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Sample records for nadph-dependent oxidoreductase genes

  1. Two Atypical l-Cysteine-regulated NADPH-dependent Oxidoreductases Involved in Redox Maintenance, l-Cystine and Iron Reduction, and Metronidazole Activation in the Enteric Protozoan Entamoeba histolytica*

    PubMed Central

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Husain, Afzal; Sato, Dan; Ali, Vahab; Suematsu, Makoto; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2010-01-01

    We discovered novel catalytic activities of two atypical NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases (EhNO1/2) from the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. EhNO1/2 were previously annotated as the small subunit of glutamate synthase (glutamine:2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase) based on similarity to authentic bacterial homologs. As E. histolytica lacks the large subunit of glutamate synthase, EhNO1/2 were presumed to play an unknown role other than glutamine/glutamate conversion. Transcriptomic and quantitative reverse PCR analyses revealed that supplementation or deprivation of extracellular l-cysteine caused dramatic up- or down-regulation, respectively, of EhNO2, but not EhNO1 expression. Biochemical analysis showed that these FAD- and 2[4Fe-4S]-containing enzymes do not act as glutamate synthases, a conclusion which was supported by phylogenetic analyses. Rather, they catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and l-cystine to l-cysteine and also function as ferric and ferredoxin-NADP+ reductases. EhNO1/2 showed notable differences in substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency; EhNO1 had lower Km and higher kcat/Km values for ferric ion and ferredoxin than EhNO2, whereas EhNO2 preferred l-cystine as a substrate. In accordance with these properties, only EhNO1 was observed to physically interact with intrinsic ferredoxin. Interestingly, EhNO1/2 also reduced metronidazole, and E. histolytica transformants overexpressing either of these proteins were more sensitive to metronidazole, suggesting that EhNO1/2 are targets of this anti-amebic drug. To date, this is the first report to demonstrate that small subunit-like proteins of glutamate synthase could play an important role in redox maintenance, l-cysteine/l-cystine homeostasis, iron reduction, and the activation of metronidazole. PMID:20592025

  2. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa rhlG Gene Encodes an NADPH-Dependent β-Ketoacyl Reductase Which Is Specifically Involved in Rhamnolipid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Campos-García, Jesús; Caro, Alma Delia; Nájera, Rebeca; Miller-Maier, Raina M.; Al-Tahhan, Ragheb A.; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    1998-01-01

    A Pseudomonas aeruginosa gene homologous to the fabG gene, which encodes the NADPH-dependent β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase required for fatty acid synthesis, was identified. The insertional mutation of this fabG homolog (herein called rhlG) produced no apparent effect on the growth rate and total lipid content of P. aeruginosa cells, but the production of rhamnolipids was completely abrogated. These results suggest that the synthetic pathway for the fatty acid moiety of rhamnolipids is separate from the general fatty acid synthetic pathway, starting with a specific ketoacyl reduction step catalyzed by the RhlG protein. In addition, the synthesis of poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is delayed in this mutant, suggesting that RhlG participates in PHA synthesis, although it is not the only reductase involved in this pathway. Traits regulated by the quorum-sensing response, other than rhamnolipid production, including production of proteases, pyocyanine, and the autoinducer butanoyl-homoserine lactone (PAI-2), were not affected by the rhlG mutation. We conclude that the P. aeruginosa rhlG gene encodes an NADPH-dependent β-ketoacyl reductase absolutely required for the synthesis of the β-hydroxy acid moiety of rhamnolipids and that it has a minor role in PHA production. Expression of rhlG mRNA under different culture conditions is consistent with this conclusion. PMID:9721281

  3. Characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YMR318C (ADH6) gene product as a broad specificity NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase: relevance in aldehyde reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Larroy, Carol; Fernández, M Rosario; González, Eva; Parés, Xavier; Biosca, Josep A

    2002-01-01

    YMR318C represents an open reading frame from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with unknown function. It possesses a conserved sequence motif, the zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) signature, specific to the medium-chain zinc-containing ADHs. In the present study, the YMR318C gene product has been purified to homogeneity from overexpressing yeast cells, and found to be a homodimeric ADH, composed of 40 kDa subunits and with a pI of 5.0-5.4. The enzyme was strictly specific for NADPH and was active with a wide variety of substrates, including aliphatic (linear and branched-chain) and aromatic primary alcohols and aldehydes. Aldehydes were processed with a 50-fold higher catalytic efficiency than that for the corresponding alcohols. The highest k(cat)/K(m) values were found with pentanal>veratraldehyde > hexanal > 3-methylbutanal >cinnamaldehyde. Taking into consideration the substrate specificity and sequence characteristics of the YMR318C gene product, we have proposed this gene to be called ADH6. The disruption of ADH6 was not lethal for the yeast under laboratory conditions. Although S. cerevisiae is considered a non lignin-degrading organism, the catalytic activity of ADHVI can direct veratraldehyde and anisaldehyde, arising from the oxidation of lignocellulose by fungal lignin peroxidases, to the lignin biodegradation pathway. ADHVI is the only S. cerevisiae enzyme able to significantly reduce veratraldehyde in vivo, and its overexpression allowed yeast to grow under toxic concentrations of this aldehyde. The enzyme may also be involved in the synthesis of fusel alcohols. To our knowledge this is the first NADPH-dependent medium-chain ADH to be characterized in S. cerevisiae. PMID:11742541

  4. NADPH-dependent reductive biotransformation with Escherichia coli and its pfkA deletion mutant: influence on global gene expression and role of oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Siedler, Solvej; Bringer, Stephanie; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2014-10-01

    An Escherichia coli ΔpfkA mutant lacking the major phosphofructokinase possesses a partially cyclized pentose phosphate pathway leading to an increased NADPH per glucose ratio. This effect decreases the amount of glucose required for NADPH regeneration in reductive biotransformations, such as the conversion of methyl acetoacetate (MAA) to (R)-methyl 3-hydroxybutyrate (MHB) by an alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis. Here, global transcriptional analyses were performed to study regulatory responses during reductive biotransformation. DNA microarray analysis revealed amongst other things increased expression of soxS, supporting previous results indicating that a high NADPH demand contributes to the activation of SoxR, the transcriptional activator of soxS. Furthermore, several target genes of the ArcAB two-component system showed a lower mRNA level in the reference strain than in the ΔpfkA mutant, pointing to an increased QH2 /Q ratio in the reference strain. This prompted us to analyze yields and productivities of MAA reduction to MHB under different oxygen regimes in a bioreactor. Under anaerobic conditions, the specific MHB production rates of both strains were comparable (7.4 ± 0.2 mmolMHB  h(-1)  gcdw (-1) ) and lower than under conditions of 15% dissolved oxygen, where those of the reference strain (12.8 mmol h(-1)  gcdw (-1) ) and of the ΔpfkA mutant (11.0 mmol h(-1)  gcdw (-1) ) were 73% and 49% higher. While the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) of the reference strain increased after the addition of MAA, presumably due to the oxidation of the acetate accumulated before MAA addition, the OTR of the ΔpfkA strain strongly decreased, indicating a very low respiration rate despite sufficient oxygen supply. The latter effect can likely be attributed to a restricted conversion of NADPH into NADH via the soluble transhydrogenase SthA, as the enzyme is outcompeted in the presence of MAA by the recombinant NADPH-dependent alcohol

  5. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ALKANE-INDUCIBLE NADPH-CYTOCHROME P-450 OXIDOREDUCTASE GENE FROM CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene coding for the Candida tropicalis NADPH-cytochrome P-450 oxidoreductase (CPR, NADPH: ferricytochrome oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.2.4) was isolated by immunoscreening of a C. tropicalis gtll expression library and colony hybridization of a C. tropicalis genomic library. he C. ...

  6. Paraquat and NADPH-dependent lipid peroxidation in lung microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, H.P.; Gorsky, L.D.

    1981-10-10

    Since there exists some controversy in the literature as to whether paraquat augments microsomal lipid peroxidation via superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/), the role of paraquat and active oxygen species in NADPH-dependent lung microsomal lipid peroxidation was investigated. Incubation of buffered aerobic mixture of bovine lung microsome and NADPH, in the presence or absence of exogenously added iron, resulted in a progressive formation of lipid peroxides whose accumulation could be followed at 535 nm as malondialdehyde. Paraquat strongly inhibited this lipid peroxidation, Thus, malondialydehyde formation was 50% inhibited by 4 X 10/sup -5/ M paraquat in the reaction mixture. The malondialdehyde color development by lipid peroxides was not affected by this concentration of paraquat. Lipid peroxidation was also strongly inhibited by singlet oxygen scavengers, e.g. dimethylfuran and diphenylfuran, and by catalase. Hydroxyl radical scavengers, e.g. mannitol, benzoate, and ethanol, had little effect in malondialydehyde production. Superoxide dismutase, which removes O/sub 2//sup -/ efficiently, did not inhibit malondialdehyde production by lung microsomes and rather enhanced its formation. A scheme in which paraquat and active O/sub 2/ species may be involved with microsomal lipid peroxidation is presented.

  7. A survey of genes encoding H2O2-producing GMC oxidoreductases in 10 Polyporales genomes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patricia; Carro, Juan; Serrano, Ana; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of three representative Polyporales (Bjerkandera adusta, Phlebia brevispora and a member of the Ganoderma lucidum complex) recently were sequenced to expand our knowledge on the diversity and distribution of genes involved in degradation of plant polymers in this Basidiomycota order, which includes most wood-rotting fungi. Oxidases, including members of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, play a central role in the above degradative process because they generate extracellular H2O2 acting as the ultimate oxidizer in both white-rot and brown-rot decay. The survey was completed by analyzing the GMC genes in the available genomes of seven more species to cover the four Polyporales clades. First, an in silico search for sequences encoding members of the aryl-alcohol oxidase, glucose oxidase, methanol oxidase, pyranose oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase families was performed. The curated sequences were subjected to an analysis of their evolutionary relationships, followed by estimation of gene duplication/reduction history during fungal evolution. Second, the molecular structures of the near one hundred GMC oxidoreductases identified were modeled to gain insight into their structural variation and expected catalytic properties. In contrast to ligninolytic peroxidases, whose genes are present in all white-rot Polyporales genomes and absent from those of brown-rot species, the H2O2-generating oxidases are widely distributed in both fungal types. This indicates that the GMC oxidases provide H2O2 for both ligninolytic peroxidase activity (in white-rot decay) and Fenton attack on cellulose (in brown-rot decay), after the transition between both decay patterns in Polyporales occurred. PMID:26297778

  8. Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase2. Gene structure, activity, and tissue-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K

    1994-05-20

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase2 (NQO2) gene, 1336 base pairs (bp) of the 5'-flanking region and 165 bp of the 3'-flanking region, have been sequenced. NQO2 gene is 20 kilobase pairs in length and have seven exons interrupted by six introns as compared to the previously cloned NQO1 gene which contains six exons. 187 bp of the first exon in the NQO2 gene are noncoding and are absent in the NQO1 gene. 92 bp of the second exon in the NQO2 gene corresponded to the first exon of the NQO1 gene and so on. The sizes and nucleotide sequences of exons 3-6 are highly conserved between NQO2 and NQO1 genes. The last exon in the NQO2 gene is 1603 bp shorter than the last exon of the NQO1 gene and encodes for 58 amino acids as compared to 101 amino acids encoded by the NQO1 gene. This makes NQO2 protein 43 amino acids shorter than the NQO1 protein. The high degree of conservation between NQO2 and NQO1 gene organization and sequence confirmed that NQO2 gene encodes for a second member of the NQO gene family in human. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the NQO2 gene revealed presence of four SP1 binding sites at positions -214, -170, -106, and -75, a single copy of the antioxidant response element (ARE) at nucleotide -936, and three copies of xenobiotic response element (XRE) at positions -708, -557, and -51. ARE and XRE elements have previously been found in the promoters of the NQO1 and glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit genes and mediate increases in their expression in response to polycyclic aromatic compounds, phenolic antioxidants, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), respectively. The NQO2 cDNA-derived protein in monkey kidney COS1 cells efficiently catalyzed nitroreduction of anti-tumor compound CB10-200, an analog of nitrophenylaziridine. Northern blot analysis indicates that NQO2 gene is expressed in human heart, brain, lung, liver, and skeletal muscle but does not express in placenta. In contrast, the NQO1 gene was expressed in

  9. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes. PMID:12359134

  10. Coregulated Genes Link Sulfide:Quinone Oxidoreductase and Arsenic Metabolism in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Csaba I.; Vass, Imre; Rákhely, Gábor; Vass, István Zoltán; Tóth, András; Duzs, Ágnes; Peca, Loredana; Kruk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Although the biogeochemistry of the two environmentally hazardous compounds arsenic and sulfide has been extensively investigated, the biological interference of these two toxic but potentially energy-rich compounds has only been hypothesized and indirectly proven. Here we provide direct evidence for the first time that in the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 the two metabolic pathways are linked by coregulated genes that are involved in arsenic transport, sulfide oxidation, and probably in sulfide-based alternative photosynthesis. Although Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is an obligate photoautotrophic cyanobacterium that grows via oxygenic photosynthesis, we discovered that specific genes are activated in the presence of sulfide or arsenite to exploit the energy potentials of these chemicals. These genes form an operon that we termed suoRSCT, located on a transposable element of type IS4 on the plasmid pSYSM of the cyanobacterium. suoS (sll5036) encodes a light-dependent, type I sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase. The suoR (sll5035) gene downstream of suoS encodes a regulatory protein that belongs to the ArsR-type repressors that are normally involved in arsenic resistance. We found that this repressor has dual specificity, resulting in 200-fold induction of the operon upon either arsenite or sulfide exposure. The suoT gene encodes a transmembrane protein similar to chromate transporters but in fact functioning as an arsenite importer at permissive concentrations. We propose that the proteins encoded by the suoRSCT operon might have played an important role under anaerobic, reducing conditions on primordial Earth and that the operon was acquired by the cyanobacterium via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25022856

  11. Coregulated genes link sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase and arsenic metabolism in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Csaba I; Vass, Imre; Rákhely, Gábor; Vass, István Zoltán; Tóth, András; Duzs, Agnes; Peca, Loredana; Kruk, Jerzy; Kós, Péter B

    2014-10-01

    Although the biogeochemistry of the two environmentally hazardous compounds arsenic and sulfide has been extensively investigated, the biological interference of these two toxic but potentially energy-rich compounds has only been hypothesized and indirectly proven. Here we provide direct evidence for the first time that in the photosynthetic model organism Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 the two metabolic pathways are linked by coregulated genes that are involved in arsenic transport, sulfide oxidation, and probably in sulfide-based alternative photosynthesis. Although Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 is an obligate photoautotrophic cyanobacterium that grows via oxygenic photosynthesis, we discovered that specific genes are activated in the presence of sulfide or arsenite to exploit the energy potentials of these chemicals. These genes form an operon that we termed suoRSCT, located on a transposable element of type IS4 on the plasmid pSYSM of the cyanobacterium. suoS (sll5036) encodes a light-dependent, type I sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase. The suoR (sll5035) gene downstream of suoS encodes a regulatory protein that belongs to the ArsR-type repressors that are normally involved in arsenic resistance. We found that this repressor has dual specificity, resulting in 200-fold induction of the operon upon either arsenite or sulfide exposure. The suoT gene encodes a transmembrane protein similar to chromate transporters but in fact functioning as an arsenite importer at permissive concentrations. We propose that the proteins encoded by the suoRSCT operon might have played an important role under anaerobic, reducing conditions on primordial Earth and that the operon was acquired by the cyanobacterium via horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25022856

  12. Biochemical and physiological analyses of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase isozymes in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Shun; Maruta, Takanori; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Takahiro

    2015-07-01

    At least four peroxiredoxins that are coupled with the thioredoxin (Trx) system have been shown to play a key role in redox metabolism in the unicellular phytoflagellate Euglena gracilis. In order to clarify Trx-mediated redox regulation in this alga, we herein identified three NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) using a homologous search and characterized their enzymatic properties and physiological roles. Each Euglena NTR protein belonged to the small, large, and NTRC types, and were named EgNTR1, EgNTR2, and EgNTRC, respectively. EgNTR2 was phylogenetically different from the known NTRs in eukaryotic algae. EgNTR1 was predicted to be localized in mitochondria, EgNTR2 in the cytosol, and EgNTRC in plastids. The catalytic efficiency of EgNTR2 for NADPH was 30-46-fold higher than those of EgNTR1 and truncated form of EgNTRC, suggested that large type EgNTR2 reduced Trx more efficiently. The silencing of EgNTR2 gene expression resulted in significant growth inhibition and cell hypertrophy in Euglena cells. These results suggest that EgNTRs function in each cellular compartment and are physiologically important, particularly in the cytosol. PMID:26025518

  13. Fur activates expression of the 2-oxoglutarate oxidoreductase genes (oorDABC) in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J; West, Abby L; Pich, Oscar Q; Carpenter, Beth M; Michel, Sarah; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen that colonizes the gastric mucosa of ∼50% of the world's population. Within this colonization niche, the bacteria encounter large fluctuations in nutrient availability. As such, it is critical that this organism regulate expression of key metabolic enzymes so that they are present when environmental conditions are optimal for growth. One such enzyme is the 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) oxidoreductase (OOR), which catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate to succinyl coenzyme A (succinyl-CoA) and CO(2). Previous studies from our group suggested that the genes that encode the OOR are activated by iron-bound Fur (Fe-Fur); microarray analysis showed that expression of oorD, oorA, and oorC was altered in a fur mutant strain of H. pylori. The goal of the present work was to more thoroughly characterize expression of the oorDABC genes in H. pylori as well as to define the role of Fe-Fur in this process. Here we show that these four genes are cotranscribed as an operon and that expression of the operon is decreased in a fur mutant strain. Transcriptional start site mapping and promoter analysis revealed the presence of a canonical extended -10 element but a poorly conserved -35 element upstream of the +1. Additionally, we identified a conserved Fur binding sequence ∼130 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Transcriptional analysis using promoter fusions revealed that this binding sequence was required for Fe-Fur-mediated activation. Finally, fluorescence anisotropy assays indicate that Fe-Fur specifically bound this Fur box with a relatively high affinity (dissociation constant [K(d)] = 200 nM). These findings provide novel insight into the genetic regulation of a key metabolic enzyme and add to our understanding of the diverse roles Fur plays in gene regulation in H. pylori. PMID:23002221

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of the Human P450 Oxidoreductase Gene: Hormonal Regulation and Influence of Promoter Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Meng Kian; Huang, Ningwu; Damm, Izabella

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the flavoprotein that acts as the obligatory electron donor to all microsomal P450 enzymes, including those involved in hepatic drug metabolism as well as three steroidogenic P450 enzymes. The untranslated first exon of human POR was located recently, permitting analysis of human POR transcription. Expression of deletional mutants containing up to 3193 bp of the human POR promoter in human adrenal NCI-H295A and liver Hep-G2 cells located the proximal promoter at −325/−1 bp from the untranslated exon. Common human POR polymorphisms at −208 and −173 had little influence on transcription, but the polymorphism at −152 reduced transcription significantly in both cell lines. EMSA and supershift assays identified binding of Smad3/Smad4 between −249 and −261 and binding of thyroid hormone receptor-β (TRβ) at −240/−245. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Smad3, Smad4, TRα, TRβ, and estrogen receptor-α were bound between −374 and −149. Cotransfection of vectors for these transcription factors and POR promoter-reporter constructs into both cell types followed by hormonal treatment showed that T3 exerts major tropic effects via TRβ, with TRα, estrogen receptor-α, Smad3, and Smad4 exerting lesser, modulatory effects. T3 also increased POR mRNA in both cell lines. Thyroid hormone also is essential for rat liver POR expression but acts via different transcription factor complexes. These are the first data on human POR gene transcription, establishing roles for TRβ and Smad3/4 in its expression and indicating that the common polymorphism at −152 may play a role in genetic variation in steroid biosynthesis and drug metabolism. PMID:21393444

  15. Sulfolobus tokodaii ST2133 is characterized as a thioredoxin reductase-like ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Nam, Young-Woo; Fushinobu, Shinya; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The putative gene (st2133) for ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) from Sulfolobus tokodaii, a thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon, was heterologously expressed. About 90% of the purified product was a homodimer containing 0.46 mol FAD/mol subunit, and showing NADPH:DCPIP oxidoreductase activity, V max being 1.38 and 21.8 U/mg (70 °C) in the absence and presence of 1 mM FMN. NADPH was a much better electron donor than NADH with various electron acceptors, such as oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, DCPIP, cytochrome c, and dithiobisnitrobenzoate. Most of the reactions were activated by 15- to 140-fold on addition of FMN, while FAD was 5-10 times less effective. Ferredoxin (Fd) from S. tokodaii served as an electron carrier in both Fd-dependent NADPH formation and NADPH-dependent Fd reduction. ST2133 belongs to the thioredoxin reductase-like protein family, which is slightly distantly related to FNR family proteins from bacteria, plants and man. This is the first report on FNR from a crenarchaeon, providing a clue to the recycling of Fd during archaeal metabolism. PMID:24292509

  16. A gene encoding a yeast equivalent of mammalian NADPH-adrenodoxin oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Lacour, T; Dumas, B

    1996-10-01

    Adrenodoxin oxidoreductase (ADR) and adrenodoxin (ADX) are the two proteins involved in electron transport to mammalian mitochondrial P-450s capable of steroid modifications. The cloning and sequencing of a S. cervisiae ADR homologue (YADR) is presented here. The YADR protein sequence shares 36 and 37% of identical amino acids with human and bovine ADR respectively. The physiological role of this ADR homologue in yeast is unknown. We intend to study the interaction of this YADR with bovine ADX in vitro and in vivo. PMID:8890749

  17. ord1, an oxidoreductase gene responsible for conversion of O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxin in Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, R; Woloshuk, C P

    1997-01-01

    Among the enzymatic steps in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway, the conversion of O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxin has been proposed to be catalyzed by an oxidoreductase. Transformants of Aspergillus flavus 649WAF2 containing a 3.3-kb genomic DNA fragment and the aflatoxin biosynthesis regulatory gene aflR converted exogenously supplied O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxin B1. A gene, ord1, corresponding to a transcript of about 2 kb was identified within the 3.3-kb DNA fragment. The promoter region presented a putative AFLR binding site and a TATA sequence. The nucleotide sequence of the gene revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 528 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 60.2 kDa. The gene contained six introns and seven exons. Heterologous expression of the ord1 open reading frame under the transcriptional control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae galactose-inducible gal1 promoter results in the ability to convert O-methylsterigmatocystin to aflatoxin B1. The data indicate that ord1 is sufficient to accomplish the last step of the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway. A search of various databases for similarity indicated that ord1 encodes a cytochrome P-450-type monooxygenase, and the gene has been assigned to a new P-450 gene family named CYP64. PMID:9143099

  18. AP-2-mediated regulation of human NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, T; Jaiswal, A K

    1996-03-22

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is a flavoprotein that catalyzes two-electron reduction and detoxification of quinones. We have shown previously that twenty-four base pairs of the human Antioxidant Response Element (hARE) mediate basal and xenobiotic-induced expression of the NQO1 gene [Li and Jaiswal, J Biol Chem 267: 15097-15104, 1992]. In the present report, we have characterized a second cis-element, AP-2, at nucleotide position -157 of the human NQO1 gene promotor that regulates basal and cAMP-induced transcription of the NQO1 gene. The NQO1 gene AP-2 mediated expression of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene and the binding of nuclear proteins to the AP-2 element were observed in HeLa (AP-2 positive) cells but not in human hepatoblastoma Hep-G2 (AP-2 deficient) cells, indicating the involvement of transcription factors AP-2 in the regulation of NQO1 gene expression. Affinity purification of nuclear protein that binds to the NQO1 gene AP-2 DNA element and western analysis revealed that AP-2 indeed binds to the NQO1 gene AP-2 element and regulates its expression HeLa cells. The involvement of AP-2 in the regulation of NQO1 gene expression was confirmed by the observation that cDNA-derived AP-2 protein in Hep-G2 cells increased in NQO1 gene AP-2 but not mutant AP-2 mediated expression of CAT gene in Hep-G2 cells. PMID:8602872

  19. Diversity and Spatial Distribution of Hydrazine Oxidoreductase (hzo) Gene in the Oxygen Minimum Zone Off Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Liangliang; Jing, Hongmei; Kataoka, Takafumi; Buchwald, Carolyn; Liu, Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) as an important nitrogen loss pathway has been reported in marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), but the community composition and spatial distribution of anammox bacteria in the eastern tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ are poorly determined. In this study, anammox bacterial communities in the OMZ off Costa Rica (CRD-OMZ) were analyzed based on both hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) genes and their transcripts assigned to cluster 1 and 2. The anammox communities revealed by hzo genes and proteins in CRD-OMZ showed a low diversity. Gene quantification results showed that hzo gene abundances peaked in the upper OMZs, associated with the peaks of nitrite concentration. Nitrite and oxygen concentrations may therefore colimit the distribution of anammox bacteria in this area. Furthermore, transcriptional activity of anammox bacteria was confirmed by obtaining abundant hzo mRNA transcripts through qRT-PCR. A novel hzo cluster 2x clade was identified by the phylogenetic analysis and these novel sequences were abundant and widely distributed in this environment. Our study demonstrated that both cluster 1 and 2 anammox bacteria play an active role in the CRD-OMZ, and the cluster 1 abundance and transcriptional activity were higher than cluster 2 in both free-living and particle-attached fractions at both gene and transcriptional levels. PMID:24205176

  20. Expression of the iorAB genes from Brevundimonas diminuta 7 encoding the molybdenum hydroxylase isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Israel, Ilka; Sohni, Monika; Fetzner, Susanne

    2002-04-23

    Isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase (Ior) from Brevundimonas diminuta 7, encoded by iorAB, is a molybdenum hydroxylase containing a molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide molybdenum cofactor (Mo-MCD) and two distinct [2Fe2S] clusters. The iorAB genes were inserted into pJB653, generating pIL1. Pseudomonas putida KT2440, and P. putida 86 which produces a Mo-MCD-containing quinoline 2-oxidoreductase when grown on quinoline, were used as recipients for pIL1. Upon induction of gene expression, both clones produced Ior protein, but Ior activity was not detectable in P. putida KT2440 pIL1. In P. putida 86 pIL1, formation of catalytically active Ior required the presence of quinoline, suggesting that accessory gene(s) encoding product(s) essential for the assembly of catalytically competent Ior is (are) part of the quinoline regulon in P. putida 86. PMID:12023088

  1. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of a gene cluster from Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600 encoding nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase and NADH:flavin mononucleotide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Mortimer, M W; Fisher, T S; Kahn, M L; Brockman, F J; Xun, L

    1997-01-01

    Nitrilotriacetate (NTA) is an important chelating agent in detergents and has also been used extensively in processing radionuclides. In Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600, biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase that oxidizes NTA to iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. The NTA monooxygenase activity requires two component proteins, component A and component B, but the function of each component is unclear. We have cloned and sequenced a gene cluster encoding components A and B (nmoA and nmoB) and two additional open reading frames, nmoR and nmoT, downstream of nmoA. Based on sequence similarities, nmoR and nmoT probably encode a regulatory protein and a transposase, respectively. The NmoA sequence was similar to a monooxygenase that uses reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) as reductant; NmoB was similar to an NADH:flavin mononucleotide (FMN) oxidoreductase. On the basis of this information, we tested the function of each component. Purified component B was shown to be an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase, and its activity could be separated from that of component A. When the Photobacterium fischeri NADH:FMN oxidoreductase was substituted for component B in the complete reaction, NTA was oxidized, showing that the substrate specificity of the reaction resides in component A. Component A is therefore an NTA monooxygenase that uses FMNH2 and O2 to oxidize NTA, and component B is an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase that provides FMNH2 for NTA oxidation. PMID:9023192

  2. Evolution of NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductases (POR) in Apiales - POR 1 is missing.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Trine Bundgaard; Hansen, Niels Bjørn; Laursen, Tomas; Weitzel, Corinna; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2016-05-01

    The NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the obligate electron donor to eukaryotic microsomal cytochromes P450 enzymes. The number of PORs within plant species is limited to one to four isoforms, with the most common being two PORs per plant. These enzymes provide electrons to a huge number of different cytochromes P450s (from 50 to several hundred within one plant). Within the eudicotyledons, PORs can be divided into two major clades, POR 1 and POR 2. Based on our own sequencing analysis and publicly available data, we have identified 45 PORs from the angiosperm order Apiales. These were subjected to a phylogenetic analysis along with 237 other publicly available (NCBI and oneKP) POR sequences found within the clade Asterids. Here, we show that the order Apiales only harbor members of the POR 2 clade, which are further divided into two distinct subclades. This is in contrast to most other eudicotyledon orders that have both POR 1 and POR 2. This suggests that through gene duplications and one gene deletion, Apiales only contain members of the POR 2 clade. Three POR 2 isoforms from Thapsia garganica L., Apiaceae, were all full-length in an Illumina root transcriptome dataset (available from the SRA at NCBI). All three genes were shown to be functional upon reconstitution into nanodiscs, confirming that none of the isoforms are pseudogenes. PMID:26854662

  3. Stress defense mechanisms of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) in plants.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Barman, Dhirendra Nath; Kim, Min Gab; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Plants establish highly and systemically organized stress defense mechanisms against unfavorable living conditions. To interpret these environmental stimuli, plants possess communication tools, referred as secondary messengers, such as Ca(2+) signature and reactive oxygen species (ROS) wave. Maintenance of ROS is an important event for whole lifespan of plants, however, in special cases, toxic ROS molecules are largely accumulated under excess stresses and diverse enzymes played as ROS scavengers. Arabidopsis and rice contain 3 NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs) which transfer reducing power to Thioredoxin/Peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx) system for scavenging ROS. However, due to functional redundancy between cytosolic and mitochondrial NTRs (NTRA and NTRB, respectively), their functional involvements under stress conditions have not been well characterized. Recently, we reported that cytosolic NTRA confers the stress tolerance against oxidative and drought stresses via regulation of ROS amounts using NTRA-overexpressing plants. With these findings, mitochondrial NTRB needs to be further elucidated. PMID:26039478

  4. Isolation and characterization of the human aldehyde oxidase gene: conservation of intron/exon boundaries with the xanthine oxidoreductase gene indicates a common origin.

    PubMed Central

    Terao, M; Kurosaki, M; Demontis, S; Zanotta, S; Garattini, E

    1998-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a molybdo-flavo enzyme involved in the metabolism of various endogenous and exogenous N-heterocyclic compounds of pharmacological and toxicological importance. The enzyme is the product of a gene which is implicated in the aetio-pathogenesis of familial recessive amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we report the cloning and structural characterization of the human AO gene. AO is a single copy gene approximately 85 kb long with 35 transcribed exons. The transcription-initiation site and the sequence of the 5'-flanking region, containing several putative regulatory elements, were determined. The 5'-flanking region contains a functional promoter, as assessed by appropriate reporter constructs in transient transfection experiments. Comparison of the AO gene structure shows conservation of the position and type of exon/intron junctions relative to those observed in the gene coding for another molybdo-flavoprotein, i.e. xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). As the two genes code for proteins with a high level of amino acid identity, our results strongly suggest that the AO and XOR genetic loci arose as the consequence of a duplication event. Southern blot analysis conducted on genomic DNA from various animal species with specific cDNA probes indicates that the AO gene is less conserved than the XOR gene during evolution. PMID:9601067

  5. Eicosanoids up-regulate production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH-dependent oxidase in Spodoptera exigua phagocytic hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Youngjin; Stanley, David W; Kim, Yonggyun

    2015-08-01

    Eicosanoids mediate cellular immune responses in insects, including phagocytosis of invading microbes. Phagocytosis entails two major steps, the internalization of microbes and the subsequent killing of them via formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we posed the hypothesis that eicosanoids mediate ROS production by activating NADPH-dependent oxidase (NOX) and tested the idea in the model insect, Spodoptera exigua. A NOX gene (we named SeNOX4) was identified and cloned, yielding a full open reading frame encoding 547 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 63,410Da and an isoelectric point at 9.28. A transmembrane domain and a large intracellular domain containing NADPH and FAD-binding sites were predicted. Phylogenetic analysis indicated SeNOX4 clusters with other NOX4 genes. SeNOX4 was expressed in all life stages except eggs, and exclusively in hemocytes. Bacterial challenge and, separately, arachidonic acid (AA, a precursor of eicosanoid biosynthesis) injection increased its expression. The internalization step was assessed by counting hemocytes engulfing fluorescence-labeled bacteria. The phagocytic behavior was inhibited by dsRNA suppression of SeNOX4 expression and, separately by dexamethasone (DEX, a specific inhibitor of eicosanoid biosynthesis) treatments. However, injecting AA to dsSeNOX4-treated larvae did not rescue the phagocytic activity. Hemocytic ROS production increased following bacterial challenge, which was sharply reduced in dsSeNOX4-treated, and separately, in DEX-treated larvae. AA partially reversed the suppressed ROS production in dsSeNOX4-treated larvae. Treating larvae with either the ROS-suppressing dsSeNOX4 construct or DEX rendered experimental larvae unable to inhibit bacterial proliferation in their hemocoels. We infer that eicosanoids mediate ROS production during phagocytosis by inducing expression of SeNOX4. PMID:26071791

  6. Reconstruction of an Acetogenic 2,3-Butanediol Pathway Involving a Novel NADPH-Dependent Primary-Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Köpke, Michael; Gerth, Monica L.; Maddock, Danielle J.; Mueller, Alexander P.; Liew, FungMin

    2014-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria use CO and/or CO2 plus H2 as their sole carbon and energy sources. Fermentation processes with these organisms hold promise for producing chemicals and biofuels from abundant waste gas feedstocks while simultaneously reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions. The acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum is known to synthesize the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate and 2,3-butanediol during gas fermentation. Industrially, 2,3-butanediol is valuable for chemical production. Here we identify and characterize the C. autoethanogenum enzymes for lactate and 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. The putative C. autoethanogenum lactate dehydrogenase was active when expressed in Escherichia coli. The 2,3-butanediol pathway was reconstituted in E. coli by cloning and expressing the candidate genes for acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase. Under anaerobic conditions, the resulting E. coli strain produced 1.1 ± 0.2 mM 2R,3R-butanediol (23 μM h−1 optical density unit−1), which is comparable to the level produced by C. autoethanogenum during growth on CO-containing waste gases. In addition to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, we identified a strictly NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CaADH) that could reduce acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed that CaADH accepts a range of 2-, 3-, and 4-carbon substrates, including the nonphysiological ketones acetone and butanone. The high activity of CaADH toward acetone led us to predict, and confirm experimentally, that C. autoethanogenum can act as a whole-cell biocatalyst for converting exogenous acetone to isopropanol. Together, our results functionally validate the 2,3-butanediol pathway from C. autoethanogenum, identify CaADH as a target for further engineering, and demonstrate the potential of C. autoethanogenum as a platform for sustainable chemical production. PMID:24657865

  7. Reconstruction of an acetogenic 2,3-butanediol pathway involving a novel NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Köpke, Michael; Gerth, Monica L; Maddock, Danielle J; Mueller, Alexander P; Liew, FungMin; Simpson, Séan D; Patrick, Wayne M

    2014-06-01

    Acetogenic bacteria use CO and/or CO2 plus H2 as their sole carbon and energy sources. Fermentation processes with these organisms hold promise for producing chemicals and biofuels from abundant waste gas feedstocks while simultaneously reducing industrial greenhouse gas emissions. The acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum is known to synthesize the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate and 2,3-butanediol during gas fermentation. Industrially, 2,3-butanediol is valuable for chemical production. Here we identify and characterize the C. autoethanogenum enzymes for lactate and 2,3-butanediol biosynthesis. The putative C. autoethanogenum lactate dehydrogenase was active when expressed in Escherichia coli. The 2,3-butanediol pathway was reconstituted in E. coli by cloning and expressing the candidate genes for acetolactate synthase, acetolactate decarboxylase, and 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase. Under anaerobic conditions, the resulting E. coli strain produced 1.1 ± 0.2 mM 2R,3R-butanediol (23 μM h(-1) optical density unit(-1)), which is comparable to the level produced by C. autoethanogenum during growth on CO-containing waste gases. In addition to the 2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase, we identified a strictly NADPH-dependent primary-secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (CaADH) that could reduce acetoin to 2,3-butanediol. Detailed kinetic analysis revealed that CaADH accepts a range of 2-, 3-, and 4-carbon substrates, including the nonphysiological ketones acetone and butanone. The high activity of CaADH toward acetone led us to predict, and confirm experimentally, that C. autoethanogenum can act as a whole-cell biocatalyst for converting exogenous acetone to isopropanol. Together, our results functionally validate the 2,3-butanediol pathway from C. autoethanogenum, identify CaADH as a target for further engineering, and demonstrate the potential of C. autoethanogenum as a platform for sustainable chemical production. PMID:24657865

  8. Recombinant expression and biochemical characterization of an NADPH:flavin oxidoreductase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Bruchhaus, I; Richter, S; Tannich, E

    1998-01-01

    The gene encoding a putative NADPH:flavin oxidoreductase of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (Eh34) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant protein (recEh34) has a molecular mass of about 35 kDa upon SDS/PAGE analysis, exhibits a flavoprotein-like absorption spectrum and contains 1 mol of non-covalently bound FMN per mol of protein. RecEh34 reveals two different enzymic activities. It catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as well as of disulphides such as 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) and cystine. The disulphide reductase but not the H2O2-forming NADPH oxidase activity is inhibitable by sulphydryl-active compounds, indicating that a thiol component is part of the active site for the disulphide reductase activity, whereas for the H2O2-forming NADPH oxidase activity only the flavin is required. Compared with the recombinant protein, similar activities are present in amoebic extracts. Native Eh34 is active in a monomeric as well as in a dimeric state. In contrast to recEh34, no flavin was associated with the native protein. However, both NADPH oxidase as well as DTNB reductase activity were found to be dependent on the addition of FAD or FMN. PMID:9494088

  9. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine G.; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Henriksen, Anette

    2009-09-01

    The first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, a protein involved in seed development and germination, has been determined. The structure is in a conformation that excludes NADPH binding and indicates that a domain reorientation facilitated by Trx binding precedes NADPH binding in the reaction mechanism. Thioredoxins (Trxs) are protein disulfide reductases that regulate the intracellular redox environment and are important for seed germination in plants. Trxs are in turn regulated by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), which provide reducing equivalents to Trx using NADPH to recycle Trxs to the active form. Here, the first crystal structure of a cereal NTR, HvNTR2 from Hordeum vulgare (barley), is presented, which is also the first structure of a monocot plant NTR. The structure was determined at 2.6 Å resolution and refined to an R{sub cryst} of 19.0% and an R{sub free} of 23.8%. The dimeric protein is structurally similar to the structures of AtNTR-B from Arabidopsis thaliana and other known low-molecular-weight NTRs. However, the relative position of the two NTR cofactor-binding domains, the FAD and the NADPH domains, is not the same. The NADPH domain is rotated by 25° and bent by a 38% closure relative to the FAD domain in comparison with AtNTR-B. The structure may represent an intermediate between the two conformations described previously: the flavin-oxidizing (FO) and the flavin-reducing (FR) conformations. Here, analysis of interdomain contacts as well as phylogenetic studies lead to the proposal of a new reaction scheme in which NTR–Trx interactions mediate the FO to FR transformation.

  10. Synergistic effect of NADH on NADPH-dependent acetaminophen activation in liver microsomes and its inhibition by cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chifumi; Marumo, Fumiaki )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of NADH and cyanide on NADPH-dependent acetaminophen activation in rat and mouse liver microsomes were studied. In both rat and mouse microsomes, NADPH-dependent acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate production was synergistically enhanced by the addition of NADH, whereas NADH alone did not initiate this reaction. The data suggest that the second electron in this reaction may be transferred from NADH. The present findings are different from a previous report in a reconstituted system that NADH decreases covalent binding of acetaminophen to proteins. This reaction was inhibited by low concentrations of sodium cyanide. The role of the cyanide sensitive factor in this reaction in liver microsomes remains to be further clarified.

  11. NADPH-dependent reduction of 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol by the phagocytic vesicles of pig polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wakeyama, H; Takeshige, K; Minakami, S

    1983-01-01

    NADPH-dependent 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol (DCIP) reductase activity in the homogenate of phagocytosing pig polymorphonuclear leucocytes was twice that of the resting cells and the activity in the phagocytic vesicles corresponded to the activity increment due to phagocytosis. The apparent Km value of the reductase activity in the vesicles for NADPH was 30 microM, which is similar to that of the NADPH-dependent superoxide (O2-) formation. Increasing the DCIP reductase activity by increasing the DCIP concentration caused a decrease in the O2- -forming activity, the NADPH oxidation rate being constant and independent of the dye concentration. p-Chloromercuribenzoate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide at low concentrations inhibited the O2- -forming activity of the vesicles without inhibiting the DCIP reductase. Quinacrine inhibited both O2- formation and DCIP reduction. The DCIP reductase activity could be extracted with a mixture of deoxycholate and Tween-20, which extracts the O2- -forming activity. The reductase activity in the extract was enhanced 2-fold by the addition of FAD, and its apparent Km was 0.085 microM. These results indicate that the NADPH-dependent DCIP reductase activity of the phagocytic vesicles is catalysed by a flavin-containing component of the O2- -forming system. PMID:6860311

  12. 1,4-Naphthoquinones and Others NADPH-Dependent Glutathione Reductase-Catalyzed Redox Cyclers as Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Belorgey, Didier; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The homodimeric flavoenzyme glutathione reductase catalyzes NADPH-dependent glutathione disulfide reduction. This reaction is important for keeping the redox homeostasis in human cells and in the human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. Different types of NADPH-dependent disulfide reductase inhibitors were designed in various chemical series to evaluate the impact of each inhibition mode on the propagation of the parasites. Against malaria parasites in cultures the most potent and specific effects were observed for redox-active agents acting as subversive substrates for both glutathione reductases of the Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. In their oxidized form, these redox-active compounds are reduced by NADPH-dependent flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions in the cytosol of infected erythrocytes. In their reduced forms, these compounds can reduce molecular oxygen to reactive oxygen species, or reduce oxidants like methemoglobin, the major nutrient of the parasite, to indigestible hemoglobin. Furthermore, studies on a fluorinated suicide-substrate of the human glutathione reductase indicate that the glutathione reductase-catalyzed bioactivation of 3-benzylnaphthoquinones to the corresponding reduced 3-benzoyl metabolites is essential for the observed antimalarial activity. In conclusion, the antimalarial lead naphthoquinones are suggested to perturb the major redox equilibria of the targeted cells. These effects result in development arrest of the parasite and contribute to the removal of the parasitized erythrocytes by macrophages. PMID:23116403

  13. Three-dimensional Structure and Enzymatic Function of Proapoptotic Human p53-inducible Quinone Oxidoreductase PIG3*

    PubMed Central

    Porté, Sergio; Valencia, Eva; Yakovtseva, Evgenia A.; Borràs, Emma; Shafqat, Naeem; Debreczeny, Judit É.; Pike, Ashley C. W.; Oppermann, Udo; Farrés, Jaume; Fita, Ignacio; Parés, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 regulates the expression of p53-induced genes (PIG) that trigger apoptosis. PIG3 or TP53I3 is the only known member of the medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily induced by p53 and is used as a proapoptotic marker. Although the participation of PIG3 in the apoptotic pathway is proven, the protein and its mechanism of action were never characterized. We analyzed human PIG3 enzymatic function and found NADPH-dependent reductase activity with ortho-quinones, which is consistent with the classification of PIG3 in the quinone oxidoreductase family. However, the activity is much lower than that of ζ-crystallin, a better known quinone oxidoreductase. In addition, we report the crystallographic structure of PIG3, which allowed the identification of substrate- and cofactor-binding sites, with residues fully conserved from bacteria to human. Tyr-59 in ζ-crystallin (Tyr-51 in PIG3) was suggested to participate in the catalysis of quinone reduction. However, kinetics of Tyr/Phe and Tyr/Ala mutants of both enzymes demonstrated that the active site Tyr is not catalytic but may participate in substrate binding, consistent with a mechanism based on propinquity effects. It has been proposed that PIG3 contribution to apoptosis would be through oxidative stress generation. We found that in vitro activity and in vivo overexpression of PIG3 accumulate reactive oxygen species. Accordingly, an inactive PIG3 mutant (S151V) did not produce reactive oxygen species in cells, indicating that enzymatically active protein is necessary for this function. This supports that PIG3 action is through oxidative stress produced by its enzymatic activity and provides essential knowledge for eventual control of apoptosis. PMID:19349281

  14. Vibrio harveyi NADPH-flavin oxidoreductase: cloning, sequencing and overexpression of the gene and purification and characterization of the cloned enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Lei, B; Liu, M; Huang, S; Tu, S C

    1994-01-01

    NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductases (flavin reductases) from luminous bacteria catalyze the reduction of flavin by NAD(P)H and are believed to provide the reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) for luciferase in the bioluminescence reaction. By using an oligonucleotide probe based on the partial N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Vibrio harveyi NADPH-FMN oxidoreductase (flavin reductase P), a recombinant plasmid, pFRP1, was obtained which contained the frp gene encoding this enzyme. The DNA sequence of the frp gene was determined; the deduced amino acid sequence for flavin reductase P consists of 240 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 26,312. The frp gene was overexpressed, apparently through induction, in Escherichia coli JM109 cells harboring pFRP1. The cloned flavin reductase P was purified to homogeneity by following a new and simple procedure involving FMN-agarose chromatography as a key step. The same chromatography material was also highly effective in concentrating diluted flavin reductase P. The purified enzyme is a monomer and is unusual in having a tightly bound FMN cofactor. Distinct from the free FMN, the bound FMN cofactor showed a diminished A375 peak and a slightly increased 8-nm red-shifted A453 peak and was completely or nearly nonfluorescent. The Kms for FMN and NADPH and the turnover number of this flavin reductase were determined. In comparison with other flavin reductases and homologous proteins, this flavin reductase P shows a number of distinct features with respect to primary sequence, redox center, and/or kinetic mechanism. Images PMID:8206832

  15. [Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken

    2008-04-01

    Inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase decrease production of uric acid, thus they act as hypouricemic drugs. Allopurinol, a prototypical xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, has been widely prescribed for treatment of gout and hyperuricemia. However, severe side effects of allopurinol may occur in patients with renal insufficiency. Recently, novel nonpurine selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductase have been developed as potential alternatives to allopurinol. They have different inhibition mechanisms, utilizing the enzyme structure and the reaction mechanism. Such variation of the inhibition mechanism affects/in vivo/hypouricemic effects of the inhibitors. PMID:18409526

  16. Molecular genetics evidence for the in vivo roles of the two major NADPH-dependent disulfide reductases in the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Kathrin; Putrianti, Elyzana D; Rahlfs, Stefan; Schirmer, R Heiner; Becker, Katja; Matuschewski, Kai

    2010-11-26

    Malaria-associated pathology is caused by the continuous expansion of Plasmodium parasites inside host erythrocytes. To maintain a reducing intracellular milieu in an oxygen-rich environment, malaria parasites have evolved a complex antioxidative network based on two central electron donors, glutathione and thioredoxin. Here, we dissected the in vivo roles of both redox pathways by gene targeting of the respective NADPH-dependent disulfide reductases. We show that Plasmodium berghei glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase are dispensable for proliferation of the pathogenic blood stages. Intriguingly, glutathione reductase is vital for extracellular parasite development inside the insect vector, whereas thioredoxin reductase is dispensable during the entire parasite life cycle. Our findings suggest that glutathione reductase is the central player of the parasite redox network, whereas thioredoxin reductase fulfils a specialized and dispensable role for P. berghei. These results also indicate redundant roles of the Plasmodium redox pathways during the pathogenic blood phase and query their suitability as promising drug targets for antimalarial intervention strategies. PMID:20852334

  17. Toxic-Selenium and Low-Selenium Transcriptomes in Caenorhabditis elegans: Toxic Selenium Up-Regulates Oxidoreductase and Down-Regulates Cuticle-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Boehler, Christopher J.; Raines, Anna M.; Sunde, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an element that in trace quantities is both essential in mammals but also toxic to bacteria, yeast, plants and animals, including C. elegans. Our previous studies showed that selenite was four times as toxic as selenate to C. elegans, but that deletion of thioredoxin reductase did not modulate Se toxicity. To characterize Se regulation of the full transcriptome, we conducted a microarray study in C. elegans cultured in axenic media supplemented with 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mM Se as selenite. C. elegans cultured in 0.2 and 0.4 mM Se displayed a significant delay in growth as compared to 0, 0.05, or 0.1 mM Se, indicating Se-induced toxicity, so worms were staged to mid-L4 larval stage for these studies. Relative to 0.1 mM Se treatment, culturing C. elegans at these Se concentrations resulted in 1.9, 9.7, 5.5, and 2.3%, respectively, of the transcriptome being altered by at least 2-fold. This toxicity altered the expression of 295 overlapping transcripts, which when filtered against gene sets for sulfur and cadmium toxicity, identified a dataset of 182 toxic-Se specific genes that were significantly enriched in functions related to oxidoreductase activity, and significantly depleted in genes related to structural components of collagen and the cuticle. Worms cultured in low Se (0 mM Se) exhibited no signs of deficiency, but low Se was accompanied by a transcriptional response of 59 genes changed ≥2-fold when compared to all other Se concentrations, perhaps due to decreases in Se-dependent TRXR-1 activity. Overall, these results suggest that Se toxicity in C. elegans causes an increase in ROS and stress responses, marked by increased expression of oxidoreductases and reduced expression of cuticle-associated genes, which together underlie the impaired growth observed in these studies. PMID:24971995

  18. Interindividual Variability of CYP2C19-Catalyzed Drug Metabolism Due to Differences in Gene Diplotypes and Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Content

    PubMed Central

    Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Chaudhry, Amarjit S.; McDonald, Matthew; Prasad, Bhagwat; Wong, Timothy; Calamia, Justina C.; Fohner, Alie; Thornton, Timothy A.; Isoherranen, Nina; Unadkat, Jashvant D.; Rettie, Allan E.; Schuetz, Erin G.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Large interindividual variability has been observed in the metabolism of CYP2C19 substrates in vivo. The study aimed to evaluate sources of this variability in CYP2C19 activity, focusing on CYP2C19 diplotypes and the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR). CYP2C19 gene analysis was carried out on 347 human liver samples. CYP2C19 activity assayed using human liver microsomes (HLMs) confirmed a significant a priori predicted rank order for (S)-mephenytoin hydroxylase activity of CYP2C19*17/*17 > *1B/*17 > *1B/*1B > *2A/*17 > *1B/*2A > *2A/*2A diplotypes. In a multivariate analysis, the CYP2C19*2A allele and POR protein content were associated with CYP2C19 activity. Further analysis indicated a strong effect of the CYP2C19*2A, but not the *17, allele on both metabolic steps in the conversion of clopidogrel to its active metabolite. The present study demonstrates that interindividual variability in CYP2C19 activity is due to differences in both CYP2C19 protein content associated with gene diplotypes and the POR concentration. PMID:26323597

  19. Interindividual variability of CYP2C19-catalyzed drug metabolism due to differences in gene diplotypes and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase content.

    PubMed

    Shirasaka, Y; Chaudhry, A S; McDonald, M; Prasad, B; Wong, T; Calamia, J C; Fohner, A; Thornton, T A; Isoherranen, N; Unadkat, J D; Rettie, A E; Schuetz, E G; Thummel, K E

    2016-08-01

    Large interindividual variability has been observed in the metabolism of CYP2C19 substrates in vivo. The study aimed to evaluate sources of this variability in CYP2C19 activity, focusing on CYP2C19 diplotypes and the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR). CYP2C19 gene analysis was carried out on 347 human liver samples. CYP2C19 activity assayed using human liver microsomes confirmed a significant a priori predicted rank order for (S)-mephenytoin hydroxylase activity of CYP2C19*17/*17 > *1B/*17 > *1B/*1B > *2A/*17 > *1B/*2A > *2A/*2A diplotypes. In a multivariate analysis, the CYP2C19*2A allele and POR protein content were associated with CYP2C19 activity. Further analysis indicated a strong effect of the CYP2C19*2A, but not the *17, allele on both metabolic steps in the conversion of clopidogrel to its active metabolite. The present study demonstrates that interindividual variability in CYP2C19 activity is due to differences in both CYP2C19 protein content associated with gene diplotypes and the POR concentration.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 1 September 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.58. PMID:26323597

  20. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester stimulates human antioxidant response element-mediated expression of the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) gene.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, A K; Venugopal, R; Mucha, J; Carothers, A M; Grunberger, D

    1997-02-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a phenolic antioxidant derived from the propolis of honeybee hives. CAPE was shown to inhibit the formation of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and oxidized bases in DNA of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated HeLa cells and was also found to induce a redox change that correlated with differential growth effects in transformed cells but not the nontumorigenic parental ones. Mediated via the electrophile or human antioxidant response element (hARE), induction of the expression of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit genes by certain phenolic antioxidants has been correlated with the chemopreventive properties of these agents. Here, we determined by Northern analysis that CAPE treatment of hepatoma cells stimulates NQO1 gene expression in cultured human hepatoma cells (HepG2), and we characterized the effects of CAPE treatment on the expression of a reporter gene either containing or lacking the hARE or carrying a mutant version of this element in rodent hepatoma (Hepa-1) transfectants. A dose-dependent transactivation of human hARE-mediated chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene expression was observed upon treatments of the Hepa-1 transfectants with TPA, a known inducer, as well as with CAPE. The combined treatments resulted in an apparent additive stimulation of the reporter expression. To learn whether this activation of cat gene expression was effected by protein kinase C in CAPE-treated cells, a comparison was made of cat gene activity after addition of calphostin, a protein kinase C inhibitor. Calphostin reduced the cat gene induction by TPA but not by CAPE, suggesting that stimulation of gene expression in this system by these agents proceeds via distinct mechanisms. Band-shift experiments to examine binding of transactivator proteins from nuclear extracts of treated and untreated cells to a hARE DNA probe showed that TPA exposure increased the binding level

  1. Nitric oxide is required for the auxin-induced activation of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase and protein denitrosylation during root growth responses in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Cejudo, Francisco J.; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Auxin is the main phytohormone controlling root development in plants. This study uses pharmacological and genetic approaches to examine the role of auxin and nitric oxide (NO) in the activation of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR), and the effect that this activity has on root growth responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Methods Arabidopsis seedlings were treated with auxin with or without the NTR inhibitors auranofin (ANF) and 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB). NTR activity, lateral root (LR) formation and S-nitrosothiol content were measured in roots. Protein S-nitrosylation was analysed by the biotin switch method in wild-type arabidopsis and in the double mutant ntra ntrb. Key Results The auxin-mediated induction of NTR activity is inhibited by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO), suggesting that NO is downstream of auxin in this regulatory pathway. The NTR inhibitors ANF and DNCB prevent auxin-mediated activation of NTR and LR formation. Moreover, ANF and DNCB also inhibit auxin-induced DR5 : : GUS and BA3 : : GUS gene expression, suggesting that the auxin signalling pathway is compromised without full NTR activity. Treatment of roots with ANF and DNCB increases total nitrosothiols (SNO) content and protein S-nitrosylation, suggesting a role of the NTR-thioredoxin (Trx)-redox system in protein denitrosylation. In agreement with these results, the level of S-nitrosylated proteins is increased in the arabidopsis double mutant ntra ntrb as compared with the wild-type. Conclusions The results support for the idea that NTR is involved in protein denitrosylation during auxin-mediated root development. The fact that a high NO concentration induces NTR activity suggests that a feedback mechanism to control massive and unregulated protein S-nitrosylation could be operating in plant cells. PMID:26229066

  2. Human antioxidant-response-element-mediated regulation of type 1 NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase gene expression. Effect of sulfhydryl modifying agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Jaiswal, A K

    1994-11-15

    Human antioxidant-response element (hARE) containing two copies of the AP1/AP1-like elements arranged as inverse repeat is known to mediate basal and beta-naphthoflavone-induced transcription of the type 1 NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) gene. Band-shift assays revealed that beta-naphthoflavone increased binding of nuclear proteins at the hARE. Super shift assays identified Jun-D and c-Fos proteins in the band-shift complexes observed with control and beta-naphthoflavone-treated Hepa-1 nuclear extracts. Hepa-1 cells stably transformed with hARE-tk-chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) recombinant plasmid were used to demonstrate that, in addition to beta-naphthoflavone, a variety of antioxidants, tumor promoters and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) also increased expression of hARE-mediated CAT gene. beta-naphthoflavone induction of the CAT gene expression in Hepa-1 cells was found insensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. However, binding of regulatory proteins at the hARE and the CAT gene expression in Hepa-1 cells were increased by dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol and diamide. Treatment of the Hepa-1 cells with N-ethylmaleimide reduced binding of proteins at the hARE and interfered with expression and beta-naphthoflavone induction of the CAT gene. These results suggested a role of sulfhydryl modification of hARE binding (Jun and Fos) proteins which mediate basal and induced expression of the NQO1 gene. We also report that in-vitro-translated products of the proto-oncogenes, Jun and Fos, bind to the hARE in band-shift assays. The incubation of Jun and Fos proteins with small amounts of nuclear extract from dimethylsulfoxide-treated (control) or beta-naphthoflavone treated Hepa-1 cells prior to band-shift assays increased the binding of Jun and Fos proteins to the hARE. Interestingly, the increase in binding of Jun and Fos proteins to the hARE was more prominent with beta-naphthoflavone-treated nuclear extract as compared to the control

  3. The oxen gene of Drosophila encodes a homolog of subunit 9 of yeast ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase complex: evidence for modulation of gene expression in response to mitochondrial activity.

    PubMed

    Frolov, M V; Benevolenskaya, E V; Birchler, J A

    2000-12-01

    A P-element insertion in the oxen gene, ox(1), has been isolated in a search for modifiers of white gene expression. The mutation preferentially exerts a negative dosage effect upon the expression of three genes encoding ABC transporters involved in pigment precursor transport, white, brown, and scarlet. A precise excision of the P element reverts the mutant phenotype. Five different transcription units were identified around the insertion site. To distinguish a transcript responsible for the mutant phenotype, a set of deletions within the oxen region was generated. Analysis of gene expression within the oxen region in the case of deletions as well as generation of transgenic flies allowed us to identify the transcript responsible for oxen function. It encodes a 6.6-kD homolog of mitochondrial ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase (QCR9), subunit 9 of the bc(1) complex in yeast. In addition to white, brown, and scarlet, oxen regulates the expression of three of seven tested genes. Thus, our data provide additional evidence for a cellular response to changes in mitochondrial function. The oxen mutation provides a model for the genetic analysis in multicellular organisms of the effect of mitochondrial activity on nuclear gene expression. PMID:11102369

  4. Purification of NADPH-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase from rat liver and its identification with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Del Bello, B; Maellaro, E; Sugherini, L; Santucci, A; Comporti, M; Casini, A F

    1994-01-01

    Rat liver cytosol has been found to reduce dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) to ascorbic acid in the presence of NADPH. The enzyme responsible for such activity has been purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-Sepharose, Sephadex G-100 SF and Reactive Red column chromatography, with an overall recovery of 27%. SDS/PAGE of the purified enzyme showed one single protein band with an M(r) of 37,500. A similar value (36,800) was found by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 SF column. The results indicate that the enzyme is a homogeneous monomer. The Km for DHAA was 4.6 mM and the Vmax. was 1.55 units/mg of protein; for NADPH Km and Vmax. were 4.3 microM and 1.10 units/mg of protein respectively. The optimum pH was around 6.2. Several typical substrates and inhibitors of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily have been tested. The strong inhibition of DHAA reductase effected by steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, together with the ability to reduce 5 alpha-androstane-3,17-dione strongly, suggest the possibility that DHAA reductase corresponds to 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Microsequence analysis performed on the electro-transferred enzyme band shows that the N-terminus is blocked. Internal primary structure data were obtained from CNBr-derived fragments and definitely proved the identity of NADPH-dependent DHAA reductase with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7998972

  5. A Novel NADPH-dependent flavoprotein reductase from Bacillus megaterium acts as an efficient cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Milhim, Mohammed; Gerber, Adrian; Neunzig, Jens; Hannemann, Frank; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-08-10

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) require electron transfer partners to catalyze substrate conversions. With regard to biotechnological approaches, the elucidation of novel electron transfer proteins is of special interest, as they can influence the enzymatic activity and specificity of the P450s. In the current work we present the identification and characterization of a novel soluble NADPH-dependent diflavin reductase from Bacillus megaterium with activity towards a bacterial (CYP106A1) and a microsomal (CYP21A2) P450 and, therefore, we referred to it as B. megaterium cytochrome P450 reductase (BmCPR). Sequence analysis of the protein revealed besides the conserved FMN-, FAD- and NADPH-binding motifs, the presence of negatively charged cluster, which is thought to represent the interaction domain with P450s and/or cytochrome c. BmCPR was expressed and purified to homogeneity in Escherichia coli. The purified BmCPR exhibited a characteristic diflavin reductase spectrum, and showed a cytochrome c reducing activity. Furthermore, in an in vitro reconstituted system, the BmCPR was able to support the hydroxylation of testosterone and progesterone with CYP106A1 and CYP21A2, respectively. Moreover, in view of the biotechnological application, the BmCPR is very promising, as it could be successfully utilized to establish CYP106A1- and CYP21A2-based whole-cell biotransformation systems, which yielded 0.3g/L hydroxy-testosterone products within 8h and 0.16g/L 21-hydroxyprogesterone within 6h, respectively. In conclusion, the BmCPR reported herein owns a great potential for further applications and studies and should be taken into consideration for bacterial and/or microsomal CYP-dependent bioconversions. PMID:27238232

  6. The fission yeast ferric reductase gene frp1+ is required for ferric iron uptake and encodes a protein that is homologous to the gp91-phox subunit of the human NADPH phagocyte oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, D G; Dancis, A; Anderson, G J; Klausner, R D

    1993-01-01

    We have identified a cell surface ferric reductase activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A mutant strain deficient in this activity was also deficient in ferric iron uptake, while ferrous iron uptake was not impaired. Therefore, reduction is a required step in cellular ferric iron acquisition. We have cloned frp1+, the wild-type allele of the mutant gene. frp1+ mRNA levels were repressed by iron addition to the growth medium. Fusion of 138 nucleotides of frp1+ promoter sequences to a reporter gene, the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, conferred iron-dependent regulation upon the latter when introduced into S. pombe. The predicted amino acid sequence of the frp1+ gene exhibits hydrophobic regions compatible with transmembrane domains. It shows similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FRE1 gene product and the gp91-phox protein, a component of the human NADPH phagocyte oxidoreductase that is deficient in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. Images PMID:8321236

  7. The effect of allopurinol administration on mitochondrial respiration and gene expression of xanthine oxidoreductase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and inflammatory cytokines in selected tissues of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Settle, T; Falkenstein, E; Klandorf, H

    2015-10-01

    Birds have a remarkable longevity for their body size despite an increased body temperature, higher metabolic rate, and increased blood glucose concentrations compared to most mammals. As the end-product of purine degradation, uric acid (UA) is generated in the xanthine/hypoxanthine reactions catalyzed by xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). In the first study, Cobb × Cobb broilers (n = 12; 4 weeks old) were separated into 2 treatments (n = 6); control (CON) and allopurinol (AL) 35 mg/kg BW (ALLO). The purpose of this study was to assess mitochondrial function in broiler chickens in response to potential oxidative stress generated from the administration of AL for 1 wk. There was a significant reduction in state 3 respiration (P = 0.01) and state 4 respiration (P = 0.007) in AL-treated birds compared to the controls. The purpose of the second study was to assess the effect of AL on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ (IFN)-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p35, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and XOR in liver tissue. Cobb × Cobb broilers were separated into two groups at 4 wk age (n = 10); CON and ALLO. After 1 wk AL treatment, half of the birds in each group (CON 1 and ALLO 1) were euthanized while the remaining birds continued on AL treatment for an additional week (CON 2 and ALLO 2). A significant increase in gene expression of XOR, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-12p35 in ALLO 2 birds as compared to birds in CON 2 was detected. Liver UA content was significantly decreased in both ALLO 1(P = 0.003) and ALLO 2 (P = 0.012) birds when compared to CON 1 and CON 2, respectively. The AL reduced liver UA concentrations and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. Additional studies are needed to determine if AL causes a direct effect on mitochondria or if mitochondrial dysfunction observed in liver mitochondria was due indirectly through increased oxidative stress or increased inflammation. PMID:26316336

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase I from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Marcos Antonio de; Discola, Karen Fulan; Alves, Simone Vidigal; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Medrano, Francisco Javier; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes

    2005-04-01

    Thioredoxin reductase 1 (Trr1) from S. cerevisiae is a component of the thioredoxin system, which is involved in several biological processes, including the reduction of disulfide bonds and response to oxidative stress. The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of yeast Trr1 are reported. Thioredoxin reductase 1 (Trr1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a member of the family of pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductases capable of reducing the redox-active disulfide bond of the cytosolic thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and thioredoxin 2 (Trx2). NADPH, Trr1 and Trx1 (or Trx2) comprise the thioredoxin system, which is involved in several biological processes, including the reduction of disulfide bonds and response to oxidative stress. Recombinant Trr1 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a His{sub 6}-tagged fusion protein and purified by nickel-affinity chromatography. The protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of PEG 3000 as precipitant after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.4 Å using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal belongs to the centred monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 127.97, b = 135.41, c = 75.81 Å, β = 89.95°. The crystal structure was solved by molecular-replacement methods and structure refinement is in progress.

  9. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J.; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP+ and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions. PMID:26338951

  10. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions.

    PubMed

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP(+) and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions. PMID:26338951

  11. Problematic detoxification of estrogen quinones by NAD(P)H-dependent quinone oxidoreductase and glutathione-S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Chandrasena, R Esala P; Edirisinghe, Praneeth D; Bolton, Judy L; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2008-07-01

    Estrogen exposure through early menarche, late menopause, and hormone replacement therapy increases the risk factor for hormone-dependent cancers. Although the molecular mechanisms are not completely established, DNA damage by quinone electrophilic reactive intermediates, derived from estrogen oxidative metabolism, is strongly implicated. A current hypothesis has 4-hydroxyestrone-o-quinone (4-OQE) acting as the proximal estrogen carcinogen, forming depurinating DNA adducts via Michael addition. One aspect of this hypothesis posits a key role for NAD(P)H-dependent quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) in the reduction of 4-OQE and protection against estrogen carcinogenesis, despite two reports that 4-OQE is not a substrate for NQO1. 4-OQE is rapidly and efficiently trapped by GSH, allowing measurement of NADPH-dependent reduction of 4-OQE in the presence and absence of NQO1. 4-OQE was observed to be a substrate for NQO1, but the acceleration of NADPH-dependent reduction by NQO1 over the nonenzymic reaction is less than 10-fold and at more relevant nanomolar concentrations of substrate is less than 2-fold. An alternative detoxifying enzyme, glutathione-S-transferase, was observed to be a target for 4-OQE, rapidly undergoing covalent modification. These results indicate that a key role for NQO1 and GST in direct detoxification of 4-hydroxy-estrogen quinones is problematic. PMID:18588320

  12. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L.; King, Paul W.; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP+. Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  13. Photosynthetic electron partitioning between [FeFe]-hydrogenase and ferredoxin:NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) enzymes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yacoby, Iftach; Pochekailov, Sergii; Toporik, Hila; Ghirardi, Maria L; King, Paul W; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-06-01

    Photosynthetic water splitting, coupled to hydrogenase-catalyzed hydrogen production, is considered a promising clean, renewable source of energy. It is widely accepted that the oxygen sensitivity of hydrogen production, combined with competition between hydrogenases and NADPH-dependent carbon dioxide fixation are the main limitations for its commercialization. Here we provide evidence that, under the anaerobic conditions that support hydrogen production, there is a significant loss of photosynthetic electrons toward NADPH production in vitro. To elucidate the basis for competition, we bioengineered a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion and characterized hydrogen production kinetics in the presence of Fd, ferredoxin:NADP(+)-oxidoreductase (FNR), and NADP(+). Replacing the hydrogenase with a ferredoxin-hydrogenase fusion switched the bias of electron transfer from FNR to hydrogenase and resulted in an increased rate of hydrogen photoproduction. These results suggest a new direction for improvement of biohydrogen production and a means to further resolve the mechanisms that control partitioning of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:21606330

  14. Lipids and NADPH-dependent superoxide production in plasma membrane vesicles from roots of wheat grown under copper deficiency or excess.

    PubMed

    Quartacci, M F; Cosi, E; Navari-Izzo, F

    2001-01-01

    The effects of in vivo copper on the lipid composition of root plasma membrane and the activities of membrane-bound enzymes, such as NADPH-dependent oxidases and lipoxygenase, were studied. Plants were grown in hydroponic culture for 11 d without Cu supply or in the presence of 50 microM Cu. Control plants were supplied with 0.3 microM Cu. Growth of roots was severely affected in the 50 microM Cu-grown plants, whereas roots grown in Cu-deficient solution did not show any difference in comparison with the control. The 50 microM Cu concentration caused an increase in the leakage of K(+) ions as well. Excess metal supply resulted in a decrease in the total lipid content of plasma membrane, a higher phospholipid amount and a reduction of steryl lipids (free sterols, steryl glycosides and acylated steryl glycosides). Cu depletion in the growth solution had only a slight effect on the plasma membrane lipid composition. In comparison with the control, only the excess of Cu caused a decrease in the lipid to protein ratio as well as a change in the phospholipid composition, with a lower phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylethanolamine ratio. The degree of unsaturation of root plasma membranes decreased following the 0 Cu treatment and even more after the 50 microM Cu supply. Plasma membranes of wheat grown under metal deficiency and excess showed increased NADPH-dependent superoxide-producing oxidase activities, whereas membrane-bound lipoxygenase was not increased or activated due to Cu treatments. The consequences of changes in plasma membrane lipid composition and activated oxygen production as a result of Cu treatments are discussed. PMID:11181715

  15. Soil oxidoreductases and FDA hydrolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The oxidoreductases (E.C. 1.) comprise the largest enzyme group and consist of enzymes that catalyze reactions between two compounds, one of which is oxidized (the donor) while reducing the other (the acceptor) (Dixon and Webb, 1979). In common with all redox reactions, the reaction mechanism involv...

  16. Beta Hydroxylation of Glycolipids from Ustilago maydis and Pseudozyma flocculosa by an NADPH-Dependent β-Hydroxylase▿

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, Beate; Lefebvre, François; Labbé, Caroline; Bölker, Michael; Linne, Uwe; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Flocculosin and ustilagic acid (UA), two highly similar antifungal cellobiose lipids, are respectively produced by Pseudozyma flocculosa, a biocontrol agent, and Ustilago maydis, a plant pathogen. Both glycolipids contain a short-chain fatty acid hydroxylated at the β position but differ in the long fatty acid, which is hydroxylated at the α position in UA and at the β position in flocculosin. In both organisms, the biosynthesis genes are arranged in large clusters. The functions of most genes have already been characterized, but those of the P. flocculosa fhd1 gene and its homolog from U. maydis, uhd1, have remained undefined. The deduced amino acid sequences of these genes show homology to those of short-chain dehydrogenases and reductases (SDR). We disrupted the uhd1 gene in U. maydis and analyzed the secreted UA. uhd1 deletion strains produced UA lacking the β-hydroxyl group of the short-chain fatty acid. To analyze the function of P. flocculosa Fhd1, the corresponding gene was used to complement U. maydis Δuhd1 mutants. Fhd1 was able to restore wild-type UA production, indicating that Fhd1 is responsible for β hydroxylation of the flocculosin short-chain fatty acid. We also investigated a P. flocculosa homolog of the U. maydis long-chain fatty-acid alpha hydroxylase Ahd1. The P. flocculosa ahd1 gene, which does not reside in the flocculosin gene cluster, was introduced into U. maydis Δahd1 mutant strains. P. flocculosa Ahd1 neither complemented the U. maydis Δahd1 phenotype nor resulted in the production of β-hydroxylated UA. This suggests that P. flocculosa Ahd1 is not involved in flocculosin hydroxylation. PMID:21926207

  17. Beta hydroxylation of glycolipids from Ustilago maydis and Pseudozyma flocculosa by an NADPH-dependent β-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Beate; Lefebvre, François; Labbé, Caroline; Bölker, Michael; Linne, Uwe; Bélanger, Richard R

    2011-11-01

    Flocculosin and ustilagic acid (UA), two highly similar antifungal cellobiose lipids, are respectively produced by Pseudozyma flocculosa, a biocontrol agent, and Ustilago maydis, a plant pathogen. Both glycolipids contain a short-chain fatty acid hydroxylated at the β position but differ in the long fatty acid, which is hydroxylated at the α position in UA and at the β position in flocculosin. In both organisms, the biosynthesis genes are arranged in large clusters. The functions of most genes have already been characterized, but those of the P. flocculosa fhd1 gene and its homolog from U. maydis, uhd1, have remained undefined. The deduced amino acid sequences of these genes show homology to those of short-chain dehydrogenases and reductases (SDR). We disrupted the uhd1 gene in U. maydis and analyzed the secreted UA. uhd1 deletion strains produced UA lacking the β-hydroxyl group of the short-chain fatty acid. To analyze the function of P. flocculosa Fhd1, the corresponding gene was used to complement U. maydis Δuhd1 mutants. Fhd1 was able to restore wild-type UA production, indicating that Fhd1 is responsible for β hydroxylation of the flocculosin short-chain fatty acid. We also investigated a P. flocculosa homolog of the U. maydis long-chain fatty-acid alpha hydroxylase Ahd1. The P. flocculosa ahd1 gene, which does not reside in the flocculosin gene cluster, was introduced into U. maydis Δahd1 mutant strains. P. flocculosa Ahd1 neither complemented the U. maydis Δahd1 phenotype nor resulted in the production of β-hydroxylated UA. This suggests that P. flocculosa Ahd1 is not involved in flocculosin hydroxylation. PMID:21926207

  18. Meta-analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 transcriptomic profiles identify a respiration rate-related gene expression transition point and interoperon recruitment of a key oxidoreductase subunit.

