz, Y

    1994-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is an important producer of penicillin antibiotics. A key step in their biosynthesis is the oxidative cyclization of delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (ACV) to isopenicillin N by the enzyme isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS). bis-ACV, the oxidized disulfide form of ACV is, however, not a substrate for IPNS. We report here the characterization of a broad-range disulfide reductase from P. chrysogenum that efficiently reduces bis-ACV to the thiol monomer. When coupled in vitro with IPNS, it converts bis-ACV to isopenicillin N and may therefore play a role in penicillin biosynthesis. The disulfide reductase consists of two protein components, a 72-kDa NADPH-dependent reductase, containing two identical subunits, and a 12-kDa general disulfide reductant. The latter reduces disulfide bonds in low-molecular-weight compounds and in proteins. The genes coding for the reductase system were cloned and sequenced. Both possess introns. A comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences showed that the 12-kDa protein shares 26 to 60% sequence identity with thioredoxins and that the 36-kDa protein subunit shares 44 to 49% sequence identity with the two known bacterial thioredoxin reductases. In addition, the P. chrysogenum NADPH-dependent reductase is able to accept thioredoxin as a substrate. These results establish that the P. chrysogenum broad-range disulfide reductase is a member of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. This is the first example of the cloning of a eucaryotic thioredoxin reductase gene. Images PMID:8106340

  13. High-Level Chromate Resistance in Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 Requires Previously Uncharacterized Accessory Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Nakatsu, Cindy N.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-09-24

    The annotated genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 revealed a chromate resistance determinant (CRD): a cluster of 8 genes located on a 10.6 kb fragment of a 96 kb plasmid. The CRD includes chrA, which encodes a putative chromate efflux protein, and three genes with amino acid similarities to the amino and carboxy termini of ChrB, a putative regulatory protein. There are also three novel genes that have not been previously associated with chromate resistance in other bacteria; they encode an oxidoreductase (most similar to malate:quinone oxidoreductase), a functionally unknown protein with a WD40 repeat domain and a lipoprotein. A chromate-sensitive mutant (strain D11) was generated by curing FB24 of its 96-kb plasmid. Elemental analysis indicated that chromate-exposed cells of strain D11 accumulated three times more chromium than strain FB24. Introduction of the CRD into strain D11 conferred chromate resistance comparable to wild-type levels, whereas deletion of specific regions of the CRD led to decreased resistance. Using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, we show that expression of each gene within the CRD is specifically induced in response to chromate but not by lead, hydrogen peroxide or arsenate. Higher levels of chrA expression were achieved when the chrB orthologs and the WD40 repeat domain genes were present, suggesting their regulatory roles. Collectively, our findings indicate that chromate resistance in strain FB24 is primarily achieved by plasmid-mediated chromate efflux with the contribution of previously unrecognized accessory genes.

  14. Cell Growth Defect Factor1/CHAPERONE-LIKE PROTEIN OF POR1 Plays a Role in Stabilization of Light-Dependent Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Yong; Lee, Ho-Seok; Song, Ji-Young; Jung, Young Jun; Reinbothe, Steffen; Park, Youn-Il; Lee, Sang Yeol; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    Angiosperms require light for chlorophyll biosynthesis because one reaction in the pathway, the reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) to chlorophyllide, is catalyzed by the light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR). Here, we report that Cell growth defect factor1 (Cdf1), renamed here as CHAPERONE-LIKE PROTEIN OF POR1 (CPP1), an essential protein for chloroplast development, plays a role in the regulation of POR stability and function. Cdf1/CPP1 contains a J-like domain and three transmembrane domains, is localized in the thylakoid and envelope membranes, and interacts with POR isoforms in chloroplasts. CPP1 can stabilize POR proteins with its holdase chaperone activity. CPP1 deficiency results in diminished POR protein accumulation and defective chlorophyll synthesis, leading to photobleaching and growth inhibition of plants under light conditions. CPP1 depletion also causes reduced POR accumulation in etioplasts of dark-grown plants and as a result impairs the formation of prolamellar bodies, which subsequently affects chloroplast biogenesis upon illumination. Furthermore, in cyanobacteria, the CPP1 homolog critically regulates POR accumulation and chlorophyll synthesis under high-light conditions, in which the dark-operative Pchlide oxidoreductase is repressed by its oxygen sensitivity. These findings and the ubiquitous presence of CPP1 in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms suggest the conserved nature of CPP1 function in the regulation of POR. PMID:24151298

  15. Studying Genes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  16. Structure-Based Computational Study of Two Disease Resistance Gene Homologues (Hm1 and Hm2) in Maize (Zea mays L.) with Implications in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Barooah, Madhumita

    2014-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent HC-toxin reductases (HCTR1 and 2) encoded by enzymatic class of disease resistance homologous genes (Hm1 and Hm2) protect maize by detoxifying a cyclic tetrapeptide, HC-toxin, secreted by the fungus Cochliobolus carbonum race 1(CCR1). Unlike the other classes' resistance (R) genes, HCTR-mediated disease resistance is an inimitable mechanism where the avirulence (Avr) component from CCR1 is not involved in toxin degradation. In this study, we attempted to decipher cofactor (NADPH) recognition and mode of HC-toxin binding to HCTRs through molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding free energy calculation methods. The rationality and the stability of docked complexes were validated by 30-ns MD simulation. The binding free energy decomposition of enzyme-cofactor complex was calculated to find the driving force behind cofactor recognition. The overall binding free energies of HCTR1-NADPH and HCTR2-NADPH were found to be −616.989 and −16.9749 kJ mol−1 respectively. The binding free energy decomposition revealed that the binding of NADPH to the HCTR1 is mainly governed by van der Waals and nonpolar interactions, whereas electrostatic terms play dominant role in stabilizing the binding mode between HCTR2 and NADPH. Further, docking analysis of HC-toxin with HCTR-NADPH complexes showed a distinct mode of binding and the complexes were stabilized by a strong network of hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. This study is the first in silico attempt to unravel the biophysical and biochemical basis of cofactor recognition in enzymatic class of R genes in cereal crop maize. PMID:24847713

  17. Novel insights into structure–function mechanism and tissue-specific expression profiling of full-length dxr gene from Cymbopogon winterianus

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Dehury, Budheswar; Phukon, Munmi; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sen, Priyabrata

    2015-01-01

    The 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR; EC1.1.1.267), an NADPH-dependent reductase, plays a pivotal role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway (MEP), in the conversion of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) into MEP. The sheath and leaf of citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) accumulates large amount of terpenes and sesquiterpenes with proven medicinal value and economic uses. Thus, sequencing of full length dxr gene and its characterization seems to be a valuable resource in metabolic engineering to alter the flux of isoprenoid active ingredients in plants. In this study, full length DXR from citronella was characterized through in silico and tissue-specific expression studies to explain its structure–function mechanism, mode of cofactor recognition and differential expression. The modelled DXR has a three-domain architecture and its active site comprised of a cofactor (NADPH) binding pocket and the substrate-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulation studies indicated that DXR model retained most of its secondary structure during 10 ns simulation in aqueous solution. The modelled DXR superimposes well with its closest structural homolog but subtle variations in the charge distribution over the cofactor recognition site were noticed. Molecular docking study revealed critical residues aiding tight anchoring NADPH within the active pocket of DXR. Tissue-specific differential expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR in various tissues of citronella plant revealed distinct differential expression of DXR. To our knowledge, this is the first ever report on DXR from the important medicinal plant citronella and further characterization of this gene will open up better avenues for metabolic engineering of secondary metabolite pathway genes from medicinal plants in the near future. PMID:25941629

  18. Novel insights into structure-function mechanism and tissue-specific expression profiling of full-length dxr gene from Cymbopogon winterianus.

