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Sample records for najd fault system

  1. The Najd Fault System of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt; Kadi, Khalid; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Hassan, Mahmoud

    2014-05-01

    The Najd Fault System of the Arabian-Nubian Shield is considered to be the largest Proterozoic Shear zone system on Earth. The shear zone was active during the late stages of the Pan African evolution and is known to be responsible for the exhumation of fragments of juvenile Proterozoic continental crust that form a series of basement domes across the shield areas of Egypt and Saudi Arabia. A three year research project funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) and supported by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) has focused on structural mapping, petrology and geochronology of the shear zone system in order to constrain age and mechanisms of exhumation of the domes - with focus on the Saudi Arabian side of the Red Sea. We recognise important differences in comparison with the basement domes in the Eastern desert of Egypt. In particular, high grade metamorphic rocks are not exclusively confined to basement domes surrounded by shear zones, but also occur within shear zones themselves. Moreover, we recognise both exhumation in extensional and in transpressive regimes to be responsible for exhumation of high grade metamorphic rocks in different parts of the shield. We suggest that these apparent structural differences between different sub-regions of the shield largely reflect different timing of activity of various branches of the Najd Fault System. In order to tackle the ill-resolved timing of the Najd Fault System, zircon geochronology is performed on intrusive rocks with different cross cutting relationships to the shear zone. We are able to constrain an age between 580 Ma and 605 Ma for one of the major branches of the shear zone, namely the Ajjaj shear zone. In our contribution we present a strain map for the shield as well as early geochronological data for selected shear zone branches.

  2. Evidence for Phanerozoic reactivation of the Najd Fault System in AVHRR, TM, and SPOT images of central Arabia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Constance G.

    1989-01-01

    SPOT stereoscopic and TM multispectral images support evidence in AVHRR thermal-IR images of a major unmapped shear zone in Phanerozoic cover rocks southeast of the ancient Najd Fault System in the Arabian Shield. This shear zone and faults of the Najd share a common alignment, orientation, and sinistral sense of movement. These similarities suggest a 200-km extension of the Najd Fault System and reactivation since it formed in the late Precambrian. Topographic and lithologic features in the TM and SPOT data along one of three faults inferred from the AVHRR data indicate sinistral offsets up to 2.5 km, en echelon folds and secondary faults like those predicted by models of left-lateral strike-slip faulting. The age of the affected outcrops indicates reactivation of Najd faults in the Cretaceous, judging from TM and SPOT data or in the Tertiary, based on AVHRR data. The total length of the system visible at the surface measures 1300 km. If the Najd Fault System is extrapolated beneath sands of the Empty Quarter to faults of a similar trend in South Yemen, the shear zone would span the Arabian Plate. Furthermore, if extensions into the Arabian Sea bed and into Egypt proposed by others are considered, it would exceed 3000 km.

  3. Strike-slip accommodated core complexes in the Najd fault system, Arabian-Nubian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, S. E.; Passchier, C. W.; Abu-Alam, T. S.; Stuewe, K.

    2013-12-01

    Metamorphic core complexes are usually developed as extensional features during crustal thinning in a continental collision zone, such as the Basin and Range and the Aegean Terrane. The Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia is a 2000 km-long and 400 km-wide complex network of crustal-scale strike-slip shear zones in a Neoproterozoic collision zone. Locally, the anastomosing shear zones lead to exhumation of lower crustal segments and represent a new kinematic model for the development of core complexes. We report on two such dome structures: the Qazaz complex in Saudi Arabia and the Hafafit complex in Egypt. The 15-km-wide Qazaz complex is a triangular dome of gently dipping mylonitic foliations within the 140-km-long sinistral strike-slip Qazaz mylonite zone. The gneissic dome consists of high-grade rocks, surrounded by low-grade metasediments and metavolcanics. The main SE trending strike-slip Qazaz shear zone splits southwards into two branches around the gneiss dome: the western branch is continuous with the shallow dipping mylonites of the dome core, without overprinting, and curves by more than 90 degrees eastwards from a NS trending strike slip zone to an EW trending 40 degree south dipping detachment that bounds the gneiss dome to the south. The eastern SE trending sinistral strike slip shear zone branch is slightly younger and transects the central dome fabrics. The gneiss dome appears to have formed along a jog in the strike slip shear zone during 40 km of strike slip motion, which caused local exhumation of lower crustal rocks by 25 km along the detachment. The eastern shear zone branch formed late during exhumation, transacted the gneiss dome and offset the two parts by another 70 km. The Hafafit core complex in Egypt is of similar shape and size to the Qazaz structure, but forms the northern termination of a sinistral strike-slip zone that is at least 100 km in length. This zone may continue into Saudi Arabia as the Ajjaj shear zone for another 100 km. The

  4. Magnetic fabrics and Pan-African structural evolution in the Najd Fault corridor in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeen, Mamdouh M.; Greiling, Reinhard O.; Sadek, Mohamed F.; Hamad, Sayed S.

    2014-11-01

    In order to assess the Pan-African structural evolution from early orogenic fabrics through Najd wrenching to the latest orogenic collapse/extension, the authors used field work, aided by aerial photographs and satellite images. This work is complemented by the study of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS, or magnetic fabric). The Pan-African rock associations of the Um Gheig-Kadabora area can be divided into a lower tier composed mainly of amphibolite-migmatite and granitoid gneisses, and an upper tier of ophiolitic rocks, metavolcanics and their related volcaniclastics, and molasse-type Hammamat sediments. Both these units are intruded by late orogenic granitoid plutons and dykes. The lower tier is exposed in a domal structure in the El Sibai area, the upper tier forms a series of weakly to highly deformed thrust units, called Pan-African Nappes here, which are dissected by high strain shear zones. According to their age, these rock units are divided here into early and late-orogenic. The early orogenic rock association is characterized by medium-high metamorphic grades. The late orogenic rock association is characterized by low metamorphic grade. The rocks in the upper tier form a series of low angle thrust sheets, which are bounded by NW-striking high angle shear zones related to the Najd Fault System. The early orogenic rocks show a polyphase structural evolution with early folds, thrusts, and strike-slip shear zones. The late orogenic rocks show a relatively weaker deformation. The latest intrusives studied here are the dykes dissecting the late orogenic Kadabora granite. In the present work magnetic fabric data document the deformational features in detail and assess the role of the Najd Fault System in the deformational evolution. A strong variation in volume susceptibility of various rocks, due to their variations in mineral composition, is observed. Lower values are in the range of 10-6 SI units for late-orogenic alkaline granite and the

  5. An aeromagnetic interpretation of eleven map sheets, scale 1:250,000, in the southern Najd and part of the southern Tuwayq quadrangles, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griscom, Andrew

    1983-01-01

    Eleven magnetic interpretation maps (scale 1:250,000) have been prepared for the area .of. exposed crystalline rocks in the Southern Najd and part of the Southern Tuwayq quadrangles (scale 1:500,000) from available published data. Boundaries of a variety of rock units that produce distinctive magnetic anomalies .or anomaly patterns are delineated. In some cases these magnetic boundaries correspond with previously mapped geologic contacts, and in other cases they indicate the possibility of additional, as yet unmapped, geologic contacts. The magnetic boundaries also allow the extrapolation of geologic contacts across areas covered by Quaternary deposits. Many boundaries are identified as part of the Najd fault system, and offset magnetic anomalies may be correlated across certain fault zones. Approximate dips were calculated for a few boundaries that represent igneous contacts, faults, or unconformities. Some characteristic anomalies appear to be associated in a general way with areas of gold mineralization and thus provide a guide for further prospecting.

  6. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  7. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Pruett, Jr., James C.

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  8. Zipper Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Passchier, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Intersecting simultaneously active pairs of faults with different orientations and opposing slip sense ("conjugate faults") present geometrical and kinematic problems. Such faults rarely offset each other, even when they have displacements of many km. A simple solution to the problem is that the two faults merge, either zippering up or unzippering, depending on the relationship between the angle of intersection and the slip senses. A widely recognized example of this is the so-called blind front developed in some thrust belts, where a backthrust branches off a decollement surface at depth. The decollement progressively unzippers, so that its hanging wall becomes the hanging wall of the backthrust, and its footwall becomes the footwall of the active decollement. The opposite situation commonly arises in core complexes, where conjugate low-angle normal faults merge to form a single detachment; in this case the two faults zipper up. Analogous situations may arise for conjugate pairs of strike-slip faults. We present kinematic and geometrical analyses of the Garlock and San Andreas faults in California, the Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia, the North and East Anatolian faults, the Karakoram and Altyn Tagh faults in Tibet, and the Tonale and Guidicarie faults in the southern Alps, all of which appear to have undergone zippering over distances of several tens to hundreds of km. The zippering process may produce complex and significant patterns of strain and rotation in the surrounding rocks, particularly if the angle between the zippered faults is large. A zippering fault may be inactive during active movement on the intersecting faults, or it may have a slip rate that differs from either fault. Intersecting conjugate ductile shear zones behave in the same way on outcrop and micro-scales.

  9. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  10. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  11. Fault management for data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    1993-01-01

    Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

  12. Late Proterozoic transpression on the Nabitah fault system-implications for the assembly of the Arabian Shield

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quick, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The longest proposed suture zone in Saudi Arabia, the Nabitah suture, can be traced as a string of ophiolite complexes for 1200 km along the north-south axis of the Arabian Shield. Results of a field study in the north-central shield between 23?? and 26??N indicate that the Nabitah suture is indeed a major crustal discontinuity across which hundreds of kilometers of displacement may have occurred on north-south trending, subvertical faults of the Nabitah fault system. Although not a unique solution, many structures within and near these faults can be reconciled with transpression, i.e., convergent strike-slip, and syntectonic emplacement of calc-alkaline plutonic rocks. Transcurrent motion on the Nabitah fault system appears to have began prior to 710 Ma, was active circa 680 Ma, and terminated prior to significant left-lateral, strike slip on the Najd fault system, which began sometime after 650 Ma. Northwest-directed subduction in the eastern shield could have produced the observed association of calc-alkaline magmatism and left-lateral transpressive strike slip, and is consistent with interpretation of the Abt schist and sedimentary rocks of the Murdama group as relics of the associated accretionary wedge and fore-arc basin. ?? 1991.

  13. Fault diagnosis of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Y. ); Akimoto, Y. ); Kunugi, M. )

    1992-05-01

    Fault diagnosis of power systems plays a crucial role in power system monitoring and control that ensures stable supply of electrical power to consumers. In the case of multiple faults or incorrect operation of protective devices, fault diagnosis requires judgment of complex conditions at various levels. For this reason, research into application of knowledge-based systems go an early start and reports of such systems have appeared in may papers. In this paper, these systems are classified by the method of inference utilized in the knowledge-based systems for fault diagnosis of power systems. The characteristics of each class and corresponding issues as well as the state-of-the-art techniques for improving their performance are presented. Additional topics covered are user interfaces, interfaces with energy management systems (EMS's), and expert system development tools for fault diagnosis. Results and evaluation of actual operation in the field are also discussed. Knowledge-based fault diagnosis of power systems will continue to disseminate.

  14. Subaru FATS (fault tracking system)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winegar, Tom W.; Noumaru, Junichi

    2000-07-01

    The Subaru Telescope requires a fault tracking system to record the problems and questions that staff experience during their work, and the solutions provided by technical experts to these problems and questions. The system records each fault and routes it to a pre-selected 'solution-provider' for each type of fault. The solution provider analyzes the fault and writes a solution that is routed back to the fault reporter and recorded in a 'knowledge-base' for future reference. The specifications of our fault tracking system were unique. (1) Dual language capacity -- Our staff speak both English and Japanese. Our contractors speak Japanese. (2) Heterogeneous computers -- Our computer workstations are a mixture of SPARCstations, Macintosh and Windows computers. (3) Integration with prime contractors -- Mitsubishi and Fujitsu are primary contractors in the construction of the telescope. In many cases, our 'experts' are our contractors. (4) Operator scheduling -- Our operators spend 50% of their work-month operating the telescope, the other 50% is spent working day shift at the base facility in Hilo, or day shift at the summit. We plan for 8 operators, with a frequent rotation. We need to keep all operators informed on the current status of all faults, no matter the operator's location.

  15. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  16. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  17. Row fault detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  18. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  19. Nonlinear Network Dynamics on Earthquake Fault Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, Paul B.; Rundle, John B.; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Sa Martins, Jorge S.; McGinnis, Seth; Klein, W.

    2001-10-01

    Earthquake faults occur in interacting networks having emergent space-time modes of behavior not displayed by isolated faults. Using simulations of the major faults in southern California, we find that the physics depends on the elastic interactions among the faults defined by network topology, as well as on the nonlinear physics of stress dissipation arising from friction on the faults. Our results have broad applications to other leaky threshold systems such as integrate-and-fire neural networks.

  20. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Iverson, David

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modern technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  1. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modem technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  2. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  3. Managing Space System Faults: Coalescing NASA's Views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muirhead, Brian; Fesq, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Managing faults and their resultant failures is a fundamental and critical part of developing and operating aerospace systems. Yet, recent studies have shown that the engineering "discipline" required to manage faults is not widely recognized nor evenly practiced within the NASA community. Attempts to simply name this discipline in recent years has been fraught with controversy among members of the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM), Fault Management (FM), Fault Protection (FP), Hazard Analysis (HA), and Aborts communities. Approaches to managing space system faults typically are unique to each organization, with little commonality in the architectures, processes and practices across the industry.

  4. Reconfigurable fault tolerant avionics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, M. M.; Asami, K.; Cho, Mengu

    This paper presents the design of a reconfigurable avionics system based on modern Static Random Access Memory (SRAM)-based Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to be used in future generations of nano satellites. A major concern in satellite systems and especially nano satellites is to build robust systems with low-power consumption profiles. The system is designed to be flexible by providing the capability of reconfiguring itself based on its orbital position. As Single Event Upsets (SEU) do not have the same severity and intensity in all orbital locations, having the maximum at the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and the polar cusps, the system does not have to be fully protected all the time in its orbit. An acceptable level of protection against high-energy cosmic rays and charged particles roaming in space is provided within the majority of the orbit through software fault tolerance. Check pointing and roll back, besides control flow assertions, is used for that level of protection. In the minority part of the orbit where severe SEUs are expected to exist, a reconfiguration for the system FPGA is initiated where the processor systems are triplicated and protection through Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) with feedback is provided. This technique of reconfiguring the system as per the level of the threat expected from SEU-induced faults helps in reducing the average dynamic power consumption of the system to one-third of its maximum. This technique can be viewed as a smart protection through system reconfiguration. The system is built on the commercial version of the (XC5VLX50) Xilinx Virtex5 FPGA on bulk silicon with 324 IO. Simulations of orbit SEU rates were carried out using the SPENVIS web-based software package.

  5. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakeri, M.; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Raghavan, V.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Iverson, David L.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the problem of sequencing tests to isolate multiple faults in redundant (fault-tolerant) systems with minimum expected testing cost (time). It can be shown that single faults and minimal faults, i.e., minimum number of failures with a failure signature different from the union of failure signatures of individual failures, together with their failure signatures, constitute the necessary information for fault diagnosis in redundant systems. In this paper, we develop an algorithm to find all the minimal faults and their failure signatures. Then, we extend the Sure diagnostic strategies [1] of our previous work to diagnose multiple faults in redundant systems. The proposed algorithms and strategies are illustrated using several examples.

  6. Performance Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine

    2005-01-01

    In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. In this paper, an FTC analysis framework is provided to calculate the upper bound of an induced-L(sub 2) norm of an FTC system with existence of false identification and detection time delay. The upper bound is written as a function of a fault detection time and exponential decay rates and has been used to determine which FTC law produces less performance degradation (tracking error) due to false identification. The analysis framework is applied for an FTC system of a HiMAT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle. Index Terms fault tolerant control system, linear parameter varying system, HiMAT vehicle.

  7. A new intelligent hierarchical fault diagnosis system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.C.; Huang, C.L.; Yang, H.T.

    1997-02-01

    As a part of a substation-level decision support system, a new intelligent Hierarchical Fault Diagnosis System for on-line fault diagnosis is presented in this paper. The proposed diagnosis system divides the fault diagnosis process into two phases. Using time-stamped information of relays and breakers, phase 1 identifies the possible fault sections through the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) networks, and phase 2 recognizes the types and detailed situations of the faults identified in phase 1 by using a fast bit-operation logical inference mechanism. The diagnosis system has been practically verified by testing on a typical Taiwan power secondary transmission system. Test results show that rapid and accurate diagnosis can be obtained with flexibility and portability for fault diagnosis purpose of diverse substations.

  8. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  9. Fault-tolerant processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A fault-tolerant, fiber optic interconnect, or backplane, which serves as a via for data transfer between modules. Fault tolerance algorithms are embedded in the backplane by dividing the backplane into a read bus and a write bus and placing a redundancy management unit (RMU) between the read bus and the write bus so that all data transmitted by the write bus is subjected to the fault tolerance algorithms before the data is passed for distribution to the read bus. The RMU provides both backplane control and fault tolerance.

  10. Fault system polarity: A matter of chance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöpfer, Martin; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Walsh, John; Nicol, Andy; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Many normal fault systems and, on a smaller scale, fracture boudinage exhibit asymmetry so that one fault dip direction dominates. The fraction of throw (or heave) accommodated by faults with the same dip direction in relation to the total fault system throw (or heave) is a quantitative measure of fault system asymmetry and termed 'polarity'. It is a common belief that the formation of domino and shear band boudinage with a monoclinic symmetry requires a component of layer parallel shearing, whereas torn boudins reflect coaxial flow. Moreover, domains of parallel faults are frequently used to infer the presence of a common décollement. Here we show, using Distinct Element Method (DEM) models in which rock is represented by an assemblage of bonded circular particles, that asymmetric fault systems can emerge under symmetric boundary conditions. The pre-requisite for the development of domains of parallel faults is however that the medium surrounding the brittle layer has a very low strength. We demonstrate that, if the 'competence' contrast between the brittle layer and the surrounding material ('jacket', or 'matrix') is high, the fault dip directions and hence fault system polarity can be explained using a random process. The results imply that domains of parallel faults are, for the conditions and properties used in our models, in fact a matter of chance. Our models suggest that domino and shear band boudinage can be an unreliable shear-sense indicator. Moreover, the presence of a décollement should not be inferred on the basis of a domain of parallel faults only.

  11. Fault analysis of multichannel spacecraft power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Lollar, Louis F.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center proposes to implement computer-controlled fault injection into an electrical power system breadboard to study the reactions of the various control elements of this breadboard. Elements under study include the remote power controllers, the algorithms in the control computers, and the artificially intelligent control programs resident in this breadboard. To this end, a study of electrical power system faults is being performed to yield a list of the most common power system faults. The results of this study will be applied to a multichannel high-voltage DC spacecraft power system called the large autonomous spacecraft electrical power system (LASEPS) breadboard. The results of the power system fault study and the planned implementation of these faults into the LASEPS breadboard are described.

  12. An aircraft sensor fault tolerant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Lancraft, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a sensor fault tolerant system which uses analytical redundancy for the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) research aircraft in a Microwave Landing System (MLS) environment was studied. The fault tolerant system provides reliable estimates for aircraft position, velocity, and attitude in the presence of possible failures in navigation aid instruments and onboard sensors. The estimates, provided by the fault tolerant system, are used by the automated guidance and control system to land the aircraft along a prescribed path. Sensor failures are identified by utilizing the analytic relationship between the various sensor outputs arising from the aircraft equations of motion.

  13. Intermittent/transient faults in digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. M.; Glazer, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Containment set techniques are applied to 8085 microprocessor controllers so as to transform a typical control system into a slightly modified version, shown to be crashproof: after the departure of the intermittent/transient fault, return to one proper control algorithm is assured, assuming no permanent faults occur.

  14. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  15. Software fault tolerance in computer operating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Lee, Inhwan

    1994-01-01

    This chapter provides data and analysis of the dependability and fault tolerance for three operating systems: the Tandem/GUARDIAN fault-tolerant system, the VAX/VMS distributed system, and the IBM/MVS system. Based on measurements from these systems, basic software error characteristics are investigated. Fault tolerance in operating systems resulting from the use of process pairs and recovery routines is evaluated. Two levels of models are developed to analyze error and recovery processes inside an operating system and interactions among multiple instances of an operating system running in a distributed environment. The measurements show that the use of process pairs in Tandem systems, which was originally intended for tolerating hardware faults, allows the system to tolerate about 70% of defects in system software that result in processor failures. The loose coupling between processors which results in the backup execution (the processor state and the sequence of events occurring) being different from the original execution is a major reason for the measured software fault tolerance. The IBM/MVS system fault tolerance almost doubles when recovery routines are provided, in comparison to the case in which no recovery routines are available. However, even when recovery routines are provided, there is almost a 50% chance of system failure when critical system jobs are involved.

  16. Testing Distributed ABS System with Fault Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trawczyński, Dawid; Sosnowski, Janusz; Gawkowski, Piotr

    The paper deals with the problem of adapting software implemented fault injection technique (SWIFI) to evaluate dependability of reactive microcontroller systems. We present an original methodology of disturbing controller operation and analyzing fault effects taking into account reactions of the controlled object and the impact of the system environment. Faults can be injected randomly (in space and time) or targeted at the most sensitive elements of the controller to check it at high stresses. This approach allows identifying rarely encountered problems, usually missed in classical approaches. The developed methodology has been used successfully to verify dependability of ABS system. Experimental results are commented in the paper.

  17. Intermittent/transient fault phenomena in digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the intermittent/transient (IT) fault study is presented. An interval survivability evaluation of digital systems for IT faults is discussed along with a method for detecting and diagnosing IT faults in digital systems.

  18. Quantifying fault recovery in multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malek, Miroslaw; Harary, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Various aspects of reliable computing are formalized and quantified with emphasis on efficient fault recovery. The mathematical model which proves to be most appropriate is provided by the theory of graphs. New measures for fault recovery are developed and the value of elements of the fault recovery vector are observed to depend not only on the computation graph H and the architecture graph G, but also on the specific location of a fault. In the examples, a hypercube is chosen as a representative of parallel computer architecture, and a pipeline as a typical configuration for program execution. Dependability qualities of such a system is defined with or without a fault. These qualities are determined by the resiliency triple defined by three parameters: multiplicity, robustness, and configurability. Parameters for measuring the recovery effectiveness are also introduced in terms of distance, time, and the number of new, used, and moved nodes and edges.

  19. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2011-04-19

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  20. Predeployment validation of fault-tolerant systems through software-implemented fault insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeck, Edward W.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.; Segall, Zary Z.