    PubMed

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Rowe, Annette R; Heavner, Gretchen L W; Zinder, Stephen H; Richardson, Ruth E

    2014-10-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6±0.6 μM Cl-/h)- and fast (22.9±9.6 μM Cl-/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n=53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID:25063656

  19. Meta-Analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi Strain 195 Transcriptomic Profiles Identify a Respiration Rate-Related Gene Expression Transition Point and Interoperon Recruitment of a Key Oxidoreductase Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Rowe, Annette R.; Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6 ± 0.6 μM Cl−/h)- and fast (22.9 ± 9.6 μM Cl−/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n = 53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID

  20. Identification of the genes encoding NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductases that are similar in sequence to Escherichia coli Fre in four species of luminous bacteria: Photorhabdus luminescens, Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio harveyi, and Vibrio orientalis.

    PubMed Central

    Zenno, S; Saigo, K

    1994-01-01

    Genes encoding NAD(P)H-flavin oxidoreductases (flavin reductases) similar in both size and sequence to Fre, the most abundant flavin reductase in Escherichia coli, were identified in four species of luminous bacteria, Photorhabdus luminescens (ATCC 29999), Vibrio fischeri (ATCC 7744), Vibrio harveyi (ATCC 33843), and Vibrio orientalis (ATCC 33934). Nucleotide sequence analysis showed Fre-like flavin reductases in P. luminescens and V. fischeri to consist of 233 and 236 amino acids, respectively. As in E. coli Fre, Fre-like enzymes in luminous bacteria preferably used riboflavin as an electron acceptor when NADPH was used as an electron donor. These enzymes also were good suppliers of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) to the bioluminescence reaction. In V. fischeri, the Fre-like enzyme is a minor flavin reductase representing < 10% of the total FMN reductase. That the V. fischeri Fre-like enzyme has no appreciable homology in amino acid sequence to the major flavin reductase in V. fischeri, FRase I, indicates that at least two different types of flavin reductases supply FMNH2 to the luminescence system in V. fischeri. Although Fre-like flavin reductases are highly similar in sequence to luxG gene products (LuxGs), Fre-like flavin reductases and LuxGs appear to constitute two separate groups of flavin-associated proteins. Images PMID:8206831

  1. Nrf1 and Nrf2 positively and c-Fos and Fra1 negatively regulate the human antioxidant response element-mediated expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase1 gene.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, R; Jaiswal, A K

    1996-12-10

    Twenty-four base pairs of the human antioxidant response element (hARE) are required for high basal transcription of the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase1 (NQO1) gene and its induction in response to xenobiotics and antioxidants. hARE is a unique cis-element that contains one perfect and one imperfect AP1 element arranged as inverse repeats separated by 3 bp, followed by a "GC" box. We report here that Jun, Fos, Fra, and Nrf nuclear transcription factors bind to the hARE. Overexpression of cDNA derived combinations of the nuclear proteins Jun and Fos or Jun and Fra1 repressed hARE-mediated chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene expression in transfected human hepatoblastoma (Hep-G2) cells. Further experiments suggested that this repression was due to overexpression of c-Fos and Fra1, but not due to Jun proteins. The Jun (c-Jun, Jun-B, and Jun-D) proteins in all the possible combinations were more or less ineffective in repression or upregulation of hARE-mediated gene expression. Interestingly, overexpression of Nrf1 and Nrf2 individually in Hep-G2 and monkey kidney (COS1) cells significantly increased CAT gene expression from reporter plasmid hARE-thymidine kinase-CAT in transfected cells that were inducible by beta-naphthoflavone and teri-butyl hydroquinone. These results indicated that hARE-mediated expression of the NQO1 gene and its induction by xenobiotics and antioxidants are mediated by Nrf1 and Nrf2. The hARE-mediated basal expression, however, is repressed by overexpression of c-Fos and Fra1. PMID:8962164

  2. Human oestrogenic 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase specificity: enzyme regulation through an NADPH-dependent substrate inhibition towards the highly specific oestrone reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, A; Garneau, A; Huang, Y W; Yang, F; Lin, S X

    2001-01-01

    Human oestrogenic 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD1) catalyses the final step in the biosynthesis of all active oestrogens. Here we report the steady-state kinetics for 17beta-HSD1 at 37 degrees C and pH 7.5, using a homogeneous enzyme preparation with oestrone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as substrate and NADP(H) as the cofactor. Kinetic studies made over a wide range of oestrone concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) revealed a typical substrate-inhibition phenomenon. Data analysis using the substrate-inhibition equation v=V.[s]/[K(m)+[s](1+[s]/K(i))] gave a K(m) of 0.07+/-0.01 microM, a k(cat) (for the dimer) of 1.5+/-0.1 s(-1), a specificity of 21 microM(-1) x s(-1) and a K(i) of 1.3 microM. When NADH was used instead of NADPH, substrate inhibition was no longer observed and the kinetic constants were significantly modified to 0.42+/-0.07 microM for the K(m), 0.8+/-0.04 s(-1) for the k(cat) and 1.9 microM(-1) x s(-1) for the specificity. The modification of an amino acid in the cofactor-binding site (Leu36Asp) eliminated the substrate inhibition observed in the presence of NADPH, confirming the NADPH-dependence of the phenomenon. The possible formation of an enzyme-NADP(+)-oestrone dead-end complex during the substrate-inhibition process is supported by the competitive inhibition of oestradiol oxidation by oestrone. Kinetic studies performed with either DHEA (K(m)=24+/-4 microM; k(cat)=0.47+/-0.06 s(-1); specificity=0.002 microM(-1) x s(-1)) or DHT (K(m)=26+/-6 microM; k(cat)=0.2+/-0.02 s(-1); specificity=0.0008 microM(-1) x s(-1)) in the presence of NADP(H) resulted in low specificities and no substrate inhibition. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the high specificity of 17beta-HSD1 towards oestrone is coupled with an NADPH-dependent substrate inhibition, suggesting that both the specificity and the enzyme control are provided for the cognate substrate. PMID:11336660

  3. Analysis of rdxA and Involvement of Additional Genes Encoding NAD(P)H Flavin Oxidoreductase (FrxA) and Ferredoxin-Like Protein (FdxB) in Metronidazole Resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dong-Hyeon; El-Zaatari, Fouad A. K.; Kato, Mototsugu; Osato, Michael S.; Reddy, Rita; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y.

    2000-01-01

    Metronidazole (Mtz) is a critical ingredient of modern multidrug therapies for Helicobacter pylori infection. Mtz resistance reduces the effectiveness of these combinations. Although null mutations in a rdxA gene that encodes oxygen-insensitive NAD(P)H nitroreductase was reported in Mtz-resistant H. pylori, an intact rdxA gene has also been reported in Mtz-resistant H. pylori, suggesting that additional Mtz resistance mechanisms exist in H. pylori. We explored the nature of Mtz resistance among 544 clinical H. pylori isolates to clarify the role of rdxA inactivation in Mtz resistance and to identify another gene(s) responsible for Mtz resistance in H. pylori. Mtz resistance was present in 33% (181 of 544) of the clinical isolates. There was marked heterogeneity of resistance, with Mtz MICs ranging from 8 to ≥256 μg/ml. rdxA inactivation resulted in Mtz MICs of up to 32 μg/ml for 6 Mtz-sensitive H. pylori strains and 128 μg/ml for one Mtz-sensitive strain. Single or dual (with rdxA) inactivation of genes that encode ferredoxin-like protein (designated fdxB) and NAD(P)H flavin oxidoreductase (frxA) also increased the MICs of Mtz for sensitive and resistant strains with low to moderate levels of Mtz resistance. fdxB inactivation resulted in a lower level of resistance than that from rdxA inactivation, whereas frxA inactivation resulted in MICs similar to those seen with rdxA inactivation. Further evidence for involvement of the frxA gene in Mtz resistance included the finding of a naturally inactivated frxA but an intact rdxA in an Mtz-resistant strain, complementation of Mtz sensitivity from an Mtz-sensitive strain to an Mtz-resistant strain or vice versa by use of naturally inactivated or functional frxA genes, respectively, and transformation of an Mtz-resistant Escherichia coli strain to an Mtz sensitive strain by a naturally functional frxA gene but not an inactivated frxA gene. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that null mutations in fdx

  4. NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C plays a role in nonhost disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pathogens by regulating chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Ishiga, Takako; Ikeda, Yoko; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts are cytoplasmic organelles for photosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. In addition, recent studies have shown that chloroplasts have a critical role in plant innate immunity against invading pathogens. Hydrogen peroxide is a toxic by-product from photosynthesis, which also functions as a signaling compound in plant innate immunity. Therefore, it is important to regulate the level of hydrogen peroxide in response to pathogens. Chloroplasts maintain components of the redox detoxification system including enzymes such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). However, the significance of 2-Cys Prxs and NTRC in the molecular basis of nonhost disease resistance is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of Prxs and NTRC using knock-out mutants of Arabidopsis in response to nonhost Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Plants lacking functional NTRC showed localized cell death (LCD) accompanied by the elevated accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in response to nonhost pathogens. Interestingly, the Arabidopsis ntrc mutant showed enhanced bacterial growth and disease susceptibility of nonhost pathogens. Furthermore, the expression profiles of the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling pathways and phytohormone analyses including SA and JA revealed that the Arabidopsis ntrc mutant shows elevated JA-mediated signaling pathways in response to nonhost pathogen. These results suggest the critical role of NTRC in plant innate immunity against nonhost P. syringae pathogens. PMID:27168965

  5. NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C plays a role in nonhost disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pathogens by regulating chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Ishiga, Takako; Ikeda, Yoko; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts are cytoplasmic organelles for photosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. In addition, recent studies have shown that chloroplasts have a critical role in plant innate immunity against invading pathogens. Hydrogen peroxide is a toxic by-product from photosynthesis, which also functions as a signaling compound in plant innate immunity. Therefore, it is important to regulate the level of hydrogen peroxide in response to pathogens. Chloroplasts maintain components of the redox detoxification system including enzymes such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). However, the significance of 2-Cys Prxs and NTRC in the molecular basis of nonhost disease resistance is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of Prxs and NTRC using knock-out mutants of Arabidopsis in response to nonhost Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Plants lacking functional NTRC showed localized cell death (LCD) accompanied by the elevated accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in response to nonhost pathogens. Interestingly, the Arabidopsis ntrc mutant showed enhanced bacterial growth and disease susceptibility of nonhost pathogens. Furthermore, the expression profiles of the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling pathways and phytohormone analyses including SA and JA revealed that the Arabidopsis ntrc mutant shows elevated JA-mediated signaling pathways in response to nonhost pathogen. These results suggest the critical role of NTRC in plant innate immunity against nonhost P. syringae pathogens. PMID:27168965

  6. The NADH-binding subunit of the energy-transducing NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase of Paracoccus denitrificans: Gene cloning and deduced primary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xuemin; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao )

    1991-07-02

    The NADH dehydrogenase complex isolated from Paracoccus denitrificans is composed of approximately 10 unlike polypeptides and contains noncovalently bound FMN, non-heme iron, and acid-labile sulfide. The NADH-binding subunit of this enzyme complex was identified by direct photoaffinity labeling with ({sup 32}P)NADH. primers were synthesized on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequency of this polypeptide, and these primers were used to synthesize an oligonucleotide probe by the polymerase chain reaction. This probe was utilized to isolate the gene encoding the NADH-binding subunit from a genomic library of P. denitrificans. The nucleotide sequence of the gene and the deduced amino acid sequence of the entire NADH-binding subunit were determined. The NADH-binding subunit has 431 amino acid residues and a calculated molecular weight of 47 191. The encoded protein contains a putative NAD(H)-binding and an iron-sulfur cluster-binding consensus sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Paracoccus NADH-binding subunit shows remarkable similarity to the {alpha} subunit of the NAD-linked hydrogenase of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16. When partial DNA sequencing of the regions surrounding the gene encoding the NADH-binding subunit was carried out, sequences homologous to the 24-, 49-, and 75-kDa polypeptides of bovine complex 1 were detected, suggesting that the structural genes of the Paracoccus NADH dehydrogenase complex constitute a gene cluster.

  7. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YMR315W Gene Encodes an NADP(H)-Specific Oxidoreductase Regulated by the Transcription Factor Stb5p in Response to NADPH Limitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Engineered xylose-metabolizing cells grown on xylose show increased expression of YMR315W at both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, the YMR315W promoter contains a putative binding site for the transcription factor Stb5p, which has been shown to regulate genes involved in nicotinamide aden...

  8. Transposon disruption of the complex I NADH oxidoreductase gene (snoD) in Staphylococcus aureus is associated with reduced susceptibility to the microbicidal activity of thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Arnold S; McNamara, Peter; Yeaman, Michael R; Lucindo, Natalie; Jones, Tiffanny; Cheung, Ambrose L; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Proctor, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    The cationic molecule thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1 (tPMP-1) exerts potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus. We previously reported that a Tn551 S. aureus transposon mutant, ISP479R, and two bacteriophage back-transductants, TxA and TxB, exhibit reduced in vitro susceptibility to tPMP-1 (tPMP-1(r)) compared to the parental strain, ISP479C (V. Dhawan, M. R. Yeaman, A. L. Cheung, E. Kim, P. M. Sullam, and A. S. Bayer, Infect. Immun. 65:3293-3299, 1997). In the current study, the genetic basis for tPMP-1(r) in these mutants was identified. GenBank homology searches using sequence corresponding to chromosomal DNA flanking Tn551 mutant strains showed that the fourth gene in the staphylococcal mnh operon (mnhABCDEFG) was insertionally inactivated. This operon was previously reported to encode a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter involved in pH tolerance and halotolerance. However, the capacity of ISP479R to grow at pH extremes and in high NaCl concentrations (1 to 3 M), coupled with its loss of transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi) during postexponential growth, suggested that the mnh gene products are not functioning as a secondary (i.e., passive) Na(+)/H(+) antiporter. Moreover, we identified protein homologies between mnhD and the nuo genes of Escherichia coli that encode components of a complex I NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. Consistent with these data, exposures of tPMP-1-susceptible (tPMP-1(s)) parental strains (both clinical and laboratory derived) with either CCCP (a proton ionophore which collapses the proton motive force) or pieracidin A (a specific complex I enzyme inhibitor) significantly reduced tPMP-induced killing to levels seen in the tPMP-1(r) mutants. To reflect the energization of the gene products encoded by the mnh operon, we have renamed the locus sno (S. aureus nuo orthologue). These novel findings indicate that disruption of a complex I enzyme locus can confer reduced in vitro susceptibility to tPMP-1 in S. aureus. PMID:16352837

  9. Transposon Disruption of the Complex I NADH Oxidoreductase Gene (snoD) in Staphylococcus aureus Is Associated with Reduced Susceptibility to the Microbicidal Activity of Thrombin-Induced Platelet Microbicidal Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Arnold S.; McNamara, Peter; Yeaman, Michael R.; Lucindo, Natalie; Jones, Tiffanny; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Proctor, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    The cationic molecule thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein 1 (tPMP-1) exerts potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus. We previously reported that a Tn551 S. aureus transposon mutant, ISP479R, and two bacteriophage back-transductants, TxA and TxB, exhibit reduced in vitro susceptibility to tPMP-1 (tPMP-1r) compared to the parental strain, ISP479C (V. Dhawan, M. R. Yeaman, A. L. Cheung, E. Kim, P. M. Sullam, and A. S. Bayer, Infect. Immun. 65:3293-3299, 1997). In the current study, the genetic basis for tPMP-1r in these mutants was identified. GenBank homology searches using sequence corresponding to chromosomal DNA flanking Tn551 mutant strains showed that the fourth gene in the staphylococcal mnh operon (mnhABCDEFG) was insertionally inactivated. This operon was previously reported to encode a Na+/H+ antiporter involved in pH tolerance and halotolerance. However, the capacity of ISP479R to grow at pH extremes and in high NaCl concentrations (1 to 3 M), coupled with its loss of transmembrane potential (ΔΨ) during postexponential growth, suggested that the mnh gene products are not functioning as a secondary (i.e., passive) Na+/H+ antiporter. Moreover, we identified protein homologies between mnhD and the nuo genes of Escherichia coli that encode components of a complex I NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. Consistent with these data, exposures of tPMP-1-susceptible (tPMP-1s) parental strains (both clinical and laboratory derived) with either CCCP (a proton ionophore which collapses the proton motive force) or pieracidin A (a specific complex I enzyme inhibitor) significantly reduced tPMP-induced killing to levels seen in the tPMP-1r mutants. To reflect the energization of the gene products encoded by the mnh operon, we have renamed the locus sno (S. aureus nuo orthologue). These novel findings indicate that disruption of a complex I enzyme locus can confer reduced in vitro susceptibility to tPMP-1 in S. aureus. PMID:16352837

  10. A Novel NADPH-Dependent Aldehyde Reductase Gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y-12632 Involved in the Detoxification of Aldehyde Inhibitors Derived from Lignocellulosic Biomass Conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aldehyde inhibitors such as furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), anisaldehyde, benzaldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, and phenylaldehyde are commonly generated during lignocellulosic biomass conversion process for low-cost cellulosic ethanol production that interferes with subsequent microbial growth and...

  11. Lactic acid-producing yeast cells having nonfunctional L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome C oxidoreductase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Matthew; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Hause, Benjamin Matthew; Van Hoek, Pim; Dundon, Catherine Asleson

    2012-03-20

    Yeast cells having an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene ae modified by reducing L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity in the cell. This leads to reduced consumption of lactate by the cell and can increase overall lactate yields in a fermentation process. Cells having the reduced L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity can be screened for by resistance to organic acids such as lactic or glycolic acid.

  12. Increased furfural tolerance due to overexpression of NADH-dependent oxidoreductase FucO in Escherichia coli strains engineered for the production of ethanol and lactate.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Miller, E N; Yomano, L P; Zhang, X; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, L O

    2011-08-01

    Furfural is an important fermentation inhibitor in hemicellulose sugar syrups derived from woody biomass. The metabolism of furfural by NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, such as YqhD (low K(m) for NADPH), is proposed to inhibit the growth and fermentation of xylose in Escherichia coli by competing with biosynthesis for NADPH. The discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural provided a new approach to improve furfural tolerance. Strains that produced ethanol or lactate efficiently as primary products from xylose were developed. These strains included chromosomal mutations in yqhD expression that permitted the fermentation of xylose broths containing up to 10 mM furfural. Expression of fucO from plasmids was shown to increase furfural tolerance by 50% and to permit the fermentation of 15 mM furfural. Product yields with 15 mM furfural were equivalent to those of control strains without added furfural (85% to 90% of the theoretical maximum). These two defined genetic traits can be readily transferred to enteric biocatalysts designed to produce other products. A similar strategy that minimizes the depletion of NADPH pools by native detoxification enzymes may be generally useful for other inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic sugar streams and with other organisms. PMID:21685167

  13. Genetics Home Reference: cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is a disorder of hormone production. This condition specifically affects steroid hormones, which are ... activity of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, which disrupts the production of steroid hormones. Changes in sex hormones such ...

  14. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na+-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na+-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  15. Occurrence of ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity and its ion specificity in several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hess, Verena; Gallegos, Rene; Jones, J Andrew; Barquera, Blanca; Malamy, Michael H; Müller, Volker

    2016-01-01

    A ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase was recently discovered as a redox-driven ion pump in the anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii. The enzyme is assumed to be encoded by the rnf genes. Since these genes are present in the genomes of many bacteria, we tested for ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity in cytoplasmic membranes from several different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that have annotated rnf genes. We found this activity in Clostridium tetanomorphum, Clostridium ljungdahlii, Bacteroides fragilis, and Vibrio cholerae but not in Escherichia coli and Rhodobacter capsulatus. As in A. woodii, the activity was Na(+)-dependent in C. tetanomorphum and B. fragilis but Na(+)-independent in C. ljungdahlii and V. cholerae. We deleted the rnf genes from B. fragilis and demonstrated that the mutant has greatly reduced ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity. This is the first genetic proof that the rnf genes indeed encode the reduced ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase activity. PMID:26793417

  16. The chloroplast membrane associated ceQORH putative quinone oxidoreductase reduces long-chain, stress-related oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Curien, Gilles; Giustini, Cécile; Montillet, Jean-Luc; Mas-Y-Mas, Sarah; Cobessi, David; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Matringe, Michel; Grechkin, Alexander; Rolland, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Under oxidative stress conditions the lipid constituents of cells can undergo oxidation whose frequent consequence is the production of highly reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyls. These molecules are toxic because they can add to biomolecules (such as proteins and nucleic acids) and several enzyme activities cooperate to eliminate these reactive electrophile species. CeQORH (chloroplast envelope Quinone Oxidoreductase Homolog, At4g13010) is associated with the inner membrane of the chloroplast envelope and imported into the organelle by an alternative import pathway. In the present study, we show that the recombinant ceQORH exhibits the activity of a NADPH-dependent α,β-unsaturated oxoene reductase reducing the double bond of medium-chain (C⩾9) to long-chain (18 carbon atoms) reactive electrophile species deriving from poly-unsaturated fatty acid peroxides. The best substrates of ceQORH are 13-lipoxygenase-derived γ-ketols. γ-Ketols are spontaneously produced in the chloroplast from the unstable allene oxide formed in the biochemical pathway leading to 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, a precursor of the defense hormone jasmonate. In chloroplasts, ceQORH could detoxify 13-lipoxygenase-derived γ-ketols at their production sites in the membranes. This finding opens new routes toward the understanding of γ-ketols role and detoxification. PMID:26678323

  17. The Study of NADPH-Dependent Flavoenzyme-Catalyzed Reduction of Benzo[1,2-c]1,2,5-oxadiazole N-Oxides (Benzofuroxans)

    PubMed Central

    Šarlauskas, Jonas; Misevičienė, Lina; Marozienė, Audronė; Karvelis, Laimonas; Stankevičiūtė, Jonita; Krikštopaitis, Kastis; Čėnas, Narimantas; Yantsevich, Aleksey; Laurynėnas, Audrius; Anusevičius, Žilvinas

    2014-01-01

    The enzymatic reactivity of a series of benzo[1,2-c]1,2,5-oxadiazole N-oxides (benzofuroxans; BFXs) towards mammalian single-electron transferring NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase (P-450R) and two-electron (hydride) transferring NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) was examined in this work. Since the =N+ (→O)O− moiety of furoxan fragments of BFXs bears some similarity to the aromatic nitro-group, the reactivity of BFXs was compared to that of nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) whose reduction mechanisms by these and other related flavoenzymes have been extensively investigated. The reduction of BFXs by both P-450R and NQO1 was accompanied by O2 uptake, which was much lower than the NADPH oxidation rate; except for annelated BFXs, whose reduction was followed by the production of peroxide. In order to analyze the possible quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) of the enzymatic reactivity of the compounds, their electron-accepting potency and other reactivity indices were assessed by quantum mechanical methods. In P-450R-catalyzed reactions, both BFXs and NACs showed the same reactivity dependence on their electron-accepting potency which might be consistent with an “outer sphere” electron transfer mechanism. In NQO1-catalyzed two-electron (hydride) transferring reactions, BFXs acted as more efficient substrates than NACs, and the reduction efficacy of BFXs by NQO1 was in general higher than by single-electron transferring P-450R. In NQO1-catalyzed reactions, QSARs obtained showed that the reduction efficacy of BFXs, as well as that of NACs, was determined by their electron-accepting potency and could be influenced by their binding mode in the active center of NQO1 and by their global softness as their electronic characteristic. The reductive conversion of benzofuroxan by both flavoenzymes yielded the same reduction product of benzofuroxan, 2,3-diaminophenazine, with the formation of o-benzoquinone dioxime as a putative primary reductive

  18. An oxidoreductase from 'Alphonso' mango catalyzing biosynthesis of furaneol and reduction of reactive carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ram; Chidley, Hemangi; Deshpande, Ashish; Schmidt, Axel; Pujari, Keshav; Giri, Ashok; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Gupta, Vidya

    2013-01-01

    Two furanones, furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone), are important constituents of flavor of the Alphonso cultivar of mango (Mangifera indica). To get insights into the biosynthesis of these furanones, we isolated an enone oxidoreductase gene from the Alphonso mango. It has high sequence similarity to an alkenal/one oxidoreductase from cucumber (79% identity) and enone oxidoreductases from tomato (73% identity) and strawberry (72% identity). The complete open reading frame was expressed in E. coli and the (his)6-tagged recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. The purified protein assayed with NADH as a reducing agent converted D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate into furaneol, the immediate precursor of mesifuran. The enzyme was also able to convert two highly reactive carbonyls, 3-buten-2-one and 1-penten-3-one, produced by lipid peroxidation in plants, into their saturated derivatives. Expression profiling in various ripening stages of Alphonso fruits depicted an expression maxima at 10 days after harvest stage, shortly before the appearance of the maximum amount of furanones (completely ripe stage, 15 days after harvest). Although no furanones were detected at the 0 day after harvest stage, significant expression of this gene was detected in the fruits at this stage. Overall, the results suggest that this oxidoreductase plays important roles in Alphonso mango fruits. PMID:24133645

  19. Functional Analysis of Paralogous Thiol-disulfide Oxidoreductases in Streptococcus gordonii*

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Lauren; Ng, Crystal K. W.; Halperin, Scott A.; Lee, Song F.

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are important for the stability of many extracellular proteins, including bacterial virulence factors. Formation of these bonds is catalyzed by thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases (TDORs). Little is known about their formation in Gram-positive bacteria, particularly among facultative anaerobic Firmicutes, such as streptococci. To investigate disulfide bond formation in Streptococcus gordonii, we identified five putative TDORs from the sequenced genome. Each of the putative TDOR genes was insertionally inactivated with an erythromycin resistance cassette, and the mutants were analyzed for autolysis, extracellular DNA release, biofilm formation, bacteriocin production, and genetic competence. This analysis revealed a single TDOR, SdbA, which exhibited a pleiotropic mutant phenotype. Using an in silico analysis approach, we identified the major autolysin AtlS as a natural substrate of SdbA and showed that SdbA is critical to the formation of a disulfide bond that is required for autolytic activity. Analysis by BLAST search revealed homologs to SdbA in other Gram-positive species. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of an oxidoreductase, SdbA, that affects multiple phenotypes in a Gram-positive bacterium. SdbA shows low sequence homology to previously identified oxidoreductases, suggesting that it may belong to a different class of enzymes. Our results demonstrate that SdbA is required for disulfide bond formation in S. gordonii and indicate that this enzyme may represent a novel type of oxidoreductase in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23615907

  20. Thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system of Streptomyces clavuligerus: sequences, expression, and organization of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Yanko, M; Mislovati, M; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Av-Gay, Y; Aharonowitz, Y

    1993-01-01

    The genes that encode thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase of Streptomyces clavuligerus were cloned, and their DNA sequences were determined. Previously, we showed that S. clavuligerus possesses a disulfide reductase with broad substrate specificity that biochemically resembles the thioredoxin oxidoreductase system and may play a role in the biosynthesis of beta-lactam antibiotics. It consists consists of two components, a 70-kDa NADPH-dependent flavoprotein disulfide reductase with two identical subunits and a 12-kDa heat-stable protein general disulfide reductant. In this study, we found, by comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences, that the 35-kDa protein is in fact thioredoxin reductase; it shares 48.7% amino acid sequence identity with Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase, the 12-kDa protein is thioredoxin, and it shares 28 to 56% amino acid sequence identity with other thioredoxins. The streptomycete thioredoxin reductase has the identical cysteine redox-active region--Cys-Ala-Thr-Cys--and essentially the same flavin adenine dinucleotide- and NADPH dinucleotide-binding sites as E. coli thioredoxin reductase and is partially able to accept E. coli thioredoxin as a substrate. The streptomycete thioredoxin has the same cysteine redox-active segment--Trp-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys--that is present in virtually all eucaryotic and procaryotic thioredoxins. However, in vivo it is unable to donate electrons to E. coli methionine sulfoxide reductase and does not serve as a substrate in vitro for E. coli thioredoxin reductase. The S. clavuligerus thioredoxin (trxA) and thioredoxin reductase (trxB) genes are organized in a cluster. They are transcribed in the same direction and separated by 33 nucleotides. In contrast, the trxA and trxB genes of E. coli, the only other organism in which both genes have been characterized, are physically widely separated. Images PMID:8349555

  1. Xanthine oxidoreductase is present in human synovium.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, R E; Outhwaite, J M; Morris, C J; Blake, D R

    1987-01-01

    It is postulated that the mobile inflamed joint may be subject to cyclical ischaemic reperfusion injury. Xanthine oxidoreductase is an enzyme thought to contribute to oxidative reperfusion injury, and the detection of this activity in human synovium is described. Three normal and five rheumatoid tissues were assayed with a carbon-14 radioassay detecting the conversion of [14C]xanthine to [14C]uric acid. Rheumatoid synovia contained 0.67-305 microU/g tissue (n = 5), while normal synovia contained 1.2-5.0 microU/g tissue (n = 3). PMID:3426290

  2. Esculetin-induced protection of human hepatoma HepG2 cells against hydrogen peroxide is associated with the Nrf2-dependent induction of the NAD(P)H: Quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, Sudhakar R.; Ellis, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-15

    Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxy coumarin), is a potent antioxidant that is present in several plant species. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of protection of esculetin in human hepatoma HepG2 cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability, cell integrity, intracellular glutathione levels, generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of antioxidant enzymes were used as markers to measure cellular oxidative stress and response to ROS. The protective effect of esculetin was compared to a well-characterized chemoprotective compound quercetin. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with sub-lethal (10-25 {mu}M) esculetin for 8 h prevented cell death and maintained cell integrity following exposure to 0.9 mM hydrogen peroxide. An increase in the generation of ROS following hydrogen peroxide treatment was significantly attenuated by 8 h pre-treatment with esculetin. In addition, esculetin ameliorated the decrease in intracellular glutathione caused by hydrogen peroxide exposure. Moreover, treatment with 25 {mu}M esculetin for 8 h increased the expression of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) at both protein and mRNA levels significantly, by 12-fold and 15-fold, respectively. Esculetin treatment also increased nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 by 8-fold indicating that increased NQO1 expression is Nrf2-mediated. These results indicate that esculetin protects human hepatoma HepG2 cells from hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative injury and that this protection is provided through the induction of protective enzymes as part of an adaptive response mediated by Nrf2 nuclear accumulation.

  3. Lipid-membrane modified electrodes to study quinone oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Sophie A.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Quinone oxidoreductases are a class of membrane enzymes that catalyse the oxidation or reduction of membrane-bound quinols/quinones. The conversion of quinone/quinol by these enzymes is difficult to study due to the hydrophobic nature of the enzymes and their substrates. We describe some biochemical properties of quinones and quinone oxidoreductases and then look in more detail at two model membranes that can be used to study quinone oxidoreductases in a native-like membrane environment with their native lipophylic quinone substrates. The results obtained with these model membranes are compared to classical enzyme assays that use water-soluble quinone analogues. PMID:19614580

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperones and oxidoreductases: critical regulators of tumor cell survival and immunorecognition.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Tomás; Simmen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones and oxidoreductases are abundant enzymes that mediate the production of fully folded secretory and transmembrane proteins. Resisting the Golgi and plasma membrane-directed "bulk flow," ER chaperones and oxidoreductases enter retrograde trafficking whenever they are pulled outside of the ER by their substrates. Solid tumors are characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), combined with reduced blood flow that leads to low oxygen supply and ER stress. Under these conditions, hypoxia and the unfolded protein response upregulate their target genes. When this occurs, ER oxidoreductases and chaperones become important regulators of tumor growth. However, under these conditions, these proteins not only promote the folding of proteins, but also alter the properties of the plasma membrane and hence modulate tumor immune recognition. For instance, high levels of calreticulin serve as an "eat-me" signal on the surface of tumor cells. Conversely, both intracellular and surface BiP/GRP78 promotes tumor growth. Other ER folding assistants able to modulate the properties of tumor tissue include protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), Ero1α and GRP94. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of ER chaperones in regulating tumor cell functions and immunorecognition will lead to important insight for the development of novel cancer therapies. PMID:25386408

  5. Origin and Evolution of the Sodium -Pumping NADH: Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Barquera, Blanca; Juárez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The sodium -pumping NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is the main ion pump and the primary entry site for electrons into the respiratory chain of many different types of pathogenic bacteria. This enzymatic complex creates a transmembrane gradient of sodium that is used by the cell to sustain ionic homeostasis, nutrient transport, ATP synthesis, flagellum rotation and other essential processes. Comparative genomics data demonstrate that the nqr operon, which encodes all Na+-NQR subunits, is found in a large variety of bacterial lineages with different habitats and metabolic strategies. Here we studied the distribution, origin and evolution of this enzymatic complex. The molecular phylogenetic analyses and the organizations of the nqr operon indicate that Na+-NQR evolved within the Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes group, after the duplication and subsequent neofunctionalization of the operon that encodes the homolog RNF complex. Subsequently, the nqr operon dispersed through multiple horizontal transfer events to other bacterial lineages such as Chlamydiae, Planctomyces and α, β, γ and δ -proteobacteria. Considering the biochemical properties of the Na+-NQR complex and its physiological role in different bacteria, we propose a detailed scenario to explain the molecular mechanisms that gave rise to its novel redox- dependent sodium -pumping activity. Our model postulates that the evolution of the Na+-NQR complex involved a functional divergence from its RNF homolog, following the duplication of the rnf operon, the loss of the rnfB gene and the recruitment of the reductase subunit of an aromatic monooxygenase. PMID:24809444

  6. Light-Dependent Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase: Phylogeny, Regulation, and Catalytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Gabruk, Michal; Mysliwa-Kurdziel, Beata

    2015-09-01

    This Current Topic focuses on light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR, EC 1.3.1.33). POR catalyzes the penultimate reaction of chlorophyll biosynthesis, i.e., the light-triggered reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide. In this reaction, the chlorin ring of the chlorophyll molecule is formed, which is crucial for photosynthesis. POR is one of very few enzymes that are driven by light; however, it is unique in the need for its substrate to absorb photons to induce the conformational changes in the enzyme, which are required for its catalytic activation. Moreover, the enzyme is also involved in the negative feedback of the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway and controls chlorophyll content via its light-dependent activity. Even though it has been almost 70 years since the first isolation of active POR complexes, our knowledge of them has markedly advanced in recent years. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of POR, including the phylogenetic roots of POR, the mechanisms of the regulation of POR genes expression, the regulation of POR activity, the import of POR into plastids, the role of POR in PLB formation, and the molecular mechanism of protochlorophyllide reduction by POR. To the best of our knowledge, no previous review has compiled such a broad set of recent findings about POR. PMID:26230427

  7. Overexpression of Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase C Regulates Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Gopal K.; Tripathy, Baishnab C.

    2011-01-01

    Light absorbed by colored intermediates of chlorophyll biosynthesis is not utilized in photosynthesis; instead, it is transferred to molecular oxygen, generating singlet oxygen (1O2). As there is no enzymatic detoxification mechanism available in plants to destroy 1O2, its generation should be minimized. We manipulated the concentration of a major chlorophyll biosynthetic intermediate i.e., protochlorophyllide in Arabidopsis by overexpressing the light-inducible protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase C (PORC) that effectively phototransforms endogenous protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide leading to minimal accumulation of the photosensitizer protochlorophyllide in light-grown plants. In PORC overexpressing (PORCx) plants exposed to high-light, the 1O2 generation and consequent malonedialdehyde production was minimal and the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II remained unaffected demonstrating that their photosynthetic apparatus and cellular organization were intact. Further, PORCx plants treated with 5-aminolevulinicacid when exposed to light, photo-converted over-accumulated protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide, reduced the generation of 1O2 and malonedialdehyde production and reduced plasma membrane damage. So PORCx plants survived and bolted whereas, the 5-aminolevulinicacid-treated wild-type plants perished. Thus, overexpression of PORC could be biotechnologically exploited in crop plants for tolerance to 1O2-induced oxidative stress, paving the use of 5-aminolevulinicacid as a selective commercial light-activated biodegradable herbicide. Reduced protochlorophyllide content in PORCx plants released the protochlorophyllide-mediated feed-back inhibition of 5-aminolevulinicacid biosynthesis that resulted in higher 5-aminolevulinicacid production. Increase of 5-aminolevulinicacid synthesis upregulated the gene and protein expression of several downstream chlorophyll biosynthetic enzymes elucidating a regulatory net work of expression of genes involved in 5

  8. Regulation of yeast replicative life span by thiol oxidoreductases

    PubMed Central

    Hacioglu, Elise; Esmer, Isil; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Thiol-based redox reactions are involved in the regulation of a variety of biological functions, such as protection against oxidative stress, signal transduction and protein folding. Some proteins involved in redox regulation have been shown to modulate life span in organisms from yeast to mammals. To assess the role of thiol oxidoreductases in aging on a genome-wide scale, we analyzed the replicative life span of yeast cells lacking known and candidate thiol oxidoreductases. The data suggest the role of several pathways in regulation of yeast aging, including thioredoxin reduction, protein folding and degradation, peroxide reduction, PIP3 signaling, and ATP synthesis. PMID:20934449

  9. Study of the Thiol/Disulfide Redox Systems of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Points Out Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase as a New Target for Thioredoxin 1

    PubMed Central

    Pieulle, Laetitia; Stocker, Pierre; Vinay, Manon; Nouailler, Matthieu; Vita, Nicolas; Brasseur, Gaël; Garcin, Edwige; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Dolla, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Sulfate reducers have developed a multifaceted adaptative strategy to survive against oxidative stresses. Along with this oxidative stress response, we recently characterized an elegant reversible disulfide bond-dependent protective mechanism in the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) of various Desulfovibrio species. Here, we searched for thiol redox systems involved in this mechanism. Using thiol fluorescent labeling, we show that glutathione is not the major thiol/disulfide balance-controlling compound in four different Desulfovibrio species and that no other plentiful low molecular weight thiol can be detected. Enzymatic analyses of two thioredoxins (Trxs) and three thioredoxin reductases allow us to propose the existence of two independent Trx systems in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). The TR1/Trx1 system corresponds to the typical bacterial Trx system. We measured a TR1 apparent Km value for Trx1 of 8.9 μm. Moreover, our results showed that activity of TR1 was NADPH-dependent. The second system named TR3/Trx3 corresponds to an unconventional Trx system as TR3 used preferentially NADH (Km for NADPH, 743 μm; Km for NADH, 5.6 μm), and Trx3 was unable to reduce insulin. The Km value of TR3 for Trx3 was 1.12 μm. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the TR1/Trx1 system was the only one able to reactivate the oxygen-protected form of Desulfovibrio africanus PFOR. Moreover, ex vivo pulldown assays using the mutant Trx1C33S as bait allowed us to capture PFOR from the DvH extract. Altogether, these data demonstrate that PFOR is a new target for Trx1, which is probably involved in the protective switch mechanism of the enzyme. PMID:21199874

  10. Hepatic catecholestrogen synthases: differential effect of sex, inducers of cytochromes P-450 and of antibody to the glucocorticoid inducible cytochrome P-450 on NADPH-dependent estrogen-2-hydroxylase and on organic hydroperoxide-dependent estrogen-2/4-hydroxylase activity of rat hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Bui, Q D; Weisz, J; Wrighton, S A

    1990-10-01

    Formation of catecholestrogens (CE) by rat hepatic microsomes was re-examined because as recently shown; (1) CE formation can be catalyzed by an NADPH-dependent estrogen-4-hydroxylase (E-4-H(NADPH)) and by a peroxidatic, organic hydroperoxide-dependent estrogen-2/4-hydroxylase (E-2/4-H(OHP)), in addition to the established NADPH-dependent estrogen 2-hydroxylase (E-2-H(NADPH)); and (2) the indirect radiometric and the COMT-coupled radioenzymatic assays, used in many previous studies, may fail to provide an accurate measure, in particular, of 4-OH-CE. Using a direct product isolation assay, hepatic microsomes of both male and female rats were shown to express E-2/4-H(OHP) activity with properties similar to those of peroxidatic activity in other tissues. The activities of E-2/4-H(OHP) and E-2-H(NADPH) were affected differently by 5 out of 7 inducers of cytochromes P-450 administered in vivo. Phenobarbital and dexamethasone caused a 4- and 2-3-fold increase in E-2-H(NADPH) activity, respectively, but only a 38 and 20% increase in E-2/4-H(OHP) activity. Ketoconazol and beta-naphtoflavone caused a modest increase in E-2-H(NADPH) activity but a decrease in OHP-dependent activity. Clofibrate decreased peroxidatic activity by 50% and NADPH-dependent activity by approximately 20%. Both activities were increased by ethanol but decreased by isoniazide, an agent which induces the same form of cytochromes P-450 as ethanol. Polyclonal antibody against P-450p, a form of P-450 induced by glucocorticoids, inhibited E-2-H(NADPH) but not E-2/4-H(OHP) activity of untreated and of dexamethasone- and phenobarbital-treated rats. This study establishes that CE formation may occur in liver via the peroxidatic pathway and indicates that this pathway depends on forms of P-450 different from those mediating E-2-H(NADPH) activity. It also confirms and extends previous observations of the involvement of multiple, constitutive and induced forms of cytochrome P-450 in NADPH-dependent 2

  11. The interaction between mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase and ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase. Evidence for stoicheiometric association.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, C I; Heron, C

    1978-01-01

    1. The NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex (Complex I) and the ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase complex (Complex III) combine in a 1:1 molar ratio to give NADH-cytochrome c oxidoreductase (Complex I-Complex III). 2. Experiments on the inhibition of the NADH-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity of mixtures of Complexes I and III by rotenone and antimycin indicate that electron transfer between a unit of Complex I-Complex III and extra molecules of Complexes I or III does not contribute to the overall rate of cytochrome c reduction. 3. The reduction by NADH of the cytochrome b of mixtures of Complexes I and III is biphasic. The extents of the fast and slow phases of reduction are determined by the proportion of the total Complex III specifically associated with Complex I. 4. Activation-energy measurements suggest that the structural features of the Complex I-Complex III unit promote oxidoreduction of endogenous ubiquinone-10. PMID:215122

  12. Archaeal Mo-Containing Glyceraldehyde Oxidoreductase Isozymes Exhibit Diverse Substrate Specificities through Unique Subunit Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Masayuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Archaea use glycolytic pathways distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes, where unique enzymes catalyze each reaction step. In this study, we isolated three isozymes of glyceraldehyde oxidoreductase (GAOR1, GAOR2 and GAOR3) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. GAOR1–3 belong to the xanthine oxidoreductase superfamily, and are composed of a molybdo-pyranopterin subunit (L), a flavin subunit (M), and an iron-sulfur subunit (S), forming an LMS hetero-trimer unit. We found that GAOR1 is a tetramer of the STK17810/STK17830/STK17820 hetero-trimer, GAOR2 is a dimer of the STK23390/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer, and GAOR3 is the STK24840/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer. GAOR1–3 exhibited diverse substrate specificities for their electron donors and acceptors, due to their different L-subunits, and probably participate in the non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway. We determined the crystal structure of GAOR2, as the first three-dimensional structure of an archaeal molybdenum-containing hydroxylase, to obtain structural insights into their substrate specificities and subunit assemblies. The gene arrangement and the crystal structure suggested that the M/S-complex serves as a structural scaffold for the binding of the L-subunit, to construct the three enzymes with different specificities. Collectively, our findings illustrate a novel principle of a prokaryotic multicomponent isozyme system. PMID:26808202

  13. Archaeal Mo-Containing Glyceraldehyde Oxidoreductase Isozymes Exhibit Diverse Substrate Specificities through Unique Subunit Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Wakagi, Takayoshi; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Miyake, Masayuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Archaea use glycolytic pathways distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes, where unique enzymes catalyze each reaction step. In this study, we isolated three isozymes of glyceraldehyde oxidoreductase (GAOR1, GAOR2 and GAOR3) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. GAOR1-3 belong to the xanthine oxidoreductase superfamily, and are composed of a molybdo-pyranopterin subunit (L), a flavin subunit (M), and an iron-sulfur subunit (S), forming an LMS hetero-trimer unit. We found that GAOR1 is a tetramer of the STK17810/STK17830/STK17820 hetero-trimer, GAOR2 is a dimer of the STK23390/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer, and GAOR3 is the STK24840/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer. GAOR1-3 exhibited diverse substrate specificities for their electron donors and acceptors, due to their different L-subunits, and probably participate in the non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway. We determined the crystal structure of GAOR2, as the first three-dimensional structure of an archaeal molybdenum-containing hydroxylase, to obtain structural insights into their substrate specificities and subunit assemblies. The gene arrangement and the crystal structure suggested that the M/S-complex serves as a structural scaffold for the binding of the L-subunit, to construct the three enzymes with different specificities. Collectively, our findings illustrate a novel principle of a prokaryotic multicomponent isozyme system. PMID:26808202

  14. NtcA is responsible for accumulation of the small isoform of ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Galmozzi, Carla V; Latifi, Amel; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Ajlani, Ghada

    2014-04-01

    In several cyanobacteria, petH, the gene encoding ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (FNR), is transcribed from at least two promoters depending on growth conditions. Two transcripts (short and long) are translated from two different translation initiation sites, resulting in two isoforms (large and small, respectively). Here, we show that in Synechocystis PCC6803 the global transcriptional regulator NtcA activates transcription from the distal petH promoter. Modification of the NtcA-binding site prevents NtcA binding to the promoter in vitro and abolishes accumulation of the small isoform of FNR in vivo. We also demonstrate that a similar petH transcription and translation regime occurs in other cyanobacteria. The conditions under which this system operates provide hints for the function of each FNR isoform. PMID:24464800

  15. NADPH: Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase-Structure, Catalytic Function, and Role in Prolamellar Body Formation and Morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, Michael P

    2013-02-01

    The biosynthesis of chlorophyll is a critical biochemical step in the development of photosynthetic vascular plants and green algae. From photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) to algae, non-vascular plants, gymnosperms and vascular plants, mechanisms have evolved for protochlorophyllide reduction a key step in chlorophyll synthesis. Protochlorophyllide reduction is carried out by both a light-dependent (POR) and light-independent (LIPOR) mechanisms. NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (EC 1.3.1.33, abbreviated POR) catalyzes the light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide (PChlide) to chlorophyllide (Chlide). In contrast, a light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase (LIPOR) involves three plastid gene products (chlL, chlN, and chlB) and several nuclear factors. Our work focused on characterization of both the POR and LIPOR catalyzed processes.

  16. LATERAL BRANCHING OXIDOREDUCTASE acts in the final stages of strigolactone biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Philip B; Yoneyama, Kaori; Filardo, Fiona; Meyers, Emma; Scaffidi, Adrian; Frickey, Tancred; Akiyama, Kohki; Seto, Yoshiya; Dun, Elizabeth A; Cremer, Julia E; Kerr, Stephanie C; Waters, Mark T; Flematti, Gavin R; Mason, Michael G; Weiller, Georg; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Nomura, Takahito; Smith, Steven M; Yoneyama, Koichi; Beveridge, Christine A

    2016-05-31

    Strigolactones are a group of plant compounds of diverse but related chemical structures. They have similar bioactivity across a broad range of plant species, act to optimize plant growth and development, and promote soil microbe interactions. Carlactone, a common precursor to strigolactones, is produced by conserved enzymes found in a number of diverse species. Versions of the MORE AXILLARY GROWTH1 (MAX1) cytochrome P450 from rice and Arabidopsis thaliana make specific subsets of strigolactones from carlactone. However, the diversity of natural strigolactones suggests that additional enzymes are involved and remain to be discovered. Here, we use an innovative method that has revealed a missing enzyme involved in strigolactone metabolism. By using a transcriptomics approach involving a range of treatments that modify strigolactone biosynthesis gene expression coupled with reverse genetics, we identified LATERAL BRANCHING OXIDOREDUCTASE (LBO), a gene encoding an oxidoreductase-like enzyme of the 2-oxoglutarate and Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenase superfamily. Arabidopsis lbo mutants exhibited increased shoot branching, but the lbo mutation did not enhance the max mutant phenotype. Grafting indicated that LBO is required for a graft-transmissible signal that, in turn, requires a product of MAX1. Mutant lbo backgrounds showed reduced responses to carlactone, the substrate of MAX1, and methyl carlactonoate (MeCLA), a product downstream of MAX1. Furthermore, lbo mutants contained increased amounts of these compounds, and the LBO protein specifically converts MeCLA to an unidentified strigolactone-like compound. Thus, LBO function may be important in the later steps of strigolactone biosynthesis to inhibit shoot branching in Arabidopsis and other seed plants. PMID:27194725

  17. Mitochondrial disease associated with complex I (NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Immo E

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases due to a reduced capacity for oxidative phosphorylation were first identified more than 20 years ago, and their incidence is now recognized to be quite significant. In a large proportion of cases the problem can be traced to a complex I (NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase) deficiency (Phenotype MIM #252010). Because the complex consists of 44 subunits, there are many potential targets for pathogenic mutations, both on the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Surprisingly, however, almost half of the complex I deficiencies are due to defects in as yet unidentified genes that encode proteins other than the structural proteins of the complex. This review attempts to summarize what we know about the molecular basis of complex I deficiencies: mutations in the known structural genes, and mutations in an increasing number of genes encoding "assembly factors", that is, proteins required for the biogenesis of a functional complex I that are not found in the final complex I. More such genes must be identified before definitive genetic counselling can be applied in all cases of affected families. PMID:25224827

  18. Orthophosphite-Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Malacinski, George M.; Konetzka, W. A.

    1967-01-01

    Information was obtained on the general properties and specificity of orthophosphite-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidoreductase. The enzyme was extracted from Pseudomonas fluorescens 195 grown in medium containing orthophosphite as the sole source of phosphorus. An enzyme preparation suitable for characterization was obtained from crude extracts by use of high-speed centrifugation, protamine sulfate precipitation, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and Sephadex gel filtration. The enzyme exhibited maximal activity at pH 7.0, and was inactivated within 6 min at 37 C. Arsenite, hypophosphite, nitrite, selenite, and tellurite were not oxidized by the enzyme. Sulfite inhibited the enzymatic oxidation of orthophosphite in an apparent competitive manner. PMID:4381632

  19. Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase Is Coupled to Light-independent Hydrogen Production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    PubMed Central

    Noth, Jens; Krawietz, Danuta; Hemschemeier, Anja; Happe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In anaerobiosis, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii evolves molecular hydrogen (H2) as one of several fermentation products. H2 is generated mostly by the [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase HYDA1, which uses plant type ferredoxin PETF/FDX1 (PETF) as an electron donor. Dark fermentation of the alga is mainly of the mixed acid type, because formate, ethanol, and acetate are generated by a pyruvate:formate lyase pathway similar to Escherichia coli. However, C. reinhardtii also possesses the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase PFR1, which, like pyruvate:formate lyase and HYDA1, is localized in the chloroplast. PFR1 has long been suggested to be responsible for the low but significant H2 accumulation in the dark because the catalytic mechanism of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase involves the reduction of ferredoxin. With the aim of proving the biochemical feasibility of the postulated reaction, we have heterologously expressed the PFR1 gene in E. coli. Purified recombinant PFR1 is able to transfer electrons from pyruvate to HYDA1, using the ferredoxins PETF and FDX2 as electron carriers. The high reactivity of PFR1 toward oxaloacetate indicates that in vivo, fermentation might also be coupled to an anaerobically active glyoxylate cycle. Our results suggest that C. reinhardtii employs a clostridial type H2 production pathway in the dark, especially because C. reinhardtii PFR1 was also able to allow H2 evolution in reaction mixtures containing Clostridium acetobutylicum 2[4Fe-4S]-ferredoxin and [Fe-Fe]-hydrogenase HYDA. PMID:23258532

  20. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  1. Structural Basis of Biological NO Generation by Octaheme Oxidoreductases*

    PubMed Central

    Maalcke, Wouter J.; Dietl, Andreas; Marritt, Sophie J.; Butt, Julea N.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Keltjens, Jan T.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Kartal, Boran

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an important molecule in all domains of life with significant biological functions in both pro- and eukaryotes. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria that contribute substantially to the release of fixed nitrogen into the atmosphere use the oxidizing power of NO to activate inert ammonium into hydrazine (N2H4). Here, we describe an enzyme from the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis that uses a novel pathway to make NO from hydroxylamine. This new enzyme is related to octaheme hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, a key protein in aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. By a multiphasic approach including the determination of the crystal structure of the K. stuttgartiensis enzyme at 1.8 Å resolution and refinement and reassessment of the hydroxylamine oxidoreductase structure from Nitrosomonas europaea, both in the presence and absence of their substrates, we propose a model for NO formation by the K. stuttgartiensis enzyme. Our results expand the understanding of the functions that the widespread family of octaheme proteins have. PMID:24302732

  2. Electron transfer by human wild-type and A287P mutant P450 oxidoreductase assessed by transient kinetics: functional basis of P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yi; Chen, Mo; Penning, Trevor M.; Miller, Walter L.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a 2-flavin protein that transfers electrons from NADPH via its FAD and FMN moieties to all microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, including steroidogenic and drug-metabolizing P450s. Defects in the POR gene can cause POR deficiency (PORD), manifested clinically by disordered steroidogenesis, genital anomalies and skeletal malformations. We examined the POR mutant A287P, which is the most frequent cause of PORD in patients of European ancestry and partially disrupts most P450 activities in vitro. Flavin content analysis showed that A287P is deficient in FAD and FMN binding, although the mutation site is distant from the binding sites of both flavins. Externally added flavin partially restored the cytochrome c reductase activity of A287P, suggesting that flavin therapy may be useful for this frequent form of PORD. Transient kinetic dissection of the reaction of POR with NADPH and the reduction in cytochrome c by POR using stopped-flow techniques revealed defects in individual electron transfer steps mediated by A287P. A287P had impaired ability to accept electrons from NADPH, but was capable of a fast FMN ➔ cytochrome c electron donation reaction. Thus the reduced rates of P450 activities with A287P may be due to deficient flavin and impaired electron transfer from NADPH. PMID:25728647

  3. GltX from Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP262: glutamate synthase or oxidoreductase?

    PubMed

    Stutz, Helen E; Reid, Sharon J

    2004-01-01

    A full-length gene encoding a homologue of the small subunit of the glutamate synthase (GOGAT) enzyme was isolated from the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium saccharobutylicum NCP262, which has been used extensively for the commercial production of solvents. Using a screening system designed to isolate genes involved in electron transport, plasmid pMET13C1 was isolated. Analysis of this plasmid identified a gene (1245 bp) with a predicted approximately 46-kDa product, which was associated with reductive activation of the pro-drug metronidazole. The deduced 414-amino-acid sequence was not typical of electron transport proteins, but rather shared striking homology to the small (beta) subunit of the GOGAT enzyme and other beta subunit-like polypeptides, and was thus designated gltX. Although all the functional domains typical of GOGAT beta subunits were conserved in this GltX protein, certain sequence features were not conserved. Furthermore, it was independently transcribed, did not lie adjacent to a GOGAT large subunit (alpha) domain, and its expression was not regulated by nitrogen conditions. These results provide additional support for current theories on the evolutionary relationships of GOGAT beta subunit domains in bacteria, and suggest that GltX belongs to a more general family of oxidoreductases, which is used in a context other than glutamate biosynthesis to transfer electrons to a currently unknown protein domain. PMID:14732492

  4. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase in neuronal injury and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsin-Tzu; Liu, Chan-Chuan; Chen, Shur-Tzu; Yap, Ye Vone; Chang, Nan-Shang; Sze, Chun-I

    2014-01-01

    The human and mouse WWOX/Wwox gene encodes a candidate tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase protein. This gene is located on a common fragile site FRA16D. WWOX participates in a variety of cellular events and acts as a transducer in the many signal pathways, including TNF, chemotherapeutic drugs, UV irradiation, Wnt, TGF-β, C1q, Hyal-2, sex steroid hormones, and others. While transiently overexpressed WWOX restricts relocation of transcription factors to the nucleus for suppressing cancer survival, physiological relevance of this regard in vivo has not been confirmed. Unlike many tumor suppressor genes, mutation of WWOX is rare, raising a question whether WWOX is a driver for cancer initiation. WWOX/Wwox was initially shown to play a crucial role in neural development and in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and neuronal injury. Later on, WWOX/Wwox was shown to participate in the development of epilepsy, mental retardation, and brain developmental defects in mice, rats and humans. Up to date, most of the research and review articles have focused on the involvement of WWOX in cancer. Here, we review the role of WWOX in neural injury and neurological diseases, and provide perspectives for the WWOX-regulated neurodegeneration. PMID:25537520

  5. Nitric oxide activation by caa3 oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Takehiro; Soulimane, Tewfik; Kitagawa, Teizo; Varotsis, Constantinos

    2015-04-28

    Visible and UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy was employed to investigate the reaction of NO with cytochrome caa3 from Thermus thermophilus. We show the formation of the hyponitrite (HO-N=N-O)(-) bound to the heme a3 species (νN=N = 1330 cm(-1)) forming a high spin complex in the oxidized heme a3 Fe/CuB binuclear center of caa3-oxidoreductase. In the absence of heme a3 Fe(2+)-NO formation, the electron required for the formation of the N=N bond originates from the autoreduction of CuB by NO, producing nitrite. With the identification of the hyponitrite intermediate the hypothesis of a common phylogeny of aerobic respiration and bacterial denitrification is fully supported and the mechanism for the 2e(-)/2H(+) reduction of NO to N2O can be described with more certainty. PMID:25820937

  6. Disruption of malate:quinone oxidoreductase increases L-lysine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Mikiro; Ohnishi, Junko; Ikeda, Masato

    2006-11-01

    Genomic analysis of a classically derived L-lysine-producing mutant, Corynebacterium glutamicum B-6, identified a nonsense mutation in the mqo gene, which encodes malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO). The effect of mqo disruption on L-lysine production was investigated in a defined L-lysine producer, C. glutamicum AHP-3, showing approximately 18% increased production. To explore the underlying mechanisms of the increase, the mqo-disrupted strain was analyzed from the viewpoints of redox balance, activities of membrane-bound dehydrogenases, and transcriptome. The intracellular [NADH]/[NAD] ratio in the strain remained unchanged. Also, there were no significant differences in the activities of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases examined. However, transcriptome analysis showed that some TCA cycle genes, such as acn, sucC, and sucD, were down-regulated in the strain. These results suggest that the loss of MQO activity down-regulates the flux of the TCA cycle to maintain the redox balance and results in redirection of oxaloacetate into L-lysine biosynthesis. PMID:17090916

  7. Structure and function of Caulobacter crescentus aldose-aldose oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Taberman, Helena; Andberg, Martina; Koivula, Anu; Hakulinen, Nina; Penttilä, Merja; Rouvinen, Juha; Parkkinen, Tarja

    2015-12-15

    Aldose-aldose oxidoreductase (Cc AAOR) is a recently characterized enzyme from the bacterial strain Caulobacter crescentus CB15 belonging to the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase/inositol dehydrogenase/rhizopine catabolism protein (Gfo/Idh/MocA) family. Cc AAOR catalyses the oxidation and reduction of a panel of aldose monosaccharides using a tightly bound NADP(H) cofactor that is regenerated in the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, Cc AAOR can also oxidize 1,4-linked oligosaccharides. In the present study, we present novel crystal structures of the dimeric Cc AAOR in complex with the cofactor and glycerol, D-xylose, D-glucose, maltotriose and D-sorbitol determined to resolutions of 2.0, 1.8, 1.7, 1.9 and 1.8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm), respectively. These complex structures allowed for a detailed analysis of the ligand-binding interactions. The structures showed that the C1 carbon of a substrate, which is either reduced or oxidized, is close to the reactive C4 carbon of the nicotinamide ring of NADP(H). In addition, the O1 hydroxy group of the substrate, which is either protonated or deprotonated, is unexpectedly close to both Lys(104) and Tyr(189), which may both act as a proton donor or acceptor. This led us to hypothesize that this intriguing feature could be beneficial for Cc AAOR to catalyse the reduction of a linear form of a monosaccharide substrate and the oxidation of a pyranose form of the same substrate in a reaction cycle, during which the bound cofactor is regenerated. PMID:26438878

  8. Recent progress on the characterization of aldonolactone oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Aboobucker, Siddique I; Lorence, Argelia

    2016-01-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (ascorbate, AsA, vitamin C) is essential for animal and plant health. Despite our dependence on fruits and vegetables to fulfill our requirement for this vitamin, the metabolic network leading to its formation in plants is just being fully elucidated. There is evidence supporting the operation of at least four biosynthetic pathways leading to AsA formation in plants. These routes use D-mannose/L-galactose, L-gulose, D-galacturonate, and myo-inositol as the main precursors. This review focuses on aldonolactone oxidoreductases, a subgroup of the vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO; EC 1.1.3.38) superfamily, enzymes that catalyze the terminal step in AsA biosynthesis in bacteria, protozoa, animals, and plants. In this report, we review the properties of well characterized aldonolactone oxidoreductases to date. A shared feature in these proteins is the presence of a flavin cofactor as well as a thiol group. The flavin cofactor in many cases is bound to the N terminus of the enzymes or to a recently discovered HWXK motif in the C terminus. The binding between the flavin moiety and the protein can be either covalent or non-covalent. Substrate specificity and subcellular localization differ among the isozymes of each kingdom. All oxidases among these enzymes possess dehydrogenase activity, however, exclusive dehydrogenases are also found. We also discuss recent evidence indicating that plants have both L-gulono-1,4-lactone oxidases and L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenases involved in AsA biosynthesis. PMID:26696130

  9. Purification and characterization of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Satoshi; Tsujita, Mizuho; Kikumoto, Mei; Manchur, Mohammed A; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo

    2007-11-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) was purified from membrane of acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans NASF-1 cells grown on sulfur medium. It was composed of a single polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 47 kDa. The apparent K(m) values for sulfide and ubiquinone were 42 and 14 muM respectively. The apparent optimum pH for the SQR activity was about 7.0. A gene encoding a putative SQR of A. ferrooxidans NASF-1 was cloned and sequenced. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli as a thioredoxin-fusion protein in inclusion bodies in an inactive form. A polyclonal antibody prepared against the recombinant protein reacted immunologically with the purified SQR. Western blotting analysis using the antibody revealed an increased level of SQR synthesis in sulfur-grown A. ferrooxidans NASF-1 cells, implying the involvement of SQR in elemental sulfur oxidation in sulfur-grown A. ferrooxidans NASF-1 cells. PMID:17986789

  10. A Single-Electron Reducing Quinone Oxidoreductase Is Necessary to Induce Haustorium Development in the Root Parasitic Plant Triphysaria[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Pradeepa C.G.; Filappova, Tatiana; Tomilov, Alexey; Tomilova, Natalya B.; Jamison-McClung, Denneal; Ngo, Quy; Inoue, Kentaro; Yoder, John I.

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae develop haustoria in response to contact with host roots or chemical haustoria-inducing factors. Experiments in this manuscript test the hypothesis that quinolic-inducing factors activate haustorium development via a signal mechanism initiated by redox cycling between quinone and hydroquinone states. Two cDNAs were previously isolated from roots of the parasitic plant Triphysaria versicolor that encode distinct quinone oxidoreductases. QR1 encodes a single-electron reducing NADPH quinone oxidoreductase similar to ζ-crystallin. The QR2 enzyme catalyzes two electron reductions typical of xenobiotic detoxification. QR1 and QR2 transcripts are upregulated in a primary response to chemical-inducing factors, but only QR1 was upregulated in response to host roots. RNA interference technology was used to reduce QR1 and QR2 transcripts in Triphysaria roots that were evaluated for their ability to form haustoria. There was a significant decrease in haustorium development in roots silenced for QR1 but not in roots silenced for QR2. The infrequent QR1 transgenic roots that did develop haustoria had levels of QR1 similar to those of nontransgenic roots. These experiments implicate QR1 as one of the earliest genes on the haustorium signal transduction pathway, encoding a quinone oxidoreductase necessary for the redox bioactivation of haustorial inducing factors. PMID:20424175

  11. Purification and characterization of a carbohydrate: acceptor oxidoreductase from Paraconiothyrium sp. that produces lactobionic acid efficiently.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, Takaaki; Nakano, Hirofumi; Kiso, Taro; Murakami, Hiromi

    2008-03-01

    A carbohydrate:acceptor oxidoreductase from Paraconiothyrium sp. was purified and characterized. The enzyme efficiently oxidized beta-(1-->4) linked sugars, such as lactose, xylobiose, and cellooligosaccharides. The enzyme also oxidized maltooligosaccharides, D-glucose, D-xylose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, and 6-deoxy-D-glucose. It specifically oxidized the beta-anomer of lactose. Molecular oxygen and 2,6-dichlorophenol indophenol were reduced by the enzyme as electron acceptors. The Paraconiothyrium enzyme was identified as a carbohydrate:acceptor oxidoreductase according to its specificity for electron donors and acceptors, and its molecular properties, as well as the N-terminal amino acid sequence. Further comparison of the amino acid sequences of lactose oxidizing enzymes indicated that carbohydrate:acceptor oxidoreductases belong to the same group as glucooligosaccharide oxidase, while they differ from cellobiose dehydrogenases and cellobiose:quinone oxidoreductases. PMID:18323642

  12. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzyme (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.

  13. The respiratory molybdo-selenoprotein formate dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli have hydrogen: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli synthesizes three membrane-bound molybdenum- and selenocysteine-containing formate dehydrogenases, as well as up to four membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Two of the formate dehydrogenases (Fdh-N and Fdh-O) and two of the hydrogenases (Hyd-1 and Hyd-2) have their respective catalytic subunits located in the periplasm and these enzymes have been shown previously to oxidize formate and hydrogen, respectively, and thus function in energy metabolism. Mutants unable to synthesize the [NiFe]-hydrogenases retain a H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase activity. The aim of this study was to identify the enzyme or enzymes responsible for this activity. Results Here we report the identification of a new H2: benzyl viologen oxidoreductase enzyme activity in E. coli that is independent of the [NiFe]-hydrogenases. This enzyme activity was originally identified after non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualization of hydrogen-oxidizing activity by specific staining. Analysis of a crude extract derived from a variety of E. coli mutants unable to synthesize any [NiFe]-hydrogenase-associated enzyme activity revealed that the mutants retained this specific hydrogen-oxidizing activity. Enrichment of this enzyme activity from solubilised membrane fractions of the hydrogenase-negative mutant FTD147 by ion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and size-exclusion chromatographies followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified the enzymes Fdh-N and Fdh-O. Analysis of defined mutants devoid of selenocysteine biosynthetic capacity or carrying deletions in the genes encoding the catalytic subunits of Fdh-N and Fdh-O demonstrated that both enzymes catalyze hydrogen activation. Fdh-N and Fdh-O can also transfer the electrons derived from oxidation of hydrogen to other redox dyes. Conclusions The related respiratory molybdo-selenoproteins Fdh-N and Fdh-O of Escherichia coli have hydrogen-oxidizing activity. These findings demonstrate that the

  14. Ero1-α and PDIs constitute a hierarchical electron transfer network of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazutaka; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Kamiya, Yukiko; Ron, David; Kato, Koichi; Natsume, Tohru; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2013-09-16

    Ero1-α and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) oxidoreductases of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family promote the efficient introduction of disulfide bonds into nascent polypeptides in the ER. However, the hierarchy of electron transfer among these oxidoreductases is poorly understood. In this paper, Ero1-α-associated oxidoreductases were identified by proteomic analysis and further confirmed by surface plasmon resonance. Ero1-α and PDI were found to constitute a regulatory hub, whereby PDI induced conformational flexibility in an Ero1-α shuttle cysteine (Cys99) facilitated intramolecular electron transfer to the active site. In isolation, Ero1-α also oxidized ERp46, ERp57, and P5; however, kinetic measurements and redox equilibrium analysis revealed that PDI preferentially oxidized other oxidoreductases. PDI accepted electrons from the other oxidoreductases via its a' domain, bypassing the a domain, which serves as the electron acceptor from reduced glutathione. These observations provide an integrated picture of the hierarchy of cooperative redox interactions among ER oxidoreductases in mammalian cells. PMID:24043701

  15. Dissecting the Diphenylene Iodonium-Sensitive NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase of Zucchini Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Trost, P.; Foscarini, S.; Preger, V.; Bonora, P.; Vitale, L.; Pupillo, P.