    PubMed

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Dehury, Budheswar; Phukon, Munmi; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sen, Priyabrata

    2015-01-01

    The 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR; EC1.1.1.267), an NADPH-dependent reductase, plays a pivotal role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway (MEP), in the conversion of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) into MEP. The sheath and leaf of citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) accumulates large amount of terpenes and sesquiterpenes with proven medicinal value and economic uses. Thus, sequencing of full length dxr gene and its characterization seems to be a valuable resource in metabolic engineering to alter the flux of isoprenoid active ingredients in plants. In this study, full length DXR from citronella was characterized through in silico and tissue-specific expression studies to explain its structure-function mechanism, mode of cofactor recognition and differential expression. The modelled DXR has a three-domain architecture and its active site comprised of a cofactor (NADPH) binding pocket and the substrate-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulation studies indicated that DXR model retained most of its secondary structure during 10 ns simulation in aqueous solution. The modelled DXR superimposes well with its closest structural homolog but subtle variations in the charge distribution over the cofactor recognition site were noticed. Molecular docking study revealed critical residues aiding tight anchoring NADPH within the active pocket of DXR. Tissue-specific differential expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR in various tissues of citronella plant revealed distinct differential expression of DXR. To our knowledge, this is the first ever report on DXR from the important medicinal plant citronella and further characterization of this gene will open up better avenues for metabolic engineering of secondary metabolite pathway genes from medicinal plants in the near future. PMID:25941629

  19. Chromosomal organization of the human dihydrofolate reductase genes: dispersion, selective amplification, and a novel form of polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Anagnou, N P; O'Brien, S J; Shimada, T; Nash, W G; Chen, M J; Nienhuis, A W

    1984-01-01

    The human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR; tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) gene family includes a functional gene (hDHFR) and at least four intronless genes. Three intronless genes (hDHFR-psi 2, hDHFR-psi 3, and hDHFR-psi 4) are identifiable as pseudogenes because of DNA sequence divergence from the functional gene with introns, while one intronless gene (hDHFR-psi 1) is completely homologous to the coding sequences of the functional gene. Analysis of genomic DNA from two panels of somatic human-rodent cell hybrids with specific molecular probes provide insight into the chromosomal organization and assignment of these genes. The five genes are dispersed in that each one is found on a different chromosome. The functional gene hDHFR has been assigned to chromosome 5, and one pseudogene (hDHFR-psi 4), to chromosome 3. In a human cell line (HeLa) that was selected for methotrexate resistance, the functional locus became amplified, while there was no amplification of the four intronless pseudogenes. hDHFR-psi 1 was found to be present in DNA of some individuals and absent from DNA of others, consistent with a recent evolutionary origin of this gene originally suggested by its sequence identity to the coding portions of the functional gene. The presence or absence of this intronless pseudogene represents a previously unreported form of DNA polymorphism. Images PMID:6089182

  20. [Gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Isao

    2002-11-01

    Gene therapy is a method for treating hereditary disease at the gene level. In this paper, I show recent gene therapy approaches for cancer, hemophilia and arteriosclerosis obliterans, and gene medical supply including antisense and decoys are also introduced. With the rapid advances in gene therapy research, the case of dying gene therapy using the adenovirus vector was reported due to DIC. Establishment of the safety in the gene therapy and solution of the ethics problems are also important issues. PMID:12652811

  1. Xenobiotic oxidation by cytochrome P-450-enriched extracts of Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Trower, M K; Sariaslani, F S; Kitson, F G

    1988-12-30

    Crude extracts of Streptomyces griseus grown on soybean flour-enriched medium contain high levels of cytochrome P-450. The cytochrome P-450-enriched fractions, obtained by ammonium sulfate fractionation (30-50% saturation), catalyze the NADPH-dependent oxidation of a variety of xenobiotics when complemented with both spinach ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase and spinach ferredoxin. Reactions observed are aromatic, benzylic and alicyclic hydroxylations, O-dealkylation, non-aromatic double bond epoxidation, N-oxidation and N-acetylation. PMID:3144975

  2. Cloning and characterization of the nucleoredoxin gene that encodes a novel nuclear protein related to thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Kato, Keizo; Minoguchi, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    In a yeast artificial chromosome contig close to the nude locus on mouse chromosome 11, we identified a novel gene, nucleoredoxin, that encodes a protein with similarity to the active site of thioredoxins. Nucleoredoxin is conserved between mammalian species, and two homologous genes were found in Caenorhabditis elegans. The nucleoredoxin transcripts are expressed in all adult tissues examined, but restricted to the nervous system and the limb buds in Day 10.5-11.5 embryos. The nucleoredoxin protein is predominantly localized in the nucleus of cells transfected with the nucleoredoxin expression construct. Since the bacterially expressed protein of nucleoredoxin showed oxidoreductase activity of the insulin disulfide bonds with kinetics similar to that of thioredoxin, it may be a redox regulator of the nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Adaptive response due to changes in gene regulation: a study with Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, J F; Chambers, G K; David, J; Ayala, F J

    1977-01-01

    In spite of the critical role of the process of adaptation in evolution, there are few detailed studies of the genotypic and molecular basis of the process. Drosophila melanogaster flies selected for increased tolerance to ethanol exhibited higher levels of alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.1) activity than unselected controls. A series of tests (electrophoresis, product inhibition, temperature stability, pH optima, substrate specificity, and Michaelis constants) gave no evidence of structural differences in the enzyme of the selected and the control flies. However, quantitative immunological assays showed that the selected flies contained significantly higher amounts of alcohol dehydrogenase. Adaptation of the selected flies to higher alcohol tolerance has most likely taken place by changes not in the structural gene locus coding for the enzyme, but by regulatory changes affecting the amount of gene product. Images PMID:412190

  4. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Halaban, R; Moellmann, G

    1990-01-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase (monophenol monooxygenase; monophenol, L-dopa:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1), and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmented (Blt/Blt) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). We show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.6) (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, we conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. Our studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the Blt mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation. Images PMID:1693779

  5. Expression of an isoflavone reductase-like gene enhanced by pollen tube growth in pistils of Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    van Eldik, G J; Ruiter, R K; Colla, P H; van Herpen, M M; Schrauwen, J A; Wullems, G J

    1997-03-01

    Successful sexual reproduction relies on gene products delivered by the pistil to create an environment suitable for pollen tube growth. These compounds are either produced before pollination or formed during the interactions between pistil and pollen tubes. Here we describe the pollination-enhanced expression of the cp100 gene in pistils of Solanum tuberosum. Temporal analysis of gene expression revealed an enhanced expression already one hour after pollination and lasts more than 72 h. Increase in expression also occurred after touching the stigma and was not restricted to the site of touch but spread into the style. The predicted CP100 protein shows similarity to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but belongs to a family of IFR-like NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases present in various plant species. PMID:9106515

  6. Purification of NADPH-dependent electron-transferring flavoproteins and N-terminal protein sequence data of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases from anaerobic, glycine-utilizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Dietrichs, D; Meyer, M; Schmidt, B; Andreesen, J R