    1989-01-01

    Fault injection-based automated testing (FIAT) environment, which can be used to experimentally characterize and evaluate distributed realtime systems under fault-free and faulted conditions is described. A survey is presented of validation methodologies. The need for fault insertion based on validation methodologies is demonstrated. The origins and models of faults, and motivation for the FIAT concept are reviewed. FIAT employs a validation methodology which builds confidence in the system through first providing a baseline of fault-free performance data and then characterizing the behavior of the system with faults present. Fault insertion is accomplished through software and allows faults or the manifestation of faults to be inserted by either seeding faults into memory or triggering error detection mechanisms. FIAT is capable of emulating a variety of fault-tolerant strategies and architectures, can monitor system activity, and can automatically orchestrate experiments involving insertion of faults. There is a common system interface which allows ease of use to decrease experiment development and run time. Fault models chosen for experiments on FIAT have generated system responses which parallel those observed in real systems under faulty conditions. These capabilities are shown by two example experiments each using a different fault-tolerance strategy.

  1. Nonlinear Network Dynamics on Earthquake Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, P. B.; Rundle, J. B.; Tiampo, K. F.

    2001-12-01

    Understanding the physics of earthquakes is essential if large events are ever to be forecast. Real faults occur in topologically complex networks that exhibit cooperative, emergent space-time behavior that includes precursory quiescence or activation, and clustering of events. The purpose of this work is to investigate the sensitivity of emergent behavior of fault networks to changes in the physics on the scale of single faults or smaller. In order to investigate the effect of changes at small scales on the behavior of the network, we need to construct models of earthquake fault systems that contain the essential physics. A network topology is therefore defined in an elastic medium, the stress Green's functions (i.e. the stress transfer coefficients) are computed, frictional properties are defined and the system is driven via the slip deficit as defined below. The long-range elastic interactions produce mean-field dynamics in the simulations. We focus in this work on the major strike-slip faults in Southern California that produce the most frequent and largest magnitude events. To determine the topology and properties of the network, we used the tabulation of fault properties published in the literature. We have found that the statistical distribution of large earthquakes on a model of a topologically complex, strongly correlated real fault network is highly sensitive to the precise nature of the stress dissipation properties of the friction laws associated with individual faults. These emergent, self-organizing space-time modes of behavior are properties of the network as a whole, rather than of the individual fault segments of which the network is comprised (ref: PBR et al., Physical Review Letters, in press, 2001).

  2. Architecture of small-scale fault zones in the context of the Leinetalgraben Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding fault zone properties in different geological settings is important to better assess the development and propagation of faults. In addition this allows better evaluation and permeability estimates of potential fault-related geothermal reservoirs. The Leinetalgraben fault system provides an outcrop analogue for many fault zones in the subsurface of the North German Basin. The Leinetalgraben is a N-S-trending graben structure, initiated in the Jurassic, in the south of Lower Saxony and as such part of the North German Basin. The fault system was reactivated and inverted during Alpine compression in the Tertiary. This complex geological situation was further affected by halotectonics. Therefore we can find different types of fault zones, that is normal, reverse, strike-slip an oblique-slip faults, surrounding the major Leinetalgraben boundary faults. Here we present first results of structural geological field studies on the geometry and architecture of fault zones in the Leinetalgraben Fault System in outcrop-scale. We measured the orientations and displacements of 17 m-scale fault zones in limestone (Muschelkalk) outcrops, the thicknesses of their fault cores and damage zones, as well as the fracture densities and geometric parameters of the fracture systems therein. We also analysed the effects of rock heterogeneities, particularly stiffness variations between layers (mechanical layering) on the propagation of natural fractures and fault zones. The analysed fault zones predominantly show similar orientations as the major fault zones they surround. Other faults are conjugate or perpendicular to the major fault zones. The direction of predominant joint strike corresponds to the orientation of the fault zones in the majority of cases. The mechanical layering of the limestone and marlstone stratification obviously has great effects on fracture propagation. Already thin layers (mm- to cm-scale) of low stiffness - here marl - seem to suffice to change the

  3. Geometric incompatibility in a fault system.

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielov, A; Keilis-Borok, V; Jackson, D D

    1996-01-01

    Interdependence between geometry of a fault system, its kinematics, and seismicity is investigated. Quantitative measure is introduced for inconsistency between a fixed configuration of faults and the slip rates on each fault. This measure, named geometric incompatibility (G), depicts summarily the instability near the fault junctions: their divergence or convergence ("unlocking" or "locking up") and accumulation of stress and deformations. Accordingly, the changes in G are connected with dynamics of seismicity. Apart from geometric incompatibility, we consider deviation K from well-known Saint Venant condition of kinematic compatibility. This deviation depicts summarily unaccounted stress and strain accumulation in the region and/or internal inconsistencies in a reconstruction of block- and fault system (its geometry and movements). The estimates of G and K provide a useful tool for bringing together the data on different types of movement in a fault system. An analog of Stokes formula is found that allows determination of the total values of G and K in a region from the data on its boundary. The phenomenon of geometric incompatibility implies that nucleation of strong earthquakes is to large extent controlled by processes near fault junctions. The junctions that have been locked up may act as transient asperities, and unlocked junctions may act as transient weakest links. Tentative estimates of K and G are made for each end of the Big Bend of the San Andreas fault system in Southern California. Recent strong earthquakes Landers (1992, M = 7.3) and Northridge (1994, M = 6.7) both reduced K but had opposite impact on G: Landers unlocked the area, whereas Northridge locked it up again. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:11607673

  4. Geometric incompatibility in a fault system.

    PubMed

    Gabrielov, A; Keilis-Borok, V; Jackson, D D

    1996-04-30

    Interdependence between geometry of a fault system, its kinematics, and seismicity is investigated. Quantitative measure is introduced for inconsistency between a fixed configuration of faults and the slip rates on each fault. This measure, named geometric incompatibility (G), depicts summarily the instability near the fault junctions: their divergence or convergence ("unlocking" or "locking up") and accumulation of stress and deformations. Accordingly, the changes in G are connected with dynamics of seismicity. Apart from geometric incompatibility, we consider deviation K from well-known Saint Venant condition of kinematic compatibility. This deviation depicts summarily unaccounted stress and strain accumulation in the region and/or internal inconsistencies in a reconstruction of block- and fault system (its geometry and movements). The estimates of G and K provide a useful tool for bringing together the data on different types of movement in a fault system. An analog of Stokes formula is found that allows determination of the total values of G and K in a region from the data on its boundary. The phenomenon of geometric incompatibility implies that nucleation of strong earthquakes is to large extent controlled by processes near fault junctions. The junctions that have been locked up may act as transient asperities, and unlocked junctions may act as transient weakest links. Tentative estimates of K and G are made for each end of the Big Bend of the San Andreas fault system in Southern California. Recent strong earthquakes Landers (1992, M = 7.3) and Northridge (1994, M = 6.7) both reduced K but had opposite impact on G: Landers unlocked the area, whereas Northridge locked it up again. PMID:11607673

  5. Transfer zones in listric normal fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Shamik

    Listric normal faults are common in passive margin settings where sedimentary units are detached above weaker lithological units, such as evaporites or are driven by basal structural and stratigraphic discontinuities. The geometries and styles of faulting vary with the types of detachment and form landward and basinward dipping fault systems. Complex transfer zones therefore develop along the terminations of adjacent faults where deformation is accommodated by secondary faults, often below seismic resolution. The rollover geometry and secondary faults within the hanging wall of the major faults also vary with the styles of faulting and contribute to the complexity of the transfer zones. This study tries to understand the controlling factors for the formation of the different styles of listric normal faults and the different transfer zones formed within them, by using analog clay experimental models. Detailed analyses with respect to fault orientation, density and connectivity have been performed on the experiments in order to gather insights on the structural controls and the resulting geometries. A new high resolution 3D laser scanning technology has been introduced to scan the surfaces of the clay experiments for accurate measurements and 3D visualizations. Numerous examples from the Gulf of Mexico have been included to demonstrate and geometrically compare the observations in experiments and real structures. A salt cored convergent transfer zone from the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana has been analyzed in detail to understand the evolutionary history of the region, which helps in deciphering the kinematic growth of similar structures in the Gulf of Mexico. The dissertation is divided into three chapters, written in a journal article format, that deal with three different aspects in understanding the listric normal fault systems and the transfer zones so formed. The first chapter involves clay experimental models to understand the fault patterns in

  6. Trends in reliability modeling technology for fault tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, S. J.

    1979-01-01

    Reliability modeling for fault tolerant avionic computing systems was developed. The modeling of large systems involving issues of state size and complexity, fault coverage, and practical computation was discussed. A novel technique which provides the tool for studying the reliability of systems with nonconstant failure rates is presented. The fault latency which may provide a method of obtaining vital latent fault data is measured.

  7. Monitoring and fault diagnosis of hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Haussecker, Horst; Reich, Jim; Cheung, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Many networked embedded sensing and control systems can be modeled as hybrid systems with interacting continuous and discrete dynamics. These systems present significant challenges for monitoring and diagnosis. Many existing model-based approaches focus on diagnostic reasoning assuming appropriate fault signatures have been generated. However, an important missing piece is the integration of model-based techniques with the acquisition and processing of sensor signals and the modeling of faults to support diagnostic reasoning. This paper addresses key modeling and computational problems at the interface between model-based diagnosis techniques and signature analysis to enable the efficient detection and isolation of incipient and abrupt faults in hybrid systems. A hybrid automata model that parameterizes abrupt and incipient faults is introduced. Based on this model, an approach for diagnoser design is presented. The paper also develops a novel mode estimation algorithm that uses model-based prediction to focus distributed processing signal algorithms. Finally, the paper describes a diagnostic system architecture that integrates the modeling, prediction, and diagnosis components. The implemented architecture is applied to fault diagnosis of a complex electro-mechanical machine, the Xerox DC265 printer, and the experimental results presented validate the approach. A number of design trade-offs that were made to support implementation of the algorithms for online applications are also described. PMID:16366248

  8. Fault-tolerant electrical power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Ishaque S.; Weimer, Joseph A.

    1987-10-01

    An electrical system that will meet the requirements of a 1990s two-engine fighter is being developed in the Fault-Tolerant Electrical Power System (FTEPS) program, sponsored by the AFWAL Aero Propulsion Laboratory. FTEPS will demonstrate the generation and distribution of fault-tolerant, reliable, electrical power required for future aircraft. The system incorporates MIL-STD-1750A digital processors and MIL-STD-1553B data buses for control and communications. Electrical power is distributed through electrical load management centers by means of solid-state power controllers for fault protection and individual load control. The system will provide uninterruptible power to flight-critical loads such as the flight control and mission computers with sealed lead-acid batteries. Primary power is provided by four 60 kVA variable speed constant frequency generators. Buildup and testing of the FTEPS demonstrator is expected to be complete by May 1988.

  9. Fault tolerant filtering and fault detection for quantum systems driven by fields in single photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qing; Dong, Daoyi; Petersen, Ian R.; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to solve the fault tolerant filtering and fault detection problem for a class of open quantum systems driven by a continuous-mode bosonic input field in single photon states when the systems are subject to stochastic faults. Optimal estimates of both the system observables and the fault process are simultaneously calculated and characterized by a set of coupled recursive quantum stochastic differential equations.

  10. Immunity-Based Aircraft Fault Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, D.; KrishnaKumar, K.; Wong, D.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the study reported in this paper, we have developed and applied an Artificial Immune System (AIS) algorithm for aircraft fault detection, as an extension to a previous work on intelligent flight control (IFC). Though the prior studies had established the benefits of IFC, one area of weakness that needed to be strengthened was the control dead band induced by commanding a failed surface. Since the IFC approach uses fault accommodation with no detection, the dead band, although it reduces over time due to learning, is present and causes degradation in handling qualities. If the failure can be identified, this dead band can be further A ed to ensure rapid fault accommodation and better handling qualities. The paper describes the application of an immunity-based approach that can detect a broad spectrum of known and unforeseen failures. The approach incorporates the knowledge of the normal operational behavior of the aircraft from sensory data, and probabilistically generates a set of pattern detectors that can detect any abnormalities (including faults) in the behavior pattern indicating unsafe in-flight operation. We developed a tool called MILD (Multi-level Immune Learning Detection) based on a real-valued negative selection algorithm that can generate a small number of specialized detectors (as signatures of known failure conditions) and a larger set of generalized detectors for unknown (or possible) fault conditions. Once the fault is detected and identified, an adaptive control system would use this detection information to stabilize the aircraft by utilizing available resources (control surfaces). We experimented with data sets collected under normal and various simulated failure conditions using a piloted motion-base simulation facility. The reported results are from a collection of test cases that reflect the performance of the proposed immunity-based fault detection algorithm.

  11. The Morelia-Acambay Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez Bucio, M.; Soria-Caballero, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V.; Mennella, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is one of the most actives and representative zones of Mexico geologically speaking. Research carried out in this area gives stratigraphic, seismologic and historical evidence of its recent activity during the quaternary (Martinez and Nieto, 1990). Specifically the Morelia-Acambay faults system (MAFS) consist in a series of normal faults of dominant direction E - W, ENE - WSW y NE - SW which is cut in center west of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This fault system appeared during the early Miocene although the north-south oriented structures are older and have been related to the activity of the tectonism inherited from the "Basin and Range" system, but that were reactivated by the east- west faults. It is believed that the activity of these faults has contributed to the creation and evolution of the longed lacustrine depressions such as: Chapala, Zacapu, Cuitzeo, Maravatio y Acambay also the location of monogenetic volcanoes that conformed the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF) and tend to align in the direction of the SFMA dominant effort. In a historical time different segments of the MAFS have been the epicenter of earthquakes from moderated to strong magnitude like the events of 1858 in Patzcuaro, Acambay in 1912, 1979 in Maravatio and 2007 in Morelia, among others. Several detailed analysis and semi-detailed analysis through a GIS platform based in the vectorial archives and thematic charts 1:50 000 scaled from the data base of the INEGI which has allowed to remark the influence of the MAFS segments about the morphology of the landscape and the identification of other structures related to the movement of the existent faults like fractures, alignments, collapses and others from the zone comprehended by the northwest of Morelia in Michoacán to the East of Acambay, Estado de México. Such analysis suggests that the fault segments possess a normal displacement plus a left component. In addition it can be

  12. The Lower Tagus Valley (LTV) Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besana-Ostman, G. M.; Fereira, H.; Pinheiro, A.; Falcao Flor, A. P.; Nemser, E.; Villanova, S. P.; Fonseca, J. D.

    2010-05-01

    , aerial photographs, and river systems together with other remotely-sensed data. Active fault-related features that were identified include fault scarps, pressure ridges, pull-apart basin, saddles, and linear valleys. Limited ocular investigation has also been undertaken to verify modifications that post-date the aerial photos, quantify both elevation differences across the fault, and possibly evaluate the cumulative lateral displacements. Thus, the newly-identified traces of an active fault in the LTV corresponds with a left-lateral fault along the Lower Tagus floodplains striking parallel to the principal structural trend (NNE-SSW) in the region. This trace clearly indicates continued tectonic movement along the LTV fault during the Holocene. Taking into account the newly-mapped location and length of the active trace, trenching work is being planned to determine recurrence intervals along the LTV fault while further mapping of its possible extension and other related active structures are underway. Moreover, new estimates of slip rate along this structure will result from this study and can be used for an improved seismic hazard assessment for the region.

  13. Parameter Transient Behavior Analysis on Fault Tolerant Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine (Technical Monitor); Shin, Jong-Yeob

    2003-01-01

    In a fault tolerant control (FTC) system, a parameter varying FTC law is reconfigured based on fault parameters estimated by fault detection and isolation (FDI) modules. FDI modules require some time to detect fault occurrences in aero-vehicle dynamics. This paper illustrates analysis of a FTC system based on estimated fault parameter transient behavior which may include false fault detections during a short time interval. Using Lyapunov function analysis, the upper bound of an induced-L2 norm of the FTC system performance is calculated as a function of a fault detection time and the exponential decay rate of the Lyapunov function.

  14. Tectonics of the Levant fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Yann

    2015-07-01

    In June 2013, for the second time, an international workshop dedicated to the tectonics of the Levant fault system and the Arabic plate was held in Paris. During two days, this meeting gathered researchers from 19 institutions and 12 countries, with 24 presentations. During this meeting, a large variety of topics were addressed, ranging from new insights into the geodynamics of the Red Sea to earthquake history along the Dead Sea fault. A key point of this meeting was actually to gather contributions focused on the same object, here the Levant fault system, but with different perspectives, to foster new collaborations and research projects. In line with this idea, several presentations were actually dealing with issues related to the palaeoclimate of this specific region, engineering issues about earthquake destructions, or the impact of the Dead Sea active tectonics on the evolution of hominins, aside from general tectonics.

  15. Fault-tolerant software - Experiment with the sift operating system. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, J. E.; Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted in the NASA Avionics Integrated Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) to investigate the implementation of fault-tolerant software techniques on fault-tolerant computer architectures, in particular the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) computer. The N-version programming and recovery block techniques were implemented on a portion of the SIFT operating system. The results indicate that, to effectively implement fault-tolerant software design techniques, system requirements will be impacted and suggest that retrofitting fault-tolerant software on existing designs will be inefficient and may require system modification.

  16. Implementation of Integrated System Fault Management Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John; Morris, Jon; Smith, Harvey; Turowski, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Fault Management to support rocket engine test mission with highly reliable and accurate measurements; while improving availability and lifecycle costs. CORE ELEMENTS: Architecture, taxonomy, and ontology (ATO) for DIaK management. Intelligent Sensor Processes; Intelligent Element Processes; Intelligent Controllers; Intelligent Subsystem Processes; Intelligent System Processes; Intelligent Component Processes.

  17. Fault interactions and growth in an outcrop-scale system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, Andy; Walsh, John; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Schoepfer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Fault geometries and strike-slip displacements in a moderately dipping (~50°) multi-layer sequence have been analysed to constrain the evolution of an outcrop-scale fault system in coastal New Zealand. Displacements and geometries of small faults (lengths 1-200 m and maximum displacements 0.007-3 m) were sampled from a horizontal shore platform up to 120 m wide and 1.5 km long with near 100% exposure. Displacement profiles have variable shapes that mainly reflect fault interactions, with individual faults being both hard- and soft-linked. Variable displacement profiles produce an average profile for all faults that is near-triangular, with displacement gradients (and displacement-length ratios) increasing by an order of magnitude from smallest to largest faults. Within fault zones these gradients are accompanied by secondary faults, which are typically of greatest density close to fault intersections, in relay zones and at fault tips. Horsetail and synthetic splays confined to the regions around fault tips are incompatible with gradual fault propagation for the duration of growth. Instead, fault displacements and tip geometries are consistent with growth initially dominated by fault propagation followed by displacement accumulation and approximately stationary fault tips. Retardation of propagation is thought to arise due to fault interactions and associated reduction of tip stresses, with the early change from propagation- to displacement-dominated growth stages produced by fault-system saturation (i.e., all faults are interacting). Initial rapid fault propagation succeeded by displacement-dominated growth accounts for different fault types over a range of scales suggesting that this fault growth model has wide application.

  18. Fault tolerant GPS/Inertial System design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Alison K.; Sturza, Mark A.; Deangelis, Franco; Lukaszewski, David A.

    The use of a GPS/Inertial integrated system in future launch vehicles motivates the described design of the present fault-tolerant system. The robustness of the navigation system is enhanced by integrating the GPS with an inertial fault-tolerant system. Three layers of failure detection and isolation are incorporated to determine the nature of flaws in the inertial instruments, the GPS receivers, or the integrated navigation solution. The layers are based on: (1) a high-rate parity algorithm for instrument failures; (2) a similar parity algorithm for GPS satellite or receiver failures; and (3) a GPS navigation solution to monitor inertial navigation failures. Dual failures of any system component can occur in any system component without affecting the performance of launch-vehicle navigation or guidance.

  19. Statistical Fault Detection & Diagnosis Expert System

    SciTech Connect

    Wegerich, Stephan

    1996-12-18

    STATMON is an expert system that performs real-time fault detection and diagnosis of redundant sensors in any industrial process requiring high reliability. After a training period performed during normal operation, the expert system monitors the statistical properties of the incoming signals using a pattern recognition test. If the test determines that statistical properties of the signals have changed, the expert system performs a sequence of logical steps to determine which sensor or machine component has degraded.

  20. Rupture Synchronicity in Complex Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, K. R.; Jordan, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    While most investigators would agree that the timing of large earthquakes within a fault system depends on stress-mediated interactions among its elements, much of the debate relevant to time-dependent forecasting has been centered on single-fault concepts, such as characteristic earthquake behavior. We propose to broaden this discussion by quantifying the multi-fault concept of rupture synchronicity. We consider a finite set of small, fault-spanning volumes {Vk} within a fault system of arbitrary (fractal) complexity. We let Ck be the catalog of length tmax comprising Nk discrete times {ti(k)} that mark when the kth volume participates in a rupture of magnitude > M. The main object of our analysis is the complete set of event time differences {τij(kk') = ti(k) - tj(k')}, which we take to be a random process with an expected density function ρkk'(t). When k = k', we call this function the auto-catalog density function (ACDF); when k ≠ k', we call it the cross-catalog density function (CCDF). The roles of the ACDF and CCDF in synchronicity theory are similar to those of autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions in time-series analysis. For a renewal process, the ACDF can be written in terms of convolutions of the interevent-time distribution, and many of its properties (e.g., large-t asymptote) can be derived analytically. The interesting information in the CCDF, like that in the ACDF, is concentrated near t = 0. If two catalogs are completely asynchronous, the CCDF collapses to an asymptote given by the harmonic mean of the ACDF asymptotes. Synchronicity can therefore be characterized by the variability of the CCDF about this asymptote. The brevity of instrumental catalogs makes the identification of synchronicity at large M difficult, but we will illustrate potentially interesting behaviors through the analysis of a million-year California catalog generated by the earthquake simulator, RSQSim (Deiterich & Richards-Dinger, 2010), which we sampled at a

  1. Fault diagnosis in sparse multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blough, Douglas M.; Sullivan, Gregory F.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of fault diagnosis in multiprocessor systems is considered under a uniformly probabilistic model in which processors are faulty with probability p. This work focuses on minimizing the number of tests that must be conducted in order to correctly diagnose the state of every processor in the system with high probability. A diagnosis algorithm that can correctly diagnose the state of every processor with probability approaching one in a class of systems performing slightly greater than a linear number of tests is presented. A nearly matching lower bound on the number of tests required to achieve correct diagnosis in arbitrary systems is also proven. The number of tests required under this probabilistic model is shown to be significantly less than under a bounded-size fault set model. Because the number of tests that must be conducted is a measure of the diagnosis overhead, these results represent a dramatic improvement in the performance of system-level diagnosis technique.

  2. Fault detection and diagnosis of HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Han, C.Y.; Xiao, Y.; Ruther, C.J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a model-based fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) system for building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC). Model-based fault detection is based on the strategy of determining the difference or the residuals between the normal and the existing patterns. Their approach was to attack the problem on many levels of abstraction: from the signal level, controller programming level, and system component, all the way up to the information and knowledge processing level. The various issues of real implementation of the system and the processing of real-time on-line data in actual systems of campus buildings using the proven technology and off-the-shelf commercial tools are discussed. The research was based on input and output points and software control programs found in typical direct digital control systems used for variable-air-volume air handlers and VAV cooling and hot water reheat terminal units.