    1997-01-01

    Quinone oxidoreductase activities dependent on pyridine nucleotides are associated with the plasma membrane (PM) in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) hypocotyls. In the presence of NADPH, lipophilic ubiquinone homologs with up to three isoprenoid units were reduced by intact PM vesicles with a Km of 2 to 7 [mu]M. Affinities for both NADPH and NADH were similar (Km of 62 and 51 [mu]M, respectively). Two NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase forms were identified. The first, labeled as peak I in gel-filtration experiments, behaves as an intrinsic membrane complex of about 300 kD, it slightly prefers NADH over NADPH, it is markedly sensitive to the inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, and it is active with lipophilic quinones. The second form (peak II) is an NADPH-preferring oxidoreductase of about 90 kD, weakly bound to the PM. Peak II is diphenylene iodonium-insensitive and resembles, in many properties, the soluble NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase that is also present in the same tissue. Following purification of peak I, however, the latter gave rise to a quinone oxidoreductase of the soluble type (peak II), based on substrate and inhibitor specificities and chromatographic and electrophoretic evidence. It is proposed that a redox protein of the same class as the soluble NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (F. Sparla, G. Tedeschi, and P. Trost [1996] Plant Physiol. 112:249-258) is a component of the diphenylene iodonium-sensitive PM complex capable of reducing lipophilic quinones. PMID:12223742

  16. Functional Analysis of Three Sulfide:Quinone Oxidoreductase Homologs in Chlorobaculum tepidum▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M.; Hanson, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) catalyzes sulfide oxidation during sulfide-dependent chemo- and phototrophic growth in bacteria. The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum) can grow on sulfide as the sole electron donor and sulfur source. C. tepidum contains genes encoding three SQR homologs: CT0117, CT0876, and CT1087. This study examined which, if any, of the SQR homologs possess sulfide-dependent ubiquinone reduction activity and are required for growth on sulfide. In contrast to CT0117 and CT0876, transcripts of CT1087 were detected only when cells actively oxidized sulfide. Mutation of CT0117 or CT1087 in C. tepidum decreased SQR activity in membrane fractions, and the CT1087 mutant could not grow with ≥6 mM sulfide. Mutation of both CT0117 and CT1087 in C. tepidum completely abolished SQR activity, and the double mutant failed to grow with ≥4 mM sulfide. A C-terminal His6-tagged CT1087 protein was membrane localized, as was SQR activity. Epitope-tagged CT1087 was detected only when sulfide was actively consumed by cells. Recombinantly produced CT1087 and CT0117 proteins had SQR activity, while CT0876 did not. In summary, we conclude that, under the conditions tested, both CT0117 and CT1087 function as SQR proteins in C. tepidum. CT0876 may support the growth of C. tepidum at low sulfide concentrations, but no evidence was found for SQR activity associated with this protein. PMID:19028893

  17. Reduced expression of the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase in human hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    LUO, LINGQING; CHEN, YAN; CHENG, XIAO; LIN, YAZHEN; FU, XIAODAN; LI, DAN; CUI, ZHAOLEI; LIN, DONGHONG

    2016-01-01

    The role of the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) gene in multiple types of solid human cancers has been documented extensively thus far. Recently, we investigated the in vitro effects of WWOX overexpression and observed marked growth arrest in human leukemia cells; however, the clinical characterization of WWOX in leukemia remains poorly investigated. The present study evaluated the WWOX expression profiles of 182 patients with leukemia of different types and 5 leukemic cell lines, using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence analysis. The results found that WWOX mRNA and WWOX protein expression was significantly reduced or absent in the leukemia cases and cell lines compared with paired controls. The WWOX-positive rate was also lower in the leukemia cases compared with the rate of the normal controls. Notably, the WWOX level was reduced in newly diagnosed and relapsed cases, or in chronic myelogenous leukemia in the blastic phase, yet elevated in remission samples. Moreover, WWOX-negative cases exhibited WWOX expression restoration following induced remission. These findings suggest that WWOX may contribute to the occurrence and development of leukemia, and that it has potential to be a good biomarker or predictor for leukemia therapy. PMID:27313745

  18. Assembly of the Escherichia coli NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (respiratory complex I).

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Thorsten; Dekovic, Doris Kreuzer; Burschel, Sabrina

    2016-03-01

    Energy-converting NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, respiratory complex I, couples the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of four protons across the membrane. The Escherichia coli complex I is made up of 13 different subunits encoded by the so-called nuo-genes. The electron transfer is catalyzed by nine cofactors, a flavin mononucleotide and eight iron-sulfur (Fe/S)-clusters. The individual subunits and the cofactors have to be assembled together in a coordinated way to guarantee the biogenesis of the active holoenzyme. Only little is known about the assembly of the bacterial complex compared to the mitochondrial one. Due to the presence of so many Fe/S-clusters the assembly of complex I is intimately connected with the systems responsible for the biogenesis of these clusters. In addition, a few other proteins have been reported to be required for an effective assembly of the complex in other bacteria. The proposed role of known bacterial assembly factors is discussed and the information from other bacterial species is used in this review to draw an as complete as possible model of bacterial complex I assembly. In addition, the supramolecular organization of the complex in E. coli is briefly described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof. Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26682761

  19. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 inducer activity of some novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; Higgins, Maureen; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Elghazawy, Nehal H; Arafa, Reem K

    2016-01-01

    The Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response elements pathway enables cells to survive oxidative stress conditions through regulating the expression of cytoprotective enzymes such as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). This work presents the design and synthesis of novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives (2–16a) and evaluation of their NQO1 inducer activity in murine cells. Molecular docking of the new compounds was performed to assess their ability to inhibit Keap1–Nrf2 protein–protein interaction through occupying the Keap1–Nrf2-binding domain, which leads to Nrf2 accumulation and enhanced gene expression of NQO1. Docking results showed that all compounds can potentially interact with Keap1; however, 1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-4-(2-phenylquinazolin-4-ylamino)-1,2-dihydropyrazol-3-one (9), the most potent inducer, showed the largest number of interactions with key amino acids in the binding pocket (Arg483, Tyr525, and Phe478) compared to the native ligand or any other compound in this series. PMID:27540279

  20. Dual targeted poplar ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase interacts with hemoglobin 1.

    PubMed

    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Kastaniotis, Alexander J; Parkash, Vimal; Sundström, Robin; Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Nymalm, Yvonne; Blokhina, Olga; Kukkola, Eija; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Salminen, Tiina A; Läärä, Esa; Bülow, Leif; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Kallio, Pauli T; Häggman, Hely

    2016-06-01

    Previous reports have connected non-symbiotic and truncated hemoglobins (Hbs) to metabolism of nitric oxide (NO), an important signalling molecule involved in wood formation. We have studied the capability of poplar (Populus tremula×tremuloides) Hbs PttHb1 and PttTrHb proteins alone or with a flavin-protein reductase to relieve NO cytotoxicity in living cells. Complementation tests in a Hb-deficient, NO-sensitive yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Δyhb1 mutant showed that neither PttHb1 nor PttTrHb alone protected cells against NO. To study the ability of Hbs to interact with a reductase, ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase PtthFNR was characterized by sequencing and proteomics. To date, by far the greatest number of the known dual-targeted plant proteins are directed to chloroplasts and mitochondria. We discovered a novel variant of hFNR that lacks the plastid presequence and resides in cytosol. The coexpression of PttHb1 and PtthFNR partially restored NO resistance of the yeast Δyhb1 mutant, whereas PttTrHb coexpressed with PtthFNR failed to rescue growth. YFP fusion proteins confirmed the interaction between PttHb1 and PtthFNR in plant cells. The structural modelling results indicate that PttHb1 and PtthFNR are able to interact as NO dioxygenase. This is the first report on dual targeting of central plant enzyme FNR to plastids and cytosol. PMID:27095407

  1. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes. PMID:26823950

  2. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes. PMID:26823950

  3. Bacterial Na+-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Biegel, Eva; Müller, Volker

    2010-10-19

    The anaerobic acetogenic bacterium Acetobacterium woodii carries out a unique type of Na(+)-motive, anaerobic respiration with caffeate as electron acceptor, termed "caffeate respiration." Central, and so far the only identified membrane-bound reaction in this respiration pathway, is a ferredoxin:NAD(+) oxidoreductase (Fno) activity. Here we show that inverted membrane vesicles of A. woodii couple electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(+) with the transport of Na(+) from the outside into the lumen of the vesicles. Na(+) transport was electrogenic, and accumulation was inhibited by sodium ionophores but not protonophores, demonstrating a direct coupling of Fno activity to Na(+) transport. Results from inhibitor studies are consistent with the hypothesis that Fno activity coupled to Na(+) translocation is catalyzed by the Rnf complex, a membrane-bound, iron-sulfur and flavin-containing electron transport complex encoded by many bacterial and some archaeal genomes. Fno is a unique type of primary Na(+) pump and represents an early evolutionary mechanism of energy conservation that expands the redox range known to support life. In addition, it explains the lifestyle of many anaerobic bacteria and gives a mechanistic explanation for the enigma of the energetic driving force for the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADH plus H(+) as reductant in a number of aerobic bacteria. PMID:20921383

  4. Posttranslational modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M; Dahlström, Käthe M; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A; Mulo, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants' survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP(+) OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research. PMID:25301888

  5. Disarming Burkholderia pseudomallei: Structural and Functional Characterization of a Disulfide Oxidoreductase (DsbA) Required for Virulence In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Róisín M.; Marshall, Laura E.; Halili, Maria; Furlong, Emily; Tay, Stephanie; Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the disease melioidosis, a major source of morbidity and mortality in southeast Asia and northern Australia. The need to develop novel antimicrobials is compounded by the absence of a licensed vaccine and the bacterium's resistance to multiple antibiotics. In a number of clinically relevant Gram-negative pathogens, DsbA is the primary disulfide oxidoreductase responsible for catalyzing the formation of disulfide bonds in secreted and membrane-associated proteins. In this study, a putative B. pseudomallei dsbA gene was evaluated functionally and structurally and its contribution to infection assessed. Results: Biochemical studies confirmed the dsbA gene encodes a protein disulfide oxidoreductase. A dsbA deletion strain of B. pseudomallei was attenuated in both macrophages and a BALB/c mouse model of infection and displayed pleiotropic phenotypes that included defects in both secretion and motility. The 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of BpsDsbA revealed differences from the classic member of this family Escherichia coli DsbA, in particular within the region surrounding the active site disulfide where EcDsbA engages with its partner protein E. coli DsbB, indicating that the interaction of BpsDsbA with its proposed partner BpsDsbB may be distinct from that of EcDsbA-EcDsbB. Innovation: This study has characterized BpsDsbA biochemically and structurally and determined that it is required for virulence of B. pseudomallei. Conclusion: These data establish a critical role for BpsDsbA in B. pseudomallei infection, which in combination with our structural characterization of BpsDsbA will facilitate the future development of rationally designed inhibitors against this drug-resistant organism. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 606–617. PMID:23901809

  6. Chlorophyllide a Oxidoreductase Works as One of the Divinyl Reductases Specifically Involved in Bacteriochlorophyll a Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Jiro; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tsukatani, Yusuke; Yokono, Makio; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a is widely distributed among anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. In bacteriochlorophyll a biosynthesis, the reduction of the C8 vinyl group in 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a is catalyzed to produce chlorophyllide a by an 8-vinyl reductase called divinyl reductase (DVR), which has been classified into two types, BciA and BciB. However, previous studies demonstrated that mutants lacking the DVR still synthesize normal bacteriochlorophyll a with the C8 ethyl group and suggested the existence of an unknown “third” DVR. Meanwhile, we recently observed that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase (COR) of a purple bacterium happened to show the 8-vinyl reduction of 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a in vitro. In this study, we made a double mutant lacking BciA and COR of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides in order to investigate whether the mutant still produces pigments with the C8 ethyl group or if COR actually works as the third DVR. The single mutant deleting BciA or COR showed production of the C8 ethyl group pigments, whereas the double mutant accumulated 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide, indicating that there was no enzyme other than BciA and COR functioning as the unknown third DVR in Rhodobacter sphaeroides (note that this bacterium has no bciB gene). Moreover, some COR genes derived from other groups of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria were introduced into the double mutant, and all of the complementary strains produced normal bacteriochlorophyll a. This observation indicated that COR of these bacteria performs two functions, reductions of the C8 vinyl group and the C7=C8 double bond, and that such an activity is probably conserved in the widely ranging groups. PMID:24637023

  7. Xanthine Oxidoreductase Function Contributes to Normal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Michael C; McEnaney, Ryan M; Shukla, Ankur J; Hong, Guiying; Kelley, Eric E; Tarpey, Margaret M; Gladwin, Mark; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Tzeng, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, nonhealing wounds result in patient morbidity and disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are both required for normal wound repair, and derangements of these result in impaired healing. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has the unique capacity to produce both ROS and NO. We hypothesize that XOR contributes to normal wound healing. Cutaneous wounds were created in C57Bl6 mice. XOR was inhibited with dietary tungsten or allopurinol. Topical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 0.15%) or allopurinol (30 μg) was applied to wounds every other day. Wounds were monitored until closure or collected at d 5 to assess XOR expression and activity, cell proliferation and histology. The effects of XOR, nitrite, H2O2 and allopurinol on keratinocyte cell (KC) and endothelial cell (EC) behavior were assessed. We identified XOR expression and activity in the skin and wound edges as well as granulation tissue. Cultured human KCs also expressed XOR. Tungsten significantly inhibited XOR activity and impaired healing with reduced ROS production with reduced angiogenesis and KC proliferation. The expression and activity of other tungsten-sensitive enzymes were minimal in the wound tissues. Oral allopurinol did not reduce XOR activity or alter wound healing but topical allopurinol significantly reduced XOR activity and delayed healing. Topical H2O2 restored wound healing in tungsten-fed mice. In vitro, nitrite and H2O2 both stimulated KC and EC proliferation and EC migration. These studies demonstrate for the first time that XOR is abundant in wounds and participates in normal wound healing through effects on ROS production. PMID:25879627

  8. Ferredoxin:NADP+ Oxidoreductase Association with Phycocyanin Modulates Its Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Anja; Ajlani, Ghada; Lagoutte, Bernard; Gall, Andrew; Sétif, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) is known to provide NADPH for CO2 assimilation, but it also utilizes NADPH to provide reduced ferredoxin. The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 produces two FNR isoforms, a small one (FNRS) similar to the one found in plant plastids and a large one (FNRL) that is associated with the phycobilisome, a light-harvesting complex. Here we show that a mutant lacking FNRL exhibits a higher NADP+/NADPH ratio. We also purified to homogeneity a phycobilisome subcomplex comprising FNRL, named FNRL-PC. The enzymatic activities of FNRL-PC were compared with those of FNRS. During NADPH oxidation, FNRL-PC exhibits a 30% decrease in the Michaelis constant Km(NADPH), and a 70% increase in Km(ferredoxin), which is in agreement with its predicted lower activity of ferredoxin reduction. During NADP+ reduction, the FNRL-PC shows a 29/43% decrease in the rate of single electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin in the presence/absence of NADP+. The increase in Km(ferredoxin) and the rate decrease of single reduction are attributed to steric hindrance by the phycocyanin moiety of FNRL-PC. Both isoforms are capable of catalyzing the NADP+ reduction under multiple turnover conditions. Furthermore, we obtained evidence that, under high ionic strength conditions, electron transfer from reduced ferredoxin is rate limiting during this process. The differences that we observe might not fully explain the in vivo properties of the Synechocystis mutants expressing only one of the isoforms. Therefore, we advocate that FNR localization and/or substrates availability are essential in vivo. PMID:19759024

  9. Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Feng; Shao, Ming-Yu; Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Tan, Zhi; Li, Jin-Long

    2011-02-01

    Sulfide is a natural, widely distributed, poisonous substance, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) has been identified to be responsible for the initial oxidation of sulfide in mitochondria. In this study, full-length SQR cDNA was cloned from the echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus, a benthic organism living in marine sediments. The protein consisted of 451 amino acids with a theoretical pI of 8.98 and molecular weight of 50.5 kDa. Subsequently, the SQR mRNA expression in different tissues was assessed by real-time reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction and showed that the highest expression was in midgut, followed by anal sacs and coelomic fluid cells, and then body wall and hindgut. Furthermore, activated SQR was obtained by dilution refolding of recombinant SQR expression in E. coli, and the refolded product showed optimal activity at 37 °C and pH 8.5 and K (m) for ubiquinone and sulfide at 15.6 µM and 40.3 µM, respectively. EDTA and GSH had an activating effect on refolded SQR, while Zn(2+) caused decreased activity. Western blot showed that SQR in vivo was located in mitochondria and was ∼ 10 kDa heavier than the recombinant protein. In addition, SQR, detected by immunohistochemistry, was mainly located in the epithelium of all tissues examined. Ultrastructural observations of these tissues' epithelium by transmission electron microscopy provided indirect cytological evidence for its mitochondrial location. Interesting aspects of the U. unicinctus SQR amino acid sequence, its catalytic mechanism, and the different roles of these tissues in sulfide metabolic adaptation are also discussed. PMID:20419499

  10. Protein Conformational Gating of Enzymatic Activity in Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Eger, Bryan T.; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi; Pai, Emil F.

    2012-05-24

    In mammals, xanthine oxidoreductase can exist as xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO). The two enzymes possess common redox active cofactors, which form an electron transfer (ET) pathway terminated by a flavin cofactor. In spite of identical protein primary structures, the redox potential difference between XDH and XO for the flavin semiquinone/hydroquinone pair (E{sub sq/hq}) is {approx}170 mV, a striking difference. The former greatly prefers NAD{sup +} as ultimate substrate for ET from the iron-sulfur cluster FeS-II via flavin while the latter only accepts dioxygen. In XDH (without NAD{sup +}), however, the redox potential of the electron donor FeS-II is 180 mV higher than that for the acceptor flavin, yielding an energetically uphill ET. On the basis of new 1.65, 2.3, 1.9, and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures for XDH, XO, the NAD{sup +}- and NADH-complexed XDH, E{sub sq/hq} were calculated to better understand how the enzyme activates an ET from FeS-II to flavin. The majority of the E{sub sq/hq} difference between XDH and XO originates from a conformational change in the loop at positions 423-433 near the flavin binding site, causing the differences in stability of the semiquinone state. There was no large conformational change observed in response to NAD{sup +} binding at XDH. Instead, the positive charge of the NAD{sup +} ring, deprotonation of Asp429, and capping of the bulk surface of the flavin by the NAD{sup +} molecule all contribute to altering E{sub sq/hq} upon NAD{sup +} binding to XDH.

  11. Combinatorial application of two aldehyde oxidoreductases on isobutanol production in the presence of furfural.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyung-Min; Jeon, Jong-Min; Lee, Ju Hee; Song, Hun-Suk; Joo, Han-Byul; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Kyungmoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Lee, Hongweon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Furfural is a toxic by-product formulated from pretreatment processes of lignocellulosic biomass. In order to utilize the lignocellulosic biomass on isobutanol production, inhibitory effect of the furfural on isobutanol production was investigated and combinatorial application of two oxidoreductases, FucO and YqhD, was suggested as an alternative strategy. Furfural decreased cell growth and isobutanol production when only YqhD or FucO was employed as an isobutyraldehyde oxidoreductase. However, combinatorial overexpression of FucO and YqhD could overcome the inhibitory effect of furfural giving higher isobutanol production by 110% compared with overexpression of YqhD. The combinatorial oxidoreductases increased furfural detoxification rate 2.1-fold and also accelerated glucose consumption 1.4-fold. When it compares to another known system increasing furfural tolerance, membrane-bound transhydrogenase (pntAB), the combinatorial aldehyde oxidoreductases were better on cell growth and production. Thus, to control oxidoreductases is important to produce isobutanol using furfural-containing biomass and the combinatorial overexpression of FucO and YqhD can be an alternative strategy. PMID:26660478

  12. Purification and properties of two 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Halobacterium halobium.

    PubMed

    Kerscher, L; Oesterhelt, D

    1981-06-01

    Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase were obtained from cell-free extracts of Halobacterium halobium as homogeneous proteins after ammonium sulfate precipitation, salting-out chromatography with ammonium sulfate on unsubstituted agarose, gel filtration and chromatography on hydroxyapatite. The respective molecular weights are 256000 and 248000. Both enzymes consist of two sets of non-identical subunits of Mr 86000 and 42000 in the case of the pyruvate-degrading enzyme and of 88000 and 36000 in the case of the 20 -oxogluatarate-degrading enzyme. Analyses indicate that an intact enzyme molecule contains two [4 Fe-4S]2 + (2 + , 1+) clusters and two molecules of thiamin diphosphate. Flavin nucleotides, lipoic acid and pantetheine are absent. Thus the enzymes are very similar to the 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from fermentative and photosynthetic anaerobes described previously, but are clearly different from the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes which commonly occur in anaerobic organisms. PMID:6266826

  13. Cooperative Protein Folding by Two Protein Thiol Disulfide Oxidoreductases and ERO1 in Soybean1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Aya; Masuda, Taro; Koishihara, Katsunori; Mita, Ryuta; Iwasaki, Kensuke; Hara, Kumiko; Naruo, Yurika; Hirose, Akiho; Tsuchi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells fold via disulfide formation (oxidative folding). Oxidative folding is catalyzed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDI-related ER protein thiol disulfide oxidoreductases (ER oxidoreductases). In yeast and mammals, ER oxidoreductin-1s (Ero1s) supply oxidizing equivalent to the active centers of PDI. In this study, we expressed recombinant soybean Ero1 (GmERO1a) and found that GmERO1a oxidized multiple soybean ER oxidoreductases, in contrast to mammalian Ero1s having a high specificity for PDI. One of these ER oxidoreductases, GmPDIM, associated in vivo and in vitro with GmPDIL-2, was unable to be oxidized by GmERO1a. We therefore pursued the possible cooperative oxidative folding by GmPDIM, GmERO1a, and GmPDIL-2 in vitro and found that GmPDIL-2 synergistically accelerated oxidative refolding. In this process, GmERO1a preferentially oxidized the active center in the a′ domain among the a, a′, and b domains of GmPDIM. A disulfide bond introduced into the active center of the a′ domain of GmPDIM was shown to be transferred to the active center of the a domain of GmPDIM and the a domain of GmPDIM directly oxidized the active centers of both the a or a′ domain of GmPDIL-2. Therefore, we propose that the relay of an oxidizing equivalent from one ER oxidoreductase to another may play an essential role in cooperative oxidative folding by multiple ER oxidoreductases in plants. PMID:26645455

  14. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  15. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  16. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  17. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  18. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a...

  19. NADPH:Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 Regulates Host Susceptibility to Ozone via Isoprostane Generation*

    PubMed Central

    Kummarapurugu, Apparao B.; Fischer, Bernard M.; Zheng, Shuo; Milne, Ginger L.; Ghio, Andrew J.; Potts-Kant, Erin N.; Foster, W. Michael; Soderblom, Erik J.; Dubois, Laura G.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Thompson, J. Will; Voynow, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is recognized as a major susceptibility gene for ozone-induced pulmonary toxicity. In the absence of NQO1 as can occur by genetic mutation, the human airway is protected from harmful effects of ozone. We recently reported that NQO1-null mice are protected from airway hyperresponsiveness and pulmonary inflammation following ozone exposure. However, NQO1 regenerates intracellular antioxidants and therefore should protect the individual from oxidative stress. To explain this paradox, we tested whether in the absence of NQO1 ozone exposure results in increased generation of A2-isoprostane, a cyclopentenone isoprostane that blunts inflammation. Using GC-MS, we found that NQO1-null mice had greater lung tissue levels of D2- and E2-isoprostanes, the precursors of J2- and A2-isoprostanes, both at base line and following ozone exposure compared with congenic wild-type mice. We confirmed in primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells that A2-isoprostane inhibited ozone-induced NF-κB activation and IL-8 regulation. Furthermore, we determined that A2-isoprostane covalently modified the active Cys179 domain in inhibitory κB kinase in the presence of ozone in vitro, thus establishing the biochemical basis for A2-isoprostane inhibition of NF-κB. Our results demonstrate that host factors may regulate pulmonary susceptibility to ozone by regulating the generation of A2-isoprostanes in the lung. These observations provide the biochemical basis for the epidemiologic observation that NQO1 regulates pulmonary susceptibility to ozone. PMID:23275341

  20. Structural basis for human NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Chuanwu; Panda, Satya P.; Marohnic, Christopher C.; Martásek, Pavel; Masters, Bettie Sue; Kim, Jung-Ja P.

    2012-03-15

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is essential for electron donation to microsomal cytochrome P450-mediated monooxygenation in such diverse physiological processes as drug metabolism (approximately 85-90% of therapeutic drugs), steroid biosynthesis, and bioactive metabolite production (vitamin D and retinoic acid metabolites). Expressed by a single gene, CYPOR's role with these multiple redox partners renders it a model for understanding protein-protein interactions at the structural level. Polymorphisms in human CYPOR have been shown to lead to defects in bone development and steroidogenesis, resulting in sexual dimorphisms, the severity of which differs significantly depending on the degree of CYPOR impairment. The atomic structure of human CYPOR is presented, with structures of two naturally occurring missense mutations, V492E and R457H. The overall structures of these CYPOR variants are similar to wild type. However, in both variants, local disruption of H bonding and salt bridging, involving the FAD pyrophosphate moiety, leads to weaker FAD binding, unstable protein, and loss of catalytic activity, which can be rescued by cofactor addition. The modes of polypeptide unfolding in these two variants differ significantly, as revealed by limited trypsin digestion: V492E is less stable but unfolds locally and gradually, whereas R457H is more stable but unfolds globally. FAD addition to either variant prevents trypsin digestion, supporting the role of the cofactor in conferring stability to CYPOR structure. Thus, CYPOR dysfunction in patients harboring these particular mutations may possibly be prevented by riboflavin therapy in utero, if predicted prenatally, or rescued postnatally in less severe cases.

  1. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chloroplasts contain a homodimeric pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase that functions with FDX1.

    PubMed

    van Lis, Robert; Baffert, Carole; Couté, Yohann; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Atteia, Ariane

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic algae have long been known to live in anoxic environments, but interest in their anaerobic energy metabolism has only recently gained momentum, largely due to their utility in biofuel production. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii figures remarkably in this respect, because it efficiently produces hydrogen and its genome harbors many genes for anaerobic metabolic routes. Central to anaerobic energy metabolism in many unicellular eukaryotes (protists) is pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), which decarboxylates pyruvate and forms acetyl-coenzyme A with concomitant reduction of low-potential ferredoxins or flavodoxins. Here, we report the biochemical properties of the homodimeric PFO of C. reinhardtii expressed in Escherichia coli. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the recombinant enzyme (Cr-rPFO) showed three distinct [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur clusters and a thiamine pyrophosphate radical upon reduction by pyruvate. Purified Cr-rPFO exhibits a specific decarboxylase activity of 12 µmol pyruvate min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ protein using benzyl viologen as electron acceptor. Despite the fact that the enzyme is very oxygen sensitive, it localizes to the chloroplast. Among the six known chloroplast ferredoxins (FDX1-FDX6) in C. reinhardtii, FDX1 and FDX2 were the most efficient electron acceptors from Cr-rPFO, with comparable apparent K(m) values of approximately 4 µm. As revealed by immunoblotting, anaerobic conditions that lead to the induction of CrPFO did not increase levels of either FDX1 or FDX2. FDX1, being by far the most abundant ferredoxin, is thus likely the partner of PFO in C. reinhardtii. This finding postulates a direct link between CrPFO and hydrogenase and provides new opportunities to better study and engineer hydrogen production in this protist. PMID:23154536

  2. Physiological roles of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase and pyruvate formate-lyase in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum JW/SL-YS485

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Jilai; Olson, Daniel G.; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Tian, Liang; Murphy, Sean Jean-Loup; Lo, Jonathan; Lynd, Lee R.

    2015-09-15

    We report that Thermoanaerobacter saccharolyticum is a thermophilic microorganism that has been engineered to produce ethanol at high titer (30–70 g/L) and greater than 90 % theoretical yield. However, few genes involved in pyruvate to ethanol production pathway have been unambiguously identified. In T. saccharolyticum, the products of six putative pfor gene clusters and one pfl gene may be responsible for the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. To gain insights into the physiological roles of PFOR and PFL, we studied the effect of deletions of several genes thought to encode these activities. We found that that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase enzymemore » (PFOR) is encoded by the pforA gene and plays a key role in pyruvate dissimilation. We further demonstrated that pyruvate formate-lyase activity (PFL) is encoded by the pfl gene. Although the pfl gene is normally expressed at low levels, it is crucial for biosynthesis in T. saccharolyticum. In pforA deletion strains, pfl expression increased and was able to partially compensate for the loss of PFOR activity. Deletion of both pforA and pfl resulted in a strain that required acetate and formate for growth and produced lactate as the primary fermentation product, achieving 88 % theoretical lactate yield. PFOR encoded by Tsac_0046 and PFL encoded by Tsac_0628 are only two routes for converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in T. saccharolyticum. The physiological role of PFOR is pyruvate dissimilation, whereas that of PFL is supplying C1 units for biosynthesis.« less

  3. A second isoform of the ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase generated by an in-frame initiation of translation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean-Claude; Ughy, Bettina; Lagoutte, Bernard; Ajlani, Ghada

    2006-01-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductases (FNRs) constitute a family of flavoenzymes that catalyze the exchange of reducing equivalents between one-electron carriers and the two-electron-carrying NADP(H). The main role of FNRs in cyanobacteria and leaf plastids is to provide the NADPH for photoautotrophic metabolism. In root plastids, a distinct FNR isoform is found that has been postulated to function in the opposite direction, providing electrons for nitrogen assimilation at the expense of NADPH generated by heterotrophic metabolism. A multiple gene family encodes FNR isoenzymes in plants, whereas there is only one FNR gene (petH) in cyanobacteria. Nevertheless, we detected two FNR isoforms in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. One of them (FNRS ≈34 kDa) is similar in size to the plastid FNR and specifically accumulates under heterotrophic conditions, whereas the other one (FNRL ≈46 kDa) contains an extra N-terminal domain that allows its association with the phycobilisome. Site-directed mutants allowed us to conclude that the smaller isoform, FNRS, is produced from an internal ribosome entry site within the petH ORF. Thus we have uncovered a mechanism by which two isoforms are produced from a single gene, which is, to our knowledge, novel in photosynthetic bacteria. Our results strongly suggest that FNRL is an NADP+ reductase, whereas FNRS is an NADPH oxidase. PMID:17116880

  4. Specificity of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases, NAD(P)H: Quinone Oxidoreductase and Carbonyl Reductases to Redox-Cycle Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Diones and 4-Hydroxyequilenin-o-Quinone

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Carol A.; Quinn, Amy M.; Park, Jong-Heum; Harvey, Ronald G.; Bolton, Judy L; Maser, Edmund; Penning, Trevor M.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are suspect human lung carcinogens and can be metabolically activated to remote quinones, e.g. benzo[a]pyrene-1,6-dione (B[a]P-1,6-dione) and B[a]P-3,6-dione by the action of either P450 monooxygenase or peroxidases and to non-K region o-quinones by aldo-keto reductases (AKRs). B[a]P-7,8-dione also structurally resembles 4-hydroxyequilenin o-quinone. These three classes of quinones can redox cycle, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and produce the mutagenic lesion 8-oxo-dGuo, and may contribute to PAH- and estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. We compared the ability of a complete panel of human recombinant AKRs to catalyze reduction of PAH o-quinones in the phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene and anthracene series. The specific activities for NADPH-dependent quinone reduction were often 100-1,000 times greater than the ability of the same AKR isoform to oxidize the cognate PAH-trans-dihydrodiol. However, the AKR with the highest quinone reductase activity for a particular PAH o-quinone was not always identical to the AKR isoform with the highest dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity for the respective PAH-trans-dihydrodiol. Discrete AKRs also catalyzed the reduction of B[a]P-1,6-dione, B[a]P-3,6-dione and 4-hydroxyequilenin o-quinone. Concurrent measurements of oxygen consumption, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide formation established that ROS were produced as a result of the redox-cycling. When compared with human recombinant NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and carbonyl reductases (CBR1 and CBR3), NQO1 was a superior catalyst of these reactions followed by AKRs and lastly CBR1 and CBR3. In A549 cells two-electron reduction of PAH o-quinones causes intracellular ROS formation. ROS formation was unaffected by the addition of dicumarol suggesting that NQO1 is not responsible for the two-electron reduction observed and does not offer protection against ROS formation from PAH o-quinones. PMID:21910479

  5. The Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Oxidative Stress Markers following Global Brain Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Matsuda, Yoko; Suzuki, Go; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels in mouse brain were elevated from 1 h until 8 h after global brain ischemia for 14 min induced with the 3-vessel occlusion model; this result indicates that ischemia reperfusion injury generated oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species production was observed not only in the hippocampal region, but also in the cortical region. We further evaluated the neuroprotective effect of xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitors in the mouse 3-vessel occlusion model by analyzing changes in the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (including pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 and intercellular adhesion molecules-1). Administration of allopurinol resulted in a statistically significant decrease in IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression, whereas febuxostat had no significant effect on expression of these genes; nevertheless, both inhibitors effectively reduced serum uric acid concentration. It is suggested that the neuroprotective effect of allopurinol is derived not from inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by xanthine oxidoreductase, but rather from a direct free-radical-scavenging effect. PMID:26230326

  6. The Effects of Xanthine Oxidoreductase Inhibitors on Oxidative Stress Markers following Global Brain Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Matsuda, Yoko; Suzuki, Go; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels in mouse brain were elevated from 1 h until 8 h after global brain ischemia for 14 min induced with the 3-vessel occlusion model; this result indicates that ischemia reperfusion injury generated oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species production was observed not only in the hippocampal region, but also in the cortical region. We further evaluated the neuroprotective effect of xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitors in the mouse 3-vessel occlusion model by analyzing changes in the expression of genes regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (including pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 and intercellular adhesion molecules-1). Administration of allopurinol resulted in a statistically significant decrease in IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression, whereas febuxostat had no significant effect on expression of these genes; nevertheless, both inhibitors effectively reduced serum uric acid concentration. It is suggested that the neuroprotective effect of allopurinol is derived not from inhibition of reactive oxygen species production by xanthine oxidoreductase, but rather from a direct free-radical-scavenging effect. PMID:26230326

  7. Independently recruited oxidases from the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enabled chemical defences in leaf beetle larvae (subtribe Chrysomelina) to evolve

    PubMed Central

    Rahfeld, Peter; Kirsch, Roy; Kugel, Susann; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of the leaf beetle subtribe Chrysomelina sensu stricto repel their enemies by displaying glandular secretions that contain defensive compounds. These repellents can be produced either de novo (iridoids) or by using plant-derived precursors (e.g. salicylaldehyde). The autonomous production of iridoids, as in Phaedon cochleariae, is the ancestral chrysomeline chemical defence and predates the evolution of salicylaldehyde-based defence. Both biosynthesis strategies include an oxidative step of an alcohol intermediate. In salicylaldehyde-producing species, this step is catalysed by salicyl alcohol oxidases (SAOs) of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, but the enzyme oxidizing the iridoid precursor is unknown. Here, we show by in vitro as well as in vivo experiments that P. cochleariae also uses an oxidase from the GMC superfamily for defensive purposes. However, our phylogenetic analysis of chrysomeline GMC oxidoreductases revealed that the oxidase of the iridoid pathway originated from a GMC clade different from that of the SAOs. Thus, the evolution of a host-independent chemical defence followed by a shift to a host-dependent chemical defence in chrysomeline beetles coincided with the utilization of genes from different GMC subfamilies. These findings illustrate the importance of the GMC multi-gene family for adaptive processes in plant–insect interactions. PMID:24943369

  8. Similarity of Escherichia coli propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO product) and an unusual alcohol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T. ); Ingram, L.O. )

    1989-07-01

    The gene that encodes 1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase (fucO) from Escherichia coli was sequenced. The reading frame specified a protein of 383 amino acids (including the N-terminal methionine), with an aggregate molecular weight of 40,642. The induction of fucO transcription, which occurred in the presence of fucose, was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. In E. coli, the primary fucO transcript was approximately 2.1 kilobases in length. The 5{prime} end of the transcript began more than 0.7 kilobase upstream of the fucO start codon within or beyond the fucA gene. Propanediol oxidoreductase exhibited 41.7% identity with the iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase II from Zymomonas mobilis and 39.5% identity with ADH4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These three proteins did not share homology with either short-chain or long-chain zinc-containing alcohol dehydrogenase enzymes. We propose that these three unusual alcohol dehydrogenases define a new family of enzymes.

  9. Roles of the Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on Vibrio cholerae Metabolism, Motility and Osmotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Yusuke; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J.; Faulkner, Wyatt J.; Aagesen, Alisha M.; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F.; Häse, Claudia C.

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology. PMID:24811312

  10. Crystal structures of mammalian xanthine oxidoreductase bound with various inhibitors: allopurinol, febuxostat, and FYX-051.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi

    2008-02-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the reaction of hypoxanthine to xanthine and of xanthine to uric acid. Inhibitors of XOR can thus decrease the concentration of uric acid in serum. Crystal structures of XOR bound with various inhibitors reveal that inhibitors can be categorized into three types, i.e. mechanism-based, structure-based, and hybrid types. PMID:18360072

  11. Differential regulation of duplicate light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Ford, Christopher J.; Miller, James S.; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Ianora, Adrianna

    2016-07-01

    Diatoms (Bacilliariophyceae) encode two light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (POR1 and POR2) that catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll biosynthesis in the light. Algae live in dynamic environments whose changing light levels induce photoacclimative metabolic shifts, including altered cellular chlorophyll levels. We hypothesized that the two POR proteins may be differentially adaptive under varying light conditions. Using the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a test system, differences in POR protein abundance and por gene expression were examined when this organism was grown on an alternating light:dark cycles at different irradiances; exposed to continuous light; and challenged by a significant decrease in light availability.more » As a result, for cultures maintained on a 12h light: 12h dark photoperiod at 200μEm–2 s–1 (200L/D), both por genes were up-regulated during the light and down-regulated in the dark, though por1 transcript abundance rose and fell earlier than that of por2. Little concordance occurred between por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance. In contrast, por2 mRNA and POR2 protein abundances followed similar diurnal patterns. When 200L/D P. tricornutum cultures were transferred to continuous light (200L/L), the diurnal regulatory pattern of por1 mRNA abundance but not of por2 was disrupted, and POR1 but not POR2 protein abundance dropped steeply. Under 1200μEm–2 s–1 (1200L/D), both por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance displayed diurnal oscillations. A compromised diel por2 mRNA response under 1200L/D did not impact the oscillation in POR2 abundance. When cells grown at 1200L/D were then shifted to 50μEm–2 s–1 (50L/D), por1 and por2 mRNA levels decreased swiftly but briefly upon light reduction. Thereafter, POR1 but not POR2 protein levels rose significantly in response to this light stepdown.« less

  12. Differential Regulation of Duplicate Light-Dependent Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductases in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background Diatoms (Bacilliariophyceae) encode two light-dependent protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (POR1 and POR2) that catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll biosynthesis in the light. Algae live in dynamic environments whose changing light levels induce photoacclimative metabolic shifts, including altered cellular chlorophyll levels. We hypothesized that the two POR proteins may be differentially adaptive under varying light conditions. Using the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a test system, differences in POR protein abundance and por gene expression were examined when this organism was grown on an alternating light:dark cycles at different irradiances; exposed to continuous light; and challenged by a significant decrease in light availability. Results For cultures maintained on a 12h light: 12h dark photoperiod at 200μE m−2 s−1 (200L/D), both por genes were up-regulated during the light and down-regulated in the dark, though por1 transcript abundance rose and fell earlier than that of por2. Little concordance occurred between por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance. In contrast, por2 mRNA and POR2 protein abundances followed similar diurnal patterns. When 200L/D P. tricornutum cultures were transferred to continuous light (200L/L), the diurnal regulatory pattern of por1 mRNA abundance but not of por2 was disrupted, and POR1 but not POR2 protein abundance dropped steeply. Under 1200μE m−2 s−1 (1200L/D), both por1 mRNA and POR1 protein abundance displayed diurnal oscillations. A compromised diel por2 mRNA response under 1200L/D did not impact the oscillation in POR2 abundance. When cells grown at 1200L/D were then shifted to 50μE m−2 s−1 (50L/D), por1 and por2 mRNA levels decreased swiftly but briefly upon light reduction. Thereafter, POR1 but not POR2 protein levels rose significantly in response to this light stepdown. Conclusion Given the sensitivity of diatom por1/POR1 to real-time light cues and adherence of por2/POR2 regulation to

  13. Preliminary crystallographic data of the three homologues of the thiol–disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Lafaye, Céline; Iwena, Thomas; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Kroll, J. Simon; Griat, Mickael; Serre, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial virulence depends on the correct folding of surface-exposed proteins, a process that is catalyzed by the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA, which facilitates the synthesis of disulfide bonds in Gram-negative bacteria. Uniquely among bacteria, the Neisseria meningitidis genome possesses three genes encoding active DsbAs: DsbA1, DsbA2 and DsbA3. DsbA1 and DsbA2 have been characterized as lipoproteins involved in natural competence and in host-interactive biology, while the function of DsbA3 remains unknown. In an attempt to shed light on the reason for this multiplicity of dsbA genes, the three enzymes from N. meningitidis have been purified and crystallized in the presence of high concentrations of ammonium sulfate. The best crystals were obtained using DsbA1 and DsbA3; they belong to the orthorhombic and tetragonal systems and diffract to 1.5 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively. PMID:18259062

  14. Preliminary crystallographic data of the three homologues of the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Lafaye, Céline; Iwema, Thomas; Iwena, Thomas; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Kroll, J Simon; Griat, Mickael; Serre, Laurence

    2008-02-01

    Bacterial virulence depends on the correct folding of surface-exposed proteins, a process that is catalyzed by the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA, which facilitates the synthesis of disulfide bonds in Gram-negative bacteria. Uniquely among bacteria, the Neisseria meningitidis genome possesses three genes encoding active DsbAs: DsbA1, DsbA2 and DsbA3. DsbA1 and DsbA2 have been characterized as lipoproteins involved in natural competence and in host-interactive biology, while the function of DsbA3 remains unknown. In an attempt to shed light on the reason for this multiplicity of dsbA genes, the three enzymes from N. meningitidis have been purified and crystallized in the presence of high concentrations of ammonium sulfate. The best crystals were obtained using DsbA1 and DsbA3; they belong to the orthorhombic and tetragonal systems and diffract to 1.5 and 2.7 A resolution, respectively. PMID:18259062

  15. Involvement of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase in sulfur oxidation of an acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans NASF-1.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Satoshi; Kikumoto, Mei; Kanao, Tadayoshi; Kamimura, Kazuo

    2004-12-01

    The effects of cyanide, azide, and 2-n-Heptyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) on the oxidation of ferrous ion or elemental sulfur with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans NASF-1 cells grown in iron- or sulfur-medium were examined. The iron oxidation of both iron- and sulfur-grown cells was strongly inhibited by cyanide and azide, but not by HQNO. Sulfur oxidation was relatively resistant to cyanide and azide, and inhibited by HQNO. Higher sulfide oxidation, ubiquinol dehydrogenase activity, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) activity were observed in sulfur-grown cells more than in iron-grown cells. Sulfide oxidation in the presence of ubiquinone with the membrane fraction was inhibited by HQNO, but not by cyanide, azide, antimycin A, and myxothiazol. The transcription of three genes, encoding an aa(3)-type cytochrome c oxidase (coxB), a bd-type ubiquinol oxidase (cydA), and an sqr, were measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The transcriptional levels of coxB and cydA genes were similar in sulfur- and iron-grown cells, but that of sqr was 3-fold higher in sulfur-grown cells than in iron-grown cells. A model is proposed for the oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds in A. ferrooxidans NASF-1 cells. PMID:15618623

  16. Role for Ferredoxin:NAD(P)H Oxidoreductase (FprA) in Sulfate Assimilation and Siderophore Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Glassing, Angela; Harper, Justin; Franklin, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylate) (PDTC), produced by certain pseudomonads, is a sulfur-containing siderophore that binds iron, as well as a wide range of transition metals, and it affects the net hydrolysis of the environmental contaminant carbon tetrachloride. The pathway of PDTC biosynthesis has not been defined. Here, we performed a transposon screen of Pseudomonas putida DSM 3601 to identify genes necessary for PDTC production (Pdt phenotype). Transposon insertions within genes for sulfate assimilation (cysD, cysNC, and cysG [cobA2]) dominated the collection of Pdt mutations. In addition, two insertions were within the gene for the LysR-type transcriptional activator FinR (PP1637). Phenotypic characterization indicated that finR mutants were cysteine bradytrophs. The Pdt phenotype of finR mutants could be complemented by the known target of FinR regulation, fprA (encoding ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase), or by Escherichia coli cysJI (encoding sulfite reductase). These data indicate that fprA is necessary for effective sulfate assimilation by P. putida and that the effect of finR mutation on PDTC production was due to deficient expression of fprA and sulfite reduction. fprA expression in both P. putida and P. aeruginosa was found to be regulated by FinR, but in a manner dependent upon reduced sulfur sources, implicating FinR in sulfur regulatory physiology. The genes and phenotypes identified in this study indicated a strong dependence upon intracellular reduced sulfur/cysteine for PDTC biosynthesis and that pseudomonads utilize sulfite reduction enzymology distinct from that of E. coli and possibly similar to that of chloroplasts and other proteobacteria. PMID:23794620

  17. NqrM (DUF539) Protein Is Required for Maturation of Bacterial Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Kostyrko, Vitaly A.; Bertsova, Yulia V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Baykov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in the bacterial respiratory chain, coupled with Na+ translocation across the membrane. Na+-NQR maturation involves covalent attachment of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues, catalyzed by flavin transferase encoded by the nqr-associated apbE gene. Analysis of complete bacterial genomes has revealed another putative gene (duf539, here renamed nqrM) that usually follows the apbE gene and is present only in Na+-NQR-containing bacteria. Expression of the Vibrio harveyi nqr operon alone or with the associated apbE gene in Escherichia coli, which lacks its own Na+-NQR, resulted in an enzyme incapable of Na+-dependent NADH or reduced nicotinamide hypoxanthine dinucleotide (dNADH) oxidation. However, fully functional Na+-NQR was restored when these genes were coexpressed with the V. harveyi nqrM gene. Furthermore, nqrM lesions in Klebsiella pneumoniae and V. harveyi prevented production of functional Na+-NQR, which could be recovered by an nqrM-containing plasmid. The Na+-NQR complex isolated from the nqrM-deficient strain of V. harveyi lacks several subunits, indicating that nqrM is necessary for Na+-NQR assembly. The protein product of the nqrM gene, NqrM, contains a single putative transmembrane α-helix and four conserved Cys residues. Mutating one of these residues (Cys33 in V. harveyi NqrM) to Ser completely prevented Na+-NQR maturation, whereas mutating any other Cys residue only decreased the yield of the mature protein. These findings identify NqrM as the second specific maturation factor of Na+-NQR in proteobacteria, which is presumably involved in the delivery of Fe to form the (Cys)4[Fe] center between subunits NqrD and NqrE. IMPORTANCE Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (Na+-NQR) is a unique primary Na+ pump believed to enhance the vitality of many bacteria, including important pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio

  18. Plant science. Morphinan biosynthesis in opium poppy requires a P450-oxidoreductase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Winzer, Thilo; Kern, Marcelo; King, Andrew J; Larson, Tony R; Teodor, Roxana I; Donninger, Samantha L; Li, Yi; Dowle, Adam A; Cartwright, Jared; Bates, Rachel; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry; Walker, Carol; Bowser, Tim A; Graham, Ian A

    2015-07-17

    Morphinan alkaloids from the opium poppy are used for pain relief. The direction of metabolites to morphinan biosynthesis requires isomerization of (S)- to (R)-reticuline. Characterization of high-reticuline poppy mutants revealed a genetic locus, designated STORR [(S)- to (R)-reticuline] that encodes both cytochrome P450 and oxidoreductase modules, the latter belonging to the aldo-keto reductase family. Metabolite analysis of mutant alleles and heterologous expression demonstrate that the P450 module is responsible for the conversion of (S)-reticuline to 1,2-dehydroreticuline, whereas the oxidoreductase module converts 1,2-dehydroreticuline to (R)-reticuline rather than functioning as a P450 redox partner. Proteomic analysis confirmed that these two modules are contained on a single polypeptide in vivo. This modular assembly implies a selection pressure favoring substrate channeling. The fusion protein STORR may enable microbial-based morphinan production. PMID:26113639

  19. Quinone reduction by Rhodothermus marinus succinate:menaquinone oxidoreductase is not stimulated by the membrane potential

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, Andreia S.; Konstantinov, Alexander A.; Teixeira, Miguel; Pereira, Manuela M. . E-mail: mpereira@itqb.unl.pt

    2005-05-06

    Succinate:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), a di-haem enzyme purified from Rhodothermus marinus, reveals an HQNO-sensitive succinate:quinone oxidoreductase activity with several menaquinone analogues as electron acceptors that decreases with lowering the redox midpoint potential of the quinones. A turnover with the low-potential 2,3-dimethyl-1,4-naphthoquinone that is the closest analogue of menaquinone, although low, can be detected in liposome-reconstituted SQR. Reduction of the quinone is not stimulated by an imposed K{sup +}-diffusion membrane potential of a physiological sign (positive inside the vesicles). Nor does the imposed membrane potential increase the reduction level of the haems in R. marinus SQR poised with the succinate/fumarate redox couple. The data do not support a widely discussed hypothesis on the electrogenic transmembrane electron transfer from succinate to menaquinone catalysed by di-haem SQRs. The role of the membrane potential in regulation of the SQR activity is discussed.

  20. Role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in voltage generation and Na(+) extrusion in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vorburger, Thomas; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Brosig, Alexander; Bok, Eva; Schunke, Emina; Steffen, Wojtek; Mayer, Sonja; Götz, Friedrich; Möller, Heiko M; Steuber, Julia

    2016-04-01

    For Vibrio cholerae, the coordinated import and export of Na(+) is crucial for adaptation to habitats with different osmolarities. We investigated the Na(+)-extruding branch of the sodium cycle in this human pathogen by in vivo (23)Na-NMR spectroscopy. The Na(+) extrusion activity of cells was monitored after adding glucose which stimulated respiration via the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR). In a V. cholerae deletion mutant devoid of the Na(+)-NQR encoding genes (nqrA-F), rates of respiratory Na(+) extrusion were decreased by a factor of four, but the cytoplasmic Na(+) concentration was essentially unchanged. Furthermore, the mutant was impaired in formation of transmembrane voltage (ΔΨ, inside negative) and did not grow under hypoosmotic conditions at pH8.2 or above. This growth defect could be complemented by transformation with the plasmid encoded nqr operon. In an alkaline environment, Na(+)/H(+) antiporters acidify the cytoplasm at the expense of the transmembrane voltage. It is proposed that, at alkaline pH and limiting Na(+) concentrations, the Na(+)-NQR is crucial for generation of a transmembrane voltage to drive the import of H(+) by electrogenic Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. Our study provides the basis to understand the role of the Na(+)-NQR in pathogenicity of V. cholerae and other pathogens relying on this primary Na(+) pump for respiration. PMID:26721205

  1. ArxA, a new clade of arsenite oxidase within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum oxidoreductases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zargar, Kamrun; Conrad, Alison; Bernick, David L.; Lowe, Todd M.; Stolc, Viktor; Hoeft, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2012-01-01

    Arsenotrophy, growth coupled to autotrophic arsenite oxidation or arsenate respiratory reduction, occurs only in the prokaryotic domain of life. The enzymes responsible for arsenotrophy belong to distinct clades within the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum-containing oxidoreductases: specifically arsenate respiratory reductase, ArrA, and arsenite oxidase, AioA (formerly referred to as AroA and AoxB). A new arsenite oxidase clade, ArxA, represented by the haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1 was also identified in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira sp. strain PHS-1. A draft genome sequence of PHS-1 was completed and an arx operon similar to MLHE-1 was identified. Gene expression studies showed that arxA was strongly induced with arsenite. Microbial ecology investigation led to the identification of additional arxA-like sequences in Mono Lake and Hot Creek sediments, both arsenic-rich environments in California. Phylogenetic analyses placed these sequences as distinct members of the ArxA clade of arsenite oxidases. ArxA-like sequences were also identified in metagenome sequences of several alkaline microbial mat environments of Yellowstone National Park hot springs. These results suggest that ArxA-type arsenite oxidases appear to be widely distributed in the environment presenting an opportunity for further investigations of the contribution of Arx-dependent arsenotrophy to the arsenic biogeochemical cycle.

  2. NxrB encoding the beta subunit of nitrite oxidoreductase as functional and phylogenetic marker for nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira.

    PubMed

    Pester, Michael; Maixner, Frank; Berry, David; Rattei, Thomas; Koch, Hanna; Lücker, Sebastian; Nowka, Boris; Richter, Andreas; Spieck, Eva; Lebedeva, Elena; Loy, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-10-01

    Nitrospira are the most widespread and diverse known nitrite-oxidizing bacteria and key nitrifiers in natural and engineered ecosystems. Nevertheless, their ecophysiology and environmental distribution are understudied because of the recalcitrance of Nitrospira to cultivation and the lack of a molecular functional marker, which would allow the detection of Nitrospira in the environment. Here we introduce nxrB, the gene encoding subunit beta of nitrite oxidoreductase, as a functional and phylogenetic marker for Nitrospira. Phylogenetic trees based on nxrB of Nitrospira were largely congruent to 16S ribosomal RNA-based phylogenies. By using new nxrB-selective polymerase chain reaction primers, we obtained almost full-length nxrB sequences from Nitrospira cultures, two activated sludge samples, and several geographically and climatically distinct soils. Amplicon pyrosequencing of nxrB fragments from 16 soils revealed a previously unrecognized diversity of terrestrial Nitrospira with 1801 detected species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (using an inferred species threshold of 95% nxrB identity). Richness estimates ranged from 10 to 946 coexisting Nitrospira species per soil. Comparison with an archaeal amoA dataset obtained from the same soils [Environ. Microbiol. 14: 525-539 (2012)] uncovered that ammonia-oxidizing archaea and Nitrospira communities were highly correlated across the soil samples, possibly indicating shared habitat preferences or specific biological interactions among members of these nitrifier groups. PMID:24118804

  3. Biochemical and structural study of the homologues of the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Lafaye, Céline; Iwema, Thomas; Carpentier, Philippe; Jullian-Binard, Céline; Kroll, J Simon; Collet, Jean-François; Serre, Laurence

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial virulence depends on the correct folding of surface-exposed proteins, a process catalyzed by the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA, which facilitates the synthesis of disulfide bonds in Gram-negative bacteria. The Neisseria meningitidis genome possesses three genes encoding active DsbAs: DsbA1, DsbA2 and DsbA3. DsbA1 and DsbA2 have been characterized as lipoproteins involved in natural competence and in host interactive biology, while the function of DsbA3 remains unknown. This work reports the biochemical characterization of the three neisserial enzymes and the crystal structures of DsbA1 and DsbA3. As predicted by sequence homology, both enzymes adopt the classic Escherichia coli DsbA fold. The most striking feature shared by all three proteins is their exceptional oxidizing power. With a redox potential of -80 mV, the neisserial DsbAs are the most oxidizing thioredoxin-like enzymes known to date. Consistent with these findings, thermal studies indicate that their reduced form is also extremely stable. For each of these enzymes, this study shows that a threonine residue found within the active-site region plays a key role in dictating this extraordinary oxidizing power. This result highlights how residues located outside the CXXC motif may influence the redox potential of members of the thioredoxin family. PMID:19631659

  4. Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants overexpressing chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase of Blastochloris viridis elucidate functions of enzymes in late bacteriochlorophyll biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Harada, Jiro; Nomata, Jiro; Yamamoto, Haruki; Fujita, Yuichi; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductases (CORs) from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-producing Rhodobacter species and BChl b-producing Blastochloris viridis show distinct substrate recognition and different catalytic hydrogenation reactions, and that these two types of CORs therefore cause committed steps for BChls a and b biosynthesis. In this study, COR genes from B. viridis were incorporated and overexpressed in a series of Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutants. We found that the following two factors are essential in making R. sphaeroides produce BChl b: the loss of functions of both intrinsic COR and 8-vinyl reductase (BciA) in the host R. sphaeroides strain; and expression of the BchYZ catalytic components of COR from B. viridis, not the complete set of COR (BchXYZ), in the host strain. In addition, we incorporated bchYZ of B. viridis into the R. sphaeroides mutant lacking BchJ and BciA, resulting in the strain accumulating both BChl a and BChl b. This is the first example of an anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium producing BChls a and b together. The results suggest that BchJ enhances activity of the intrinsic COR. The physiological significance of BchJ in pigment biosynthetic pathways will be discussed. PMID:25978726

  5. Xanthine oxidoreductase in cancer: more than a differentiation marker.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Human xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the last two steps of purine catabolism and is present in two interconvertible forms, which may utilize O2 or NAD(+) as electron acceptors. In addition to uric acid, XOR products may comprise reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that have many biologic effects, including inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and cytotoxicity, as well as mutagenesis and induction of proliferation. XOR is strictly modulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, and its expression and activity are highly variable in cancer. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) expression has been negatively associated with a high malignity grade and a worse prognosis in neoplasms of the breast, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and kidney, which normally express a high level of XOR protein. However, the level of XOR expression may be associated with a worse outcome in cancer of low XOR-expressing cells, in relation to the inflammatory response elicited through the tissue damage induced by tumor growth. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been implicated in the process of oncogenesis either directly because it is able to catalyze the metabolic activation of carcinogenic substances or indirectly through the action of XOR-derived reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The role of uric acid is characterized by both oxidant and antioxidant action; thus, it is still debatable whether control of uricemia may be helpful to improve the outcomes of tumor illness. PMID:26687331

  6. Bioelectrocatalysts: engineered oxidoreductase system for utilization of fumarate reductase in chemical synthesis, detection, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Doo Hyun; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    2003-10-01

    Fumarate reductase was used as a model oxidoreductase to demonstrate continuous electrical cofactor reduction-oxidation during the bioelectrochemical synthesis and detection of chemicals. The enzyme preparation was immobilized onto a graphite felt electrode that was modified with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), neutral red, and fumarate reductase (which contained menaquinone) were covalently linked by peptide bonds to the CMC. The electron mediator neutral red allowed NAD and menaquinone to be recycled electrically during enzymatic chemical synthesis. Succinate detection by the bioelectrocatalyst was linear from 5 microM to 10 mM succinate. Fumarate synthesis using this bioelectrode was dependent on succinate utilization and resulted in proportional production of electricity and fumarate. Succinate synthesis using this bioelectrocatalyst was dependent on current and fumarate concentration. This bioelectrocatalyst system may enhance the utility of menaquinone- and/or pyridine nucleotide-linked oxidoreductases in diverse enzymatic fuel cells and sensors. It may also enhance the utility of oxidoreductase-based chemical synthesis systems because it eliminates the problem of cofactor recycling. PMID:14566068

  7. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a ferredoxin/flavodoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductase (Bc0385) from Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Skråmo, Silje; Hersleth, Hans-Petter; Hammerstad, Marta; Andersson, K. Kristoffer; Røhr, Åsmund K.

    2014-01-01

    Ferredoxin/flavodoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductases (FNRs) are key enzymes involved in catalysing electron transfer between ferredoxins/flavodoxins and NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+. In Bacillus cereus there are three genes that may encode FNRs, and the Bc0385 FNR has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and successfully crystallized in its NADPH/NADP+-free form. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.5 Å resolution from crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 57.2, b = 164.3, c = 95.0 Å, containing two FNR molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of the Bc0385 FNR has been solved by molecular replacement, and is a member of the homodimeric thioredoxin reductase-like class of FNRs. PMID:24915092

  8. Production of the Streptomyces scabies coronafacoyl phytotoxins involves a novel biosynthetic pathway with an F420 -dependent oxidoreductase and a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase.

    PubMed

    Bown, Luke; Altowairish, Mead S; Fyans, Joanna K; Bignell, Dawn R D

    2016-07-01

    Coronafacoyl phytotoxins are secondary metabolites that are produced by various phytopathogenic bacteria, including several pathovars of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae as well as the Gram-positive potato scab pathogen Streptomyces scabies. The phytotoxins are composed of the polyketide coronafacic acid (CFA) linked via an amide bond to amino acids or amino acid derivatives, and their biosynthesis involves the cfa and cfa-like gene clusters that are found in P. syringae and S. scabies, respectively. The S. scabies cfa-like gene cluster was previously reported to contain several genes that are absent from the P. syringae cfa gene cluster, including one (oxr) encoding a putative F420 -dependent oxidoreductase, and another (sdr) encoding a predicted short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Using gene deletion analysis, we demonstrated that both oxr and sdr are required for normal production of the S. scabies coronafacoyl phytotoxins, and structural analysis of metabolites that accumulated in the Δsdr mutant cultures revealed that Sdr is directly involved in the biosynthesis of the CFA moiety. Our results suggest that S. scabies and P. syringae use distinct biosynthetic pathways for producing coronafacoyl phytotoxins, which are important mediators of host-pathogen interactions in various plant pathosystems. PMID:26991928

  9. The effects of lipid phase transitions on the interaction of mitochondrial NADH--ubiquinone oxidoreductase with ubiquinol--cytochrome c oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Heron, C; Gore, M G; Ragan, C I

    1979-01-01

    1. The endogenous phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine of Complexes I and III from bovine heart mitochondria may be completely replaced with 1,2-ditetradecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine with at least partial retention of activity. 2. The lipid-replaced enzymes associate in 1:1 molar ratio to give a Complex I--III unit catalysing NADH-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity. 3. On increasing the concentration of ubiquinone-10 and the synthetic phospholipid, the lipid-replaced Complexes appear to operate independently of each other as in the natural membrane. Thus the lipid-replaced enzymes associate in exactly the same ways as the enzymes containing natural phospholipids. 4. Arrhenius plots of NADH--cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity reconstituted from lipid-replaced Complexes I and III exhibit changes in slope at 24 degrees C. When the concentrations of phospholipid and ubiquinone-10 are increased, the Arrhenius plots show discontinuities at 24 degrees C as well as changes in slope. 5. The kinetics of cytochrome b reduction by NADH were measured in mixtures containing 2 mol of Complex III/mol of Complex I. When the enzymes contained natural phospholipids. the reduction kinetics were biphasic. When the enzymes had been supplemented with further phospholipid and ubiquinone-10 the kinetics were monophasic. When lipid-replaced enzymes were supplemented with 1,2-ditetradecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and ubiquinone-10, reduction of cytochrome b was monophasic above the phase-transition temperature of the lipid but biphasic below it. 6. These findings are interpreted in terms of the model for the interaction of Complexes in the natural membrane proposed by Heron, Ragan & Trum-power [(1978) Biochem. J. 174, 791--800]. PMID:220964

  10. A Structure-Based Approach for Detection of Thiol Oxidoreductases and Their Catalytic Redox-Active Cysteine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Stefano M.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine (Cys) residues often play critical roles in proteins, for example, in the formation of structural disulfide bonds, metal binding, targeting proteins to the membranes, and various catalytic functions. However, the structural determinants for various Cys functions are not clear. Thiol oxidoreductases, which are enzymes containing catalytic redox-active Cys residues, have been extensively studied, but even for these proteins there is little understanding of what distinguishes their catalytic redox Cys from other Cys functions. Herein, we characterized thiol oxidoreductases at a structural level and developed an algorithm that can recognize these enzymes by (i) analyzing amino acid and secondary structure composition of the active site and its similarity to known active sites containing redox Cys and (ii) calculating accessibility, active site location, and reactivity of Cys. For proteins with known or modeled structures, this method can identify proteins with catalytic Cys residues and distinguish thiol oxidoreductases from the enzymes containing other catalytic Cys types. Furthermore, by applying this procedure to Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins containing conserved Cys, we could identify the majority of known yeast thiol oxidoreductases. This study provides insights into the structural properties of catalytic redox-active Cys and should further help to recognize thiol oxidoreductases in protein sequence and structure databases. PMID:19424433

  11. Functional and phylogenetic analysis of the Aspergillus ochraceoroseus aflQ (ordA) gene ortholog

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Within the Aspergillus parasiticus and A. flavus aflatoxin (AF) biosynthetic gene cluster the aflQ (ordA) and aflP (omtA) genes encode an oxidoreductase and methyltransferase, respectively. These genes are required for the final steps in the conversion of sterigmatocystin (ST) to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1...

  12. Soluble expression and purification of the oxidoreductase component of toluene 4-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Lucas J; Elsen, Nathaniel L; Pierce, Brad S; Fox, Brian G

    2008-01-01

    Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases, an enzyme family that utilizes a soluble diiron hydroxylase to oxidize a variety of hydrocarbons as the initial step in their metabolism. The hydroxylases obtain reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H via an electron transfer chain that is initiated by an oxidoreductase containing an N-terminal ferredoxin domain and C-terminal flavin- and NAD-binding domains. T4moF, the NADH oxidoreductase of T4MO, was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) from the pUC-derived expression vector pRS205. This vector contains a lac promoter instead of a T7 promoter. A three step purification from the soluble cell lysate yielded approximately 1 mg of T4moF per gram of wet cell paste with greater than 90% purity. The purified protein contained 1 mol of FAD and 2 mol of Fe per mol of T4moF; quantitative EPR spectroscopy showed approximately 1 mol of the S=1/2 signal from the reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster per mol of T4moF. Steady state kinetic analysis of p-cresol formation activity treating T4moF as the variable substrate while all other proteins and substrates were held constant gave apparent K(M-) and apparent k(cat)-values of 0.15 microM and 3.0 s(-1), respectively. This expression system and purification allows for the recovery of the soluble oxidoreductase in yields that facilitate further biochemical and structural characterizations. PMID:17964805

  13. Identification of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases A and B: a branched pathway for light-dependent chlorophyll biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, G A; Runge, S; Frick, G; Sperling, U; Apel, K

    1995-01-01

    Illumination releases the arrest in chlorophyll (Chl) biosynthesis in etiolated angiosperm seedlings through the enzymatic photoreduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) to chlorophyllide (Chlide), the first light-dependent step in chloroplast biogenesis. NADPH: Pchlide oxidoreductase (POR, EC 1.3.1.33), a nuclear-encoded plastid-localized enzyme, mediates this unique photoreduction. Paradoxically, light also triggers a drastic decrease in the amounts of POR activity and protein before the Chl accumulation rate reaches its maximum during greening. While investigating this seeming contradiction, we identified two distinct Arabidopsis thaliana genes encoding POR, in contrast to previous reports of only one gene in angiosperms. The genes, designated PorA and PorB, by analogy to the principal members of the phytochrome photoreceptor gene family, display dramatically different patterns of light and developmental regulation. PorA mRNA disappears within the first 4 h of greening, whereas PorB mRNA persists even after 16 h of illumination, mirroring the behavior of two distinct POR protein species. Experiments designed to help define the functions of POR A and POR B demonstrate exclusive expression of PorA in young seedlings and of PorB both in seedlings and in adult plants. Accordingly, we propose the existence of a branched light-dependent Chl biosynthesis pathway in which POR A performs a specialized function restricted to the initial stages of greening and POR B maintains Chl levels throughout angiosperm development. PMID:7659751

  14. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a Single Player Disulfide-Bond Oxidoreductase System to Manage Disulfide Bond Formation and Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z.; Day, Shandra R.; Mills, Brandy W.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared to E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2. PMID:25534767

  15. Interplay Between the Oxidoreductase PDIA6 and microRNA-322 Controls the Response to Disrupted Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Groenendyk, Jody; Peng, Zhenling; Dudek, Elzbieta; Fan, Xiao; Mizianty, Marcin J.; Dufey, Estefanie; Urra, Hery; Sepulveda, Denisse; Rojas-Rivera, Diego; Lim, Yunki; Kim, Do Han; Baretta, Kayla; Srikanth, Sonal; Gwack, Yousang; Ahnn, Joohong; Kaufman, Randal J.; Lee, Sun-Kyung; Hetz, Claudio; Kurgan, Lukasz; Michalak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of the energy or nutrient balance triggers endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a process that mobilizes various strategies, collectively called the unfolded protein response (UPR), which reestablish homeostasis of the ER and cell. Activation of the UPR stress sensor IRE1α (inositol-requiring enzyme 1α) stimulates its endoribonuclease activity, leading to the generation of the mRNA encoding the transcription factor XBP1 (X-box binding protein 1), which regulates the transcription of genes encoding factors involved in controlling the quality and folding of proteins. We found that the activity of IRE1α was regulated by the ER oxidoreductase PDIA6 (protein disulfide isomerase A6) and the microRNA miR-322 in response to disruption of ER Ca2+ homeostasis. PDIA6 interacted with IRE1α and enhanced IRE1α activity as monitored by phosphorylation of IRE1α and XBP1 mRNA splicing, but PDIA6 did not substantially affect the activity of other pathways that mediate responses to ER stress. ER Ca2+ depletion and activation of store operated Ca2+ entry reduced the abundance of the microRNA miR-322, which increased PDIA6 mRNA stability and consequently IRE1α activity during the ER stress response. In vivo experiments with mice and worms showed that the induction of ER stress correlated with decreased miR-322 abundance, increased PDIA6 mRNA abundance, or both. Together these findings demonstrated that ER Ca2+, PDIA6, IRE1α, and miR-322 function in a dynamic feedback loop modulating the UPR under conditions of disrupted ER Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:24917591

  16. Selenoprotein T Exerts an Essential Oxidoreductase Activity That Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boukhzar, Loubna; Hamieh, Abdallah; Cartier, Dorthe; Tanguy, Yannick; Alsharif, Ifat; Castex, Matthieu; Arabo, Arnaud; Hajji, Sana El; Bonnet, Jean-Jacques; Errami, Mohammed; Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Lihrmann, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidative stress is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the mechanisms involved in the control of this stress in dopaminergic cells are not fully understood. There is increasing evidence that selenoproteins play a central role in the control of redox homeostasis and cell defense, but the precise contribution of members of this family of proteins during the course of neurodegenerative diseases is still elusive. Results: We demonstrated first that selenoprotein T (SelT) whose gene disruption is lethal during embryogenesis, exerts a potent oxidoreductase activity. In the SH-SY5Y cell model of dopaminergic neurons, both silencing and overexpression of SelT affected oxidative stress and cell survival. Treatment with PD-inducing neurotoxins such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or rotenone triggered SelT expression in the nigrostriatal pathway of wild-type mice, but provoked rapid and severe parkinsonian-like motor defects in conditional brain SelT-deficient mice. This motor impairment was associated with marked oxidative stress and neurodegeneration and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal system. Finally, in PD patients, we report that SelT is tremendously increased in the caudate putamen tissue. Innovation: These results reveal the activity of a novel selenoprotein enzyme that protects dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and prevents early and severe movement impairment in animal models of PD. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that selenoproteins such as SelT play a crucial role in the protection of dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and cell death, providing insight into the molecular underpinnings of this stress in PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 557–574. PMID:26866473

  17. Tenebrionid secretions and a fungal benzoquinone oxidoreductase form competing components of an arms race between a host and pathogen.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Nicolás; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Huarte-Bonnet, Carla; Fan, Yanhua; Juárez, M Patricia; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2015-07-14

    Entomopathogenic fungi and their insect hosts represent a model system for examining invertebrate-pathogen coevolutionary selection processes. Here we report the characterization of competing components of an arms race consisting of insect protective antimicrobial compounds and evolving fungal mechanisms of detoxification. The insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana has a remarkably wide host range; however, some insects are resistant to fungal infection. Among resistant insects is the tenebrionid beetle Tribolium castaneum that produces benzoquinone-containing defensive secretions. Reduced fungal germination and growth was seen in media containing T. castaneum dichloromethane extracts or synthetic benzoquinone. In response to benzoquinone exposure, the fungus expresses a 1,4-benzoquinone oxidoreductase, BbbqrA, induced >40-fold. Gene knockout mutants (ΔBbbqrA) showed increased growth inhibition, whereas B. bassiana overexpressing BbbqrA (Bb::BbbqrA(O)) displayed increased resistance to benzoquinone compared with wild type. Increased benzoquinone reductase activity was detected in wild-type cells exposed to benzoquinone and in the overexpression strain. Heterologous expression and purification of BbBqrA in Escherichia coli confirmed NAD(P)H-dependent benzoquinone reductase activity. The ΔBbbqrA strain showed decreased virulence toward T. castaneum, whereas overexpression of BbbqrA increased mortality versus T. castaneum. No change in virulence was seen for the ΔBbbqrA or Bb::BbbqrA(O) strains when tested against the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella or the beetle Sitophilus oryzae, neither of which produce significant amounts of cuticular quinones. The observation that artificial overexpression of BbbqrA results in increased virulence only toward quinone-secreting insects implies the lack of strong selection or current failure of B. bassiana to counteradapt to this particular host defense throughout evolution. PMID:26056261

  18. Simultaneous Involvement of a Tungsten-Containing Aldehyde:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase and a Phenylacetaldehyde Dehydrogenase in Anaerobic Phenylalanine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Debnar-Daumler, Carlotta; Seubert, Andreas; Schmitt, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic phenylalanine metabolism in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum is initiated by conversion of phenylalanine to phenylacetate, which is further metabolized via benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA). The formation of phenylacetate is catalyzed by phenylalanine transaminase, phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, and a phenylacetaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme. The presence of these enzymes was detected in extracts of cells grown with phenylalanine and nitrate. We found that two distinct enzymes are involved in the oxidation of phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetate, an aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and a phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase (PDH). Based on sequence comparison, growth studies with various tungstate concentrations, and metal analysis of the enriched enzyme, AOR was shown to be a tungsten-containing enzyme, necessitating specific cofactor biosynthetic pathways for molybdenum- and tungsten-dependent enzymes simultaneously. We predict from the genome sequence that most enzymes of molybdopterin biosynthesis are shared, while the molybdate/tungstate uptake systems are duplicated and specialized paralogs of the sulfur-inserting MoaD and the metal-inserting MoeA proteins seem to be involved in dedicating biosynthesis toward molybdenum or tungsten cofactors. We also characterized PDH biochemically and identified both NAD+ and NADP+ as electron acceptors. We identified the gene coding for the enzyme and purified a recombinant Strep-tagged PDH variant. The homotetrameric enzyme is highly specific for phenylacetaldehyde, has cooperative kinetics toward the substrate, and shows considerable substrate inhibition. Our data suggest that A. aromaticum utilizes PDH as the primary enzyme during anaerobic phenylalanine degradation, whereas AOR is not essential for the metabolic pathway. We hypothesize a function as a detoxifying enzyme if high aldehyde concentrations accumulate in the cytoplasm, which would lead to substrate inhibition of PDH. PMID:24214948

  19. Tenebrionid secretions and a fungal benzoquinone oxidoreductase form competing components of an arms race between a host and pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Nicolás; Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Huarte-Bonnet, Carla; Fan, Yanhua; Juárez, M. Patricia; Keyhani, Nemat O.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi and their insect hosts represent a model system for examining invertebrate-pathogen coevolutionary selection processes. Here we report the characterization of competing components of an arms race consisting of insect protective antimicrobial compounds and evolving fungal mechanisms of detoxification. The insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana has a remarkably wide host range; however, some insects are resistant to fungal infection. Among resistant insects is the tenebrionid beetle Tribolium castaneum that produces benzoquinone-containing defensive secretions. Reduced fungal germination and growth was seen in media containing T. castaneum dichloromethane extracts or synthetic benzoquinone. In response to benzoquinone exposure, the fungus expresses a 1,4-benzoquinone oxidoreductase, BbbqrA, induced >40-fold. Gene knockout mutants (ΔBbbqrA) showed increased growth inhibition, whereas B. bassiana overexpressing BbbqrA (Bb::BbbqrAO) displayed increased resistance to benzoquinone compared with wild type. Increased benzoquinone reductase activity was detected in wild-type cells exposed to benzoquinone and in the overexpression strain. Heterologous expression and purification of BbBqrA in Escherichia coli confirmed NAD(P)H-dependent benzoquinone reductase activity. The ΔBbbqrA strain showed decreased virulence toward T. castaneum, whereas overexpression of BbbqrA increased mortality versus T. castaneum. No change in virulence was seen for the ΔBbbqrA or Bb::BbbqrAO strains when tested against the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella or the beetle Sitophilus oryzae, neither of which produce significant amounts of cuticular quinones. The observation that artificial overexpression of BbbqrA results in increased virulence only toward quinone-secreting insects implies the lack of strong selection or current failure of B. bassiana to counteradapt to this particular host defense throughout evolution. PMID:26056261

  20. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae quinone oxidoreductase Lot6p: stability, inhibition and cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Megarity, Clare F; Looi, Hong Keat; Timson, David J

    2014-08-01

    Lot6p (EC 1.5.1.39; Ylr011wp) is the sole quinone oxidoreductase in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using hexahistidine tagged, recombinant Lot6p, we determined the steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters with both NADH and NADPH as electron donors; no cooperativity was observed with these substrates. The NQO1 inhibitor curcumin, the NQO2 inhibitor resveratrol, the bacterial nitroreductase inhibitor nicotinamide and the phosphate mimic vanadate all stabilise the enzyme towards thermal denaturation as judged by differential scanning fluorimetry. All except vanadate have no observable effect on the chemical cross-linking of the two subunits of the Lot6p dimer. These compounds all inhibit Lot6p's oxidoreductase activity, and all except nicotinamide exhibit negative cooperativity. Molecular modelling suggests that curcumin, resveratrol and nicotinamide all bind over the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in Lot6p. Resveratrol was predicted to contact an α-helix that links the two active sites. Mutation of Gly-142 (which forms part of this helix) to serine does not greatly affect the thermal stability of the enzyme. However, this variant shows less cooperativity towards resveratrol than the wild type. This suggests a plausible hypothesis for the transmission of information between the subunits and, thus, the molecular mechanism of negative cooperativity in Lot6p. PMID:24866129

  1. Structural and functional alterations of two multidomain oxidoreductases induced by guanidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ming; Zhou, Yu-Ling; Li, Hong-Tao; Zhang, De-Ling; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The unfolding and refolding of two multidomain oxidoreductases, bovine liver catalase and flavoprotein bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO), have been analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and activity measurements. Two intermediates, a partially folded active dimer disassembled from the native tetramer and a partially folded inactivated monomer, are found to exist in the conformational changes of catalase induced by guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl). Similarly, two intermediates, an active, compacted intermediate bound by flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) partially and an inactive flexible intermediate with FAD completely dissociated, exist in the conformational changes of XO induced by GdnHCl. The activity regains completely and an enhancement in activity compared with the native catalase or native XO is observed by dilution of catalase or XO incubated with GdnHCl at concentrations not >0.5 or 1.8 M into the refolding buffer, but the yield of reactivation for catalase or XO is zero when the concentration of GdnHCl is >1.5 or 3.0 M. The addition of FAD provides a remarkable protection against the inactivation of XO by GdnHCl under mild denaturing conditions, and the conformational change of XO is irreversible after FAD has been removed in the presence of a strong denaturing agent. These findings provide impetus for exploring the influences of cofactors such as FAD on the structure-function relationship of xanthine oxidoreductases. PMID:20043044

  2. NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity in the kinetoplasts of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    PubMed

    González-Halphen, Diego; Maslov, Dmitri A

    2004-03-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity is present in mitochondrial lysates of Phytomonas serpens. Rotenone at 2-10 microM inhibited the activity 50-75%, indicating that it belongs to respiratory complex I. The activity was also inhibited 50-60% in the presence of 10-30 nM atovaquone suggesting that inhibition of complex I represents a likely mechanism of the known antileishmanial activity of this drug. The complex was partially purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and gel-filtration on Sepharose CL-2B. The NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity in this preparation was completely inactivated by 20 nM atovaquone. The partially purified complex was present in a low amount and its subunits could not be discerned by staining with Coomassie. However, one of its components, a homologue of the 39 kDa subunit of the bovine complex I, was identified immunochemically in the original lysate and in the partially purified material. PMID:14727190

  3. Crystal structures of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 quinone oxidoreductase and its complex with NADPH

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Hongmei; Gao, Yu; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2009-12-18

    Zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase is NAD(P)H-dependent and catalyzes one-electron reduction of certain quinones to generate semiquinone. Here we present the crystal structures of zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoQOR) and its complexes with NADPH determined at 2.4 and 2.01 A resolutions, respectively. PtoQOR forms as a homologous dimer, each monomer containing two domains. In the structure of the PtoQOR-NADPH complex, NADPH locates in the groove between the two domains. NADPH binding causes obvious conformational changes in the structure of PtoQOR. The putative substrate-binding site of PtoQOR is wider than that of Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus HB8. Activity assays show that PtoQOR has weak 1,4-benzoquinone catalytic activity, and very strong reduction activity towards large substrates such as 9,10-phenanthrenequinone. We propose a model to explain the conformational changes which take place during reduction reactions catalyzed by PtoQOR.