    1990-01-01

    Three electron-transferring flavoproteins were purified to homogeneity from anaerobic, amino acid-utilizing bacteria (bacterium W6, Clostridium sporogenes, and Clostridium sticklandii), characterized, and compared with the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Eubacterium acidaminophilum. All the proteins were found to be dimers consisting of two identical subunits with a subunit Mr of about 35,000 and to contain about 1 mol of flavin adenine dinucleotide per subunit. Spectra of the oxidized proteins exhibited characteristic absorption of flavoproteins, and the reduced proteins showed an A580 indicating a neutral semiquinone. Many artificial electron acceptors, including methyl viologen, could be used with NADPH as the electron donor but not with NADH. Unlike the enzyme of E. acidaminophilum, which exhibited by itself a dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity (W. Freudenberg, D. Dietrichs, H. Lebertz, and J. R. Andreesen, J. Bacteriol. 171:1346-1354, 1989), the electron-transferring flavoprotein purified from bacterium W6 reacted with lipoamide only under certain assay conditions, whereas the proteins of C. sporogenes and C. sticklandii exhibited no dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase activity. The three homogeneous electron-transferring flavoproteins were very similar in their structural and biochemical properties to the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of E. acidaminophilum and exhibited cross-reaction with antibodies raised against the latter enzyme. N-terminal sequence analysis demonstrated a high degree of homology between the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of E. acidaminophilum and the electron-transferring flavoprotein of C. sporogenes to the thioredoxin reductase of Escherichia coli. Unlike these proteins, the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases purified from the anaerobic, glycine-utilizing bacteria Peptostreptococcus glycinophilus, Clostridium cylindrosporum, and C. sporogenes exhibited a high homology to dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases known from other organisms. PMID:2318809

  7. Involvement of NADPH-Dependent and cAMP-PKA Sensitive H+ Channels in the Chorda Tympani Nerve Responses to Strong Acids

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, John A.; T. Phan, Tam-Hao; Heck, Gerard L.; Ren, ZuoJun; Coleman, Jamison; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Melone, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    To investigate if chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses to strong (HCl) and weak (CO2 and acetic acid) acidic stimuli are dependent upon NADPH oxidaselinked and cAMP-sensitive proton conductances in taste cell membranes, CT responses were monitored in rats, wild-type (WT) mice, and gp91phox knockout (KO) mice in the absence and presence of blockers (Zn2+ and diethyl pyrocarbonate [DEPC]) or activators (8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP; 8-CPT-cAMP) of proton channels and activators of the NADPH oxidase enzyme (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA], H2O2, and nitrazepam). Zn2+ and DEPC inhibited and 8-CPT-cAMP, PMA, H2O2, and nitrazepam enhanced the tonic CT responses to HCl without altering responses to CO2 and acetic acid. In KO mice, the tonic HCl CT response was reduced by 64% relative to WT mice. The residual CT response was insensitive to H2O2 but was blocked by Zn2+. Its magnitude was further enhanced by 8-CPT-cAMP treatment, and the enhancement was blocked by 8-CPT-adenosine-3?-5?-cyclic monophospho-rothioate, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Under voltage-clamp conditions, before cAMP treatment, rat tonic HCl CT responses demonstrated voltage-dependence only at 90 mV, suggesting the presence of H+ channels with voltage-dependent conductances. After cAMP treatment, the tonic HCl CT response had a quasi-linear dependence on voltage, suggesting that the cAMP-dependent part of the HCl CT response has a quasi-linear voltage dependence between +60 and ?60 mV, only becoming sigmoidal when approaching +90 and ?90 mV. The results suggest that CT responses to HCl involve 2 proton entry pathways, an NADPH oxidasedependent proton channel, and a cAMP-PKA sensitive proton channel. PMID:21339339

  8. Purification and Characterization of a NADPH-Dependent Aldehyde Reductase from Mung Bean That Detoxifies Eutypine, a Toxin from Eutypa lata1

    PubMed Central

    Colrat, Ségolène; Latché, Alain; Guis, Monique; Pech, Jean-Claude; Bouzayen, Mondher; Fallot, Jean; Roustan, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    Eutypine (4-hydroxy-3-[3-methyl-3-butene-1-ynyl] benzaldehyde) is a toxin produced by Eutypa lata, the causal agent of eutypa dieback in the grapevine (Vitis vinifera). Eutypine is enzymatically converted by numerous plant tissues into eutypinol (4-hydroxy-3-[3-methyl-3-butene-1-ynyl] benzyl alcohol), a metabolite that is nontoxic to grapevine. We report a four-step procedure for the purification to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity of a eutypine-reducing enzyme (ERE) from etiolated mung bean (Vigna radiata) hypocotyls. The purified protein is a monomer of 36 kD, uses NADPH as a cofactor, and exhibits a Km value of 6.3 μm for eutypine and a high affinity for 3- and 4-nitro-benzaldehyde. The enzyme failed to catalyze the reverse reaction using eutypinol as a substrate. ERE detoxifies eutypine efficiently over a pH range from 6.2 to 7.5. These data strongly suggest that ERE is an aldehyde reductase that could probably be classified into the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. We discuss the possible role of this enzyme in eutypine detoxification. PMID:9952458

  9. Gene Expression Profiling in the Type 1 Diabetes Rat Diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, Erik; Moyer, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Background Respiratory muscle contractile performance is impaired by diabetes, mechanisms of which included altered carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and changes in membrane electrophysiology. The present study examined to what extent these cellular perturbations involve changes in gene expression. Methodology/Principal Findings Diaphragm muscle from streptozotocin-diabetic rats was analyzed with Affymetrix gene expression arrays. Diaphragm from diabetic rats had 105 genes with at least 2-fold significantly changed expression (55 increased, 50 decreased), and these were assigned to gene ontology groups based on over-representation analysis using DAVID software. There was increased expression of genes involved in palmitoyl-CoA hydrolase activity (a component of lipid metabolism) (P?=?0.037, n?=?2 genes, fold change 4.2 to 27.5) and reduced expression of genes related to carbohydrate metabolism (P?=?0.000061, n?=?8 genes, fold change ?2.0 to ?8.5). Other gene ontology groups among upregulated genes were protein ubiquitination (P?=?0.0053, n?=?4, fold change 2.2 to 3.4), oxidoreductase activity (P?=?0.024, n?=?8, fold change 2.1 to 6.0), and morphogenesis (P?=?0.012, n?=?10, fold change 2.1 to 4.3). Other downregulated gene groups were extracellular region (including extracellular matrix and collagen) (P?=?0.00032, n?=?13, fold change ?2.2 to ?3.7) and organogenesis (P?=?0.032, n?=?7, fold change ?2.1 to ?3.7). Real-time PCR confirmed the directionality of changes in gene expression for 30 of 31 genes tested. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that in diaphragm muscle type 1 diabetes increases expression of genes involved in lipid energetics, oxidative stress and protein ubiquitination, decreases expression of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and has little effect on expression of ion channel genes. Reciprocal changes in expression of genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism may change the availability of energetic substrates and thereby directly modulate fatigue resistance, an important issue for a muscle like the diaphragm which needs to contract without rest for the entire lifetime of the organism. PMID:19915678

  10. The Nairovirus Nairobi Sheep Disease Virus/Ganjam Virus Induces the Translocation of Protein Disulphide Isomerase-Like Oxidoreductases from the Endoplasmic Reticulum to the Cell Surface and the Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Lasecka, Lidia; Baron, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) of the genus Nairovirus causes a haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats with mortality up to 90%; the virus is found in East and Central Africa, and in India, where the virus is called Ganjam virus. NSDV is closely related to the human pathogen Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, which also causes a haemorrhagic disease. As with other nairoviruses, replication of NSDV takes place in the cytoplasm and the new virus particles bud into the Golgi apparatus; however, the effect of viral replication on cellular compartments has not been studied extensively. We have found that the overall structure of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and the Golgi were unaffected by infection with NSDV. However, we observed that NSDV infection led to the loss of protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), an oxidoreductase present in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and which assists during protein folding, from the ER. Further investigation showed that NSDV-infected cells have high levels of PDI at their surface, and PDI is also secreted into the culture medium of infected cells. Another chaperone from the PDI family, ERp57, was found to be similarly affected. Analysis of infected cells and expression of individual viral glycoproteins indicated that the NSDV PreGn glycoprotein is involved in redistribution of these soluble ER oxidoreductases. It has been suggested that extracellular PDI can activate integrins and tissue factor, which are involved respectively in pro-inflammatory responses and disseminated intravascular coagulation, both of which manifest in many viral haemorrhagic fevers. The discovery of enhanced PDI secretion from NSDV-infected cells may be an important finding for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of haemorrhagic nairoviruses. PMID:24714576

  11. Isolation and characterization of the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene: identification of 5' alternative splice sites responsible for multiple mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, K.L.; Anhalt, M.J.; Martin, B.M.; Kelsoe, J.R.; Winfield, S.L.; Ginns, E.I.