  3. Reinitialization issues in fault tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Lancraft, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the reinitialization of fault tolerant systems in which detection and isolation (FDI) techniques are used, on-line, to identify and compensate for system failures. Specifically, it will focus on FDI techniques which utilize analytic redundancy, arising from a knowledge of the plant dynamics, by analyzing the residuals of a no-fail filter designed on the assumption of no failures. In these types of fault tolerant systems, system failures have to propagate through the no-fail filter dynamics in order to get detected. Therefore, the no-fail filter must be reinitialized after the isolation of a failure so that the accumulated effects of the failure are removed. In this paper, various approaches to this reinitialization problem will be discussed.

  4. A PC based fault diagnosis expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Christopher A.

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Status Assessment (ISA) prototype expert system performs system level fault diagnosis using rules and models created by the user. The ISA evolved from concepts to a stand-alone demonstration prototype using OPS5 on a LISP Machine. The LISP based prototype was rewritten in C and the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) to run on a Personal Computer (PC) and a graphics workstation. The ISA prototype has been used to demonstrate fault diagnosis functions of Space Station Freedom's Operation Management System (OMS). This paper describes the development of the ISA prototype from early concepts to the current PC/workstation version used today and describes future areas of development for the prototype.

  5. Simultaneous Sensor and Process Fault Diagnostics for Propellant Feed System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, J.; Kwan, C.; Figueroa, F.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to extract fault features from sensor faults and process faults by using advanced fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithms. A tank system that has some common characteristics to a NASA testbed at Stennis Space Center was used to verify our proposed algorithms. First, a generic tank system was modeled. Second, a mathematical model suitable for FDI has been derived for the tank system. Third, a new and general FDI procedure has been designed to distinguish process faults and sensor faults. Extensive simulations clearly demonstrated the advantages of the new design.

  6. Fault Location Methods for Ungrounded Distribution Systems Using Local Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Wanjing; Liao, Yuan

    2013-08-01

    This article presents novel fault location algorithms for ungrounded distribution systems. The proposed methods are capable of locating faults by using obtained voltage and current measurements at the local substation. Two types of fault location algorithms, using line to neutral and line to line measurements, are presented. The network structure and parameters are assumed to be known. The network structure needs to be updated based on information obtained from utility telemetry system. With the help of bus impedance matrix, local voltage changes due to the fault can be expressed as a function of fault currents. Since the bus impedance matrix contains information about fault location, superimposed voltages at local substation can be expressed as a function of fault location, through which fault location can be solved. Simulation studies have been carried out based on a sample distribution power system. From the evaluation study, it is evinced that very accurate fault location estimates are obtained from both types of methods.

  7. Strike-slip faulting and block rotation in the Lake Mead fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Hagai; Aydin, Atilla; Nur, Amos

    1986-12-01

    Strike-slip faults in the Basin and Range province have often been considered passive boundaries between differentially extended domains of tilted normal faults and are thus considered secondary in accommodating regional horizontal deformation. Paleomagnotic investigation of late Miocene age volcanic rocks, displaced by the left-lateral fault system of Lake Mead, Nevada, shows: (1) that these rocks have not been affected by significant structural tilt, the difference between observed and expected inclinations being only -0.6° ± 14.9° and (2) a significant horizontal counterclockwise rotation of -29.4° ± 8.5° about a vertical axis. This rotation was accommodated by slip on northwest-trending, right-lateral strike-slip faults; this implies significant west-northwest elongation. Results of the investigation indicate that strike-slip faulting is the primary process accommodating crustal deformation along the Lake Mead fault system and that tilting in response to normal faulting is secondary.

  8. Abstractions for Fault-Tolerant Distributed System Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Lee S.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Miner, Paul S.; Geser, Alfons

    2004-01-01

    Four kinds of abstraction for the design and analysis of fault tolerant distributed systems are discussed. These abstractions concern system messages, faults, fault masking voting, and communication. The abstractions are formalized in higher order logic, and are intended to facilitate specifying and verifying such systems in higher order theorem provers.

  9. Robust Fault Detection and Isolation for Stochastic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jemin; Gregory, Irene M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the formulation of a robust fault detection and isolation scheme that can precisely detect and isolate simultaneous actuator and sensor faults for uncertain linear stochastic systems. The given robust fault detection scheme based on the discontinuous robust observer approach would be able to distinguish between model uncertainties and actuator failures and therefore eliminate the problem of false alarms. Since the proposed approach involves precise reconstruction of sensor faults, it can also be used for sensor fault identification and the reconstruction of true outputs from faulty sensor outputs. Simulation results presented here validate the effectiveness of the robust fault detection and isolation system.

  10. Fault Accommodation in Control of Flexible Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Lim, Kyong B.

    1998-01-01

    New synthesis techniques for the design of fault accommodating controllers for flexible systems are developed. Three robust control design strategies, static dissipative, dynamic dissipative and mu-synthesis, are used in the approach. The approach provides techniques for designing controllers that maximize, in some sense, the tolerance of the closed-loop system against faults in actuators and sensors, while guaranteeing performance robustness at a specified performance level, measured in terms of the proximity of the closed-loop poles to the imaginary axis (the degree of stability). For dissipative control designs, nonlinear programming is employed to synthesize the controllers, whereas in mu-synthesis, the traditional D-K iteration is used. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed techniques, they are applied to the control design of a structural model of a flexible laboratory test structure.

  11. Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, James

    2013-05-24

    Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

  12. Dynamic faulting on a conjugate fault system detected by near-fault tilt measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Eiichi

    2015-03-01

    There have been reports of conjugate faults that have ruptured during earthquakes. However, it is still unclear whether or not these conjugate faults ruptured coseismically during earthquakes. In this paper, we investigated near-fault ground tilt motions observed at the IWTH25 station during the 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake ( M w 6.9). Since near-fault tilt motion is very sensitive to the fault geometry on which the slip occurs during an earthquake, these data make it possible to distinguish between the main fault rupture and a rupture on the conjugate fault. We examined several fault models that have already been proposed and confirmed that only the models with a conjugated fault could explain the tilt data observed at IWTH25. The results support the existence of simultaneous conjugate faulting during the main rupture. This will contribute to the understanding of earthquake rupture dynamics because the conjugate rupture releases the same shear strain as that released on the main fault, and thus it has been considered quite difficult for both ruptures to accelerate simultaneously.

  13. Practical Methods for Estimating Software Systems Fault Content and Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, A.; Schneidewind, N.; Munson, J.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past several years, we have developed techniques to discriminate between fault-prone software modules and those that are not, to estimate a software system's residual fault content, to identify those portions of a software system having the highest estimated number of faults, and to estimate the effects of requirements changes on software quality.

  14. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Functional Fault Models For Fault Isolation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perotti, Jose M. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    This project implements functional fault models (FFM) to automate the isolation of failures during ground systems operations. FFMs will also be used to recommend sensor placement to improve fault isolation capabilities. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators.

  15. Results of an electrical power system fault study (CDDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugal-Whitehead, N. R.; Johnson, Y. B.

    1993-01-01

    This report gives the results of an electrical power system fault study which has been conducted over the last 2 and one-half years. First, the results of the literature search into electrical power system faults in space and terrestrial power system applications are reported. A description of the intended implementations of the power system faults into the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System (LASEPS) breadboard is then presented. Then, the actual implementation of the faults into the breadboard is discussed along with a discussion describing the LASEPS breadboard. Finally, the results of the injected faults and breadboard failures are discussed.

  16. Vegetation analysis of Wadi Al-Jufair, a hyper-arid region in Najd, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alatar, Abdulrahman; El-Sheikh, Mohamed A.; Thomas, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Wadi Al-Jufair, a tributary of Wadi Nisah, is one of the important wadis of Najd region (Saudi Arabia) sheltering a rich diversity of higher plants. The study area is extended into approximately 15 km2 encompassing the commonest geomorphological features encountered in desert wadis. The wadi supports several rare plants, including Maerua crassifolia Forssk., a regionally endangered tree, and Acacia oerfota (Forssk.) Schweinf., a rare shrub with restricted distribution. The present study aims to analyze the vegetation of wadi Al-Jufair and propose its designation as an important plant reserve. The vegetation type is fundamentally of chamaephytic nature with some phanerophytes, and distinguished into associations where the dominant perennial species give the permanent character of plant cover in each habitat. Four vegetation groups were identified with the application of TWINSPAN, DCA and CCA programs and named after the characteristic species as follows: Lycium shawii; A. oerfota; Acacia raddiana–Rhazya stricta and Artemisia monosperma. These plant associations demonstrate significant variation in soil texture, moisture, organic matter, pH, EC, and minerals of Wadi Al-Jufair. PMID:23961197

  17. Intermittent/transient faults in computer systems: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of an approach for diagnosing intermittent/transient (I/T) faults is presented. The development of an interrelated theory and experimental methodology to be used in a laboratory situation to measure the capability of a fault tolerant computing system to diagnose I/T faults, is discussed. To the extent that such diagnosing capability is important to reliability in fault tolerant computing systems, this theory and supporting methodology serves as a foundation for validation efforts.

  18. Fault reactivation: The Picuris-Pecos fault system of north-central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, David Wilson

    The PPFS is a N-trending fault system extending over 80 km in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico. Precambrian basement rocks are offset 37 km in a right-lateral sense; however, this offset includes dextral strike-slip (Precambrian), mostly normal dip-slip (Pennsylvanian), mostly reverse dip-slip (Early Laramide), limited strike-slip (Late Laramide) and mostly normal dip-slip (Cenozoic). The PPFS is broken into at least 3 segments by the NE-trending Embudo fault and by several Laramide age NW-trending tear faults. These segments are (from N to S): the Taos, the Picuris, and the Pecos segments. On the east side of the Picuris segment in the Picuris Mountains, the Oligocene-Miocene age Miranda graben developed and represents a complex extension zone south of the Embudo fault. Regional analysis of remotely sensed data and geologic maps indicate that lineaments subparallel to the trace of the PPFS are longer and less frequent than lineaments that trend orthogonal to the PPFS. Significant cross cutting faults and subtle changes in fault trends in each segment are clear in the lineament data. Detailed mapping in the eastern Picuris Mountains showed that the favorably oriented Picuris segment was not reactivated in the Tertiary development of the Rio Grande rift. Segmentation of the PPFS and post-Laramide annealing of the Picuris segment are interpreted to have resulted in the development of the subparallel La Serna fault. The Picuris segment of the PPFS is offset by several E-ESE trending faults. These faults are Late Cenozoic in age and interpreted to be related to the uplift of the Picuris Mountains and the continuing sinistral motion on the Embudo fault. Differential subsidence within the Miranda graben caused the development of several synthetic and orthogonal faults between the bounding La Serna and Miranda faults. Analysis of over 10,000 outcrop scale brittle structures reveals a strong correlation between faults and fracture systems. The dominant

  19. Statistical Fault Detection & Diagnosis Expert System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-12-18

    STATMON is an expert system that performs real-time fault detection and diagnosis of redundant sensors in any industrial process requiring high reliability. After a training period performed during normal operation, the expert system monitors the statistical properties of the incoming signals using a pattern recognition test. If the test determines that statistical properties of the signals have changed, the expert system performs a sequence of logical steps to determine which sensor or machine component hasmore » degraded.« less

  20. Structural and geomorphic fault segmentations of the Doruneh Fault System, central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbod, Yassaman; Bellier, Olivier; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Abbassi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-05-01

    The active tectonics of Iran results from the northward Arabia-Eurasia convergence at a rate of ~22±2 mm/yr at the longitude of Bahrain (e.g., Sella et al., 2002). At the southwestern and southern boundaries of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone, the convergence is taken up by the continental collision in the Zagros Mountains, and the active subduction of Makran, respectively. Further north, the northward motion not absorbed by the Makran subduction is expressed as the N-trending right lateral shear between central Iran and Eurasia at a rate of ~16 mm/yr (e.g., Regard et al., 2005; Vernant et al, 2004). This shear involves N-trending right-lateral fault systems, which are extended at both sides of the Lut block up to the latitude of 34°N. North of this latitude, about 35°N, the left-lateral Doruneh Fault separates the N-trending right-lateral fault systems from the northern deformation domains (i.e., the Alborz, Kopeh Dagh and Binalud mountain ranges). At the Iranian tectonic scale, the Doruneh Fault represents a curved-shape, 600-km-long structure through central Iran, which runs westward from the Iran-Afghanistan boundary (i.e., the eastern boundary of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone) to the Great Kavir desert. Nevertheless, east of the longitude of 56°45'E, the fault is expressed as an E-trending ~360-km-long fault (hereinafter the Doruneh Fault System - DFS) having a geological evolution history different from the western part (the Great Kavir Fault System). In this study, we look for characterizing geomorphic and structural features of active faulting on the DFS. Detailed structural and geomorphic mapping based on satellite Imageries (SPOT5 and Landsat ETM+) and SRTM digital topographic data, complemented with field surveys allowed us to establish structural and geomorphic segmentations along the DFS. According to our observations, the DFS is comprised of three distinct fault zones: (1) The 100-km-long, N75°E-trending western fault zone, which is

  1. Fault tolerant architecture for artificial olfactory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfivand, Nasser; Nizar Hamidon, Mohd; Abdolzadeh, Vida

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, to cover and mask the faults that occur in the sensing unit of an artificial olfactory system, a novel architecture is offered. The proposed architecture is able to tolerate failures in the sensors of the array and the faults that occur are masked. The proposed architecture for extracting the correct results from the output of the sensors can provide the quality of service for generated data from the sensor array. The results of various evaluations and analysis proved that the proposed architecture has acceptable performance in comparison with the classic form of the sensor array in gas identification. According to the results, achieving a high odor discrimination based on the suggested architecture is possible.

  2. SSME fault monitoring and diagnosis expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Moonis; Norman, Arnold M.; Gupta, U. K.

    1989-01-01

    An expert system, called LEADER, has been designed and implemented for automatic learning, detection, identification, verification, and correction of anomalous propulsion system operations in real time. LEADER employs a set of sensors to monitor engine component performance and to detect, identify, and validate abnormalities with respect to varying engine dynamics and behavior. Two diagnostic approaches are adopted in the architecture of LEADER. In the first approach fault diagnosis is performed through learning and identifying engine behavior patterns. LEADER, utilizing this approach, generates few hypotheses about the possible abnormalities. These hypotheses are then validated based on the SSME design and functional knowledge. The second approach directs the processing of engine sensory data and performs reasoning based on the SSME design, functional knowledge, and the deep-level knowledge, i.e., the first principles (physics and mechanics) of SSME subsystems and components. This paper describes LEADER's architecture which integrates a design based reasoning approach with neural network-based fault pattern matching techniques. The fault diagnosis results obtained through the analyses of SSME ground test data are presented and discussed.

  3. Diagnosis without repair for hybrid fault situations. [in computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallela, S.; Masson, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, the concept of a hybrid fault situation is introduced, which specifies bounded combinations of permanently faulty and intermittently faulty units in a system. The general class of hybrid fault situations includes, as special cases, the all permanent fault case and the unrestricted intermittent fault case, which have been previously considered with PMC models. An approach compatible with the diagnosis of permanent fault situations is then applied to the diagnosis of hybrid fault situation. The motivation for doing so is the common practice of testing for the presence of intermittent faults in systems by means of repeated applications of tests that are designed for the detection of permanent faults. The testing assignment of PMC models of system is characterized, and interrelationships between the number of intermittently and permanently faulty units that can be diagnosed is established.

  4. H∞ fault-tolerant control for time-varied actuator fault of nonlinear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunsheng; Jiang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    This paper studies H∞ fault-tolerant control for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems subject to time-varied actuator faults. A radial basis function neural network is utilised to approximate the unknown nonlinear functions; an updating rule is designed to estimate on-line time-varied fault of actuator; and the controller with the states feedback and faults estimation is applied to compensate for the effects of fault and minimise H∞ performance criteria in order to get a desired H∞ disturbance rejection constraint. Sufficient conditions are derived, which guarantees that the closed-loop system is robustly stable and satisfies the H∞ performance in both normal and fault cases. In order to reduce computing cost, a simplified algorithm of matrix Riccati inequality is given. A spacecraft model is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  5. Fault diagnostic system for a mobile robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikam, Umesh; Hall, Ernest L.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a robot fault diagnosis system (RFDS). Though designed ostensibly for the University of Cincinnati's autonomous, unmanned, mobile robot for a national competition, it has the flexibility to be adapted for industrial applications as well. Using a top-down approach the robot is sub-divided into different functional units, such as the vision guidance system, the ultrasonic obstacle avoidance system, the steering mechanism, the speed control system, the braking system and the power unit. The techniques of potential failure mode and effects analysis (PFMEA) are used to analyze faults, their visible symptoms, and probable causes and remedies. The relationships obtained therefrom are mapped in a database framework. This is then coded in a user-friendly interactive Visual BasicTM program that guides the user to the likely cause(s) of failure through a question-answer format. A provision is made to ensure better accuracy of the system by incorporating historical data on failures as it becomes available. The RFDS thus provides a handy trouble-shooting tool that cuts down the time involved in diagnosing failures in the complex robot consisting of mechanical, electric, electronic and optical systems. This has been of great help in diagnosing failures and ensuring maximum performance from the robot during the contest in the face of pressure of the competition and the outdoor conditions.

  6. Discrete Wavelet Transform for Fault Locations in Underground Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apisit, C.; Ngaopitakkul, A.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, a technique for detecting faults in underground distribution system is presented. Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) based on traveling wave is employed in order to detect the high frequency components and to identify fault locations in the underground distribution system. The first peak time obtained from the faulty bus is employed for calculating the distance of fault from sending end. The validity of the proposed technique is tested with various fault inception angles, fault locations and faulty phases. The result is found that the proposed technique provides satisfactory result and will be very useful in the development of power systems protection scheme.

  7. Studies on system-level fault diagnosis and related topics

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation deals mainly with the diagnosis aspects of fault-tolerant computing. A number of system models are studied, and their diagnosability conditions established. Fault-diagnosis algorithms for some models are proposed and complexity of diagnosis problem analyzed for some other models. Finally, some fault-tolerant computer networks are studied, and efficient routing algorithms are proposed for these networks.

  8. Paleoseismology and Fault Interactions of the Pajarito Fault System, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. N.; Lewis, C. J.; Lavine, A.; Reneau, S. L.; Schultz, E. S.

    2006-12-01

    The Pajarito fault system is the local active boundary fault of the Rio Grande rift in the vicinity of Los Alamos, New Mexico. Detailed geologic and geomorphic mapping, and displacement-length profiles, reveal a complex pattern of structural deformation that suggests interaction and connective growth among the principal faults in the system (Pajarito, Rendija Canyon, Guaje Mountain, and Santa Clara faults, totaling ~55 km in length). At the surface, the Pajarito fault is not a single shear surface but a complex zone of deformation with considerable lateral variation in structural style from south to north. In the area of detailed mapping, the Pajarito fault is a broad zone of distributed deformation: at the southwest corner of the area, structure is dominated by a large monocline, but small faults and monoclines span a breadth of about 2 km with about 125 m of displacement in the last 1.2 million years; at the west central part of the area, the Pajarito fault is expressed as mainly a large normal fault with smaller faults spread across about 1 km with about 80 m of displacement in the last 1.2 million years; and, in the northwestern part of the area, structure is again dominated by a large monocline with normal faulting in a zone about 1.5 km wide with about 65 m of displacement in the last 1.2 million years. These along-strike variations in the deformation of the Pajarito fault suggest that in most places the tip of the master fault does not break the surface; instead, most of what can be observed is subsidiary structure. The implication of the complex structure and styles of deformation in the fault is that it severely complicates paleoseismic exploration for hazard analyses because different subsidiary structures rupture in different seismic events; no individual structure can be identified with even a near- complete paleoseismic record. Additionally, surface rupture hazards must be associated with broad zones instead of individual faults. Seven paleoseismic

  9. An example of complex fault geometries in a young, rapidly deforming transform fault system: The Maacama Fault in northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, R. D.; Brady, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Maacama Fault Zone (MFZ) in northern California is a young transform system that developed behind the northward migrating Mendocino Triple Junction, and comprises a complex set of active, linked fault strands that form a series of pull-apart basins within the rapidly slipping (~13.9 mm/yr) right-lateral fault system. Surface fault traces within the MFZ are defined by geomorphic features, shallow resistivity profiles, and previously published surface creep and paleoseismic trenching studies. The surface traces of these faults outline classic pull-apart rhomohedrons, with all of the bounding faults inferred to be kinematically linked and currenty active. This activity is supported not only by paleoseismic and surface creep studies, which have tended to focus on the single main strand of the Maacama Fault, but also by the location of tabular seismogenic zones that project from the subsurface into several of the mapped surface fault traces. For each of the 3 mapped pull-apart basins, at least two of the interpreted bounding faults can be shown to be currently active, requiring near-synchronous activity on all of the kinematically linked faults. Historically, active displacement across the MFZ has been assigned to only one relatively well-studied main strand of the fault zone, which slips at ~6.5 mm/yr, resulting in an apparent slip deficit of ~7.4 mm/yr. However, the newly studied adjacent faults in this complex system could accommodate as much or more slip than the historically defined main fault trace, thus resulting in a possibly broader zone of seismic hazard, but less risk of major earthquakes on the main trace. Timing of pull-apart basin initiations is not well constrained, with data permitting either the interpretation that basins formed due to oblique subduction and are currently being reactivated by similar stresses, or that they are newly formed and rapidly evolving. Limited data even allows that the largest pull-apart system may be a reactivated pre

  10. Automated Diagnosis Of Faults In Antenna-Aiming Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, Patrick J.; Mellstrom, Jeffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses research directed toward automated diagnosis of faults in complicated electromechanical and hydraulic systems aiming 70-m and 34-m antennas of Deep Space Network communication system.

  11. Characterization of leaky faults: Study of water flow in aquifer-fault-aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Chao; Javandel, Iraj; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    Leaky faults provide important flow paths for fluids to move underground. It is often necessary to characterize such faults in engineering projects such as deep well injection of waste liquids, underground natural gas storage, and radioactive waste isolation. To provide this characterization, analytical solutions are presented for groundwater flow through saturated aquifer-fault-aquifer systems assuming that both the aquifers and the fault are homogeneous and that the fault has an insignificant effect on aquifer hydraulic properties. Three different conditions are considered: (1) drawdown in the unpumped aquifer is negligibly small; (2) drawdown in the unpumped aquifer is significant, and the two aquifers have the same diffusivity; and (3) drawdown in the unpumped aquifer is significant, and the two aquifers have different diffusivities. Methods are presented to determine the fault transmissivity from pumping test data.