  4. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  5. On the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase from Brevundimonas diminuta 7

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, D. Roeland; Müller, Axel; Lowe, David J.; Romão, Maria João

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization of isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase from B. diminuta was achieved using two different crystallization buffers. Streak-seeding and cross-linking were essential to obtain well diffracting crystals. Suitable cryo-conditions were found and a structure solution was obtained by molecular replacement. Isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase (IOR) from Brevundimonas diminuta is a mononuclear molybdoenzyme of the xanthine-dehydrogenase family of proteins and catalyzes the conversion of isoquinoline to isoquinoline-1-one. Its primary sequence and behaviour, specifically in its substrate specificity and lipophilicity, differ from other members of the family. A crystal structure of the enzyme is expected to provide an explanation for these differences. This paper describes the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments as well as an optimized purification protocol for IOR. Crystallization of IOR was achieved using two different crystallization buffers. Streak-seeding and cross-linking were essential to obtain well diffracting crystals. Suitable cryo-conditions were found and a structure solution was obtained by molecular replacement. However, phases need to be improved in order to obtain a more interpretable electron-density map.

  6. Structural insights into the functional versatility of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Amjad

    2015-03-01

    Recent work on WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) tumor suppressor is beginning to shed new light on both the molecular mechanism of action of its WW domains as well as the contiguous catalytic domain. Herein, the structural basis underlying the ability of WW1 domain to bind to various physiological ligands and how the orphan WW2 tandem partner synergizes its ligand binding in the context of WW1-WW2 tandem module of WWOX is discussed. Notably, the WW domains within the WW1-WW2 tandem module physically associate so as to adopt a fixed spatial orientation relative to each other. In this manner, the association of WW2 domain with WW1 hinders ligand binding to the latter. Consequently, ligand binding to WW1 domain not only results in the displacement of WW2 lid but also disrupts the fixed orientation of WW domains in the liganded conformation. Equally importantly, structure-guided functional approach suggests that the catalytic domain of WWOX likely serves as a retinal oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reversible oxidation and reduction of all-trans-retinal. Collectively, this review provides structural insights into the functional versatility of a key signaling protein with important implications on its biology. PMID:25662954

  7. Evaluation of neuronal protective effects of xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitors on severe whole-brain ischemia in mouse model and analysis of xanthine oxidoreductase activity in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Matsuda, Yoko; Fuse, Akira; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) often result in high mortality. Free radicals play an important role in global cerebral I/R. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitors, such as allopurinol, have been reported to protect tissues from damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) by inhibiting its production through XOR inhibition. The recently introduced XOR inhibitor febuxostat, which is a more potent inhibitor than allopurinol, is expected to decrease free radical production more effectively. Here, we analyzed the effects of allopurinol and febuxostat in decreasing global severe cerebral I/R damage in mice. Mice were divided into three groups: a placebo group, an allopurinol group, and a febuxostat group. Pathological examinations, which were performed in each group in the CA1 and CA2 regions of the hippocampus 4 days after I/R surgery, revealed that there was a decrease in the number of neuronal cells in the 14-min occlusion model in both regions and that drugs that were administered to prevent this damage were not effective. The enzymatic activity was extremely low in the mouse brain, and XOR could not be detected in the nonischemic and ischemic mice brains with western blot analyses. Thus, one of the reasons for the decreased effectiveness of XOR inhibitors in controlling severe whole-brain ischemia in a mouse model was the low levels of expression of XOR in the mouse brain. PMID:25744353

  8. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product. PMID:26264136

  9. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase of C. perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium-related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic Clostridium perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by react...

  10. Disulfide Bond Oxidoreductase DsbA2 of Legionella pneumophila Exhibits Protein Disulfide Isomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z.; Jameson-Lee, Max; Yeh, Anthony J.; Chertihin, Olga; Shumilin, Igor A.; Dey, Rafik; Day, Shandra R.

    2013-01-01

    The extracytoplasmic assembly of the Dot/Icm type IVb secretion system (T4SS) of Legionella pneumophila is dependent on correct disulfide bond (DSB) formation catalyzed by a novel and essential disulfide bond oxidoreductase DsbA2 and not by DsbA1, a second nonessential DSB oxidoreductase. DsbA2, which is widely distributed in the microbial world, is phylogenetically distinct from the canonical DsbA oxidase and the DsbC protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)/reductase of Escherichia coli. Here we show that the extended N-terminal amino acid sequence of DsbA2 (relative to DsbA proteins) contains a highly conserved 27-amino-acid dimerization domain enabling the protein to form a homodimer. Complementation tests with E. coli mutants established that L. pneumophila dsbA1, but not the dsbA2 strain, restored motility to a dsbA mutant. In a protein-folding PDI detector assay, the dsbA2 strain, but not the dsbA1 strain, complemented a dsbC mutant of E. coli. Deletion of the dimerization domain sequences from DsbA2 produced the monomer (DsbA2N), which no longer exhibited PDI activity but complemented the E. coli dsbA mutant. PDI activity was demonstrated in vitro for DsbA2 but not DsbA1 in a nitrocefin-based mutant TEM β-lactamase folding assay. In an insulin reduction assay, DsbA2N activity was intermediate between those of DsbA2 and DsbA1. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 was maintained as a mixture of thiol and disulfide forms, while in E. coli, DsbA2 was present as the reduced thiol. Our studies suggest that DsbA2 is a naturally occurring bifunctional disulfide bond oxidoreductase that may be uniquely suited to the majority of intracellular bacterial pathogens expressing T4SSs as well as in many slow-growing soil and aquatic bacteria. PMID:23435972

  11. Adaptive hepatic and intestinal alterations in mice after deletion of NADPH-cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase (Cpr) in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingguo; Gu, Jun; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450) play an important role in first-pass metabolism in both the intestine and liver. NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Cpr) is an essential electron transfer protein required for microsomal P450 activity. Mice with conditional knockout of Cpr in hepatocytes develop normally and survive even with complete loss of liver microsomal P450 activity. Our current studies were performed to determine whether alternative drug-metabolizing pathways increase in an attempt to maintain whole-body homeostasis. In addition to the liver, Cpr is mainly expressed in tissues such as lung, kidney, and gastrointestinal tract. In livers of H-Cpr-null mice, there is a marked increase in mRNA expression of phase I enzymes (Aldh1a1, 1a7, 3a2; Ces1b2, 2a6, and 2a12), antioxidant enzymes (Ho-1, Nqo1, and epoxide hydrolase), phase II enzymes (Ugt1a9; Gsta1/2, m3, m4, m6, t1, and t3; and Sult1a1 and 1d1), and drug transporters (Oatp1a4, Oct3, Mate1, Mdr1a, and Mrp3 and 4). In addition, glucuronide-conjugated bilirubin concentrations are doubled in serum of H-Cpr-null mice. Both constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein in nuclei are higher in the livers of H-Cpr-null mice, indicating that CAR and Nrf2 are activated. In the small intestine of H-Cpr-null mice, mRNA expression of Cyp3a11 and Mdr1a, two genes critical for intestinal first-pass metabolism, are markedly up-regulated. In addition, nutrient (Pept1) and cholesterol (Npc1l1) transporters are induced in the small intestine of H-Cpr-null mice. In conclusion, in H-Cpr-null mice, adaptive regulation of alternative detoxification genes in liver and small intestine appear to partially compensate for the loss of microsomal P450 function in liver. PMID:25147274

  12. Pyruvate Oxidoreductases Involved in Glycolytic Anaerobic Metabolism of Polychaetes from the Continental Shelf off Central-South Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, R. R.; Quiñones, R. A.

    2000-10-01

    The presence of low oxygen conditions in extensive areas of the continental shelf off central-south Chile has important effects on the biochemical adaptations of the organisms living in this ecosystem. Polychaetes assemblages cohabit on the shelf with an extensively distributed prokaryotic community made up of giant filamentous sulfur bacteria (mainly Thioploca sp.). The aim of this research was to characterize the pyruvate oxidoreductases enzymes involved in the biochemical adaptation of these benthic polychaetes. Nine polychaete species ( Paraprionospio pinnata, Nephtys ferruginea, Glycera americana, Haploscoloplos sp., Lumbrineris composita, Sigambra bassi, Aricidea pigmentata , Cossura chilensis, and Pectinaria chilensis) were assayed for lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), octopine dehydrogenase (OPDH), strombine dehydrogenase (STRDH) and alanopine dehydrogenase (ALPDH). Each species had a characteristic number of the pyruvate oxidoreductases assayed ranging from 4 in Paraprionospio pinnata to 1 in Pectinaria chilensis . The pyruvate saturation curves obtained for the enzymes from all species analysed, except L. composita, suggest that NADH can be oxidized at different rates depending on the amino acid used in the reaction with pyruvate. Our results indicate that organisms having more that one pyruvate oxidoreductase present a greater metabolic capacity to cope with functional and environmental hypoxia because these enzymes would better regulate the pyruvate consumption rate during the transition period. Thus, the dominance of Paraprionospio pinnata in the study area and its worldwide distribution is consistent with its higher number of pyruvate oxidoreductases with different pyruvate consumption rates involved in anaerobic metabolism. Finally, a positive allometric relationship was found between body size and the specific activity of ALPDH, STRDH, and maximum pyruvate oxidoreductase specific activity. This latter result suggests a positive scaling of the specific

  13. Tethering of ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase to thylakoid membranes is mediated by novel chloroplast protein TROL.

    PubMed

    Jurić, Snjezana; Hazler-Pilepić, Kroata; Tomasić, Ana; Lepedus, Hrvoje; Jelicić, Branka; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Bionda, Tihana; Vojta, Lea; Allen, John F; Schleiff, Enrico; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2009-12-01

    Working in tandem, two photosystems in the chloroplast thylakoid membranes produce a linear electron flow from H(2)O to NADP(+). Final electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP(+) is accomplished by a flavoenzyme ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR). Here we describe TROL (thylakoid rhodanese-like protein), a nuclear-encoded component of thylakoid membranes that is required for tethering of FNR and sustaining efficient linear electron flow (LEF) in vascular plants. TROL consists of two distinct modules; a centrally positioned rhodanese-like domain and a C-terminal hydrophobic FNR binding region. Analysis of Arabidopsis mutant lines indicates that, in the absence of TROL, relative electron transport rates at high-light intensities are severely lowered accompanied with significant increase in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Thus, TROL might represent a missing thylakoid membrane docking site for a complex between FNR, ferredoxin and NADP(+). Such association might be necessary for maintaining photosynthetic redox poise and enhancement of the NPQ. PMID:19682289

  14. Characterization of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in the trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida).

    PubMed

    Cermáková, Petra; Verner, Zdenek; Man, Petr; Lukes, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2007-06-01

    NADH dehydrogenase activity was characterized in the mitochondrial lysates of Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid flagellate parasitizing plants. Two different high molecular weight NADH dehydrogenases were characterized by native PAGE and detected by direct in-gel activity staining. The association of NADH dehydrogenase activities with two distinct multisubunit complexes was revealed in the second dimension performed under denaturing conditions. One subunit present in both complexes cross-reacted with the antibody against the 39 kDa subunit of bovine complex I. Out of several subunits analyzed by MS, one contained a domain characteristic for the LYR family subunit of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases. Spectrophotometric measurement of the NADH:ubiquinone 10 and NADH:ferricyanide dehydrogenase activities revealed their different sensitivities to rotenone, piericidin, and diphenyl iodonium. PMID:17521330

  15. Substrate-Protein Interactions of Type II NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salewski, Johannes; Batista, Ana P; Sena, Filipa V; Millo, Diego; Zebger, Ingo; Pereira, Manuela M; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2016-05-17

    Type II NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (NDH-2s) are membrane proteins involved in respiratory chains and responsible for the maintenance of NADH/NAD(+) balance in cells. NDH-2s are the only enzymes with NADH dehydrogenase activity present in the respiratory chain of many pathogens, and thus, they were proposed as suitable targets for antimicrobial therapies. In addition, NDH-2s were also considered key players for the treatment of complex I-related neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we explored substrate-protein interaction in NDH-2 from Escherichia coli (EcNDH-2) combining surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopic studies with electrochemical experiments, fluorescence spectroscopy assays, and quantum chemical calculations. Because of the specific stabilization of substrate complexes of EcNDH-2 immobilized on electrodes, it was possible to demonstrate the presence of two distinct substrate binding sites for NADH and the quinone and to identify a bound semiprotonated quinol as a catalytic intermediate. PMID:27109164

  16. Structural domains in NADPH: Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases involved in catalysis and substrate binding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Timko, Michael P.

    1999-09-24

    Until recently little direct information was available about specific structural determinants within the light-dependent NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (PORs) required for substrate and cofactor binding, catalytic activity, and thylakoid membrane localization. Based on our previous DOE-funded studies, during the past year we brought to fruition a number of ongoing experiments, initiated several new avenues of investigations, and overall have made considerable progress towards establishing the basic structural parameters governing POR function. Our studies to date have defined residues and domains involved in substrate and cofactor binding and catalysis, and elaborated on the mechanism for membrane localization of POR in developing plastids. Our results and their significance, as well as our work in progress, are detailed.

  17. Ion translocation by the Escherichia coli NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Friedrich, T; Stolpe, S; Schneider, D; Barquera, B; Hellwig, P

    2005-08-01

    The energy-converting NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, also known as respiratory complex I, couples the transfer of electrons from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of ions across the membrane. It was assumed that the complex exclusively works as a proton pump. Recently, it has been proposed that complex I from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli work as Na+ pumps. We have used an E. coli complex I preparation to determine the type of ion(s) translocated by means of enzyme activity, generation of a membrane potential and redox-induced Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We did not find any indications for Na+ translocation by the E. coli complex I. PMID:16042610

  18. Discovery of Potent Succinate-Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase Inhibitors via Pharmacophore-linked Fragment Virtual Screening Approach.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Hua-Wei; Fu, Yu; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Jiang, Li-Na; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2016-06-22

    Succinate-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is an attractive target for fungicide discovery. Herein, we report the discovery of novel SQR inhibitors using a pharmacophore-linked fragment virtual screening approach, a new drug design method developed in our laboratory. Among newly designed compounds, compound 9s was identified as the most potent inhibitor with a Ki value of 34 nM against porcine SQR, displaying approximately 10-fold higher potency than that of the commercial control penthiopyrad. Further inhibitory kinetics studies revealed that compound 9s is a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate cytochrome c and DCIP. Interestingly, compounds 8a, 9h, 9j, and 9k exhibited good in vivo preventive effects against Rhizoctonia solani. The results obtained from molecular modeling showed that the orientation of the R(2) group had a significant effect on binding with the protein. PMID:27225833

  19. On the purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase from Brevundimonas diminuta 7.

    PubMed

    Boer, D Roeland; Müller, Axel; Fetzner, Susanne; Lowe, David J; Romão, Maria João

    2005-01-01

    Isoquinoline 1-oxidoreductase (IOR) from Brevundimonas diminuta is a mononuclear molybdoenzyme of the xanthine-dehydrogenase family of proteins and catalyzes the conversion of isoquinoline to isoquinoline-1-one. Its primary sequence and behaviour, specifically in its substrate specificity and lipophilicity, differ from other members of the family. A crystal structure of the enzyme is expected to provide an explanation for these differences. This paper describes the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments as well as an optimized purification protocol for IOR. Crystallization of IOR was achieved using two different crystallization buffers. Streak-seeding and cross-linking were essential to obtain well diffracting crystals. Suitable cryo-conditions were found and a structure solution was obtained by molecular replacement. However, phases need to be improved in order to obtain a more interpretable electron-density map. PMID:16508115

  20. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A.; Sonavane, Manoj N.; Avi, Manuela; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S)-selectivity and together with a highly (R)-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases. PMID:24970175

  1. Biochemical characterization of NfsA, the Escherichia coli major nitroreductase exhibiting a high amino acid sequence homology to Frp, a Vibrio harveyi flavin oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Zenno, S; Koike, H; Kumar, A N; Jayaraman, R; Tanokura, M; Saigo, K

    1996-01-01

    We identified the nfsA gene, encoding the major oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase in Escherichia coli, and determined its position on the E. coli map to be 19 min. We also purified its gene product, NfsA, to homogeneity. It was suggested that NfsA is a nonglobular protein with a molecular weight of 26,799 and is associated tightly with a flavin mononucleotide. Its amino acid sequence is highly similar to that of Frp, a flavin oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi (B. Lei, M. Liu, S. Huang, and S.-C. Tu, J. Bacteriol. 176:3552-3558, 1994), an observation supporting the notion that E. coli nitroreductase and luminescent-bacterium flavin reductase families are intimately related in evolution. Although no appreciable sequence similarity was detected between two E. coli nitroreductases, NfsA and NfsB, NfsA exhibited a low level of the flavin reductase activity and a broad electron acceptor specificity similar to those of NfsB. NfsA reduced nitrofurazone by a ping-pong Bi-Bi mechanism possibly to generate a two-electron transfer product. PMID:8755878

  2. (The interaction of ferredoxin:NADP sup + oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase with substrates)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    We seek to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes located in spinach chloroplasts which utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +}oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase needs be determined, the amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. Related to an aim elucidate the binding sites for ferredoxin to determine whether there is a common binding site on all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. Additionally thioredoxin binding by FTR needs be determine to resolve whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress is reported on the prosthetic groups of glutamate synthase, in establishing the role of arginine and lysine residues in ferredoxin binding by, ferredoxin:nitrite oxidoreductase nitrite reductase, labelling carboxyl groups on ferredoxin with taurine and labelling lysine residues biotinylation, and low potential heme proteins have been isolated and characterized from a non-photosynthetic plant tissue. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out not to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADPinteraction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique. The techniques developed for differential chemical modification of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions.

  3. Characterization of a unique Caulobacter crescentus aldose-aldose oxidoreductase having dual activities.

    PubMed

    Andberg, Martina; Maaheimo, Hannu; Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Boer, Harry; Toivari, Mervi; Penttilä, Merja; Koivula, Anu

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the characterization of a novel enzyme called aldose-aldose oxidoreductase (Cc AAOR; EC 1.1.99) from Caulobacter crescentus. The Cc AAOR exists in solution as a dimer, belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA family and shows homology with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis. However, unlike other known members of this protein family, Cc AAOR is specific for aldose sugars and can be in the same catalytic cycle both oxidise and reduce a panel of monosaccharides at the C1 position, producing in each case the corresponding aldonolactone and alditol, respectively. Cc AAOR contains a tightly-bound nicotinamide cofactor, which is regenerated in this oxidation-reduction cycle. The highest oxidation activity was detected on D-glucose but significant activity was also observed on D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-galactose, revealing that both hexose and pentose sugars are accepted as substrates by Cc AAOR. The configuration at the C2 and C3 positions of the saccharides was shown to be especially important for the substrate binding. Interestingly, besides monosaccharides, Cc AAOR can also oxidise a range of 1,4-linked oligosaccharides having aldose unit at the reducing end, such as lactose, malto- and cello-oligosaccharides as well as xylotetraose. (1)H NMR used to monitor the oxidation and reduction reaction simultaneously, demonstrated that although D-glucose has the highest affinity and is also oxidised most efficiently by Cc AAOR, the reduction of D-glucose is clearly not as efficient. For the overall reaction catalysed by Cc AAOR, the L-arabinose, D-xylose and D-galactose were the most potent substrates. PMID:26428243

  4. Regulation of gap junction function and Connexin 43 expression by cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Masters, Bettie Sue; Panda, Satya P.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Humans with severe forms of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) mutations show bone defects as observed in Antley-Bixler Syndrome. {yields} First report showing knockdown of CYPOR in osteoblasts decreased Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein levels. Cx43 is known to play an important role in bone modeling. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and hemichannel activity. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Cx43 in mouse primary calvarial osteoblasts. {yields} Decreased Cx43 expression was observed at the transcriptional level. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is a microsomal electron-transferring enzyme containing both FAD and FMN as co-factors, which provides the reducing equivalents to various redox partners, such as cytochromes P450 (CYPs), heme oxygenase (HO), cytochrome b{sub 5} and squalene monooxygenase. Human patients with severe forms of CYPOR mutation show bone defects such as cranio- and humeroradial synostoses and long bone fractures, known as Antley-Bixler-like Syndrome (ABS). To elucidate the role of CYPOR in bone, we knocked-down CYPOR in multiple osteoblast cell lines using RNAi technology. In this study, knock-down of CYPOR decreased the expression of Connexin 43 (Cx43), known to play a critical role in bone formation, modeling, and remodeling. Knock-down of CYPOR also decreased Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) and hemichannel activity. Promoter luciferase assays revealed that the decrease in expression of Cx43 in CYPOR knock-down cells was due to transcriptional repression. Primary osteoblasts isolated from bone specific Por knock-down mice calvariae confirmed the findings in the cell lines. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of gap junction function by CYPOR and suggests that Cx43 may play an important role(s) in CYPOR-mediated bone defects seen in patients.

  5. Crystal structures of archaeal 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Sulfolobus tokodaii.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Maruyama, Akane; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Fushinobu, Shinya; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    As the first three-dimensional structure of the two-subunit type 2-oxoacid:ferredoxin oxidoreductases (OFOR) from archaea, we solved the crystal structures of STK_23000/STK_22980 (StOFOR1) and STK_24350/STK_24330 (StOFOR2) from Sulfolobus tokodaii. They showed similar overall structures, consisting of two a- and b-subunit heterodimers containing thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) cofactor and [4Fe-4S] cluster, but lack an intramolecular ferredoxin domain. Unlike other OFORs, StOFORs can utilize both pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, playing a key role in the central metabolism. In the structure of StOFOR2 in unreacted pyruvate complex form, carboxylate group of pyruvate is recognized by Arg344 and Thr257 from the a-subunit, which are conserved in pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Desulfovbrio africanus (DaPFOR). In the structure of StOFOR1 co-crystallized with 2-oxobutyrate, electron density corresponding to a 1-hydroxypropyl group (post-decarboxylation state) was observed at the thiazole ring of TPP. The binding pockets of the StOFORs surrounding the methyl or propyl group of the ligands are wider than that of DaPFOR. Mutational analyses indicated that several residues were responsible for the broad 2-oxoacid specificity of StOFORs. We also constructed a possible complex structural model by placing a Zn(2+)-containing dicluster ferredoxin of S. tokodaii into the large pocket of StOFOR2, providing insight into the electron transfer between the two redox proteins. PMID:27619895

  6. Ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase of Cyanophora paradoxa: purification, partial characterization, and N-terminal amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Gebhart, U B; Maier, T L; Stevanović, S; Bayer, M G; Schenk, H E

    1992-06-01

    The ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase of the protist Cyanophora paradoxa, as a descendant of a former symbiotic consortium, an important model organism in view of the Endosymbiosis Theory, is the first enzyme purified from a formerly original endocytobiont (cyanelle) that is found to be encoded in the nucleus of the host. This cyanoplast enzyme was isolated by FPLC (19% yield) and characterized with respect to the uv-vis spectrum, pH optimum (pH 9), molecular mass of 34 kDa, and an N-terminal amino acid sequence (24 residues). The enzyme shows, as known from other organisms, molecular heterogeneity. The N-terminus of a further ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase polypeptide represents a shorter sequence missing the first four amino acids of the mature enzyme. PMID:1392619

  7. Mutation of the Thiol-Disulfide Oxidoreductase SdbA Activates the CiaRH Two-Component System, Leading to Bacteriocin Expression Shutdown in Streptococcus gordonii

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Lauren; Halperin, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus gordonii is a commensal inhabitant of the human oral cavity. To maintain its presence as a major component of oral biofilms, S. gordonii secretes inhibitory molecules such as hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins to inhibit competitors. S. gordonii produces two nonmodified bacteriocins (i.e., Sth1 and Sth2) that are regulated by the Com two-component regulatory system, which also regulates genetic competence. Previously we found that the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA was required for bacteriocin activity; however, the role of SdbA in Com signaling was not clear. Here we demonstrate that ΔsdbA mutants lacked bacteriocin activity because the bacteriocin gene sthA was strongly repressed and the peptides were not secreted. Addition of synthetic competence-stimulating peptide to the medium reversed the phenotype, indicating that the Com pathway was functional but was not activated in the ΔsdbA mutant. Repression of bacteriocin production was mediated by the CiaRH two-component system, which was strongly upregulated in the ΔsdbA mutant, and inactivation of CiaRH restored bacteriocin production. The CiaRH-induced protease DegP was also upregulated in the ΔsdbA mutant, although it was not required for inhibition of bacteriocin production. This establishes CiaRH as a regulator of Sth bacteriocin activity and links the CiaRH and Com systems in S. gordonii. It also suggests that either SdbA or one of its substrates is an important factor in regulating activation of the CiaRH system. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus gordonii is a noncariogenic colonizer of the human oral cavity. To be competitive in the oral biofilm, S. gordonii secretes antimicrobial peptides called bacteriocins, which inhibit closely related species. Our previous data showed that mutation of the disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA abolished bacteriocin production. In this study, we show that mutation of SdbA generates a signal that upregulates the CiaRH two-component system, which in turn

  8. Metabolic activities of metronidazole-sensitive and -resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori: repression of pyruvate oxidoreductase and expression of isocitrate lyase activity correlate with resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, P S; Goodwin, A; Johnsen, J; Magee, K; Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we compared metronidazole (Mtz)-sensitive and -resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori for metabolic differences that might correlate with drug resistance. Included in this study was an isogenic Mtz(r) strain, HP1107, that was constructed by transforming genomic DNA from Mtz(r) strain HP439 into Mtz(s) strain HP500. Enzyme activities were also measured for Mtz(r) strains grown in the presence or absence of 18 micrograms of metronidazole per ml (ca. one-half of the MIC). These studies confirmed the presence of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas, Entner-Doudoroff, and pentose pathways. H. pylori strains expressed enzymatic activities indicative of a complete and active Krebs cycle. All strains expressed pyruvate oxidoreductase (POR) and alpha-ketoglutarate oxidoreductase (KOR) as measured with the redox-active dye benzyl viologen (30 to 96 nmol/min/mg of protein for POR and 30 nmol/min/mg of protein for KOR). When grown in the presence of Mtz at > or = 3.5 micrograms/ml, Mtz(r) strains expressed no detectable POR or KOR activity. The apparent repression of POR and KOR activities by Mtz affected bacterial growth as manifest by extended lag periods and growth yield reductions of > 30%. A dose-dependent relationship was demonstrated between the metronidazole concentration in the growth medium and the specific activity of POR measured in bacterial cell extracts. The observed repression was not due to inactivation of POR by Mtz. In addition to repression of POR and KOR activities, growth in the presence of Mtz also led to decreases in the activities of various Krebs cycle enzymes, including aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase. All of the Mtz(r) strains examined expressed isocitrate lyase and malate synthase activities indicative of the glyoxylate bypass. No isocitrate lyase activity was detected in Mtz(s) strain HP500. Isocitrate lyase activity was expressed by HP500 following transformation to Mtz resistance (Mtz(r) strain HP1107) with

  9. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23Å) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  10. Coordination between BrlA regulation and secretion of the oxidoreductase FmqD directs selective accumulation of fumiquinazoline C to conidial tissues in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Fang Yun; Ames, Brian; Walsh, Christopher; Keller, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Aerial spores, crucial for propagation and dispersal of the Kingdom Fungi, are commonly the initial inoculum of pathogenic fungi. Natural products (secondary metabolites) have been correlated with fungal spore development and enhanced virulence in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus but mechanisms for metabolite deposition in the spore are unknown. Metabolomic profiling of A. fumigatus deletion mutants of fumiquinazoline (Fq) cluster genes reveal that the first two products of the Fq cluster, FqF and FqA, are produced to comparable levels in all fungal tissues but the final enzymatically-derived product, FqC, predominantly accumulates in the fungal spore. Loss of the sporulation-specific transcription factor, BrlA, yields a strain unable to produce FqA or FqC. Fluorescence microscopy showed FmqD, the oxidoreductase required to generate FqC, was secreted via the Golgi apparatus to the cell wall in an actin-dependent manner. In contrast, all other members of the Fq pathway including the putative transporter, FmqE – which had no effect on Fq biosynthesis – were internal to the hyphae. The coordination of BrlA-mediated tissue specificity with FmqD secretion to the cell wall presents a previously undescribed mechanism to direct localization of specific secondary metabolites to spores of the differentiating fungus. PMID:24612080

  11. Over-expression of a putative oxidoreductase (UcpA) for increasing furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Xuan; Miller, Elliot N.; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2016-05-24

    The subject invention pertains to overexpression of a putative oxidoreductase (ucpA) for increasing furfural tolerance in genetically modified microorganisms. Genetically modified microorganisms capable of overexpressing UcpA are also provided. Increased expression of ucpA was shown to increase furfural tolerance by 50%, and to permit the fermentation of sugars to products in the presence of 15 mM furfural.

  12. Immunodetection of the Ferredoxin-NADP+ Oxidoreductase-Binding Protein Complex in Thylakoids of Different Higher Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Soncini, Fernando C.; Vallejos, Rubén H.

    1989-01-01

    Monospecific polyclonal antibodies against thylakoid ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase and its binding protein from Spinacia oleracea were used to detect the presence of these proteins in different higher plants, including C3, C4, and Crassulacean acid metabolism species. A remarkable conservation of antigenic determinants in all the species analyzed was demonstrated for both the reductase and its binding protein. The association of these polypeptides in a complex was detected by immunoprecipitation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16666777

  13. Over-expression of NADH-dependent oxidoreductase (fucO) for increasing furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Elliot N.; Zhang, Xueli; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Wang, Xuan; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2015-10-13

    The subject invention pertains to the discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural. This allows for a new approach to improve furfural tolerance in bacterial and/or yeast cells used to produce desired products. Thus, novel biocatalysts (bacterial, fungal or yeast cells) exhibiting increased tolerance to furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are provided as are methods of making and using such biocatalysts for the production of a desired product.

  14. NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in the Sensitivity and Resistance to Antitumor Quinones

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, David; Yan, Chao; Ross, David

    2012-01-01

    The quinone pharmacophore is present in many drug classes but is particularly common among antitumor drugs. Many quinones serve essentially as pro-drugs and exert their activities after reduction. Reduction of quinones may generate semiquinones or hydroquinones with subsequent generation of reactive oxygen radicals and oxidative stress, quinones can be designed so they lose a leaving group when reduced to the hydroquinone generating a reactive electrophile or the hydroquinone form of the molecule may have greater pharmacological activity than the parent quinone against a particular target. Enzyme systems that reduce quinones therefore become critically important in the pharmacological activity of this class of drugs. There are a number of enzyme systems that can catalyze reduction of quinones including cytochrome P450 reductase, cytochrome b5 reductase, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2), carbonyl reductases, and thioredoxin reductase. In this context, one of the most extensively studied reductases has been NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). In this review we will focus on the role of NQO1 in the bioactivation of clinically important quinones mitomycin C, β-lapachone and 17AAG as well as the influence of the NQO1*2 polymorphism on the sensitivity and resistance to these agents. PMID:22209713

  15. Structure of the membrane proximal oxidoreductase domain of human Steap3, the dominant ferrireductase of the erythroid transferrin cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sendamarai, Anoop K.; Ohgami, Robert S.; Fleming, Mark D.; Lawrence, C. Martin

    2008-01-01

    The daily production of 200 billion erythrocytes requires 20 mg of iron, accounting for nearly 80% of the iron demand in humans. Thus, erythroid precursor cells possess an efficient mechanism for iron uptake in which iron loaded transferrin (Tf) binds to the transferrin receptor (TfR) at the cell surface. The Tf:TfR complex then enters the endosome via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Upon endosomal acidification, iron is released from Tf, reduced to Fe2+ by Steap3, and transported across the endosomal membrane by divalent metal iron transporter 1. Steap3, the major ferrireductase in erythrocyte endosomes, is a member of a unique family of reductases. Steap3 is comprised of an N-terminal cytosolic oxidoreductase domain and a C-terminal heme-containing transmembrane domain. Cytosolic NADPH and a flavin are predicted cofactors, but the NADPH/flavin binding domain differs significantly from those in other eukaryotic reductases. Instead, Steap3 shows remarkable, although limited homology to FNO, an archaeal oxidoreductase. We have determined the crystal structure of the human Steap3 oxidoreductase domain in the absence and presence of NADPH. The structure reveals an FNO-like domain with an unexpected dimer interface and substrate binding sites that are well positioned to direct electron transfer from the cytosol to a heme moiety predicted to be fixed within the transmembrane domain. Here, we discuss possible gating mechanisms for electron transfer across the endosomal membrane. PMID:18495927

  16. A discovery study of daunorubicin induced cardiotoxicity in a sample of acute myeloid leukemia patients prioritizes P450 oxidoreductase polymorphisms as a potential risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Lubieniecka, Joanna M.; Graham, Jinko; Heffner, Daniel; Mottus, Randy; Reid, Ronald; Hogge, Donna; Grigliatti, Tom A.; Riggs, Wayne K.

    2013-01-01

    Anthracyclines are very effective chemotherapeutic agents; however, their use is hampered by the treatment-induced cardiotoxicity. Genetic variants that help define patient's sensitivity to anthracyclines will greatly improve the design of optimal chemotherapeutic regimens. However, identification of such variants is hampered by the lack of analytical approaches that address the complex, multi-genic character of anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity (AIC). Here, using a multi-SNP based approach, we examined 60 genes coding for proteins involved in drug metabolism and efflux and identified the P450 oxidoreductase (POR) gene to be most strongly associated with daunorubicin induced cardiotoxicity in a population of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients (FDR adjusted p-value of 0.15). In this sample of cancer patients, variation in the POR gene is estimated to account for some 11.6% of the variability in the drop of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) after daunorubicin treatment, compared to the estimated 13.2% accounted for by the cumulative dose and ethnicity. In post-hoc analysis, this association was driven by 3 SNPs—the rs2868177, rs13240755, and rs4732513—through their linear interaction with cumulative daunorubicin dose. The unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for rs2868177 and rs13240755 were estimated to be 1.89 (95% CI: 0.7435–4.819; p = 0.1756) and 3.18 (95% CI: 1.223–8.27; p = 0.01376), respectively. Although the contribution of POR variants is expected to be overestimated due to the multiple testing performed in this small pilot study, given that cumulative anthracycline dose is virtually the only factor used clinically to predict the risk of cardiotoxicity, the contribution that genetic analyses of POR can make to the assessment of this risk is worthy of follow up in future investigations. PMID:24273552

  17. Functional Characterization of the FoxE Iron Oxidoreductase from the Photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2*

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Ivo H.; Newman, Dianne K.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2012-01-01

    Photoferrotrophy is presumed to be an ancient type of photosynthetic metabolism in which bacteria use the reducing power of ferrous iron to drive carbon fixation. In this work the putative iron oxidoreductase of the photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 was cloned, purified, and characterized for the first time. This protein, FoxE, was characterized using spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and kinetic techniques. It is a c-type cytochrome that forms a trimer or tetramer in solution; the two hemes of each monomer are hexacoordinated by histidine and methionine. The hemes have positive reduction potentials that allow downhill electron transfer from many geochemically relevant ferrous iron forms to the photosynthetic reaction center. The reduction potentials of the hemes are different and are cross-assigned to fast and slow kinetic phases of ferrous iron oxidation in vitro. Lower reactivity was observed at high pH and may contribute to prevent ferric iron precipitation inside or at the surface of the cell. These results help fill in the molecular details of a metabolic process that likely contributed to the deposition of precambrian banded iron formations, globally important sedimentary rocks that are found on every continent today. PMID:22661703

  18. Characterization of two-step deglycosylation via oxidation by glycoside oxidoreductase and defining their subfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Baek, Kiheon; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a two-step deglycosylation mediated by the oxidation of glycoside which is different from traditional glycoside hydrolase (GH) mechanism. Previously, we reported a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glycoside oxidoreductase (FAD-GO) having deglycosylation activity. Various features of the reaction of FAD-GO such as including mechanism and catalytic residue and substrate specificity were studied. In addition, classification of novel FAD-GO subfamily was attempted. Deglycosylation of glycoside was performed spontaneously via oxidation of 3-OH of glycone moiety by FAD-GO mediated oxidation reaction. His493 residue was identified as a catalytic residue for the oxidation step. Interestingly, this enzyme has broad glycone and aglycon specificities. For the classification of FAD-GO enzyme subfamily, putative FAD-GOs were screened based on the FAD-GO from Rhizobium sp. GIN611 (gi 365822256) using BLAST search. The homologs of R. sp. GIN611 included the putative FAD-GOs from Stenotrophomonas strains, Sphingobacterium strains, Agrobacterium tumefaciens str. C58, and etc. All the cloned FAD-GOs from the three strains catalyzed the deglycosylation via enzymatic oxidation. Based on their substrate specificities, deglycosylation and oxidation activities to various ginsenosides, the FAD-GO subfamily members can be utilized as novel biocatalysts for the production of various aglycones. PMID:26057169

  19. Identification of the NADH-binding subunit of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase of Paracoccus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Takao; Dinh, T.M. )

    1990-06-12

    The NADH dehydrogenase complex isolated from Paracoccus denitrificans is composed of approximately 10 unlike polypeptides and contains noncovalently bound FMN, non-heme iron, and acid-labile sulfide. When the Paracoccus NADH dehydrogenase complex was irradiated by UV light in the presence of (adenylate-{sup 32}P)NAD, radioactivity was incorporated exclusively into one of three polypeptides of M{sub r} {approximately}50,000. Similar results were obtained when (adenylate-{sup 32}P)NADH was used. The labeling of the M{sub r} 50,000 polypeptide was diminished when UV irradiation of the enzyme with (adenylate-{sup 32}P)NAD was performed in the presence of NADH, but not in the presence of NADP(H). The labeled polypeptide was isolated by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and was shown to cross-react with antiserum to the NADH-binding subunit of bovine NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase. Its amino acid composition was also very similar to that of the bovine NADH-binding subunit. These chemical and immunological results indicate that the M{sub r} 50,000 polypeptide is an NADH-binding subunit of the Paracoccus NADH dehydrogenase complex.

  20. Iron (III) reduction: A novel activity of the human NAD(P)H:oxidoreductase

    SciTech Connect

    Onyenwoke, Rob U.; Wiegel, Juergen . E-mail: jwiegel@uga.edu

    2007-02-09

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1; EC 1.6.99.2) catalyzes a two-electron transfer involved in the protection of cells from reactive oxygen species. These reactive oxygen species are often generated by the one-electron reduction of quinones or quinone analogs. We report here on the previously unreported Fe(III) reduction activity of human NQO1. Under steady state conditions with Fe(III) citrate, the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}{sup app}) was {approx}0.3nM and the apparent maximum velocity (V{sub max}{sup app}) was 16Umg{sup -1}. Substrate inhibition was observed above 5nM. NADH was the electron donor, K{sub m}{sup app}=340{mu}M and V{sub max}{sup app}=46Umg{sup -1}. FAD was also a cofactor with a K{sub m}{sup app} of 3.1{mu}M and V{sub max}{sup app} of 89Umg{sup -1}. The turnover number for NADH oxidation was 25s{sup -1}. Possible physiological roles of the Fe(III) reduction by this enzyme are discussed.

  1. A novel method for preparation of MNP@CS-tethered coenzyme for coupled oxidoreductase system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo; Wu, Zhichao; Ma, Yunhui

    2015-02-20

    The immobilized cofactor NAD(H) is easily recovered from the reaction bulk, which is essential for repeated use of NAD(H) in the bioprocess catalyzed by NAD(H)-dependent oxidoreductase. Here, a magnetic nanoparticle platform was designed to immobilize both of the NADH and the NAD(+). The design was based on chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNP@CS) which was activated by the EDC/NHS with the aid of azelaic acid as spacer. Interestingly, the succinimide group at the end of spacer arm catalyzed direct coupling of a carboxyl-terminal to the 6-amino group of the adenine residue of NAD(H). Our results indicated that 150 μmol NADH and 50 μmol NAD(+) was effectively attached to 1g MNP@CS at 25°C in 120 min and the prepared MNP@CS-NAD(H) showed good activity according to the coupling reaction of benzyl alcohol and acetaldehyde catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:25617681

  2. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Oxidoreductase NmDsbA3 from Neisseria meningitidis

    SciTech Connect

    Vivian, Julian P.; Scoullar, Jessica; Robertson, Amy L.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Horne, James; Chin, Yanni; Wielens, Jerome; Thompson, Philip E.; Velkov, Tony; Piek, Susannah; Byres, Emma; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Kahler, Charlene M.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Scanlon, Martin J.

    2009-09-02

    DsbA is an enzyme found in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria that catalyzes the formation of disulfide bonds in a diverse array of protein substrates, many of which are involved in bacterial pathogenesis. Although most bacteria possess only a single essential DsbA, Neisseria meningitidis is unusual in that it possesses three DsbAs, although the reason for this additional redundancy is unclear. Two of these N. meningitidis enzymes (NmDsbA1 and NmDsbA2) play an important role in meningococcal attachment to human epithelial cells, whereas NmDsbA3 is considered to have a narrow substrate repertoire. To begin to address the role of DsbAs in the pathogenesis of N. meningitidis, we have determined the structure of NmDsbA3 to 2.3-{angstrom} resolution. Although the sequence identity between NmDsbA3 and other DsbAs is low, the NmDsbA3 structure adopted a DsbA-like fold. Consistent with this finding, we demonstrated that NmDsbA3 acts as a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase in vitro and is reoxidized by Escherichia coli DsbB (EcDsbB). However, pronounced differences in the structures between DsbA3 and EcDsbA, which are clustered around the active site of the enzyme, suggested a structural basis for the unusual substrate specificity that is observed for NmDsbA3.

  3. A sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from Chlorobaculum tepidum displays unusual kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Kevin E; Hanson, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is the primary sulfide-oxidizing enzyme found in all three domains of life. Of the six phylogenetically distinct types of SQR, four have representatives that have been biochemically characterized. The genome of Chlorobaculum tepidum encodes three SQR homologs. One of these, encoded by CT1087, is a type VI SQR that has been previously shown to be required for growth at high sulfide concentrations and to be expressed in sulfide-dependent manner. Therefore, CT1087 was hypothesized to be a high sulfide adapted SQR. CT1087 was expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His-tag (CT1087NHis6) and purified by Ni-NTA chromatography. CT1087NHis6 was active and contained FAD as a strongly bound cofactor. The measured kinetic parameters for CT1087NHis6 indicate a low affinity for sulfide and a high enzymatic turnover rate consistent with the hypothesis for its function inferred from genetic and expression data. These are the first kinetic data for a type VI SQR and have implications for structure-function analyses of all SQR's. PMID:27190141

  4. Hyperuricemia-Related Diseases and Xanthine Oxidoreductase (XOR) Inhibitors: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changyi; Lü, Jian-Ming; Yao, Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine metabolism in humans. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes oxidative hydroxylation of hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid, accompanying the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid usually forms ions and salts known as urates and acid urates in serum. Clinically, overproduction or under-excretion of uric acid results in the elevated level of serum uric acid (SUA), termed hyperuricemia, which has long been established as the major etiologic factor in gout. Accordingly, urate-lowering drugs such as allopurinol, an XOR-inhibitor, are extensively used for the treatment of gout. In recent years, the prevalence of hyperuricemia has significantly increased and more clinical investigations have confirmed that hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and many other diseases. Urate-lowering therapy may also play a critical role in the management of these diseases. However, current XOR-inhibitor drugs such as allopurinol and febuxostat may have significant adverse effects. Therefore, there has been great effort to develop new XOR-inhibitor drugs with less or no toxicity for the long-term treatment or prevention of these hyperuricemia-related diseases. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of uric acid homeostasis and alterations, updated prevalence, therapeutic outcomes, and molecular pathophysiology of hyperuricemia-related diseases. We also summarize current discoveries in the development of new XOR inhibitors. PMID:27423335

  5. Functional characterization of the FoxE iron oxidoreductase from the photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Ivo H; Newman, Dianne K; Louro, Ricardo O

    2012-07-20

    Photoferrotrophy is presumed to be an ancient type of photosynthetic metabolism in which bacteria use the reducing power of ferrous iron to drive carbon fixation. In this work the putative iron oxidoreductase of the photoferrotroph Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 was cloned, purified, and characterized for the first time. This protein, FoxE, was characterized using spectroscopic, thermodynamic, and kinetic techniques. It is a c-type cytochrome that forms a trimer or tetramer in solution; the two hemes of each monomer are hexacoordinated by histidine and methionine. The hemes have positive reduction potentials that allow downhill electron transfer from many geochemically relevant ferrous iron forms to the photosynthetic reaction center. The reduction potentials of the hemes are different and are cross-assigned to fast and slow kinetic phases of ferrous iron oxidation in vitro. Lower reactivity was observed at high pH and may contribute to prevent ferric iron precipitation inside or at the surface of the cell. These results help fill in the molecular details of a metabolic process that likely contributed to the deposition of precambrian banded iron formations, globally important sedimentary rocks that are found on every continent today. PMID:22661703

  6. FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, induces nephropathy in rats, but not in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Ashizawa, Naoki; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Koji; Iwanaga, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2009-06-01

    The present studies were performed to investigate the possible mechanism of marked species differences on nephropathy found in the long-term toxicity study of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor. In the twenty-six-week dose toxicity study in the rat, in which FYX-051 was administered by oral gavage at 0.04, 0.2, and 1 mg/kg, xanthine-mediated nephropathy was seen only at 1 mg/kg, despite the presence of xanthine crystals in urine at 0.2 mg/kg and more; however, in the fifty-two-week dose toxicity study in the monkey, in which FYX-051 was administered by oral gavage at 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, no toxicities were seen, even at 300 mg/kg. These outcomes showed there would be 1500-fold or more differences in the mode of intrarenal xanthine deposition between rats and monkeys. Thus we performed the mechanistic study, and the following outcomes were obtained. First, the amount of urinary purine metabolites was thirty-fold higher in rats than in monkeys. Second, urinary xanthine solubility was sixfold higher in monkeys than in rats. Third, exposure levels of FYX-051 were five-fold higher in rats than in monkeys. Therefore, the present study indicated that the combined effects of purine metabolism, urinary xanthine solubility, and toxicokinetics would contribute to species differences in nephropathy, that is, absence of xanthine-mediated nephropathy in monkeys even at the highest dose of FYX-051. PMID:19336671

  7. Simultaneous treatment with citrate prevents nephropathy induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Ashizawa, Naoki; Matsumoto, Koji; Nakazawa, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    The possible mechanism of the underlying nephropathy found in the rat toxicity study of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, was investigated. Rats received oral treatment of either 1 or 3 mg/kg of FYX-051, with and without citrate for four weeks to elucidate whether nephropathy could be caused by materials deposited in the kidney. Furthermore, analysis of the renal deposits in rats was also performed. Consequently, interstitial nephritis comprising interstitial inflammatory cell infiltration, dilatation, basophilia and epithelial necrosis of renal tubules and collecting ducts, deposits in renal tubules and collecting ducts, and so forth was seen in six of the eight rats and in all eight rats in the 1 and 3 mg/kg FYX-051 alone groups, respectively, with the intensity in the 3 mg/kg group being moderate to severe. In the simultaneous treatment with citrate group, however, no alterations were observed in the kidney, except for minimal interstitial nephritis in one instance in the 3 mg/kg FYX-051 + citrate group along with an increased urinary pH, leading to an increase in xanthine solubility. Analysis of intrarenal deposits showed that the entity would be composed of xanthine crystals. The present study, therefore, showed that nephropathy in rats occurring after the administration of FYX-051 was a secondary change caused by xanthine crystals being deposited in the kidney, and no other causes could be implicated in this kidney lesion. PMID:15933230

  8. Chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by xray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR ischemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23116398

  9. One-carbon chemistry of oxalate oxidoreductase captured by X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Percival Yang-Ting; Johnson, Aileen C.; Pierce, Elizabeth; Can, Mehmet; Ragsdale, Stephen W.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent oxalate oxidoreductase (OOR) metabolizes oxalate, generating two molecules of CO2 and two low-potential electrons, thus providing both the carbon and reducing equivalents for operation of the Wood−Ljungdahl pathway of acetogenesis. Here we present structures of OOR in which two different reaction intermediate bound states have been trapped: the covalent adducts between TPP and oxalate and between TPP and CO2. These structures, along with the previously determined structure of substrate-free OOR, allow us to visualize how active site rearrangements can drive catalysis. Our results suggest that OOR operates via a bait-and-switch mechanism, attracting substrate into the active site through the presence of positively charged and polar residues, and then altering the electrostatic environment through loop and side chain movements to drive catalysis. This simple but elegant mechanism explains how oxalate, a molecule that humans and most animals cannot break down, can be used for growth by acetogenic bacteria. PMID:26712008

  10. Response of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase to sulfide exposure in the echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Feng; Shao, Ming-Yu; Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Shi, Xiao-Li; Dong, Ying-Ping; Li, Jin-Long

    2012-04-01

    Sulfide is a natural, widely distributed, poisonous substance, and sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is responsible for the initial oxidation of sulfide in mitochondria. In this study, we examined the response of SQR to sulfide exposure (25, 50, and 150 μM) at mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels in the body wall and hindgut of the echiuran worm Urechis unicinctus, a benthic organism living in marine sediments. The results revealed SQR mRNA expression during sulfide exposure in the body wall and hindgut increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner that increased significantly at 12 h and continuously increased with time. At the protein level, SQR expression in the two tissues showed a time-dependent relationship that increased significantly at 12 h in 50 μM sulfide and 6 h in 150 μM, and then continued to increase with time while no significant increase appeared after 25 μM sulfide exposure. SQR enzyme activity in both tissues increased significantly in a time-dependent manner after 50 μM sulfide exposure. We concluded that SQR expression could be induced by sulfide exposure and that the two tissues studied have dissimilar sulfide metabolic patterns. A U. unicinctus sulfide-induced detoxification mechanism was also discussed. PMID:21997848

  11. Structural and biochemical characterization of the oxidoreductase NmDsbA3 from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Vivian, Julian P; Scoullar, Jessica; Robertson, Amy L; Bottomley, Stephen P; Horne, James; Chin, Yanni; Wielens, Jerome; Thompson, Philip E; Velkov, Tony; Piek, Susannah; Byres, Emma; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C J; Kahler, Charlene M; Rossjohn, Jamie; Scanlon, Martin J

    2008-11-21

    DsbA is an enzyme found in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria that catalyzes the formation of disulfide bonds in a diverse array of protein substrates, many of which are involved in bacterial pathogenesis. Although most bacteria possess only a single essential DsbA, Neisseria meningitidis is unusual in that it possesses three DsbAs, although the reason for this additional redundancy is unclear. Two of these N. meningitidis enzymes (NmDsbA1 and NmDsbA2) play an important role in meningococcal attachment to human epithelial cells, whereas NmDsbA3 is considered to have a narrow substrate repertoire. To begin to address the role of DsbAs in the pathogenesis of N. meningitidis, we have determined the structure of NmDsbA3 to 2.3-A resolution. Although the sequence identity between NmDsbA3 and other DsbAs is low, the NmDsbA3 structure adopted a DsbA-like fold. Consistent with this finding, we demonstrated that NmDsbA3 acts as a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase in vitro and is reoxidized by Escherichia coli DsbB (EcDsbB). However, pronounced differences in the structures between DsbA3 and EcDsbA, which are clustered around the active site of the enzyme, suggested a structural basis for the unusual substrate specificity that is observed for NmDsbA3. PMID:18715864

  12. Influence of 120 kDa Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase on Pathogenicity of Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan parasite and commonly infected the lower genital tract in women and men. Iron is a known nutrient for growth of various pathogens, and also reported to be involved in establishment of trichomoniasis. However, the exact mechanism was not clarified. In this study, the author investigated whether the 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis may be involved in pathogenicity of trichomonads. Antibodies against 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis, which was identified as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) by peptide analysis of MALDI-TOF-MS, were prepared in rabbits. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with anti-120 kDa Ab decreased the proliferation and adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (MS74) of T. vaginalis. Subcutaneous tissue abscess in anti-120 kDa Ab-treated T. vaginalis-injected mice was smaller in size than that of untreated T. vaginalis-infected mice. Collectively, the 120 kDa protein expressed by iron may be involved in proliferation, adhesion to host cells, and abscess formation, thereby may influence on the pathogenicity of T. vaginalis. PMID:26951982

  13. The crystal structure of xanthine oxidoreductase during catalysis: Implications for reaction mechanism and enzyme inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Matsumoto, Koji; Hille, Russ; Eger, Bryan T.; Pai, Emil F.; Nishino, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    Molybdenum is widely distributed in biology and is usually found as a mononuclear metal center in the active sites of many enzymes catalyzing oxygen atom transfer. The molybdenum hydroxylases are distinct from other biological systems catalyzing hydroxylation reactions in that the oxygen atom incorporated into the product is derived from water rather than molecular oxygen. Here, we present the crystal structure of the key intermediate in the hydroxylation reaction of xanthine oxidoreductase with a slow substrate, in which the carbon–oxygen bond of the product is formed, yet the product remains complexed to the molybdenum. This intermediate displays a stable broad charge–transfer band at ≈640 nm. The crystal structure of the complex indicates that the catalytically labile Mo—OH oxygen has formed a bond with a carbon atom of the substrate. In addition, the Mo⋕S group of the oxidized enzyme has become protonated to afford Mo—SH on reduction of the molybdenum center. In contrast to previous assignments, we find this last ligand at an equatorial position in the square-pyramidal metal coordination sphere, not the apical position. A water molecule usually seen in the active site of the enzyme is absent in the present structure, which probably accounts for the stability of this intermediate toward ligand displacement by hydroxide. PMID:15148401

  14. A Complex of Htm1 and the Oxidoreductase Pdi1 Accelerates Degradation of Misfolded Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Anett; Stephanowitz, Heike; Krause, Eberhard; Volkwein, Corinna; Hirsch, Christian; Jarosch, Ernst; Sommer, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    A quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) efficiently discriminates polypeptides that are in the process of productive folding from conformers that are trapped in an aberrant state. Only the latter are transported into the cytoplasm and degraded in a process termed ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD). In the ER, an enzymatic cascade generates a specific N-glycan structure of seven mannosyl and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (Man7GlcNAc2) on misfolded glycoproteins to facilitate their disposal. We show that a complex encompassing the yeast lectin-like protein Htm1 and the oxidoreductase Pdi1 converts Man8GlcNAc2 on glycoproteins into the Man7GlcNAc2 signal. In vitro the Htm1-Pdi1 complex processes both unfolded and native proteins albeit with a preference for the former. In vivo, elevated expression of HTM1 causes glycan trimming on misfolded and folded proteins, but only degradation of the non-native species is accelerated. Thus, modification with a Man7GlcNAc2 structure does not inevitably commit a protein for ER-associated protein degradation. The function of Htm1 in ERAD relies on its association with Pdi1, which appears to regulate the access to substrates. Our data support a model in which the balanced activities of Pdi1 and Htm1 are crucial determinants for the efficient removal of misfolded secretory glycoproteins. PMID:27053108

  15. Posttranslational Modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M.; Dahlström, Käthe M.; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T.; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A.; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants’ survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research. PMID:25301888

  16. Sulfolobus solfataricus protein disulphide oxidoreductase: insight into the roles of its redox sites.

    PubMed

    Limauro, Danila; Saviano, Michele; Galdi, Ilaria; Rossi, Mosè; Bartolucci, Simonetta; Pedone, Emilia

    2009-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus protein disulphide oxidoreductase (SsPDO) contains three disulphide bridges linking residues C(41)XXC(44), C(155)XXC(158), C(173)XXXXC(178). To get information on the role played by these cross-links in determining the structural and functional properties of the protein, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on Cys residues and investigated the changes in folding, stability and functional features of the mutants and analysed the results with computational analysis. The reductase activity of SsPDO and its mutants was evaluated by insulin and thioredoxin reductase assays also coupled with peroxiredoxin Bcp1 of S. solfataricus. The three-dimensional model of SsPDO was constructed and correlated with circular dichroism data and functional results. Biochemical analysis indicated a key function for the redox site constituted by Cys155 and Cys158. To discriminate between the role of the two cysteine residues, each cysteine was mutagenized and the behaviour of the single mutants was investigated elucidating the basis of the electron-shuffling mechanism for SsPDO. Finally, cysteine pK values were calculated and the accessible surface for the cysteine side chains in the reduced form was measured, showing higher reactivity and solvent exposure for Cys155. PMID:18988690

  17. Chemical Nature and Reaction Mechanisms of the Molybdenum Cofactor of Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by x-ray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR is chemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions. PMID:23116398

  18. Hyperuricemia-Related Diseases and Xanthine Oxidoreductase (XOR) Inhibitors: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyi; Lü, Jian-Ming; Yao, Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Uric acid is the final oxidation product of purine metabolism in humans. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes oxidative hydroxylation of hypoxanthine to xanthine to uric acid, accompanying the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Uric acid usually forms ions and salts known as urates and acid urates in serum. Clinically, overproduction or under-excretion of uric acid results in the elevated level of serum uric acid (SUA), termed hyperuricemia, which has long been established as the major etiologic factor in gout. Accordingly, urate-lowering drugs such as allopurinol, an XOR-inhibitor, are extensively used for the treatment of gout. In recent years, the prevalence of hyperuricemia has significantly increased and more clinical investigations have confirmed that hyperuricemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and many other diseases. Urate-lowering therapy may also play a critical role in the management of these diseases. However, current XOR-inhibitor drugs such as allopurinol and febuxostat may have significant adverse effects. Therefore, there has been great effort to develop new XOR-inhibitor drugs with less or no toxicity for the long-term treatment or prevention of these hyperuricemia-related diseases. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of uric acid homeostasis and alterations, updated prevalence, therapeutic outcomes, and molecular pathophysiology of hyperuricemia-related diseases. We also summarize current discoveries in the development of new XOR inhibitors. PMID:27423335

  19. Localization, Purification, and Characterization of Shikimate Oxidoreductase-Dehydroquinate Hydrolyase from Stroma of Spinach Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Erich; Schultz, Gernot

    1985-01-01

    The stroma of chloroplasts is probably the sole site of the shikimate pathway enzymes shikimate oxidoreductase/dehydroquinate hydrolyase (SORase/DHQase) in spinach leaves. (a) The chromatographic behavior of the bifunctional protein SORase/DHQase on several separation materials with extracts from stroma compared with leaf extracts showed only one peak of enzymic activity originating from the stroma. (b) Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of these extracts followed by specific staining resulted in the same pattern without a band of extraplastidic enzyme. (c) In protoplast fractionation experiments it was shown that SORase/DHQase was present only in the soluble chloroplast protein fraction. An improved purification procedure for SORase/DHQase from stroma of chloroplasts, yield 40%, 1600 times as pure, gave essentially one protein band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Our results demonstrate that both enzyme functions are carried out by a single polypeptide. Nondenaturing PAGE exhibited a pattern of four bands with SORase/DHQase showing that they differ in charge but not in their molecular weight. Molecular weight was determined to be 67 kilodaltons (gel filtration) and 59 kilodaltons (PAGE) for all four forms. It was proven they were not due to artifacts. The four forms show similar kinetic properties, their Km and pH optima differing only very slightly. Response to some metabolites is reported. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 7 PMID:16664373

  20. Purification and Characterization of Cinnamoyl-Coenzyme A:NADP Oxidoreductase in Eucalyptus gunnii.

    PubMed Central

    Goffner, D.; Campbell, M. M.; Campargue, C.; Clastre, M.; Borderies, G.; Boudet, A.; Boudet, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cinnamoyl-coenzyme A:NADP oxidoreductase (CCR, EC 1.2.1.44), the entry-point enzyme into the monolignol biosynthetic pathway, was purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity from differentiating xylem of Eucalyptus gunnii Hook. The purified protein is a monomer of 38 kD and has an isoelectric point of 7. Although Eucalyptus gunnii CCR has approximately equal affinities for all possible substrates (p-coumaroyl-coenzyme A, feruloyl-coenzyme A, and sinapoyl-coenzyme A), it is approximately three times more effective at converting feruloyl-coenzyme A than the other substrates. To gain a better understanding of the catalytic regulation of Eucalyptus CCR, a variety of compounds were tested to determine their effect on CCR activity. CCR activity is inhibited by NADP and coenzyme A. Effectors that bind lysine and cysteine residues also inhibit CCR activity. As a prerequisite to the study of the regulation of CCR at the molecular level, polyclonal antibodies were obtained. PMID:12232355

  1. Sequence-Structure-Function Classification of a Catalytically Diverse Oxidoreductase Superfamily in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, F Hafna; Carr, Paul D; Lee, Brendon M; Afriat-Jurnou, Livnat; Mohamed, A Elaaf; Hong, Nan-Sook; Flanagan, Jack; Taylor, Matthew C; Greening, Chris; Jackson, Colin J

    2015-11-01

    The deazaflavin cofactor F420 enhances the persistence of mycobacteria during hypoxia, oxidative stress, and antibiotic treatment. However, the identities and functions of the mycobacterial enzymes that utilize F420 under these conditions have yet to be resolved. In this work, we used sequence similarity networks to analyze the distribution of the largest F420-dependent protein family in mycobacteria. We show that these enzymes are part of a larger split β-barrel enzyme superfamily (flavin/deazaflavin oxidoreductases, FDORs) that include previously characterized pyridoxamine/pyridoxine-5'-phosphate oxidases and heme oxygenases. We show that these proteins variously utilize F420, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, and heme cofactors. Functional annotation using phylogenetic, structural, and spectroscopic methods revealed their involvement in heme degradation, biliverdin reduction, fatty acid modification, and quinone reduction. Four novel crystal structures show that plasticity in substrate binding pockets and modifications to cofactor binding motifs enabled FDORs to carry out a variety of functions. This systematic classification and analysis provides a framework for further functional analysis of the roles of FDORs in mycobacterial pathogenesis and persistence. PMID:26434506

  2. Mutations Associated with Functional Disorder of Xanthine Oxidoreductase and Hereditary Xanthinuria in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Amaya, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid with concomitant reduction of either NAD+ or O2. The enzyme is a target of drugs to treat hyperuricemia, gout and reactive oxygen-related diseases. Human diseases associated with genetically determined dysfunction of XOR are termed xanthinuria, because of the excretion of xanthine in urine. Xanthinuria is classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Type I xanthinuria involves XOR deficiency due to genetic defect of XOR, whereas type II xanthinuria involves dual deficiency of XOR and aldehyde oxidase (AO, a molybdoflavo enzyme similar to XOR) due to genetic defect in the molybdenum cofactor sulfurase. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is associated with triple deficiency of XOR, AO and sulfite oxidase, due to defective synthesis of molybdopterin, which is a precursor of molybdenum cofactor for all three enzymes. The present review focuses on mutation or chemical modification studies of mammalian XOR, as well as on XOR mutations identified in humans, aimed at understanding the reaction mechanism of XOR and the relevance of mutated XORs as models to estimate the possible side effects of clinical application of XOR inhibitors. PMID:23203137

  3. Cation transport by the respiratory NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I): facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Wojtek; Steuber, Julia

    2013-10-01

    The respiratory complex I (electrogenic NADH:quinone oxidoreductase) has been considered to act exclusively as a H+ pump. This was questioned when the search for the NADH-driven respiratory Na+ pump in Klebsiella pneumoniae initiated by Peter Dimroth led to the discovery of a Na+-translocating complex in this enterobacterium. The 3D structures of complex I from different organisms support the idea that the mechanism of cation transport by complex I involves conformational changes of the membrane-bound NuoL, NuoM and NuoN subunits. In vitro methods to follow Na+ transport were compared with in vivo approaches to test whether complex I, or its individual NuoL, NuoM or NuoN subunits, extrude Na+ from the cytoplasm to the periplasm of bacterial host cells. The truncated NuoL subunit of the Escherichia coli complex I which comprises amino acids 1-369 exhibits Na+ transport activity in vitro. This observation, together with an analysis of putative cation channels in NuoL, suggests that there exists in NuoL at least one continuous pathway for cations lined by amino acid residues from transmembrane segments 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8. Finally, we discuss recent studies on Na+ transport by mitochondrial complex I with respect to its putative role in the cycling of Na+ ions across the inner mitochondrial membrane. PMID:24059520

  4. Staphylococcus aureus lactate- and malate-quinone oxidoreductases contribute to nitric oxide resistance and virulence.

    PubMed

    Spahich, Nicole A; Vitko, Nicholas P; Thurlow, Lance R; Temple, Brenda; Richardson, Anthony R

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen that resists many facets of innate immunity including nitric oxide (NO·). Staphylococcus aureus NO-resistance stems from its ability to evoke a metabolic state that circumvents the negative effects of reactive nitrogen species. The combination of l-lactate and peptides promotes S. aureus growth at moderate NO-levels, however, neither nutrient alone suffices. Here, we investigate the staphylococcal malate-quinone and l-lactate-quinone oxidoreductases (Mqo and Lqo), both of which are critical during NO-stress for the combined utilization of peptides and l-lactate. We address the specific contributions of Lqo-mediated l-lactate utilization and Mqo-dependent amino acid consumption during NO-stress. We show that Lqo conversion of l-lactate to pyruvate is required for the formation of ATP, an essential energy source for peptide utilization. Thus, both Lqo and Mqo are essential for growth under these conditions making them attractive candidates for targeted therapeutics. Accordingly, we exploited a modelled Mqo/Lqo structure to define the catalytic and substrate-binding residues.We also compare the S. aureus Mqo/Lqo enzymes to their close relatives throughout the staphylococci and explore the substrate specificities of each enzyme. This study provides the initial characterization of the mechanism of action and the immunometabolic roles for a newly defined staphylococcal enzyme family. PMID:26851155

  5. Structure and mechanism of a eukaryotic transmembrane ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Peilong; Ma, Dan; Yan, Chuangye; Gong, Xinqi; Du, Mingjian; Shi, Yigong

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C, also known as ascorbate, is required in numerous essential metabolic reactions in eukaryotes. The eukaryotic ascorbate-dependent oxidoreductase cytochrome b561 (Cyt b561), a family of highly conserved transmembrane enzymes, plays an important role in ascorbate recycling and iron absorption. Although Cyt b561 was identified four decades ago, its atomic structure and functional mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structures of cytochrome b561 from Arabidopsis thaliana in both substrate-free and substrate-bound states. Cyt b561 forms a homodimer, with each protomer consisting of six transmembrane helices and two heme groups. The negatively charged substrate ascorbate, or monodehydroascorbate, is enclosed in a positively charged pocket on either side of the membrane. Two highly conserved amino acids, Lys81 and His106, play an essential role in substrate recognition and catalysis. Our structural and biochemical analyses allow the proposition of a general electron transfer mechanism for members of the Cyt b561 family. PMID:24449903

  6. Mechanical stress activates xanthine oxidoreductase through MAP kinase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Peng, Xinqi; Finigan, Jay H; Han, Eugenia J; Hasan, Emile J; Birukov, Konstantin G; Reddy, Sekhar P; Watkins, James E; Kayyali, Usamah S; Garcia, Joe G N; Tuder, Rubin M; Hassoun, Paul M

    2006-09-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) plays a prominent role in acute lung injury because of its ability to generate reactive oxygen species. We investigated the role of XOR in ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Male C57BL/6J mice were assigned to spontaneous ventilation (sham) or mechanical ventilation (MV) with low (7 ml/kg) and high tidal volume (20 ml/kg) for 2 h after which lung XOR activity and expression were measured and the effect of the specific XOR inhibitor allopurinol on pulmonary vascular leakage was examined. In separate experiments, rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (RPMECs) were exposed to cyclic stretch (5% and 18% elongation, 20 cycles/min) for 2 h before intracellular XOR activity measurement. Lung XOR activity was significantly increased at 2 h of MV without changes in XOR expression. There was evidence of p38 MAP kinase, ERK1/2, and ERK5 phosphorylation, but no change in JNK phosphorylation. Evans blue dye extravasation and bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentration were significantly increased in response to MV, changes that were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with allopurinol. Cyclic stretch of RPMECs also caused MAP kinase phosphorylation and a 1.7-fold increase in XOR activity, which was completely abrogated by pretreatment of the cells with specific MAP kinase inhibitors. We conclude that XOR enzymatic activity is significantly increased by mechanical stress via activation of p38 MAP kinase and ERK and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema associated with VILI. PMID:16632522

  7. Xanthine oxidoreductase activation is implicated in the onset of metabolic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aibibula, Zulipiya; Ailixiding, Maierhaba; Iwata, Munetaka; Piao, Jinying; Hara, Yasushi; Okawa, Atsushi; Asou, Yoshinori

    2016-03-25

    A metabolic syndrome (MetS) is accompanied by hyperuricemia, during which xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the production of uric acid. In the cohort study, a correlation between uric acid concentration in the synovial fluid and osteoarthritis (OA) incidence is observed. The purpose of our study was to elucidate XOR function in terms of correlation between MetS and OA. Seven week-old male C57BL6J mice were fed normal diet (ND) or high fat diet (HFD) with or without febuxostat (FEB), a XOR inhibitor. HFD stimulated xanthine oxidase activity in the IPFP and the visceral fat. OA changes at the site of the knee joints had progressed due to HFD, but these changes were reduced upon FEB administration. IL-1β expression in the HFD group was increased in accordance with the enhancement of NLRP3 or iNOS expression in the IPFP, whereas it was inhibited by FEB administration. In the organ culture system, when the IPFP was stimulated with insulin, IL-1β expression was increased in accordance with the increase of NLRP3 expression; however, they were reduced by FEB administration. Based on the above results, we showed that inflammasome activation accompanied by an increase in XOR activity contributed to IPFP inflammation followed by OA progression. PMID:26903297

  8. Genetic association of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1*2) polymorphism with NQO1 levels and risk of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mohini; Mehndiratta, Mohit; Gupta, Stuti; Kalra, Om P; Shukla, Rimi; Gambhir, Jasvinder K

    2016-08-01

    NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) catalyzes reactions having a cyto-protective effect against redox cycling and oxidative stress. A single base polymorphism (C/T) at nucleotide 609 of the NQO1 gene impairs the stability and function of its protein. Its role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) has not been deciphered. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the association of NQO1*2 (rs1800566) polymorphism with plasma NQO1 levels and DN. This study screened 600 participants including healthy controls (HC), type 2 diabetes mellitus without complications (T2DM) and diabetic nephropathy (DN): 200 each for studying NQO1*2 gene polymorphism using the PCR-RFLP. Plasma NQO1 levels were measured by ELISA. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to evaluate the association of NQO1 polymorphism with plasma NQO1 levels and DN. The allelic frequencies of NQO1*1/NQO1*2 were 0.88/0.12 in HC, 0.765/0.235 in T2DM and 0.65/0.35 in DN. Carriers of the NQO1*2 allele had significantly lower plasma NQO1 levels (p<0.05) and revealed higher risk towards the development of DN (OR=1.717, p=0.010). NQO1*2 SNP is a functional polymorphism having a significant effect on NQO1 levels. Our results indicate that NQO1*2 genotype may increase susceptibility to DN in north Indian subjects with T2DM. PMID:27078674

  9. Extensive horizontal gene transfer, duplication, and loss of chlorophyll synthesis genes in the algae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hunsperger, Heather M.; Randhawa, Tejinder; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-02-10

    Two non-homologous, isofunctional enzymes catalyze the penultimate step of chlorophyll a synthesis in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, eukaryotic algae and land plants: the light independent (LIPOR) and light-dependent (POR) protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases. Whereas the distribution of these enzymes in cyanobacteria and land plants is well understood, the presence, loss, duplication, and replacement of these genes have not been surveyed in the polyphyletic and remarkably diverse eukaryotic algal lineages.