    1987-11-03

    A full-length genomic clone for human tyrosine hydroxylase (L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.16.2) has been isolated. A human brain genomic library constructed in EMBL3 was screened by using a rat cDNA for tyrosine hydroxylase as a probe. Out of one million recombinant phage, one clone was identified that hybridized to both 5' and 3' rat cDNA probes. Restriction endonuclease mapping, Southern blotting, and sequence analysis revealed that, like its rodent counterpart, the human gene is single copy, contains 13 primary exons, and spans approximately 8 kilobases (kb). In contrast to the rat gene, human tyrosine hydroxylase undergoes alternative RNA processing within intron 1, generating at least three distinct mRNAs. A comparison of the human tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylalanine hydroxylase genes indicates that although both probably evolved from a common ancestral gene, major changes in the size of introns have occurred since their divergence.

  12. A new family of enzymes catalyzing the first committed step of the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sangari, Félix J.; Pérez-Gil, Jordi; Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; García-Lobo, Juan M.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a large family of compounds with essential functions in all domains of life. Most eubacteria synthesize their isoprenoids using the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, whereas a minority uses the unrelated mevalonate pathway and only a few have both. Interestingly, Brucella abortus and some other bacteria that only use the MEP pathway lack deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase (DXR), the enzyme catalyzing the NADPH-dependent production of MEP from DXP in the first committed step of the pathway. Fosmidomycin, a specific competitive inhibitor of DXR, inhibited growth of B. abortus cells expressing the Escherichia coli GlpT transporter (required for fosmidomycin uptake), confirming that a DXR-like (DRL) activity exists in these bacteria. The B. abortus DRL protein was found to belong to a family of uncharacterized proteins similar to homoserine dehydrogenase. Subsequent experiments confirmed that DRL and DXR catalyze the same biochemical reaction. DRL homologues shown to complement a DXR-deficient E. coli strain grouped within the same phylogenetic clade. The scattered taxonomic distribution of sequences from the DRL clade and the occurrence of several paralogues in some bacterial strains might be the result of lateral gene transfer and lineage-specific gene duplications and/or losses, similar to that described for typical mevalonate and MEP pathway genes. These results reveal the existence of a novel class of oxidoreductases catalyzing the conversion of DXP into MEP in prokaryotic cells, underscoring the biochemical and genetic plasticity achieved by bacteria to synthesize essential compounds such as isoprenoids. PMID:20660776

  13. RNA-Seq Reveals OTA-Related Gene Transcriptional Changes in Aspergillus carbonarius

    PubMed Central

    Gerin, Donato; De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M.; Pollastro, Stefania; Faretra, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin harmful for animals and humans. Aspergillus carbonarius is the main responsible for OTA contamination of grapes and derived products. Gene transcriptional profiling of 4 A. carbonarius strains was carried out by RNA-Seq analysis to study transcriptome changes associated with OTA production. By comparing OTA inducing (OTAI) vs. non-inducing (OTAN) cultural conditions, a total of 3,705 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (fold change > |2| and FDR ≤ 0.05) were identified. Several genes involved in primary metabolic processes, with particular regard to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms, secondary metabolic processes, transport, response to stress and sporulation were up-regulated by OTAI conditions at all the analysed sampling times (4, 6 and 8 DAI) or starting from 6 DAI. Highly up-regulated DEGs encoding enzymes involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, oxidoreductases, transporters and transcription factors were examined for their potential involvement in OTA biosynthesis and related metabolic pathways. Differential expression of genes encoding polyketide synthases (pks), non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (nrps) and chloroperoxidase (cpo) was validated by RT-qPCR. Among clusters of co-regulated genes involved in SM biosynthesis, one putative OTA-gene cluster, including both pks and nrps genes, was detected in the A. carbonarius genome. PMID:26765536

  14. Endocrine genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Y.F.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the titles are: Gene Transfer and Expression of Mammalian Cell Receptors; Mapping Endocrine Genes with Sorted Human Chromosomes; Structure, Function, Hormonal Regulation of Steroidogenic Enzyme Genes; Molecular Analysis of Steroid Hormone Action Using the Human Metallothionein Genes as a Model.

  15. Characterization of a Gene Cluster Responsible for the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Agent FK228 in Chromobacterium violaceum No. 968?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Yang, Min; Matter, Andrea M.

    2007-01-01

    A gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of anticancer agent FK228 has been identified, cloned, and partially characterized in Chromobacterium violaceum no. 968. First, a genome-scanning approach was applied to identify three distinctive C. violaceum no. 968 genomic DNA clones that code for portions of nonribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase. Next, a gene replacement system developed originally for Pseudomonas aeruginosa was adapted to inactivate the genomic DNA-associated candidate natural product biosynthetic genes in vivo with high efficiency. Inactivation of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-encoding gene completely abolished FK228 production in mutant strains. Subsequently, the entire FK228 biosynthetic gene cluster was cloned and sequenced. This gene cluster is predicted to encompass a 36.4-kb DNA region that includes 14 genes. The products of nine biosynthetic genes are proposed to constitute an unusual hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase assembly line including accessory activities for the biosynthesis of FK228. In particular, a putative flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase is proposed to catalyze disulfide bond formation between two sulfhydryl groups of cysteine residues as the final step in FK228 biosynthesis. Acquisition of the FK228 biosynthetic gene cluster and acclimation of an efficient genetic system should enable genetic engineering of the FK228 biosynthetic pathway in C. violaceum no. 968 for the generation of structural analogs as anticancer drug candidates. PMID:17400765

  16. Cloning, Sequencing, and Characterization of a Gene Cluster Involved in EDTA Degradation from the Bacterium BNC1

    PubMed Central

    Bohuslavek, Jan; Payne, Jason W.; Liu, Yong; Bolton, Harvey; Xun, Luying

    2001-01-01

    EDTA is a chelating agent, widely used in many industries. Because of its ability to mobilize heavy metals and radionuclides, it can be an environmental pollutant. The EDTA monooxygenases that initiate EDTA degradation have been purified and characterized in bacterial strains BNC1 and DSM 9103. However, the genes encoding the enzymes have not been reported. The EDTA monooxygenase gene was cloned by probing a genomic library of strain BNC1 with a probe generated from the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the monooxygenase. Sequencing of the cloned DNA fragment revealed a gene cluster containing eight genes. Two of the genes, emoA and emoB, were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the gene products, EmoA and EmoB, were purified and characterized. Both experimental data and sequence analysis showed that EmoA is a reduced flavin mononucleotide-utilizing monooxygenase and that EmoB is an NADH:flavin mononucleotide oxidoreductase. The two-enzyme system oxidized EDTA to ethylenediaminediacetate (EDDA) and nitrilotriacetate (NTA) to iminodiacetate (IDA) with the production of glyoxylate. The emoA and emoB genes were cotranscribed when BNC1 cells were grown on EDTA. Other genes in the cluster encoded a hypothetical transport system, a putative regulatory protein, and IDA oxidase that oxidizes IDA and EDDA. We concluded that this gene cluster is responsible for the initial steps of EDTA and NTA degradation. PMID:11157232