  12. Fault detection in finite frequency domain for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with sensor faults.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2014-08-01

    This paper is concerned with the fault detection (FD) problem in finite frequency domain for continuous-time Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems with sensor faults. Some finite-frequency performance indices are initially introduced to measure the fault/reference input sensitivity and disturbance robustness. Based on these performance indices, an effective FD scheme is then presented such that the generated residual is designed to be sensitive to both fault and reference input for faulty cases, while robust against the reference input for fault-free case. As the additional reference input sensitivity for faulty cases is considered, it is shown that the proposed method improves the existing FD techniques and achieves a better FD performance. The theory is supported by simulation results related to the detection of sensor faults in a tunnel-diode circuit. PMID:24184791

  13. Advanced information processing system: Fault injection study and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura F.; Masotto, Thomas K.; Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the AIPS program is to achieve a validated fault tolerant distributed computer system. The goals of the AIPS fault injection study were: (1) to present the fault injection study components addressing the AIPS validation objective; (2) to obtain feedback for fault removal from the design implementation; (3) to obtain statistical data regarding fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration responses; and (4) to obtain data regarding the effects of faults on system performance. The parameters are described that must be varied to create a comprehensive set of fault injection tests, the subset of test cases selected, the test case measurements, and the test case execution. Both pin level hardware faults using a hardware fault injector and software injected memory mutations were used to test the system. An overview is provided of the hardware fault injector and the associated software used to carry out the experiments. Detailed specifications are given of fault and test results for the I/O Network and the AIPS Fault Tolerant Processor, respectively. The results are summarized and conclusions are given.

  14. A expert system for locating distribution system faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Y.Y.; Lu, F.C.; Chien, Y. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Liu, J.P.; Lin, J.T. ); Yu, H.S.; Kuo, R.T )

    1991-01-01

    A rule-based expert system is designed to locate the faults in a distribution system. Distribution system component data and network topology are stored in the database. A set of heuristic rules are compiled from the dispatchers' experience and are imbedded in the rule base. To locate distribution system fault, an inference engine is developed to perform deductive reasonings on the rules in the knowledge base. The inference engine comprises three major parts: the dynamic searching method, the backtracking approach, and the set intersection operation. The expert system is implemented on a personal computer using the artificial intelligence language PROLOG. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, the expert system has been applied to locate faults in a real underground distribution system.

  15. Robust fault detection and isolation in stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jemin

    2012-07-01

    This article outlines the formulation of a robust fault detection and isolation (FDI) scheme that can precisely detect and isolate simultaneous actuator and sensor faults for uncertain linear stochastic systems. The given robust fault detection scheme based on the discontinuous robust observer approach would be able to distinguish between model uncertainties and actuator failures and therefore eliminate the problem of false alarms. Since the proposed approach involves estimating sensor faults, it can also be used for sensor fault identification and the reconstruction of true outputs from faulty sensor outputs. Simulation results presented here validate the effectiveness of the proposed robust FDI system.

  16. Study on fault diagnose expert system for large astronomy telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-jing; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Tang, Peng-yi; Wu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Guang-yu; Zhang, Hong-fei; Wang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    The development of astronomical techniques and telescopes currently entered a new vigorous period. The telescopes have trends of the giant, complex, diversity of equipment and wide span of control despite of optical, radio space telescopes. That means, for telescope observatory, the control system must have these specifications: flexibility, scalability, distributive, cross-platform and real-time, especially the fault locating and fault processing is more important when fault or exception arise. Through the analysis of the structure of large telescopes, fault diagnosis expert system of large telescope based on the fault tree and distributed log service is given.

  17. Fault tolerant highly reliable inertial navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeerage, Mahesh; Boettcher, Kevin

    This paper describes a development of failure detection and isolation (FDI) strategies for highly reliable inertial navigation systems. FDI strategies are developed based on the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT). A relationship between detection threshold and false alarm rate is developed in terms of the sensor parameters. A new method for correct isolation of failed sensors is presented. Evaluation of FDI performance parameters, such as false alarm rate, wrong isolation probability, and correct isolation probability, are presented. Finally a fault recovery scheme capable of correcting false isolation of good sensors is presented.

  18. Hardware fault insertion and instrumentation system: Mechanization and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Automated test capability for extensive low-level hardware fault insertion testing is developed. The test capability is used to calibrate fault detection coverage and associated latency times as relevant to projecting overall system reliability. Described are modifications made to the NASA Ames Reconfigurable Flight Control System (RDFCS) Facility to fully automate the total test loop involving the Draper Laboratories' Fault Injector Unit. The automated capability provided included the application of sequences of simulated low-level hardware faults, the precise measurement of fault latency times, the identification of fault symptoms, and bulk storage of test case results. A PDP-11/60 served as a test coordinator, and a PDP-11/04 as an instrumentation device. The fault injector was controlled by applications test software in the PDP-11/60, rather than by manual commands from a terminal keyboard. The time base was especially developed for this application to use a variety of signal sources in the system simulator.

  19. Method and system for environmentally adaptive fault tolerant computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copenhaver, Jason L. (Inventor); Jeremy, Ramos (Inventor); Wolfe, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Brenner, Dean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for adapting fault tolerant computing. The method includes the steps of measuring an environmental condition representative of an environment. An on-board processing system's sensitivity to the measured environmental condition is measured. It is determined whether to reconfigure a fault tolerance of the on-board processing system based in part on the measured environmental condition. The fault tolerance of the on-board processing system may be reconfigured based in part on the measured environmental condition.

  20. Investigation of fault interaction and growth in Mygdonia basin (Greece) fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkarlaouni, Charikleia; Kilias, Adamantios; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Lasocki, Stanislaw; Karakostas, Vasileios

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays there is a scientific debate upon the strong correlation that exists between the earthquake clusters and the active seismogenic fault systems since they both constitute populations that participate in processes that include different states of initiation, interaction and coalescence. Since faults grow by the increase in their displacement and their length, the degree of fault interaction between two neighbour segments is expressed by scaling laws describing the fault dimensions, such as the displacement and the length. The distribution of the displacement along the fault trace, follows a bell-shaped pattern according to Dugdale model and is often a key to quantify the degree of interaction between two different fault segments since it gives an insight to the stage of growth and linkage between faults. In our case the fault attributes of Mygdonia basin that is located in the northern part of the Greek mainland are investigated under the prism of the scaling properties of its major active faults. Important seismogenic fault segments such as Lagina - Agios Vasilios, Gerakarou - Stivos and Sohos fault that define the boundaries of the basin and have generated important earthquakes in the past are investigated. Displacement - length profiles were constrained for the major fault segments, using digital elevation models (DEMs) since intense tectonics is etched upon the topography of the area such as to provide valuable seismotectonic information. In our case scarp heights are used for the approximation of fault displacement. Structural information, concerning displacement measurements on active fault scarps, and slip lineaments onto fault expressions are collected in-situ from field surveys. The information based on the field observations, justify the results coming out from the D.E.M. analysis. The final results are compared to conclusions derived from the investigation of different fault systems and the influence on the hazard assessment is discussed. This work

  1. Fault Diagnosis of Power Systems Using Intelligent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Oliver, Walter E. , Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The power system operator's need for a reliable power delivery system calls for a real-time or near-real-time Al-based fault diagnosis tool. Such a tool will allow NASA ground controllers to re-establish a normal or near-normal degraded operating state of the EPS (a DC power system) for Space Station Alpha by isolating the faulted branches and loads of the system. And after isolation, re-energizing those branches and loads that have been found not to have any faults in them. A proposed solution involves using the Fault Diagnosis Intelligent System (FDIS) to perform near-real time fault diagnosis of Alpha's EPS by downloading power transient telemetry at fault-time from onboard data loggers. The FDIS uses an ANN clustering algorithm augmented with a wavelet transform feature extractor. This combination enables this system to perform pattern recognition of the power transient signatures to diagnose the fault type and its location down to the orbital replaceable unit. FDIS has been tested using a simulation of the LeRC Testbed Space Station Freedom configuration including the topology from the DDCU's to the electrical loads attached to the TPDU's. FDIS will work in conjunction with the Power Management Load Scheduler to determine what the state of the system was at the time of the fault condition. This information is used to activate the appropriate diagnostic section, and to refine if necessary the solution obtained. In the latter case, if the FDIS reports back that it is equally likely that the faulty device as 'start tracker #1' and 'time generation unit,' then based on a priori knowledge of the system's state, the refined solution would be 'star tracker #1' located in cabinet ITAS2. It is concluded from the present studies that artificial intelligence diagnostic abilities are improved with the addition of the wavelet transform, and that when such a system such as FDIS is coupled to the Power Management Load Scheduler, a faulty device can be located and isolated

  2. Formal Techniques for Synchronized Fault-Tolerant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiVito, Ben L.; Butler, Ricky W.

    1992-01-01

    We present the formal verification of synchronizing aspects of the Reliable Computing Platform (RCP), a fault-tolerant computing system for digital flight control applications. The RCP uses NMR-style redundancy to mask faults and internal majority voting to purge the effects of transient faults. The system design has been formally specified and verified using the EHDM verification system. Our formalization is based on an extended state machine model incorporating snapshots of local processors clocks.

  3. Pseudotachylyte-bearing faults and shear zones along the Norumbega fault system in Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, D. P.; Price, N. A.; Swanson, M.; Pollock, S. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Norumbega fault system represents the eroded roots of a >400 km long fault system that records a Middle Paleozoic through Mesozoic history of superimposed deformational processes. The Paleozoic history is dominated by right lateral shearing that evolved from a wide zone of regional scale dextral transpression to more highly focused and in many cases seismogenic slip along relatively narrow faults and shear zones. The Mesozoic history, largely deduced through geochronological studies, likely involved localized reactivation in association with the transition between Late Paleozoic dextral transpression and Early Mesozoic extension in the northern Appalachians. Pseudotachylyte, found in a variety of structural settings, has been identified on numerous fault strands along the southern 250 km of the fault system in Maine and provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate evolving seismogenic processes, at a variety of depths, along a regional scale fault system. The oldest pseudotachylyte (Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous) formed at frictional-to-viscous transitional depths during dextral deformation and is most commonly characterized by multiple generations of foliation-parallel frictional melt veins that were subsequently deformed through viscous shearing and transformed into thin ultramylonite layers. While this variety of pseudotachylyte has only been positively identified along three ~25 km long fault segments within the central portion of the Norumbega (e.g., Sandhill Corner), we speculate it may be more widespread in the fault system owing to difficulties in recognition in the field and a lack of detailed imaging and laboratory studies of mylonite-hosted pseudotachylyte-bearing rocks in the fault system. Younger (Permian-Early Triassic) undeformed pseudotachylyte-bearing faults have been found discontinuously along much of the Norumbega and presumably these occurrences reflect countless high velocity coseismic slip events at shallower depths. Spectacularly

  4. NASA ground terminal communication equipment automated fault isolation expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Y. K.; Wetzel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    The prototype expert systems are described that diagnose the Distribution and Switching System I and II (DSS1 and DSS2), Statistical Multiplexers (SM), and Multiplexer and Demultiplexer systems (MDM) at the NASA Ground Terminal (NGT). A system level fault isolation expert system monitors the activities of a selected data stream, verifies that the fault exists in the NGT and identifies the faulty equipment. Equipment level fault isolation expert systems are invoked to isolate the fault to a Line Replaceable Unit (LRU) level. Input and sometimes output data stream activities for the equipment are available. The system level fault isolation expert system compares the equipment input and output status for a data stream and performs loopback tests (if necessary) to isolate the faulty equipment. The equipment level fault isolation system utilizes the process of elimination and/or the maintenance personnel's fault isolation experience stored in its knowledge base. The DSS1, DSS2 and SM fault isolation systems, using the knowledge of the current equipment configuration and the equipment circuitry issues a set of test connections according to the predefined rules. The faulty component or board can be identified by the expert system by analyzing the test results. The MDM fault isolation system correlates the failure symptoms with the faulty component based on maintenance personnel experience. The faulty component can be determined by knowing the failure symptoms. The DSS1, DSS2, SM, and MDM equipment simulators are implemented in PASCAL. The DSS1 fault isolation expert system was converted to C language from VP-Expert and integrated into the NGT automation software for offline switch diagnoses. Potentially, the NGT fault isolation algorithms can be used for the DSS1, SM, amd MDM located at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

  5. A dynamic fault tree model of a propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Hong; Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Meshkat, Leila

    2006-01-01

    We present a dynamic fault tree model of the benchmark propulsion system, and solve it using Galileo. Dynamic fault trees (DFT) extend traditional static fault trees with special gates to model spares and other sequence dependencies. Galileo solves DFT models using a judicious combination of automatically generated Markov and Binary Decision Diagram models. Galileo easily handles the complexities exhibited by the benchmark problem. In particular, Galileo is designed to model phased mission systems.

  6. Real-time fault diagnosis for propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter C.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Delaat, John C.; Duyar, Ahmet

    1991-01-01

    Current research toward real time fault diagnosis for propulsion systems at NASA-Lewis is described. The research is being applied to both air breathing and rocket propulsion systems. Topics include fault detection methods including neural networks, system modeling, and real time implementations.

  7. Formation and Suppression of Strike-Slip Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, Ivy S.; Bird, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Strike-slip faults are a defining feature of plate tectonics, yet many aspects of their development and evolution remain unresolved. For intact materials and/or regions, a standard sequence of shear development is predicted from physical models and field studies, commencing with the formation of Riedel shears and culminating with the development of a throughgoing fault. However, for materials and/or regions that contain crustal heterogeneities (normal and/or thrust faults, joints, etc.) that predate shear deformation, kinematic evolution of strike-slip faulting is poorly constrained. We present a new plane-stress finite-strain physical analog model developed to investigate primary deformation zone evolution in simple shear, pure strike-slip fault systems in which faults or joints are present before shear initiation. Experimental results suggest that preexisting mechanical discontinuities (faults and/or joints) have a marked effect on the geometry of such systems, causing deflection, lateral distribution, and suppression of shears. A lower limit is placed on shear offset necessary to produce a throughgoing fault in systems containing preexisting structures. Fault zone development observed in these experiments provides new insight for kinematic interpretation of structural data from strike-slip fault zones on Earth, Venus, and other terrestrial bodies.

  8. Fault tolerant architectures for integrated aircraft electronics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, K. N.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Schwartz, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Work into possible architectures for future flight control computer systems is described. Ada for Fault-Tolerant Systems, the NETS Network Error-Tolerant System architecture, and voting in asynchronous systems are covered.

  9. Kinematically Coupled Strike-Slip and Normal Faults in the Lake Mead Strike-Slip Fault System, Southeast Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, S. A.; Marshall, S. T.; Cooke, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    The Lake Mead fault system consists of a ~95 km long, northeast-trending zone of strike-slip faults of Miocene age that accommodate a total left-lateral offset of 20-65 km. We use a combination of detailed field mapping and numerical modeling to show that a previously unnamed left-lateral strike-slip segment of the Lake Mead fault system and a dense cluster of dominantly west-dipping normal faults acted in concert to accommodate regional left-lateral offset. We suggest that the strike-slip fault that we refer to as the Pinto Ridge fault: (1) was kinematically related to other faults of the Lake Mead fault system; (2) was responsible for the creation of the normal fault cluster at Pinto Ridge; and (3) utilized these normal faults as linking structures between separate strike-slip fault segments to create a longer, through-going fault. Results from numerical models demonstrate that the observed location and curving strike patterns of the normal fault cluster is consistent with the faults having formed as secondary structures as the result of the perturbed stress field around the slipping Pinto Ridge fault. Comparison of mechanical efficiency of various normal fault geometries within extending terranes suggests that the observed west dip of normal faults reflects a west- dipping anisotropy at depth, such as a detachment. The apparent terminations of numerous strike-slip faults of the Lake Mead fault system into west-dipping normal faults suggest that a west-dipping detachment may be regionally coherent.

  10. Online Monitoring System for Performance Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gioiosa, Roberto; Kestor, Gokcen; Kerbyson, Darren J.

    2014-12-31

    To achieve the exaFLOPS performance within a contained power budget, next generation supercomputers will feature hundreds of millions of components operating at low- and near-threshold voltage. As the probability that at least one of these components fails during the execution of an application approaches certainty, it seems unrealistic to expect that any run of a scientific application will not experience some performance faults. We believe that there is need of a new generation of light-weight performance and debugging tools that can be used online even during production runs of parallel applications and that can identify performance anomalies during the application execution. In this work we propose the design and implementation of such a monitoring system.

  11. Online Monitoring System for Performance Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gioiosa, Roberto; Kestor, Gokcen; Kerbyson, Darren J.

    2014-05-19

    To achieve the exaFLOPS performance within a contain power budget, next supercomputers will feature hundreds of millions of components operating at low- and near-threshold voltage. As the probability that at least one of these components fails during the execution of an application approaches certainty, it seems unrealistic to expect that any run of a scientific application will not experience some performance faults. We believe that there is need of a new generation of light-weight performance and debugging tools that can be used online even during production runs of parallel applications and that can identify performance anomalies during the application execution. In this work we propose the design and implementation of a monitoring system that continuously inspects the evolution of run

  12. Architectural issues in fault-tolerant, secure computing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation explores several facets of the applicability of fault-tolerance techniques to secure computer design, these being: (1) how fault-tolerance techniques can be used on unsolved problems in computer security (e.g., computer viruses, and denial-of-service); (2) how fault-tolerance techniques can be used to support classical computer-security mechanisms in the presence of accidental and deliberate faults; and (3) the problems involved in designing a fault-tolerant, secure computer system (e.g., how computer security can degrade along with both the computational and fault-tolerance capabilities of a computer system). The approach taken in this research is almost as important as its results. It is different from current computer-security research in that a design paradigm for fault-tolerant computer design is used. This led to an extensive fault and error classification of many typical security threats. Throughout this work, a fault-tolerance perspective is taken. However, the author did not ignore basic computer-security technology. For some problems he investigated how to support and extend basic-security mechanism (e.g., trusted computing base), instead of trying to achieve the same result with purely fault-tolerance techniques.

  13. Morphostructural study of the Belledonne faults system (French Alps).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billant, Jérémy; Bellier, Olivier; Hippolyte, Jean-Claude; Godard, Vincent; Manchuel, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    The NE trending Belledonne faults system, located in the Alps, is a potentially active faults system that extends from the Aiguilles Rouges and Mont Blanc massifs in the NE to the Vercors massif in the SW (subalpine massifs). It includes the Belledonne border fault (BBF), defined by an alignment of micro earthquakes (ML≤3.5) along the eastern part of the Grésivaudan valley (Thouvenot et al., 2003). Focal mechanisms and their respective depths tend to confirm a dextral strike-slip faulting at crustal scale. In the scope of the Sigma project (http://projet-sigma.com/index.html, EDF), this study aims at better constraining the geometry, kinematic and seismogenic potential of the constitutive faults of the Belledonne fault system, by using a multidisciplinary approach that includes tectonics, geomorphology and geophysics. Fault kinematic analysis along the BBF (Billant et al., 2015) and the Jasneuf fault allows the determination of a strike-slip tectonic regime characterised by an ENE trending σ1 stress axes, which is consistent with stress state deduced from the focal mechanisms. Although no morphological anomalies could be related to recent faulting along the BBF, new clues of potential Quaternary deformations were observed along the other faults of the system: -right lateral offset of morphologic markers (talwegs...) along the NE trending Arcalod fault located at the north-eastern terminations of the BBF; -left lateral offset of the valley formed by the Isère glacier along the NW trending Brion fault which is consistent with its left-lateral slip inferred from the focal mechanisms; -fault scarps and right lateral offsets of cliffs bordering a calcareous plateau and talwegs along the four fault segments of the NE trending Jasneuf fault located at the south-western termination of the BBF in the Vercors massif. Some offsets were measured using a new method that does not require the identification of piercing points and take advantage of the high resolution

  14. Design and validation of fault-tolerant flight systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finelli, George B.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1987-01-01

    NASA has undertaken the development of a methodology for the design of easily validated fault-tolerant systems which emphasizes validation processes that can be directly incorporated into the design process. Attention is presently given to the statistical issues arising in the validation of highly reliable fault-tolerant systems. Structured specification and design methodologies, mathematical proof techniques, analytical modeling, simulation/emulation, and physical testing, are all discussed. Important design factors associated with fault-tolerance are noted; synchronization and 'Byzantine resilience' must accompany fault tolerance.

  15. Transformations in shallow fault zones; evidence from fault rocks in young strike-slip systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pluijm, B. A.; Schleicher, A. M.; Warr, L. N.

    2008-12-01

    cataclasis creates nucleation sites for neomineralization or produces localized melting in upper-crustal strike-slip fault systems (< 5 km depth), which is coupled to slip rate. Transformations in shallow fault rock involve the localization of clay neomineralization along slip surfaces in creeping segments, controlling strength in the shallowest segment of fault zones. During sudden, large displacements, the energy can be sufficient to produce friction melts that are similarly generated at small slip surfaces. Thus, shallow faults rocks preserve mineral and state transformations during faulting, and provide information on the history of fluid activity, mass transport and mechanical behavior. Additionally, dating of neocrystallized mineral phases by radiogenic techniques provides the age of faulting and can constrain rates of crustal deformation.

  16. Modeling and Fault Simulation of Propellant Filling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunchun; Liu, Weidong; Hou, Xiaobo

    2012-05-01

    Propellant filling system is one of the key ground plants in launching site of rocket that use liquid propellant. There is an urgent demand for ensuring and improving its reliability and safety, and there is no doubt that Failure Mode Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a good approach to meet it. Driven by the request to get more fault information for FMEA, and because of the high expense of propellant filling, in this paper, the working process of the propellant filling system in fault condition was studied by simulating based on AMESim. Firstly, based on analyzing its structure and function, the filling system was modular decomposed, and the mathematic models of every module were given, based on which the whole filling system was modeled in AMESim. Secondly, a general method of fault injecting into dynamic system was proposed, and as an example, two typical faults - leakage and blockage - were injected into the model of filling system, based on which one can get two fault models in AMESim. After that, fault simulation was processed and the dynamic characteristics of several key parameters were analyzed under fault conditions. The results show that the model can simulate effectively the two faults, and can be used to provide guidance for the filling system maintain and amelioration.

  17. Simultaneous fault detection and control for switched systems with actuator faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the fault detection and control problem for discrete-time switched systems. The actuator faults, especially 'outage cases', are considered. The detector/controller is designed simultaneously such that the closed-loop system switches under an average dwell time, and when a fault is detected, an alarm is generated and then the controller is switched to allow the norm of the states of the subsystem to increase within the acceptable limits. Thus, a switching strategy which combines average dwell time switching with event-driven switching is proposed. Under this switching strategy, the attention is focused on designing the detector/controller such that estimation errors between residual signals and faults are minimised for the fulfillment of fault detection objectives; simultaneously, the closed-loop system becomes asymptotically stable for the fulfillment of control objectives. A two-step procedure is adopted to obtain the solutions through satisfying a set of linear matrix inequalities. An example comprising of three cases is considered. Through these cases, it is demonstrated that the fault detection and control for switched systems using a two-stage switching strategy and asynchronous switching are feasible.