  10. Decreased xanthine oxidoreductase is a predictor of poor prognosis in early‐stage gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Linder, N; Haglund, C; Lundin, M; Nordling, S; Ristimäki, A; Kokkola, A; Mrena, J; Wiksten, J‐P; Lundin, J

    2006-01-01

    Background Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is a key enzyme in the degradation of DNA, RNA and high‐energy phosphates. About half of the patients with breast cancer have a decrease in XOR expression. Patients with breast cancer with unfavourable prognosis are independently identified by the loss of XOR. Aim To assess the clinical relevance of XOR expression in gastric cancer. Methods XOR levels were studied by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarray specimens of 337 patients with gastric cancer and the relation between XOR expression and a series of clinicopathological variables, as well as disease‐specific survival, was assessed. Results XOR was moderately decreased in 41% and was undetectable in another 14% of the tumours compared with the corresponding normal tissue. Decreased XOR was associated with advanced stage, deep tumour penetration, diffusely spread tumour location, positive lymph node status, large tumour size, non‐curative disease, cellular aneuploidy, high S‐phase fraction and high cyclooxygenase‐2 expression, but not with p53 expression or Borrmann classification. Down regulation of XOR was associated with unfavourable outcome, and the cumulative 5‐year gastric cancer‐specific survival in patients with strong XOR expression was 47%, compared with 22% in those with moderate to negative expression (p<0.001). This was also true in patients with stage I–II (p = 0.01) and lymph node‐negative (p = 0.02) disease, as well as in patients with smaller (⩽5 cm) tumours (p = 0.02). Conclusion XOR expression in gastric cancer may be a new marker for a more aggressive gastric cancer biology, similar to that previously reported for breast cancer. PMID:16935971

  11. Study on species differences in nephropathy induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Ashizawa, Naoki; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Iwanaga, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2011-05-01

    To clarify the toxicological aspects of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, which is currently being developed as a therapeutic agent against gout and hyperuricemia, we performed the study focused on species differences in FYX-051-induced nephropathy. In the repeated toxicology testing by oral administration, nephropathy was seen at 1 mg/kg and more in rats and at 100 mg/kg in dogs, in contrast to no toxicity even at the practical maximum dose (300 mg/kg) in monkeys. The HPLC and LC-MS/MS analyses of intrarenal deposits in dogs have proven that the entity was xanthine. The study on dose dependency of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, urinary xanthine excretion, and kidney xanthine content by oral administration at 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg to rats revealed the involvement of xanthine in the occurrence of nephropathy, thus suggesting that plasma concentrations of FYX-051 can contribute to species differences. Regarding the possible factors of species differences, the daily urinary excretion of total purine metabolites was 30.5- and 6.3-fold greater in rats and dogs, respectively, than in monkeys. Urinary xanthine solubility was 2.3- and 6.3-fold higher in dogs and monkeys, respectively, than in rats. Plasma concentrations of FYX-051 were fivefold higher in rats than in dogs and monkeys, without differences between the latter two species. Therefore, the present study indicated that species differences in nephropathy were produced by the combined effects of purine metabolism, urinary xanthine solubility, and plasma concentrations of FYX-051. PMID:20936465

  12. Xanthine crystals induced by topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats, cause transitional cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Ashizawa, Naoki; Matsumoto, Koji; Iwanaga, Takashi; Saito, Kazuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the underlying mechanism of transitional cell tumors found in the carcinogenicity testing of topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in which topiroxostat was orally given to F344 rats at 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg for 2 years. In the urinary bladder, transitional cell papillomas and/or carcinomas were seen in males receiving 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg (1/49, 3/49, and 10/50, respectively). In the kidney, transitional cell papillomas and/or carcinomas in the pelvis were seen in 2/50 males and 1/50 females receiving 3 mg/kg. In the mechanistic study by 52-week oral treatment with topiroxostat at 3 mg/kg to F344 male rats, with and without citrate, simple and papillary transitional cell hyperplasias of the urinary bladder epithelium were observed in 5/17 in the topiroxostat-alone treatment group, along with xanthine-induced nephropathy, in contrast to neither xanthine crystals nor lesions in urinary organs by co-treatment group with citrate. As for sex differences of urinary bladder tumors, the BrdU labeling index for epithelial cells of the urinary bladder by 5-week oral treatment with topiroxostat at 10 mg/kg to F344 rats was increased in males only, showing consistency with histopathological findings. Therefore, the present study indicates that transitional cell tumors induced by topiroxostat in rats were due to physical stimulation to transitional cells of xanthine crystals/calculi and provides that other factors were not implicated in this tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the present study suggests that such tumors do not predict for humans since topiroxostat-induced xanthine deposition is a rodent-specific event. PMID:24448833

  13. Analysis of the kinetics and bistability of ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Bazil, Jason N; Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Wu, Fan; Beard, Daniel A

    2013-07-16

    Ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase, bc1 complex, is the enzyme in the respiratory chain of mitochondria responsible for the transfer reducing potential from ubiquinol to cytochrome c coupled to the movement of charge against the electrostatic potential across the mitochondrial inner membrane. The complex is also implicated in the generation of reactive oxygen species under certain conditions and is thus a contributor to cellular oxidative stress. Here, a biophysically detailed, thermodynamically consistent model of the bc1 complex for mammalian mitochondria is developed. The model incorporates the major redox centers near the Qo- and Qi-site of the enzyme, includes the pH-dependent redox reactions, accounts for the effect of the proton-motive force of the reaction rate, and simulates superoxide production at the Qo-site. The model consists of six distinct states characterized by the mobile electron distribution in the enzyme. Within each state, substates that correspond to various electron localizations exist in a rapid equilibrium distribution. The steady-state equation for the six-state system is parameterized using five independent data sets and validated in comparison to additional experimental data. Model analysis suggests that the pH-dependence on turnover is primarily due to the pKa values of cytochrome bH and Rieske iron sulfur protein. A previously proposed kinetic scheme at the Qi-site where ubiquinone binds to only the reduced enzyme and ubiquinol binds to only the oxidized enzyme is shown to be thermodynamically infeasible. Moreover, the model is able to reproduce the bistability phenomenon where at a given overall flux through the enzyme, different rates of superoxide production are attained when the enzyme is differentially reduced. PMID:23870256

  14. Engineering of Helicobacter pylori Dimeric Oxidoreductase DsbK (HP0231)

    PubMed Central

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M.; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J.; Banaś, Anna M.; Jastrząb, Katarzyna; Pisarczyk, Karolina; Kolarzyk, Anna; Łasica, Anna M.; Collet, Jean-François; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of disulfide bonds that are catalyzed by proteins of the Dsb (disulfide bond) family is crucial for the correct folding of many extracytoplasmic proteins. Thus, this formation plays an essential, pivotal role in the assembly of many virulence factors. The Helicobacter pylori disulfide bond-forming system is uncomplicated compared to the best-characterized Escherichia coli Dsb pathways. It possesses only two extracytoplasmic Dsb proteins named HP0377 and HP0231. As previously shown, HP0377 is a reductase involved in the process of cytochrome c maturation. Additionally, it also possesses disulfide isomerase activity. HP0231 was the first periplasmic dimeric oxidoreductase involved in disulfide generation to be described. Although HP0231 function is critical for oxidative protein folding, its structure resembles that of dimeric EcDsbG, which does not confer this activity. However, the HP0231 catalytic motifs (CXXC and the so-called cis-Pro loop) are identical to that of monomeric EcDsbA. To understand the functioning of HP0231, we decided to study the relations between its sequence, structure and activity through an extensive analysis of various HP0231 point mutants, using in vivo and in vitro strategies. Our work shows the crucial role of the cis-Pro loop, as changing valine to threonine in this motif completely abolishes the protein function in vivo. Functioning of HP0231 is conditioned by the combination of CXXC and the cis-Pro loop, as replacing the HP0231 CXXC motif by the motif from EcDsbG or EcDsbC results in bifunctional protein, at least in E. coli. We also showed that the dimerization domain of HP0231 ensures contact with its substrates. Moreover, the activity of this oxidase is independent on the structure of the catalytic domain. Finally, we showed that HP0231 chaperone activity is independent of its redox function. PMID:27507968

  15. Enzyme activation and catalysis: characterisation of the vibrational modes of substrate and product in protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Sytina, Olga A; Alexandre, Maxime T; Heyes, Derren J; Hunter, C Neil; Robert, Bruno; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise

    2011-02-14

    The light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide, a key step in the synthesis of chlorophyll, is catalyzed by the enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) and requires two photons (O. A. Sytina et al., Nature, 2008, 456, 1001-1008). The first photon activates the enzyme-substrate complex, a subsequent second photon initiates the photochemistry by triggering the formation of a catalytic intermediate. These two events are characterized by different spectral changes in the infra-red spectral region. Here, we investigate the vibrational frequencies of the POR-bound and unbound substrate, and product, and thus provide a detailed assignment of the spectral changes in the 1800-1250 cm(-1) region associated with the catalytic conversion of PChlide:NADPH:TyrOH into Chlide:NADP(+):TyrO(-). Fluorescence line narrowed spectra of the POR-bound Pchlide reveal a C=O keto group downshifted by more than 20 cm(-1) to a relatively low vibrational frequency of 1653 cm(-1), as compared to the unbound Pchlide, indicating that binding of the chromophore to the protein occurs via strong hydrogen bond(s). The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes are consistent with a six-coordinated state of the POR-bound Pchlide, suggesting that there are two coordination interactions between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and protein residues, and/or a water molecule. The frequencies of the C=C vibrational modes of Chlide are consistent with a five-coordinated state, indicating a single interaction between the central Mg atom of the chromophore and a water molecule. Rapid-scan FTIR measurements on the Pchlide:POR:NADPH complex at 4 cm(-1) spectral resolution reveal a new band in the 1670 cm(-1) region. The FTIR spectra of the enzyme activation phase indicate involvement of a nucleotide-binding structural motif, and an increased exposure of the protein to solvent after activation. PMID:21103538

  16. FYX-051: a novel and potent hybrid-type inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Koji; Okamoto, Ken; Ashizawa, Naoki; Nishino, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    4-[5-(Pyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]pyridine-2-carbonitrile (FYX-051) is a potent inhibitor of bovine milk xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). Steady-state kinetics study showed that it initially behaved as a competitive-type inhibitor with a K(i) value of 5.7 × 10(-9) M, then after a few minutes it formed a tight complex with XOR via a Mo-oxygen-carbon atom covalent linkage, as reported previously (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101:7931-7936, 2004). Thus, FYX-051 is a hybrid-type inhibitor exhibiting both structure- and mechanism-based inhibition. The FYX-051-XOR complex decomposed with a half-life of 20.4 h, but the enzyme activity did not fully recover. This was found to be caused by XOR-mediated conversion of FYX-051 to 4-[5-(2-hydroxypyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]pyridine-2-carbonitrile (2-hydroxy-FYX-051), as well as formation of 6-hydroxy-4-[5-(2-hydroxypyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]pyridine-2-carbonitrile (dihydroxy-FYX-051) and 4-[5-(2,6-dihydroxypyridin-4-yl)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl]-6-hydroxypyridine-2-carbonitrile (trihydroxy-FYX-051) during prolonged incubation for up to 72 h. A distinct charge-transfer band was observed concomitantly with the formation of the trihydroxy-FYX-051-XOR complex. Crystallographic analysis of the charge-transfer complex indicated that a Mo-nitrogen-carbon bond was formed between molybdenum of XOR and the nitrile group of trihydroxy-FYX-051. FYX-051 showed a potent and long-lasting hypouricemic effect in a rat model of potassium oxonate-induced hyperuricemia, and it seems to be a promising candidate for the clinical treatment of hyperuricemia. PMID:20952484

  17. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model. PMID:27029427

  18. Selective Time- and NADPH-Dependent Inhibition of Human CYP2E1 by Clomethiazole.

    PubMed

    Stresser, David M; Perloff, Elke S; Mason, Andrew K; Blanchard, Andrew P; Dehal, Shangara S; Creegan, Timothy P; Singh, Ritu; Gangl, Eric T

    2016-08-01

    The sedative clomethiazole (CMZ) has been used in Europe since the mid-1960s to treat insomnia and alcoholism. It has been previously demonstrated in clinical studies to reversibly inhibit human CYP2E1 in vitro and decrease CYP2E1-mediated elimination of chlorzoxazone. We have investigated the selectivity of CMZ inhibition of CYP2E1 in pooled human liver microsomes (HLMs). In a reversible inhibition assay of the major drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (P450) isoforms, CYP2A6 and CYP2E1 exhibited IC50 values of 24 µM and 42 µM, respectively with all other isoforms exhibiting values >300 µM. When CMZ was preincubated with NADPH and liver microsomal protein for 30 minutes before being combined with probe substrates, however, more potent inhibition was observed for CYP2E1 and CYP2B6 but not CYP2A6 or other P450 isoforms. The substantial increase in potency of CYP2E1 inhibition upon preincubation enables the use of CMZ to investigate the role of human CYP2E1 in xenobiotic metabolism and provides advantages over other chemical inhibitors of CYP2E1. The KI and kinact values obtained with HLM-catalyzed 6-hydroxylation of chlorzoxazone were 40 µM and 0.35 minute(-1), respectively, and similar to values obtained with recombinant CYP2E1 (41 µM, 0.32 minute(-1)). The KI and kinact values, along with other parameters, were used in a mechanistic static model to explain earlier observations of a profound decrease in the rate of chlorzoxazone elimination in volunteers despite the absence of detectable CMZ in blood. PMID:27149898

  19. Effects of 5-azacytidine and methyl-group deficiency on NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase and glutathione S-transferase in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, G; Pott, U; Bruckschen, M; Sies, H

    1988-01-01

    Treatment with 5-azacytidine or dietary methyl-group deficiency effected DNA hypomethylation in mouse liver. With these treatments, NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.2) and some glutathione S-transferase (EC 2.5.1.18) activities were over-expressed, lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) activity was unaffected and the level of cytochrome P-450 was decreased. The 5-azacytidine induction of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase was significantly suppressed by puromycin, suggesting that increased enzyme activity results from an elevated level of enzyme-protein synthesis. Regulation at the transcriptional level was revealed by a substantial increase in mRNA of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase, as shown by Northern-blot analysis. The enzyme pattern observed with 5-azacytidine and with the (carcinogenic) dietary methyl-group deficiency resembles that found in hepatic nodules. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2458098

  20. Identification of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase activity in azoreductases from P. aeruginosa: azoreductases and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases belong to the same FMN-dependent superfamily of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Ali; Kaplan, Elise; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Polycarpou, Elena; Crescente, Vincenzo; Lowe, Edward; Preston, Gail M; Sim, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Water soluble quinones are a group of cytotoxic anti-bacterial compounds that are secreted by many species of plants, invertebrates, fungi and bacteria. Studies in a number of species have shown the importance of quinones in response to pathogenic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. Two electron reduction is an important mechanism of quinone detoxification as it generates the less toxic quinol. In most organisms this reaction is carried out by a group of flavoenzymes known as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases. Azoreductases have previously been separate from this group, however using azoreductases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa we show that they can rapidly reduce quinones. Azoreductases from the same organism are also shown to have distinct substrate specificity profiles allowing them to reduce a wide range of quinones. The azoreductase family is also shown to be more extensive than originally thought, due to the large sequence divergence amongst its members. As both NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases and azoreductases have related reaction mechanisms it is proposed that they form an enzyme superfamily. The ubiquitous and diverse nature of azoreductases alongside their broad substrate specificity, indicates they play a wide role in cellular survival under adverse conditions. PMID:24915188

  1. Rescue of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por) mouse mutants reveals functions in vasculogenesis, brain and limb patterning linked to retinoic acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Vanessa; Otto, Diana M E; Dickmann, Leslie; Schmidt, Katy; Schuhbaur, Brigitte; Henderson, Colin; Blomhoff, Rune; Wolf, C Roland; Tickle, Cheryll; Dollé, Pascal

    2007-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) acts as an electron donor for all cytochrome P450 enzymes. Knockout mouse Por(-/-) mutants, which are early embryonic (E9.5) lethal, have been found to have overall elevated retinoic acid (RA) levels, leading to the idea that POR early developmental function is mainly linked to the activity of the CYP26 RA-metabolizing enzymes (Otto et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 23, 6103-6116). By crossing Por mutants with a RA-reporter lacZ transgene, we show that Por(-/-) embryos exhibit both elevated and ectopic RA signaling activity e.g. in cephalic and caudal tissues. Two strategies were used to functionally demonstrate that decreasing retinoid levels can reverse Por(-/-) phenotypic defects, (i) by culturing Por(-/-) embryos in defined serum-free medium, and (ii) by generating compound mutants defective in RA synthesis due to haploinsufficiency of the retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (Raldh2) gene. Both approaches clearly improved the Por(-/-) early phenotype, the latter allowing mutants to be recovered up until E13.5. Abnormal brain patterning, with posteriorization of hindbrain cell fates and defective mid- and forebrain development and vascular defects were rescued in E9.5 Por(-/-) embryos. E13.5 Por(-/-); Raldh2(+/-) embryos exhibited abdominal/caudal and limb defects that strikingly phenocopy those of Cyp26a1(-/-) and Cyp26b1(-/-) mutants, respectively. Por(-/-); Raldh2(+/-) limb buds were truncated and proximalized and the anterior-posterior patterning system was not established. Thus, POR function is indispensable for the proper regulation of RA levels and tissue distribution not only during early embryonic development but also in later morphogenesis and molecular patterning of the brain, abdominal/caudal region and limbs. PMID:17126317

  2. The PRY/SPRY/B30.2 Domain of Butyrophilin 1A1 (BTN1A1) Binds to Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaekwang; Rao, Anita U.; Xu, Jinling; Ogg, Sherry L.; Hathout, Yetrib; Fenselau, Catherine; Mather, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    Butyrophilin 1A1 (BTN1A1) and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) are highly expressed in the lactating mammary gland and are secreted into milk associated with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). Ablation of the genes encoding either protein causes severe defects in the secretion of milk lipid droplets, suggesting that the two proteins may function in the same pathway. Therefore, we determined whether BTN1A1 and XOR directly interact using protein binding assays, surface plasmon resonance analysis, and gel filtration. Bovine XOR bound with high affinity in a pH- and salt-sensitive manner (KD = 101 ± 31 nm in 10 mm HEPES, 150 mm NaCl, pH 7.4) to the PRY/SPRY/B30.2 domain in the cytoplasmic region of bovine BTN1A1. Binding was stoichiometric, with one XOR dimer binding to either two BTN1A1 monomers or one dimer. XOR bound to BTN1A1 orthologs from mice, humans, or cows but not to the cytoplasmic domains of the closely related human paralogs, BTN2A1 or BTN3A1, or to the B30.2 domain of human RoRet (TRIM 38), a protein in the TRIM family. Analysis of the protein composition of the MFGM of wild type and BTN1A1 null mice showed that most of the XOR in mice lacking BTN1A1 was released from the MFGM in a soluble form when the milk lipid droplets were disrupted to prepare membrane, compared with wild-type mice, in which most of the XOR remained membrane-bound. Thus BTN1A1 functions in vivo to stabilize the association of XOR with the MFGM by direct interactions through the PRY/SPRY/B30.2 domain. The potential significance of BTN1A1/XOR interactions in the mammary gland and other tissues is discussed. PMID:19531472

  3. Arabidopsis Tic62 and Ferredoxin-NADP(H) Oxidoreductase Form Light-Regulated Complexes That Are Integrated into the Chloroplast Redox Poise[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Benz, J.P.; Stengel, A.; Lintala, M.; Lee, Y.-H.; Weber, A.; Philippar, K.; Gügel, I.L.; Kaieda, S.; Ikegami, T.; Mulo, P.; Soll, J.; Bölter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the inner envelope of chloroplasts is catalyzed by the Tic translocon, consisting of Tic110, Tic40, Tic62, Tic55, Tic32, Tic20, and Tic22. Tic62 was proposed to act as a redox sensor of the complex because of its redox-dependent shuttling between envelope and stroma and its specific interaction with the photosynthetic protein ferredoxin-NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR). However, the nature of this close relationship so far remained enigmatic. A putative additional localization of Tic62 at the thylakoids mandated further studies examining how this feature might be involved in the respective redox sensing pathway and the interaction with its partner protein. Therefore, both the association with FNR and the physiological role of the third, thylakoid-bound pool of Tic62 were investigated in detail. Coexpression analysis indicates that Tic62 has similar expression patterns as genes involved in photosynthetic functions and protein turnover. At the thylakoids, Tic62 and FNR form high molecular weight complexes that are not involved in photosynthetic electron transfer but are dynamically regulated by light signals and the stromal pH. Structural analyses reveal that Tic62 binds to FNR in a novel binding mode for flavoproteins, with a major contribution from hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, in absence of Tic62, membrane binding and stability of FNR are drastically reduced. We conclude that Tic62 represents a major FNR interaction partner not only at the envelope and in the stroma, but also at the thylakoids of Arabidopsis thaliana and perhaps all flowering plants. Association with Tic62 stabilizes FNR and is involved in its dynamic and light-dependent membrane tethering. PMID:20040542

  4. Characterization of a polymorphism in NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (DT-diaphorase).

    PubMed Central

    Traver, R. D.; Siegel, D.; Beall, H. D.; Phillips, R. M.; Gibson, N. W.; Franklin, W. A.; Ross, D.

    1997-01-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1, EC 1.6.99.2) is an obligate two-electron reductase that can either bioactivate or detoxify quinones and has been proposed to play an important role in chemoprevention. We have previously characterized a homozygous point mutation in the BE human colon carcinoma cell line that leads to a loss of NQO1 activity. Sequence analysis showed that this mutation was at position 609 of the NQO1 cDNA, conferring a proline to serine substitution at position 187 of the NQO1 enzyme. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, we have found that the H596 human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line has elevated NQO1 mRNA, but no detectable enzyme activity. Sequencing of the coding region of NQO1 from the H596 cells showed the presence of the identical homozygous point mutation present in the BE cell line. Expression and purification of recombinant wild-type and mutant protein from E. coli showed that mutant protein could be detected using immunoblot analysis and had 2% of the enzymatic activity of the wild-type protein. PCR and Northern blot analysis showed moderate to low levels of expression of the correctly sized transcript in the mutant cells. Immunoblot analysis also revealed that recombinant mutant protein was immunoreactive; however, the mutant protein was not detected in the cytosol of either BE or H596 cells, suggesting that the mutant proteins were either not translated or were rapidly degraded. The absence of any detectable, active protein, therefore, appears to be responsible for the lack of NQO1 activity in cells homozygous for the mutation. A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis for the mutation at position 609 conducted on 90 human lung tissue samples (45 matched sets of tumour and uninvolved tissue) revealed a 7% incidence of individuals homozygous for the mutation, and 42% heterozygous for the mutation. These data suggest that the mutation at position 609 represents a

  5. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase in the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kramkowski, K; Leszczynska, A; Przyborowski, K; Kaminski, T; Rykaczewska, U; Sitek, B; Zakrzewska, A; Proniewski, B; Smolenski, R T; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W; Chlopicki, S

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying nitrite-induced effects on thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo are not clear. The goal of the work described here was to investigate the role of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in the anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic activities of nitrite in rats in vivo. Arterial thrombosis was induced electrically in rats with renovascular hypertension by partial ligation of the left renal artery. Sodium nitrite (NaNO2, 0.17 mmol/kg twice daily for 3 days, p.o) was administered with or without one of the XOR-inhibitors: allopurinol (ALLO) and febuxostat (FEB) (100 and 5 mg/kg, p.o., for 3 days). Nitrite treatment (0.17 mmol/kg), which was associated with a significant increase in NOHb, nitrite/nitrate plasma concentration, resulted in a substantial decrease in thrombus weight (TW) (0.48 ± 0.03 mg vs. vehicle [VEH] 0.88 ± 0.08 mg, p < 0.001) without a significant hypotensive effect. The anti-thrombotic effect of nitrite was partially reversed by FEB (TW = 0.63 ± 0.06 mg, p < 0.05 vs. nitrites), but not by ALLO (TW = 0.43 ± 0.02 mg). In turn, profound anti-platelet effect of nitrite measured ex vivo using collagen-induced whole-blood platelet aggregation (70.5 ± 7.1% vs. VEH 100 ± 4.5%, p < 0.05) and dynamic thromboxaneB2 generation was fully reversed by both XOR-inhibitors. In addition, nitrite decreased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentration (0.47 ± 0.13 ng/ml vs. VEH 0.62 ± 0.04 ng/ml, p < 0.05) and FEB/ALLO reversed this effect. In vitro the anti-platelet effect of nitrite (1 mM) was reversed by FEB (0.1 mM) under hypoxia (0.5%O2) and normoxia (20%O2). Nitrite treatment had no effect on coagulation parameters. In conclusion, the nitrite-induced anti-platelet effect in rats in vivo is mediated by XOR, but XOR does not fully account for the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite. PMID:26374946

  6. Comparison of the inhibitory action of synthetic capsaicin analogues with various NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductases.

    PubMed

    Satoh, T; Miyoshi, H; Sakamoto, K; Iwamura, H

    1996-01-11

    Capsaicin is a new naturally occurring inhibitor of proton-pumping NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-1), that competitively acts against ubiquinone. A series of capsaicin analogues was synthesized to examine the structural factors required for the inhibitory action and to probe the structural property of the ubiquinone catalytic site of various NADH-ubiquinone reductases, including non-proton-pumping enzyme (NDH-2), from bovine heart mitochondria, potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum, L) mitochondria and Escherichia coli (GR 19N) plasma membranes. Some synthetic capsaicins were fairly potent inhibitors of each of the three NDH-1 compared with the potent rotenone and piericidin A. Synthetic capsaicin analogues inhibited all three NDH-1 activities in a competitive manner against an exogenous quinone. The modification both of the substitution pattern and of the number of methoxy groups on the benzene ring, which may be superimposable on the quinone ring of ubiquinone, did not drastically affect the inhibitory potency. In addition, alteration of the position of dipolar amide bond unit in the molecule and chemical modifications of this unit did not change the inhibitory potency, particularly with bovine heart and potato tuber NDH-1. These results might be explained assuming that the ubiquinone catalytic site of NDH-1 is spacious enough to accommodate a variety of structurally different capsaicin analogues in a dissimilar manner. Regarding the moiety corresponding to the alkyl side chain, a rigid diphenyl ether structure was more inhibitory than a flexible alkyl chain. Structure-activity studies and molecular orbital calculations suggested that a bent form is the active conformation of capsaicin analogues. On the other hand, poor correlations between the inhibitory potencies determined with the three NDH-1 suggested that the structural similarity of the ubiquinone catalytic sites of these enzymes is rather poor. The sensitivity to the inhibition by synthetic capsaicins

  7. High-Yield Expression of a Catalytically Active Membrane-Bound Protein: Human P450 Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Sandee, Duanpen

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a two-flavin protein that reduces microsomal P450 enzymes and some other proteins. Preparation of active bacterially expressed human POR for biochemical studies has been difficult because membrane-bound proteins tend to interact with column matrices. To reduce column-protein interactions and permit more vigorous washing, human POR lacking 27 N-terminal residues (N-27 POR) was modified to carry a C-terminal Gly3His6-tag (N-27 POR-G3H6). When expressed in Escherichia coli, N-27 POR-G3H6 could be purified to apparent homogeneity by a modified, single-step nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography, yielding 31 mg POR per liter of culture, whereas standard purification of native N-27 POR required multiple steps, yielding 5 mg POR per liter. Both POR proteins had absorption maxima at 375 and 453 nm and both reduced cytochrome c with indistinguishable specific activities. Using progesterone as substrate for bacterially expressed purified human P450c17, the Michaelis constant for 17α-hydroxylase activity supported by N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 were 1.73 or 1.49 μm, and the maximal velocity was 0.029 or 0.026 pmol steroids per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Using 17-hydroxypregnenolone as the P450c17 substrate, the Michaelis constant for 17,20 lyase activity using N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 was 1.92 or 1.89 μm and the maximal velocity was 0.041 or 0.042 pmol steroid per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Thus, N-27 POR-G3H6 is equally active as native N-27 POR. This expression and purification system permits the rapid preparation of large amounts of highly pure, biologically active POR and may be generally applicable for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:21586563

  8. Tempol improves xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated vascular responses to nitrite in experimental renovascular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Guimaraes, Danielle A; Tella, Sandra O Conde; Blanco, Ana L Furlan; Angelis, Celio D; Schechter, Alan N; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-08-01

    Upregulation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) increases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and contributes to nitroso-redox imbalance. However, XOR can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite, and increased superoxide could inactivate NO formed from nitrite. This study tested the hypothesis that XOR contributes to the cardiovascular effects of nitrite in renovascular hypertension, and that treatment with the antioxidant tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) improves XOR-mediated effects of nitrite. Blood pressure was assessed weekly in two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) and control rats. After six weeks of hypertension, the relaxing responses to nitrite were assessed in aortic rings in the presence of the XOR inhibitor oxypurinol (or vehicle), either in the absence or in the presence of tempol. Moreover, in vivo hypotensive responses to nitrite were also examined in the presence of oxypurinol (or vehicle) and tempol (or vehicle). Aortic XOR activity and expression were evaluated by fluorescence and Western blot, respectively. Vascular ROS production was assessed by the dihydroethidium assay. 2K1C hypertensive rats showed increased aortic XOR activity and vascular ROS production compared with control rats. Oxypurinol shifted the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right in aortic rings from 2K1C rats (but not in controls). Oxypurinol also attenuated the hypotensive responses to nitrite in 2K1C rats (but not in controls). These functional findings agree with increased aortic and plasma XOR activity found in 2K1C rats. Tempol treatment enhanced oxypurinol-induced shift of the nitrite concentration-response curve to the right. However, antioxidant treatment did not affect XOR-mediated hypotensive effects of nitrite. Our results show that XOR is important to the cardiovascular responses to nitrite in 2K1C hypertension, and XOR inhibitors commonly used by patients may cancel this effect. This finding suggests that nitrite treatment may not be

  9. Purification and characterization of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from a thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6.

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, K S; Ishii, M; Igarashi, Y; Kodama, T

    1996-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from a thermophilic, obligately autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, was purified to homogeneity by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and by fractionation by DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, polyacrylate-quaternary amine, hydroxyapatite, and Superdex-200 chromatography. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of about 105 kDa and comprised two subunits (70 kDa and 35 kDa). The activity of the 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase was detected by the use of 2-oxoglutarate, coenzyme A, and one of several electron acceptors in substrate amounts (ferredoxin isolated from H. thermophilus, flavin adenine dinucleotide, flavin mononucleotide, or methyl viologen). NAD, NADP, and ferredoxins from Chlorella spp. and Clostridium pasteurianum were ineffective. The enzyme was extremely thermostable; the temperature optimum for 2-oxoglutarate oxidation was above 80 degrees C, and the time for a 50% loss of activity at 70 degrees C under anaerobic conditions was 22 h. The optimum pH for a 2-oxoglutarate oxidation reaction was 7.6 to 7.8. The apparent Km values for 2-oxoglutarate and coenzyme A at 70 degrees C were 1.42 mM and 80 microM, respectively. PMID:8655524

  10. Probing the Transmembrane Structure and Dynamics of Microsomal NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Zhang, Meng; Popovych, Nataliya; Hung, Ivan; Im, Sang-Choul; Gan, Zhehong; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-01-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is an essential redox partner of the cytochrome P450 (cyt P450) superfamily of metabolic enzymes. In the endoplasmic reticulum of liver cells, such enzymes metabolize ∼75% of the pharmaceuticals in use today. It is known that the transmembrane domain of CYPOR plays a crucial role in aiding the formation of a complex between CYPOR and cyt P450. Here we present the transmembrane structure, topology, and dynamics of the FMN binding domain of CYPOR in a native membrane-like environment. Our solid-state NMR results reveal that the N-terminal transmembrane domain of CYPOR adopts an α-helical conformation in the lipid membrane environment. Most notably, we also show that the transmembrane helix is tilted ∼13° from the lipid bilayer normal, and exhibits motions on a submillisecond timescale including rotational diffusion of the whole helix and fluctuation of the helical director axis. The approaches and the information reported in this study would enable further investigations on the structure and dynamics of the full-length NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase and its interaction with other membrane proteins in a membrane environment. PMID:24853741

  11. Convenient microtiter plate-based, oxygen-independent activity assays for flavin-dependent oxidoreductases based on different redox dyes

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Dagmar; Krondorfer, Iris; Zahma, Kawah; Stoisser, Thomas; Bolivar, Juan M; Nidetzky, Bernd; Peterbauer, Clemens K; Haltrich, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-dependent oxidoreductases are increasingly recognized as important biocatalysts for various industrial applications. In order to identify novel activities and to improve these enzymes in engineering approaches, suitable screening methods are necessary. We developed novel microtiter-plate-based assays for flavin-dependent oxidases and dehydrogenases using redox dyes as electron acceptors for these enzymes. 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, methylene green, and thionine show absorption changes between their oxidized and reduced forms in the visible range, making it easy to judge visually changes in activity. A sample set of enzymes containing both flavoprotein oxidases and dehydrogenases – pyranose 2-oxidase, pyranose dehydrogenase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, d-amino acid oxidase, and l-lactate oxidase – was selected. Assays for these enzymes are based on a direct enzymatic reduction of the redox dyes and not on the coupled detection of a reaction product as in the frequently used assays based on hydrogen peroxide formation. The different flavoproteins show low Michaelis constants with these electron acceptor substrates, and therefore these dyes need to be added in only low concentrations to assure substrate saturation. In conclusion, these electron acceptors are useful in selective, reliable and cheap MTP-based screening assays for a range of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases, and offer a robust method for library screening, which could find applications in enzyme engineering programs. PMID:24376171

  12. Ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase in junction with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: characteristics of an enzymatically active nanohybrid.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, Krzysztof; Worch, Remigiusz; Grzyb, Joanna

    2013-05-15

    Ferredoxin:NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR) is a plant and cyanobacterial photosynthetic enzyme, also found in non-photosynthetic tissues, where it is involved in redox reactions of biosynthetic pathways. In vivo it transfers electrons to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)), forming its reduced version, NADPH, while in vitro it can also use NADPH to reduce several substrates, such as ferricyanide, various quinones and nitriles. As an oxidoreductase catalyzing reaction of a broad range of substrates, FNR may be used in biotechnological processes. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals of a few to several nanometers diameter, having very useful luminescent properties. We present the spectroscopic and functional characteristics of a covalent conjugation of FNR and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots. Two types of quantum dots, of different diameter and emission maximum (550 and 650 nm), were used for comparison. Steady-state fluorescence and gel electrophoresis confirmed efficient conjugation, while fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) allowed for determination of the conjugates' radii. The nanohybrids sustained enzymatic activity; however, changes in maximal reaction rates and Michaelis constant were found. Detailed analysis of the kinetic parameters showed that the changes in the enzyme activity depend on the substrate used for activity measurement but also on the size of the quantum dots. The presented nanohybrids, as the first example using plant and photosynthetic enzyme as a protein partner, may became a tool to study photosynthesis as well as other biosynthetic and biotechnological processes, involving enzymatically catalyzed electron transfer. PMID:23611948

  13. Comprehensively Characterizing the Thioredoxin Interactome In Vivo Highlights the Central Role Played by This Ubiquitous Oxidoreductase in Redox Control.

    PubMed

    Arts, Isabelle S; Vertommen, Didier; Baldin, Francesca; Laloux, Géraldine; Collet, Jean-François

    2016-06-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase maintaining protein-bound cysteine residues in the reduced thiol state. Here, we combined a well-established method to trap Trx substrates with the power of bacterial genetics to comprehensively characterize the in vivo Trx redox interactome in the model bacterium Escherichia coli Using strains engineered to optimize trapping, we report the identification of a total 268 Trx substrates, including 201 that had never been reported to depend on Trx for reduction. The newly identified Trx substrates are involved in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from energy metabolism to amino acid synthesis and transcription. The interaction between Trx and two of its newly identified substrates, a protein required for the import of most carbohydrates, PtsI, and the bacterial actin homolog MreB was studied in detail. We provide direct evidence that PtsI and MreB contain cysteine residues that are susceptible to oxidation and that participate in the formation of an intermolecular disulfide with Trx. By considerably expanding the number of Trx targets, our work highlights the role played by this major oxidoreductase in a variety of cellular processes. Moreover, as the dependence on Trx for reduction is often conserved across species, it also provides insightful information on the interactome of Trx in organisms other than E. coli. PMID:27081212

  14. Membrane-associated glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enzymes PhcC and PhcD are essential for enantioselective catabolism of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (-)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  15. Membrane-Associated Glucose-Methanol-Choline Oxidoreductase Family Enzymes PhcC and PhcD Are Essential for Enantioselective Catabolism of Dehydrodiconiferyl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (−)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  16. Laboratory Prototype of Bioreactor for Oxidation of Toxic D-Lactate Using Yeast Cells Overproducing D-Lactate Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Karkovska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    D-lactate is a natural component of many fermented foods like yogurts, sour milk, cheeses, and pickles vegetable products. D-lactate in high concentrations is toxic for children and people with short bowel syndrome and provokes encephalopathy. These facts convincingly demonstrate a need for effective tools for the D-lactate removal from some food products. The main idea of investigation is focused on application of recombinant thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha “tr6,” overproducing D-lactate: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.2.4, D-lactate cytochrome c oxidoreductase, D-lactate dehydrogenase (cytochrome), DLDH). In addition to 6-fold overexpression of DLDH under a strong constitutive promoter (prAOX), the strain of H. polymorpha “tr6” (gcr1 catX/Δcyb2, prAOX_DLDH) is characterized by impairment in glucose repression of AOX promoter, devoid of catalase and L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. Overexpression of DLDH coupling with the deletion of L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity opens possibility for usage of the strain as a base for construction of bioreactor for removing D-lactate from fermented products due to oxidation to nontoxic pyruvate. A laboratory prototype of column-type bioreactor for removing a toxic D-lactate from model solution based on permeabilized cells of the H. polymorpha “tr6” and alginate gel was constructed and efficiency of this process was tested. PMID:27446952

  17. Identification and cloning of two immunogenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO) of Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clostridium related poultry diseases such as necrotic enteritis (NE) and gangrenous dermatitis (GD) cause substantial economic losses on a global scale. Two antigenic C. perfringens proteins, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), were identified by reaction with...

  18. Laboratory Prototype of Bioreactor for Oxidation of Toxic D-Lactate Using Yeast Cells Overproducing D-Lactate Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Karkovska, Maria; Smutok, Oleh; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2016-01-01

    D-lactate is a natural component of many fermented foods like yogurts, sour milk, cheeses, and pickles vegetable products. D-lactate in high concentrations is toxic for children and people with short bowel syndrome and provokes encephalopathy. These facts convincingly demonstrate a need for effective tools for the D-lactate removal from some food products. The main idea of investigation is focused on application of recombinant thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha "tr6," overproducing D-lactate: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.2.4, D-lactate cytochrome c oxidoreductase, D-lactate dehydrogenase (cytochrome), DLDH). In addition to 6-fold overexpression of DLDH under a strong constitutive promoter (prAOX), the strain of H. polymorpha "tr6" (gcr1 catX/Δcyb2, prAOX_DLDH) is characterized by impairment in glucose repression of AOX promoter, devoid of catalase and L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activities. Overexpression of DLDH coupling with the deletion of L-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity opens possibility for usage of the strain as a base for construction of bioreactor for removing D-lactate from fermented products due to oxidation to nontoxic pyruvate. A laboratory prototype of column-type bioreactor for removing a toxic D-lactate from model solution based on permeabilized cells of the H. polymorpha "tr6" and alginate gel was constructed and efficiency of this process was tested. PMID:27446952

  19. The two common polymorphic forms of human NRH-quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) have different biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Megarity, Clare F; Gill, James R E; Caraher, M Clare; Stratford, Ian J; Nolan, Karen A; Timson, David J

    2014-05-01

    There are two common forms of NRH-quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) in the human population resulting from SNP rs1143684. One has phenylalanine at position 47 (NQO2-F47) and the other leucine (NQO2-L47). Using recombinant proteins, we show that these variants have similar steady state kinetic parameters, although NQO2-L47 has a slightly lower specificity constant. NQO2-L47 is less stable towards proteolytic digestion and thermal denaturation than NQO2-F47. Both forms are inhibited by resveratrol, but NQO2-F47 shows negative cooperativity with this inhibitor. Thus these data demonstrate, for the first time, clear biochemical differences between the variants which help explain previous biomedical and epidemiological findings. PMID:24631540

  20. Reversible dissociation of flavin mononucleotide from the mammalian membrane-bound NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I)

    PubMed Central

    Gostimskaya, Irina S.; Grivennikova, Vera G.; Cecchini, Gary; Vinogradov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Conditions for the reversible dissociation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) from the membrane-bound mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) are described. The catalytic activities of the enzyme, i.e. rotenone-insensitive NADH:hexaammineruthenium III reductase and rotenone-sensitive NADH:quinone reductase decline when bovine heart submitochondrial particles are incubated with NADH in the presence of rotenone or cyanide at alkaline pH. FMN protects and fully restores the NADH-induced inactivation whereas riboflavin and flavin adenine dinucleotide do not. The data show that the reduction of complex I significantly weakens the binding of FMN to protein thus resulting in its dissociation when the concentration of holoenzyme is comparable with Kd (~10−8 M at pH 10.0). PMID:18037377

  1. Discovery of a ferredoxin:NAD+-oxidoreductase (Rnf) in Acetobacterium woodii: a novel potential coupling site in acetogens.

    PubMed

    Müller, Volker; Imkamp, Frank; Biegel, Eva; Schmidt, Silke; Dilling, Sabrina

    2008-03-01

    Acetogens use the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for reduction of carbon dioxide to acetate. This pathway not only allows reoxidation of reducing equivalents during heterotrophic growth but also supports chemolithoautotrophic growth on H(2) + CO(2). The latter argues for this pathway being a source for net energy conservation, but the mechanism involved remains unknown. In addition to CO(2), acetogens can use alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate or caffeate. Caffeate respiration in the model acetogen Acetobacterium woodii is coupled to energy conservation via a chemiosmotic mechanism, with Na(+) as coupling ion. The pathway and its bioenergetics were solved in some detail very recently. This review focuses on the regulation of caffeate respiration, describes the enyzmes involved, summarizes the evidence for a potential Na(+)-translocating ferredoxin:NAD(+)-oxidoreductase (Rnf complex) as a new coupling site, and hypothesizes on the role of this Rnf complex in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. PMID:18378592

  2. Catalytic properties of Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductases from Vibrio harveyi, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Fadeeva, Maria S; Núñez, Cinthia; Bertsova, Yulia V; Espín, Guadalupe; Bogachev, Alexander V

    2008-02-01

    The catalytic properties of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (Na+-NQRs) from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, the enterobacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae, and the soil microorganism Azotobacter vinelandii have been comparatively analyzed. It is shown that these enzymes drastically differ in their affinity to sodium ions. The enzymes also possess different sensitivity to inhibitors. Na+-NQR from A. vinelandii is not sensitive to low 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO) concentrations, while Na+-NQR from K. pneumoniae is fully resistant to either Ag+ or N-ethylmaleimide. All the Na+-NQR-type enzymes are sensitive to diphenyliodonium, which is shown to modify the noncovalently bound FAD of the enzyme. PMID:18300384

  3. [The interaction of ferredoxin:NADP{sup +} oxidoreductase and ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase with substrates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    We seek to map the ferredoxin-binding sites on three soluble enzymes located in spinach chloroplasts which utilize ferredoxin as an electron donor:Ferredoxin:NADP{sup +}oxidoreductase (FNR); ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and glutamate synthase. As the availability of amino acid sequences for the enzymes are important in such studies, that the amino acid sequence of glutamate synthase needs be determined, the amino acid sequences of FNR, FTR and ferredoxin are already known. Related to an aim elucidate the binding sites for ferredoxin to determine whether there is a common binding site on all of these ferredoxin-dependent chloroplast enzymes and, if so, to map it. Additionally thioredoxin binding by FTR needs be determine to resolve whether the same site on FTR is involved in binding both ferredoxin and thioredoxin. Considerable progress is reported on the prosthetic groups of glutamate synthase, in establishing the role of arginine and lysine residues in ferredoxin binding by, ferredoxin:nitrite oxidoreductase nitrite reductase, labelling carboxyl groups on ferredoxin with taurine and labelling lysine residues biotinylation, and low potential heme proteins have been isolated and characterized from a non-photosynthetic plant tissue. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out not to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADPinteraction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique. The techniques developed for differential chemical modification of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions.

  4. A macrophage migration inhibitory factor like oxidoreductase from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata involved in innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shuge; Zhang, Dianchang; Jiang, Shigui; Pu, Hanlin; Hu, Yuting; Guo, Huayang; Chen, Mingqiang; Su, Tanfeng; Zhu, Caiyan

    2011-08-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important cytokine and plays a crucial role as a pivotal regulator of innate immunity. In this study, a MIF cDNA was identified and characterized from the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata (designated as PoMIF). The full-length of PoMIF was 1544 bp and consisted of a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 45 bp, a 3'-UTR of 1139 bp with a polyadenylation signal (AATAAA) at 12 nucleotides upstream of the poly (A) tail. The open reading frame (ORF) of PoMIF was 360 bp which encoded a polypeptide of 120 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 13.3 kDa and a predicted pI of 6.1. SMART analysis showed that PoMIF contained the catalytic-sites P² and K³³ for tautomerase activity, a motif C⁵⁷GSV⁶⁰ for oxidoreductase activity and a MIF family signature D⁵⁵PCGSVEVYSIGALG⁶⁹. Homology analysis revealed that the PoMIF shared 40.3-65.5% similarity and 26.9-45.0% identity to other known MIF sequences. PoMIF mRNA was constitutively expressed in seven selected tissues of healthy pearl oysters, with the highest expression level in digestive gland. Eight hours after P. fucata was injected with Vibrio alginolyticus, the expression of PoMIF mRNA was significantly up-regulated in digestive gland, gills, hemocytes and intestine. The cDNA fragment encoding mature protein of PoMIF was subcloned to expression vector pRSET and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant PoMIF (rPoMIF) was expressed and purified under optimized conditions. Function analysis showed that rPoMIF had oxidoreductase activity and could utilize dithiothreitol (DTT) as reductant to reduce insulin. PMID:21496487

  5. Mechanism of Porcine Liver Xanthine Oxidoreductase Mediated N-Oxide Reduction of Cyadox as Revealed by Docking and Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Xu; Huang, Lingli; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is a cytoplasmic molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase, catalyzing both endogenous purines and exogenous compounds. It is suggested that XOR in porcine hepatocytes catalyzes the N-oxide reduction of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides (QdNOs). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this metabolism, the cDNA of porcine XOR was cloned and heterologously expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. The bovine XOR, showing sequence identity of 91% to porcine XOR, was employed as template for homology modeling. By docking cyadox, a representative compound of QdNOs, into porcine XOR model, eight amino acid residues, Gly47, Asn352, Ser360, Arg427, Asp430, Asp431, Ser1227 and Lys1230, were located at distances of less than 4Å to cyadox. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze their catalytic functions. Compared with wild type porcine XOR, G47A, S360P, D431A, S1227A, and K1230A displayed altered kinetic parameters in cyadox reduction, similarly to that in xanthine oxidation, indicating these mutations influenced electron-donating process of xanthine before subsequent electron transfer to cyadox to fulfill the N-oxide reduction. Differently, R427E and D430H, both located in the 424–434 loop, exhibited a much lower Km and a decreased Vmax respectively in cyadox reduction. Arg427 may be related to the substrate binding of porcine XOR to cyadox, and Asp430 is suggested to be involved in the transfer of electron to cyadox. This study initially reveals the possible catalytic mechanism of porcine XOR in cyadox metabolism, providing with novel insights into the structure-function relationship of XOR in the reduction of exogenous di-N-oxides. PMID:24040113

  6. Crystal Structures of NADH:FMN Oxidoreductase (EmoB) at Different Stages of Catalysis*S⃞♦

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Mark S.; Youn, Buhyun; Knowles, Benjamin D.; Ballinger, Jordan W.; Jun, Se-Young; Belchik, Sara M.; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2008-01-01

    EDTA has become a major organic pollutant in the environment because of its extreme usage and resistance to biodegradation. Recently, two critical enzymes, EDTA monooxygenase (EmoA) and NADH:FMN oxidoreductase (EmoB), belonging to the newly established two-component flavin-diffusible monooxygenase family, were identified in the EDTA degradation pathway in Mesorhizobium sp. BNC1. EmoA is an FMNH2-dependent enzyme that requires EmoB to provide FMNH2 for the conversion of EDTA to ethylenediaminediacetate. To understand the molecular basis of this FMN-mediated reaction, the crystal structures of the apo-form, FMN·FMN complex, and FMN·NADH complex of EmoB were determined at 2.5Å resolution. The structure of EmoB is a homotetramer consisting of four α/β-single-domain monomers of five parallel β-strands flanked by five α-helices, which is quite different from those of other known two-component flavin-diffusible monooxygenase family members, such as PheA2 and HpaC, in terms of both tertiary and quaternary structures. For the first time, the crystal structures of both the FMN·FMN and FMN·NADH complexes of an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase were determined. Two stacked isoalloxazine rings and nicotinamide/isoalloxazine rings were at a proper distance for hydride transfer. The structures indicated a ping-pong reaction mechanism, which was confirmed by activity assays. Thus, the structural data offer detailed mechanistic information for hydride transfer between NADH to an enzyme-bound FMN and between the bound FMNH2 and a diffusible FMN. PMID:18701448

  7. Engineering Clostridium beijerinckii with the Cbei_4693 gene knockout for enhanced ferulic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Guo, Ting; Shen, Xiaoning; Xu, Jiahui; Wang, Junzhi; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Dong; Niu, Huanqing; Liang, Lei; Ying, Hanjie

    2016-07-10

    A mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052, C. beijerinckii M11, which exhibited ferulic acid tolerance up to 0.9g/L, was generated using atmospheric pressure glow discharge and high-throughput screening. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that this strain harbored a mutation of the Cbei_4693 gene, which encodes a hypothetical protein suspected to be an NADPH-dependent FMN reductase. After disrupting the Cbei_4693 gene in C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 using the ClosTron group II intron-based gene inactivation system, we obtained the Cbei_4693 gene inactivated mutant strain, C. beijerinckii 4693::int. Compared with C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052, 6.23g/L of butanol was produced in P2 medium containing 0.5g/L of ferulic acid by 4693::int, and the ferulic acid tolerance was also significantly increased up to 0.8g/L. These data showed, for the first time, that the Cbei_4693 gene plays an important role in regulating ferulic acid tolerance in ABE fermentation by C. beijerinckii. PMID:27164255

  8. Common polymorphisms in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) genes influence quality of aging and longevity in humans.

    PubMed

    Montesanto, Alberto; Crocco, Paolina; Tallaro, Federica; Pisani, Francesca; Mazzei, Bruno; Mari, Vincenzo; Corsonello, Andrea; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Passarino, Giuseppe; Rose, Giuseppina

    2013-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) triggers multiple signal transduction pathways and contributes to the control of numerous cellular functions. Previous studies have shown in model organisms that the alteration of NO production has important effects on aging and lifespan. We studied in a large sample (763 subjects, age range 19-107 years) the variability of the three human genes (NOS1, -2, -3) coding for the three isoforms of the NADPH-dependent enzymes named NO synthases (NOS) which are responsible of NO synthesis. We have then verified if the variability of these genes is associated with longevity, and with a number of geriatric parameters. We found that gene variation of NOS1 and NOS2 was associated with longevity. In addition NOS1 rs1879417 was also found to be associated with a lower cognitive performance, while NOS2 rs2297518 polymorphism showed to be associated with physical performance. Moreover, SNPs in the NOS1 and NOS3 genes were respectively associated with the presence of depression symptoms and disability, two of the main factors affecting quality of life in older individuals. On the whole, our study shows that genetic variability of NOS genes has an effect on common age related phenotypes and longevity in humans as well as previously reported for model organisms. PMID:23572278

  9. Reduction of mitomycin C is catalysed by human recombinant NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 using reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as an electron donating co-factor

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, D; Tung, A T Y; Knox, R J; Boddy, A V

    2006-01-01

    NRH:Quinone Oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2) has been described as having no enzymatic activity with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) or NADPH as electron donating cosubstrates. Mitomycin C (MMC) is both a substrate for and a mechanistic inhibitor of the NQO2 homologue NQO1. NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 catalysed the reduction of MMC at pH 5.8 with NADH as a co-factor. This reaction results in species that inhibit the NQO2-mediated metabolism of CB1954. In addition, MMC caused an increase in DNA cross-links in a cell line transfected to overexpress NQO2 to an extent comparable to that observed with an isogenic NQO1-expressing cell line. These data indicate that NQO2 may contribute to the metabolism of MMC to cytotoxic species. PMID:17031400

  10. Kinetic Properties of Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase of Intestinal Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan V

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce sulfate ions to hydrogen sulfide causing inflammatory bowel diseases of humans and animals. The bacteria consume lactate as electron donor which is oxidized to acetate via pyruvate in process of the dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity and the kinetic properties of the enzyme from intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger and Desulfomicrobium sp. have never been well-characterized and have not been yet studied. In this paper we present for the first time the specific activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and the kinetic properties of the enzyme in cell-free extracts of both D. piger Vib-7 and Desulfomicrobium sp. Rod-9 intestinal bacterial strains. Microbiological, biochemical, biophysical and statistical methods were used in this work. The optimal temperature (+35°C) and pH 8.5 for enzyme reaction were determined. The spectral analysis of the puri- fied pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the cell-free extracts was demonstrated. Analysis of the kinetic properties of the studied enzyme was carried out. Initial (instantaneous) reaction velocity (V0), maximum amount of the product of reaction (Pmax), the reaction time (half saturation period) and maximum velocity of the pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase reaction (V ) were defined. Michaelis constants (Km) of the enzyme reaction were calculated for both intestinal bacterial strains. The studies of the kinetic enzyme properties in the intestinal sulfate-reducing bacteria strains in detail can be prospects for clarifying the etiological role of these bacteria in the development of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26373169

  11. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD(+) Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Dar, SA; Leang, C; Lovley, DR

    2012-12-26

    It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin: NAD(+) oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H-2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. IMPORTANCE Mechanisms for energy conservation in the acetogen Clostridium ljungdahlii are of interest because of its potential value as a chassis for the production of biocommodities with novel electron donors such as carbon monoxide, syngas, and electrons derived from electrodes. Characterizing the components implicated in the chemiosmotic ATP synthesis during acetogenesis by C. ljungdahlii is a prerequisite for the development of highly productive strains. The Rnf complex has been considered the prime candidate to be the pump responsible for the formation of an ion gradient coupled with ATP synthesis in multiple acetogens. However, experimental evidence for a proton-pumping Rnf complex has been lacking. This study establishes the C. ljungdahlii Rnf complex as

  12. Response surface methodology to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductase enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and d-galactose dehydrogenase in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Shahbaz Mohammadi, Hamid; Mostafavi, Seyede Samaneh; Soleimani, Saeideh; Bozorgian, Sajad; Pooraskari, Maryam; Kianmehr, Anvarsadat

    2015-04-01

    Oxidoreductases are an important family of enzymes that are used in many biotechnological processes. An experimental design was applied to optimize partition and purification of two recombinant oxidoreductases, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis and d-galactose dehydrogenase (GalDH) from Pseudomonas fluorescens AK92 in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was performed to optimize critical factors like polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentration, concentration of salt and pH value. The best partitioning conditions was achieved in an ATPS composed of 12% PEG-6000, 15% K2HPO4 with pH 7.5 at 25°C, which ensured partition coefficient (KE) of 66.6 and 45.7 for GDH and GalDH, respectively. Under these experimental conditions, the activity of GDH and GalDH was 569.5U/ml and 673.7U/ml, respectively. It was found that these enzymes preferentially partitioned into the top PEG-rich phase and appeared as single bands on SDS-PAGE gel. Meanwhile the validity of the response model was confirmed by a good agreement between predicted and experimental results. Collectively, according to the obtained data it can be inferred that the ATPS optimization using RSM approach can be applied for recovery and purification of any enzyme from oxidoreductase family. PMID:25591389

  13. The oxidoreductase DsbA plays a key role in the ability of the Crohn's disease-associated adherent-invasive Escherichia coli strain LF82 to resist macrophage killing.

    PubMed

    Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Rolhion, Nathalie; Glasser, Anne-Lise; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2007-07-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) isolated from Crohn's disease patients is able to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells and to replicate in mature phagolysosomes within macrophages. Here, we show that the dsbA gene, encoding a periplasmic oxidoreductase, was required for AIEC strain LF82 to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and to survive within macrophages. The LF82-DeltadsbA mutant did not express flagella and, probably as a consequence of this, did not express type 1 pili. The role of DsbA in adhesion is restricted to the loss of flagella and type 1 pili, as forced contact between bacteria and cells and induced expression of type 1 pili restored the wild-type phenotype. In contrast, the dsbA gene is essential for AIEC LF82 bacteria to survive within macrophages, irrespective of the loss of flagella and type 1 pilus expression, and the survival ability of LF82-DeltadsbA was as low as that of the nonpathogenic E. coli K-12, which was efficiently killed by macrophages. We also provide evidence that the dsbA gene is needed for LF82 bacteria to grow and survive in an acidic and nutrient-poor medium that partly mimics the harsh environment of the phagocytic vacuole. In addition, under such stress conditions dsbA transcription is highly up-regulated. Finally, the CpxRA signaling pathway does not play a role in regulation of dsbA expression in AIEC LF82 bacteria under conditions similar to those of mature phagolysosomes. PMID:17449627

  14. NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibits the proteasomal degradation of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum protein.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tomoji; Tanabe-Fujimura, Chiaki; Fujita, Yu; Abe, Chihiro; Nanakida, Yoshino; Zou, Kun; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Komano, Hiroto

    2016-05-13

    Homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein (Herp) is an ER stress-inducible key regulatory component of ER-associated degradation (ERAD) that has been implicated in insulin hypersecretion in diabetic mouse models. Herp expression is tightly regulated. Additionally, Herp is a highly labile protein and interacts with various proteins, which are characteristic features of ubiquitinated protein. Previously, we reported that ubiquitination is not required for Herp degradation. In addition, we found that the lysine residues of Herp (which are ubiquitinated by E3 ubiquitin ligase) are not sufficient for regulation of Herp degradation. In this study, we found that NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-mediated targeting of Herp to the proteasome was involved in Herp degradation. In addition, we found that Herp protein levels were markedly elevated in synoviolin-null cells. The E3 ubiquitin ligase synoviolin is a central component of ERAD and is involved in the degradation of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), which regulates cellular reactive oxygen species. Additionally, NQO1 is a target of Nrf2. Thus, our findings indicated that NQO1 could stabilize Herp protein expression via indirect regulation of synoviolin. PMID:27084451

  15. Crystallization of the NADH-oxidizing domain of the Na{sup +}-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Minli; Türk, Karin; Diez, Joachim; Grütter, Markus G.; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2006-02-01

    The FAD domain of the NqrF subunit from the Na{sup +}-translocating NADH dehydrogenase from V. cholerae has been purified and crystallized. A complete data set was recorded at 3.1 Å. The Na{sup +}-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na{sup +}-NQR) from pathogenic and marine bacteria is a respiratory complex that couples the exergonic oxidation of NADH by quinone to the transport of Na{sup +} across the membrane. The NqrF subunit oxidizes NADH and transfers the electrons to other redox cofactors in the enzyme. The FAD-containing domain of NqrF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The purified NqrF FAD domain exhibited high rates of NADH oxidation and contained stoichiometric amounts of the FAD cofactor. Initial crystallization of the flavin domain was achieved by the sitting-drop technique using a Cartesian MicroSys4000 robot. Optimization of the crystallization conditions yielded yellow hexagonal crystals with dimensions of 30 × 30 × 70 µm. The protein mainly crystallizes in long hexagonal needles with a diameter of up to 30 µm. Crystals diffract to 2.8 Å and belong to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145.3, c = 90.2 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°.

  16. The quinone-binding site of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans sulfide: quinone oxidoreductase controls both sulfide oxidation and quinone reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfei; Qadri, Ali; Weiner, Joel H

    2016-04-01

    Sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase (SQR) is a peripheral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of sulfide and the reduction of ubiquinone. Ubiquinone binds to a conserved hydrophobic domain and shuttles electrons from a noncovalent flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor to the membrane-bound quinone pool. Utilizing the structure of decylubiquinone bound to Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans SQR, we combined site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic approaches to analyze quinone binding. SQR can reduce both benzoquinones and naphthoquinones. The alkyl side-chain of ubiquinone derivatives enhances binding to SQR but limits the enzyme turnover. Pentachlorophenol and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide are potent inhibitors of SQR with apparent inhibition constants (Ki) of 0.46 μmol·L(-1) and 0.58 μmol·L(-1), respectively. The highly conserved amino acids surrounding the quinone binding site play an important role in quinone reduction. The phenyl side-chains of Phe357 and Phe391 sandwich the benzoquinone head group and are critical for quinone binding. Importantly, conserved amino acids that define the ubiquinone-binding site also play an important role in sulfide oxidation/flavin reduction. PMID:26914540

  17. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Amixicile-Based Inhibitors of the Pyruvate-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductases of Anaerobic Bacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Andrew J; Bruce, Alexandra M; Gineste, Catherine; Ballard, T Eric; Olekhnovich, Igor N; Macdonald, Timothy L; Hoffman, Paul S

    2016-07-01

    Amixicile is a promising derivative of nitazoxanide (an antiparasitic therapeutic) developed to treat systemic infections caused by anaerobic bacteria, anaerobic parasites, and members of the Epsilonproteobacteria (Campylobacter and Helicobacter). Amixicile selectively inhibits pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and related enzymes by inhibiting the function of the vitamin B1 cofactor (thiamine pyrophosphate) by a novel mechanism. Here, we interrogate the amixicile scaffold, guided by docking simulations, direct PFOR inhibition assays, and MIC tests against Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, and Helicobacter pylori Docking simulations revealed that the nitro group present in nitazoxanide interacts with the protonated N4'-aminopyrimidine of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The ortho-propylamine on the benzene ring formed an electrostatic interaction with an aspartic acid moiety (B456) of PFOR that correlated with improved PFOR-inhibitory activity and potency by MIC tests. Aryl substitution with electron-withdrawing groups and substitutions of the propylamine with other alkyl amines or nitrogen-containing heterocycles both improved PFOR inhibition and, in many cases, biological activity against C. difficile Docking simulation results correlate well with mechanistic enzymology and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies that show members of this class of antimicrobials to be specific inhibitors of vitamin B1 function by proton abstraction, which is both novel and likely to limit mutation-based drug resistance. PMID:27090174

  18. Arabidopsis tic62 trol mutant lacking thylakoid-bound ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase shows distinct metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lintala, Minna; Schuck, Natalie; Thormählen, Ina; Jungfer, Andreas; Weber, Katrin L; Weber, Andreas P M; Geigenberger, Peter; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina; Mulo, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR), functioning in the last step of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain, exists both as a soluble protein in the chloroplast stroma and tightly attached to chloroplast membranes. Surface plasmon resonance assays showed that the two FNR isoforms, LFNR1 and LFNR2, are bound to the thylakoid membrane via the C-terminal domains of Tic62 and TROL proteins in a pH-dependent manner. The tic62 trol double mutants contained a reduced level of FNR, exclusively found in the soluble stroma. Although the mutant plants showed no visual phenotype or defects in the function of photosystems under any conditions studied, a low ratio of NADPH/NADP+ was detected. Since the CO₂ fixation capacity did not differ between the tic62 trol plants and wild-type, it seems that the plants are able to funnel reducing power to most crucial reactions to ensure survival and fitness of the plants. However, the activity of malate dehydrogenase was down-regulated in the mutant plants. Apparently, the plastid metabolism is able to cope with substantial changes in directing the electrons from the light reactions to stromal metabolism and thus only few differences are visible in steady-state metabolite pool sizes of the tic62 trol plants. PMID:24043709

  19. Insights into Flavin-based Electron Bifurcation via the NADH-dependent Reduced Ferredoxin:NADP Oxidoreductase Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, Julius K.; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Shuning; Demmer, Ulrike; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Ermler, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    NADH-dependent reduced ferredoxin:NADP oxidoreductase (NfnAB) is found in the cytoplasm of various anaerobic bacteria and archaea. The enzyme reversibly catalyzes the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin with NADPH driven by the exergonic transhydrogenation from NADPH onto NAD+. Coupling is most probably accomplished via the mechanism of flavin-based electron bifurcation. To understand this process on a structural basis, we heterologously produced the NfnAB complex of Thermotoga maritima in Escherichia coli, provided kinetic evidence for its bifurcating behavior, and determined its x-ray structure in the absence and presence of NADH. The structure of NfnAB reveals an electron transfer route including the FAD (a-FAD), the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NfnA and the FAD (b-FAD), and the two [4Fe-4S] clusters of NfnB. Ferredoxin is presumably docked onto NfnB close to the [4Fe-4S] cluster distal to b-FAD. NAD(H) binds to a-FAD and NADP(H) consequently to b-FAD, which is positioned in the center of the NfnAB complex and the site of electron bifurcation. Arg187 is hydrogen-bonded to N5 and O4 of the bifurcating b-FAD and might play a key role in adjusting a low redox potential of the FADH•/FAD pair required for ferredoxin reduction. A mechanism of FAD-coupled electron bifurcation by NfnAB is proposed. PMID:26139605

  20. A New Class of Tungsten-Containing Oxidoreductase in Caldicellulosiruptor, a Genus of Plant Biomass-Degrading Thermophilic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Scott, Israel M; Rubinstein, Gabe M; Lipscomb, Gina L; Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J; Rhaesa, Amanda M; Lancaster, W Andrew; Poole, Farris L; Kelly, Robert M; Adams, Michael W W

    2015-10-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor bescii grows optimally at 78°C and is able to decompose high concentrations of lignocellulosic plant biomass without the need for thermochemical pretreatment. C. bescii ferments both C5 and C6 sugars primarily to hydrogen gas, lactate, acetate, and CO2 and is of particular interest for metabolic engineering applications given the recent availability of a genetic system. Developing optimal strains for technological use requires a detailed understanding of primary metabolism, particularly when the goal is to divert all available reductant (electrons) toward highly reduced products such as biofuels. During an analysis of the C. bescii genome sequence for oxidoreductase-type enzymes, evidence was uncovered to suggest that the primary redox metabolism of C. bescii has a completely uncharacterized aspect involving tungsten, a rarely used element in biology. An active tungsten utilization pathway in C. bescii was demonstrated by the heterologous production of a tungsten-requiring, aldehyde-oxidizing enzyme (AOR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Furthermore, C. bescii also contains a tungsten-based AOR-type enzyme, here termed XOR, which is phylogenetically unique, representing a completely new member of the AOR tungstoenzyme family. Moreover, in C. bescii, XOR represents ca. 2% of the cytoplasmic protein. XOR is proposed to play a key, but as yet undetermined, role in the primary redox metabolism of this cellulolytic microorganism. PMID:26276113

  1. Isolation and characterization of a Chinese hamster ovary cell line deficient in fatty alcohol:NAD sup + oxidoreductase activity

    SciTech Connect

    James, P.F.; Lee, J. ); Rizzo, W.B.; Zoeller, R.A. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have isolated a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line that is defective in long-chain fatty alcohol oxidation. The ability of the mutant cells to convert labeled hexadecanol to the corresponding fatty acid in vivo was reduced to 5% of the parent strain. Whole-cell homogenates from the mutant strain, FAA.1, were deficient in long-chain fatty alcohol:NAD{sup +} oxidoreductase activity, which catalyzes the oxidation of hexadecanol to hexadecanoic acid, although the intermediate fatty aldehyde was formed normally. A direct measurement of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase showed that the FAA.1, strain was defective in this component of FAO activity. FAA.1 is a two-stage mutant that was selected from a previously described parent strain, ZR-82, which is defective in ether lipid biosynthesis and peroxisome assembly. Because of combined defects in ether lipid biosynthesis and fatty alcohol oxidation, the ability of the FAA.1 cells to incorporate hexadecanol into complex lipids was greatly impaired, resulting in a 60-fold increase in cellular fatty alcohol levels. As the FAO deficiency in FAA.1 cells appears to be identical to the defect associated with the human genetic disorder Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome, the FAA.1 cell line may be useful in studying this disease.

  2. Paraquat Toxicity Induced by Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 1 Acts as an NADH-dependent Oxidoreductase*

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroki; Hirai, Kei-Ichi; Simamura, Eriko; Hatta, Toshihisa; Iwakiri, Hiroki; Mizuki, Keiji; Hatta, Taizo; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Satoko; Endo, Yaeta; Shimizu, Shigeomi

    2009-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ), a herbicide used worldwide, causes fatal injury to organs upon high dose ingestion. Treatments for PQ poisoning are unreliable, and numerous deaths have been attributed inappropriate usage of the agent. It is generally speculated that a microsomal drug-metabolizing enzyme system is responsible for PQ toxicity. However, recent studies have demonstrated cytotoxicity via mitochondria, and therefore, the cytotoxic mechanism remains controversial. Here, we demonstrated that mitochondrial NADH-dependent PQ reductase containing a voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) is responsible for PQ cytotoxicity. When mitochondria were incubated with NADH and PQ, superoxide anion (O2˙̄) was produced, and the mitochondria ruptured. Outer membrane extract oxidized NADH in a PQ dose-dependent manner, and oxidation was suppressed by VDAC inhibitors. Zymographic analysis revealed the presence of VDAC1 protein in the oxidoreductase, and the direct binding of PQ to VDAC1 was demonstrated using biotinylated PQ. VDAC1-overexpressing cells showed increased O2˙̄ production and cytotoxicity, both of which were suppressed in VDAC1 knockdown cells. These results indicated that a VDAC1-containing mitochondrial system is involved in PQ poisoning. These insights into the mechanism of PQ poisoning not only demonstrated novel physiological functions of VDAC protein, but they may facilitate the development of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:19717555

  3. The Crystal Structure and Mechanism of an Unusual Oxidoreductase, GilR, Involved in Gilvocarcin V Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bosserman, Mary A.; Schickli, M. Alexandra; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Kharel, Madan K.; Pahari, Pallab; Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    GilR is a recently identified oxidoreductase that catalyzes the terminal step of gilvocarcin V biosynthesis and is a unique enzyme that establishes the lactone core of the polyketide-derived gilvocarcin chromophore. Gilvocarcin-type compounds form a small distinct family of anticancer agents that are involved in both photo-activated DNA-alkylation and histone H3 cross-linking. High resolution crystal structures of apoGilR and GilR in complex with its substrate pregilvocarcin V reveals that GilR belongs to the small group of a relatively new type of the vanillyl-alcohol oxidase flavoprotein family characterized by bicovalently tethered cofactors. GilR was found as a dimer, with the bicovalently attached FAD cofactor mediated through His-65 and Cys-125. Subsequent mutagenesis and functional assays indicate that Tyr-445 may be involved in reaction catalysis and in mediating the covalent attachment of FAD, whereas Tyr-448 serves as an essential residue initiating the catalysis by swinging away from the active site to accommodate binding of the 6R-configured substrate and consequently abstracting the proton of the hydroxyl residue of the substrate hemiacetal 6-OH group. These studies lay the groundwork for future enzyme engineering to broaden the substrate specificity of this bottleneck enzyme of the gilvocarcin biosynthetic pathway for the development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:21561854

  4. Crystallization of the NADH-oxidizing domain of the Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Minli; Türk, Karin; Diez, Joachim; Grütter, Markus G.; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2006-01-01

    The Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from pathogenic and marine bacteria is a respiratory complex that couples the exergonic oxidation of NADH by quinone to the transport of Na+ across the membrane. The NqrF subunit oxidizes NADH and transfers the electrons to other redox cofactors in the enzyme. The FAD-containing domain of NqrF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The purified NqrF FAD domain exhibited high rates of NADH oxidation and contained stoichiometric amounts of the FAD cofactor. Initial crystallization of the flavin domain was achieved by the sitting-drop technique using a Cartesian MicroSys4000 robot. Optimization of the crystallization conditions yielded yellow hexagonal crystals with dimensions of 30 × 30 × 70 µm. The protein mainly crystallizes in long hexagonal needles with a diameter of up to 30 µm. Crystals diffract to 2.8 Å and belong to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145.3, c = 90.2 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. PMID:16511277

  5. Multiple active site residues are important for photochemical efficiency in the light-activated enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR).