  17. Cold-Induced Changes in Gene Expression in Brown Adipose Tissue, White Adipose Tissue and Liver

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Andrew M.; Karamitri, Angeliki; Kemp, Paul; Speakman, John R.; Graham, Neil S.; Lomax, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Cold exposure imposes a metabolic challenge to mammals that is met by a coordinated response in different tissues to prevent hypothermia. This study reports a transcriptomic analysis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), white adipose (WAT) and liver of mice in response to 24 h cold exposure at 8°C. Expression of 1895 genes were significantly (P<0.05) up- or down-regulated more than two fold by cold exposure in all tissues but only 5 of these genes were shared by all three tissues, and only 19, 14 and 134 genes were common between WAT and BAT, WAT and liver, and BAT and liver, respectively. We confirmed using qRT-PCR, the increased expression of a number of characteristic BAT genes during cold exposure. In both BAT and the liver, the most common direction of change in gene expression was suppression (496 genes in BAT and 590 genes in liver). Gene ontology analysis revealed for the first time significant (P<0.05) down regulation in response to cold, of genes involved in oxidoreductase activity, lipid metabolic processes and protease inhibitor activity, in both BAT and liver, but not WAT. The results reveal an unexpected importance of down regulation of cytochrome P450 gene expression and apolipoprotein, in both BAT and liver, but not WAT, in response to cold exposure. Pathway analysis suggests a model in which down regulation of the nuclear transcription factors HNF4α and PPARα in both BAT and liver may orchestrate the down regulation of genes involved in lipoprotein and steroid metabolism as well as Phase I enzymes belonging to the cytochrome P450 group in response to cold stress in mice. We propose that the response to cold stress involves decreased gene expression in a range of cellular processes in order to maximise pathways involved in heat production. PMID:23894377

  18. Identification of the Genes Involved in the Fruiting Body Production and Cordycepin Formation of Cordyceps militaris Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhuang-li; Qiu, Xue-hong

    2015-01-01

    A mutant library of Cordyceps militaris was constructed by improved Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and screened for degradation features. Six mutants with altered characters in in vitro and in vivo fruiting body production, and cordycepin formation were found to contain a single copy T-DNA. T-DNA flanking sequences of these mutants were identified by thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR approach. ATP-dependent helicase, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and ubiquitin-like activating enzyme were involved in in vitro fruiting body production, serine/threonine phosphatase involved in in vivo fruiting body production, while glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase and telomerase reverse transcriptase involved in cordycepin formation. These genes were analyzed by bioinformatics methods, and their molecular function and biology process were speculated by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. The results provided useful information for the control of culture degeneration in commercial production of C. militaris. PMID:25892913

  19. Identification of the Genes Involved in the Fruiting Body Production and Cordycepin Formation of Cordyceps militaris Fungus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhuang-Li; Qiu, Xue-Hong; Han, Ri-Chou

    2015-03-01

    A mutant library of Cordyceps militaris was constructed by improved Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and screened for degradation features. Six mutants with altered characters in in vitro and in vivo fruiting body production, and cordycepin formation were found to contain a single copy T-DNA. T-DNA flanking sequences of these mutants were identified by thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR approach. ATP-dependent helicase, cytochrome oxidase subunit I and ubiquitin-like activating enzyme were involved in in vitro fruiting body production, serine/threonine phosphatase involved in in vivo fruiting body production, while glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase and telomerase reverse transcriptase involved in cordycepin formation. These genes were analyzed by bioinformatics methods, and their molecular function and biology process were speculated by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. The results provided useful information for the control of culture degeneration in commercial production of C. militaris. PMID:25892913

  20. Cloning of WWOX gene and its growth-inhibiting effects on ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhoufang; Hu, Sha; Wang, Zehua

    2010-06-01

    The growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing effects of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene on ovarian cancer cell line A2780 were investigated. The full length cDNA of human WWOX gene was amplified from normal human ovary tissues. The correct cDNA of full length WWOX was subcloned into eukaryocytic expression vector pCMV. After introduction of WWOX gene into cancer cells with liposome, the WWOX mRNA and protein level in the cancer cells were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting. The growth activities of cancer cells were detected by Trypan blue staining. The clone formation assay in soft agar was employed to observe the proliferation of the cancer cells. Apoptosis was examined by DNA ladder and acridine orange-ethidium bromide fluorescent staining. The results showed that 72 h after WWOX gene transfection, the WWOX expression was increased significantly (P<0.01). The growth of ovarian cancer cells was decreased by 16.41% to 38.49% (P<0.01). The clone formation abilities were reduced (P<0.01). Some cancer cells presented the characteristic morphological changes of apoptosis with obvious ladder bands on electrophoresis. The apoptosis rate was (20.7+/-6.0)% (P<0.01). It was concluded that over-expression of WWOX gene could induce apoptosis and inhibit the growth of ovarian cancer cells, which might be potentially useful in the gene therapy of ovarian cancers. PMID:20556583

  1. Differential Divergence of Three Human Pseudoautosomal Genes and Their Mouse Homologs: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Sanges, Remo; Esposito, Teresa; Tempesta, Sergio; Rao, Ercole; Rappold, Gudrun; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Graves, Jennifer A.M.; Forabosco, Antonino; D'Urso, Michele

    2001-01-01

    The human pseudoautosomal region 1 (PAR1) is essential for meiotic pairing and recombination, and its deletion causes male sterility. Comparative studies of human and mouse pseudoautosomal genes are valuable in charting the evolution of this interesting region, but have been limited by the paucity of genes conserved between the two species. We have cloned a novel human PAR1 gene, DHRSXY, encoding an oxidoreductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family, and isolated a mouse ortholog Dhrsxy. We also searched for mouse homologs of recently reported PGPL and TRAMP genes that flank it within PAR1. We recovered a highly conserved mouse ortholog of PGPL by cross-hybridization, but found no mouse homolog of TRAMP. Like Csf2ra and Il3ra, both mouse homologs are autosomal; Pgpl on chromosome 5, and Dhrsxy subtelomeric on chromosome 4. TRAMP, like the human genes within or near PAR1, is probably very divergent or absent in the mouse genome. We interpret the rapid divergence and loss of pseudoautosomal genes in terms of a model of selection for the concentration of repetitive recombinogenic sequences that predispose to high recombination and translocation. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL data library under accession nos. AJ293620, AJ296079, and AJ293619.] PMID:11731500

  2. Organization of the human [zeta]-crystallin/quinone reductase gene (CRYZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.; Rao, P.V.; Zigler, J.S. Jr. )

    1994-05-15

    [zeta]-Crystallin is a protein highly expressed in the lens of guinea pigs and camels, where it comprises about 10% of the total soluble protein. It has recently been characterized as a novel quinone oxidoreductase present in a variety of mammalian tissues. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of the human [zeta]-crystallin gene (CRYZ) and its processed pseudogene. The functional gene is composed of nine exons and spans about 20 kb. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene is rich in G and C (58%) and lacks TATA and CAAT boxes. Previous analysis of the guinea pig gene revealed the presence of two different promoters, one responsible for the high lens-specific expression and the other for expression at the enzymatic level in numerous tissues. Comparative analysis with the guinea pig gene shows that a region of [approximately]2.5 kb that includes the promoter responsible for the high expression in the lens in guinea pig is not present in the human gene. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhlG and rhlAB genes are inversely regulated and RhlG is not required for rhamnolipid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces rhamnolipid biosurfactants involved in numerous phenomena including virulence. The transcriptional study of the rhlAB operon encoding two key enzymes for rhamnolipid synthesis led to the discovery of the quorum sensing system RhlRI. The latter positively controls the transcription of rhlAB, as well as of rhlC, which is required for di-rhamnolipid synthesis. The rhlG gene encodes an NADPH-dependent ?-ketoacyl reductase. Although it was reported to be required for the biosynthesis of the fatty acid part of rhamnolipids, its function in rhamnolipid synthesis was later questioned. The rhlG transcription and its role in rhamnolipid production were investigated here. Results Using 5?-RACE PCR, a luxCDABE-based transcriptional fusion, and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we confirmed two previously identified ?70- and ?54-dependent promoters and we identified a third promoter recognized by the extra-cytoplasmic function sigma factor AlgU. rhlG was inversely regulated compared to rhlAB and rhlC: the rhlG transcription was down-regulated in response to N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone, the communication molecule of the RhlRI system, and was induced by hyperosmotic stress in an AlgU-dependent manner. Consistently with this transcriptional pattern, the single or double deletions of rhlG and PA3388, which forms an operon with rhlG, did not dramatically impair rhamnolipid synthesis. Conclusion This first detailed study of rhlG transcription reveals a complex regulation involving three sigma factors and N-butyryl-l-homoserine lactone. We furthermore present evidences that RhlG does not play a key role in rhamnolipid synthesis. PMID:24943492