  18. Expert systems for real-time monitoring and fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, S. J.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for building real-time onboard expert systems were investigated, and the use of expert systems technology was demonstrated in improving the performance of current real-time onboard monitoring and fault diagnosis applications. The potential applications of the proposed research include an expert system environment allowing the integration of expert systems into conventional time-critical application solutions, a grammar for describing the discrete event behavior of monitoring and fault diagnosis systems, and their applications to new real-time hardware fault diagnosis and monitoring systems for aircraft.

  19. Fault-tolerance for exascale systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Riesen, Rolf E.; Varela, Maria Ruiz; Ferreira, Kurt Brian

    2010-08-01

    Periodic, coordinated, checkpointing to disk is the most prevalent fault tolerance method used in modern large-scale, capability class, high-performance computing (HPC) systems. Previous work has shown that as the system grows in size, the inherent synchronization of coordinated checkpoint/restart (CR) limits application scalability; at large node counts the application spends most of its time checkpointing instead of executing useful work. Furthermore, a single component failure forces an application restart from the last correct checkpoint. Suggested alternatives to coordinated CR include uncoordinated CR with message logging, redundant computation, and RAID-inspired, in-memory distributed checkpointing schemes. Each of these alternatives have differing overheads that are dependent on both the scale and communication characteristics of the application. In this work, using the Structural Simulation Toolkit (SST) simulator, we compare the performance characteristics of each of these resilience methods for a number of HPC application patterns on a number of proposed exascale machines. The result of this work provides valuable guidance on the most efficient resilience methods for exascale systems.

  20. Mantle fluids in the San Andreas fault system, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, B.M.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Evans, William C.; Ellwood, A.; DePaolo, D.J.; Thordsen, J.; Ambats, G.; Mariner, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Fluids associated with the San Andreas and companion faults n central and south-central California have high 3He/4He ratios. The lack of correlation between helium isotopes and fluid chemistry or local geology requires that fluids enter the fault system from the mantle. Mantle fluids passing through the ductile lower crust must enter the brittle fault zone at or near lithostatic pressures; estimates of fluid flux based on helium isotopes suggest that they may thus contribute directly to fault-weakening high-fluid pressures at seismogenic depths.

  1. Mantle fluids in the San Andreas fault system, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.M.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Evans, W.C.

    1997-11-14

    Fluids associated with the San Andreas and companion faults in central and south-central California have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios. The lack of correlation between helium isotopes and fluid chemistry or local geology requires that fluids enter the fault system from the mantle. Mantle fluids passing through the ductile lower crust must enter the brittle fault zone at or near lithostatic pressures; estimates of fluid flux based on helium isotopes suggest that they may thus contribute directly to fault-weakening high-fluid pressures at seismogenic depths. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Fault-tolerance - The survival attribute of digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avizienis, A.

    1978-01-01

    Fault-tolerance is the architectural attribute of a digital system that keeps the logic machine doing its specified tasks when its host, the physical system, suffers various kinds of failures of its components. A more general concept of fault-tolerance also includes human mistakes committed during software and hardware implementation and during man/machine interaction among the causes of faults that are to be tolerated by the logic machine. This paper discusses the concept of fault-tolerance, the reasons for its inclusion in digital system architecture, and the methods of its implementation. A chronological view of the evolution of fault-tolerant systems and an outline of some goals for its further development conclude the presentation.

  3. Results of an electrical power system fault study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Johnson, Yvette B.

    1992-01-01

    NASA-Marshall conducted a study of electrical power system faults with a view to the development of AI control systems for a spacecraft power system breadboard. The results of this study have been applied to a multichannel high voltage dc spacecraft power system, the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System (LASEPS) breadboard. Some of the faults encountered in testing LASEPS included the shorting of a bus an a falloff in battery cell capacity.

  4. Results of an electrical power system fault study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Johnson, Yvette B.

    NASA-Marshall conducted a study of electrical power system faults with a view to the development of AI control systems for a spacecraft power system breadboard. The results of this study have been applied to a multichannel high voltage dc spacecraft power system, the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System (LASEPS) breadboard. Some of the faults encountered in testing LASEPS included the shorting of a bus an a falloff in battery cell capacity.

  5. Catastrophic fault diagnosis in dynamic systems using bond graph methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yarom, Tamar.

    1990-01-01

    Detection and diagnosis of faults has become a critical issue in high performance engineering systems as well as in mass-produced equipment. It is particularly helpful when the diagnosis can be made at the initial design level with respect to a prospective fault list. A number of powerful methods have been developed for aiding in the general fault analysis of designs. Catastrophic faults represent the limit case of complete local failure of connections or components. They result in the interruption of energy transfer between corresponding points in the system. In this work the conventional approach to fault detection and diagnosis is extended by means of bond-graph methods to a wide variety of engineering systems. Attention is focused on catastrophic fault diagnosis. A catastrophic fault dictionary is generated from the system model based on topological properties of the bond graph. The dictionary is processed by existing methods to extract a catastrophic fault report to aid the engineer in performing a design analysis.

  6. All-to-all sequenced fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-11-02

    An apparatus, program product and method enable nodal fault detection by sequencing communications between all system nodes. A master node may coordinate communications between two slave nodes before sequencing to and initiating communications between a new pair of slave nodes. The communications may be analyzed to determine the nodal fault.

  7. Comparing fault susceptibility of multiple ISAs and operating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyłek, Sławomir

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a research that aims to compare effects of faults on different configurations of computer systems. The study covers comparison of susceptibility to faults of x86, AMD64, ARM, PowerPC, MIPS architectures and Linux, FreeBSD, Minix operating systems. An emulation based software implemented fault injection technique was used to perform experiments. The problem of choosing an adequate number of tests in experiments is followed by report with collected results where multiple aspects of test runs were analyzed: providing correct computation result, availability of the system under test and error messages. The research allows to determine characteristics of susceptibility to faults of each platform and is a first step towards designing new fault tolerance solutions and assessing their effectiveness.

  8. Fault tolerant architectures for integrated aircraft electronics systems, task 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitt, K. N.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Schwartz, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The architectural basis for an advanced fault tolerant on-board computer to succeed the current generation of fault tolerant computers is examined. The network error tolerant system architecture is studied with particular attention to intercluster configurations and communication protocols, and to refined reliability estimates. The diagnosis of faults, so that appropriate choices for reconfiguration can be made is discussed. The analysis relates particularly to the recognition of transient faults in a system with tasks at many levels of priority. The demand driven data-flow architecture, which appears to have possible application in fault tolerant systems is described and work investigating the feasibility of automatic generation of aircraft flight control programs from abstract specifications is reported.

  9. Software For Fault-Tree Diagnosis Of A System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, Dave; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Liao, Jack

    1993-01-01

    Fault Tree Diagnosis System (FTDS) computer program is automated-diagnostic-system program identifying likely causes of specified failure on basis of information represented in system-reliability mathematical models known as fault trees. Is modified implementation of failure-cause-identification phase of Narayanan's and Viswanadham's methodology for acquisition of knowledge and reasoning in analyzing failures of systems. Knowledge base of if/then rules replaced with object-oriented fault-tree representation. Enhancement yields more-efficient identification of causes of failures and enables dynamic updating of knowledge base. Written in C language, C++, and Common LISP.

  10. High-Intensity Radiated Field Fault-Injection Experiment for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Amy M.; Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Gonzalez, Oscar R.; Gray, W. Steven

    2010-01-01

    Safety-critical distributed flight control systems require robustness in the presence of faults. In general, these systems consist of a number of input/output (I/O) and computation nodes interacting through a fault-tolerant data communication system. The communication system transfers sensor data and control commands and can handle most faults under typical operating conditions. However, the performance of the closed-loop system can be adversely affected as a result of operating in harsh environments. In particular, High-Intensity Radiated Field (HIRF) environments have the potential to cause random fault manifestations in individual avionic components and to generate simultaneous system-wide communication faults that overwhelm existing fault management mechanisms. This paper presents the design of an experiment conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center's HIRF Laboratory to statistically characterize the faults that a HIRF environment can trigger on a single node of a distributed flight control system.

  11. Oblique fault systems crossing the Seattle Basin: Geophysical evidence for additional shallow fault systems in the central Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Chris G.; Keranen, Katie M.

    2012-03-01

    Upper plate seismicity in the Puget Lowland is more broadly distributed than mapped fault systems and presents a conundrum for understanding the active tectonics of the region. Although many previous studies have mapped faulting in the Puget Lowland from subsurface geophysical data, many of these efforts have focused specifically on mapping the structure of the Seattle Fault Zone and the South Whidbey Island Fault. The thick glacial sediments and extensive water bodies may conceal additional active faults away from these major structures. We map fault networks in Quaternary sediments broadly throughout the central Puget Lowland using existing marine multichannel seismic reflection data sets with widely distributed profiles to extend the results of previous work. We identify a NE-SW zone of recent high-angle faulting and shallow sediment deformation crossing the Seattle Uplift and the Seattle Basin that segments the Seattle Fault Zone and is distinct from previously mapped fault systems. Faults in this zone cut or deform sediments at the seafloor, and the zone trends across the central Puget Lowland at an oblique angle to major regional structures. Two additional zones of faulting trend NW-SE and cut through the Seattle Basin and the Kingston Arch, respectively. Aeromagnetic lineations extend the NE-SW trend of deformation across the Seattle Uplift and connect deformation of shallow sediment in the Puget Sound with deformation of shallow sediment in the Hood Canal. These oblique fault structures may partially control the wide distribution of seismicity within the central Puget Lowland and should be considered in seismic hazard assessments.

  12. Coulomb Stress Accumulation along the San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Bridget; Sandwell, David

    2003-01-01

    Stress accumulation rates along the primary segments of the San Andreas Fault system are computed using a three-dimensional (3-D) elastic half-space model with realistic fault geometry. The model is developed in the Fourier domain by solving for the response of an elastic half-space due to a point vector body force and analytically integrating the force from a locking depth to infinite depth. This approach is then applied to the San Andreas Fault system using published slip rates along 18 major fault strands of the fault zone. GPS-derived horizontal velocity measurements spanning the entire 1700 x 200 km region are then used to solve for apparent locking depth along each primary fault segment. This simple model fits remarkably well (2.43 mm/yr RMS misfit), although some discrepancies occur in the Eastern California Shear Zone. The model also predicts vertical uplift and subsidence rates that are in agreement with independent geologic and geodetic estimates. In addition, shear and normal stresses along the major fault strands are used to compute Coulomb stress accumulation rate. As a result, we find earthquake recurrence intervals along the San Andreas Fault system to be inversely proportional to Coulomb stress accumulation rate, in agreement with typical coseismic stress drops of 1 - 10 MPa. This 3-D deformation model can ultimately be extended to include both time-dependent forcing and viscoelastic response.

  13. Sliding mode based fault detection, reconstruction and fault tolerant control scheme for motor systems.

    PubMed

    Mekki, Hemza; Benzineb, Omar; Boukhetala, Djamel; Tadjine, Mohamed; Benbouzid, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    The fault-tolerant control problem belongs to the domain of complex control systems in which inter-control-disciplinary information and expertise are required. This paper proposes an improved faults detection, reconstruction and fault-tolerant control (FTC) scheme for motor systems (MS) with typical faults. For this purpose, a sliding mode controller (SMC) with an integral sliding surface is adopted. This controller can make the output of system to track the desired position reference signal in finite-time and obtain a better dynamic response and anti-disturbance performance. But this controller cannot deal directly with total system failures. However an appropriate combination of the adopted SMC and sliding mode observer (SMO), later it is designed to on-line detect and reconstruct the faults and also to give a sensorless control strategy which can achieve tolerance to a wide class of total additive failures. The closed-loop stability is proved, using the Lyapunov stability theory. Simulation results in healthy and faulty conditions confirm the reliability of the suggested framework. PMID:25747198

  14. Programs For Modeling Fault-Tolerant Computing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.

    1991-01-01

    Pade Approximation with Scaling, (PAWS) and Scaling Taylor Exponential Matrix (STEM) computer programs are software tools for design and validation. Provide flexible, user-friendly, language-based interface for input of Markov mathematical methods describing behaviors of fault-tolerant computer systems. Markov models include both recovery from faults via reconfiguration and behaviors of such systems when faults occur. PAWS and STEM produce exact solutions of probability of system failure and provide conservative estimate of number of significant digits in solution. Written in PASCAL and FORTRAN.

  15. Evaluation of reliability modeling tools for advanced fault tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Robert; Scheper, Charlotte

    1986-01-01

    The Computer Aided Reliability Estimation (CARE III) and Automated Reliability Interactice Estimation System (ARIES 82) reliability tools for application to advanced fault tolerance aerospace systems were evaluated. To determine reliability modeling requirements, the evaluation focused on the Draper Laboratories' Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) architecture as an example architecture for fault tolerance aerospace systems. Advantages and limitations were identified for each reliability evaluation tool. The CARE III program was designed primarily for analyzing ultrareliable flight control systems. The ARIES 82 program's primary use was to support university research and teaching. Both CARE III and ARIES 82 were not suited for determining the reliability of complex nodal networks of the type used to interconnect processing sites in the AIPS architecture. It was concluded that ARIES was not suitable for modeling advanced fault tolerant systems. It was further concluded that subject to some limitations (the difficulty in modeling systems with unpowered spare modules, systems where equipment maintenance must be considered, systems where failure depends on the sequence in which faults occurred, and systems where multiple faults greater than a double near coincident faults must be considered), CARE III is best suited for evaluating the reliability of advanced tolerant systems for air transport.

  16. Functional Fault Modeling of a Cryogenic System for Real-Time Fault Detection and Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Perotti, Jose; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Brown, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the model development process used to create a Functional Fault Model (FFM) of a liquid hydrogen (L H2) system that will be used for realtime fault isolation in a Fault Detection, Isolation and Recover (FDIR) system. The paper explains th e steps in the model development process and the data products required at each step, including examples of how the steps were performed fo r the LH2 system. It also shows the relationship between the FDIR req uirements and steps in the model development process. The paper concl udes with a description of a demonstration of the LH2 model developed using the process and future steps for integrating the model in a live operational environment.

  17. Ground Fault Diagnosctic System for PEP-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Glen; Himel, Tom; Johnson, Ralph

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a diagnostic system designed into the String Magnet Power Conversion System that localizes magnet or cable ground faults in the PEP-II rings. This system provides online diagnostics that allow the operator/maintenance personnel to identify the magnet string that has the ground fault and the region in the ring where the ground fault exists. Furthermore, it is our goal to identify within 2 adjacent magnets where this fault exists. The system utilizes the existing PEP-II control system with transient digitizers, ADCs to monitor voltages and currents from the DC/DC converters and the voltage across the soft ground resistor at each bulk power supply. Also, the magnet string voltages are monitored in six locations around the ring to provide an adaptive model of the voltage distribution for each for each magnet string. These signals are utilized in a ground fault location algorithm that identifies and displays the magnet string and specific magnet candidate with the ground fault, on the operators console. Wave forms taken during the fault event are also available for examination at the operators console.

  18. Fault Slip Rate of the Kazerun Fault System (KFS), Iran, Investigated Using Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoorcheh, Bijan; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2015-10-01

    A 3D non-homogenous finite element model (FEM) is developed to investigate the spatial variations of interseismic deformation for the Kazerun Fault System (KFS) in the Zagros Mountains of Iran. The model includes 19 fault segments that were extracted from geological maps and previous studies, and the average slips in the dip and strike directions on these segments were computed. The contemporary surface deformation is simulated using a free horizontal detachment surface. The dip angles of the faults in the model are varied at 90°, 70°, 50° and 30° to simulate different 3D representations of the fault systems. Tectonic loading at the boundaries of the region is applied using predicted GPS velocity vectors to the north (southern part of the Central Iran Block) and south (southern region of the Zagros mountain belt), which were obtained by solving inverse and forward problems. Where possible, the fault slip rates that are obtained using our non-homogeneous finite element model are validated using the long-term geologic and instantaneous GPS slip rates. The model is then used to estimate the dip- and strike-slip rates of the fault segments of the KFS for which no a priori information was available. We derive an upper bound of 1 mm/year for the average dip-slip rate in the region, which is consistent with estimates from geomorphologic observations. The modeling results show that in addition to the 4 main faults (Dena, Kazerun, Kareh Bas and Main Recent), other faults, such as the Zagros Front, Main Front, High Zagros and Mishan faults, accommodate up to 2.5 mm/year of the differential movement between the North and Central Zagros. We also investigated the contrast in rigidity between the southern and northern areas of the Zagros mountain belt and found that a rigidity contrast of 2 best explains the GPS data of contemporary surface deformation. Neglecting to account for the rigidity contrast in the model can lead to biased estimates of the fault slip rate of up to

  19. Comparing Different Fault Identification Algorithms in Distributed Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkaabi, Salim

    A power system is a huge complex system that delivers the electrical power from the generation units to the consumers. As the demand for electrical power increases, distributed power generation was introduced to the power system. Faults may occur in the power system at any time in different locations. These faults cause a huge damage to the system as they might lead to full failure of the power system. Using distributed generation in the power system made it even harder to identify the location of the faults in the system. The main objective of this work is to test the different fault location identification algorithms while tested on a power system with the different amount of power injected using distributed generators. As faults may lead the system to full failure, this is an important area for research. In this thesis different fault location identification algorithms have been tested and compared while the different amount of power is injected from distributed generators. The algorithms were tested on IEEE 34 node test feeder using MATLAB and the results were compared to find when these algorithms might fail and the reliability of these methods.

  20. Suppression of strike-slip fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    In orogens elongated parallel to a great circle about the Euler pole for the two bounding plates, theory requires simple-shear deformation in the form of distributed deformation or velocity discontinuities across strike-slip faults. This type of deformation, however, does not develop at all plate boundaries requiring toroidal motion. Using the global plate boundary model, PB2002 [Bird, 2003], as the basis for identifying areas where expected simple-shear deformation is absent or underdeveloped, it was also possible to identify two potential causes for this behavior: (1) the presence of extensive fracturing at right angles to the shear plane and (2) regional cover of flood basalts or andesites with columnar joints. To test this hypothesis, a new plane-stress finite-strain model was developed to study the effects of such pre-existing structures on the development of simple shear in a clay cake. A homogenous kaolinite-water mixture was poured into a deforming parallelogram box and partially dried to allow for brittle and plastic deformation at and below the surface of the clay, respectively. This was floated on a dense fluid foundation, effectively removing basal friction, and driven by a motor in a sinistral direction from the sides of the box. Control experiments produced classic Riedel model fault assemblages and discrete, through-going primary deformation zones (PDZs); experiments with pre-existing structures developed the same, though subdued and distributed, fault assemblages but did not develop through-going PDZs. Although formation of strike-slip faults was underdeveloped at the surface in clay with pre-existing structures, offset within the clay cake (measured, with respect to a fixed point, by markers on the clay surface) as a fraction of total offset of the box was consistently larger than that of the control experiments. This suggests that while the extent of surface faulting was lessened in clay with pre-existing structures, slip was still occurring at

  1. Disturbance observer based fault estimation and dynamic output feedback fault tolerant control for fuzzy systems with local nonlinear models.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Yingchun; Liu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the problems of fault estimation (FE) and fault tolerant control (FTC) for fuzzy systems with local nonlinear models, external disturbances, sensor and actuator faults, simultaneously. Disturbance observer (DO) and FE observer are designed, simultaneously. Compared with the existing results, the proposed observer is with a wider application range. Using the estimation information, a novel fuzzy dynamic output feedback fault tolerant controller (DOFFTC) is designed. The controller can be used for the fuzzy systems with unmeasurable local nonlinear models, mismatched input disturbances, and measurement output affecting by sensor faults and disturbances. At last, the simulation shows the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:26456728

  2. Programming fault-tolerant distributed systems in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Susan J.

    1985-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the topic of programming fault-tolerant distributed systems in the Ada programming language are presented. Topics covered include project goals, Ada difficulties and solutions, testbed requirements, and virtual processors.

  3. Use of Fuzzy Logic Systems for Assessment of Primary Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Ivica; Jozsa, Lajos; Baus, Zoran

    2015-09-01

    In electric power systems, grid elements are often subjected to very complex and demanding disturbances or dangerous operating conditions. Determining initial fault or cause of those states is a difficult task. When fault occurs, often it is an imperative to disconnect affected grid element from the grid. This paper contains an overview of possibilities for using fuzzy logic in an assessment of primary faults in the transmission grid. The tool for this task is SCADA system, which is based on information of currents, voltages, events of protection devices and status of circuit breakers in the grid. The function model described with the membership function and fuzzy logic systems will be presented in the paper. For input data, diagnostics system uses information of protection devices tripping, states of circuit breakers and measurements of currents and voltages before and after faults.

  4. Fault Injection and Monitoring Capability for a Fault-Tolerant Distributed Computation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Yates, Amy M.; Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2010-01-01

    The Configurable Fault-Injection and Monitoring System (CFIMS) is intended for the experimental characterization of effects caused by a variety of adverse conditions on a distributed computation system running flight control applications. A product of research collaboration between NASA Langley Research Center and Old Dominion University, the CFIMS is the main research tool for generating actual fault response data with which to develop and validate analytical performance models and design methodologies for the mitigation of fault effects in distributed flight control systems. Rather than a fixed design solution, the CFIMS is a flexible system that enables the systematic exploration of the problem space and can be adapted to meet the evolving needs of the research. The CFIMS has the capabilities of system-under-test (SUT) functional stimulus generation, fault injection and state monitoring, all of which are supported by a configuration capability for setting up the system as desired for a particular experiment. This report summarizes the work accomplished so far in the development of the CFIMS concept and documents the first design realization.

  5. Advanced Information Processing System - Fault detection and error handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is designed to provide a fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing architecture for a broad range of aerospace vehicles, including tactical and transport aircraft, and manned and autonomous spacecraft. A proof-of-concept (POC) system is now in the detailed design and fabrication phase. This paper gives an overview of a preliminary fault detection and error handling philosophy in AIPS.

  6. Multi-directional fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  7. Multi-directional fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-06-29

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  8. Multi-directional fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2009-03-17

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a group of nodes comprising a center node and all adjacent nodes. The center node concurrently communicates with the immediately adjacent nodes in three dimensions. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  9. All row, planar fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian Edward

    2013-07-23

    An apparatus, program product and method for detecting nodal faults may simultaneously cause designated nodes of a cell to communicate with all nodes adjacent to each of the designated nodes. Furthermore, all nodes along the axes of the designated nodes are made to communicate with their adjacent nodes, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  10. A fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Tso, Kam Sing

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the concept, design, and features of a fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system being developed for space and commercial applications that require high dependability. The comprehensive strategy integrates system level hardware/software fault tolerance with task level handling of uncertainties and unexpected events for robotic control. The underlying architecture for system level fault tolerance is the distributed recovery block which protects against application software, system software, hardware, and network failures. Task level fault tolerance provisions are implemented in a knowledge-based system which utilizes advanced automation techniques such as rule-based and model-based reasoning to monitor, diagnose, and recover from unexpected events. The two level design provides tolerance of two or more faults occurring serially at any level of command, control, sensing, or actuation. The potential benefits of such a fault tolerant robotic control system include: (1) a minimized potential for damage to humans, the work site, and the robot itself; (2) continuous operation with a minimum of uncommanded motion in the presence of failures; and (3) more reliable autonomous operation providing increased efficiency in the execution of robotic tasks and decreased demand on human operators for controlling and monitoring the robotic servicing routines.