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Hardman, Samantha J O; Scrutton, Nigel S; Heyes, Derren J

    2016-08-01

    Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the light-driven reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), an essential, regulatory step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The unique requirement of the enzyme for light has provided the opportunity to investigate how light energy can be harnessed to power biological catalysis and enzyme dynamics. Excited state interactions between the Pchlide molecule and the protein are known to drive the subsequent reaction chemistry. However, the structural features of POR and active site residues that are important for photochemistry and catalysis are currently unknown, because there is no crystal structure for POR. Here, we have used static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a number of active site variants to study the role of a number of residues, which are located in the proposed NADPH/Pchlide binding site based on previous homology models, in the reaction mechanism of POR. Our findings, which are interpreted in the context of a new improved structural model, have identified several residues that are predicted to interact with the coenzyme or substrate. Several of the POR variants have a profound effect on the photochemistry, suggesting that multiple residues are important in stabilizing the excited state required for catalysis. Our work offers insight into how the POR active site geometry is finely tuned by multiple active site residues to support enzyme-mediated photochemistry and reduction of Pchlide, both of which are crucial to the existence of life on Earth. PMID:27285815

  6. The Rnf Complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii Is a Proton-Translocating Ferredoxin:NAD+ Oxidoreductase Essential for Autotrophic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Zhang, Tian; Dar, Shabir A.; Leang, Ching; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been predicted that the Rnf complex of Clostridium ljungdahlii is a proton-translocating ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase which contributes to ATP synthesis by an H+-translocating ATPase under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions. The recent development of methods for genetic manipulation of C. ljungdahlii made it possible to evaluate the possible role of the Rnf complex in energy conservation. Disruption of the C. ljungdahlii rnf operon inhibited autotrophic growth. ATP synthesis, proton gradient, membrane potential, and proton motive force collapsed in the Rnf-deficient mutant with H2 as the electron source and CO2 as the electron acceptor. Heterotrophic growth was hindered in the absence of a functional Rnf complex, as ATP synthesis, proton gradient, and proton motive force were significantly reduced with fructose as the electron donor. Growth of the Rnf-deficient mutant was also inhibited when no source of fixed nitrogen was provided. These results demonstrate that the Rnf complex of C. ljungdahlii is responsible for translocation of protons across the membrane to elicit energy conservation during acetogenesis and is a multifunctional device also implicated in nitrogen fixation. PMID:23269825

  7. Collapse of the native structure caused by a single amino acid exchange in human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Michael K.; Binter, Alexandra; Pulido, Sergio A.; Saf, Robert; Zangger, Klaus; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is essential for the antioxidant defense system, stabilization of tumor suppressors (e.g. p53, p33, and p73), and activation of quinone-based chemotherapeutics. Overexpression of NQO1 in many solid tumors, coupled with its ability to convert quinone-based chemotherapeutics into potent cytotoxic compounds, have made it a very attractive target for anticancer drugs. A naturally occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism (C609T) leading to an amino acid exchange (P187S) has been implicated in the development of various cancers and poor survival rates following anthracyclin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite its importance for cancer prediction and therapy, the exact molecular basis for the loss of function in NQO1 P187S is currently unknown. Therefore, we solved the crystal structure of NQO1 P187S. Surprisingly, this structure is almost identical to NQO1. Employing a combination of NMR spectroscopy and limited proteolysis experiments, we demonstrated that the single amino acid exchange destabilized interactions between the core and C-terminus, leading to depopulation of the native structure in solution. This collapse of the native structure diminished cofactor affinity and led to a less competent FAD-binding pocket, thus severely compromising the catalytic capacity of the variant protein. Hence, our findings provide a rationale for the loss of function in NQO1 P187S with a frequently occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism. PMID:25143260

  8. Insight Into the Radical Mechanism of Phycocyanobilin-Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase (Pcya) Revealed By X-Ray Crystallography And Biochemical Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, S.-L.; Rockwell, N.; Lagarias, J.C.; Fisher, A.J.; /Inst. Plant Microb. Biol., Taipei /UC, Davis

    2007-07-13

    The X-ray crystal structure of the substrate-free form of phycocyanobilin (PCB)-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PcyA; EC 1.3.7.5) from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC7120 has been solved at 2.5 angstrom resolution. A comparative analysis of this structure with those recently reported for substrate-bound and substrate-free forms of PcyA from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Hagiwara et al. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 27-32; Hagiwara et al. (2006) FEBS Lett. 580, 3823-3828) provides a compelling picture of substrate-induced changes in the PcyA enzyme and the chemical basis of PcyA's catalytic activity. On the basis of these structures and the biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants of Nostoc PcyA, including mutants reported in recent studies (Tu et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3127-3136) as well as mutants described in this study, a revised mechanism for the PcyA-mediated four-electron reduction of biliverdin IX{alpha} to 3E/3Z-phycocyanobilin via enzyme-bound bilin radical intermediates is proposed. The mechanistic insight of these studies, along with homology modeling, have provided new insight into the catalytic mechanisms of other members of the ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductase family that are widespread in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  9. Evidence that a type-2 NADH:quinone oxidoreductase mediates electron transfer to particulate methane monooxygenase in methylococcus capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Scott A; Shiemke, Andrew K

    2002-02-01

    NADH readily provides reducing equivalents to membrane-bound methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) in isolated membrane fractions, but detergent solubilization disrupts this electron-transfer process. Addition of exogenous quinones (especially decyl-plastoquinone and duroquinone) restores the NADH-dependent pMMO activity. Results of inhibitor and substrate dependence of this activity indicate the presence of only a type-2 NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NDH-2). A 100-fold purification of the NDH-2 was achieved using lauryl-maltoside solubilization followed by ion exchange, hydrophobic-interaction, and gel-filtration chromatography. The purified NDH-2 has a subunit molecular weight of 36 kDa and exists as a monomer in solution. UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy identified flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a cofactor present in stoichiometric amounts. NADH served as the source of electrons, whereas NADPH could not. The purified NDH-2 enzyme reduced coenzyme Q(0), duroquinone, and menaquinone at high rates, whereas the decyl analogs of ubiquinone and plastoquinone were reduced at approximately 100-fold lower rates. Rotenone and flavone did not inhibit the NDH-2, whereas amytal caused partial inhibition but only at high concentrations. PMID:11811946

  10. The Crystal Structure and Mechanism of an Unusual Oxidoreductase, GilR, Involved in Gilvocarcin V Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bosserman, Mary A.; Schickli, M. Alexandra; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Kharel, Madan K.; Pahari, Pallab; Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2012-11-26

    GilR is a recently identified oxidoreductase that catalyzes the terminal step of gilvocarcin V biosynthesis and is a unique enzyme that establishes the lactone core of the polyketide-derived gilvocarcin chromophore. Gilvocarcin-type compounds form a small distinct family of anticancer agents that are involved in both photo-activated DNA-alkylation and histone H3 cross-linking. High resolution crystal structures of apoGilR and GilR in complex with its substrate pregilvocarcin V reveals that GilR belongs to the small group of a relatively new type of the vanillyl-alcohol oxidase flavoprotein family characterized by bicovalently tethered cofactors. GilR was found as a dimer, with the bicovalently attached FAD cofactor mediated through His-65 and Cys-125. Subsequent mutagenesis and functional assays indicate that Tyr-445 may be involved in reaction catalysis and in mediating the covalent attachment of FAD, whereas Tyr-448 serves as an essential residue initiating the catalysis by swinging away from the active site to accommodate binding of the 6R-configured substrate and consequently abstracting the proton of the hydroxyl residue of the substrate hemiacetal 6-OH group. These studies lay the groundwork for future enzyme engineering to broaden the substrate specificity of this bottleneck enzyme of the gilvocarcin biosynthetic pathway for the development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

  11. Acyclic monoterpene primary alcohol:NADP+ oxidoreductase of Rauwolfia serpentina cells: the key enzyme in biosynthesis of monoterpene alcohols.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, H; Esaki, N; Nakai, S; Hashimoto, K; Uesato, S; Soda, K; Fujita, T

    1991-02-01

    Acyclic monoterpene primary alcohol:NADP+ oxidoreductase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of monoterpene alcohols in plants, is unstable and has been only poorly characterized. However we have established conditions which stabilize the enzyme from Rauwolfia serpentina cells, and then purified it to homogeneity. It is a monomer with a molecular weight of about 44,000 and contains zinc ions. Various branched-chain allylic primary alcohols such as nerol, geraniol, and 10-hydroxygeraniol were substrates, but ethanol was inert. The enzyme exclusively requires NADP+ or NADPH as the cofactor. Steady-state kinetic studies showed that the nerol dehydrogenation proceeds by an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism. NADP+ binds the enzyme first and then NADPH is the second product released from it. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of the reaction products showed that 10-hydroxygeraniol undergoes a reversible dehydrogenation to produce 10-oxogeraniol or 10-hydroxygeranial, which are oxidized further to give 10-oxogeranial, the direct precursor of iridodial. The enzyme has been found to exclusively transfer the pro-R hydrogen of NADPH to neral. The N-terminal sequence of the first 21 amino acids revealed no significant homology with those of various other proteins including the NAD(P)(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases registered in a protein data bank. PMID:1864846

  12. A New Class of Tungsten-Containing Oxidoreductase in Caldicellulosiruptor, a Genus of Plant Biomass-Degrading Thermophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Israel M.; Rubinstein, Gabe M.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J.; Rhaesa, Amanda M.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Poole, Farris L.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Caldicellulosiruptor bescii grows optimally at 78°C and is able to decompose high concentrations of lignocellulosic plant biomass without the need for thermochemical pretreatment. C. bescii ferments both C5 and C6 sugars primarily to hydrogen gas, lactate, acetate, and CO2 and is of particular interest for metabolic engineering applications given the recent availability of a genetic system. Developing optimal strains for technological use requires a detailed understanding of primary metabolism, particularly when the goal is to divert all available reductant (electrons) toward highly reduced products such as biofuels. During an analysis of the C. bescii genome sequence for oxidoreductase-type enzymes, evidence was uncovered to suggest that the primary redox metabolism of C. bescii has a completely uncharacterized aspect involving tungsten, a rarely used element in biology. An active tungsten utilization pathway in C. bescii was demonstrated by the heterologous production of a tungsten-requiring, aldehyde-oxidizing enzyme (AOR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. Furthermore, C. bescii also contains a tungsten-based AOR-type enzyme, here termed XOR, which is phylogenetically unique, representing a completely new member of the AOR tungstoenzyme family. Moreover, in C. bescii, XOR represents ca. 2% of the cytoplasmic protein. XOR is proposed to play a key, but as yet undetermined, role in the primary redox metabolism of this cellulolytic microorganism. PMID:26276113

  13. Inactivation of corticosteroids in intestinal mucosa by 11 beta-hydroxysteroid: NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1. 1. 1. 146)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, A.F.; Anderson, F.H.

    1983-10-01

    Activity of the enzyme 11 beta-hydroxysteroid:NADP oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.146) in human intestinal mucosa was determined by incubating scraped mucosa with /sup 3/H-cortisone and /sup 14/C-cortisol; these steroids were then extracted, separated chromatographically, and the radioactivity assayed to determine simultaneously both reductase and dehydrogenase activities. This was the only significant metabolic alteration which the substrate underwent. Only two cases had slight (5 and 13%) reductase activity. In 35 patients, 16 male and 19 female, including seven cases of Crohn's disease, three ulcerative colitis, five diverticulitis, two undergoing surgery for repair of injuries and 18 for carcinoma of colon or rectum, cortisol was converted to cortisone in 15 min with a wide range of values distributed uniformly up to 85% dehydrogenation, with a mean of 42%. When tissue homogenates were fortified with coenzymes, excess NADPH lowered dehydrogenase activity 81%; excess NADP increased dehydrogenase activity 2-fold in three cases. It is possible that a value is characteristic of an individual but perhaps more likely enzyme activity varies with metabolic events involving changes in the coenzyme levels in mucosa, and a random sampling might be expected to yield such a distribution of values. In any event, where activity is high most of the cortisol is inactivated within minutes. It is suggested that synthetic corticoids which escape such metabolic alteration might, except during pregnancy, prove superior in the treatment of conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  14. Molecular and biochemical characterization of bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylases and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Wong, Alton; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2015-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea produce ethanol as a metabolic end product, which is resulted from acetaldehyde reduction catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, the enzyme that is involved in the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate is not well characterized. An oxygen sensitive and coenzyme A-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity was found to be present in cell free extracts of T. maritima and T. hypogea. Both enzymes were purified and found to have pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activity, indicating their bifunctionality. Both PDC and POR activities from each of the purified enzymes were characterized in regards to their optimal assay conditions including pH dependency, oxygen sensitivity, thermal stability, temperature dependency and kinetic parameters. The close relatedness of the PORs that was shown by sequence analysis could be an indication of the presence of such bifunctionality in other hyperthermophilic bacteria. This is the first report of a bifunctional PDC/POR enzyme in hyperthermophilic bacteria. The PDC and the previously reported ADHs are most likely the key enzymes catalysing the production of ethanol from pyruvate in bacterial hyperthermophiles. PMID:26032540

  15. Dark-operative protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase generates substrate radicals by an iron-sulphur cluster in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nomata, Jiro; Kondo, Toru; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Fujita, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts solar energy to chemical energy using chlorophylls (Chls). In a late stage of biosynthesis of Chls, dark-operative protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) oxidoreductase (DPOR), a nitrogenase-like enzyme, reduces the C17 = C18 double bond of Pchlide and drastically changes the spectral properties suitable for photosynthesis forming the parental chlorin ring for Chl a. We previously proposed that the spatial arrangement of the proton donors determines the stereospecificity of the Pchlide reduction based on the recently resolved structure of the DPOR catalytic component, NB-protein. However, it was not clear how the two-electron and two-proton transfer events are coordinated in the reaction. In this study, we demonstrate that DPOR initiates a single electron transfer reaction from a [4Fe-4S]-cluster (NB-cluster) to Pchlide, generating Pchlide anion radicals followed by a single proton transfer, and then, further electron/proton transfer steps transform the anion radicals into chlorophyllide (Chlide). Thus, DPOR is a unique iron-sulphur enzyme to form substrate radicals followed by sequential proton- and electron-transfer steps with the protein folding very similar to that of nitrogenase. This novel radical-mediated reaction supports the biosynthesis of Chl in a wide variety of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:24965831

  16. Insights into MHC class I peptide loading from the structure of the Tapasin-ERp57 thiol oxidoreductase heterodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, G.; Wearsch, P.A.; Peaper, D.R.; Cresswell, P.; Reinisch, K.M.

    2009-03-02

    Tapasin is a glycoprotein critical for loading major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with high-affinity peptides. It functions within the multimeric peptide-loading complex (PLC) as a disulfide-linked, stable heterodimer with the thiol oxidoreductase ERp57, and this covalent interaction is required to support optimal PLC activity. Here, we present the 2.6 {angstrom} resolution structure of the tapasin-ERp57 core of the PLC. The structure revealed that tapasin interacts with both ERp57 catalytic domains, accounting for the stability of the heterodimer, and provided an example of a protein disulfide isomerase family member interacting with substrate. Mutational analysis identified a conserved surface on tapasin that interacted with MHC class I molecules and was critical for peptide loading and editing functions of the tapasin-ERp57 heterodimer. By combining the tapasin-ERp57 structure with those of other defined PLC components, we present a molecular model that illuminates the processes involved in MHC class I peptide loading.

  17. Automated resonance assignment of the 21 kDa stereo-array isotope labeled thioldisulfide oxidoreductase DsbA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Elena; Ikeya, Teppei; Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Löhr, Frank; Buchner, Lena; Ito, Yutaka; Kainosho, Masatsune; Güntert, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The automated chemical shift assignment algorithm FLYA has been extended for use with stereo-array isotope labeled (SAIL) proteins to determine the sequence-specific resonance assignments of large proteins. Here we present the assignment of the backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the 21 kDa thioldisulfide oxidoreductase DsbA from Escherichia coli that were determined with the SAIL-FLYA algorithm in conjunction with automated peak picking. No manual corrections of peak lists or assignments were applied. The assignments agreed with manually determined reference assignments in 95.4% of the cases if 16 input spectra were used, 94.1% if only 3D 13C/15N-resolved NOESY, CBCA(CO)NH, and 2D [13C/15N,1H]-HSQC were used, and 86.8% if exclusively 3D 13C/15N-resolved NOESY spectra were used. Considering only the assignments that are classified as reliable by the SAIL-FLYA algorithm, the degrees of agreement increased to 97.5%, 96.5%, and 94.2%, respectively. With our approach it is thus possible to automatically obtain almost complete and correct assignments of proteins larger than 20 kDa.

  18. Copper radical oxidases and related extracellular oxidoreductases of wood-decay Agaricomycetes.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Phil; Cullen, Dan

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular peroxide generation, a key component of oxidative lignocellulose degradation, has been attributed to various enzymes including the copper radical oxidases. Encoded by a family of structurally related sequences, the genes are widely distributed among wood decay fungi including three recently completed polypore genomes. In all cases, core catalytic residues are conserved, but five subfamilies are recognized. Glyoxal oxidase, the most intensively studied representative, has been shown physiologically connected to lignin peroxidase. Relatively little is known about structure-function relationships among more recently discovered copper radical oxidases. Nevertheless, differences in substrate preferences have been observed in one case and the proteins have been detected in filtrates of various wood-grown cultures. Such diversity may reflect adaptations to host cell wall composition and changing environmental conditions. PMID:24915038

  19. Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Influences CYP2B6 Activity in Cyclophosphamide Bioactivation

    PubMed Central

    El-Serafi, Ibrahim; Afsharian, Parvaneh; Moshfegh, Ali; Hassan, Moustapha; Terelius, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cyclophosphamide is commonly used as an important component in conditioning prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, a curative treatment for several hematological diseases. Cyclophosphamide is a prodrug activated mainly by cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) in the liver. A high degree of inter- and intra-individual variation in cyclophosphamide kinetics has been reported in several studies. Materials and Methods Hydroxylation of cyclophosphamide was investigated in vitro using three microsomal batches of CYP2B6*1 with different ratios of POR/CYP expression levels. Twenty patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were also included in the study. All patients received an i.v. infusion of cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg/day, for two days) as a part of their conditioning. Blood samples were collected from each patient before cyclophosphamide infusion, 6 h after the first dose and before and 6 h after the second dose. POR gene expression was measured by mRNA analysis and the pharmacokinetics of cyclophosphamide and its active metabolite were determined. Results A strong correlation between the in vitro intrinsic clearance of cyclophosphamide and the POR/CYP ratio was found. The apparent Km for CYP2B6.1 was almost constant (3-4 mM), while the CLint values were proportional to the POR/CYP ratio (3-34 μL/min/nmol CYP). In patients, the average expression of the POR gene in blood was significantly (P <0.001) up-regulated after cyclophosphamide infusion, with high inter-individual variations and significant correlation with the concentration ratio of the active metabolite 4-hydroxy-cyclophosphamide/cyclophosphamide. Nine patients were carriers for POR*28; four patients had relatively high POR expression. Conclusions This investigation shows for the first time that POR besides CYP2B6 can influence cyclophosphamide metabolism. Our results indicate that not only CYPs are important, but also POR expression and/or activity may influence

  20. Optimized inhibition assays reveal different inhibitory responses of hydroxylamine oxidoreductases from beta- and gamma-proteobacterial ammonium-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nishigaya, Yuki; Fujimoto, Zui; Yamazaki, Toshimasa

    2016-07-29

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), ubiquitous chemoautotrophic bacteria, convert ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2(-)) via hydroxylamine as energy source. Excessive growth of AOB, enhanced by applying large amounts of ammonium-fertilizer to the farmland, leads to nitrogen leaching and nitrous oxide gas emission. To suppress these unfavorable phenomena, nitrification inhibitors, AOB specific bactericides, are widely used in fertilized farmland. However, new nitrification inhibitors are desired because of toxicity and weak-effects of currently used inhibitors. Toward development of novel nitrification inhibitors that target hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO), a key enzyme of nitrification in AOB, we established inhibitor evaluation systems that include simplified HAO purification procedure and high-throughput HAO activity assays for the purified enzymes and for the live AOB cells. The new assay systems allowed us to observe distinct inhibitory responses of HAOs from beta-proteobacterial AOB (βAOB) Nitrosomonas europaea (NeHAO) and gamma-proteobacterial AOB (γAOB) Nitrosococcus oceani (NoHAO) against phenylhydrazine, a well-known suicide inhibitor for NeHAO. Consistently, the live cells of N. europaea, Nitrosomonas sp. JPCCT2 and Nitrosospira multiformis of βAOB displayed higher responses to phenylhydrazine than those of γAOB N. oceani. Our homology modeling studies suggest that different inhibitory responses of βAOB and γAOB are originated from different local environments around the substrate-binding sites of HAOs in these two classes of bacteria due to substitutions of two residues. The results reported herein strongly recommend inhibitor screenings against both NeHAO of βAOB and NoHAO of γAOB to develop HAO-targeting nitrification inhibitors with wide anti-AOB spectra. PMID:27173879

  1. Suppression of Chloroplastic Alkenal/One Oxidoreductase Represses the Carbon Catabolic Pathway in Arabidopsis Leaves during Night.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Daisuke; Ifuku, Kentaro; Ikeda, Ken-Ichi; Inoue, Kanako Ikeda; Park, Pyoyun; Tamoi, Masahiro; Inoue, Hironori; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Saito, Ryota; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2016-04-01

    Lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS) possess electrophilic moieties and cause oxidative stress by reacting with cellular components. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has a chloroplast-localized alkenal/one oxidoreductase (AtAOR) for the detoxification of lipid-derived RCS, especially α,β-unsaturated carbonyls. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the physiological importance of AtAOR and analyzed AtAOR (aor) mutants, including a transfer DNA knockout, aor (T-DNA), and RNA interference knockdown, aor (RNAi), lines. We found that both aor mutants showed smaller plant sizes than wild-type plants when they were grown under day/night cycle conditions. To elucidate the cause of the aor mutant phenotype, we analyzed the photosynthetic rate and the respiration rate by gas-exchange analysis. Subsequently, we found that both wild-type and aor (RNAi) plants showed similar CO2 assimilation rates; however, the respiration rate was lower in aor (RNAi) than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, we revealed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity decreased and starch degradation during the night was suppressed in aor (RNAi). In contrast, the phenotype of aor (RNAi) was rescued when aor (RNAi) plants were grown under constant light conditions. These results indicate that the smaller plant sizes observed in aor mutants grown under day/night cycle conditions were attributable to the decrease in carbon utilization during the night. Here, we propose that the detoxification of lipid-derived RCS by AtAOR in chloroplasts contributes to the protection of dark respiration and supports plant growth during the night. PMID:26884484

  2. Effects of topiroxostat and febuxostat on urinary albumin excretion and plasma xanthine oxidoreductase activity in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Nampei, Mai; Morimoto, Nobutaka; Ashizawa, Naoki; Iwanaga, Takashi; Sakamoto, Ryusuke

    2016-06-01

    Topiroxostat, a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, has been shown to decrease the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio compared with placebo in hyperuricemic patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. Thus, we aimed to ascertain the albuminuria-lowering effect of topiroxostat in diabetic mouse. Db/db mice were fed standard diets with or without topiroxostat (0.1, 0.3, 1, and 3mg/kg/day) and febuxostat (0.1, 0.3, and 1mg/kg/day) for four weeks. Urinary albumin and purine bodies levels, XOR activities, and drug concentrations in the liver, kidney, and plasma were measured. Moreover, the XOR inhibitory activity of each XOR inhibitor was evaluated with or without an exogenous protein in vitro. Topiroxostat decreased dose-dependently the urinary albumin excretion, but febuxostat did not show such a tendency. Treatment with topiroxostat inhibited plasma XOR activity with dose-dependent increase in plasma purine levels, which was not observed by febuxostat. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis revealed that topiroxostat and febuxostat concentration in each tissue showed a good correlation with both the hypouricemic effect and plasma drug concentration, whereas the change in albuminuria correlated neither with the change in uric acid nor with drug concentration in plasma. However, the change in urinary albumin and plasma XOR activity showed good correlation in topiroxostat group. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 value) of febuxostat against plasma XOR in vitro was 12-fold higher than that of topiroxostat, and increased by approximately 13-fold by interfering with an exogenous protein. Topiroxostat caused reduced urinary albumin excretion, in which potent inhibition of the plasma XOR activity might be involved. PMID:27038523

  3. Study on toxicological aspects of crystal-mediated nephrotoxicity induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimo, Takeo; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Ashizawa, Naoki; Oba, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Osamu

    2011-04-01

    To clarify the toxicological aspects of crystal-mediated nephrotoxicity, we performed analysis concerning the correlation between representative kidney-related parameters and renal histopathology, using the individual data obtained from the 4-week toxicity studies of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, by oral administration at 1 and 3 mg/kg to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and at 3 and 10 mg/kg to F344 rats. In SD rats, the correlation coefficient on histopathology between the right and left kidneys was 0.7826 and remained within a lower range of strong correlation (range: ±0.7 ∼ ±0.9). The correlation coefficient between body-weight gains, urinary volume, osmolarity, serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and relative kidney weights and renal histopathology was -0.6648, 0.7896, -0.7751, 0.8195, 0.8479, and 0.8969, respectively, showing a strong correlation, except a moderate correlation in body-weight gains (range: ±0.4 ∼ ±0.7). In F344 rats, the correlation coefficient on histopathology between the right and left kidneys was 0.8637, remaining within an upper range of strong correlation. The correlation coefficient between the above parameters and renal histopathology was -0.8175, 0.8616, -0.9045, 0.9010, 0.8991, and 0.9524, respectively, showing an extremely strong correlation in urinary osmolarity, serum BUN, and relative kidney weights (range: ±0.9 ∼ ±1.0). Therefore, the present study suggests that FYX-051-induced nephrotoxicity may occur with more inconsistency in the degree of nephropathy between the right and left kidneys in SD rats than in F344 rats, which would explain the above outcomes. PMID:21314469

  4. Application of nanodisc technology for direct electrochemical investigation of plant cytochrome P450s and their NADPH P450 oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Bavishi, Krutika; Laursen, Tomas; Martinez, Karen L.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Direct electrochemistry of cytochrome P450 containing systems has primarily focused on investigating enzymes from microbes and animals for bio-sensing applications. Plant P450s receive electrons from NADPH P450 oxidoreductase (POR) to orchestrate the bio-synthesis of a plethora of commercially valuable compounds. In this report, full length CYP79A1, CYP71E1 and POR of the dhurrin pathway in Sorghum bicolor were reconstituted individually in nanoscale lipid patches, “nanodiscs”, and directly immobilized on unmodified gold electrodes. Cyclic voltammograms of CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 revealed reversible redox peaks with average midpoint potentials of 80 ± 5 mV and 72 ± 5 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively. POR yielded two pairs of redox peaks with midpoint potentials of 90 ± 5 mV and −300 ± 10 mV, respectively. The average heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant was calculated to be ~1.5 s−1. POR was electro-catalytically active while the P450s generated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These nanodisc-based investigations lay the prospects and guidelines for construction of a simplified platform to perform mediator-free, direct electrochemistry of non-engineered cytochromes P450 under native-like conditions. It is also a prelude for driving plant P450 systems electronically for simplified and cost-effective screening of potential substrates/inhibitors and fabrication of nano-bioreactors for synthesis of high value natural products. PMID:27386958

  5. Phylogenomic Analysis and Predicted Physiological Role of the Proton-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Complex I) Across Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Aylward, Frank O.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a multisubunit integral membrane enzyme found in the respiratory chains of both bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Although much research has focused on the enzyme’s central role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, comparatively little is known about its role in the diverse energetic lifestyles of different bacteria. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to better understand the distribution of complex I across bacteria, the evolution of this enzyme, and its potential roles in shaping the physiology of different bacterial groups. By surveying 970 representative bacterial genomes, we predict complex I to be present in ~50% of bacteria. While this includes bacteria with a wide range of energetic schemes, the presence of complex I is associated with specific lifestyles, including aerobic respiration and specific types of phototrophy (bacteria with only a type II reaction center). A phylogeny of bacterial complex I revealed five main clades of enzymes whose evolution is largely congruent with the evolution of the bacterial groups that encode complex I. A notable exception includes the gammaproteobacteria, whose members encode one of two distantly related complex I enzymes predicted to participate in different types of respiratory chains (aerobic versus anaerobic). Comparative genomic analyses suggest a broad role for complex I in reoxidizing NADH produced from various catabolic reactions, including the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Together, these findings suggest diverse roles for complex I across bacteria and highlight the importance of this enzyme in shaping diverse physiologies across the bacterial domain. PMID:25873378

  6. The Ontogeny and Population Variability of Human Hepatic NADPH Dehydrogenase Quinone Oxido-Reductase 1 (NQO1).

    PubMed

    Rougée, Luc R A; Riches, Zoe; Berman, Jacob M; Collier, Abby C

    2016-07-01

    The NADPH dehydrogenase quinone oxido-reductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme is an antioxidant and metabolic enzyme that performs two electron reduction of quinones and other chemicals. Based on the physiologic role(s) of NQO1, we hypothesized that expression and activity of this enzyme would vary with age and other demographic variables. Cytosols from 117 archived human livers were investigated for changes in NQO1 with age, sex, obesity, and ethnicity. Protein expression but not activity of NQO1 was weakly negatively correlated with age (Spearman r = -0.2, P = 0.03). No sex differences were observed for either protein expression or activity and for ethnicity; Caucasians had greater NQO1 activity than Asians (P < 0.05). Overweight children had statistically significantly higher NQO1 activity as compared with ideal weight children (P < 0.05) although this difference was not observed in adults. These findings establish that NQO1 is approximately as active in children as adults. However, modeled NQO1 clearance (both allometric and physiologically based pharmacokinetics) predicted maturation at 23 to 26 years. This is almost certainly an overestimate, with error in the model resulting from a small sample size and inability to scale for age-related changes in hepatic cellularity and/or cytosolic protein content, and indicates a delay in reaching maximum clearance through the NQO1 pathway that is affected by physiologic development as much, or more than, biochemical development. Obesity may increase hepatic NQO1 activity in children, which is likely a protective mechanism in oxidative stress, but may also have significant implications for drug and chemical disposition in obese children. PMID:26856346

  7. The Critical Role of Arabidopsis Electron-Transfer Flavoprotein:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase during Dark-Induced StarvationW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Larson, Tony R.; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Graham, Ian A.; Leaver, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETFQO) and electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) are functionally associated, and ETF accepts electrons from at least nine mitochondrial matrix flavoprotein dehydrogenases and transfers them to ubiquinone in the inner mitochondrial membrane. In addition, the mammalian ETF/ETFQO system plays a key role in β-oxidation of fatty acids and catabolism of amino acids and choline. By contrast, nothing is known of the function of ETF and ETFQO in plants. Sequence analysis of the unique Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of ETFQO revealed high similarity to the mammalian ETFQO protein. Moreover, green fluorescent protein cellular localization experiments suggested a mitochondrial location for this protein. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that Arabidopsis ETFQO transcripts accumulated in long-term dark-treated leaves. Analysis of three independent insertional mutants of Arabidopsis ETFQO revealed a dramatic reduction in their ability to withstand extended darkness, resulting in senescence and death within 10 d after transfer, whereas wild-type plants remained viable for at least 15 d. Metabolite profiling of dark-treated leaves of the wild type and mutants revealed a dramatic decline in sugar levels. In contrast with the wild type, the mutants demonstrated a significant accumulation of several amino acids, an intermediate of Leu catabolism, and, strikingly, high-level accumulation of phytanoyl-CoA. These data demonstrate the involvement of a mitochondrial protein, ETFQO, in the catabolism of Leu and potentially of other amino acids in higher plants and also imply a novel role for this protein in the chlorophyll degradation pathway activated during dark-induced senescence and sugar starvation. PMID:16055629

  8. Establishment of simultaneous treatment model with citrate for preventing nephropathy induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Naoki; Shimo, Takeo; Matsumoto, Koji; Taniguchi, Tetsuya; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Nagata, Osamu

    2011-04-01

    As a precedent study for elucidating the mechanism of possible urinary bladder carcinogenesis due to xanthine crystals induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, we have determined the experimental conditions suitable for the 52-week simultaneous treatment with citrate in F344 rats. Simultaneous treatment with citrate and FYX-051 produced both increased urinary citrate excretion and suppression of urinary xanthine deposition at around 4 hours after a single dosing, but these effects disappeared 2 hours later, indicating a lack of the durability of citrate effects. Next, we carried out a 7-day simultaneous treatment study by two daily treatments, that is, FYX-051 (6 mg/kg) and citrate (2,000 mg/kg), followed by citrate-alone treatment, under the conditions of selected dosing intervals, the second dose of citrate, and dosing volume. As a result, the dosing interval of citrate was found to be optimal at 4 hours, but not at 3 or 5 hours, because this treatment completely inhibited intrarenal xanthine deposition. The dose of citrate for the second treatment and the dosing volume were found to be sufficient at 1,500 mg/kg and 10 mL/kg, respectively. Subsequently, a 4-week study by simultaneous treatment at 3 mg/kg of FYX-051 and citrate (2,000 mg/kg) + citrate (1,500 mg/kg), under the improved conditions, revealed that renal lesions could be drastically inhibited. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the interval of two citrate treatments is pivotal and indicated that the improved model would be useful for the mechanistic study of FYX-051-induced urinary bladder carcinogenesis because of an easier treatment method than our previous model. PMID:21105859

  9. Application of nanodisc technology for direct electrochemical investigation of plant cytochrome P450s and their NADPH P450 oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Bavishi, Krutika; Laursen, Tomas; Martinez, Karen L; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Della Pia, Eduardo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Direct electrochemistry of cytochrome P450 containing systems has primarily focused on investigating enzymes from microbes and animals for bio-sensing applications. Plant P450s receive electrons from NADPH P450 oxidoreductase (POR) to orchestrate the bio-synthesis of a plethora of commercially valuable compounds. In this report, full length CYP79A1, CYP71E1 and POR of the dhurrin pathway in Sorghum bicolor were reconstituted individually in nanoscale lipid patches, "nanodiscs", and directly immobilized on unmodified gold electrodes. Cyclic voltammograms of CYP79A1 and CYP71E1 revealed reversible redox peaks with average midpoint potentials of 80 ± 5 mV and 72 ± 5 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively. POR yielded two pairs of redox peaks with midpoint potentials of 90 ± 5 mV and -300 ± 10 mV, respectively. The average heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant was calculated to be ~1.5 s(-1). POR was electro-catalytically active while the P450s generated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These nanodisc-based investigations lay the prospects and guidelines for construction of a simplified platform to perform mediator-free, direct electrochemistry of non-engineered cytochromes P450 under native-like conditions. It is also a prelude for driving plant P450 systems electronically for simplified and cost-effective screening of potential substrates/inhibitors and fabrication of nano-bioreactors for synthesis of high value natural products. PMID:27386958

  10. Deletion of P399{sub E}401 in NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase results in partial mixed oxidase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mallet, Delphine; Hofer, Gaby; Samara-Boustani, Dinane; Leger, Juliane; Polak, Michel; Morel, Yves; Pandey, Amit V.

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia. {yields} We are reporting a novel 3 amino acid deletion mutation in POR P399{sub E}401del. {yields} POR mutation P399{sub E}401del decreased P450 activities by 60-85%. {yields} Impairment of steroid metabolism may be caused by multiple hits. {yields} Severity of aromatase inhibition is related to degree of in utero virilization. -- Abstract: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the electron donor for all microsomal P450s including steroidogenic enzymes CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2. We found a novel POR mutation P399{sub E}401del in two unrelated Turkish patients with 46,XX disorder of sexual development. Recombinant POR proteins were produced in yeast and tested for their ability to support steroid metabolizing P450 activities. In comparison to wild-type POR, the P399{sub E}401del protein was found to decrease catalytic efficiency of 21-hydroxylation of progesterone by 68%, 17{alpha}-hydroxylation of progesterone by 76%, 17,20-lyase action on 17OH-pregnenolone by 69%, aromatization of androstenedione by 85% and cytochrome c reduction activity by 80%. Protein structure analysis of the three amino acid deletion P399{sub E}401 revealed reduced stability and flexibility of the mutant. In conclusion, P399{sub E}401del is a novel mutation in POR that provides valuable genotype-phenotype and structure-function correlation for mutations in a different region of POR compared to previous studies. Characterization of P399{sub E}401del provides further insight into specificity of different P450s for interaction with POR as well as nature of metabolic disruptions caused by more pronounced effect on specific P450s like CYP17A1 and aromatase.

  11. Bovine heart NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase contains one molecule of ubiquinone with ten isoprene units as one of the cofactors.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Seiyama, Junko; Terada, Hirohito; Nakatsubo, Ryohei; Naoki, Kazuki; Nakashima, Yumiko; Yoshikawa, Shinya

    2010-01-26

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) is located at the entrance of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain and transfers electrons from NADH to ubiquinone with 10 isoprene units (Q(10)) coupled with proton pumping. The composition of Complex I, the largest and most complex proton pump in the mitochondrial electron transfer system, especially the contents of Q(10) and phospholipids, has not been well established. An improved purification method including solubilization of mitochondrial membrane with deoxycholate followed by sucrose gradient centrifugation and anion-exchange column chromatography provided reproducibly a heme-free preparation containing 1 Q(10), 70 phosphorus atoms of phospholipids, 1 zinc ion, 1 FMN, 30 inorganic sulfur ions, and 30 iron atoms as the intrinsic constituents. The rotenone-sensitive enzymatic activity of the Complex I preparation was comparable to that of Complex I in the mitochondrial membrane. It has been proposed that Complex I has two Q(10) binding sites, one involved in the proton pump and the other functioning as a converter between one and two electron transfer pathways [Ohnishi, T., Johnson, J. J. E., Yano, T., LoBrutto, R., and Widger, R. W. (2005) FEBS Lett. 579, 500-506]. The existence of one molecule of Q(10) in the fully oxidized Complex I suggests that the affinity of Q(10) to one of the two Q(10) sites is greatly dependent on the oxidation state and/or the membrane potential and that the Q(10) in the present preparation functions as the converter of the electron transfer pathways which should be present in any oxidation state. PMID:19961238

  12. Correlation of Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Expression with the Expression of 10 Isoforms of Cytochrome P450 in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Li, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Jia-Yu; Liu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Ping; Fang, Yan; Zhou, Jun; Cui, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Na; Tian, Xin; Gao, Jie; Wen, Qiang; Jia, Lin-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Human cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) provides electrons for all microsomal cytochromes P450 (P450s) and plays an indispensable role in drug metabolism catalyzed by this family of enzymes. We evaluated 100 human liver samples and found that POR protein content varied 12.8-fold, from 12.59 to 160.97 pmol/mg, with a median value of 67.99 pmol/mg; POR mRNA expression varied by 26.4-fold. POR activity was less variable with a median value of 56.05 nmol/min per milligram. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption clearly influenced POR activity. Liver samples with a 2286822 TT genotype had significantly higher POR mRNA expression than samples with CT genotype. Homozygous carriers of POR2286822C>T, 2286823G>A, and 3823884A>C had significantly lower POR protein levels compared with the corresponding heterozygous carriers. Liver samples from individuals homozygous at 286823G>A, 1135612A>G, and 10954732G>A generally had lower POR activity levels than those from heterozygous or wild-type samples, whereas the common variant POR*28 significantly increased POR activity. There was a strong association between POR and the expression of P450 isoforms at the mRNA and protein level, whereas the relationship at the activity level, as well as the effect of POR protein content on P450 activity, was less pronounced. POR transcription was strongly correlated with both hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha and pregnane X receptor mRNA levels. In conclusion, we have elucidated some potentially important correlations between POR single-nucleotide polymorphisms and POR expression in the Chinese population and have developed a database that correlates POR expression with the expression and activity of 10 P450s important in drug metabolism. PMID:27271371

  13. Activities of Secreted Aryl Alcohol Quinone Oxidoreductases from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus Provide Insights into Fungal Degradation of Plant Biomass.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Yann; Piumi, Francois; Valli, Richard; Aramburu, Juan Carro; Ferreira, Patricia; Faulds, Craig B; Record, Eric

    2016-04-15

    Auxiliary activities family 3 subfamily 2 (AA3_2) from the CAZy database comprises various functions related to ligninolytic enzymes, such as fungal aryl alcohol oxidases (AAO) and glucose oxidases, both of which are flavoenzymes. The recent study of thePycnoporus cinnabarinusCIRM BRFM 137 genome combined with its secretome revealed that four AA3_2 enzymes are secreted during biomass degradation. One of these AA3_2 enzymes, scf184803.g17, has recently been produced heterologously inAspergillus niger Based on the enzyme's activity and specificity, it was assigned to the glucose dehydrogenases (PcinnabarinusGDH [PcGDH]). Here, we analyze the distribution of the other three AA3_2 enzymes (scf185002.g8, scf184611.g7, and scf184746.g13) to assess their putative functions. These proteins showed the highest homology with aryl alcohol oxidase fromPleurotus eryngii Biochemical characterization demonstrated that they were also flavoenzymes harboring flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a cofactor and able to oxidize a wide variety of phenolic and nonphenolic aryl alcohols and one aliphatic polyunsaturated primary alcohol. Though presenting homology with fungal AAOs, these enzymes exhibited greater efficiency in reducing electron acceptors (quinones and one artificial acceptor) than molecular oxygen and so were defined as aryl-alcohol:quinone oxidoreductases (AAQOs) with two enzymes possessing residual oxidase activity (PcAAQO2 andPcAAQO3). Structural comparison ofPcAAQO homology models withP. eryngiiAAO demonstrated a wider substrate access channel connecting the active-site cavity to the solvent, explaining the absence of activity with molecular oxygen. Finally, the ability ofPcAAQOs to reduce radical intermediates generated by laccase fromP. cinnabarinuswas demonstrated, shedding light on the ligninolytic system of this fungus. PMID:26873317

  14. Correlation of Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase Expression with the Expression of 10 Isoforms of Cytochrome P450 in Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Li, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Jia-Yu; Liu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Ping; Fang, Yan; Zhou, Jun; Cui, Ming-Zhu; Gao, Na; Tian, Xin; Gao, Jie; Wen, Qiang; Jia, Lin-Jing; Qiao, Hai-Ling

    2016-08-01

    Human cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) provides electrons for all microsomal cytochromes P450 (P450s) and plays an indispensable role in drug metabolism catalyzed by this family of enzymes. We evaluated 100 human liver samples and found that POR protein content varied 12.8-fold, from 12.59 to 160.97 pmol/mg, with a median value of 67.99 pmol/mg; POR mRNA expression varied by 26.4-fold. POR activity was less variable with a median value of 56.05 nmol/min per milligram. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption clearly influenced POR activity. Liver samples with a 2286822 TT genotype had significantly higher POR mRNA expression than samples with CT genotype. Homozygous carriers of POR2286822C>T, 2286823G>A, and 3823884A>C had significantly lower POR protein levels compared with the corresponding heterozygous carriers. Liver samples from individuals homozygous at 286823G>A, 1135612A>G, and 10954732G>A generally had lower POR activity levels than those from heterozygous or wild-type samples, whereas the common variant POR*28 significantly increased POR activity. There was a strong association between POR and the expression of P450 isoforms at the mRNA and protein level, whereas the relationship at the activity level, as well as the effect of POR protein content on P450 activity, was less pronounced. POR transcription was strongly correlated with both hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha and pregnane X receptor mRNA levels. In conclusion, we have elucidated some potentially important correlations between POR single-nucleotide polymorphisms and POR expression in the Chinese population and have developed a database that correlates POR expression with the expression and activity of 10 P450s important in drug metabolism. PMID:27271371

  15. Reductive half-reaction of aldehyde oxidoreductase toward acetaldehyde: Ab initio and free energy quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, Johannes M.; Werner, Hans-Joachim; Mata, Ricardo A.; Metz, Sebastian; Thiel, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Energy and free energy barriers for acetaldehyde conversion in aldehyde oxidoreductase are determined for three reaction pathways using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations on the solvated enzyme. Ab initio single-point QM/MM energies are obtained at the stationary points optimized at the DFT(B3LYP)/MM level. These ab initio calculations employ local correlation treatments [LMP2 and LCCSD(T0)] in combination with augmented triple- and quadruple-zeta basis sets, and the final coupled cluster results include MP2-based corrections for basis set incompleteness and for the domain approximation. Free energy perturbation (FEP) theory is used to generate free energy profiles at the DFT(B3LYP)/MM level for the most important reaction steps by sampling along the corresponding reaction paths using molecular dynamics. The ab initio and FEP QM/MM results are combined to derive improved estimates of the free energy barriers, which differ from the corresponding DFT(B3LYP)/MM energy barriers by about 3 kcal mol-1. The present results confirm the qualitative mechanistic conclusions from a previous DFT(B3LYP)/MM study. Most favorable is a three-step Lewis base catalyzed mechanism with an initial proton transfer from the cofactor to the Glu869 residue, a subsequent nucleophilic attack that yields a tetrahedral intermediate (IM2), and a final rate-limiting hydride transfer. The competing metal center activated pathway has the same final step but needs to overcome a higher barrier in the initial step on the route to IM2. The concerted mechanism has the highest free energy barrier and can be ruled out. While confirming the qualitative mechanistic scenario proposed previously on the basis of DFT(B3LYP)/MM energy profiles, the present ab initio and FEP QM/MM calculations provide corrections to the barriers that are important when aiming at high accuracy.

  16. Substrate-specific modulation of CYP3A4 activity by genetic variants of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR)

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vishal; Choi, Ji Ha; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Miller, Walter L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives CYP3A4 receives electrons from P450 oxidoreductase (POR) to metabolize about 50% of clinically used drugs. There is substantial inter-individual variation in CYP3A4 catalytic activity that is not explained by CYP3A4 genetic variants. CYP3A4 is flexible and distensible, permitting it to accommodate substrates varying in shape and size. To elucidate mechanisms of variability in CYP3A4 catalysis, we examined the effects of genetic variants of POR, and explored the possibility that substrate-induced conformational changes in CYP3A4 differentially affect the ability of POR variants to support catalysis. Methods We expressed human CYP3A4 and four POR variants (Q153R, A287P, R457H, A503V) in bacteria, reconstituted them in vitro and measured the Michaelis constant and maximum velocity with testosterone, midazolam, quinidine and erythromycin as substrates. Results POR A287P and R457H had low activity with all substrates; Q153R had 76–94% of wild type (WT) activity with midazolam and erythromycin, but 129–150% activity with testosterone and quinidine. The A503V polymorphism reduced CYP3A4 activity to 61–77% of wild type with testosterone and midazolam, but had nearly wild type activity with quinidine and erythromycin. Conclusion POR variants affect CYP3A4 activities. The impact of a POR variant on catalysis by CYP3A4 is substrate-specific, probably due to substrate-induced conformational changes in CYP3A4. PMID:20697309

  17. Suppression of Chloroplastic Alkenal/One Oxidoreductase Represses the Carbon Catabolic Pathway in Arabidopsis Leaves during Night1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ifuku, Kentaro; Ikeda, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Kanako Ikeda; Park, Pyoyun; Tamoi, Masahiro; Inoue, Hironori; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Saito, Ryota

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS) possess electrophilic moieties and cause oxidative stress by reacting with cellular components. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has a chloroplast-localized alkenal/one oxidoreductase (AtAOR) for the detoxification of lipid-derived RCS, especially α,β-unsaturated carbonyls. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the physiological importance of AtAOR and analyzed AtAOR (aor) mutants, including a transfer DNA knockout, aor (T-DNA), and RNA interference knockdown, aor (RNAi), lines. We found that both aor mutants showed smaller plant sizes than wild-type plants when they were grown under day/night cycle conditions. To elucidate the cause of the aor mutant phenotype, we analyzed the photosynthetic rate and the respiration rate by gas-exchange analysis. Subsequently, we found that both wild-type and aor (RNAi) plants showed similar CO2 assimilation rates; however, the respiration rate was lower in aor (RNAi) than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, we revealed that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity decreased and starch degradation during the night was suppressed in aor (RNAi). In contrast, the phenotype of aor (RNAi) was rescued when aor (RNAi) plants were grown under constant light conditions. These results indicate that the smaller plant sizes observed in aor mutants grown under day/night cycle conditions were attributable to the decrease in carbon utilization during the night. Here, we propose that the detoxification of lipid-derived RCS by AtAOR in chloroplasts contributes to the protection of dark respiration and supports plant growth during the night. PMID:26884484

  18. The Structural and Functional Basis of Catalysis Mediated by NAD(P)H:acceptor Oxidoreductase (FerB) of Paracoccus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Sedláček, Vojtěch; Klumpler, Tomáš; Marek, Jaromír; Kučera, Igor

    2014-01-01

    FerB from Paracoccus denitrificans is a soluble cytoplasmic flavoprotein that accepts redox equivalents from NADH or NADPH and transfers them to various acceptors such as quinones, ferric complexes and chromate. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements in solution reported here reveal a head-to-tail dimer with two flavin mononucleotide groups bound at the opposite sides of the subunit interface. The dimers tend to self-associate to a tetrameric form at higher protein concentrations. Amino acid residues important for the binding of FMN and NADH and for the catalytic activity are identified and verified by site-directed mutagenesis. In particular, we show that Glu77 anchors a conserved water molecule in close proximity to the O2 of FMN, with the probable role of facilitating flavin reduction. Hydride transfer is shown to occur from the 4-pro-S position of NADH to the solvent-accessible si side of the flavin ring. When using deuterated NADH, this process exhibits a kinetic isotope effect of about 6 just as does the NADH-dependent quinone reductase activity of FerB; the first, reductive half-reaction of flavin cofactor is thus rate-limiting. Replacing the bulky Arg95 in the vicinity of the active site with alanine substantially enhances the activity towards external flavins that obeys the standard bi-bi ping-pong reaction mechanism. The new evidence for a cryptic flavin reductase activity of FerB justifies the previous inclusion of this enzyme in the protein family of NADPH-dependent FMN reductases. PMID:24817153

  19. The structural and functional basis of catalysis mediated by NAD(P)H:acceptor Oxidoreductase (FerB) of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Sedláček, Vojtěch; Klumpler, Tomáš; Marek, Jaromír; Kučera, Igor

    2014-01-01

    FerB from Paracoccus denitrificans is a soluble cytoplasmic flavoprotein that accepts redox equivalents from NADH or NADPH and transfers them to various acceptors such as quinones, ferric complexes and chromate. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements in solution reported here reveal a head-to-tail dimer with two flavin mononucleotide groups bound at the opposite sides of the subunit interface. The dimers tend to self-associate to a tetrameric form at higher protein concentrations. Amino acid residues important for the binding of FMN and NADH and for the catalytic activity are identified and verified by site-directed mutagenesis. In particular, we show that Glu77 anchors a conserved water molecule in close proximity to the O2 of FMN, with the probable role of facilitating flavin reduction. Hydride transfer is shown to occur from the 4-pro-S position of NADH to the solvent-accessible si side of the flavin ring. When using deuterated NADH, this process exhibits a kinetic isotope effect of about 6 just as does the NADH-dependent quinone reductase activity of FerB; the first, reductive half-reaction of flavin cofactor is thus rate-limiting. Replacing the bulky Arg95 in the vicinity of the active site with alanine substantially enhances the activity towards external flavins that obeys the standard bi-bi ping-pong reaction mechanism. The new evidence for a cryptic flavin reductase activity of FerB justifies the previous inclusion of this enzyme in the protein family of NADPH-dependent FMN reductases. PMID:24817153

  20. FaQR, Required for the Biosynthesis of the Strawberry Flavor Compound 4-Hydroxy-2,5-Dimethyl-3(2H)-Furanone, Encodes an Enone Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Thomas; López-Ráez, Juan Antonio; Klein, Dorothée; Caballero, Jose Luis; Moyano, Enriqueta; Schwab, Wilfried; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan

    2006-01-01

    The flavor of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit is dominated by an uncommon group of aroma compounds with a 2,5-dimethyl-3(H)-furanone structure. We report the characterization of an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF; Furaneol), the key flavor compound in strawberries. Protein extracts were partially purified, and the observed distribution of enzymatic activity correlated with the presence of a single polypeptide of ∼37 kD. Sequence analysis of two peptide fragments showed total identity with the protein sequence of a strongly ripening-induced, auxin-dependent putative quinone oxidoreductase, Fragaria × ananassa quinone oxidoreductase (FaQR). The open reading frame of the FaQR cDNA consists of 969 bp encoding a 322–amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 34.3 kD. Laser capture microdissection followed by RNA extraction and amplification demonstrated the presence of FaQR mRNA in parenchyma tissue of the strawberry fruit. The FaQR protein was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the monomer catalyzed the formation of HDMF. After chemical synthesis and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis, 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2-methylene-3(2H)-furanone was confirmed as a substrate of FaQR and the natural precursor of HDMF. This study demonstrates the function of the FaQR enzyme in the biosynthesis of HDMF as enone oxidoreductase and provides a foundation for the improvement of strawberry flavor and the biotechnological production of HDMF. PMID:16517758

  1. FaQR, required for the biosynthesis of the strawberry flavor compound 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, encodes an enone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Raab, Thomas; López-Ráez, Juan Antonio; Klein, Dorothée; Caballero, Jose Luis; Moyano, Enriqueta; Schwab, Wilfried; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan

    2006-04-01

    The flavor of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruit is dominated by an uncommon group of aroma compounds with a 2,5-dimethyl-3(H)-furanone structure. We report the characterization of an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF; Furaneol), the key flavor compound in strawberries. Protein extracts were partially purified, and the observed distribution of enzymatic activity correlated with the presence of a single polypeptide of approximately 37 kD. Sequence analysis of two peptide fragments showed total identity with the protein sequence of a strongly ripening-induced, auxin-dependent putative quinone oxidoreductase, Fragaria x ananassa quinone oxidoreductase (FaQR). The open reading frame of the FaQR cDNA consists of 969 bp encoding a 322-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 34.3 kD. Laser capture microdissection followed by RNA extraction and amplification demonstrated the presence of FaQR mRNA in parenchyma tissue of the strawberry fruit. The FaQR protein was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the monomer catalyzed the formation of HDMF. After chemical synthesis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2-methylene-3(2H)-furanone was confirmed as a substrate of FaQR and the natural precursor of HDMF. This study demonstrates the function of the FaQR enzyme in the biosynthesis of HDMF as enone oxidoreductase and provides a foundation for the improvement of strawberry flavor and the biotechnological production of HDMF. PMID:16517758

  2. Arsenic induces NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase I by disrupting the Nrf2 x Keap1 x Cul3 complex and recruiting Nrf2 x Maf to the antioxidant response element enhancer.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoqing; Chen, Michael G; Lin, Gary X; Ma, Qiang

    2006-08-18

    The ubiquitous toxic metalloid arsenic elicits pleiotropic adverse and adaptive responses in mammalian species. The biological targets of arsenic are largely unknown at present. We analyzed the signaling pathway for induction of detoxification gene NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo1) by arsenic. Genetic and biochemical evidence revealed that induction required cap 'n' collar basic leucine zipper transcription factor Nrf2 and the antioxidant response element (ARE) of Nqo1. Arsenic stabilized Nrf2 protein, extending the t(1/2) of Nrf2 from 21 to 200 min by inhibiting the Keap1 x Cul3-dependent ubiquitination and proteasomal turnover of Nrf2. Arsenic markedly inhibited the ubiquitination of Nrf2 but did not disrupt the Nrf2 x Keap1 x Cul3 association in the cytoplasm. In the nucleus, arsenic, but not phenolic antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone, dissociated Nrf2 from Keap1 and Cul3 followed by dimerization of Nrf2 with a Maf protein (Maf G/Maf K). Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Nrf2 and Maf associated with the endogenous Nqo1 ARE enhancer constitutively. Arsenic substantially increased the ARE occupancy by Nrf2 and Maf. In addition, Keap1 was shown to be ubiquitinated in the cytoplasm and deubiquitinated in the nucleus in the presence of arsenic without changing the protein level, implicating nuclear-cytoplasmic recycling of Keap1. Our data reveal that arsenic activates the Nrf2/Keap1 signaling pathway through a distinct mechanism from that by antioxidants and suggest an "on-switch" model of Nqo1 transcription in which the binding of Nrf2 x Maf to ARE controls both the basal and inducible expression of Nqo1. PMID:16785233

  3. Modulation of Biofilm-Formation in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium by the Periplasmic DsbA/DsbB Oxidoreductase System Requires the GGDEF-EAL Domain Protein STM3615

    PubMed Central

    Römling, Ute; Rhen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), biofilm-formation is controlled by the cytoplasmic intracellular small-molecular second messenger cyclic 3′, 5′-di- guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) through the activities of GGDEF and EAL domain proteins. Here we describe that deleting either dsbA or dsbB, respectively encoding a periplasmic protein disulfide oxidase and a cytoplasmic membrane disulfide oxidoreductase, resulted in increased biofilm-formation on solid medium. This increased biofilm-formation, defined as a red, dry and rough (rdar) colony morphotype, paralleled with enhanced expression of the biofilm master regulator CsgD and the biofilm-associated fimbrial subunit CsgA. Deleting csgD in either dsb mutant abrogated the enhanced biofilm-formation. Likewise, overexpression of the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase YhjH, or mutationally inactivating the CsgD activator EAL-domain protein YdiV, reduced biofilm-formation in either of the dsb mutants. Intriguingly, deleting the GGDEF-EAL domain protein gene STM3615 (yhjK), previously not connected to rdar morphotype development, also abrogated the escalated rdar morphotype formation in dsb mutant backgrounds. Enhanced biofilm-formation in dsb mutants was furthermore annulled by exposure to the protein disulfide catalyst copper chloride. When analyzed for the effect of exogenous reducing stress on biofilm-formation, both dsb mutants initially showed an escalated rdar morphotype development that later dissolved to reveal a smooth mucoid colony morphotype. From these results we conclude that biofilm-development in S. Typhimurium is affected by periplasmic protein disulphide bond status through CsgD, and discuss the involvement of selected GGDEF/EAL domain protein(s) as signaling mediators. PMID:25153529

  4. A Single Gene Cluster for Chalcomycins and Aldgamycins: Genetic Basis for Bifurcation of Their Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Long; Dai, Ping; Gao, Hao; Wang, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Guo-Dong; Hong, Kui; Hu, Dan; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Aldgamycins are 16-membered macrolide antibiotics with a rare branched-chain sugar d-aldgarose or decarboxylated d-aldgarose at C-5. In our efforts to clone the gene cluster for aldgamycins from a marine-derived Streptomyces sp. HK-2006-1 capable of producing both aldgamycins and chalcomycins, we found that both are biosynthesized from a single gene cluster. Whole-genome sequencing combined with gene disruption established the entire gene cluster of aldgamycins: nine new genes are incorporated with the previously identified chalcomycin gene cluster. Functional analysis of these genes revealed that almDI/almDII, (encoding α/β subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase) triggers the biosynthesis of aldgamycins, whereas almCI (encoding an oxidoreductase) initiates chalcomycins biosynthesis. This is the first report that aldgamycins and chalcomycins are derived from a single gene cluster and of the genetic basis for bifurcation in their biosynthesis. PMID:27191535

  5. Altered patterns of gene duplication and differential gene gain and loss in fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Amy J; Conant, Gavin C; Brown, Douglas E; Carbone, Ignazio; Dean, Ralph A

    2008-01-01

    Background Duplication, followed by fixation or random loss of novel genes, contributes to genome evolution. Particular outcomes of duplication events are possibly associated with pathogenic life histories in fungi. To date, differential gene gain and loss have not been studied at genomic scales in fungal pathogens, despite this phenomenon's known importance in virulence in bacteria and viruses. Results To determine if patterns of gene duplication differed between pathogens and non-pathogens, we identified gene families across nine euascomycete and two basidiomycete species. Gene family size distributions were fit to power laws to compare gene duplication trends in pathogens versus non-pathogens. Fungal phytopathogens showed globally altered patterns of gene duplication, as indicated by differences in gene family size distribution. We also identified sixteen examples of gene family expansion and five instances of gene family contraction in pathogenic lineages. Expanded gene families included those predicted to be important in melanin biosynthesis, host cell wall degradation and transport functions. Contracted families included those encoding genes involved in toxin production, genes with oxidoreductase activity, as well as subunits of the vacuolar ATPase complex. Surveys of the functional distribution of gene duplicates indicated that pathogens show enrichment for gene duplicates associated with receptor and hydrolase activities, while euascomycete pathogens appeared to have not only these differences, but also significantly more duplicates associated with regulatory and carbohydrate binding functions. Conclusion Differences in the overall levels of gene duplication in phytopathogenic species versus non-pathogenic relatives implicate gene inventory flux as an important virulence-associated process in fungi. We hypothesize that the observed patterns of gene duplicate enrichment, gene family expansion and contraction reflect adaptation within pathogenic life

  6. Structural and Functional Insights into the Catalytic Inactivity of the Major Fraction of Buffalo Milk Xanthine Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Gadave, Kaustubh S.; Panda, Santanu; Singh, Surender; Kalra, Shalini; Malakar, Dhruba; Mohanty, Ashok K.; Kaushik, Jai K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) existing in two interconvertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO), catabolises xanthine to uric acid that is further broken down to antioxidative agent allantoin. XOR also produces free radicals serving as second messenger and microbicidal agent. Large variation in the XO activity has been observed among various species. Both hypo and hyper activity of XOR leads to pathophysiological conditions. Given the important nutritional role of buffalo milk in human health especially in south Asia, it is crucial to understand the functional properties of buffalo XOR and the underlying structural basis of variations in comparison to other species. Methods and Findings Buffalo XO activity of 0.75 U/mg was almost half of cattle XO activity. Enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km) of 0.11 sec−1 µM−1 of buffalo XO was 8–10 times smaller than that of cattle XO. Buffalo XOR also showed lower antibacterial activity than cattle XOR. A CD value (Δε430 nm) of 46,000 M−1 cm−1 suggested occupancy of 77.4% at Fe/S I centre. Buffalo XOR contained 0.31 molybdenum atom/subunit of which 48% existed in active sulfo form. The active form of XO in buffalo was only 16% in comparison to ∼30% in cattle. Sequencing revealed 97.4% similarity between buffalo and cattle XOR. FAD domain was least conserved, while metal binding domains (Fe/S and Molybdenum) were highly conserved. Homology modelling of buffalo XOR showed several variations occurring in clusters, especially close to FAD binding pocket which could affect NAD+ entry in the FAD centre. The difference in XO activity seems to be originating from cofactor deficiency, especially molybdenum. Conclusion A major fraction of buffalo milk XOR exists in a catalytically inactive form due to high content of demolybdo and desulfo forms. Lower Fe/S content and structural factors might be contributing to lower enzymatic efficiency of buffalo XOR in a minor way. PMID:24498153

  7. Differences in the secretion pattern of oxidoreductases from Bjerkandera adusta induced by a phenolic olive mill extract.

    PubMed

    Reina, Rocío; Kellner, Harald; Jehmlich, Nico; Ullrich, René; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Aranda, Elisabet; Liers, Christiane

    2014-11-01

    The secretome of the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera adusta produced in synthetic Kirk medium was compared to that supplemented with an aqueous phenol-rich extract of dry olive mill residues (ADOR). Distinct changes in the protein composition of oxidoreductases, namely diverse class-II peroxidases and aryl alcohol oxidases were found. In the ADOR-supplemented medium (ASC), 157 distinct proteins were identified by the secretome analysis, whereas only 59 of them were identified without ADOR supplementation (Kirk medium culture; KM). Proteome analysis indicated that the number of peroxidases produced in ASC was more than doubled (from 4 to 11) compared to KM. Two short manganese peroxidases (MnP1 and MnP6) and one versatile peroxidase (VP1) represented 29% of the relative abundance (NSAF) in ASC. Two of them (MnP1 and VP1) were also detected in KM at a relative abundance (NSAF) of only 3%. Further peroxidases present in ASC were one lignin peroxidase (LiP2), one generic peroxidase (GP) and three dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs). The relative abundance of DyPs and aryl alcohol oxidases (AAO) were lower in ASC in comparison to KM. In addition to peptide sequence analysis, the secretion of Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidases as well as AAOs were followed by enzyme measurement. The Mn(2+)-oxidizing activity increased nearly 30-fold (from 10 to 281Ul(-1)) after ADOR addition. Two enzymes responsible for that activity were successfully purified (BadVPI and BadVPII). To prove a potential involvement of these enzymes in the degradation of aromatic compounds, BadVPI was tested for its ability to degrade the recalcitrant dehydrogenated polymer (DHP, synthetic lignin). These results show that natural phenol-rich materials act as secretome-stimulating additives. Applying these substances enables us to investigate fungal degradation and detoxification processes and gives more insight into the complexity of fungal secretomes, e.g. of white-rot fungi. PMID:25069088

  8. Functional and Bioinformatics Analysis of Two Campylobacter jejuni Homologs of the Thiol-Disulfide Oxidoreductase, DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Grabowska, Anna D.; Wywiał, Ewa; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Łasica, Anna M.; Wösten, Marc M. S. M.; Nagy-Staroń, Anna; Godlewska, Renata; Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna; Pieńkowska, Katarzyna; Łaniewski, Paweł; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, E. Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial Dsb enzymes are involved in the oxidative folding of many proteins, through the formation of disulfide bonds between their cysteine residues. The Dsb protein network has been well characterized in cells of the model microorganism Escherichia coli. To gain insight into the functioning of the Dsb system in epsilon-Proteobacteria, where it plays an important role in the colonization process, we studied two homologs of the main Escherichia coli Dsb oxidase (EcDsbA) that are present in the cells of the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the most frequently reported bacterial cause of human enteritis in the world. Methods and Results Phylogenetic analysis suggests the horizontal transfer of the epsilon-Proteobacterial DsbAs from a common ancestor to gamma-Proteobacteria, which then gave rise to the DsbL lineage. Phenotype and enzymatic assays suggest that the two C. jejuni DsbAs play different roles in bacterial cells and have divergent substrate spectra. CjDsbA1 is essential for the motility and autoagglutination phenotypes, while CjDsbA2 has no impact on those processes. CjDsbA1 plays a critical role in the oxidative folding that ensures the activity of alkaline phosphatase CjPhoX, whereas CjDsbA2 is crucial for the activity of arylsulfotransferase CjAstA, encoded within the dsbA2-dsbB-astA operon. Conclusions Our results show that CjDsbA1 is the primary thiol-oxidoreductase affecting life processes associated with bacterial spread and host colonization, as well as ensuring the oxidative folding of particular protein substrates. In contrast, CjDsbA2 activity does not affect the same processes and so far its oxidative folding activity has been demonstrated for one substrate, arylsulfotransferase CjAstA. The results suggest the cooperation between CjDsbA2 and CjDsbB. In the case of the CjDsbA1, this cooperation is not exclusive and there is probably another protein to be identified in C. jejuni cells that acts to re-oxidize CjDsbA1. Altogether

  9. Characterization of Escherichia coli thioredoxin variants mimicking the active-sites of other thiol/disulfide oxidoreductases.

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, E.; Huber-Wunderlich, M.; Glockshuber, R.

    1998-01-01

    Thiol/disulfide oxidoreductases like thioredoxin, glutaredoxin, DsbA, or protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) share the thioredoxin fold and a catalytic disulfide bond with the sequence Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys (Xaa corresponds to any amino acid). Despite their structural similarities, the enzymes have very different redox properties, which is reflected by a 100,000-fold difference in the equilibrium constant (K(eq)) with glutathione between the most oxidizing member, DsbA, and the most reducing member, thioredoxin. Here we present a systematic study on a series of variants of thioredoxin from Escherichia coli, in which the Xaa-Xaa dipeptide was exchanged by that of glutaredoxin, PDI, and DsbA. Like the corresponding natural enzymes, all thioredoxin variants proved to be stronger oxidants than the wild-type, with the order wild-type < PDI-type < DsbA-type < glutaredoxin-type. The most oxidizing, glutaredoxin-like variant has a 420-fold decreased value of K(eq), corresponding to an increase in redox potential by 75 mV. While oxidized wild-type thioredoxin is more stable than the reduced form (delta deltaG(ox/red) = 16.9 kJ/mol), both redox forms have almost the same stability in the variants. The pH-dependence of the reactivity with the alkylating agent iodoacetamide proved to be the best method to determine the pKa value of thioredoxin's nucleophilic active-site thiol (Cys32). A pKa of 7.1 was measured for Cys32 in the reduced wild-type. All variants showed a lowered pKa of Cys32, with the lowest value of 5.9 for the glutaredoxin-like variant. A correlation of redox potential and the Cys32 pKa value could be established on a quantitative level. However, the predicted correlation between the measured delta deltaG(ox/red) values and Cys32 pKa values was only qualitative. PMID:9605329

  10. The antidote effect of quinone oxidoreductase 2 inhibitor against paraquat-induced toxicity in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Elzbieta; Parafati, Maddalena; Aprigliano, Serafina; Carresi, Cristina; Visalli, Valeria; Sacco, Iolanda; Ventrice, Domenica; Mega, Tiziana; Vadalá, Nuria; Rinaldi, Stefano; Musolino, Vincenzo; Palma, Ernesto; Gratteri, Santo; Rotiroti, Domenicantonio; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The mechanisms of paraquat (PQ)-induced toxicity are poorly understood and PQ poisoning is often fatal due to a lack of effective antidotes. In this study we report the effects of N-[2-(2-methoxy-6H-dipyrido{2,3-a:3,2-e}pyrrolizin-11-yl)ethyl]-2-furamide (NMDPEF), a melatonin-related inhibitor of quinone oxidoreductase2 (QR2) on the toxicity of PQ in vitro & in vivo. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Prevention of PQ-induced toxicity was tested in different cells, including primary pneumocytes and astroglial U373 cells. Cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were analysed by flow cytometry and fluorescent probes. QR2 silencing was achieved by lentiviral shRNAs. PQ (30 mg·kg−1) and NMDPEF were administered i.p. to Wistar rats and animals were monitored for 28 days. PQ toxicity in the substantia nigra (SN) was tested by a localized microinfusion and electrocorticography. QR2 activity was measured by fluorimetry of N-benzyldihydronicotinamide oxidation. KEY RESULTS NMDPEF potently antagonized non-apoptotic PQ-induced cell death, ROS generation and inhibited cellular QR2 activity. In contrast, the cytoprotective effect of melatonin and apocynin was limited and transient compared with NMDPEF. Silencing of QR2 attenuated PQ-induced cell death and reduced the efficacy of NMDPEF. Significantly, NMDPEF (4.5 mg·kg−1) potently antagonized PQ-induced systemic toxicity and animal mortality. Microinfusion of NMDPEF into SN prevented severe behavioural and electrocortical effects of PQ which correlated with inhibition of malondialdehyde accumulation in cells and tissues. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS NMDPEF protected against PQ-induced toxicity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a key role for QR2 in the regulation of oxidative stress. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Baltazar et al., pp. 44–45 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02017.x PMID:22289031

  11. Constitutive activation of L-fucose genes by an unlinked mutation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y M; Chakrabarti, T; Lin, E C

    1984-01-01

    Wild-type Escherichia coli cannot grow on L-1,2-propanediol; mutants that can do so have increased basal activity of an NAD-linked L-1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase. This enzyme belongs to the L-fucose system and functions normally as L-lactaldehyde reductase during fermentation of the methylpentose. In wild-type cells, the activity of this enzyme is fully induced only anaerobically. Continued aerobic selection for mutants with an improved growth rate on L-1,2-propanediol inevitably leads to full constitutive expression of the oxidoreductase activity. When this occurs, L-fuculose 1-phosphate aldolase concomitantly becomes constitutive, whereas L-fucose permease, L-fucose isomerase, and L-fuculose kinase become noninducible. It is shown in this study that the noninducibility of the three proteins can be changed by two different kinds of suppressor mutations: one mapping external to and the other within the fuc gene cluster. Both mutations result in constitutive synthesis of the permease, the isomerase, and the kinase, without affecting synthesis of the oxidoreductase and the aldolase. Since expression of the fuc structural genes is activated by a protein specified by the regulator gene fucR, and since all the known genes of the fuc system are clustered at minute 60.2 of the chromosome, the external gene in which the suppressor mutation can occur probably has an unrelated function in the wild-type strain. The internal suppressor mutation might be either in fucR or in the promoter region of the genes encoding the permease, the isomerase, and the kinase, if these genes belong to the same operon. PMID:6378890

  12. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CYP51 and a CYP51 fusion protein with NADPH cytochrome P-450 oxidoreductase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswarlu, K; Kelly, D E; Kelly, S L

    1997-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CYP51, target of azole antifungal agents, and CYP51 fused with S. cerevisiae cytochrome P-450 oxidoreductase (FUS protein) were expressed in active forms in Escherichia coli by cloning into pET15b. The expression was monitored immunologically, catalytically, and by using reduced carbon monoxide difference and type II binding spectra. CYP51 and FUS enzymes were located in membranes and produced a Soret peak at 448 nm in the reduced CO difference spectrum. The cytochrome P-450 contents in the membrane fractions containing CYP51 and FUS proteins were 12.8 +/- 2.6 and 17.4 +/- 3.7 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. The NADPH cytochrome P-450 oxidoreductase (CPR) content was estimated to be 15.7 +/- 1.1 pmol/mg of protein in FUS membrane fractions. FUS protein catalyzed the demethylation of substrate at the 14alpha position, with a turnover number of 1.96 +/- 0.37 min(-1) in the presence of NADPH. No reductase activity was observed in membrane fractions containing CYP51, and therefore, CYP51 did not function catalytically in the presence of NADPH, but in the presence of an artificial electron donor, cumene hydroperoxide, activity was comparable to that of the FUS enzyme. Further support for a normal structure for the hemoproteins was obtained from type II binding spectra, in which the spectral response was saturated with an equimolar concentration of ketoconazole. PMID:9087488

  13. A thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase of the Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae is essential for viability, pilus assembly, toxin production and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E.; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Jooya, Neda; Chang, Chungyu; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae exports through the Sec apparatus many extracellular proteins that include the key virulence factors diphtheria toxin and the adhesive pili. How these proteins attain their native conformations after translocation as unfolded precursors remains elusive. The fact that the majority of these exported proteins contain multiple cysteine residues and that several membrane-bound oxidoreductases are encoded in the corynebacterial genome suggests the existence of an oxidative protein-folding pathway in this organism. Here we show that the shaft pilin SpaA harbors a disulfide bond in vivo and alanine substitution of these cysteines abrogates SpaA polymerization and leads to the secretion of degraded SpaA peptides. We then identified a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (MdbA), whose structure exhibits a conserved thioredoxin-like domain with a CPHC active site. Remarkably, deletion of mdbA results in a severe temperature-sensitive cell division phenotype. This mutant also fails to assemble pilus structures and is greatly defective in toxin production. Consistent with these defects, the ΔmdbA mutant is attenuated in a guinea pig model of diphtheritic toxemia. Given its diverse cellular functions in cell division, pilus assembly and toxin production, we propose that MdbA is a component of the general oxidative folding machine in C. diphtheriae. PMID:26294390

  14. A thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase of the Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae is essential for viability, pilus assembly, toxin production and virulence.