  4. High-level chromate resistance in Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 requires previously uncharacterized accessory genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The genome of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 contains a chromate resistance determinant (CRD), consisting of a cluster of 8 genes located on a 10.6 kb fragment of a 96 kb plasmid. The CRD includes chrA, which encodes a putative chromate efflux protein, and three genes with amino acid similarities to the amino and carboxy termini of ChrB, a putative regulatory protein. There are also three novel genes that have not been previously associated with chromate resistance in other bacteria; they encode an oxidoreductase (most similar to malate:quinone oxidoreductase), a functionally unknown protein with a WD40 repeat domain and a lipoprotein. To delineate the contribution of the CRD genes to the FB24 chromate [Cr(VI)] response, we evaluated the growth of mutant strains bearing regions of the CRD and transcript expression levels in response to Cr(VI) challenge. Results A chromate-sensitive mutant (strain D11) was generated by curing FB24 of its 96-kb plasmid. Elemental analysis indicated that chromate-exposed cells of strain D11 accumulated three times more chromium than strain FB24. Introduction of the CRD into strain D11 conferred chromate resistance comparable to wild-type levels, whereas deletion of specific regions of the CRD led to decreased resistance. Using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, we show that expression of each gene within the CRD is specifically induced in response to chromate but not by lead, hydrogen peroxide or arsenate. Higher levels of chrA expression were achieved when the chrB orthologs and the WD40 repeat domain genes were present, suggesting their possible regulatory roles. Conclusion Our findings indicate that chromate resistance in Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 is due to chromate efflux through the ChrA transport protein. More importantly, new genes have been identified as having significant roles in chromate resistance. Collectively, the functional predictions of these additional genes suggest the involvement of a signal transduction system in the regulation of chromate efflux and warrants further study. PMID:19758450

  5. Gene transfer and gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudet, A.L.; Mulligan, R.; Verma, I.M.

    1988-01-01

    This book reports the progress in gene transfer that has been made in various species, from Drosophila to higher mammals, including illustrative examples of germline gene transfer and tissue-specific somatic gene regulation in the mouse. Important new information regarding developmental control of gene transcription includes the delineation of distal elements, both cis and trans, controlling specific gene regulation. The book also offers an overview of vectors for gene transfer, including retroviral vectors and new retroviral packaging cell lines designed to minimize production of replication-competent virus.

  6. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  7. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J.; Nguyen, Diep M.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Benn, Robert A.; Prybol, Cameron J.; Vaccaro, Brian J.; Poole, Farris L.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways. PMID:25368184

  8. Assembly of evolved ligninolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The ligninolytic enzymatic consortium produced by white-rot fungi is one of the most efficient oxidative systems found in nature, with many potential applications that range from the production of 2nd generation biofuels to chemicals synthesis. In the current study, two high redox potential oxidoreductase fusion genes (laccase -Lac- and versatile peroxidase -Vp-) that had been evolved in the laboratory were re-assembled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, cell viability and secretion were assessed after co-transforming the Lac and Vp genes into yeast. Several expression cassettes were inserted in vivo into episomal bi-directional vectors in order to evaluate inducible promoter and/or terminator pairs of different strengths in an individual and combined manner. The synthetic white-rot yeast model harboring Vp(GAL1/CYC1)-Lac(GAL10/ADH1) displayed up to 1000 and 100 Units per L of peroxidase and laccase activity, respectively, representing a suitable point of departure for future synthetic biology studies. PMID:24830983

  9. Variation in P450 oxidoreductase (POR) A503V and flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO)-3 E158K is associated with minor alterations in nicotine metabolism, but does not alter cigarette consumption.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Meghan J; Zhu, Andy Z X; Sanderson Cox, Lisa; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S; Benowitz, Neal L; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2014-03-01

    The rates of nicotine metabolism differ widely, even after controlling for genetic variation in the major nicotine-metabolizing enzyme, CYP2A6. Genetic variants in an additional nicotine-metabolizing enzyme, flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO)-3, and an obligate microsomal CYP-supportive enzyme, cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR), were investigated. We examined the impact of FMO3 E158K and POR A503V before and after stratifying by CYP2A6 metabolism group. In 130 nonsmokers of African descent who received 4 mg oral nicotine, FMO3 158K trended toward slower nicotine metabolism in reduced CYP2A6 metabolizers (P=0.07) only, whereas POR 503V was associated with faster CYP2A6 activity (nicotine metabolite ratio) in normal (P=0.03), but not reduced, CYP2A6 metabolizers. Neither FMO3 158K nor POR 503V significantly altered the nicotine metabolic ratio (N=659), cigarette consumption (N=667), or urine total nicotine equivalents (N=418) in smokers of African descent. Thus, FMO3 E158K and POR A503V are minor sources of nicotine metabolism variation, insufficient to appreciably alter smoking. PMID:24448396

  10. The synthesis and evaluation of 3-aryloxymethyl-1,2-dimethylindole-4,7-diones as mechanism-based inhibitors of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Marie A.; Reigan, Philip; Siegel, David; Chilloux, Aurélie; Ross, David; Moody, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 is a proposed target in pancreatic cancer. We describe the synthesis of a series of indolequinones, based on the 5- and 6-methoxy-1,2-dimethylindole-4,7-dione chromophores with a range of phenolic leaving groups at the (indol-3-yl)methyl position. The ability of these indolequinones to function as mechanism-based inhibitors of purified human NQO1 was evaluated, as was their ability to inhibit both NQO1 and cell growth in human pancreatic MIA PaCa-2 tumor cells. The inhibition of rhNQO1 was related to the pKa of the leaving group: compounds with poorer phenolic leaving groups were poor inhibitors whereas those with more acidic leaving groups were more efficient inhibitors. These inhibition data also correlated with the inhibition NQO1 in MIA PaCa-2 cells. However, the data demonstrate that NQO1 inhibition does not correlate with growth inhibitory activity, at least in the MIA PaCa-2 cell line, suggesting that targets in addition to NQO1 need to be considered to explain the potent growth inhibitory activity of this series of indolequinones in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:17944451

  11. The Conformational Changes Induced by Ubiquinone Binding in the Na+-pumping NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) Are Kinetically Controlled by Conserved Glycines 140 and 141 of the NqrB Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Madeleine; Juárez, Oscar; Neehaul, Yashvin; Cook, Darcie A.; Barquera, Blanca; Hellwig, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Na+-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is responsible for maintaining a sodium gradient across the inner bacterial membrane. This respiratory enzyme, which couples sodium pumping to the electron transfer between NADH and ubiquinone, is not present in eukaryotes and as such could be a target for antibiotics. In this paper it is shown that the site of ubiquinone reduction is conformationally coupled to the NqrB subunit, which also hosts the final cofactor in the electron transport chain, riboflavin. Previous work showed that mutations in conserved NqrB glycine residues 140 and 141 affect ubiquinone reduction and the proper functioning of the sodium pump. Surprisingly, these mutants did not affect the dissociation constant of ubiquinone or its analog HQNO (2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide) from Na+-NQR, which indicates that these residues do not participate directly in the ubiquinone binding site but probably control its accessibility. Indeed, redox-induced difference spectroscopy showed that these mutations prevented the conformational change involved in ubiquinone binding but did not modify the signals corresponding to bound ubiquinone. Moreover, data are presented that demonstrate the NqrA subunit is able to bind ubiquinone but with a low non-catalytically relevant affinity. It is also suggested that Na+-NQR contains a single catalytic ubiquinone binding site and a second site that can bind ubiquinone but is not active. PMID:25006248