  11. Fault detection in rotor bearing systems using time frequency techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, N. Harish; Sekhar, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Faults such as misalignment, rotor cracks and rotor to stator rub can exist collectively in rotor bearing systems. It is an important task for rotor dynamic personnel to monitor and detect faults in rotating machinery. In this paper, the rotor startup vibrations are utilized to solve the fault identification problem using time frequency techniques. Numerical simulations are performed through finite element analysis of the rotor bearing system with individual and collective combinations of faults as mentioned above. Three signal processing tools namely Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT), Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) and Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT) are compared to evaluate their detection performance. The effect of addition of Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) on three time frequency techniques is presented. The comparative study is focused towards detecting the least possible level of the fault induced and the computational time consumed. The computation time consumed by HHT is very less when compared to CWT based diagnosis. However, for noisy data CWT is more preferred over HHT. To identify fault characteristics using wavelets a procedure to adjust resolution of the mother wavelet is presented in detail. Experiments are conducted to obtain the run-up data of a rotor bearing setup for diagnosis of shaft misalignment and rotor stator rubbing faults.

  12. Measurement and analysis of operating system fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I.; Tang, D.; Iyer, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a methodology to model and evaluate the fault tolerance characteristics of operational software. The methodology is illustrated through case studies on three different operating systems: the Tandem GUARDIAN fault-tolerant system, the VAX/VMS distributed system, and the IBM/MVS system. Measurements are made on these systems for substantial periods to collect software error and recovery data. In addition to investigating basic dependability characteristics such as major software problems and error distributions, we develop two levels of models to describe error and recovery processes inside an operating system and on multiple instances of an operating system running in a distributed environment. Based on the models, reward analysis is conducted to evaluate the loss of service due to software errors and the effect of the fault-tolerance techniques implemented in the systems. Software error correlation in multicomputer systems is also investigated.

  13. Intelligent fault isolation and diagnosis for communication satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tallo, Donald P.; Durkin, John; Petrik, Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is a prototype diagnosis expert system to provide the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) System with autonomous diagnosis capability. The system, the Fault Isolation and Diagnosis EXpert (FIDEX) system, is a frame-based system that uses hierarchical structures to represent such items as the satellite's subsystems, components, sensors, and fault states. This overall frame architecture integrates the hierarchical structures into a lattice that provides a flexible representation scheme and facilitates system maintenance. FIDEX uses an inexact reasoning technique based on the incrementally acquired evidence approach developed by Shortliffe. The system is designed with a primitive learning ability through which it maintains a record of past diagnosis studies.

  14. Soft-Fault Detection Technologies Developed for Electrical Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, partner universities, and defense contractors are working to develop intelligent power management and distribution (PMAD) technologies for future spacecraft and launch vehicles. The goals are to provide higher performance (efficiency, transient response, and stability), higher fault tolerance, and higher reliability through the application of digital control and communication technologies. It is also expected that these technologies will eventually reduce the design, development, manufacturing, and integration costs for large, electrical power systems for space vehicles. The main focus of this research has been to incorporate digital control, communications, and intelligent algorithms into power electronic devices such as direct-current to direct-current (dc-dc) converters and protective switchgear. These technologies, in turn, will enable revolutionary changes in the way electrical power systems are designed, developed, configured, and integrated in aerospace vehicles and satellites. Initial successes in integrating modern, digital controllers have proven that transient response performance can be improved using advanced nonlinear control algorithms. One technology being developed includes the detection of "soft faults," those not typically covered by current systems in use today. Soft faults include arcing faults, corona discharge faults, and undetected leakage currents. Using digital control and advanced signal analysis algorithms, we have shown that it is possible to reliably detect arcing faults in high-voltage dc power distribution systems (see the preceding photograph). Another research effort has shown that low-level leakage faults and cable degradation can be detected by analyzing power system parameters over time. This additional fault detection capability will result in higher reliability for long-lived power systems such as reusable launch vehicles and space exploration missions.

  15. Object-oriented fault tree models applied to system diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    When a diagnosis system is used in a dynamic environment, such as the distributed computer system planned for use on Space Station Freedom, it must execute quickly and its knowledge base must be easily updated. Representing system knowledge as object-oriented augmented fault trees provides both features. The diagnosis system described here is based on the failure cause identification process of the diagnostic system described by Narayanan and Viswanadham. Their system has been enhanced in this implementation by replacing the knowledge base of if-then rules with an object-oriented fault tree representation. This allows the system to perform its task much faster and facilitates dynamic updating of the knowledge base in a changing diagnosis environment. Accessing the information contained in the objects is more efficient than performing a lookup operation on an indexed rule base. Additionally, the object-oriented fault trees can be easily updated to represent current system status. This paper describes the fault tree representation, the diagnosis algorithm extensions, and an example application of this system. Comparisons are made between the object-oriented fault tree knowledge structure solution and one implementation of a rule-based solution. Plans for future work on this system are also discussed.

  16. Fault tolerant hypercube computer system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madan, Herb S. (Inventor); Chow, Edward (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A fault-tolerant multiprocessor computer system of the hypercube type comprising a hierarchy of computers of like kind which can be functionally substituted for one another as necessary is disclosed. Communication between the working nodes is via one communications network while communications between the working nodes and watch dog nodes and load balancing nodes higher in the structure is via another communications network separate from the first. A typical branch of the hierarchy reporting to a master node or host computer comprises, a plurality of first computing nodes; a first network of message conducting paths for interconnecting the first computing nodes as a hypercube. The first network provides a path for message transfer between the first computing nodes; a first watch dog node; and a second network of message connecting paths for connecting the first computing nodes to the first watch dog node independent from the first network, the second network provides an independent path for test message and reconfiguration affecting transfers between the first computing nodes and the first switch watch dog node. There is additionally, a plurality of second computing nodes; a third network of message conducting paths for interconnecting the second computing nodes as a hypercube. The third network provides a path for message transfer between the second computing nodes; a fourth network of message conducting paths for connecting the second computing nodes to the first watch dog node independent from the third network. The fourth network provides an independent path for test message and reconfiguration affecting transfers between the second computing nodes and the first watch dog node; and a first multiplexer disposed between the first watch dog node and the second and fourth networks for allowing the first watch dog node to selectively communicate with individual ones of the computing nodes through the second and fourth networks; as well as, a second watch dog node

  17. Fault-tolerant interconnection networks for multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Interconnection networks represent the backbone of multiprocessor systems. A failure in the network, therefore, could seriously degrade the system performance. For this reason, fault tolerance has been regarded as a major consideration in interconnection network design. This thesis presents two novel techniques to provide fault tolerance capabilities to three major networks: the Beneline network and the Clos network. First, the Simple Fault Tolerance Technique (SFT) is presented. The SFT technique is in fact the result of merging two widely known interconnection mechanisms: a normal interconnection network and a shared bus. This technique is most suitable for networks with small switches, such as the Baseline network and the Benes network. For the Clos network, whose switches may be large for the SFT, another technique is developed to produce the Fault-Tolerant Clos (FTC) network. In the FTC, one switch is added to each stage. The two techniques are described and thoroughly analyzed.

  18. On the design of fault-tolerant robotic manipulator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesar, Delbert

    1993-02-01

    Robotic systems are finding increasing use in space applications. Many of these devices are going to be operational on board the Space Station Freedom. Fault tolerance has been deemed necessary because of the criticality of the tasks and the inaccessibility of the systems to maintenance and repair. Design for fault tolerance in manipulator systems is an area within robotics that is without precedence in the literature. In this paper, we will attempt to lay down the foundations for such a technology. Design for fault tolerance demands new and special approaches to design, often at considerable variance from established design practices. These design aspects, together with reliability evaluation and modeling tools, are presented. Mechanical architectures that employ protective redundancies at many levels and have a modular architecture are then studied in detail. Once a mechanical architecture for fault tolerance has been derived, the chronological stages of operational fault tolerance are investigated. Failure detection, isolation, and estimation methods are surveyed, and such methods for robot sensors and actuators are derived. Failure recovery methods are also presented for each of the protective layers of redundancy. Failure recovery tactics often span all of the layers of a control hierarchy. Thus, a unified framework for decision-making and control, which orchestrates both the nominal redundancy management tasks and the failure management tasks, has been derived. The well-developed field of fault-tolerant computers is studied next, and some design principles relevant to the design of fault-tolerant robot controllers are abstracted. Conclusions are drawn, and a road map for the design of fault-tolerant manipulator systems is laid out with recommendations for a 10 DOF arm with dual actuators at each joint.

  19. A Fault Tree Approach to Analysis of Organizational Communication Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkin, Belle Ruth; Stephens, Kent G.

    Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) is a method of examing communication in an organization by focusing on: (1) the complex interrelationships in human systems, particularly in communication systems; (2) interactions across subsystems and system boundaries; and (3) the need to select and "prioritize" channels which will eliminate noise in the system and…

  20. ROBUS-2: A Fault-Tolerant Broadcast Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo; Malekpour, Mahyar R.; Miner, Paul S.

    2005-01-01

    The Reliable Optical Bus (ROBUS) is the core communication system of the Scalable Processor-Independent Design for Enhanced Reliability (SPIDER), a general-purpose fault-tolerant integrated modular architecture currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center. The ROBUS is a time-division multiple access (TDMA) broadcast communication system with medium access control by means of time-indexed communication schedule. ROBUS-2 is a developmental version of the ROBUS providing guaranteed fault-tolerant services to the attached processing elements (PEs), in the presence of a bounded number of faults. These services include message broadcast (Byzantine Agreement), dynamic communication schedule update, clock synchronization, and distributed diagnosis (group membership). The ROBUS also features fault-tolerant startup and restart capabilities. ROBUS-2 is tolerant to internal as well as PE faults, and incorporates a dynamic self-reconfiguration capability driven by the internal diagnostic system. This version of the ROBUS is intended for laboratory experimentation and demonstrations of the capability to reintegrate failed nodes, dynamically update the communication schedule, and tolerate and recover from correlated transient faults.

  1. Probabilistic approaches to fault detection in networked discrete event systems.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, Eleftheria; Hadjicostis, Christoforos N

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we consider distributed systems that can be modeled as finite state machines with known behavior under fault-free conditions, and we study the detection of a general class of faults that manifest themselves as permanent changes in the next-state transition functionality of the system. This scenario could arise in a variety of situations encountered in communication networks, including faults occurred due to design or implementation errors during the execution of communication protocols. In our approach, fault diagnosis is performed by an external observer/diagnoser that functions as a finite state machine and which has access to the input sequence applied to the system but has only limited access to the system state or output. In particular, we assume that the observer/diagnoser is only able to obtain partial information regarding the state of the given system at intermittent time intervals that are determined by certain synchronizing conditions between the system and the observer/diagnoser. By adopting a probabilistic framework, we analyze ways to optimally choose these synchronizing conditions and develop adaptive strategies that achieve a low probability of aliasing, i.e., a low probability that the external observer/diagnoser incorrectly declares the system as fault-free. An application of these ideas in the context of protocol testing/classification is provided as an example. PMID:16252815

  2. Health Monitoring System for the SSME-fault detection algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, S.; Galinaitis, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    A Health Monitoring System (HMS) Framework for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) has been developed by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) for the NASA Lewis Research Center. As part of this effort, fault detection algorithms have been developed to detect the SSME faults with sufficient time to shutdown the engine. These algorithms have been designed to provide monitoring coverage during the startup, mainstage and shutdown phases of the SSME operation. The algorithms have the capability to detect multiple SSME faults, and are based on time series, regression and clustering techniques. This paper presents a discussion of candidate algorithms suitable for fault detection followed by a description of the algorithms selected for implementation in the HMS and the results of testing these algorithms with the SSME test stand data.

  3. Fault tolerance control for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Boyang

    2016-08-01

    Fault diagnosis and controller design are two important aspects to improve proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system durability. However, the two tasks are often separately performed. For example, many pressure and voltage controllers have been successfully built. However, these controllers are designed based on the normal operation of PEMFC. When PEMFC faces problems such as flooding or membrane drying, a controller with a specific design must be used. This paper proposes a unique scheme that simultaneously performs fault diagnosis and tolerance control for the PEMFC system. The proposed control strategy consists of a fault diagnosis, a reconfiguration mechanism and adjustable controllers. Using a back-propagation neural network, a model-based fault detection method is employed to detect the PEMFC current fault type (flooding, membrane drying or normal). According to the diagnosis results, the reconfiguration mechanism determines which backup controllers to be selected. Three nonlinear controllers based on feedback linearization approaches are respectively built to adjust the voltage and pressure difference in the case of normal, membrane drying and flooding conditions. The simulation results illustrate that the proposed fault tolerance control strategy can track the voltage and keep the pressure difference at desired levels in faulty conditions.

  4. Fault sensitivity and wear-out analysis of VLSI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gwan Seung

    1994-07-01

    This thesis describes simulation approaches to conduct fault sensitivity and wear-out failure analysis of VLSI systems. A fault-injection approach to study transient impact in VLSI systems is developed. Through simulated fault injection at the device level and, subsequent fault propagation at the gate functional and software levels, it is possible to identify critical bottlenecks in dependability. Techniques to speed up the fault simulation and to perform statistical analysis of fault-impact are developed. A wear-out simulation environment is also developed to closely mimic dynamic sequences of wear-out events in a device through time, to localize weak location/aspect of target chip and to allow generation of TTF (Time-to-failure) distribution of VLSI chip as a whole. First, an accurate simulation of a target chip and its application code is performed to acquire trace data (real workload) on switch activity. Then, using this switch activity information, wear-out of the each component in the entire chip is simulated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  5. Secondary Normal Faulting Near the Terminus of a Strike-Slip Fault Segment in the Lake Mead Fault System, SE Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, S. T.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2003-12-01

    The 95 km long Lake Mead Fault System (LMFS), located about 50 km east of Las Vegas and about 100 km west of the relatively undeformed Colorado Plateau, consists of a group of NE/SW-trending Miocene left-lateral strike-slip faults with a total offset of 65-110 km. Previous work suggests that the LMFS acted as a transform zone to accommodate differential extension between the southern Basin and Range to the north and the metamorphic core complexes of the Colorado River extensional corridor to the south. Studies of individual faults of the LMFS have shown that strike-slip faulting was the dominant mode of deformation while normal faulting, pull-apart basins, and push up structures formed as localized secondary structures related to strike-slip faults. This study focuses on the portion of the LMFS west of the Overton Arm of Lake Mead, which consists of the Bitter Spring Valley Fault (BSVF) and the Hamblin Bay Fault (HBF). Both faults have estimated offsets of 20-60 km, but past mapping efforts have been inconsistent with respect to the BSVF trace locations and degree of fault complexity. In order to demonstrate that the apparent complexity of the BSVF is the result of segmentation and secondary normal faults associated with individual segments, we focused field mapping efforts on an apparent segment of the BSVF near Pinto Ridge, located southwest of the Echo Hills and about 5 km NW of the more prominent HBF. We have identified nine normal faults that initiate near the SW tip of a segment of the BSVF and die out to the south before reaching the HBF. The offset on all these faults is a maximum at their northern intersection with the BSVF, then steadily decreases to zero away from the BSVF. These normal faults range from 0.6 km-2.25 km in length and have variable fault trace patterns. The normal fault originating closest to the SW tip of the BSVF segment curves with increasing distance away towards parallelism with the BSVF. The eight other normal faults are all oriented

  6. A three-dimensional study of fault zone architecture: Results from the SEMP fault system, Austria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, E. K.; Dolan, J. F.; Sammis, C. G.; Hacker, B.; Cole, J.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2008-12-01

    One of the most exciting frontiers in earthquake science is the linkage between the internal structure and mechanical behavior of fault zones. Little is known about how fault-zone structure varies as a function of depth, yet such understanding is vital if we are to understand the mechanical instabilities that control the nucleation and propagation of seismic ruptures. This has led us to the Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg [SEMP] fault system in Austria, a major left-lateral strike-slip fault that has accommodated ~ 60 km of displacement during Oligo-Miocene time. Differential exhumation of the SEMP has resulted in a fault zone that reveals a continuum of structural levels along strike. This provides us with a unique opportunity to directly observe how fault-zone properties change with depth, from near-surface levels, down through the seismogenic crust, across the brittle-ductile transition, and into the uppermost part of the lower crust in western Austria. Here we present results from four key outcrops and discuss the mechanical implications of these new data. Our brittle outcrop at Gstatterboden has been exhumed from at least 4 km depth. Here the SEMP juxtaposes limestone of the Wettersteinkalk on the south against Rauwacken dolomite to the north. Faulting has produced extremely asymmetric damage, extensively shattering and shearing the dolomite while leaving the limestone largely intact. Measurements of outcrop-scale faults and fractures in the dolomite, combined with analysis of grain-size-distributions, suggest that strain has progressively localized to a zone ~ 10 m wide. These findings are compared to those from two outcrops (Kitzlochklamm and Liechtensteinklamm) that bracket the brittle-ductile transition, exhumed from depths of = 10 km. Here, the SEMP juxtaposes Greywacke Zone rocks on the north against carbonate mylonites of the Klammkalk to the south. We calculate the strain gradient in the ductile Klammkalk rocks by analyzing the lattice preferred

  7. A study of fault injection in multichannel spacecraft power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.; Johnson, Yvette B.

    1991-01-01

    NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center proposes to implement fault injection into an electrical power system breadboard to study the reactions of the various control elements of this breadboard. Among the elements to be studied are the remote power controllers, the algorithms in the control computers, and the artificially intelligent control programs resident in this breadboard. To this end, a study of electrical power is being performed to yield a list of the most common power system faults. The results of this study are being applied to a multichannel high-voltage DC spacecraft power system called the Large Autonomous Spacecraft Electrical Power System Breadboard. Some of the reactions of the breadboard to some of the faults which have been encountered are presented along with the results of this study.

  8. Performance of fault-tolerant diagnostics in the hypercube systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafoor, A.; Sole, P.

    1989-08-01

    In this paper, they introduce the concept of fault-tolerant self-diagnosis for distributed systems and show that there exists a performance tradeoff between the complexity of a self-diagnostic algorithm and the level of fault tolerance inherited by the algorithm. For the study, they select hypercube systems and show that designing an optimal algorithm for such systems has an equivalent coding theory formulation which belongs to the class of NP-hard problems. Subsequently, they propose an ''efficient'' diagnostic scheme for these systems and study the performance tradeoff of the proposed algorithm which is based on a combinatorial structure called Hadamard matrix. The authors make an essential use of its properties of symmetrical partitioning and covering in hypercube networks. Using known translate weight distributions, they evaluated the tradeoff between the fault tolerance and traffic complexity of the proposed diagnostic algorithm for hypercubes of small sizes. An interesting compromise is exhibited for the hypercube with an arbitrary size.

  9. New GPS Network on the Active Fault System in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, C.; Chen, Y.; Hu, J.; Lin, C.; Chen, C.; Wang, J.; Chung, L.; Chung, W.; Hsieh, C.; Chen, Y.

    2004-12-01

    According to the historical records, disastrous earthquakes occurred in Taiwan were caused by reactivations of active faults. In last century, there were five with the surface rupture: 1906 Meishan Eq. (the Meishan F.), 1935 Hsihchu Eq. (the Shihtan and the Tuntzuchiao F.), 1946 Hsinhua Eq. (Hsinhua F.), 1951 Hualien-Taitung Eq. (Longitudinal Valley F.), and 1999 Chi-Chi Eq. (the Chelungpu F.). In order to identify earthquake associated surface rupture and further to mitigate potential hazards, the investigation and monitoring on the active fault system are of great urgency. Central Geological Survey (CGS) of Taiwan is currently executing a 5-year (2002-2006) project, integrating geological and geodetic data to better characterize short-term and long-term spatial and temporal variations in deformation across major already-known active faults of Taiwan. For the former, we use field survey, drilling, geophysical exploration, and trenching to recognize the long-term slip rate and recurrence interval of each fault. For the latter, we deploy near-fault campaign-style GPS and leveling monitoring networks. Here we further combine the result of other GPS networks including continuous-mode. This project is actually concentrated on fault-specific investigation.. Until Dec. 2004, we have set up 756 GPS stations and 27 precise leveling lines including 1024 leveling benchmarks. For the purpose of understanding temporal variability and receive continuous record, the CGS began to deploy 6~10 new GPS stations of continuous mode since 2004. Upon the completion of the geodetic project, we are supposed to provide information on short-term slip rates of major active faults. By integrating other geological datasets we will also evaluate the short-term and long-term behavior of the active faults, and further offer insight into spatial and temporal variability in deformation processes.

  10. Distribution of Slip at the Northern Sumatran Fault System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genrich, J. F.; Bock, Y.; McCaffrey, R.; Prawirodirdjo, L.; Stevens, C. W.; Puntodewo, S. S. O.; Subarya, C.; Wdowinski, S.

    2000-01-01

    We model spatial variations in horizontal displacements of 117 geodetic sites measured during annual surveys in 1989-1996 with the Global Positioning System (GPS) as elastic strain across a locked strike-slip fault to infer the contemporary slip rate, locking depth, and location of the Sumatran fault (SF) in northern Sumatra (1 S-3 N). GPS-derived slip rate estimates increase slightly northward from 23 plus or minus 3 mm/yr at 0.8 deg S to 26 plus or minus 2mm/yr at 2.7 N. They agree with geologic estimates north of the Equator, but at 0.5 S they are about 10 mm/yr higher. Strain appears to be distributed asymmetrically about the fault. South of 2 N, about 5 mm/yr of shear is required within the offshore forearc, west of the fault, to achieve a closer agreement of fault locations inferred from GPS velocities with geologically identified traces of the SF. Locking depth estimates are on the order of 10-20 km. The western branch of the major fault bifurcation near 1 N slips at a rate five times higher than the eastern branch. The two main strands of the fault at the northwestern tip of Sumatra (5.5 N) appear to be nearly free of horizontal strain; significant slip must occur away from the two strands, probably further east at two other geologically active branches. The Banda Aceh embayment is extruded to the northwest at a rate of 5 plus or minus 2 mm/yr. Within the estimated velocity uncertainties of several mm/yr, fault-normal deformation along the SF is insignificant. Almost strain free, the northern part of the back-arc basin is part of a rigid Sunda shelf, while the northern forearc is subjected to 8 plus or minus 5 x 10 (exp -8)/yr of extension nearly parallel to the arc.