    PubMed

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Jooya, Neda; Chang, Chungyu; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-12-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae exports through the Sec apparatus many extracellular proteins that include the key virulence factors diphtheria toxin and the adhesive pili. How these proteins attain their native conformations after translocation as unfolded precursors remains elusive. The fact that the majority of these exported proteins contain multiple cysteine residues and that several membrane-bound oxidoreductases are encoded in the corynebacterial genome suggests the existence of an oxidative protein-folding pathway in this organism. Here we show that the shaft pilin SpaA harbors a disulfide bond in vivo and alanine substitution of these cysteines abrogates SpaA polymerization and leads to the secretion of degraded SpaA peptides. We then identified a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (MdbA), whose structure exhibits a conserved thioredoxin-like domain with a CPHC active site. Remarkably, deletion of mdbA results in a severe temperature-sensitive cell division phenotype. This mutant also fails to assemble pilus structures and is greatly defective in toxin production. Consistent with these defects, the ΔmdbA mutant is attenuated in a guinea pig model of diphtheritic toxemia. Given its diverse cellular functions in cell division, pilus assembly and toxin production, we propose that MdbA is a component of the general oxidative folding machine in C. diphtheriae. PMID:26294390

  15. Investigation of protein FTT1103 electroactivity using carbon and mercury electrodes. Surface-inhibition approach for disulfide oxidoreductases using silver amalgam powder.

    PubMed

    Večerková, Renata; Hernychová, Lenka; Dobeš, Petr; Vrba, Jiří; Josypčuk, Bohdan; Bartošík, Martin; Vacek, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Recently, it was shown that electrochemical methods can be used for analysis of poorly water-soluble proteins and for study of their structural changes and intermolecular (protein-ligand) interactions. In this study, we focused on complex electrochemical investigation of recombinant protein FTT1103, a disulfide oxidoreductase with structural similarity to well described DsbA proteins. This thioredoxin-like periplasmic lipoprotein plays an important role in virulence of bacteria Francisella tularensis. For electrochemical analyses, adsorptive transfer (ex situ) square-wave voltammetry with pyrolytic graphite electrode, and alternating-current voltammetry and constant-current chronopotentiometric stripping analysis with mercury electrodes, including silver solid amalgam electrode (AgSAE) were used. AgSAE was used in poorly water-soluble protein analysis for the first time. In addition to basic redox, electrocatalytic and adsorption/desorption characterization of FTT1103, electrochemical methods were also used for sensitive determination of the protein at nanomolar level and study of its interaction with surface of AgSA microparticles. Proposed electrochemical protocol and AgSA surface-inhibition approach presented here could be used in future for biochemical studies focused on proteins associated with membranes as well as on those with disulfide oxidoreductase activity. PMID:24856508

  16. Fluorescence quenching studies on the characterization of energy generated at the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase and quinol oxidase segments of marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J; Mizushima, S; Tokuda, H

    1991-04-01

    Generation of membrane potential (inside-positive) and delta pH (inside-acidic) at two kinds of NADH:quinone oxidoreductase segments, the Na(+)-motive segment and another segment, of Vibrio alginolyticus was examined by monitoring the quenching of fluorescence of oxonol V and that of quinacrine, respectively, with inside-out membrane vesicles. Transient generation of membrane potential at the segment occurred when ubiquinone-1 was added in the presence of KCN and NADH. The membrane potential was resistant to a proton conductor, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, indicating that the membrane potential was generated specifically at the Na(+)-motive segment. On the other hand, neither membrane potential nor delta pH was generated at another segment. The Na(+)-motive segment did not generate delta pH, indicating that only Na+ is extruded at this segment. Furthermore, generation of membrane potential and delta pH at the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase segment of V. anguillarum was examined by using the fluorescence quenching technique. This segment of the bacterium was also found to generate delta psi by the extrusion of Na+ but not H+. These results revealed that the fluorescence quenching technique is useful for the rapid identification and characterization of the respiratory segment involved in Na+ translocation. PMID:1907969

  17. Directed Evolution and Resolution Mechanism of 1, 3-Propanediol Oxidoreductase from Klebsiella pneumoniae toward Higher Activity by Error-Prone PCR and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhuang, Yuan; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-01-01

    1, 3-propanediol oxidoreductase (PDOR) is a key enzyme in glycerol bioconversion to 1,3-propanediol (1, 3-PD) which is a valuable chemical and one of the six new petrochemical products. We used error-prone PCR and activity screening to identify mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) PDOR with improved activity. The activity of one of the identified mutants, PDOR’-24, which includes a single mutation, A199S, was 48 U/mg, 4.9 times that of the wild-type enzyme. Molecular docking was performed to analyze the identified mutants; and amino acids S103, H271, N366, D106, N262 and D364 were predicted to bond with NADH. The origins of the improved activity of PDOR’-24, as well as three other mutants were analyzed by simulating the interaction mechanism of the mutants with the substrate and coenzyme, respectively. This research provides useful information about the use of safranine O plate screening for the directed evolution of oxidoreductases, identifies interesting sites for improving PDOR activity, and demonstrates the utility of using molecular docking to analyze the interaction mechanism of the mutants with the substrate and coenzyme, respectively. PMID:26528716

  18. Progesterone Exerts a Neuromodulatory Effect on Turning Behavior of Hemiparkinsonian Male Rats: Expression of 3α-Hydroxysteroid Oxidoreductase and Allopregnanolone as Suggestive of GABAA Receptors Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Yunes, Roberto; Casas, Sebastián; Gaglio, Eliana; Cabrera, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence for a neuroprotective role of progesterone and its neuroactive metabolite, allopregnanolone, in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. By using a model of hemiparkinsonism in male rats, injection of the neurotoxic 6-OHDA in left striatum, we studied progesterone's effects on rotational behavior induced by amphetamine or apomorphine. Also, in order to find potential explanatory mechanisms, we studied expression and activity of nigrostriatal 3α-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase, the enzyme that catalyzes progesterone to its active metabolite allopregnanolone. Coherently, we tested allopregnanolone for a possible neuromodulatory effect on rotational behavior. Also, since allopregnanolone is known as a GABAA modulator, we finally examined the action of GABAA antagonist bicuculline. We found that progesterone, in addition to an apparent neuroprotective effect, also increased ipsilateral expression and activity of 3α-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase. It was interesting to note that ipsilateral administration of allopregnanolone reversed a clear sign of motor neurodegeneration, that is, contralateral rotational behavior. A possible GABAA involvement modulated by allopregnanolone was shown by the blocking effect of bicuculline. Our results suggest that early administration of progesterone possibly activates genomic mechanisms that promote neuroprotection subchronically. This, in turn, could be partially mediated by fast, nongenomic, actions of allopregnanolone acting as an acute modulator of GABAergic transmission. PMID:25918669

  19. Expression of a heat-stable NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii results in furan aldehyde detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daehwan; Verbeke, Tobin J.; Cross, Karissa L.; Westpheling, Janet; Elkins, James G.

    2015-07-22

    Compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are generated through the dehydration of xylose and glucose, respectively, during dilute-acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and are also potent microbial growth and fermentation inhibitors. The enzymatic reduction of these furan aldehydes to their corresponding, and less toxic, alcohols is an engineering approach that has been successfully implemented in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ethanologenicEscherichia coli, but has not yet been investigated in thermophiles relevant to biofuel production through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). Developing CBP-relevant biocatalysts that are either naturally resistant to such inhibitors, or are amenable to engineered resistance, is therefore, an important component in making biofuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feasible.

  20. Expression of a heat-stable NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii results in furan aldehyde detoxification

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chung, Daehwan; Verbeke, Tobin J.; Cross, Karissa L.; Westpheling, Janet; Elkins, James G.

    2015-07-22

    Compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are generated through the dehydration of xylose and glucose, respectively, during dilute-acid pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and are also potent microbial growth and fermentation inhibitors. The enzymatic reduction of these furan aldehydes to their corresponding, and less toxic, alcohols is an engineering approach that has been successfully implemented in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ethanologenicEscherichia coli, but has not yet been investigated in thermophiles relevant to biofuel production through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). Developing CBP-relevant biocatalysts that are either naturally resistant to such inhibitors, or are amenable to engineered resistance, is therefore, an important componentmore » in making biofuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feasible.« less

  1. NADPH-dependent generation of a cytosolic dithiol which activates hepatic iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase. Demonstration by alkylation with iodoacetamide.

    PubMed Central

    Das, A K; Hummel, B C; Walfish, P G

    1986-01-01

    We have assessed a previously proposed mechanism mediating 5'-deiodinase activation involving enzymic reduction of disulphides to thiols in non-glutathione cytosolic components of Mr approx. 13,000 (Fraction B) catalysed by NADPH in the presence of other cytosolic components of Mr greater than 60,000 (Fraction A). The extent of Fraction B reduction under various experimental conditions was monitored by determining the amount of 14C incorporated into chromatographically isolated Fractions B and A after their alkylation with iodo[14C]acetamide. Incorporation of 14C into B was found to require the simultaneous presence of NADPH and A, to be directly proportional to the concentration of NADPH added, and to be unaffected by either propylthiouracil or iopanoate. Activation of 5'-deiodinase attainable using B after its partial reduction by various concentrations of NADPH and subsequent alkylation with non-radioactive iodoacetamide was inversely proportional to the previously added concentration of NADPH. Fraction B was stable at 100 degrees C for 5 min, while similar heat treatment of Fraction A or omission of NADPH resulted in a complete loss of 14C incorporation. A greater than 90% reduction in iodo[14C]acetamide incorporation was revealed when 0.2 mM-sodium arsenite was added after enzymic reduction of B, as well as when NADPH was replaced by NADH. Fraction B could be labelled more extensively after reduction non-specifically, with dithiothreitol or NaBH4, but not by GSH. These observations provide strong evidence for the presence in vivo of a cytosolic disulphide (DFBS2) in Fraction B which can be reduced enzymically to a dithiol [DFB(SH)2] by NADPH and cytosolic components in Fraction A. The degree of activation of hepatic 5'-deiodinase correlated with the amount of available (unalkylated) Fraction B. PMID:3814095

  2. A possible role of NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450nor isozyme in glycolysis under denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Watsuji, Tomo-o; Takaya, Naoki; Nakamura, Akira; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2003-05-01

    The denitrifying fungus Cylindrocarpon tonkinense contains two isozymes of cytochrome P450nor. One isozyme, P450nor1, uses NADH specifically as its electron donor whereas the other isozyme P450nor2 prefers NADPH to NADH. Here we show that P450nor1 is localized in both cytosol and mitochondria, like P450nor of Fusarium oxysporum, while P450nor2 is exclusively in cytosol. We also found that the addition of glucose as a carbon source to the culture media leads to the production of much more P450nor2 in the fungal cells than a non-fermentable substrate (glycerol or acetate) does. These results suggest that the NADP-dependent pentose phosphate cycle acts predominantly in C. tonkinense as the glycolysis pathway under the denitrifying conditions, which was confirmed by the observation that glucose induced enzyme activities involved in the cycle. These results showed that P450nor2 should act as the electron sink under anaerobic, denitrifying conditions to regenerate NADP+ for the pentose phosphate cycle. PMID:12834289

  3. Physiological properties of a mutant of Pachysolen tannophilus deficient in NADPH-dependent D-xylose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, H.; James, A.P. ); Lee, Hung; Barbosa, M. De F.S. Univ. of Guelph, Ontario ); Kubicek, C.P. )

    1989-11-01

    A D-xylose reductase mutant of Pachysolen tannophilus was isolated on the basis of its poor growth on D-xylose but normal growth on xylitol and D-glucose. Fractionation of cell extracts indicated that the mutant was deficient in D-cylose reductase activity that used NADPH exclusively as a cofactor, but not in activity that used both NADH and NADPH. Mutant cultures grown on D-xylose as the sole carbon source exhibited some properties that would be desired in improved strains. Growth rate, growth yield, and D-xylose consumption rate of the mutant were less sensitive than those of the wild type to changes in aeration rate. D-Xylose was utilized more efficiently in that less of a by-product, xylitol, was produced. In addition, under low aeration conditions, more ethanol was produced. A disadvantage was a relatively slow rate of D-xylose utilization.

  4. Molecular Characterization of an NADPH-Dependent Acetoin Reductase/2,3-Butanediol Dehydrogenase from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052

    PubMed Central

    Raedts, John; Siemerink, Marco A. J.; Levisson, Mark; van der Oost, John

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin reductase is an important enzyme for the fermentative production of 2,3-butanediol, a chemical compound with a very broad industrial use. Here, we report on the discovery and characterization of an acetoin reductase from Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052. An in silico screen of the C. beijerinckii genome revealed eight potential acetoin reductases. One of them (CBEI_1464) showed substantial acetoin reductase activity after expression in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme (C. beijerinckii acetoin reductase [Cb-ACR]) was found to exist predominantly as a homodimer. In addition to acetoin (or 2,3-butanediol), other secondary alcohols and corresponding ketones were converted as well, provided that another electronegative group was attached to the adjacent C-3 carbon. Optimal activity was at pH 6.5 (reduction) and 9.5 (oxidation) and around 68°C. Cb-ACR accepts both NADH and NADPH as electron donors; however, unlike closely related enzymes, NADPH is preferred (Km, 32 μM). Cb-ACR was compared to characterized close homologs, all belonging to the “threonine dehydrogenase and related Zn-dependent dehydrogenases” (COG1063). Metal analysis confirmed the presence of 2 Zn2+ atoms. To gain insight into the substrate and cofactor specificity, a structural model was constructed. The catalytic zinc atom is likely coordinated by Cys37, His70, and Glu71, while the structural zinc site is probably composed of Cys100, Cys103, Cys106, and Cys114. Residues determining NADP specificity were predicted as well. The physiological role of Cb-ACR in C. beijerinckii is discussed. PMID:24441158

  5. Eicosanoids up-regulate production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH-dependent oxidase in Spodoptera exigua phagocytic hemocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eicosanoids mediate cellular immune responses in insects, including phagocytosis of invading microbes. Phagocytosis entails two major steps, the internalization of microbes and the subsequent killing of them via formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we posed the hypothesis that eicosanoi...

  6. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (AtNTRC) confers freezing and cold shock tolerance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Jeong Chan; Lee, Sangmin; Shin, Su Young; Chae, Ho Byoung; Jung, Young Jun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Kyun Oh; Lee, Jung Ro; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2015-08-07

    Overexpression of AtNTRC (AtNTRC{sup OE}) in Arabidopsis thaliana led to a freezing and cold stress tolerance, whereas a knockout mutant (atntrc) showed a stress-sensitive phenotype. Biochemical analyses showed that the recombinant AtNTRC proteins exhibited a cryoprotective activity for malate dehydrogenase and lactic dehydrogenase. Furthermore, conclusive evidence of its interaction with nucleic acids in vitro is provided here on the basis of gel shift and electron microscopy analysis. Recombinant AtNTRC efficiently protected RNA and DNA from RNase A and metal catalyzed oxidation damage, respectively. The C-terminal thioredoxin domain is required for the nucleic acid–protein complex formation. From these results, it can be hypothesized that AtNTRC, which is known to be an electron donor of peroxiredoxin, contributes the stability of macromolecules under cold stress. - Highlights: • AtNTRC has a cryoprotective activity in vitro. • Overexpression of AtNTRC increases tolerance to freezing and cold shock stresses. • Thioredoxin domain of AtNTRC protects nucleic acids in vitro. • AtNTRC inhibits protein aggregation under freezing stress in vitro.

  7. The Ocean as a Global Reservoir of Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hatosy, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of natural environments have revealed vast genetic reservoirs of antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Soil bacteria and human pathogens share AR genes, and AR genes have been discovered in a variety of habitats. However, there is little knowledge about the presence and diversity of AR genes in marine environments and which organisms host AR genes. To address this, we identified the diversity of genes conferring resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, nitrofurantoin, and sulfadimethoxine in diverse marine environments using functional metagenomics (the cloning and screening of random DNA fragments). Marine environments were host to a diversity of AR-conferring genes. Antibiotic-resistant clones were found at all sites, with 28% of the genes identified as known AR genes (encoding beta-lactamases, bicyclomycin resistance pumps, etc.). However, the majority of AR genes were not previously classified as such but had products similar to proteins such as transport pumps, oxidoreductases, and hydrolases. Furthermore, 44% of the genes conferring antibiotic resistance were found in abundant marine taxa (e.g., Pelagibacter, Prochlorococcus, and Vibrio). Therefore, we uncovered a previously unknown diversity of genes that conferred an AR phenotype among marine environments, which makes the ocean a global reservoir of both clinically relevant and potentially novel AR genes. PMID:26296734

  8. Characterization of the Tuber borchii nitrate reductase gene and its role in ectomycorrhizae.

    PubMed

    Guescini, M; Pierleoni, R; Palma, F; Zeppa, S; Vallorani, L; Potenza, L; Sacconi, C; Giomaro, G; Stocchi, V

    2003-09-01

    The nitrate assimilation pathway represents a useful model system in which to study the contribution of a mycorrhizal fungus to the nitrogen nutrition of its host plant. In the present work we cloned and characterized the nitrate reductase gene (tbnr1) from Tuber borchii. The coding region of tbnr1 is 2,787 nt in length, and it encodes a protein of 929 amino acids. Biochemical and Northern-blot analyses revealed that nitrate assimilation in T. borchii is an inducible system that responds mainly to nitrate. Furthermore, we cloned a nitrate reductase cDNA (tpnr1) from Tilia platyphyllos to set up a quantitative real-time PCR assay that would allow us to determine the fungal contribution to nitrate assimilation in ectomycorrhizal tissue. Using this approach we demonstrated that the level of tbnr1 expression in ectomycorhizae is eight times higher than in free-living mycelia, whereas tpnr1 transcription was found to be down-regulated after the establishment of the symbiosis. Enzymatic assays showed that NADPH-dependent nitrite formation markedly increases in ectomycorrhizae. These findings imply that the fungal partner plays a fundamental role in nitrate assimilation by ectomycorrhizae. Amino acid determination by HPLC revealed higher levels of glutamate, glutamine and asparagine in symbiotic tissues compared with mycelial controls, thus suggesting that these amino acids may represent the compounds that serve to transfer nitrogen to the host plant. PMID:12898221

  9. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  10. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of conserved cysteine residues in NqrD and NqrE subunits of Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Fadeeva, M S; Bertsova, Y V; Verkhovsky, M I; Bogachev, A V

    2008-02-01

    Each of two hydrophobic subunits of Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR), NqrD and NqrE, contain a pair of strictly conserved cysteine residues within their transmembrane alpha-helices. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that substitutions of these residues in NQR of Vibrio harveyi blocked the Na+-dependent and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide-sensitive quinone reductase activity of the enzyme. However, these mutations did not affect the interaction of NQR with NADH and menadione. It was demonstrated that these conserved cysteine residues are necessary for the correct folding and/or the stability of the NQR complex. Mass and EPR spectroscopy showed that NQR from V. harveyi bears only a 2Fe-2S cluster as a metal-containing prosthetic group. PMID:18298367

  12. Wiring of the aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC to electrode surfaces via entrapment in low potential phenothiazine-modified redox polymers.

    PubMed

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Ruff, Adrian; Pöller, Sascha; Alsaoub, Sabine; Leimkühler, Silke; Wollenberger, Ulla; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-06-01

    Phenothiazine-modified redox hydrogels were synthesized and used for the wiring of the aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC to electrode surfaces. The effects of the pH value and electrode surface modification on the biocatalytic activity of the layers were studied in the presence of vanillin as the substrate. The enzyme electrodes were successfully employed as bioanodes in vanillin/O2 biofuel cells in combination with a high potential bilirubin oxidase biocathode. Open circuit voltages of around 700 mV could be obtained in a two compartment biofuel cell setup. Moreover, the use of a rather hydrophobic polymer with a high degree of crosslinking sites ensures the formation of stable polymer/enzyme films which were successfully used as bioanode in membrane-less biofuel cells. PMID:26775204

  13. A light-dependent complementation system for analysis of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase: Identification and mutagenesis of two conserved residues that are essential for enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, H.M.; Timko, M.P.

    1995-01-31

    Protochlorophyllide reductase (NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase; EC 1.6.99.1) catalyzes the light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide, a key regulatory step in the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. We have developed an expression system in which the protochlorophyllide reductase from pea (Pisum sativum L.) is used to complement protochlorophyllide reduction mutants in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, allowing analysis of wild-type and mutant forms of the enzyme. By protein sequence comparisons, we have identified the plant protochlorophyllide reductases as belonging to the family of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases. Based on our protein sequence alignments, we have identified and mutated two conserved residues (Tyr-275 and Lys-279) within the proposed active site of the enzyme and shown that they are critical for activity. A model of the enzyme reaction mechanism for light-dependent protochlorophyllide reduction is proposed. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Nanosecond ligand migration and functional protein relaxation in ba3 oxidoreductase: Structures of the B0, B1 and B2 intermediate states.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Antonis; Soulimane, Tewfik; Varotsis, Constantinos

    2016-09-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved step-scan FTIR spectroscopy (nTRS (2) -FTIR) has been applied to literally probe the active site of the carbon monoxide (CO)-bound thermophilic ba3 heme-copper oxidoreductase as it executes its function. The nTRS (2) - snapshots of the photolysed heme a3 Fe-CO/CuB species captured a "transition state" whose side chains prevent the photolysed CO to enter the docking cavity. There are three sets of ba3 photoproduct bands of docked CO with different orientation exhibiting different kinetics. The trajectories of the "docked" CO at 2122, 2129 and 2137cm(-1) is referred to in the literature as B2, B1 and B0 intermediate states, respectively. The present data provided direct evidence for the role of water in controlling ligand orientation in an intracavity protein environment. PMID:27207588

  15. Crystallization and preliminary analysis of the NqrA and NqrC subunits of the Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Vohl, Georg; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Claussen, Björn; Casutt, Marco S.; Vorburger, Thomas; Diederichs, Kay; Möller, Heiko M.; Steuber, Julia; Fritz, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae is a membrane protein complex consisting of six different subunits NqrA–NqrF. The major domains of the NqrA and NqrC subunits were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized. The structure of NqrA1–377 was solved in space groups C2221 and P21 by SAD phasing and molecular replacement at 1.9 and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. NqrC devoid of the transmembrane helix was co-expressed with ApbE to insert the flavin mononucleotide group covalently attached to Thr225. The structure was determined by molecular replacement using apo-NqrC of Parabacteroides distasonis as search model at 1.8 Å resolution. PMID:25005105

  16. [Steroid-transforming enzymes from microorganisms. XII. Induction characteristics of the 4-en-3-oxosteroid: (acceptor)-1-en-oxidoreductase in Nocardia opaca].

    PubMed

    Hörhold, C; Hüller, E; Rose, G

    1979-01-01

    17 alpha-Methyltestosterone and the corresponding 1(2)-dehydrocompound (Dianabol) are efficient inducers of the 4-en-3-oxosteroid: (acceptor)-1-en-oxidoreductase from Nocardia opaca. After a lag period of 4 hours the enzyme activity increases rapidly. During the induction the steroids are completely metabolized causing a drastical drop of specific enzyme activity. Using a fixed induction time the optimal steroid concentration and the temperature characteristic were found out. The influence of the concentration of the steroid water suspension on the induction effect is discussed to be dependent on the velocity of the dissolving of the steroid particles. Chloramphenicol and streptomycin are powerful inhibitors of the induction process. PMID:547499

  17. Chloroplast lipid droplet type II NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase is essential for prenylquinone metabolism and vitamin K1 accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Eugeni Piller, Lucia; Besagni, Céline; Ksas, Brigitte; Rumeau, Dominique; Bréhélin, Claire; Glauser, Gaétan; Kessler, Felix; Havaux, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous cellular structures in eukaryotes and are required for lipid metabolism. Little is currently known about plant lipid droplets other than oil bodies. Here, we define dual roles for chloroplast lipid droplets (plastoglobules) in energy and prenylquinone metabolism. The prenylquinones—plastoquinone, plastochromanol-8, phylloquinone (vitamin K1), and tocopherol (vitamin E)—are partly stored in plastoglobules. This work shows that NAD(P)H dehydrogenase C1 (NDC1) (At5g08740), a type II NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase, associates with plastoglobules. NDC1 reduces a plastoquinone analog in vitro and affects the overall redox state of the total plastoquinone pool in vivo by reducing the plastoquinone reservoir of plastoglobules. Finally, NDC1 is required for normal plastochromanol-8 accumulation and is essential for vitamin K1 production. PMID:21844348

  18. Time-lapse anomalous X-ray diffraction shows how Fe(2+) substrate ions move through ferritin protein nanocages to oxidoreductase sites.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Cecilia; Di Pisa, Flavio; Lalli, Daniela; Rosa, Camilla; Theil, Elizabeth; Turano, Paola; Mangani, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Ferritin superfamily protein cages reversibly synthesize internal biominerals, Fe2O3·H2O. Fe(2+) and O2 (or H2O2) substrates bind at oxidoreductase sites in the cage, initiating biomineral synthesis to concentrate iron and prevent potentially toxic reactions products from Fe(2+)and O2 or H2O2 chemistry. By freezing ferritin crystals of Rana catesbeiana ferritin M (RcMf) at different time intervals after exposure to a ferrous salt, a series of high-resolution anomalous X-ray diffraction data sets were obtained that led to crystal structures that allowed the direct observation of ferrous ions entering, moving along and binding at enzyme sites in the protein cages. The ensemble of crystal structures from both aerobic and anaerobic conditions provides snapshots of the iron substrate bound at different cage locations that vary with time. The observed differential occupation of the two iron sites in the enzyme oxidoreductase centre (with Glu23 and Glu58, and with Glu58, His61 and Glu103 as ligands, respectively) and other iron-binding sites (with Glu53, His54, Glu57, Glu136 and Asp140 as ligands) reflects the approach of the Fe(2+) substrate and its progression before the enzymatic cycle 2Fe(2+) + O2 → Fe(3+)-O-O-Fe(3+) → Fe(3+)-O(H)-Fe(3+) and turnover. The crystal structures also revealed different Fe(2+) coordination compounds bound to the ion channels located at the threefold and fourfold symmetry axes of the cage. PMID:25849404

  19. Time-lapse anomalous X-ray diffraction shows how Fe2+ substrate ions move through ferritin protein nanocages to oxidoreductase sites

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Cecilia; Di Pisa, Flavio; Lalli, Daniela; Rosa, Camilla; Theil, Elizabeth; Turano, Paola; Mangani, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin superfamily protein cages reversibly synthesize internal biominerals, Fe2O3·H2O. Fe2+ and O2 (or H2O2) substrates bind at oxidoreductase sites in the cage, initiating biomineral synthesis to concentrate iron and prevent potentially toxic reactions products from Fe2+and O2 or H2O2 chemistry. By freezing ferritin crystals of Rana catesbeiana ferritin M (RcMf) at different time intervals after exposure to a ferrous salt, a series of high-resolution anomalous X-ray diffraction data sets were obtained that led to crystal structures that allowed the direct observation of ferrous ions entering, moving along and binding at enzyme sites in the protein cages. The ensemble of crystal structures from both aerobic and anaerobic conditions provides snapshots of the iron substrate bound at different cage locations that vary with time. The observed differential occupation of the two iron sites in the enzyme oxidoreductase centre (with Glu23 and Glu58, and with Glu58, His61 and Glu103 as ligands, respectively) and other iron-binding sites (with Glu53, His54, Glu57, Glu136 and Asp140 as ligands) reflects the approach of the Fe2+ substrate and its progression before the enzymatic cycle 2Fe2+ + O2 → Fe3+—O—O—Fe3+ → Fe3+—O(H)—Fe3+ and turnover. The crystal structures also revealed different Fe2+ coordination compounds bound to the ion channels located at the threefold and fourfold symmetry axes of the cage. PMID:25849404

  20. Omeprazole induces NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 via aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent mechanisms: Role of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy

    2015-11-13

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptionally induces phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1) and phase II (NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) detoxifying enzymes. The effects of the classical and nonclassical AhR ligands on phase I and II enzymes are well studied in human hepatocytes. Additionally, we observed that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole (OM), transcriptionally induces CYP1A1 in the human adenocarcinoma cell line, H441 cells via AhR. Whether OM activates AhR and induces the phase II enzyme, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in fetal primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that OM will induce NQO1 in HPMEC via the AhR. The concentrations of OM used in our experiments did not result in cytotoxicity. OM activated AhR as evident by increased CYP1A1 mRNA expression. However, contrary to our hypothesis, OM increased NQO1 mRNA and protein via an AhR-independent mechanism as AhR knockdown failed to abrogate OM-mediated increase in NQO1 expression. Interestingly, OM activated Nrf2 as evident by increased phosphoNrf2 (S40) expression in OM-treated compared to vehicle-treated cells. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown abrogated OM-mediated increase in NQO1 expression. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OM induces NQO1 via AhR-independent, but Nrf2-dependent mechanisms. PMID:26441083

  1. Knockdown of human Oxa1l impairs the biogenesis of F1Fo-ATP synthase and NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Stiburek, Lukas; Fornuskova, Daniela; Wenchich, Laszlo; Pejznochova, Martina; Hansikova, Hana; Zeman, Jiri

    2007-11-23

    The Oxa1 protein is a founding member of the evolutionarily conserved Oxa1/Alb3/YidC protein family, which is involved in the biogenesis of membrane proteins in mitochondria, chloroplasts and bacteria. The predicted human homologue, Oxa1l, was originally identified by partial functional complementation of the respiratory growth defect of the yeast oxa1 mutant. Here we demonstrate that both the endogenous human Oxa1l, with an apparent molecular mass of 42 kDa, and the Oxa1l-FLAG chimeric protein localize exclusively to mitochondria in HEK293 cells. Furthermore, human Oxa1l was found to be an integral membrane protein, and, using two-dimensional blue native/denaturing PAGE, the majority of the protein was identified as part of a 600-700 kDa complex. The stable short hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated knockdown of Oxa1l in HEK293 cells resulted in markedly decreased steady-state levels and ATP hydrolytic activity of the F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase and moderately reduced levels and activity of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). However, no significant accumulation of corresponding sub-complexes could be detected on blue native immunoblots. Intriguingly, the achieved depletion of Oxa1l protein did not adversely affect the assembly or activity of cytochrome c oxidase or the cytochrome bc(1) complex. Taken together, our results indicate that human Oxa1l represents a mitochondrial integral membrane protein required for the correct biogenesis of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase and NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. PMID:17936786

  2. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Selective regulation of 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons: a possible mechanism to cope with peripheral nerve injury-induced chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Schaeffer, Véronique; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2010-09-01

    The enzyme 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR) catalyzes the synthesis and bioavailability of 3alpha,5alpha-neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP) which activates GABA(A) receptors and blocks T-type calcium channels involved in pain mechanisms. Here, we used a multidisciplinary approach to demonstrate that 3alpha-HSOR is a cellular target the modulation of which in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) may contribute to suppress pain resulting from peripheral nerve injury. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscope analyses showed 3alpha-HSOR-immunostaining in naive rat DRG sensory neurons and glial cells. Pulse-chase, high performance liquid chromatography and Flo/One characterization of neurosteroids demonstrated 3alpha,5alpha-THP production in DRG. Behavioral methods allowed identification of pain symptoms (thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia and/or allodynia) in rats subjected to sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI). Reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that 3alpha-HSOR mRNA concentration in CCI-rat ipsilateral DRG, 5-fold higher than in contralateral DRG, was also 4- to 6-fold elevated than that in sham-operated or naive rat DRG. Consistently, Western blotting confirmed increased 3alpha-HSOR protein levels in CCI-rat ipsilateral DRG and double immunolabeling showed that 3alpha-HSOR overexpression occurred in DRG neurons but not in glia. Functional plasticity of 3alpha-HSOR leading to increased 3alpha,5alpha-THP production was evidenced in CCI-rat DRG. Interestingly, behavioral and molecular time-course investigations revealed that 3alpha-HSOR gene upregulation was correlated to pain symptom development. Most importantly, in vivo knockdown of 3alpha-HSOR expression in healthy rat DRG using 6-carboxyfluorescein-3alpha-HSOR-siRNA exacerbated thermal and mechanical pain perceptions. This paper is the first to show that siRNA-induced knockdown of a key neurosteroid-synthesizing enzyme directly

  4. Redox-activated expression of the cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase gene in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Hérouart, D; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D

    1993-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs; superoxide: superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) play a key role in protection against oxygen radicals, and SOD gene expression is highly induced during environmental stress. To determine the conditions of SOD induction, the promoter of the cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (Cu/ZnSODcyt) gene was isolated in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Oxidative stress is likely to alter the cellular redox in favor of the oxidized status. Surprisingly, the expression of the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene is induced by sulfhydryl antioxidants such as reduced glutathione, cysteine, and dithiothreitol, whereas the oxidized forms of glutathione and cysteine have no effect. It is therefore possible that reduced glutathione directly acts as an antioxidant and simultaneously activates the Cu/ZnSODcyt gene during oxidative stress. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8464930

  5. Influence of Populus Genotype on Gene Expression by the Wood Decay Fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, Jill; Marty, Amber; Mozuch, Michael; Kersten, Philip J.; Splinter BonDurant, Sandra; Sabat, Grzegorz; Azarpira, Ali; Ralph, John; Skyba, Oleksandr; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Blanchette, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    We examined gene expression patterns in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium when it colonizes hybrid poplar (Populus alba × tremula) and syringyl (S)-rich transgenic derivatives. A combination of microarrays and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed detection of a total of 9,959 transcripts and 793 proteins. Comparisons of P. chrysosporium transcript abundance in medium containing poplar or glucose as a sole carbon source showed 113 regulated genes, 11 of which were significantly higher (>2-fold, P < 0.05) in transgenic line 64 relative to the parental line. Possibly related to the very large amounts of syringyl (S) units in this transgenic tree (94 mol% S), several oxidoreductases were among the upregulated genes. Peptides corresponding to a total of 18 oxidoreductases were identified in medium consisting of biomass from line 64 or 82 (85 mol% S) but not in the parental clone (65 mol% S). These results demonstrate that P. chrysosporium gene expression patterns are substantially influenced by lignin composition. PMID:25015893

  6. Regulation of hexuronate system genes in Escherichia coli K-12: multiple regulation of the uxu operon by exuR and uxuR gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Baudouy, J; Portalier, R; Stoeber, F

    1981-01-01

    New regulatory mutants of Escherichia coli K-1 carrying alterations of the uxuR gene were isolated and characterized. In the presence of superrepressed or derepressed uxuR mutations, mannonic hydrolyase (uxuA) and oxidoreductase relationship analyses suggested that the uxuR gene product acted as a repressor in the control of uxuA-uxuB operon expression. uxuR mutations were localized near min 97, and the following gene order was established: (argH)-uxuR-uxuB-uxuA-(thr). Properties of exuR (point and deletion) mutants showed that both exuR and uxuR regulatory gene products were involved in the control of the uxuA uxuB operon. Analysis of exuR uxuR double-derepressed mutants suggested that exuR and uxuR repressors act cooperatively to repress the uxu operon. PMID:7007313

  7. Recombinant expression of four oxidoreductases in Phanerochaete chrysosporium improves degradation of phenolic and non-phenolic substrates.

    PubMed

    Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Ortiz-Vázquez, Elizabeth; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2015-09-10

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium belongs to a group of lignin-degrading fungi that secretes various oxidoreductive enzymes, including lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP). Previously, we demonstrated that the heterologous expression of a versatile peroxidase (VP) in P. chrysosporium recombinant strains is possible. However, the production of laccases (Lac) in this fungus has not been completely demonstrated and remains controversial. In order to investigate if the co-expression of Lac and VP in P. chrysosporium would improve the degradation of phenolic and non-phenolic substrates, we tested the constitutive co-expression of the lacIIIb gene from Trametes versicolor and the vpl2 gene from Pleurotus eryngii, and also the endogenous genes mnp1 and lipH8 by shock wave mediated transformation. The co-overexpression of peroxidases and laccases was improved up to five-fold as compared with wild type species. Transformant strains showed a broad spectrum in phenolic/non-phenolic biotransformation and a high percentage in synthetic dye decolorization in comparison with the parental strain. Our results show that the four enzymes can be constitutively expressed in a single transformant of P. chrysosporium in minimal medium. These data offer new possibilities for an easy and efficient co-expression of laccases and peroxidases in suitable basidiomycete species. PMID:26113215

  8. PAH Particles Perturb Prenatal Processes and Phenotypes: Protection from Deficits in Object Discrimination Afforded by Dampening of Brain Oxidoreductase Following In Utero Exposure to Inhaled Benzo(a)pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Ramesh, Aramandla; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Maguire, Mark; Safe, Stephen; Rhoades, Raina E.; Clark, Ryan; Jules, George; McCallister, Monique; Aschner, Michael; Hood, Darryl B.

    2012-01-01

    The wild-type (WT) Cprlox/lox (cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, Cpr) mouse is an ideal model to assess the contribution of P450 enzymes to the metabolic activation and disposition of environmental xenobiotics. In the present study, we examined the effect of in utero exposure to benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] aerosol on Sp4 and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)–dependent systems as well as a resulting behavioral phenotype (object discrimination) in Cpr offspring. Results from in utero exposure of WT Cprlox/lox mice were compared with in utero exposed brain-Cpr-null offspring mice. Null mice were used as they do not express brain cytochrome P4501B1–associated NADPH oxidoreductase (CYP1B1-associated NADPH oxidoreductase), thus reducing their capacity to produce neural B(a)P metabolites. Subsequent to in utero (E14–E17) exposure to B(a)P (100 μg/m3), Cprlox/lox offspring exhibited: (1) elevated B(a)P metabolite and F2-isoprostane neocortical tissue burdens, (2) elevated concentrations of cortical glutamate, (3) premature developmental expression of Sp4, (4) decreased subunit ratios of NR2B:NR2A, and (5) deficits in a novelty discrimination phenotype monitored to in utero exposed brain-Cpr-null offspring. Collectively, these findings suggest that in situ generation of metabolites by CYP1B1-associated NADPH oxidoreductase promotes negative effects on NMDA-mediated signaling processes during the period when synapses are first forming as well as effects on a subsequent behavioral phenotype. PMID:21987461

  9. An NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles for tumor targeted drug delivery in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayam, Srivardhan Reddy; Venkatesan, Parthiban; Sung, Yi-Ming; Sung, Shuo-Yuan; Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Wu, Shu-Pao

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis and characterization of an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for on-command delivery applications has been described in this paper. Gatekeeping of MSNPs is achieved by the integration of mechanically interlocked rotaxane nanovalves on the surface of MSNPs. The rotaxane nanovalve system is composed of a linear stalk anchoring on the surface of MSNPs, an α-cyclodextrin ring that encircles it and locks the payload ``cargo'' molecules in the mesopores, and a benzoquinone stopper incorporated at the end of the stalk. The gate opening and controlled release of the cargo are triggered by cleavage of the benzoquinone stopper using an endogenous NQO1 enzyme. In addition to having efficient drug loading and controlled release mechanisms, this smart biocompatible carrier system showed obvious uptake and consequent release of the drug in tumor cells, could selectively induce the tumor cell death and enhance the capability of inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. The controlled drug delivery system demonstrated its use as a potential theranostic material.The synthesis and characterization of an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for on-command delivery applications has been described in this paper. Gatekeeping of MSNPs is achieved by the integration of mechanically interlocked rotaxane nanovalves on the surface of MSNPs. The rotaxane nanovalve system is composed of a linear stalk anchoring on the surface of MSNPs, an α-cyclodextrin ring that encircles it and locks the payload ``cargo'' molecules in the mesopores, and a benzoquinone stopper incorporated at the end of the stalk. The gate opening and controlled release of the cargo are triggered by cleavage of the benzoquinone stopper using an endogenous NQO1 enzyme. In addition to having efficient drug loading and controlled release mechanisms, this

  10. The Bioinformatics Report of Mutation Outcome on NADPH Flavin Oxidoreductase Protein Sequence in Clinical Isolates of H. pylori.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Nasrin; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Moghim, Sharareh; Ghaempanah, Abdol Majid; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2016-05-01

    frxA gene has been implicated in the metronidazole nitro reduction by H. pylori. Alternatively, frxA is expected to contribute to the protection of urease and to the in vivo survival of H. pylori. The aim of present study is to report the mutation effects on the frxA protein sequence in clinical isolates of H. pylori in our community. Metronidazole resistance was proven in 27 of 48 isolates. glmM and frxA genes were used for molecular confirmation of H. pylori isolates. The primer set for detection of whole sequence of frxA gene for the effect of mutation on protein sequence was used. DNA and protein sequence evaluation and analysis were done by blast, Clustal Omega, and T COFFEE programs. Then, FrxA protein sequences from six metronidazole-resistant clinical isolates were analyzed by web-based bioinformatics tools. The result of six metronidazole-resistant clinical isolates in comparison with strain 26695 showed ten missense mutations. The result with the STRING program revealed that no change was seen after alterations in these sequences. According to consensus data involving four methods, residue substitutions at 40, 13, and 141 increase the stability of protein sequence after mutation, while other alterations decrease. Residue substitutions at 40, 43, 141, 138, 169, and 179 are deleterious, while, V7I, Q10R, V34I, and V96I alterations are neutral. As FrxA contribute to survival of bacterium and in regard to the effect of mutations on protein function, it might affect the survival and bacterium phenotype and it need to be studied more. Also, none of the stability prediction tool is perfect; iStable is the best predictor method among all methods. PMID:26821239

  11. NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase-1 Expression Sensitizes Malignant Melanoma Cells to the HSP90 Inhibitor 17-AAG.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Shuya; Arakawa, Nobuyuki; Okubo, Ayaka; Shigeeda, Wataru; Yasuhira, Shinji; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Akasaka, Toshihide; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Maesawa, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    The KEAP1-NRF2 pathway regulates cellular redox homeostasis by transcriptional induction of genes associated with antioxidant synthesis and detoxification in response to oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that KEAP1 mutation elicits constitutive NRF2 activation and resistance to cisplatin (CDDP) and dacarbazine (DTIC) in human melanomas. The present study was conducted to clarify whether an HSP90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, efficiently eliminates melanoma with KEAP1 mutation, as the NRF2 target gene, NQO1, is a key enzyme in 17-AAG bioactivation. In melanoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines with or without KEAP1 mutations, NQO1 expression and 17-AAG sensitivity are inversely correlated. NQO1 is highly expressed in normal melanocytes and in several melanoma cell lines despite the presence of wild-type KEAP1, and the NQO1 expression is dependent on NRF2 activation. Because either CDDP or DTIC produces reactive oxygen species that activate NRF2, we determined whether these agents would sensitize NQO1-low melanoma cells to 17-AAG. Synergistic cytotoxicity of the 17-AAG and CDDP combination was detected in four out of five NQO1-low cell lines, but not in the cell line with KEAP1 mutation. These data indicate that 17-AAG could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma with KEAP1 mutation or NQO1 expression. PMID:27045471

  12. NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase-1 Expression Sensitizes Malignant Melanoma Cells to the HSP90 Inhibitor 17-AAG

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Shuya; Arakawa, Nobuyuki; Okubo, Ayaka; Shigeeda, Wataru; Yasuhira, Shinji; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Akasaka, Toshihide; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Maesawa, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    The KEAP1-NRF2 pathway regulates cellular redox homeostasis by transcriptional induction of genes associated with antioxidant synthesis and detoxification in response to oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that KEAP1 mutation elicits constitutive NRF2 activation and resistance to cisplatin (CDDP) and dacarbazine (DTIC) in human melanomas. The present study was conducted to clarify whether an HSP90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, efficiently eliminates melanoma with KEAP1 mutation, as the NRF2 target gene, NQO1, is a key enzyme in 17-AAG bioactivation. In melanoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines with or without KEAP1 mutations, NQO1 expression and 17-AAG sensitivity are inversely correlated. NQO1 is highly expressed in normal melanocytes and in several melanoma cell lines despite the presence of wild-type KEAP1, and the NQO1 expression is dependent on NRF2 activation. Because either CDDP or DTIC produces reactive oxygen species that activate NRF2, we determined whether these agents would sensitize NQO1-low melanoma cells to 17-AAG. Synergistic cytotoxicity of the 17-AAG and CDDP combination was detected in four out of five NQO1-low cell lines, but not in the cell line with KEAP1 mutation. These data indicate that 17-AAG could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma with KEAP1 mutation or NQO1 expression. PMID:27045471

  13. The biological activity of 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase in the spinal cord regulates thermal and mechanical pain thresholds after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Laurence; Venard, Christine; Schaeffer, Véronique; Patte-Mensah, Christine; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe G

    2008-04-01

    Identification of cellular targets pertinent for the development of effective therapies against pathological pain constitutes a difficult challenge. We combined several approaches to show that 3alpha-hydroxysteroid oxido-reductase (3alpha-HSOR), abundantly expressed in the spinal cord (SC), is a key target, the modulation of which markedly affects nociception. 3alpha-HSOR catalyzes the biosynthesis and oxidation of 3alpha,5alpha-reduced neurosteroids as allopregnanolone (3alpha,5alpha-THP), which stimulates GABA(A) receptors. Intrathecal injection of Provera (pharmacological inhibitor of 3alpha-HSOR activity) in naive rat SC decreased thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds assessed with behavioral methods. In contrast, pain thresholds were dose-dependently increased by 3alpha,5alpha-THP. In animals subjected to sciatic nerve injury-evoked neuropathic pain, molecular and biochemical experiments revealed an up-regulation of 3alpha-HSOR reductive activity in the SC. Enhancement of 3alpha,5alpha-THP concentration in the SC induced analgesia in neuropathic rats while Provera exacerbated their pathological state. Possibilities are opened for chronic pain control with drugs modulating 3alpha-HSOR activity in nerve cells. PMID:18291663

  14. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. Deficient activity of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase component of fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, W B; Craft, D A

    1991-01-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is an inherited disorder associated with impaired fatty alcohol oxidation due to deficient activity of fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAO). FAO is a complex enzyme which consists of two separate proteins that sequentially catalyze the oxidation of fatty alcohol to fatty aldehyde and fatty acid. To determine which enzymatic component of FAO was deficient in SLS, we assayed fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH) and fatty alcohol dehydrogenase in cultured fibroblasts from seven unrelated SLS patients. All SLS cells were selectively deficient in the FALDH component of FAO, and had normal activity of fatty alcohol dehydrogenase. The extent of FALDH deficiency in SLS cells depended on the aliphatic aldehyde used as substrate, ranging from 62% of mean normal activity using propionaldehyde as substrate to 8% of mean normal activity with octadecanal. FALDH activity in obligate SLS heterozygotes was partially decreased to 49 +/- 7% of mean normal activity using octadecanal as substrate. Differential centrifugation studies in fibroblasts indicated that this FALDH enzyme was largely particulate; soluble FALDH activity was normal in SLS cells. Intact SLS fibroblasts oxidized octadecanol to fatty acid at less than 10% of the normal rate, but oxidized free octadecanal normally, suggesting that the FALDH affected in SLS is chiefly involved in the oxidation of fatty alcohol to fatty acid. These results show that the primary enzymatic defect in SLS is the FALDH component of the FAO complex, which leads to deficient oxidation of fatty aldehyde derived from fatty alcohol. PMID:1939650

  15. GmcA is a putative glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase required for the induction of asexual development in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Etxebeste, Oier; Herrero-García, Erika; Cortese, Marc S; Garzia, Aitor; Oiartzabal-Arano, Elixabet; de los Ríos, Vivian; Ugalde, Unai; Espeso, Eduardo A

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans asexual differentiation is induced by Upstream Developmental Activators (UDAs) that include the bZIP-type Transcription Factor (TF) FlbB. A 2D-PAGE/MS-MS-coupled screen for proteins differentially expressed in the presence and absence of FlbB identified 18 candidates. Most candidates belong to GO term classes involved in osmotic and/or oxidative stress response. Among these, we focused on GmcA, a putative glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase which is upregulated in a ΔflbB background. GmcA is not required for growth since no differences were detected in the radial extension upon deletion of gmcA. However, its activity is required to induce conidiation under specific culture conditions. A ΔgmcA strain conidiates profusely under acid conditions but displays a characteristic fluffy aconidial phenotype in alkaline medium. The absence of asexual development in a ΔgmcA strain can be suppressed, on one hand, using high concentrations of non-fermentable carbon sources like glycerol, and on the other hand, when the cMyb-type UDA TF flbD is overexpressed. Overall, the results obtained in this work support a role for GmcA at early stages of conidiophore initiation. PMID:22792266

  16. A highly sensitive assay for xanthine oxidoreductase activity using a combination of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine and liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takayo; Oka, Mitsuru; Nampei, Mai; Miyachi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we developed a highly sensitive assay for xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) activity utilizing a combination of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine and liquid chromatography (LC)/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (TQMS). In this assay, the amount of [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]uric acid (UA) produced by XOR was determined by using LC/TQMS. For this assay, we synthesized [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]xanthine as a substrate, [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]UA as an analytical standard, and [(13) C3 ,(15) N3 ]UA as an internal standard. The [(13) C2 ,(15) N2 ]UA calibration curve obtained using LC/TQMS under the selected reaction monitoring mode was evaluated, and the results indicated good linearity (R(2)  = 0.998, weighting of 1/x(2) ) in the range of 20 to 4000 nM. As a model reaction of less active samples, the XOR activity of serial-diluted mouse plasma was measured. Thereby, the XOR activity of the 1024-fold-diluted mouse plasma was 4.49 ± 0.44 pmol/100 μL/h (mean ± standard deviation, n = 3). This value is comparable to the predicted XOR activity value of healthy human plasma. Hence, this combination method may be used to obtain high-sensitivity measurements required for XOR activity analysis on various organs or human plasma. PMID:27006202

  17. The role of phospholipids in the reduction of ubiquinone analogues by the mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Ragan, C I

    1978-01-01

    The isolated NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex of bovine heart mitochondria reduces ubiquinone analogues by two pathways. One pathway is inhibited by rotenone, and reduction of quinones takes place in the lipid phase of the system. The other pathway is insensitive to rotenone and reduction takes place in the aqueous phase. The variation of rates of electron transpport with the chemical nature of the quinone analogue and the concentrations of both quinone and phospholipid can be rationalized in terms of partition of the quinone between the aqueous and lipid phases of the system. Thus one function of phospholipid associated with the enzyme appears to be to act as solvent for ubiquinone reduced by the rotenone-sensitive pathway. This proposal is supported by the kinetic behaviour of enzyme whose endogenous lipids have been replaced by (1,2)-dimyristoylsn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. Thus, under certain circumstances, the rotenone-sensitive reduction of ubiquinone-1 exhibited a substantial increase in activation energy below the phase-transition temperature of the synthetic lipid, whereas the reduction of other acceptors was unaffected. PMID:210762

  18. Localization and Function of the Membrane-bound Riboflavin in the Na+-translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Casutt, Marco S.; Huber, Tamara; Brunisholz, René; Tao, Minli; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The sodium ion-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is a respiratory membrane protein complex that couples the oxidation of NADH to the transport of Na+ across the bacterial membrane. The Na+-NQR comprises the six subunits NqrABCDEF, but the stoichiometry and arrangement of these subunits are unknown. Redox-active cofactors are FAD and a 2Fe-2S cluster on NqrF, covalently attached FMNs on NqrB and NqrC, and riboflavin and ubiquinone-8 with unknown localization in the complex. By analyzing the cofactor content and NADH oxidation activity of subcomplexes of the Na+-NQR lacking individual subunits, the riboflavin cofactor was unequivocally assigned to the membrane-bound NqrB subunit. Quantitative analysis of the N-terminal amino acids of the holo-complex revealed that NqrB is present in a single copy in the holo-complex. It is concluded that the hydrophobic NqrB harbors one riboflavin in addition to its covalently attached FMN. The catalytic role of two flavins in subunit NqrB during the reduction of ubiquinone to ubiquinol by the Na+-NQR is discussed. PMID:20558724

  19. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase is involved in upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 by Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yu-Yan; Wu, Shih-Yi; Lai, Hsiao-Ching; Chang, Nan-Shan; Chang, Fang-Hsin; Tsai, Meng-Hsuan; Su, Ih-Jen; Chang, Yao

    2013-07-12

    WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WOX1) participates in tumor suppression and many other biologic functions, but its molecular and functional interactions with viral proteins remain largely unknown. This study reveals that WOX1 is physically associated with latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A), an oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus. The molecular interaction involves the tyrosine residue 33 of WOX1 and the proline-rich motifs of LMP2A. Interestingly, endogenous WOX1 is required for some LMP2A-triggered, cancer-promoting effects, including activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2, upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and promotion of cell invasion. Upon knockdown of endogenous WOX1, LMP2A-triggered MMP9 induction is restored by exogenous wild-type WOX1, but not by a WOX1 mutant defective in LMP2A binding. These results indicate that, through interaction with LMP2A, WOX1 is involved in MMP9 induction, suggesting a novel role of WOX1 in Epstein-Barr virus-associated cancer progression. PMID:23770367

  20. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. PMID:6432847

  1. Correlated Changes in the Activity, Amount of Protein, and Abundance of Transcript of NADPH:Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase and Chlorophyll Accumulation during Greening of Cucumber Cotyledons.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K.; Chen, R. M.; Tanaka, A.; Teramoto, H.; Tanaka, R.; Timko, M. P.; Tsuji, H.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the activity and abundance of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (NPR) and the abundance of mRNA encoding it were examined during the greening of 5-d-old etiolated cucumber cotyledons under continuous illumination. To measure NPR activity in the extracts from fully greened tissues, we have developed an improved method of assay. Upon exposure of etiolated cotyledons to light, NPR activity decreased rapidly within the first 2 h of exposure. Thereafter, enzymatic activity increased transiently, reaching a submaximum level at 12 h, and decreased slowly. The level of immunodetectable NPR protein followed the same pattern of changes during 96 h of greening as observed for NPR activity. The NPR mRNA in etiolated cotyledons disappeared quickly in the 1st h of irradiation. However, the level of mRNA increased thereafter to reach 3-fold or more of the dark level at 12 h and then decreased. The changes in the activity, protein level, and mRNA level after the first rapid decreases corresponded chronologically and nearly paralleled the increase in the rate of chlorophyll accumulation. These findings suggest that the greening of cucumber cotyledons is regulated basically by the level of NPR protein without activation or repression of enzymatic activity and that NPR mRNA increased by light maintains the level of enzyme protein necessary for greening. PMID:12228591

  2. Involvement of Xanthine Oxidoreductase-related Oxidative Stress in a Dermatophagoides farinae-induced Asthma Model of NC/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Heri; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Kubo, Masayuki; Fujikura, Yoshihisa; Ogino, Keiki

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress is widely known to play a role in asthma. However, the contribution of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) as a source of the superoxide anion radical (O2-) in oxidative stress associated with asthma has not yet been examined in detail. Here we investigated pathophysiological changes in XOR in an experimental model of asthma induced by the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae (Df). In the lungs of Df-treated mice, the production of O2 - from XOR increased and the nitrite concentrations decreased, whereas the protein expression of XOR remained unchanged. Moreover, the protein expression levels of XOR and the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were higher in the Df-treated mice than in saline-treated mice. Immunohistochemically, although XOR was highly localized in the bronchial epithelial cells of the saline-treated mice, immunostaining for XOR was absent in the bronchial epithelium of Df-treated mice. These results suggest that oxidative stress is up-regulated by increases in the conversion of the dehydrogenase form (xanthine dehydrogenase; XDH) of XOR to the oxidase form (xanthine oxidase; XOD). PMID:27339206

  3. Structure and Function of an NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase in an Open Conformation Capable of Reducing Cytochrome P450

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdane, Djemel; Xia, Chuanwu; Im, Sang-Choul; Zhang, Haoming; Kim, Jung-Ja P.; Waskell, Lucy

    2010-01-20

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) catalyzes the transfer of electrons to all known microsomal cytochromes P450. A CYPOR variant, with a 4-amino acid deletion in the hinge connecting the FMN domain to the rest of the protein, has been crystallized in three remarkably extended conformations. The variant donates an electron to cytochrome P450 at the same rate as the wild-type, when provided with sufficient electrons. Nevertheless, it is defective in its ability to transfer electrons intramolecularly from FAD to FMN. The three extended CYPOR structures demonstrate that, by pivoting on the C terminus of the hinge, the FMN domain of the enzyme undergoes a structural rearrangement that separates it from FAD and exposes the FMN, allowing it to interact with its redox partners. A similar movement most likely occurs in the wild-type enzyme in the course of transferring electrons from FAD to its physiological partner, cytochrome P450. A model of the complex between an open conformation of CYPOR and cytochrome P450 is presented that satisfies mutagenesis constraints. Neither lengthening the linker nor mutating its sequence influenced the activity of CYPOR. It is likely that the analogous linker in other members of the diflavin family functions in a similar manner.

  4. Steady-State Kinetic Mechanism of the Proline:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase Activity of Proline Utilization A (PutA) from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Michael A.; Tanner, John J.; Becker, Donald F.

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme from Escherichia coli performs the oxidation of proline to glutamate in two catalytic steps using separate proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase domains. In the first reaction, the oxidation of proline is coupled to the reduction of ubiquinone (CoQ) by the PRODH domain, which has a β8α8-barrel structure that is conserved in bacterial and eukaryotic PRODH enzymes. The structural requirements of the benzoquinone moiety were examined by steady-state kinetics using CoQ analogs. PutA displayed activity with all the analogs tested; the highest kcat/Km was obtained with CoQ2. The kinetic mechanism of the PRODH reaction was investigated use a variety of steady-state approaches. Initial velocity patterns measured using proline and CoQ1, combined with dead-end and product inhibition studies, suggested a two-site ping-pong mechanism for PutA. The kinetic parameters for PutA were not strongly influenced by solvent viscosity suggesting that diffusive steps do not significantly limit the overall reaction rate. In summary, the kinetic data reported here, along with analysis of the crystal structure data for the PRODH domain, suggest that the proline:ubiquinone oxidoreductase reaction of PutA occurs via a rapid equilibrium ping-pong mechanism with proline and ubiquinone binding at two distinct sites. PMID:22040654

  5. The MoxR ATPase RavA and Its Cofactor ViaA Interact with the NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase I in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith S.; Snider, Jamie D.; Graham, Chris; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew; Babu, Mohan; Houry, Walid A.

    2014-01-01

    MoxR ATPases are widespread throughout bacteria and archaea. The experimental evidence to date suggests that these proteins have chaperone-like roles in facilitating the maturation of dedicated protein complexes that are functionally diverse. In Escherichia coli, the MoxR ATPase RavA and its putative cofactor ViaA are found to exist in early stationary-phase cells at 37°C at low levels of about 350 and 90 molecules per cell, respectively. Both proteins are predominantly localized to the cytoplasm, but ViaA was also unexpectedly found to localize to the cell membrane. Whole genome microarrays and synthetic lethality studies both indicated that RavA-ViaA are genetically linked to Fe-S cluster assembly and specific respiratory pathways. Systematic analysis of mutant strains of ravA and viaA indicated that RavA-ViaA sensitizes cells to sublethal concentrations of aminoglycosides. Furthermore, this effect was dependent on RavA's ATPase activity, and on the presence of specific subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase I (Nuo Complex, or Complex I). Importantly, both RavA and ViaA were found to physically interact with specific Nuo subunits. We propose that RavA-ViaA facilitate the maturation of the Nuo complex. PMID:24454883

  6. LIGHT-INDUCED RICE1 Regulates Light-Dependent Attachment of LEAF-TYPE FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE to the Thylakoid Membrane in Rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Hu, Hongtao; Ren, Hongyan; Kong, Yuzhu; Lin, Hongwei; Guo, Jiangfan; Wang, Lingling; He, Yi; Ding, Xiaomeng; Grabsztunowicz, Magda; Mulo, Paula; Chen, Tao; Liu, Yu; Wu, Zhongchang; Wu, Yunrong; Mao, Chuanzao; Wu, Ping; Mo, Xiaorong

    2016-03-01

    LIR1 (LIGHT-INDUCED RICE1) encodes a 13-kD, chloroplast-targeted protein containing two nearly identical motifs of unknown function. LIR1 is present in the genomes of vascular plants, mosses, liverworts, and algae, but not in cyanobacteria. Using coimmunoprecipitation assays, pull-down assays, and yeast two-hybrid analyses, we showed that LIR1 interacts with LEAF-TYPE FERREDOXIN-NADP(+) OXIDOREDUCTASE (LFNR), an essential chloroplast enzyme functioning in the last step of photosynthetic linear electron transfer. LIR1 and LFNR formed high molecular weight thylakoid protein complexes with the TIC62 and TROL proteins, previously shown to anchor LFNR to the membrane. We further showed that LIR1 increases the affinity of LFNRs for TIC62 and that the rapid light-triggered degradation of the LIR1 coincides with the release of the LFNR from the thylakoid membrane. Loss of LIR1 resulted in a marked decrease in the accumulation of LFNR-containing thylakoid protein complexes without a concomitant decrease in total LFNR content. In rice (Oryza sativa), photosynthetic capacity of lir1 plants was slightly impaired, whereas no such effect was observed in Arabidopsis thaliana knockout mutants. The consequences of LIR1 deficiency in different species are discussed. PMID:26941088

  7. Analysis of experimental errors in bioprocesses. 1. Production of lactobionic acid and sorbitol using the GFOR (glucose-fructose oxidoreductase) enzyme from permeabilized cells of Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Severo, João B; Pinto, José C; Ferraz, Helen C; Alves, Tito L M

    2011-09-01

    The proper determination of experimental errors in bioprocesses can be very important because experimental errors can exert a major impact on the analysis of experimental results. Despite this, the effect of experimental errors on the analysis of bioprocess data has been largely overlooked in the literature. For this reason, we performed detailed statistical analyses of experimental errors obtained during the production of lactobionic acid and sorbitol in a system utilizing as catalyst the GFOR (glucose-fructose oxidoreductase) enzyme from permeabilized cells of the bacteria Zymomonas mobilis. The magnitude of the experimental errors thus obtained were then correlated with the process operation conditions and with the composition of the culture media used for bacterial growth. It is shown that experimental errors can depend very significantly on the operation conditions and affect the interpretation of available experimental data. More specifically, in this study, experimental errors depended on the nutritional supplements added to the cultivation medium, the inoculation process, and the reaction time, which may be of fundamental importance for actual process development. The results obtained also indicate, for the first time, that GFOR activity can be affected by the composition of the medium in which cells are cultivated. PMID:21328074

  8. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    PubMed

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  9. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R.; Jung, In J.; Kang, Sun B.; Park, Hee J.; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OXC85S plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OXC85S plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  10. Identification of pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter IM; Glaholt, Stephen; Colbourne, John K; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC

    2013-01-01

    Although cyanobacteria produce a wide range of natural toxins that impact aquatic organisms, food webs and water quality, the mechanisms of toxicity are still insufficiently understood. Here, we implemented a whole-genome expression microarray to identify pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families responsive to Microcystis stress in Daphnia pulex. Therefore, neonates of a sensitive isolate were given a diet contaminated with Microcystis to contrast with those given a control diet for sixteen days. The microarray revealed 2247 differentially expressed (DE) genes (7.6% of the array) in response to Microcystis, of which 17% are lineage specific( i.e., these genes have no detectable homology to any other gene in currently available databases) and 49% are gene duplicates (paralogs). We identified four pathways/gene networks and eight paralogous gene families affected by Microcystis. Differential regulation of the ribosome, including 3 paralogous gene families encoding 40S, 60S and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, suggests an impact of Microcystis on protein synthesis of D. pulex. In addition, differential regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (including the NADH ubquinone oxidoreductase gene family) and the trypsin paralogous gene family (a major component of the digestive system in D. pulex) could explain why fitness is reduced based on energy budget considerations. PMID:22799445

  11. Cloning and sequence analysis demonstrate the chromate reduction ability of a novel chromate reductase gene from Serratia sp

    PubMed Central

    DENG, PENG; TAN, XIAOQING; WU, YING; BAI, QUNHUA; JIA, YAN; XIAO, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The ChrT gene encodes a chromate reductase enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of Cr(VI). The chromate reductase is also known as flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase (FMN_red). The aim of the present study was to clone the full-length ChrT DNA from Serratia sp. CQMUS2 and analyze the deduced amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure. The putative ChrT gene fragment of Serratia sp. CQMUS2 was isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), according to the known FMN_red gene sequence from Serratia sp. AS13. The flanking sequences of the ChrT gene were obtained by high efficiency TAIL-PCR, while the full-length gene of ChrT was cloned in Escherichia coli for subsequent sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of ChrT was submitted onto GenBank under the accession number, KF211434. Sequence analysis of the gene and amino acids was conducted using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, and open reading frame (ORF) analysis was performed using ORF Finder software. The ChrT gene was found to be an ORF of 567 bp that encodes a 188-amino acid enzyme with a calculated molecular weight of 20.4 kDa. In addition, the ChrT protein was hypothesized to be an NADPH-dependent FMN_red and a member of the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. The amino acid sequence of ChrT showed high sequence similarity to the FMN reductase genes of Klebsiella pneumonia and Raoultella ornithinolytica, which belong to the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. Furthermore, ChrT was shown to have a 85.6% similarity to the three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli ChrR, sharing four common enzyme active sites for chromate reduction. Therefore, ChrT gene cloning and protein structure determination demonstrated the ability of the gene for chromate reduction. The results of the present study provide a basis for further studies on ChrT gene expression and protein function. PMID:25667630

  12. Cloning and Characterization of a Gene Cluster for Hatomarubigin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces sp. Strain 2238-SVT4 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Takashi; Hirashima, Reiko; Maruta, Tomoka; Sato, Haruka; Maeda, Ayumi; Yamada, Yuki; Takeda, Maho; Hayakawa, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    Streptomyces sp. strain 2238-SVT4 produces hatomarubigins A, B, C, and D, which belong to the angucycline family. Among them, hatomarubigin D has a unique dimeric structure with a methylene linkage. PCR using aromatase and cyclase gene-specific primers identified the hrb gene cluster for angucycline biosynthesis in Streptomyces sp. 2238-SVT4. The cluster consisted of 30 open reading frames, including those for the minimal polyketide synthase, ketoreductase, aromatase, cyclase, O-methyltransferase, oxidoreductase, and oxygenase genes. Expression of a part of the gene cluster containing hrbR1 to hrbX in Streptomyces lividans TK23 resulted in the production of hatomarubigins A, B, and C. Hatomarubigin D was obtained from the conversion of hatomarubigin C by a purified enzyme encoded by hrbY, among the remaining genes. PMID:20453135

  13. Characterization of the Type 2 NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductases from Staphylococcus aureus and the bactericidal action of phenothiazines

    PubMed Central

    Schurig-Briccio, Lici A.; Yano, Takahiro; Rubin, Harvey; Gennis, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is currently one of the principal multiply resistant bacterial pathogens causing serious infections, many of which are life-threatening. Consequently, new therapeutic targets are required to combat such infections. In the current work, we explore the type 2 NADH dehydrogenases (NDH-2s) as possible drug targets and look at the effects of phenothiazines, known to inhibit NDH-2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. NDH-2s are monotopic membrane proteins that catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADH via FAD to the quinone pool. They are required for maintaining the NADH/NAD+ redox balance and contribute indirectly to the generation of proton motive force. NDH-2s are not present in mammals, but are the only form of respiratory NADH dehydrogenase in several pathogens, including S. aureus. In this work, the two putative ndh genes present in the S. aureus genome were identified, cloned and expressed, and the proteins purified and characterized. Phenothiazines were shown to inhibit both of the S. aureus NDH-2s with IC50 values as low as 8 μM. However, evaluating the effects of phenothiazines on whole cells of S. aureus was complicated by the fact that they are also acting as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:24709059

  14. Defining redox centers in human electron transfer flavoprotein: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Frerman, F.E.; Beard, S.; Goodman, S.I.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in ETF or ETC:QO cause glutaric acidemia type II (GA2). ETF:QO is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein in the inner mitochondrial membrane which transfers electrons from ETF in the mitochondrial matrix to ubiquinone (Q). The human ETF:QO gene is on chromosome 4q32{r_arrow}qter, and encodes a 617 amino acid precursor which is processed to the 64 kDa mature form in the mitochondrion. One ETF:QO mutation in GA2 is a G{r_arrow}T transversion in a donor splice site, deleting the 222 bp upstream exon from the transcript. The deleted 74 amino acids are near the carboxyl terminus just beyond a predicted membrane helix, and include C561, one of four cysteine residues predicted to ligate the 4Fe4S cluster. The mutant protein is not stable in patient fibroblasts. We have expressed cDNAs encoding wild type (wt) ETF:QO, ETF:QO with the 74 amino acid deletion, and ETFF:QO with only a C561A mutation, in S cerevisiae. In all instances, precursor and mature ETF:QOs were stably inserted into the mitochondrial membrane. ETF:QO (C561A) is extracted from the membrane under the same conditions as wt ETF:QO, but ETF:QO with the deletion is much more difficult to extract. Wt ETF:QO accepts electrons from ETF and reduces Q but, while both mutant proteins accept electrons from ETF, neither of them reduces Q. This work demonstrates that C561 in human ETF:QO is essential for Q reduction (probably because it ligands the 4Fe4S cluster), that mutant proteins that are unstable in man may be stable in other systems, that cleavage of signal peptide from precursor proteins can occur within the inner mitochondrial membrane, and the general usefulness of expressing human mitochondrial proteins in yeast.