  12. Negative Regulation of DsbA-L Gene Expression by the Transcription Factor Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qichen; Yang, Wenjing; Li, Huating; Hu, Wenxiu; Chen, Lihui; Jiang, Shan; Dong, Kun; Song, Qianqian; Wang, Chen; Chen, Shuo; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide-bond A oxidoreductase-like protein (DsbA-L) possesses beneficial effects such as promoting adiponectin multimerization and stability, increasing insulin sensitivity, and enhancing energy metabolism. The expression level of DsbA-L is negatively correlated with obesity in mice and humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To address this question, we generated reporter gene constructs containing the promoter sequence of the mouse DsbA-L gene. Deletion analysis showed that the proximal promoter of mouse DsbA-L is located between ?186 and ?34 bp relative to the transcription start site. In silico analysis identified a putative Sp1 transcription factor binding site in the first intron of the DsbA-L gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that Sp1 bound to this intron region in vitro and in intact cells. Overexpression of Sp1 or suppressing Sp1 expression by siRNA reduced or increased DsbA-L promoter activity, respectively. The binding activity of Sp1 was gradually decreased during 3T3-L1 cell differentiation and was significantly increased in adipose tissues of obese mice. Our results identify Sp1 as an inhibitor of DsbA-L gene transcription, and the Sp1-mediated inhibition of DsbA-L gene expression may provide a mechanism underlying obesity-induced adiponectin downregulation and insulin resistance. PMID:25024375

  13. Negative regulation of DsbA-L gene expression by the transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qichen; Yang, Wenjing; Li, Huating; Hu, Wenxiu; Chen, Lihui; Jiang, Shan; Dong, Kun; Song, Qianqian; Wang, Chen; Chen, Shuo; Liu, Feng; Jia, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    Disulfide-bond A oxidoreductase-like protein (DsbA-L) possesses beneficial effects such as promoting adiponectin multimerization and stability, increasing insulin sensitivity, and enhancing energy metabolism. The expression level of DsbA-L is negatively correlated with obesity in mice and humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To address this question, we generated reporter gene constructs containing the promoter sequence of the mouse DsbA-L gene. Deletion analysis showed that the proximal promoter of mouse DsbA-L is located between -186 and -34 bp relative to the transcription start site. In silico analysis identified a putative Sp1 transcription factor binding site in the first intron of the DsbA-L gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that Sp1 bound to this intron region in vitro and in intact cells. Overexpression of Sp1 or suppressing Sp1 expression by siRNA reduced or increased DsbA-L promoter activity, respectively. The binding activity of Sp1 was gradually decreased during 3T3-L1 cell differentiation and was significantly increased in adipose tissues of obese mice. Our results identify Sp1 as an inhibitor of DsbA-L gene transcription, and the Sp1-mediated inhibition of DsbA-L gene expression may provide a mechanism underlying obesity-induced adiponectin downregulation and insulin resistance. PMID:25024375

  14. Alpha-Tocopherol Modulates Genes Involved in Hepatic Xenobiotic Pathways in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mustacich, Debbie J.; Gohil, Kishorchandra; Bruno, Richard S.; Yan, Michelle; Leonard, Scott W.; Ho, Emily; Cross, Carroll E.; Traber, Maret G.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic proteins involved in xenobiotic pathways (Phases I, II, and III) are responsible for the metabolism and disposition of endogenous and exogenous compounds including dietary phytochemicals. To test the hypothesis that elevated ?-tocopherol intakes alter gene expression of hepatic xenobiotic pathways, mice were fed diets supplemented with either 1000 IU (++E) or 35 IU (E) all-rac-?-tocopheryl acetate for 4 month, liver RNA was isolated and gene expression determined using both whole genome microarray and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analyses. Hepatic ?-tocopherol (173 18 vs. 21 1 nmol/g, mean SE) and its metabolite (?-CEHC, 0.232 0.046 vs. 0.031 .019 nmol/g) concentrations were ?8-fold higher following the ++E dietary treatment. In ++E relative to E mice, gene expression of Phase I enzymes, P450 oxidoreductase and cytochrome P450 (Cyp) 3a11, increased 1.6- and 4.0-fold, respectively; two Phase II genes, sulfotransferase 2a and glutathione S-transferase mu 3, increased 10.8- and 1.9-fold respectively; and a Phase III biliary transporter, Abcb1a, doubled. Thus, consumption of high-level dietary ?-tocopherol simultaneously coordinated Phase I, II and III gene expression. These data demonstrate that increased hepatic ?-tocopherol modulates its own concentrations through increasing xenobiotic metabolism, a process that may alter metabolism of other foreign compounds, such as therapeutic drugs and phytochemicals, in humans. PMID:18789671

  15. H2O2 production rate in Lactobacillus johnsonii is modulated via the interplay of a heterodimeric flavin oxidoreductase with a soluble 28 Kd PAS domain containing protein

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Ricardo B.; Graves, Christina; Wright, Kaitlyn; Gardner, Christopher L.; Lorca, Graciela L.; Gonzalez, Claudio F.

    2015-01-01

    Host and commensals crosstalk, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), has triggered a growing scientific interest to understand the mechanisms governing such interaction. However, the majority of the scientific studies published do not evaluate the ROS production by commensals bacteria. In this context we recently showed that Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2, a strain of probiotic value, modulates the activity of the critical enzymes 2,3-indoleamine dioxygenase via H2O2 production. L. johnsonii N6.2 by decreasing IDO activity, is able to modify the tryptophan/kynurenine ratio in the host blood with further systemic consequences. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2 production is critical to predict the probiotic value of these strains and to optimize bacterial biomass production in industrial processes. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in L. johnsonii N6.2 cells collected from cultures grown under different aeration conditions. Herein we described the biochemical characteristics of a heterodimeric FMN reductase (FRedA/B) whose in vitro activity is controlled by LjPAS protein with a typical Per-Arnst-Sim (PAS) sensor domain. Interestingly, LjPAS is fused to the FMN reductase domains in other lactobacillaceae. In L. johnsonii, LjPAS is encoded by an independent gene which expression is repressed under anaerobic conditions (>3 fold). Purified LjPAS was able to slow down the FRedA/B initial activity rate when the holoenzyme precursors (FredA, FredB, and FMN) were mixed in vitro. Altogether the results obtained suggest that LjPAS module regulates the H2O2 production helping the cells to minimize oxidative stress in response to environmental conditions. PMID:26236298

  16. H2O2 production rate in Lactobacillus johnsonii is modulated via the interplay of a heterodimeric flavin oxidoreductase with a soluble 28 Kd PAS domain containing protein.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ricardo B; Graves, Christina; Wright, Kaitlyn; Gardner, Christopher L; Lorca, Graciela L; Gonzalez, Claudio F