  11. Fault detection and isolation for multisensor navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Paul A.; Vangraas, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to the problem of erroneous measurement data for multisensor navigation systems. A recursive estimator can be used in conjunction with a 'snapshot' batch estimator to provide fault detection and isolation (FDI) for these systems. A recursive estimator uses past system states to form a new state estimate and compares it to the calculated state based on a new set of measurements. A 'snapshot' batch estimator uses a set of measurements collected simultaneously and compares solutions based on subsets of measurements. The 'snapshot' approach requires redundant measurements in order to detect and isolate faults. FDI is also referred to as Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM).

  12. Fault Tolerance Middleware for a Multi-Core System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael R.; Springer, Paul L.; Zima, Hans P.; James, Mark; Wagner, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Fault Tolerance Middleware (FTM) provides a framework to run on a dedicated core of a multi-core system and handles detection of single-event upsets (SEUs), and the responses to those SEUs, occurring in an application running on multiple cores of the processor. This software was written expressly for a multi-core system and can support different kinds of fault strategies, such as introspection, algorithm-based fault tolerance (ABFT), and triple modular redundancy (TMR). It focuses on providing fault tolerance for the application code, and represents the first step in a plan to eventually include fault tolerance in message passing and the FTM itself. In the multi-core system, the FTM resides on a single, dedicated core, separate from the cores used by the application. This is done in order to isolate the FTM from application faults and to allow it to swap out any application core for a substitute. The structure of the FTM consists of an interface to a fault tolerant strategy module, a responder module, a fault manager module, an error factory, and an error mapper that determines the severity of the error. In the present reference implementation, the only fault tolerant strategy implemented is introspection. The introspection code waits for an application node to send an error notification to it. It then uses the error factory to create an error object, and at this time, a severity level is assigned to the error. The introspection code uses its built-in knowledge base to generate a recommended response to the error. Responses might include ignoring the error, logging it, rolling back the application to a previously saved checkpoint, swapping in a new node to replace a bad one, or restarting the application. The original error and recommended response are passed to the top-level fault manager module, which invokes the response. The responder module also notifies the introspection module of the generated response. This provides additional information to the

  13. Experimental study on superconducting fault current limiting transformer for fault current suppression and system stability improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, H.; Hayakawa, N.; Kashima, N.; Nagaya, S.; Okubo, H.

    2002-08-01

    We have been developing a superconducting fault current limiting transformer (SFCLT) with 3-phase, 500/275 kV, 625 MVA and optimized the main parameters by EMTP simulation. In this paper, we designed and fabricated an experimental scale-down model of SFCLT with 3-phase, 275/105 V, 6.25 kVA, using NbTi superconducting wire. We introduced the experimental model SFCLT into a transient network analyzer consisted of synchronous generators, transformers, transmission lines, circuit breakers and an infinite bus. It was revealed that experimental model had effective function-parameters as was simulated and experimental results clarified the effectiveness of SFCLT having both functions of the fault current suppression and the system stability improvement in a future superconducting power system.

  14. A diagnosis system using object-oriented fault tree models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    Spaceborne computing systems must provide reliable, continuous operation for extended periods. Due to weight, power, and volume constraints, these systems must manage resources very effectively. A fault diagnosis algorithm is described which enables fast and flexible diagnoses in the dynamic distributed computing environments planned for future space missions. The algorithm uses a knowledge base that is easily changed and updated to reflect current system status. Augmented fault trees represented in an object-oriented form provide deep system knowledge that is easy to access and revise as a system changes. Given such a fault tree, a set of failure events that have occurred, and a set of failure events that have not occurred, this diagnosis system uses forward and backward chaining to propagate causal and temporal information about other failure events in the system being diagnosed. Once the system has established temporal and causal constraints, it reasons backward from heuristically selected failure events to find a set of basic failure events which are a likely cause of the occurrence of the top failure event in the fault tree. The diagnosis system has been implemented in common LISP using Flavors.

  15. Dataflow models for fault-tolerant control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Dataflow concepts are used to generate a unified hardware/software model of redundant physical systems which are prone to faults. Basic results in input congruence and synchronization are shown to reduce to a simple model of data exchanges between processing sites. Procedures are given for the construction of congruence schemata, the distinguishing features of any correctly designed redundant system.

  16. Clouds: A support architecture for fault tolerant, distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, P.; Leblanco, R. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Clouds is a distributed operating system providing support for fault tolerance, location independence, reconfiguration, and transactions. The implementation paradigm uses objects and nested actions as building blocks. Subsystems and applications that can be supported by Clouds to further enhance the performance and utility of the system are also discussed.

  17. How fault zones impact regional permeability and groundwater systems: insights from global database of fault zone studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibek, J.; McKenzie, J. M.; Gleeson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Regional and continental scale groundwater flow models derive aquifer permeability distributions from datasets based on hydraulic tests and calibrated local and regional flow models, however, much of this data does not account for barrier/conduit effects of fault zones, local and regional geothermal flow cells, and other fault-controlled flow systems. In this study we researched and compiled fault zone permeability and conceptual permeability models in different geologic settings from published multidisciplinary literature (structural- and hydro-geology, engineering geology of tunnels and mines, and geothermal projects among others). The geospatial database focuses on data-rich regions such as North America, Europe, and Japan. Regionalization of the dominant conceptual models of fault zones was regionalized based on geological attributes and tested conceptually with simple numerical models, to help incorporate the effect of fault zones on regional to continental flow models. Results show that for large regional and continental scale flow modeling, the fault zone data can be generalized by geology to determine the relative importance of fault conduits vs fault barriers, which can be converted to effective anisotropy ratios for large scale flow, although local fault-controlled flow cells in rift zones require appropriate upscaling. The barrier/conduit properties of fault zones are present in all regions and rock types, and the barrier effect must be properly conceptualized in large scale flow models. The fault zone data from different geologic disciplines have different biases (e.g. outcrop studies, deep drillhole tests, tunnels, etc.) depending on scale of hydraulic tests. Finally, the calibrated recharge estimates for fault controlled flow systems may be lower than for unfaulted flow systems due to predominant barrier (regional anisotropy or permeability reduction), suggesting a "scaling effect" on recharge estimates.

  18. Active fault database of Japan: Its construction and search system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, T.; Miyamoto, F.

    2011-12-01

    The Active fault database of Japan was constructed by the Active Fault and Earthquake Research Center, GSJ/AIST and opened to the public on the Internet from 2005 to make a probabilistic evaluation of the future faulting event and earthquake occurrence on major active faults in Japan. The database consists of three sub-database, 1) sub-database on individual site, which includes long-term slip data and paleoseismicity data with error range and reliability, 2) sub-database on details of paleoseismicity, which includes the excavated geological units and faulting event horizons with age-control, 3) sub-database on characteristics of behavioral segments, which includes the fault-length, long-term slip-rate, recurrence intervals, most-recent-event, slip per event and best-estimate of cascade earthquake. Major seismogenic faults, those are approximately the best-estimate segments of cascade earthquake, each has a length of 20 km or longer and slip-rate of 0.1m/ky or larger and is composed from about two behavioral segments in average, are included in the database. This database contains information of active faults in Japan, sorted by the concept of "behavioral segments" (McCalpin, 1996). Each fault is subdivided into 550 behavioral segments based on surface trace geometry and rupture history revealed by paleoseismic studies. Behavioral segments can be searched on the Google Maps. You can select one behavioral segment directly or search segments in a rectangle area on the map. The result of search is shown on a fixed map or the Google Maps with information of geologic and paleoseismic parameters including slip rate, slip per event, recurrence interval, and calculated rupture probability in the future. Behavioral segments can be searched also by name or combination of fault parameters. All those data are compiled from journal articles, theses, and other documents. We are currently developing a revised edition, which is based on an improved database system. More than ten

  19. Managing systems faults on the commercial flight deck: Analysis of pilots' organization and prioritization of fault management information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, William H.

    1993-01-01

    In rare instances, flight crews of commercial aircraft must manage complex systems faults in addition to all their normal flight tasks. Pilot errors in fault management have been attributed, at least in part, to an incomplete or inaccurate awareness of the fault situation. The current study is part of a program aimed at assuring that the types of information potentially available from an intelligent fault management aiding concept developed at NASA Langley called 'Faultfinde' (see Abbott, Schutte, Palmer, and Ricks, 1987) are an asset rather than a liability: additional information should improve pilot performance and aircraft safety, but it should not confuse, distract, overload, mislead, or generally exacerbate already difficult circumstances.

  20. Monitoring microseismicity at the Servita Fault System, Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, P.; Dimate, C.

    2013-05-01

    The Servita Fault System is located in the eastern foothills of the Colombian Andes Eastern Cordillera. It is considered a key fault for detailed active tectonics studies by its capacity to generate destructive earthquakes which has been demonstrated historically and its short distance to Bogotá (7 million inhabitants), about 60 km. With the aim of increasing our knowledge on the active deformation pattern, the geometry and the seismogenic depth of the potentially active structures, a dense temporary seismic network was installed in the Servitá Fault region to register microseismic activity. The network consisted of 21 portable stations, 6 broadband and 15 short period sensors, recording in continuous mode and in-situ data storage. Four permanent stations of the National Seismological Network of Colombia (RSNC) installed in the same region were also used to locate events. A thousand events with local magnitude between 0.1 and 3.2 ML were registered in the region during about 10 months of observation from 2011 to 2012. We used an automatic detection algorithm to identify seismic events and picked P and S wave arrival times manually. Recorded seismicity follows the same trend as the fault system, SW-NE. A group of events located westward of its trace suggests a fault plane dipping to the west. Refined seismicity locations show various clusters, consisting of sequences of small earthquakes with very similar waveforms. The most important cluster is located near the rupture zone of the 2008 Quetame earthquake (Mw=5.9).

  1. Is there a "blind" strike-slip fault at the southern end of the San Jacinto Fault system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymofyeyeva, E.; Fialko, Y. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the interseismic deformation at the southern end of the San Jacinto fault system using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) data. To complement the continuous GPS measurements from the PBO network, we have conducted campaign-style GPS surveys of 19 benchmarks along Highway 78 in the years 2012, 2013, and 2014. We processed the campaign GPS data using GAMIT to obtain horizontal velocities. The data show high velocity gradients East of the surface trace of the Coyote Creek Fault. We also processed InSAR data from the ascending and descending tracks of the ENVISAT mission between the years 2003 and 2010. The InSAR data were corrected for atmospheric artifacts using an iterative common point stacking method. We combined average velocities from different look angles to isolate the fault-parallel velocity field, and used fault-parallel velocities to compute strain rate. We filtered the data over a range of wavelengths prior to numerical differentiation, to reduce the effects of noise and to investigate both shallow and deep sources of deformation. At spatial wavelengths less than 2km the strain rate data show prominent anomalies along the San Andreas and Superstition Hills faults, where shallow creep has been documented by previous studies. Similar anomalies are also observed along parts of the Coyote Creek Fault, San Felipe Fault, and an unmapped southern continuation of the Clark strand of the San Jacinto Fault. At wavelengths on the order of 20km, we observe elevated strain rates concentrated east of the Coyote Creek Fault. The long-wavelength strain anomaly east of the Coyote Creek Fault, and the localized shallow creep observed in the short-wavelength strain rate data over the same area suggest that there may be a "blind" segment of the Clark Fault that accommodates a significant portion of the deformation on the southern end of the San Jacinto Fault.

  2. Study of fault tolerant software technology for dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Zacharias, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    The major aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using systems-based failure detection isolation and compensation (FDIC) techniques in building fault-tolerant software and extending them, whenever possible, to the domain of software fault tolerance. First, it is shown that systems-based FDIC methods can be extended to develop software error detection techniques by using system models for software modules. In particular, it is demonstrated that systems-based FDIC techniques can yield consistency checks that are easier to implement than acceptance tests based on software specifications. Next, it is shown that systems-based failure compensation techniques can be generalized to the domain of software fault tolerance in developing software error recovery procedures. Finally, the feasibility of using fault-tolerant software in flight software is investigated. In particular, possible system and version instabilities, and functional performance degradation that may occur in N-Version programming applications to flight software are illustrated. Finally, a comparative analysis of N-Version and recovery block techniques in the context of generic blocks in flight software is presented.

  3. A System for Fault Management and Fault Consequences Analysis for NASA's Deep Space Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombano, Silvano; Spirkovska, Liljana; Baskaran, Vijaykumar; Aaseng, Gordon; McCann, Robert S.; Ossenfort, John; Smith, Irene; Iverson, David L.; Schwabacher, Mark

    2013-01-01

    NASA's exploration program envisions the utilization of a Deep Space Habitat (DSH) for human exploration of the space environment in the vicinity of Mars and/or asteroids. Communication latencies with ground control of as long as 20+ minutes make it imperative that DSH operations be highly autonomous, as any telemetry-based detection of a systems problem on Earth could well occur too late to assist the crew with the problem. A DSH-based development program has been initiated to develop and test the automation technologies necessary to support highly autonomous DSH operations. One such technology is a fault management tool to support performance monitoring of vehicle systems operations and to assist with real-time decision making in connection with operational anomalies and failures. Toward that end, we are developing Advanced Caution and Warning System (ACAWS), a tool that combines dynamic and interactive graphical representations of spacecraft systems, systems modeling, automated diagnostic analysis and root cause identification, system and mission impact assessment, and mitigation procedure identification to help spacecraft operators (both flight controllers and crew) understand and respond to anomalies more effectively. In this paper, we describe four major architecture elements of ACAWS: Anomaly Detection, Fault Isolation, System Effects Analysis, and Graphic User Interface (GUI), and how these elements work in concert with each other and with other tools to provide fault management support to both the controllers and crew. We then describe recent evaluations and tests of ACAWS on the DSH testbed. The results of these tests support the feasibility and strength of our approach to failure management automation and enhanced operational autonomy

  4. A distributed fault-detection and diagnosis system using on-line parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, T.-H.; Merrill, W.; Duyar, A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a model-based fault-detection and diagnosis system (FDD) is reviewed. The system can be used as an integral part of an intelligent control system. It determines the faults of a system from comparison of the measurements of the system with a priori information represented by the model of the system. The method of modeling a complex system is described and a description of diagnosis models which include process faults is presented. There are three distinct classes of fault modes covered by the system performance model equation: actuator faults, sensor faults, and performance degradation. A system equation for a complete model that describes all three classes of faults is given. The strategy for detecting the fault and estimating the fault parameters using a distributed on-line parameter identification scheme is presented. A two-step approach is proposed. The first step is composed of a group of hypothesis testing modules, (HTM) in parallel processing to test each class of faults. The second step is the fault diagnosis module which checks all the information obtained from the HTM level, isolates the fault, and determines its magnitude. The proposed FDD system was demonstrated by applying it to detect actuator and sensor faults added to a simulation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The simulation results show that the proposed FDD system can adequately detect the faults and estimate their magnitudes.

  5. An expert system for fault section diagnosis of power systems using fuzzy relations

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H.J.; Park, J.K.

    1997-02-01

    This paper proposes an expert system using fuzzy relations to deal with uncertainties imposed on fault section diagnosis of power systems. The authors build sagittal diagrams which represent the fuzzy relations for power systems, and diagnose fault sections using the sagittal diagrams. Next, they examine the malfunction or wrong alarm of relays and circuit breakers based on the alarm information and the estimated fault section. The proposed system provides the fault section candidates in terms of the degree of membership and the malfunction or wrong alarm. An operator monitors these candidates and is able to diagnose the fault section, coping with uncertainties. Experimental studies for real power systems reveal usefulness of the proposed technique to diagnose faults that have uncertainty.

  6. Fracture surface energy of the Punchbowl fault, San Andreas system.

    PubMed

    Chester, Judith S; Chester, Frederick M; Kronenberg, Andreas K

    2005-09-01

    Fracture energy is a form of latent heat required to create an earthquake rupture surface and is related to parameters governing rupture propagation and processes of slip weakening. Fracture energy has been estimated from seismological and experimental rock deformation data, yet its magnitude, mechanisms of rupture surface formation and processes leading to slip weakening are not well defined. Here we quantify structural observations of the Punchbowl fault, a large-displacement exhumed fault in the San Andreas fault system, and show that the energy required to create the fracture surface area in the fault is about 300 times greater than seismological estimates would predict for a single large earthquake. If fracture energy is attributed entirely to the production of fracture surfaces, then all of the fracture surface area in the Punchbowl fault could have been produced by earthquake displacements totalling <1 km. But this would only account for a small fraction of the total energy budget, and therefore additional processes probably contributed to slip weakening during earthquake rupture. PMID:16136142

  7. Fault-tolerant clock synchronization validation methodology. [in computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Johnson, Sally C.

    1987-01-01

    A validation method for the synchronization subsystem of a fault-tolerant computer system is presented. The high reliability requirement of flight-crucial systems precludes the use of most traditional validation methods. The method presented utilizes formal design proof to uncover design and coding errors and experimentation to validate the assumptions of the design proof. The experimental method is described and illustrated by validating the clock synchronization system of the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer. The design proof of the algorithm includes a theorem that defines the maximum skew between any two nonfaulty clocks in the system in terms of specific system parameters. Most of these parameters are deterministic. One crucial parameter is the upper bound on the clock read error, which is stochastic. The probability that this upper bound is exceeded is calculated from data obtained by the measurement of system parameters. This probability is then included in a detailed reliability analysis of the system.

  8. Variogram-based fault diagnosis in an interconnected tank system.

    PubMed

    Kouadri, Abdelmalek; Aitouche, Mohanad Amokrane; Zelmat, Mimoun

    2012-05-01

    We consider in this paper the fault diagnosis problem of a three tank system DTS-200 pilot plant. The presented approach is based on the analysis of the variogram, which is a graphical variance representation that characterizes the distribution of a measured dataset, and is used to extract the sensor fault parameters. These parameters are obtained by determining the best mathematical model that fits the empirical data. Nonlinear regression techniques are used to estimate the model coefficients. Experimental study is provided to illustrate the potential applicability of this method in process monitoring. PMID:22369877

  9. Enhanced Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computing in d -Level Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Earl T.

    2014-12-01

    Error-correcting codes protect quantum information and form the basis of fault-tolerant quantum computing. Leading proposals for fault-tolerant quantum computation require codes with an exceedingly rare property, a transversal non-Clifford gate. Codes with the desired property are presented for d -level qudit systems with prime d . The codes use n =d -1 qudits and can detect up to ˜d /3 errors. We quantify the performance of these codes for one approach to quantum computation known as magic-state distillation. Unlike prior work, we find performance is always enhanced by increasing d .

  10. Exhumation and continental strike-slip fault systems: Introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeske, S.M.; Till, A.B.; Foster, D.A.; Sample, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Metamorphic rocks adjacent to and within strike-slip faultsystems occur in a wide range of tectonic settings. Detailed studies show that for a number of these locales a significant part of the exhumation occurred during strike-slip fault motion, but the specific processes involved are often cryptic. Although some sites share characteristic features, such as metamorphic rocks exhumed in extensional step-overs within overall transtensional systems, no one common theme emerges from all of the studies. Our understanding of the variables that control continental strike-slip faults' interaction with mid- to lower-crustal structures is still primitive.

  11. Vibration Signature Analysis of a Faulted Gear Transmission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Huang, S.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1996-01-01

    A comprehensive procedure in predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions is presented. Experimental data were obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA/Lewis. Time-synchronous-averaged vibration data were recorded throughout the test as the fault progressed from a small single pit to severe pitting over several teeth, and finally tooth fracture. A numerical procedure based on the Wigner-Ville distribution was used to examine the time-averaged vibration data. Results from the Wigner-Ville procedure are compared to results from a variety of signal analysis techniques that include time-domain analysis methods and frequency analysis methods. Using photographs of the gear tooth at various stages of damage, the limitations and accuracy of the various techniques are compared and discussed. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of the different approaches as well as the applicability of the Wigner-Ville method in predicting gear faults.

  12. Vibration signature analysis of a faulted gear transmission system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, F. K.; Huang, S.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1994-06-01

    A comprehensive procedure in predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions is presented. Experimental data was obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. Time synchronous averaged vibration data was recorded throughout the test as the fault progressed from a small single pit to severe pitting over several teeth, and finally tooth fracture. A numerical procedure based on the Winger-Ville distribution was used to examine the time averaged vibration data. Results from the Wigner-Ville procedure are compared to results from a variety of signal analysis techniques which include time domain analysis methods and frequency analysis methods. Using photographs of the gear tooth at various stages of damage, the limitations and accuracy of the various techniques are compared and discussed. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of the different approaches as well as the applicability of the Wigner-Ville method in predicting gear faults.

  13. Vibration Signature Analysis of a Faulted Gear Transmission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Huang, S.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Townsend, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive procedure in predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions is presented. Experimental data was obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. Time synchronous averaged vibration data was recorded throughout the test as the fault progressed from a small single pit to severe pitting over several teeth, and finally tooth fracture. A numerical procedure based on the Winger-Ville distribution was used to examine the time averaged vibration data. Results from the Wigner-Ville procedure are compared to results from a variety of signal analysis techniques which include time domain analysis methods and frequency analysis methods. Using photographs of the gear tooth at various stages of damage, the limitations and accuracy of the various techniques are compared and discussed. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of the different approaches as well as the applicability of the Wigner-Ville method in predicting gear faults.

  14. Timing and rate of exhumation along the Litang fault system, implication for fault reorganization in Southeast Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan-Ze; Replumaz, Anne; Wang, Guo-Can; Leloup, Philippe Hervé; Gautheron, Cécile; Bernet, Matthias; Beek, Peter; Paquette, Jean Louis; Wang, An; Zhang, Ke-Xin; Chevalier, Marie-Luce; Li, Hai-Bing

    2015-06-01

    The Litang fault system that crosses the Litang Plateau, a low relief surface at high elevation (~4200-4800 m above sea level) that is not affected by regional incision, provides the opportunity to study exhumation related to tectonics in the SE Tibetan Plateau independently of regional erosion. Combining apatite and zircon fission track with apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronologic data, we constrain the cooling history of the Litang fault system footwall along two transects. Apatite fission track ages range from 4 to 16 Ma, AHe ages from 2 to 6 Ma, and one zircon fission track age is ~99 Ma. These data imply a tectonic quiet period sustained since at least 100 Ma with a slow denudation rate of ~0.03 km/Ma, interrupted at 7 to 5 Ma by exhumation at a rate between 0.59 and 0.99 km/Ma. We relate that faster exhumation to the onset of motion along the left-lateral/normal Litang fault system. That onset is linked to a Lower Miocene important kinematic reorganization between the Xianshuihe and the Red River faults, with the eastward propagation of the Xianshuihe fault along the Xiaojiang fault system and the formation of the Zhongdian fault. Such strike-slip faults allow the sliding to the east of a wide continental block, with the Litang fault system accommodating differential motion between rigid blocks. The regional evolution appears to be guided by the strike-slip faults, with different phases of deformation, which appears more in agreement with an "hidden plate-tectonic" model rather than with a "lower channel flow" model.