  15. Expression of Human NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase (DT-Diaphorase) in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells: Effect on the Toxicity of Antitumor Quinones

    PubMed Central

    GUSTAFSON, DANIEL L.; BEALL, HOWARD D.; BOLTON, EMIKO M.; ROSS, DAVID; WALDREN, CHARLES A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Previous studies have indicated that NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase [DT-diaphorase (NQO1)] plays an important role in the bioreductive activation of quinone-containing antitumor agents. Although these studies demonstrated that purified NQO1 can reduce these compounds in vitro, the importance NQO1 in the intracellular activation of quinone-containing antitumor agents remains controversial. In our study, we transfected human NQO1 into Chinese hamster ovary cells that do not normally express NQO1 activity and obtained stable clones that expressed NQO1 activity of 19–3527 nmol of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol reduced/min/mg of protein. The level of NQO1 expression correlated with an increased killing by streptonigrin, EO9 (3-hydroxymethyl-5-aziridinyl-1-methyl-2-(1H-indole-4,7-dione)-propenol), and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,6-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone, but mitomycin C sensitivity was independent of this activity. NQO1 expression also led to a slight decrease in the sensitivity of cells to menadione. Our data demonstrate that compounds that are efficient substrates for NQO1 in vitro are also bioactivated in cultured mammalian cells when they are transfected with human NQO1. These results are consistent with the relative abilities of mitomycin C, streptonigrin, EO9, and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,6-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone to serve as substrates for bioreduction by human NQO1, and show that NQO1 levels are not necessarily predictive in terms of sensitivity to mitomycin C. PMID:8863816

  16. Apoptosis-inducing Factor (AIF) and Its Family Member Protein, AMID, Are Rotenone-sensitive NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductases (NDH-2).

    PubMed

    Elguindy, Mahmoud M; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2015-08-21

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death) are flavoproteins. Although AIF was originally discovered as a caspase-independent cell death effector, bioenergetic roles of AIF, particularly relating to complex I functions, have since emerged. However, the role of AIF in mitochondrial respiration and redox metabolism has remained unknown. Here, we investigated the redox properties of human AIF and AMID by comparing them with yeast Ndi1, a type 2 NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-2) regarded as alternative complex I. Isolated AIF and AMID containing naturally incorporated FAD displayed no NADH oxidase activities. However, after reconstituting isolated AIF or AMID into bacterial or mitochondrial membranes, N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID displayed substantial NADH:O₂ activities and supported NADH-linked proton pumping activities in the host membranes almost as efficiently as Ndi1. NADH:ubiquinone-1 activities in the reconstituted membranes were highly sensitive to 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (IC₅₀ = ∼1 μm), a quinone-binding inhibitor. Overexpressing N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID enhanced the growth of a double knock-out Escherichia coli strain lacking complex I and NDH-2. In contrast, C-terminally tagged AIF and NADH-binding site mutants of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID failed to show both NADH:O₂ activity and the growth-enhancing effect. The disease mutant AIFΔR201 showed decreased NADH:O₂ activity and growth-enhancing effect. Furthermore, we surprisingly found that the redox activities of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID were sensitive to rotenone, a well known complex I inhibitor. We propose that AIF and AMID are previously unidentified mammalian NDH-2 enzymes, whose bioenergetic function could be supplemental NADH oxidation in cells. PMID:26063804

  17. Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and thioredoxin reductase are involved in 5-nitroimidazole activation while flavin metabolism is linked to 5-nitroimidazole resistance in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Leitsch, David; Burgess, Anita G.; Dunn, Linda A.; Krauer, Kenia G.; Tan, Kevin; Duchêne, Michael; Upcroft, Peter; Eckmann, Lars; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The mechanism of action of, and resistance to, metronidazole in the anaerobic (or micro-aerotolerant) protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia has long been associated with the reduction of ferredoxin (Fd) by the enzyme pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and the subsequent activation of metronidazole by Fd to toxic radical species. Resistance to metronidazole has been associated with down-regulation of PFOR and Fd. The aim of this study was to determine whether the PFOR/Fd couple is the only pathway involved in metronidazole activation in Giardia. Methods PFOR and Fd activities were measured in extracts of highly metronidazole-resistant (MTRr) lines and activities of recombinant G. lamblia thioredoxin reductase (GlTrxR) and NADPH oxidase were assessed for their involvement in metronidazole activation and resistance. Results We demonstrated that several lines of highly MTRr G. lamblia have fully functional PFOR and Fd indicating that PFOR/Fd-independent mechanisms are involved in metronidazole activation and resistance in these cells. Flavin-dependent GlTrxR, like TrxR of other anaerobic protozoa, reduces 5-nitroimidazole compounds including metronidazole, although expression of TrxR is not decreased in MTRr Giardia. However, reduction of flavins is suppressed in highly MTRr cells, as evidenced by as much as an 80% decrease in NADPH oxidase flavin mononucleotide reduction activity. This suppression is consistent with generalized impaired flavin metabolism in highly MTRr Trichomonas vaginalis. Conclusions These data add to the mounting evidence against the dogma that PFOR/Fd is the only couple with a low enough redox potential to reduce metronidazole in anaerobes and point to the multi-factorial nature of metronidazole resistance. PMID:21602576

  18. Functional Analysis of Two Isoforms of Leaf-Type Ferredoxin-NADP+-Oxidoreductase in Rice Using the Heterologous Expression System of Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Ichikawa, Takanari; Kondou, Youichi; Matsui, Keiko; Hasegawa, Yukako; Kawashima, Mika; Sonoike, Kintake; Mori, Masaki; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Matsui, Minami

    2011-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) mediates electron transfer between ferredoxin (Fd) and NADP+; therefore, it is a key enzyme that provides the reducing power used in the Calvin cycle. Other than FNR, nitrite reductase, sulfite reductase, glutamate synthase, and Fd-thioredoxin reductase also accept electrons from Fd, an electron carrier protein in the stroma. Therefore, the regulation of electron partitioning in the chloroplast is important for photosynthesis and other metabolic pathways. The regulatory mechanism of electron partitioning, however, remains to be elucidated. We found, by taking advantage of a gain-of-function approach, that expression of two rice (Oryza sativa) full-length cDNAs of leaf-type FNRs (OsLFNR1 and OsLFNR2) led to altered chlorophyll fluorescence and growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice. We revealed that overexpression of the OsLFNR1 and OsLFNR2 full-length cDNAs resulted in distinct phenotypes despite the high sequence similarity between them. Expression of OsLFNR1 affected the nitrogen assimilation pathway without inhibition of photosynthesis under normal conditions. On the other hand, OsLFNR2 expression led to the impairment of photosynthetic linear electron transport as well as Fd-dependent cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. The endogenous protein level of OsLFNR was found to be suppressed in both OsLFNR1- and OsLFNR2-overexpressing rice plants, leading to changes in the stoichiometry of the two LFNR isoforms within the thylakoid and soluble fractions. Thus, we propose that the stoichiometry of two LFNR isoforms plays an important role in electron partitioning between carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation. PMID:21734114

  19. Structural and Functional Investigation of Flavin Binding Center of the NqrC Subunit of Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi

    PubMed Central

    Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  20. The antiproliferative activity of the heat shock protein 90 inhibitor IPI-504 is not dependent on NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Mark; Lim, Alice R; Porter, James R; West, Kip; Pink, Melissa M; Ge, Jie; Wylie, Andrew A; Tibbits, Thomas T; Biggs, Kurtis; Curtis, Michael; Palombella, Vito J; Adams, Julian; Fritz, Christian C; Normant, Emmanuel

    2009-12-01

    IPI-504, a water-soluble ansamycin analogue currently being investigated in clinical trials, is a potent inhibitor of the protein chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Inhibition of Hsp90 by IPI-504 triggers the degradation of important oncogenic client proteins. In cells, the free base of IPI-504 hydroquinone exists in a dynamic redox equilibrium with its corresponding quinone (17-AAG); the hydroquinone form binding 50 times more tightly to Hsp90. It has been proposed recently that the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase NQO1 can produce the active hydroquinone and could be essential for the activity of IPI-504. Here, we have devised a method to directly measure the intracellular ratio of hydroquinone to quinone (HQ/Q) and have applied this measurement to correlate NQO1 enzyme abundance with HQ/Q ratio and cellular activity of IPI-504 in 30 cancer cell lines. Interestingly, the intracellular HQ/Q ratio was correlated with NQO1 levels only in a subset of cell lines and overall was poorly correlated with the growth inhibitory activity of IPI-504. Although artificial overexpression of NQO1 is able to increase the level of hydroquinone and cell sensitivity to IPI-504, it has little effect on the activity of 17-amino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin, the major active metabolite of IPI-504. This finding could provide an explanation for the biological activity of IPI-504 in xenograft models of cell lines that are not sensitive to IPI-504 in vitro. Our results suggest that NQO1 activity is not a determinant of IPI-504 activity in vivo and, therefore, unlikely to become an important resistance mechanism to IPI-504 in the clinic. PMID:19952119

  1. ES936 stimulates DNA synthesis in HeLa cells independently on NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibition, through a mechanism involving p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    González-Aragón, David; Alcaín, Francisco J; Ariza, Julia; Jódar, Laura; Barbarroja, Nuria; López-Pedrera, Chary; Villalba, José M

    2010-07-30

    The indolequinone ES936 (5-methoxy-1,2-dimethyl-3-[(4-nitrophenol)methyl]-indole-4,7-dione) is a potent mechanism-based inhibitor of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Here, we report that ES936 significantly stimulated thymidine incorporation in sparse cultures of human adenocarcinoma HeLa cells, but was without effect in dense cultures. Stimulation of DNA synthesis was not related with a DNA repair response because an increase in thymidine incorporation was not observed in cells treated with 2,5 bis-[1-aziridyl]-1,4 benzoquinone, a well-established antitumor quinone that causes DNA damage. Conversely, it was related with an increase of cell growth. NQO1 inhibition was not involved in ES936 stimulation of DNA synthesis, because the same response was observed in cells where NQO1 expression had been knocked down by small interfering RNA. Stimulation of DNA synthesis was reverted by treatment with ambroxol, a SOD mimetic, and by pyruvate, an efficient peroxide scavenger, supporting the involvement of alterations in cellular redox state. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 with either SB203580 or PD169316 completely abolished ES936-stimulated DNA synthesis, indicating the requirement of p38 activity. This is the first report that demonstrates the existence of an ES936-sensitive system which is separate from NQO1, modulating the redox state and cell growth in HeLa cells through a p38-dependent mechanism. Our results show that the effect ES936 exerts on DNA synthesis may be either positive or negative depending on the cellular context and growth conditions. PMID:20433816

  2. FeS/S/FeS2 Redox System and Its Oxidoreductase-like Chemistry in the Iron-Sulfur World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Bin; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Su, Wenhui

    2011-06-01

    The iron-sulfur world (ISW) theory is an intriguing prediction regarding the origin of life on early Earth. It hypothesizes that life arose as a geochemical process from inorganic starting materials on the surface of sulfide minerals in the vicinity of deep-sea hot springs. During the last two decades, many experimental studies have been carried out on this topic, and some interesting results have been achieved. Among them, however, the processes of carbon/nitrogen fixation and biomolecular assembly on the mineral surface have received an inordinate amount of attention. To the present, an abiotic model for the oxidation-reduction of intermediates participating in metabolic pathways has been ignored. We examined the oxidation-reduction effect of a prebiotic FeS/S/FeS2 redox system on the interconversion between several pairs of ±-hydroxy acids and ±-keto acids (i.e., lactate/pyruvate, malate/oxaloacetate, and glycolate/glyoxylate). We found that, in the absence of FeS, elemental sulfur (S) oxidized ±-hydroxy acids to form corresponding keto acids only at a temperature higher than its melting point (113°C); in the presence of FeS, such reactions occurred more efficiently through a coupled reaction mechanism, even at a temperature below the phase transition point of S. On the other hand, FeS was shown to have the capacity to reversibly reduce the keto acids. Such an oxidoreductase-like chemistry of the FeS/S/FeS2 redox system suggests that it can determine the redox homeostasis of metabolic intermediates in the early evolutionary phase of life. The results provide a possible pathway for the development of primordial redox biochemistry in the iron-sulfur world.

  3. Identification, Design and Biological Evaluation of Bisaryl Quinolones Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Type II NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (PfNDH2)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A program was undertaken to identify hit compounds against NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (PfNDH2), a dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial electron transport chain of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PfNDH2 has only one known inhibitor, hydroxy-2-dodecyl-4-(1H)-quinolone (HDQ), and this was used along with a range of chemoinformatics methods in the rational selection of 17 000 compounds for high-throughput screening. Twelve distinct chemotypes were identified and briefly examined leading to the selection of the quinolone core as the key target for structure–activity relationship (SAR) development. Extensive structural exploration led to the selection of 2-bisaryl 3-methyl quinolones as a series for further biological evaluation. The lead compound within this series 7-chloro-3-methyl-2-(4-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)benzyl)phenyl)quinolin-4(1H)-one (CK-2-68) has antimalarial activity against the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum of 36 nM, is selective for PfNDH2 over other respiratory enzymes (inhibitory IC50 against PfNDH2 of 16 nM), and demonstrates low cytotoxicity and high metabolic stability in the presence of human liver microsomes. This lead compound and its phosphate pro-drug have potent in vivo antimalarial activity after oral administration, consistent with the target product profile of a drug for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Other quinolones presented (e.g., 6d, 6f, 14e) have the capacity to inhibit both PfNDH2 and P. falciparum cytochrome bc1, and studies to determine the potential advantage of this dual-targeting effect are in progress. PMID:22364416

  4. Electrical Wiring of the Aldehyde Oxidoreductase PaoABC with a Polymer Containing Osmium Redox Centers: Biosensors for Benzaldehyde and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Dierich, Marlen; Stiba, Konstanze; Schwuchow, Viola; Leimkühler, Silke; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and γ−aminobutyric acid (GABA) are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below −0.15 V (vs. Ag|AgCl, 1 M KCl). The pH-dependence of benzaldehyde oxidation can be strongly influenced by the ionic strength. The effect is similar with the soluble osmium redox complex and therefore indicates a clear electrostatic effect on the bioelectrocatalytic efficiency of PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. At lower ionic strength, the pH-optimum is high and can be switched to low pH-values at high ionic strength. This offers biosensing at high and low pH-values. A “reagentless” biosensor has been formed with enzyme wired onto a screen-printed electrode in a flow cell device. The response time to addition of benzaldehyde is 30 s, and the measuring range is between 10–150 µM and the detection limit of 5 µM (signal to noise ratio 3:1) of benzaldehyde. The relative standard deviation in a series (n = 13) for 200 µM benzaldehyde is 1.9%. For the biosensor, a response to succinic semialdehyde was also identified. Based on this response and the ability to work at high pH a biosensor for GABA is proposed by coimmobilizing GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) and PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. PMID:25587431

  5. LEDGF/p75 Overexpression Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Necrosis and Upregulates the Oxidoreductase ERP57/PDIA3/GRP58 in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anamika; Cajigas-Du Ross, Christina K.; Rios-Colon, Leslimar; Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R.; Leoh, Lai Sum; Rojas, Heather; Banerjee, Hiya; Martinez, Shannalee R.; Acevedo-Martinez, Stephanny; Casiano, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) mortality is driven by highly aggressive tumors characterized by metastasis and resistance to therapy, and this aggressiveness is mediated by numerous factors, including activation of stress survival pathways in the pro-inflammatory tumor microenvironment. LEDGF/p75, also known as the DFS70 autoantigen, is a stress transcription co-activator implicated in cancer, HIV-AIDS, and autoimmunity. This protein is targeted by autoantibodies in certain subsets of patients with PCa and inflammatory conditions, as well as in some apparently healthy individuals. LEDGF/p75 is overexpressed in PCa and other cancers, and promotes resistance to chemotherapy-induced cell death via the transactivation of survival proteins. We report in this study that overexpression of LEDGF/p75 in PCa cells attenuates oxidative stress-induced necrosis but not staurosporine-induced apoptosis. This finding was consistent with the observation that while LEDGF/p75 was robustly cleaved in apoptotic cells into a p65 fragment that lacks stress survival activity, it remained relatively intact in necrotic cells. Overexpression of LEDGF/p75 in PCa cells led to the upregulation of transcript and protein levels of the thiol-oxidoreductase ERp57 (also known as GRP58 and PDIA3), whereas its depletion led to ERp57 transcript downregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcription reporter assays showed LEDGF/p75 binding to and transactivating the ERp57 promoter, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly elevated co-expression of these two proteins in clinical prostate tumor tissues. Our results suggest that LEDGF/p75 is not an inhibitor of apoptosis but rather an antagonist of oxidative stress-induced necrosis, and that its overexpression in PCa leads to ERp57 upregulation. These findings are of significance in clarifying the role of the LEDGF/p75 stress survival pathway in PCa. PMID:26771192

  6. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor: A Novel Inhibitor of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1-p38-Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Dependent Cigarette Smoke-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fallica, Jonathan; Varela, Lidenys; Johnston, Laura; Kim, Bo; Serebreni, Leonid; Wang, Lan; Damarla, Mahendra; Kolb, Todd M; Hassoun, Paul M; Damico, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure is the leading cause of emphysema. CS mediates pathologic emphysematous remodeling of the lung via apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells resulting in enlargement of the airspaces, loss of the capillary bed, and diminished surface area for gas exchange. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pleiotropic cytokine, is reduced both in a preclinical model of CS-induced emphysema and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, particularly those with the most severe disease and emphysematous phenotype. MIF functions to antagonize CS-induced DNA damage, p53-dependent apoptosis of pulmonary endothelial cells (EndoCs) and resultant emphysematous tissue remodeling. Using primary alveolar EndoCs and a mouse model of CS-induced lung damage, we investigated the capacity and molecular mechanism(s) by which MIF modifies oxidant injury. Here, we demonstrate that both the activity of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a superoxide-generating enzyme obligatory for CS-induced DNA damage and EndoC apoptosis, and superoxide concentrations are increased after CS exposure in the absence of MIF. Both XOR hyperactivation and apoptosis in the absence of MIF occurred via a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family member, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), was necessary for CS-induced p38 activation and EndoC apoptosis. MIF was sufficient to directly suppress ASK1 enzymatic activity. Taken together, MIF suppresses CS-mediated cytotoxicity in the lung, in part by antagonizing ASK1-p38-XOR-dependent apoptosis. PMID:26390063

  7. Characterization of Chlorophenol 4-Monooxygenase (TftD) and NADH:Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidoreductase (TftC) of Burkholderia cepacia AC1100

    PubMed Central

    Gisi, Michelle R.; Xun, Luying

    2003-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 uses 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, an environmental pollutant, as a sole carbon and energy source. Chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase is a key enzyme in the degradation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and it was originally characterized as a two-component enzyme (TftC and TftD). Sequence analysis suggests that they are separate enzymes. The two proteins were separately produced in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. TftC was an NADH:flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) oxidoreductase. A C-terminally His-tagged fusion TftC used NADH to reduce either FAD or flavin mononucleotide (FMN) but did not use NADPH or riboflavin as a substrate. Kinetic and binding property analysis showed that FAD was a better substrate than FMN. TftD was a reduced FAD (FADH2)-utilizing monooxygenase, and FADH2 was supplied by TftC. It converted 2,4,5-trichlorophenol to 2,5-dichloro-p-quinol and then to 5-chlorohydroxyquinol but converted 2,4,6-trichlorophenol only to 2,6-dichloro-p-quinol as the final product. TftD interacted with FADH2 and retarded its rapid oxidation by O2. A spectrum of possible TftD-bound FAD-peroxide was identified, indicating that the peroxide is likely the active oxygen species attacking the aromatic substrates. The reclassification of the two enzymes further supports the new discovery of FADH2-utilizing enzymes, which have homologues in the domains Bacteria and Archaea. PMID:12700257

  8. Structure-function relationship of Vibrio harveyi NADPH-flavin oxidoreductase FRP: essential residues Lys167 and Arg15 for NADPH binding.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hae-Won; Tu, Shiao-Chun

    2012-06-19

    Vibrio harveyi NADPH-FMN oxidoreductase (FRP) catalyzes flavin reduction by NADPH. In comparing amino acid sequence and crystal structure with Escherichia coli NfsA, residues N134, R225, R133, K167, and R15 were targeted for investigation of their possible roles in the binding and utilization of the NADPH substrate. By mutation of each of these five residues to an alanine, steady-state rate analyses showed that the variants K167A and R15A had apparently greatly increased K(m,NADPH) and reduced k(cat)/K(m,NADPH), whereas little or much more modest changes were found for the other variants. The deuterium isotope effects (D)(V/K) for (4R)-[4-(2)H]-NADPH were markedly increased to 6.3 and 7.4 for K167A and R15A, respectively, indicating that the rate constants for NADPH and NADP(+) dissociation were greatly enhanced relative to the hydride transfer steps. Also, anaerobic stopped-flow analyses revealed that the equilibrium dissociation constant for NADPH binding (K(d)) to be 2.5-3.9 and 1.1 mM for K167A and R15A, respectively, much higher than the 0.4 μM K(d) for the native FRP, whereas the k(cat) of these two variants were similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. Moreover, the K167 to alanine mutation led to even a slight increase in k(cat)/K(m) for NADH. These results, taken together, provide a strong support to the conclusion that K167 and R15 each was critical in the binding of NADPH by FRP. Such a functional role may also exist for other FRP homologous proteins. PMID:22650604

  9. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Round, Ekaterina; Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium. PMID:25734798

  10. The Membrane-Associated Methane Monooxygenase (pMMO) and pMMO-NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase Complex from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dong-W.; Kunz, Ryan C.; Boyd, Eric S.; Semrau, Jeremy D.; Antholine, William E.; Han, J.-I.; Zahn, James A.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.; de la Mora, Arlene M.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in purification of membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) have resulted in preparations of pMMO with activities more representative of physiological rates: i.e., >130 nmol · min−1 · mg of protein−1. Altered culture and assay conditions, optimization of the detergent/protein ratio, and simplification of the purification procedure were responsible for the higher-activity preparations. Changes in the culture conditions focused on the rate of copper addition. To document the physiological events that occur during copper addition, cultures were initiated in medium with cells expressing soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and then monitored for morphological changes, copper acquisition, fatty acid concentration, and pMMO and sMMO expression as the amended copper concentration was increased from 0 (approximately 0.3 μM) to 95 μM. The results demonstrate that copper not only regulates the metabolic switch between the two methane monooxygenases but also regulates the level of expression of the pMMO and the development of internal membranes. With respect to stabilization of cell-free pMMO activity, the highest cell-free pMMO activity was observed when copper addition exceeded maximal pMMO expression. Optimization of detergent/protein ratios and simplification of the purification procedure also contributed to the higher activity levels in purified pMMO preparations. Finally, the addition of the type 2 NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (NADH dehydrogenase [NDH]) from M. capsulatus Bath, along with NADH and duroquinol, to enzyme assays increased the activity of purified preparations. The NDH and NADH were added to maintain a high duroquinol/duroquinone ratio. PMID:13129946

  11. The membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) and pMMO-NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-W; Kunz, Ryan C; Boyd, Eric S; Semrau, Jeremy D; Antholine, William E; Han, J-I; Zahn, James A; Boyd, Jeffrey M; de la Mora, Arlene M; DiSpirito, Alan A

    2003-10-01

    Improvements in purification of membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) have resulted in preparations of pMMO with activities more representative of physiological rates: i.e., >130 nmol.min(-1).mg of protein(-1). Altered culture and assay conditions, optimization of the detergent/protein ratio, and simplification of the purification procedure were responsible for the higher-activity preparations. Changes in the culture conditions focused on the rate of copper addition. To document the physiological events that occur during copper addition, cultures were initiated in medium with cells expressing soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and then monitored for morphological changes, copper acquisition, fatty acid concentration, and pMMO and sMMO expression as the amended copper concentration was increased from 0 (approximately 0.3 microM) to 95 microM. The results demonstrate that copper not only regulates the metabolic switch between the two methane monooxygenases but also regulates the level of expression of the pMMO and the development of internal membranes. With respect to stabilization of cell-free pMMO activity, the highest cell-free pMMO activity was observed when copper addition exceeded maximal pMMO expression. Optimization of detergent/protein ratios and simplification of the purification procedure also contributed to the higher activity levels in purified pMMO preparations. Finally, the addition of the type 2 NADH:quinone oxidoreductase complex (NADH dehydrogenase [NDH]) from M. capsulatus Bath, along with NADH and duroquinol, to enzyme assays increased the activity of purified preparations. The NDH and NADH were added to maintain a high duroquinol/duroquinone ratio. PMID:13129946

  12. Compounds from the Fruits of the Popular European Medicinal Plant Vitex agnus-castus in Chemoprevention via NADP(H):Quinone Oxidoreductase Type 1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shenghong; Qiu, Shengxiang; Yao, Ping; Sun, Handong; Fong, Harry H. S.; Zhang, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    As part of our continuing efforts in the search for potential biologically active compounds from medicinal plants, we have isolated 18 compounds including two novel nitrogen containing diterpenes from extracts of the fruits of Vitex agnus-castus. These isolates, along with our previously obtained novel compound vitexlactam A (1), were evaluated for potential biological effects, including cancer chemoprevention. Chemically, the nitrogenous isolates were found to be two labdane diterpene alkaloids, each containing an α, β-unsaturated γ-lactam moiety. Structurally, they were elucidated to be 9α-hydroxy-13(14)-labden-16,15-amide (2) and 6β-acetoxy-9α-hydroxy-13(14)-labden-15,16-amide (3), which were named vitexlactams B and C, respectively. The 15 known isolates were identified as vitexilactone (4), rotundifuran (5), 8-epi-manoyl oxide (6), vitetrifolin D (7), spathulenol (8), cis-dihydro-dehydro-diconiferylalcohol-9-O-β-D-glucoside (9), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (10), 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,4′-tetramethoxyflavone (11), casticin (12), artemetin (13), aucubin (14), agnuside (15), β-sitosterol (16), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (17), and p-hydroxybenzoic acid glucose ester (18). All compound structures were determined/identified on the basis of 1D and/or 2D NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. Compounds 6, 8, 9, and 18 were reported from a Vitex spieces for the first time. The cancer chemopreventive potentials of these isolates were evaluated for NADP(H):quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1) induction activity. Compound 7 demonstrated promising QR1 induction effect, while the new compound vitexlactam (3) was only slightly active. PMID:23662135

  13. Down-regulation of the detoxifying enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 by vanadium in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2009-05-01

    Recent data suggest that vanadium (V5+) compounds exert protective effects against chemical-induced carcinogenesis, mainly through modifying various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. In fact, we have shown that V5+ down-regulates the expression of Cyp1a1 at the transcriptional level through an ATP-dependent mechanism. However, incongruously, there is increasing evidence that V5+ is found in higher amounts in cancer cells and tissues than in normal cells or tissues. Therefore, the current study aims to address the possible effect of this metal on the regulation of expression of an enzyme that helps maintain endogenous antioxidants used to protect tissues/cells from mutagens, carcinogens, and oxidative stress damage, NAD(P) H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1). In an attempt to examine these effects, Hepa 1c1c7 cells and its AhRdeficient version, c12, were treated with increasing concentrations of V5+ in the presence of two distinct Nqo1 inducers, the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SUL). Our results showed that V5+ inhibits the TCDD- and SUL-mediated induction of Nqo1 at mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels. At transcriptional level, V5+ was able to decrease the TCDD- and SUL-induced nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the subsequent binding to antioxidant responsive element (ARE) without affecting Nrf2 protein levels. Looking at post-transcriptional level; we found that V5+ did not affect Nqo1 mRNA transcripts turn-over rates. However, at the post-translational level V5+ increased Nqo1 protein half-life. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that V5+ down-regulates Nqo1 at the transcriptional level, possibly through inhibiting the ATP-dependent activation of Nrf2. PMID:19367690

  14. Arsenite pretreatment enhances the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in human cancer cell lines via increased NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Yiling; Ho, I-C.; Su, P.-F.; Lee, T.-C. . E-mail: bmtcl@ibms.sinica.edu.tw

    2006-08-01

    Arsenic is an effective therapeutic agent for the treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. The use of arsenic for treating solid tumors, particularly in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents, has been extensively studied. Here, we report that arsenite-resistant human lung cancer CL3R15 cells constitutively overexpress NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), an enzyme responsible for activation of mitomycin C (MMC), and are more susceptible to MMC cytotoxicity than parental CL3 cells. The effects of arsenite pretreatment on NQO1 induction were examined in CL3, H1299, H460, and MC-T2 cells. Arsenite pretreatment significantly enhanced the expression of NQO1 and susceptibility to MMC in CL3, H1299, and MC-T2 cells, but not in H460 cells that express high endogenous levels of NQO1. Alternatively, arsenic pretreatment reduced adriamycin sensitivity of CL3 cells. Arsenite-mediated MMC susceptibility was abrogated by dicumarol (DIC), an NQO1 inhibitor, indicating that NQO1 is one of the key regulators of arsenite-mediated MMC susceptibility. Various cancer cell lines showed different basal levels of NQO1 activity and a different capacity for NQO1 induction in response to arsenite treatment. However, overall, there was a positive correlation between induced NQO1 activity and MMC susceptibility in cells pretreated with various doses of arsenite. These results suggest that arsenite may increase NQO1 activity and thus enhance the antineoplastic activity of MMC. In addition, our results also showed that inhibition of NQO1 activity by DIC reversed the arsenite resistance of CL3R15 cells.

  15. Identification of the coupling step in Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from real-time kinetics of electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Belevich, Nikolai P; Bertsova, Yulia V; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Baykov, Alexander A; Bogachev, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) uses a unique set of prosthetic redox groups-two covalently bound FMN residues, a [2Fe-2S] cluster, FAD, riboflavin and a Cys4[Fe] center-to catalyze electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone in a reaction coupled with Na(+) translocation across the membrane. Here we used an ultra-fast microfluidic stopped-flow instrument to determine rate constants and the difference spectra for the six consecutive reaction steps of Vibrio harveyi Na(+)-NQR reduction by NADH. The instrument, with a dead time of 0.25 ms and optical path length of 1 cm allowed collection of visible spectra in 50-μs intervals. By comparing the spectra of reaction steps with the spectra of known redox transitions of individual enzyme cofactors, we were able to identify the chemical nature of most intermediates and the sequence of electron transfer events. A previously unknown spectral transition was detected and assigned to the Cys4[Fe] center reduction. Electron transfer from the [2Fe-2S] cluster to the Cys4[Fe] center and all subsequent steps were markedly accelerated when Na(+) concentration was increased from 20 μM to 25 mM, suggesting coupling of the former step with tight Na(+) binding to or occlusion by the enzyme. An alternating access mechanism was proposed to explain electron transfer between subunits NqrF and NqrC. According to the proposed mechanism, the Cys4[Fe] center is alternatively exposed to either side of the membrane, allowing the [2Fe-2S] cluster of NqrF and the FMN residue of NqrC to alternatively approach the Cys4[Fe] center from different sides of the membrane. PMID:26655930

  16. Cross-Species Analysis of Protein Dynamics Associated with Hydride and Proton Transfer in the Catalytic Cycle of the Light-Driven Enzyme Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Hoeven, Robin; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-02-16

    Experimental interrogation of the relationship between protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis is challenging. Light-activated protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) is an excellent model for investigating this relationship because photoinitiation of the reaction cycle enables coordinated turnover in a "dark-assembled" ternary enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic cycle involves sequential hydride and proton transfers (from NADPH and an active site tyrosine residue, respectively) to the substrate protochlorophyllide. Studies with a limited cross-species subset of POR enzymes (n = 4) have suggested that protein dynamics associated with hydride and proton transfer are distinct [Heyes, D. J., Levy, C., Sakuma, M., Robertson, D. L., and Scrutton, N. S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 11849-11854]. Here, we use steady-state assays and single-turnover laser flash spectroscopy to analyze hydride and proton transfer dynamics in an extended series of POR enzymes taken from many species, including cyanobacteria, algae, embryophytes, and angiosperms. Hydride/proton transfer in all eukaryotic PORs is faster compared to prokaryotic PORs, suggesting active site architecture has been optimized in eukaryotic PORs following endosymbiosis. Visible pump-probe spectroscopy was also used to demonstrate a common photoexcitation mechanism for representative POR enzymes from different branches of the phylogenetic tree. Dynamics associated with hydride transfer are localized to the active site of all POR enzymes and are conserved. However, dynamics associated with proton transfer are variable. Protein dynamics associated with proton transfer are also coupled to solvent dynamics in cyanobacterial PORs, and these networks are likely required to optimize (shorten) the donor-acceptor distance for proton transfer. These extended networks are absent in algal and plant PORs. Our analysis suggests that extended networks of dynamics are disfavored, possibly through natural selection. Implications for

  17. Characterization of the threshold for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase activity in intact sulforaphane-treated pulmonary arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bongard, Robert D; Krenz, Gary S; Gastonguay, Adam J; Williams, Carol L; Lindemer, Brian J; Merker, Marilyn P

    2011-04-15

    Treatment of bovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells in culture with the phase II enzyme inducer sulforaphane (5μM, 24h; sulf-treated) increased cell-lysate NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) activity by 5.7 ± 0.6 (mean ± SEM)-fold, but intact-cell NQO1 activity by only 2.8 ± 0.1-fold compared to control cells. To evaluate the hypothesis that the threshold for sulforaphane-induced intact-cell NQO1 activity reflects a limitation in the capacity to supply NADPH at a sufficient rate to drive all the induced NQO1 to its maximum activity, total KOH-extractable pyridine nucleotides were measured in cells treated with duroquinone to stimulate maximal NQO1 activity. NQO1 activation increased NADP(+) in control and sulf-treated cells, with the effect more pronounced in the sulf-treated cells, in which the NADPH was also decreased. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) inhibition partially blocked NQO1 activity in control and sulf-treated cells, but G-6-PDH overexpression via transient transfection with the human cDNA alleviated neither the restriction on intact sulf-treated cell NQO1 activity nor the impact on the NADPH/NADP(+) ratios. Intracellular ATP levels were not affected by NQO1 activation in control or sulf-treated cells. An increased dependence on extracellular glucose and a rightward shift in the K(m) for extracellular glucose were observed in NQO1-stimulated sulf-treated vs control cells. The data suggest that glucose transport in the sulf-treated cells may be insufficient to support the increased metabolic demand for pentose phosphate pathway-generated NADPH as an explanation for the NQO1 threshold. PMID:21238579

  18. Dopamine as a potent inducer of cellular glutathione and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in PC12 neuronal cells: a potential adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhenquan; Zhu, Hong; Misra, Bhaba R; Li, Yunbo; Misra, Hara P

    2008-11-01

    Dopamine auto-oxidation and the consequent formation of reactive oxygen species and electrophilic quinone molecules have been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. We reported here that in PC12 dopaminergic neuronal cells dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations (50-150 muM) potently induced cellular glutathione (GSH) and the phase 2 enzyme NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), two critical cellular defenses in detoxification of ROS and electrophilic quinone molecules. Incubation of PC12 cells with dopamine also led to a marked increase in the mRNA levels for gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and NQO1. In addition, treatment of PC12 cells with dopamine resulted in a significant elevation of GSH content in the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether treatment with dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations, which upregulated the cellular defenses could protect the neuronal cells against subsequent lethal oxidative and electrophilic injury, PC12 cells were pretreated with dopamine (150 muM) for 24 h and then exposed to various cytotoxic concentrations of dopamine or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We found that pretreatment of PC12 cells with dopamine at a noncytotoxic concentration led to a remarkable protection against cytotoxicity caused by dopamine or 6-OHDA at lethal concentrations, as detected by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium reduction assay. In view of the critical roles of GSH and NQO1 in protecting against dopaminergic neuron degeneration, the above findings implicate that upregulation of both GSH and NQO1 by dopamine at noncytotoxic concentrations may serve as an important adaptive mechanism for dopaminergic neuroprotection. PMID:18368484

  19. Mitochondrial Impairment May Increase Cellular NAD(P)H: Resazurin Oxidoreductase Activity, Perturbing the NAD(P)H-Based Viability Assays

    PubMed Central

    Aleshin, Vasily A.; Artiukhov, Artem V.; Oppermann, Henry; Kazantsev, Alexey V.; Lukashev, Nikolay V.; Bunik, Victoria I.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase activity with artificial dyes (NAD(P)H-OR) is an indicator of viability, as the cellular redox state is important for biosynthesis and antioxidant defense. However, high NAD(P)H due to impaired mitochondrial oxidation, known as reductive stress, should increase NAD(P)H-OR yet perturb viability. To better understand this complex behavior, we assayed NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin (Alamar Blue) in glioblastoma cell lines U87 and T98G, treated with inhibitors of central metabolism, oxythiamin, and phosphonate analogs of 2-oxo acids. Targeting the thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes, the inhibitors are known to decrease the NAD(P)H production in the pentose phosphate shuttle and/or upon mitochondrial oxidation of 2-oxo acids. Nevertheless, the inhibitors elevated NAD(P)H-OR with resazurin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, suggesting impaired NAD(P)H oxidation rather than increased viability. In particular, inhibition of the ThDP-dependent enzymes affects metabolism of malate, which mediates mitochondrial oxidation of cytosolic NAD(P)H. We showed that oxythiamin not only inhibited mitochondrial 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases, but also induced cell-specific changes in glutamate and malate dehydrogenases and/or malic enzyme. As a result, inhibition of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenases compromises mitochondrial metabolism, with the dysregulated electron fluxes leading to increases in cellular NAD(P)H-OR. Perturbed mitochondrial oxidation of NAD(P)H may thus complicate the NAD(P)H-based viability assay. PMID:26308058

  20. The thioredoxin system of Penicillium chrysogenum and its possible role in penicillin biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G; Argaman, A; Schreiber, R; Mislovati, M; Aharonowitz, Y

    1994-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is an important producer of penicillin antibiotics. A key step in their biosynthesis is the oxidative cyclization of delta-(L-alpha-aminoadipyl)-L-cysteinyl-D-valine (ACV) to isopenicillin N by the enzyme isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS). bis-ACV, the oxidized disulfide form of ACV is, however, not a substrate for IPNS. We report here the characterization of a broad-range disulfide reductase from P. chrysogenum that efficiently reduces bis-ACV to the thiol monomer. When coupled in vitro with IPNS, it converts bis-ACV to isopenicillin N and may therefore play a role in penicillin biosynthesis. The disulfide reductase consists of two protein components, a 72-kDa NADPH-dependent reductase, containing two identical subunits, and a 12-kDa general disulfide reductant. The latter reduces disulfide bonds in low-molecular-weight compounds and in proteins. The genes coding for the reductase system were cloned and sequenced. Both possess introns. A comparative analysis of their predicted amino acid sequences showed that the 12-kDa protein shares 26 to 60% sequence identity with thioredoxins and that the 36-kDa protein subunit shares 44 to 49% sequence identity with the two known bacterial thioredoxin reductases. In addition, the P. chrysogenum NADPH-dependent reductase is able to accept thioredoxin as a substrate. These results establish that the P. chrysogenum broad-range disulfide reductase is a member of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. This is the first example of the cloning of a eucaryotic thioredoxin reductase gene. Images PMID:8106340

  1. Characterization of Pseudomonas putida Genes Responsive to Nutrient Limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, Chris K.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Kingsley, Mark T.; Swarup, Sanjay

    2004-06-01

    The low bioavailability of nutrients and oxygen in the soil environment has hampered successful expression of biodegradation/biocontrol genes that are driven by promoters highly active during routine laboratory conditions of high nutrient- and oxygen-availability. Hence, in the present study, expression of the gus-tagged genes in 12 Tn5-gus mutants of the soil microbe Pseudomonas putida PNL-MK25 was examined under various conditions chosen to mimic the soil environment: low carbon, phosphate, nitrate, or oxygen, and in the rhizosphere. Based on their expression profiles, three nutrient-responsive mutant (NRM) strains, NRM5, NRM7, and NRM17, were selected for identification of the tagged genes. In the mutant strain NRM5, expression of the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA) gene was increased between 4.9- to 26.4-fold under various low nutrient conditions. In NRM7, expression of the novel NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-like (nql) gene was consistently amongst the highest and was synergistically upregulated by low nutrient and anoxic conditions. The cyoD gene in NRM17, which encodes the fourth subunit of the cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase complex, had decreased expression in low nutrient conditions but its absolute expression levels was still amongst the highest. Additionally, it was independent of oxygen availability, in contrast to that in E. coli.

  2. Altered circadian rhythm of the clock genes in fibrotic livers induced by carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Kakan, Xiamusiya; Zhang, Jianfa

    2010-04-16

    Disruption in circadian rhythms either by mutation in mice or by shiftwork in people, is associated with an increased risk for the development of multiple organ diseases. In turn, organ disease may influence the function of clock genes and peripheral circadian systems. Here we showed that hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in mice leads to alterations in the circadian rhythms of hepatic clock genes. Especially, we found an impaired daily Cry2 rhythm in the fibrotic livers, with markedly decreased levels during the day time while compared with control livers. Associatively, the expressions of two important clock-regulated genes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase lost circadian rhythm with significantly decreased levels during the light-dark (12/12h) cycle in fibrotic livers. PMID:20233594

  3. Mapping of aldose reductase gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, and 13

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, J.B.; Kojis, T. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA ); Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S.; Klisak, I.; Diep, A. ); Carper, D. ); Nishimura, Chihiro ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.21) (AR) catalyzes the reduction of several aldehydes, including that of glucose, to the corresponding sugar alcohol. Using a complementary DNA clone encoding human AR, the authors mapped the gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, and 18 by somatic cell hybridization. By in situ hybridization analysis, sequences were localized to human chromosomes 1q32-q43, 3p12, 7q31-q35, 9q22, 11p14-p15, and 13q14-q21. As a putative functional AR gene has been mapped to chromosome 7 and a putative pseudogene to chromosome 3, the sequences on the other seven chromosomes may represent other active genes, non-aldose reductase homologous sequences, or pseudogenes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    SciTech Connect

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela; Nebert, Daniel W.; Phillips, David H.; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Stiborova, Marie

    2012-12-15

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)—the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(−/−), Cyp1a2(−/−) and Cyp1a1/1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ► Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ► Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  5. Precorrin-6x reductase from Pseudomonas denitrificans: purification and characterization of the enzyme and identification of the structural gene.

    PubMed Central

    Blanche, F; Thibaut, D; Famechon, A; Debussche, L; Cameron, B; Crouzet, J

    1992-01-01

    Precorrin-6x reductase, which catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of precorrin-6x to a dihydro derivative named precorrin-6y, was purified 14,300-fold to homogeneity with an 8% yield from extracts of a recombinant strain of Pseudomonas denitrificans. Precorrin-6y was identified by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. It was converted in high yield (90%) to hydrogenobyrinic acid by cell-free protein preparations from P. denitrificans. For the purification and characterization of precorrin-6x reductase, a coupled-enzyme radioenzymatic assay was developed in which precorrin-6y was methylated in situ by the cobL gene product (F. Blanche, A. Famechon, D. Thibaut, L. Debussche, B. Cameron, J. Crouzet, J. Bacteriol. 174:1050-1052, 1992) in the presence of [methyl-3H]S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Molecular weights of precorrin-6x reductase obtained by gel filtration (Mr congruent to 27,000) and by analytical sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Mr congruent to 31,000) were consistent with the enzyme being a monomer. Km values of 3.6 +/- 0.2 microM for precorrin-6x and 23.5 +/- 3.5 microM for NADPH and a Vmax value of 17,000 U mg-1 were obtained at pH 7.7. The N-terminal sequence (six amino acids) and three internal sequences obtained after tryptic digestion of the enzyme were determined by microsequencing and established that precorrin-6x reductase is encoded by the cobK gene, located on a previously described 8.7-kb EcoRI fragment (J. Crouzet, B. Cameron, L. Cauchois, S. Rigault, M.-C. Rouyez, F. Blanche, D. Thibaut, and L. Debussche, J. Bacteriol. 172:5980-5990, 1990). However, the coding sequence was shown to be on the strand complementary to the one previously proposed as the coding strand. Images PMID:1732193

  6. Genes and gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, N.

    1988-01-01

    Genetics has long been a central topic for biologists, and recent progress has captured the public imagination as well. This book addresses questions that are at the leading edge of this continually advancing discipline. In tune with the increasing emphasis on molecular biology and genetic engineering, this text emphasizes the molecular aspects of gene expression, and the evolution of gene sequence organization and control. It reviews the genetic material of viruses, bacteria, and of higher organisms. Cells and organisms are compared in terms of gene numbers, their arrangements within a cell, and the control mechanisms which regulate the activity of genes.

  7. High-Level Chromate Resistance in Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 Requires Previously Uncharacterized Accessory Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Henne, Kristene L.; Nakatsu, Cindy N.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Konopka, Allan

    2009-09-24

    The annotated genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. strain FB24 revealed a chromate resistance determinant (CRD): a cluster of 8 genes located on a 10.6 kb fragment of a 96 kb plasmid. The CRD includes chrA, which encodes a putative chromate efflux protein, and three genes with amino acid similarities to the amino and carboxy termini of ChrB, a putative regulatory protein. There are also three novel genes that have not been previously associated with chromate resistance in other bacteria; they encode an oxidoreductase (most similar to malate:quinone oxidoreductase), a functionally unknown protein with a WD40 repeat domain and a lipoprotein. A chromate-sensitive mutant (strain D11) was generated by curing FB24 of its 96-kb plasmid. Elemental analysis indicated that chromate-exposed cells of strain D11 accumulated three times more chromium than strain FB24. Introduction of the CRD into strain D11 conferred chromate resistance comparable to wild-type levels, whereas deletion of specific regions of the CRD led to decreased resistance. Using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, we show that expression of each gene within the CRD is specifically induced in response to chromate but not by lead, hydrogen peroxide or arsenate. Higher levels of chrA expression were achieved when the chrB orthologs and the WD40 repeat domain genes were present, suggesting their regulatory roles. Collectively, our findings indicate that chromate resistance in strain FB24 is primarily achieved by plasmid-mediated chromate efflux with the contribution of previously unrecognized accessory genes.

  8. RNA-Seq analysis reveals a six-gene SoxR regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Nawar; Shapiro, Joshua A; Chander, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The redox-regulated transcription factor SoxR is conserved in diverse bacteria, but emerging studies suggest that this protein plays distinct physiological roles in different bacteria. SoxR regulates a global oxidative stress response (involving > 100 genes) against exogenous redox-cycling drugs in Escherichia coli and related enterics. In the antibiotic producers Streptomyces coelicolor and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, however, SoxR regulates a smaller number of genes that encode membrane transporters and proteins with homology to antibiotic-tailoring enzymes. In both S. coelicolor and P. aeruginosa, SoxR-regulated genes are expressed in stationary phase during the production of endogenously-produced redox-active antibiotics. These observations suggest that SoxR evolved to sense endogenous secondary metabolites and activate machinery to process and transport them in antibiotic-producing bacteria. Previous bioinformatics analysis that searched the genome for SoxR-binding sites in putative promoters defined a five-gene SoxR regulon in S. coelicolor including an ABC transporter, two oxidoreductases, a monooxygenase and an epimerase/dehydratase. Since this in silico screen may have missed potential SoxR-targets, we conducted a whole genome transcriptome comparison of wild type S. coelicolor and a soxR-deficient mutant in stationary phase using RNA-Seq. Our analysis revealed a sixth SoxR-regulated gene in S. coelicolor that encodes a putative quinone oxidoreductase. Knowledge of the full complement of genes regulated by SoxR will facilitate studies to elucidate the function of this regulatory molecule in antibiotic producers. PMID:25162599

  9. Differentially expressed genes in embryonic cardiac tissues of mice lacking Folr1 gene activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huiping; Cabrera, Robert M; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J; Bozinov, Daniel; Wang, Deli; Schwartz, Robert J; Finnell, Richard H

    2007-01-01

    Background Heart anomalies are the most frequently observed among all human congenital defects. As with the situation for neural tube defects (NTDs), it has been demonstrated that women who use multivitamins containing folic acid peri-conceptionally have a reduced risk for delivering offspring with conotruncal heart defects [1-3]. Cellular folate transport is mediated by a receptor or binding protein and by an anionic transporter protein system. Defective function of the Folr1 (also known as Folbp1; homologue of human FRα) gene in mice results in inadequate transport, accumulation, or metabolism of folate during cardiovascular morphogenesis. Results We have observed cardiovascular abnormalities including outflow tract and aortic arch arterial defects in genetically compromised Folr1 knockout mice. In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure to complete development of outflow tract and aortic arch arteries in the Folr1 knockout mouse model, we examined tissue-specific gene expression difference between Folr1 nullizygous embryos and morphologically normal heterozygous embryos during early cardiac development (14-somite stage), heart tube looping (28-somite stage), and outflow track septation (38-somite stage). Microarray analysis was performed as a primary screening, followed by investigation using quantitative real-time PCR assays. Gene ontology analysis highlighted the following ontology groups: cell migration, cell motility and localization of cells, structural constituent of cytoskeleton, cell-cell adhesion, oxidoreductase, protein folding and mRNA processing. This study provided preliminary data and suggested potential candidate genes for further description and investigation. Conclusion The results suggested that Folr1 gene ablation and abnormal folate homeostasis altered gene expression in developing heart and conotruncal tissues. These changes affected normal cytoskeleton structures, cell migration and motility as well as cellular

  10. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  11. Novel insights into structure–function mechanism and tissue-specific expression profiling of full-length dxr gene from Cymbopogon winterianus

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Kamalakshi; Dehury, Budheswar; Phukon, Munmi; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sen, Priyabrata

    2015-01-01

    The 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR; EC1.1.1.267), an NADPH-dependent reductase, plays a pivotal role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway (MEP), in the conversion of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) into MEP. The sheath and leaf of citronella (Cymbopogon winterianus) accumulates large amount of terpenes and sesquiterpenes with proven medicinal value and economic uses. Thus, sequencing of full length dxr gene and its characterization seems to be a valuable resource in metabolic engineering to alter the flux of isoprenoid active ingredients in plants. In this study, full length DXR from citronella was characterized through in silico and tissue-specific expression studies to explain its structure–function mechanism, mode of cofactor recognition and differential expression. The modelled DXR has a three-domain architecture and its active site comprised of a cofactor (NADPH) binding pocket and the substrate-binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulation studies indicated that DXR model retained most of its secondary structure during 10 ns simulation in aqueous solution. The modelled DXR superimposes well with its closest structural homolog but subtle variations in the charge distribution over the cofactor recognition site were noticed. Molecular docking study revealed critical residues aiding tight anchoring NADPH within the active pocket of DXR. Tissue-specific differential expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and qRT-PCR in various tissues of citronella plant revealed distinct differential expression of DXR. To our knowledge, this is the first ever report on DXR from the important medicinal plant citronella and further characterization of this gene will open up better avenues for metabolic engineering of secondary metabolite pathway genes from medicinal plants in the near future. PMID:25941629

  12. Structure-Based Computational Study of Two Disease Resistance Gene Homologues (Hm1 and Hm2) in Maize (Zea mays L.) with Implications in Plant-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Maharana, Jitendra; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Barooah, Madhumita

    2014-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent HC-toxin reductases (HCTR1 and 2) encoded by enzymatic class of disease resistance homologous genes (Hm1 and Hm2) protect maize by detoxifying a cyclic tetrapeptide, HC-toxin, secreted by the fungus Cochliobolus carbonum race 1(CCR1). Unlike the other classes' resistance (R) genes, HCTR-mediated disease resistance is an inimitable mechanism where the avirulence (Avr) component from CCR1 is not involved in toxin degradation. In this study, we attempted to decipher cofactor (NADPH) recognition and mode of HC-toxin binding to HCTRs through molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding free energy calculation methods. The rationality and the stability of docked complexes were validated by 30-ns MD simulation. The binding free energy decomposition of enzyme-cofactor complex was calculated to find the driving force behind cofactor recognition. The overall binding free energies of HCTR1-NADPH and HCTR2-NADPH were found to be −616.989 and −16.9749 kJ mol−1 respectively. The binding free energy decomposition revealed that the binding of NADPH to the HCTR1 is mainly governed by van der Waals and nonpolar interactions, whereas electrostatic terms play dominant role in stabilizing the binding mode between HCTR2 and NADPH. Further, docking analysis of HC-toxin with HCTR-NADPH complexes showed a distinct mode of binding and the complexes were stabilized by a strong network of hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. This study is the first in silico attempt to unravel the biophysical and biochemical basis of cofactor recognition in enzymatic class of R genes in cereal crop maize. PMID:24847713

  13. Strain differences in the responsiveness between Sprague-Dawley and Fischer rats to nephropathy induced by FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Naoki; Shimo, Takeo; Matsumoto, Koji; Oba, Kazuhiko; Nakazawa, Takashi; Nagata, Osamu

    2006-12-15

    To determine a rat strain appropriate for carcinogenicity testing of FYX-051, a xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, we performed a 4-week oral toxicity study by administering 0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg, and 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg of FYX-051 to male Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Fischer (F344) rats, respectively. Histopathology revealed that the degree of FYX-051-induced nephropathy was 3-fold stronger in SD rats than in F344 rats. Our previous study demonstrated that the key factor of species differences in FYX-051-induced nephropathy is purine metabolism. This observation led us to examine the involvement of purine metabolism in differences among two strains of rats. However, purine metabolism was proven not to be implicated as an important factor. Subsequently, other factors responsible for the strain differences were examined. FYX-051-induced increases in plasma xanthine concentrations were higher in SD rats than in F344 rats, suggesting more remarkable effects on pharmacodynamics in the former than the latter. Urinary volume was greater in F344 rats administered 10 mg/kg of FYX-051 (6.8 ml/h/kg) than in SD rats administered 3 mg/kg of FYX-051 (5.0 ml/h/kg), implying easier xanthine excretion in the former. Urinary xanthine solubility was 55 mg/dl in F344 rats aged 6 weeks, in contrast to 38 mg/dl in SD rats of the same age. Also, there were no significant differences in exposure levels at the same dose between SD and F344 rats. The outcomes of exposure levels and renal histopathology in both rats suggest the possibility that F344 rats could be exposed to a 3-fold higher amount of drug than SD rats in a carcinogenicity bioassay. The present study, therefore, suggested that strain differences of nephrotoxicity were caused by the combined effects of pharmacodynamics, xanthine excretion capacity, and urinary xanthine solubility. Furthermore, these results indicate that F344 rats would be a suitable strain for the carcinogenicity study of FYX-051. PMID:17084874

  14. Four structural subclasses of the antivirulence drug target disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA provide a platform for design of subclass-specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Róisín M; Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    By catalyzing oxidative protein folding, the bacterial disulfide bond protein A (DsbA) plays an essential role in the assembly of many virulence factors. Predictably, DsbA disruption affects multiple downstream effector molecules, resulting in pleiotropic effects on the virulence of important human pathogens. These findings mark DsbA as a master regulator of virulence, and identify the enzyme as a target for a new class of antivirulence agents that disarm pathogenic bacteria rather than killing them. The purpose of this article is to discuss and expand upon recent findings on DsbA and to provide additional novel insights into the druggability of this important disulfide oxidoreductase by comparing the structures and properties of 13 well-characterized DsbA enzymes. Our structural analysis involved comparison of the overall fold, the surface properties, the conformations of three loops contributing to the binding surface and the sequence identity of residues contributing to these loops. Two distinct structural classes were identified, classes I and II, which are differentiated by their central β-sheet arrangements and which roughly separate the DsbAs produced by Gram-negative from Gram-positive organisms. The classes can be further subdivided into a total of four subclasses on the basis of surface features. Class Ia is equivalent to the Enterobacteriaceae class that has been defined previously. Bioinformatic analyses support the classification of DsbAs into 3 of the 4 subclasses, but did not pick up the 4th subclass which is only apparent from analysis of DsbA electrostatic surface properties. In the context of inhibitor development, the discrete structural subclasses provide a platform for developing DsbA inhibitory scaffolds with a subclass-wide spectrum of activity. We expect that more DsbA classes are likely to be identified, as enzymes from other pathogens are explored, and we highlight the issues associated with structure-based inhibitor development targeting

  15. Pre-steady-state kinetic studies of redox reactions catalysed by Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase with NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxin.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daisuke; Soeta, Takahiro; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Sétif, Pierre; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase ([EC1.18.1.2], FNR) from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is a homodimeric flavoprotein sharing structural homology with bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the reactions of BsFNR with NADP(+), NADPH, NADPD (deuterated form) and B. subtilis ferredoxin (BsFd) using stopped-flow spectrophotometry were studied. Mixing BsFNR with NADP(+) and NADPH yielded two types of charge-transfer (CT) complexes, oxidized FNR (FNR(ox))-NADPH and reduced FNR (FNR(red))-NADP(+), both having CT absorption bands centered at approximately 600n m. After mixing BsFNR(ox) with about a 10-fold molar excess of NADPH (forward reaction), BsFNR was almost completely reduced at equilibrium. When BsFNR(red) was mixed with NADP(+), the amount of BsFNR(ox) increased with increasing NADP(+) concentration, but BsFNR(red) remained as the major species at equilibrium even with about 50-fold molar excess NADP(+). In both directions, the hydride-transfer was the rate-determining step, where the forward direction rate constant (~500 s(-1)) was much higher than the reverse one (<10 s(-1)). Mixing BsFd(red) with BsFNR(ox) induced rapid formation of a neutral semiquinone form. This process was almost completed within 1 ms. Subsequently the neutral semiquinone form was reduced to the hydroquinone form with an apparent rate constant of 50 to 70 s(-1) at 10°C, which increased as BsFd(red) increased from 40 to 120 μM. The reduction rate of BsFNR(ox) by BsFd(red) was markedly decreased by premixing BsFNR(ox) with BsFd(ox), indicating that the dissociation of BsFd(ox) from BsFNR(sq) is rate-limiting in the reaction. The characteristics of the BsFNR reactions with NADP(+)/NADPH were compared with those of other types of FNRs. PMID:26965753

  16. Classic and non-classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency can be discriminated from P450 oxidoreductase deficiency in Japanese infants by urinary steroid metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yuhei; Homma, Keiko; Fukami, Maki; Miwa, Masayuki; Ikeda, Kazushige; Ogata, Tsutomu; Murata, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We previously reported a two-step biochemical diagnosis to discriminate classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency (C21OHD) from P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) by using urinary steroid metabolites: the pregnanetriolone/tetrahydrocortisone ratio (Ptl / the cortisol metabolites 5α- and 5β-tetrahydrocortisone (sum of these metabolites termed THEs), and 11β-hydroxyandrosterone (11OHAn). The objective of this study was to investigate whether both C21OHD and non-classic 21OHD (C+NC21OHD) could be biochemically differentiated from PORD. We recruited 55 infants with C21OHD, 8 with NC21OHD, 16 with PORD, 57 with transient hyper-17α-hydroxyprogesteronemia (TH17OHP), and 2,473 controls. All infants were Japanese with ages between 0–180 d. In addition to Ptl, THEs, and 11OHAn, we measured urinary tetrahydroaldosterone (THAldo) and pregnenediol (PD5). The first step: by Ptl with the age-specific cutoffs 0.06 mg/g creatinine (0–10 d of age) and 0.3 mg/g creatinine (11–180 d of age), we were able to differentiate C+NC21OHD and PORD from TH17OHP and controls (0–10 d of age: 0.065–31 vs. < 0.001–0.052, 11–180 d of age: 0.40–42 vs. < 0.001–0.086) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The second step: by the 11OHAn/THAldo or 11OHAn/PD5 ratio with a cutoff of 0.80 or 1.0, we were able to discriminate between C+NC21OHD and PORD (1.0–720 vs. 0.021–0.61 or 1.8–160 vs. 0.005–0.32, respectively) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Ptl, 11OHAn/THAldo, and 11OHAn/PD5 could differentiate between C+NC21OHD and PORD in Japanese infants. PMID:27212795

  17. Two EPR-detectable [4Fe-4S] clusters, N2a and N2b, are bound to the NuoI (TYKY) subunit of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Chevallet, Mireille; Dupuis, Alain; Issartel, Jean-Paul; Lunardi, Joël; van Belzen, Ronald; Albracht, Simon P J

    2003-03-01

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases (Complex I) contain a subunit, TYKY in the bovine enzyme and NuoI in the enzyme from Rhodobacter capsulatus, which is assumed to bind two [4Fe-4S] clusters because it contains two sets of conserved cysteine motifs similar to those found in the 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins. It was recently shown that the TYKY subunit is not an ordinary 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin, but has a unique amino acid sequence, which is only found in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductases and certain membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenases expected to be involved in redox-linked proton translocation [FEBS Lett. 485 (2000) 1]. We have generated a set of R. capsulatus mutants in which five out of the eight conserved cysteine residues in NuoI were replaced by other amino acids. The resulting mutants fell into three categories with virtually no, intermediate or quite normal Complex I activities. EPR-spectroscopic analysis of the membranes of the C67S and C106S mutants, two mutants belonging to the second and third group, respectively, showed a specific 50% decrease of the EPR signal attributed to cluster N2. It is concluded that the NuoI (TYKY) subunit binds two clusters N2, called N2a and N2b, which exhibit very similar spectral features when analyzed by X-band EPR spectroscopy. PMID:12615348

  18. Cofactor regeneration at the lab scale.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, R; Vasic-Racki, D

    2005-01-01

    Progress made in lab-scale applications of various coenzyme regeneration systems over the last two decades has mainly focused on the applications of NAD+/NADH- and NADP+/NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase reactions. In situ regeneration systems for these reactions, as well as whole cell, enzymatic, electro-enzymatic, chemical, and photochemical reactions are presented, including details about their efficiency and novelty. The progress of enzyme reaction engineering is also reported. PMID:15791939

  19. Identification and Characterization of Catabolic para-Nitrophenol 4-Monooxygenase and para-Benzoquinone Reductase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain WBC-3▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Hong; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Xian-En; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain WBC-3 utilizes para-nitrophenol (PNP) as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. In order to identify the genes involved in this utilization, we cloned and sequenced a 12.7-kb fragment containing a conserved region of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase genes. Of the products of the 13 open reading frames deduced from this fragment, PnpA shares 24% identity to the large component of a 3-hydroxyphenylacetate hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida U and PnpB is 58% identical to an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli. Both PnpA and PnpB were purified to homogeneity as His-tagged proteins, and they were considered to be a monomer and a dimer, respectively, as determined by gel filtration. PnpA is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent single-component PNP 4-monooxygenase that converts PNP to para-benzoquinone in the presence of NADPH. PnpB is a flavin mononucleotide-and NADPH-dependent p-benzoquinone reductase that catalyzes the reduction of p-benzoquinone to hydroquinone. PnpB could enhance PnpA activity, and genetic analyses indicated that both pnpA and pnpB play essential roles in PNP mineralization in strain WBC-3. Furthermore, the pnpCDEF gene cluster next to pnpAB shares significant similarities with and has the same organization as a gene cluster responsible for hydroquinone degradation (hapCDEF) in Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB (M. J. Moonen, N. M. Kamerbeek, A. H. Westphal, S. A. Boeren, D. B. Janssen, M. W. Fraaije, and W. J. van Berkel, J. Bacteriol. 190:5190-5198, 2008), suggesting that the genes involved in PNP degradation are physically linked. PMID:19218392

  20. Bioinformatics Prediction of Polyketide Synthase Gene Clusters from Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    PubMed

    Noar, Roslyn D; Daub, Margaret E

    2016-01-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of black Sigatoka disease of banana, is a Dothideomycete fungus closely related to fungi that produce polyketides important for plant pathogenicity. We utilized the M. fijiensis genome sequence to predict PKS genes and their gene clusters and make bioinformatics predictions about the types of compounds produced by these clusters. Eight PKS gene clusters were identified in the M. fijiensis genome, placing M. fijiensis into the 23rd percentile for the number of PKS genes compared to other Dothideomycetes. Analysis of the PKS domains identified three of the PKS enzymes as non-reducing and two as highly reducing. Gene clusters contained types of genes frequently found in PKS clusters including genes encoding transporters, oxidoreductases, methyltransferases, and non-ribosomal peptide synthases. Phylogenetic analysis identified a putative PKS cluster encoding melanin biosynthesis. None of the other clusters were closely aligned with genes encoding known polyketides, however three of the PKS genes fell into clades with clusters encoding alternapyrone, fumonisin, and solanapyrone produced by Alternaria and Fusarium species. A search for homologs among available genomic sequences from 103 Dothideomycetes identified close homologs (>80% similarity) for six of the PKS sequences. One of the PKS sequences was not similar (< 60% similarity) to sequences in any of the 103 genomes, suggesting that it encodes a unique compound. Comparison of the M. fijiensis PKS sequences with those of two other banana pathogens, M. musicola and M. eumusae, showed that these two species have close homologs to five of the M. fijiensis PKS sequences, but three others were not found in either species. RT-PCR and RNA-Seq analysis showed that the melanin PKS cluster was down-regulated in infected banana as compared to growth in culture. Three other clusters, however were strongly upregulated during disease development in banana, suggesting that they may encode

  1. Bioinformatics Prediction of Polyketide Synthase Gene Clusters from Mycosphaerella fijiensis

    PubMed Central

    Noar, Roslyn D.; Daub, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis, causal agent of black Sigatoka disease of banana, is a Dothideomycete fungus closely related to fungi that produce polyketides important for plant pathogenicity. We utilized the M. fijiensis genome sequence to predict PKS genes and their gene clusters and make bioinformatics predictions about the types of compounds produced by these clusters. Eight PKS gene clusters were identified in the M. fijiensis genome, placing M. fijiensis into the 23rd percentile for the number of PKS genes compared to other Dothideomycetes. Analysis of the PKS domains identified three of the PKS enzymes as non-reducing and two as highly reducing. Gene clusters contained types of genes frequently found in PKS clusters including genes encoding transporters, oxidoreductases, methyltransferases, and non-ribosomal peptide synthases. Phylogenetic analysis identified a putative PKS cluster encoding melanin biosynthesis. None of the other clusters were closely aligned with genes encoding known polyketides, however three of the PKS genes fell into clades with clusters encoding alternapyrone, fumonisin, and solanapyrone produced by Alternaria and Fusarium species. A search for homologs among available genomic sequences from 103 Dothideomycetes identified close homologs (>80% similarity) for six of the PKS sequences. One of the PKS sequences was not similar (< 60% similarity) to sequences in any of the 103 genomes, suggesting that it encodes a unique compound. Comparison of the M. fijiensis PKS sequences with those of two other banana pathogens, M. musicola and M. eumusae, showed that these two species have close homologs to five of the M. fijiensis PKS sequences, but three others were not found in either species. RT-PCR and RNA-Seq analysis showed that the melanin PKS cluster was down-regulated in infected banana as compared to growth in culture. Three other clusters, however were strongly upregulated during disease development in banana, suggesting that they may encode

  2. Cloning and characterization of the nucleoredoxin gene that encodes a novel nuclear protein related to thioredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kurooka, Hisanori; Kato, Keizo; Minoguchi, Shigeru

    1997-02-01

    In a yeast artificial chromosome contig close to the nude locus on mouse chromosome 11, we identified a novel gene, nucleoredoxin, that encodes a protein with similarity to the active site of thioredoxins. Nucleoredoxin is conserved between mammalian species, and two homologous genes were found in Caenorhabditis elegans. The nucleoredoxin transcripts are expressed in all adult tissues examined, but restricted to the nervous system and the limb buds in Day 10.5-11.5 embryos. The nucleoredoxin protein is predominantly localized in the nucleus of cells transfected with the nucleoredoxin expression construct. Since the bacterially expressed protein of nucleoredoxin showed oxidoreductase activity of the insulin disulfide bonds with kinetics similar to that of thioredoxin, it may be a redox regulator of the nuclear proteins, such as transcription factors. 40 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Expression of an isoflavone reductase-like gene enhanced by pollen tube growth in pistils of Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    van Eldik, G J; Ruiter, R K; Colla, P H; van Herpen, M M; Schrauwen, J A; Wullems, G J

    1997-03-01

    Successful sexual reproduction relies on gene products delivered by the pistil to create an environment suitable for pollen tube growth. These compounds are either produced before pollination or formed during the interactions between pistil and pollen tubes. Here we describe the pollination-enhanced expression of the cp100 gene in pistils of Solanum tuberosum. Temporal analysis of gene expression revealed an enhanced expression already one hour after pollination and lasts more than 72 h. Increase in expression also occurred after touching the stigma and was not restricted to the site of touch but spread into the style. The predicted CP100 protein shows similarity to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but belongs to a family of IFR-like NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases present in various plant species. PMID:9106515

  4. Identification and expression analysis of multiple FRO gene copies in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Del C Orozco-Mosqueda, Ma; Santoyo, G; Farías-Rodríguez, R; Macías-Rodríguez, L; Valencia-Cantero, E

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant growth. Commonly, this element is found in an oxidized form in soil, which is poorly available for plants. Therefore, plants have evolved ferric-chelate reductase enzymes (FRO) to reduce iron into a more soluble ferrous form. Fe scarcity in plants induce the FRO enzyme activity. Although the legume Medicago truncatula has been employed as a model for FRO activity studies, only one copy of the M. truncatula MtFRO1 gene has been characterized so far. In this study, we identified multiple gene copies of the MtFRO gene in the genome of M. truncatula by an in silico search, using BLAST analysis in the database of the M. truncatula Genome Sequencing Project and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, and also determined whether they are functional. We identified five genes apart from MtFRO1, which had been already characterized. All of the MtFRO genes exhibited high identity with homologous FRO genes from Lycopersicon esculentum, Citrus junos and Arabidopsis thaliana. The gene copies also presented characteristic conserved FAD and NADPH motifs, transmembrane regions and oxidoreductase signature motifs. We also detected expression in five of the putative MtFRO sequences by semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis, performed with mRNA from root and shoot tissues. Iron scarcity might be a condition for an elevated expression of the MtFRO genes observed in different M. truncatula tissues. PMID:23096909

  5. H2S exposure elicits differential expression of candidate genes in fish adapted to sulfidic and non-sulfidic environments.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Michael; Henpita, Chathurika; Bassett, Brandon; Kelley, Joanna L; Shaw, Jennifer H

    2014-09-01

    Disentangling the effects of plasticity, genetic variation, and their interactions on organismal responses to environmental stressors is a key objective in ecological physiology. We quantified the expression of five candidate genes in response to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure in fish (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) from a naturally sulfide-rich environment as well as an ancestral, non-sulfidic population to test for constitutive and environmentally dependent population differences in gene expression patterns. Common garden raised individuals that had never encountered environmental H2S during their lifetime were subjected to short or long term H2S exposure treatments or respective non-sulfidic controls. The expression of genes involved in responses to H2S toxicity (cytochrome c oxidase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and cytochrome P450-2J6), H2S detoxification (sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase), and endogenous H2S production (cystathionine γ lyase) was determined in both gill and liver tissues by real time PCR. The results indicated complex changes in expression patterns that--depending on the gene--not only differed between organs and populations, but also on the type of H2S exposure. Populations differences, both constitutive and H2S exposure dependent (i.e., plastic), in gene expression were particularly evident for sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and to a lesser degree for cytochrome P450-2J6. Our study uncovered putatively adaptive modifications in gene regulation that parallel previously documented adaptive changes in phenotypic traits. PMID:24813672

  6. Isolation and characterization of the human tyrosine hydroxylase gene: identification of 5' alternative splice sites responsible for multiple mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, K.L.; Anhalt, M.J.; Martin, B.M.; Kelsoe, J.R.; Winfield, S.L.; Ginns, E.I.

    1987-11-03

    A full-length genomic clone for human tyrosine hydroxylase (L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.16.2) has been isolated. A human brain genomic library constructed in EMBL3 was screened by using a rat cDNA for tyrosine hydroxylase as a probe. Out of one million recombinant phage, one clone was identified that hybridized to both 5' and 3' rat cDNA probes. Restriction endonuclease mapping, Southern blotting, and sequence analysis revealed that, like its rodent counterpart, the human gene is single copy, contains 13 primary exons, and spans approximately 8 kilobases (kb). In contrast to the rat gene, human tyrosine hydroxylase undergoes alternative RNA processing within intron 1, generating at least three distinct mRNAs. A comparison of the human tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylalanine hydroxylase genes indicates that although both probably evolved from a common ancestral gene, major changes in the size of introns have occurred since their divergence.

  7. Purification, Characterization, and Potential Bacterial Wax Production Role of an NADPH-Dependent Fatty Aldehyde Reductase from Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wahlen, Bradley D.; Oswald, Whitney S.; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Barney, Brett M.

    2009-01-01

    Wax esters, ester-linked fatty acids and long-chain alcohols, are important energy storage compounds in select bacteria. The synthesis of wax esters from fatty acids is proposed to require the action of a four-enzyme pathway. An essential step in the pathway is the reduction of a fatty aldehyde to the corresponding fatty alcohol, although the enzyme responsible for catalyzing this reaction has yet to be identified in bacteria. We report here the purification and characterization of an enzyme from the wax ester-accumulating bacterium Marinobacter aquaeolei VT8, which is a proposed fatty aldehyde reductase in this pathway. The enzyme, a 57-kDa monomer, was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with the maltose binding protein on the N terminus and was purified to near homogeneity by using amylose affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme was found to reduce a number of long-chain aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols coupled to the oxidation of NADPH. The highest specific activity was observed for the reduction of decanal (85 nmol decanal reduced/min/mg). Short-chain and aromatic aldehydes were not substrates. The enzyme showed no detectable catalysis of the reverse reaction, the oxidation of decanol by NADP+. The mechanism of the enzyme was probed with several site-specific chemical probes. The possible uses of this enzyme in the production of wax esters are discussed. PMID:19270127

  8. Discovery of