    2015-01-01

    Host and commensals crosstalk, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), has triggered a growing scientific interest to understand the mechanisms governing such interaction. However, the majority of the scientific studies published do not evaluate the ROS production by commensals bacteria. In this context we recently showed that Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2, a strain of probiotic value, modulates the activity of the critical enzymes 2,3-indoleamine dioxygenase via H2O2 production. L. johnsonii N6.2 by decreasing IDO activity, is able to modify the tryptophan/kynurenine ratio in the host blood with further systemic consequences. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2 production is critical to predict the probiotic value of these strains and to optimize bacterial biomass production in industrial processes. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in L. johnsonii N6.2 cells collected from cultures grown under different aeration conditions. Herein we described the biochemical characteristics of a heterodimeric FMN reductase (FRedA/B) whose in vitro activity is controlled by LjPAS protein with a typical Per-Arnst-Sim (PAS) sensor domain. Interestingly, LjPAS is fused to the FMN reductase domains in other lactobacillaceae. In L. johnsonii, LjPAS is encoded by an independent gene which expression is repressed under anaerobic conditions (>3 fold). Purified LjPAS was able to slow down the FRedA/B initial activity rate when the holoenzyme precursors (FredA, FredB, and FMN) were mixed in vitro. Altogether the results obtained suggest that LjPAS module regulates the H2O2 production helping the cells to minimize oxidative stress in response to environmental conditions. PMID:26236298

  17. Characterization of a putative stereoselective oxidoreductase from Gluconobacter oxydans and its application in producing ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate ester.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Rong; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Jiale; Lin, Jinping; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-04-01

    A gene encoding an NADH-dependent short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (gox2036) from Gluconobacter oxydans 621H was cloned and heterogeneously expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein (Gox2036) was purified to homogeneity and biochemically characterized. Gox2036 was a homotetramer with a subunit size of approximately 28 kDa. Gox2036 had a strict requirement for NAD?/NADH as the cofactor. Gox2036 displayed preference for oxidation of secondary alcohols and 2,3-diols as well as for reduction of ?-diketones, hydroxy ketones, ?-ketoesters, and ?-ketoesters. However, Gox2036 was poorly active on 1,2-diols and acetoin and showed no activity on primary alcohols, polyols, and aldehydes. The optimum pH values for the oxidation and reduction reactions were 9 and 6, respectively. Gox2036 was highly selective in the reduction of various ?-ketones and ?-ketoesters. Among the substrates tested, ethyl 4-chloro acetoacetate was reduced to ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate ester with an excellent conversion yield of 96.9 % and optical purity of >99 % e.e. using an efficient in situ NADH-recycling system involving glucose and a glucose dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis (BsGDH). PMID:24113812

  18. Conserved lysine residues of the membrane subunit NuoM are involved in energy conversion by the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I).

    PubMed

    Euro, Liliya; Belevich, Galina; Verkhovsky, Michael I; Wikstrm, Mrten; Verkhovskaya, Marina

    2008-09-01

    Analysis of the amino acid sequences of subunits NuoM and NuoN in the membrane domain of Complex I revealed a clear common pattern, including two lysines that are predicted to be located within the membrane, and which are important for quinone reductase activity. Site-directed mutations of the amino acid residues E144, K234, K265 and W243 in this pattern were introduced into the chromosomal gene nuoM of Escherichia coli Complex I. The activity of mutated Complex I was studied in both membranes and in purified Complex I. The quinone reductase activity was practically lost in K234A, K234R and E144A, decreased in W243A and K265A but unchanged in E144D. Complex I from all these mutants contained 1 mol tightly bound ubiquinone per mol FMN like wild type enzyme. The mutant enzymes E144D, W243A and K265A had wild type sensitivity to rolliniastatin and complete proton-pumping efficiency of Complex I. Remarkably, the subunits NuoL and NuoH in the membrane domain also appear to contain conserved lysine residues in transmembrane helices, which may give a clue of the mechanism of proton translocation. A tentative principle of proton translocation by Complex I is suggested based on electrostatic interactions of lysines in the membrane subunits. PMID:18590697

  19. New Insights into the Conversion of Versicolorin A in the Biosynthesis of Aflatoxin B1

    PubMed Central

    Conradt, David; Schätzle, Michael A.; Haas, Julian; Townsend, Craig A.; Müller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A crucial and enigmatic step in the complex biosynthesis of aflatoxin B1 is the oxidative rearrangement of versicolorin A to demethylsterigmatocystin. This step is thought to proceed by an oxidation–reduction–oxidation sequence, in which the NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase AflM catalyzes the enclosed reduction step. AflM from Aspergillus parasiticus, after heterologous production in E. coli and puriflcation, however, catalyzed the reduction of the hydroquinoid form of the starting compound versicolorin A (25% conversion) to a so far unknown product of aflatoxin biosynthesis. The asymmetric reduction of emodin hydroquinone to (R)-3,8,9,10-tetrahydroxy-6-methyl-3,4-dihydroanthracen-1(2H)-one (up to 82% for AflM) has also been observed in previous studies using MdpC from Aspergillus nidulans (mono-dictyphenone biosynthetic gene cluster). The first (non-enzymatic) reduction of emodin to emodin hydroquinone, for example with sodium dithionite, is obligatory for the enzymatic reduction by AflM or MdpC. These results imply an unprecedented role of AflM in the complex enzymatic network of aflatoxin biosynthesis. PMID:26266881

  20. YNL134C from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a novel protein with aldehyde reductase activity for detoxification of furfural derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xianxian; Tang, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yang, Ruoheng; Zhang, Xiaoping; Gu, Yunfu; Li, Xi; Ma, Menggen

    2015-05-01

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are the two main aldehyde compounds derived from pentoses and hexoses, respectively, during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. These two compounds inhibit microbial growth and interfere with subsequent alcohol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the in situ ability to detoxify furfural and HMF to the less toxic 2-furanmethanol (FM) and furan-2,5-dimethanol (FDM), respectively. Herein, we report that an uncharacterized gene, YNL134C, was highly up-regulated under furfural or HMF stress and Yap1p and Msn2/4p transcription factors likely controlled its up-regulated expression. Enzyme activity assays showed that YNL134C is an NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase, which plays a role in detoxification of furfural to FM. However, no NADH- or NADPH-dependent enzyme activity was observed for detoxification of HMF to FDM. This enzyme did not catalyse the reverse reaction of FM to furfural or FDM to HMF. Further studies showed that YNL134C is a broad-substrate aldehyde reductase, which can reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Although YNL134C is grouped into the quinone oxidoreductase family, no quinone reductase activity was observed using 1,2-naphthoquinone or 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as a substrate, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is genetically distant to quinone reductases. Proteins similar to YNL134C in sequence from S. cerevisiae and other microorganisms were phylogenetically analysed. PMID:25656244

  1. New Insights into the Conversion of Versicolorin A in the Biosynthesis of Aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Conradt, David; Schtzle, Michael A; Haas, Julian; Townsend, Craig A; Mller, Michael

    2015-09-01

    A crucial and enigmatic step in the complex biosynthesis of aflatoxin B1 is the oxidative rearrangement of versicolorin A to demethylsterigmatocystin. This step is thought to proceed by an oxidation-reduction-oxidation sequence, in which the NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase AflM catalyzes the enclosed reduction step. AflM from Aspergillus parasiticus, after heterologous production in E. coli and purification, however, catalyzed the reduction of the hydroquinoid form of the starting compound versicolorin A (25% conversion) to a so far unknown product of aflatoxin biosynthesis. The asymmetric reduction of emodin hydroquinone to (R)-3,8,9,10-tetrahydroxy-6-methyl-3,4-dihydroanthracen-1(2H)-one (up to 82% for AflM) has also been observed in previous studies using MdpC from Aspergillus nidulans (monodictyphenone biosynthetic gene cluster). The first (nonenzymatic) reduction of emodin to emodin hydroquinone, for example with sodium dithionite, is obligatory for the enzymatic reduction by AflM or MdpC. These results imply an unprecedented role of AflM in the complex enzymatic network of aflatoxin biosynthesis. PMID:26266881

  2. Changes in gene expression linked to methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Tong, Liqiong; Bar