  15. From fissure to fault: A model of fault growth in the Krafla Fissure System, NE Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bramham, Emma; Paton, Douglas; Wright, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Current models of fault growth examine the relationship of fault length (L) to vertical displacement (D) where the faults exhibit the classic fault shape of gradually increasing vertical displacement from zero at the fault tips to a maximum displacement (Dmax) at the middle of the fault. These models cannot adequately explain displacement-length observations at the Krafla fissure swarm, in Iceland's northern volcanic zone, where we observe that many of the faults with significant vertical displacements still retain fissure-like features, with no vertical displacement, along portions of their lengths. We have created a high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Krafla region using airborne LiDAR and measured the displacement/length profiles of 775 faults, with lengths ranging from 10s to 1000s of metres. We have categorised the faults based on the proportion of the profile that was still fissure-like. Fully-developed faults (no fissure-like regions) were further grouped into those with profiles that had a flat-top geometry (i.e. significant proportion of fault length with constant throw), those with a bell-shaped throw profile and those that show regions of fault linkage. We suggest that a fault can most easily accommodate stress by displacing regions that are still fissure-like, and that a fault would be more likely to accommodate stress by linkage once it has reached the maximum displacement for its fault length. Our results demonstrate that there is a pattern of growth from fissure to fault in the Dmax/L ratio of the categorised faults and propose a model for this growth. These data better constrain our understanding of how fissures develop into faults but also provide insights into the discrepancy in D/L profiles from a typical bell-shaped distribution.

  16. An implementation of a hybrid intelligent tool for distribution system fault diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Momoh, J.A.; Dias, L.G.; Laird, D.N.

    1997-04-01

    The common fault in distribution systems due to line outages consists of single-line-to-ground (SLG) faults, with low or high fault impedance. The presence of arcing is commonplace in high impedance SLG faults. Recently, artificial intelligence (AI) based techniques have been introduced for low/high impedance fault diagnosis in ungrounded distribution systems and high impedance fault diagnosis in grounded distribution systems. So far no tool has been developed to identify, locate and classify faults on grounded and ungrounded systems. This paper describes an integrated package for fault diagnosis in either grounded or ungrounded distribution systems. It utilizes rule based schemes as well as artificial neural networks (ANN) to detect, classify and locate faults. Its application on sample test data as well as field test data are reported in the paper.

  17. Development and Evaluation of Fault-Tolerant Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Yong D.; Gupta, Kajal (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The research is concerned with developing a new approach to enhancing fault tolerance of flight control systems. The original motivation for fault-tolerant control comes from the need for safe operation of control elements (e.g. actuators) in the event of hardware failures in high reliability systems. One such example is modem space vehicle subjected to actuator/sensor impairments. A major task in flight control is to revise the control policy to balance impairment detectability and to achieve sufficient robustness. This involves careful selection of types and parameters of the controllers and the impairment detecting filters used. It also involves a decision, upon the identification of some failures, on whether and how a control reconfiguration should take place in order to maintain a certain system performance level. In this project new flight dynamic model under uncertain flight conditions is considered, in which the effects of both ramp and jump faults are reflected. Stabilization algorithms based on neural network and adaptive method are derived. The control algorithms are shown to be effective in dealing with uncertain dynamics due to external disturbances and unpredictable faults. The overall strategy is easy to set up and the computation involved is much less as compared with other strategies. Computer simulation software is developed. A serious of simulation studies have been conducted with varying flight conditions.

  18. Strike-slip linked core complexes: A new kinematic model of basement rock exhumation in a crustal-scale fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Sven Erik; Passchier, Cees; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Stüwe, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    Metamorphic core complexes usually develop as extensional features during continental crustal thinning, such as the Basin and Range and the Aegean Terrane. The Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia is a 2000 km-long and 400 km-wide complex network of crustal-scale strike-slip shear zones in a Neoproterozoic collision zone. Locally, the anastomosing shear zones lead to exhumation of lower crustal segments and represent a new kinematic model for the development of core complexes. We report on two such structures: the Qazaz complex in Saudi Arabia and the Hafafit complex in Egypt. The 15 km-wide Qazaz complex is a triangular dome of gently dipping mylonitic foliations within the 140 km-long sinistral strike-slip Qazaz mylonite zone. The gneissic dome consists of high-grade rocks, surrounded by low-grade metasediments and metavolcanics. The main SE-trending strike-slip Qazaz shear zone splits southwards into two branches around the gneiss dome: the western branch is continuous with the shallow dipping mylonites of the dome core, without overprinting, and changes by more than 90 degrees from a NS-trending strike-slip zone to an EW-trending 40 degree south-dipping detachment that bounds the gneiss dome to the south. The eastern SE-trending sinistral strike-slip shear zone branch is slightly younger and transects the central dome fabrics. The gneiss dome appears to have formed along a jog in the strike-slip shear zone during 40 km of horizontal strike-slip motion, which caused local exhumation of lower crustal rocks by 25 km along the detachment. The eastern shear zone branch formed later during exhumation, transacted the gneiss dome and offset the two parts by another 70 km. The Hafafit core complex in Egypt is of similar shape and size to the Qazaz structure, but forms the northern termination of a sinistral strike-slip zone that is at least 100 km in length. This zone may continue into Saudi Arabia as the Ajjaj shear zone for another 100 km. The NW trending strike slip

  19. Scaling, kinematics and evolution of a polymodal fault system: Hail Creek Mine, NE Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvell, Jacob; Blenkinsop, Thomas; Clarke, Gavin; Tonelli, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    We analyse a system of normal faults that cuts sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, coal, and tuff at Hail Creek Coal Mine in the Bowen Basin, NE Australia. Our detailed mapping utilised the dense borehole network and strip mining operations. The fault surfaces have complex geometries, yet the components of the individual faults show similar orientation variability to the whole fault system. The faults and their components dip to the SE, NW, NNW, and SSE with an orthorhombic symmetry that we refer to as polymodal. There are multiple displacement peaks, with complementary changes on adjacent faults. This observation suggests kinematic coherence between neighbouring faults. Twin displacement peaks on some faults suggest that segment linkage occurred on a scale of hundreds of m. These polymodal faults follow the same displacement-length scaling laws as other normal faults. Fault dip is affected by lithology, with steeper dips in more competent (sandstone) beds. An ‘odd-axis’ construction using whole fault planes suggests that they formed in a triaxial strain state (three different principal strains) with vertical shortening, and horizontal extension along principal directions of 148° and 058°. Odd-axis constructions using individual fault components, as opposed to whole faults, give similar principal strain orientations and maximum strain ratios. The variable component orientations, and the consistency of fault kinematics on different scales, suggest that the faults evolved by the propagation or linkage of smaller components with variable orientations, within the same bulk strain state.

  20. A Fault Tolerant System for an Integrated Avionics Sensor Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Lancraft, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    An aircraft sensor fault tolerant system methodology for the Transport Systems Research Vehicle in a Microwave Landing System (MLS) environment is described. The fault tolerant system provides reliable estimates in the presence of possible failures both in ground-based navigation aids, and in on-board flight control and inertial sensors. Sensor failures are identified by utilizing the analytic relationships between the various sensors arising from the aircraft point mass equations of motion. The estimation and failure detection performance of the software implementation (called FINDS) of the developed system was analyzed on a nonlinear digital simulation of the research aircraft. Simulation results showing the detection performance of FINDS, using a dual redundant sensor compliment, are presented for bias, hardover, null, ramp, increased noise and scale factor failures. In general, the results show that FINDS can distinguish between normal operating sensor errors and failures while providing an excellent detection speed for bias failures in the MLS, indicated airspeed, attitude and radar altimeter sensors.

  1. Fault detection in electromagnetic suspension systems with state estimation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, P.K.; Zhou, F.B.; Kutiyal, R.S. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    High-speed maglev vehicles need a high level of safety that depends on the whole vehicle system's reliability. There are many ways of attaining high reliability for the system. Conventional method uses redundant hardware with majority vote logic circuits. Hardware redundancy costs more, weigh more and occupy more space than that of analytically redundant methods. Analytically redundant systems use parameter identification and state estimation methods based on the system models to detect and isolate the fault of instruments (sensors), actuator and components. In this paper the authors use the Luenberger observer to estimate three state variables of the electromagnetic suspension system: position (airgap), vehicle velocity, and vertical acceleration. These estimates are compared with the corresponding sensor outputs for fault detection. In this paper, they consider FDI of the accelerometer, the sensor which provides the ride quality.

  2. Seismic images of the active fault system in the Yunlin and Chiayi area of Taiwan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Hsiang; Shih, Ruey-Chyuan

    2015-04-01

    The Yunlin and Chiayi area in western Taiwan are well known of having a higher risk of earthquake disaster. The main fault system that controls the structure deformation in this area consists of the Chiuchiungkeng fault, the Meishan fault, and the Gukeng fault. According to historical records, the 1906 Meishan earthquake, magnitude 7.1, was triggered by the right-lateral strike-slip fault Meishan fault. Previous Seismic surveys showed that the Meishan fault is a high angle fault with flower structure. The Chiuchiungkeng fault is a thrust fault, located at front of the western foothills. Formations on the hanging wall and foot wall of the fault, both dipping to the east with different angles, can be identified from seismic images. The Gukeng fault was never been studied before. From the recent study of GPS monitoring, we may found that the velocity field near the Gukeng fault had a significant difference at both side of the fault. In addition, there is other information showed that there exists an aseismic gap around the fault. The above phenomena could be considered as a stress accumulation along the Gukeng fault. In the other words, the Gukeng fault could be playing an important role of controlling the regional surface deformation and seismicity distribution in this area. In this case, it will be worthwhile of knowing where the Gukeng fault is, and its subsurface structure. In this presentation, we will show our study of the subsurface structure of the Gukeng fault by using the seismic exploration method. The data consist of the shallow seismic reflection images those conducted by ourselves and the deeper seismic profiles acquired by CPC. Three dimensional relationships between the Gukeng fault, the Meishan fault, the Chiuchiungkeng fault, and other structures such as the Hsiaomei anticline will be illustrated as well.

  3. New fault locating system for air-insulated substations using optical current detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Y.; Kawazoe, S. ); Ibuki, K.; Yamada, K.; Ochi, N. . Itami Works)

    1992-10-01

    This paper deals with a newly developed fault locating system. This fault locating system helps to shorten the time required for restoration of service after the occurrence of a busbar fault in an air-insulated distribution substation. Recent optical and electronic technologies allow highly accurate and compact fault locating system, which consists of optical current detectors using Faraday effect and a fault locating processor employing digital data processing technique. The fault location is made by discriminating the direction of zero-sequence currents. Through various tests and field operations it has been confirmed that the system has sufficient performance for practical application.

  4. Scattered Wavefield Within the San Andreas Fault System, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, T.; Silver, P. G.; Niu, F.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2004-12-01

    Since transient aseismic deformation at seismogenic depth is one of the key phenomena related to earthquake occurrence, it is important to estimate the physical characteristics of such stress/strain transients within the deeper structure of the fault zone. Analysis of coda (scattered) waves has the potential for identifying such transients because the scattered wavefield is attributed mainly to small-scale heterogeneity that is likely formed by these transient events. In addition, the sampling area of scattered waves is concentrated within the fault zone, compared to the area sampled by direct waves. We have begun a program to map the spatial distribution of fault-zone scatterers and their time dependence within two regions of San Andreas Fault system: the Hayward Fault and the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault. In order to most reliably evaluate the scattered wavefields, we limited our analysis to records from borehole seismographs recorded by the Hayward Fault Network (HFN) and the High-Resolution Seismic Network (HRSN) in each area. For the Hayward fault, we mapped the spatial distribution of scatterers by analysis of the S-wave coda amplification factor (CAF) in a manner similar to Taira and Yomogida (2003). CAF is defined as the amplitude ratio of coda waves among different stations after corrections for source, station, and overall propagation effects (e.g., coda Q). This parameter allows for a statistical characterization of the distribution of scatterers. The station effect for each station and the coda Q averaged over all the seismograms in this area were estimated by the coda-normalization and maximum likelihood methods, respectively, using five regional earthquakes (epicentral distance > 50 km). We evaluated the CAF value of each source-station pair for the transverse-component, using 294 seismograms for 39 local earthquakes (epicentral distance < 50 km) recorded by 14 stations of the HFN. A map of CAF values for stations near the Hayward Fault

  5. cost and benefits optimization model for fault-tolerant aircraft electronic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The factors involved in economic assessment of fault tolerant systems (FTS) and fault tolerant flight control systems (FTFCS) are discussed. Algorithms for optimization and economic analysis of FTFCS are documented.

  6. An expert systems approach to automated fault diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, N.; Malin, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The implementation of the life support function on the Space Station will probably have to be based on regenerative life support techniques. It is essential that the regenerative subsystems operate with minimum attendance from the crew. However, the results of extensive testing show that uninterrupted subsystem operation over long periods of time (e.g., months) is not easy to achieve. In order to achieve longer periods of time on line for these subsystems, it is necessary that the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) designers focus their attention on technologies which will permit both increasing the mean time between shutdowns and decreasing the time for which a subsystem is down for fault diagnosis and maintenance. With the aim to be able to perform the fault diagnosis on line rather than after the subsystem has shut down, an expert systems approach to automated fault diagnostics is considered. A description is given of a program, designated CS-1 'FIXER' for fault isolation expert to enhance reliability.

  7. Sensor-based fault diagnosis in a flight expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, M.; Scharnhorst, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A prototype of a knowledge-based flight expert system (FLES) has been developed to assist airplane pilots in monitoring, analyzing, and diagnosing faults and to provide support in reducing the pilot's own mistakes. A sensor simulation model has been developed to provide FLES with the airplane status information during the diagnostic process. The simulator is based partly on the Advanced Concept System (ACS), a future-generation airplane, and partly on the Boeing 737, an existing airplane. The architecture of FLES contains several subsystems. One of the major subsystems performs fault diagnosis in the electrical system of the ACS. This paper describes the mechanism and functionality of the automatic diagnosis performed in this expert system.

  8. Reliability modeling of fault-tolerant computer based systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.

    1987-01-01

    Digital fault-tolerant computer-based systems have become commonplace in military and commercial avionics. These systems hold the promise of increased availability, reliability, and maintainability over conventional analog-based systems through the application of replicated digital computers arranged in fault-tolerant configurations. Three tightly coupled factors of paramount importance, ultimately determining the viability of these systems, are reliability, safety, and profitability. Reliability, the major driver affects virtually every aspect of design, packaging, and field operations, and eventually produces profit for commercial applications or increased national security. However, the utilization of digital computer systems makes the task of producing credible reliability assessment a formidable one for the reliability engineer. The root of the problem lies in the digital computer's unique adaptability to changing requirements, computational power, and ability to test itself efficiently. Addressed here are the nuances of modeling the reliability of systems with large state sizes, in the Markov sense, which result from systems based on replicated redundant hardware and to discuss the modeling of factors which can reduce reliability without concomitant depletion of hardware. Advanced fault-handling models are described and methods of acquiring and measuring parameters for these models are delineated.

  9. Validation of a fault-tolerant clock synchronization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, R. W.; Johnson, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    A validation method for the synchronization subsystem of a fault tolerant computer system is investigated. The method combines formal design verification with experimental testing. The design proof reduces the correctness of the clock synchronization system to the correctness of a set of axioms which are experimentally validated. Since the reliability requirements are often extreme, requiring the estimation of extremely large quantiles, an asymptotic approach to estimation in the tail of a distribution is employed.

  10. SIGPI. Fault Tree Cut Set System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Patenaude, C.J.

    1992-01-14

    SIGPI computes the probabilistic performance of complex systems by combining cut set or other binary product data with probability information on each basic event. SIGPI is designed to work with either coherent systems, where the system fails when certain combinations of components fail, or noncoherent systems, where at least one cut set occurs only if at least one component of the system is operating properly. The program can handle conditionally independent components, dependent components, or a combination of component types and has been used to evaluate responses to environmental threats and seismic events. The three data types that can be input are cut set data in disjoint normal form, basic component probabilities for independent basic components, and mean and covariance data for statistically dependent basic components.

  11. SIGPI. Fault Tree Cut Set System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Patenaude, C.J.

    1992-01-13

    SIGPI computes the probabilistic performance of complex systems by combining cut set or other binary product data with probability information on each basic event. SIGPI is designed to work with either coherent systems, where the system fails when certain combinations of components fail, or noncoherent systems, where at least one cut set occurs only if at least one component of the system is operating properly. The program can handle conditionally independent components, dependent components, or a combination of component types and has been used to evaluate responses to environmental threats and seismic events. The three data types that can be input are cut set data in disjoint normal form, basic component probabilities for independent basic components, and mean and covariance data for statistically dependent basic components.

  12. Fault Tree Cut Set System Performance.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-02-21

    Version 00 SIGPI computes the probabilistic performance of complex systems by combining cut set or other binary product data with probability information on each basic event. SIGPI is designed to work with either coherent systems, where the system fails when certain combinations of components fail, or noncoherent systems, where at least one cut set occurs only if at least one component of the system is operating properly. The program can handle conditionally independent components, dependentmore » components, or a combination of component types and has been used to evaluate responses to environmental threats and seismic events. The three data types that can be input are cut set data in disjoint normal form, basic component probabilities for independent basic components, and mean and covariance data for statistically dependent basic components.« less

  13. Estimating Rates of Fault Insertion and Test Effectiveness in Software Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, A.; Munson, J.

    1998-01-01

    In developing a software system, we would like to estimate the total number of faults inserted into a software system, the residual fault content of that system at any given time, and the efficacy of the testing activity in executing the code containing the newly inserted faults.

  14. Fault recovery for real-time, multi-tasking computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Richard (Inventor); Kelly, Gerald B. (Inventor); Rogers, Randy (Inventor); Stange, Kent A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    System and methods for providing a recoverable real time multi-tasking computer system are disclosed. In one embodiment, a system comprises a real time computing environment, wherein the real time computing environment is adapted to execute one or more applications and wherein each application is time and space partitioned. The system further comprises a fault detection system adapted to detect one or more faults affecting the real time computing environment and a fault recovery system, wherein upon the detection of a fault the fault recovery system is adapted to restore a backup set of state variables.

  15. Study on fault-tolerant processors for advanced launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Kang G.; Liu, Jyh-Charn

    1990-01-01

    Issues related to the reliability of a redundant system with large main memory are addressed. The Fault-Tolerant Processor (FTP) for the Advanced Launch System (ALS) is used as a basis for the presentation. When the system is free of latent faults, the probability of system crash due to multiple channel faults is shown to be insignificant even when voting on the outputs of computing channels is infrequent. Using channel error maskers (CEMs) is shown to improve reliability more effectively than increasing redundancy or the number of channels for applications with long mission times. Even without using a voter, most memory errors can be immediately corrected by those CEMs implemented with conventional coding techniques. In addition to their ability to enhance system reliability, CEMs (with a very low hardware overhead) can be used to dramatically reduce not only the need of memory realignment, but also the time required to realign channel memories in case, albeit rare, such a need arises. Using CEMs, two different schemes were developed to solve the memory realignment problem. In both schemes, most errors are corrected by CEMs, and the remaining errors are masked by a voter.

  16. ARGES: an Expert System for Fault Diagnosis Within Space-Based ECLS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachura, David W.; Suleiman, Salem A.; Mendler, Andrew P.

    1988-01-01

    ARGES (Atmospheric Revitalization Group Expert System) is a demonstration prototype expert system for fault management for the Solid Amine, Water Desorbed (SAWD) CO2 removal assembly, associated with the Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System. ARGES monitors and reduces data in real time from either the SAWD controller or a simulation of the SAWD assembly. It can detect gradual degradations or predict failures. This allows graceful shutdown and scheduled maintenance, which reduces crew maintenance overhead. Status and fault information is presented in a user interface that simulates what would be seen by a crewperson. The user interface employs animated color graphics and an object oriented approach to provide detailed status information, fault identification, and explanation of reasoning in a rapidly assimulated manner. In addition, ARGES recommends possible courses of action for predicted and actual faults. ARGES is seen as a forerunner of AI-based fault management systems for manned space systems.

  17. SIFT - Design and analysis of a fault-tolerant computer for aircraft control. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wensley, J. H.; Lamport, L.; Goldberg, J.; Green, M. W.; Levitt, K. N.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Shostak, R. E.; Weinstock, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) is an ultrareliable computer for critical aircraft control applications that achieves fault tolerance by the replication of tasks among processing units. The main processing units are off-the-shelf minicomputers, with standard microcomputers serving as the interface to the I/O system. Fault isolation is achieved by using a specially designed redundant bus system to interconnect the processing units. Error detection and analysis and system reconfiguration are performed by software. Iterative tasks are redundantly executed, and the results of each iteration are voted upon before being used. Thus, any single failure in a processing unit or bus can be tolerated with triplication of tasks, and subsequent failures can be tolerated after reconfiguration. Independent execution by separate processors means that the processors need only be loosely synchronized, and a novel fault-tolerant synchronization method is described.

  18. Investigating multiple fault rupture at the Salar del Carmen segment of the Atacama Fault System (northern Chile): Fault scarp morphology and knickpoint analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewiak, Oktawian; Victor, Pia; Oncken, Onno

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a new geomorphological approach to investigate the past activity and potential seismic hazard of upper crustal faults at the Salar del Carmen segment of the Atacama Fault System in the northern Chile forearc. Our contribution is based on the analysis of a large set of topographic profiles and allows extrapolating fault analysis from a few selected locations to distances of kilometers along strike of the fault. We detected subtle changes in the fault scarp geometry which may represent the number of paleoearthquakes experienced by the structure and extracted the cumulative and last incremental displacement along strike of the investigated scarps. We also tested the potential of knickpoints in channels crossing the fault scarps as markers for repeated fault rupture and proxies for seismic displacement. The number of paleoearthquakes derived from our analysis is 2-3, well in agreement with recent paleoseismological investigations, which suggest 2-3 earthquakes (Mw = 6.5-6.7) at the studied segments. Knickpoints record the number of events for about 55% of the analyzed profile pairs. Only few knickpoints represent the full seismic displacement, while most retain only a fraction of the displacement. The along-strike displacement distributions suggest fault growth from the center toward the tips and linkage of individual ruptures. Our approach also improves the estimation of paleomagnitudes in case of multiple fault rupture by allowing to quantify the last increment of displacement separately. Paleomagnitudes calculated from total segment length and the last increment of displacement (Mw = 6.5-7.1) are in agreement with paleoseismological results.

  19. Provable Transient Recovery for Frame-Based, Fault-Tolerant Computing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiVito, Ben L.; Butler, Ricky W.

    1992-01-01

    We present a formal verification of the transient fault recovery aspects of the Reliable Computing Platform (RCP), a fault-tolerant computing system architecture for digital flight control applications. The RCP uses NMR-style redundancy to mask faults and internal majority voting to purge the effects of transient faults. The system design has been formally specified and verified using the EHDM verification system. Our formalization accommodates a wide variety of voting schemes for purging the effects of transients.

  20. Development of an accurate transmission line fault locator using the global positioning system satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Harry

    1994-01-01

    A highly accurate transmission line fault locator based on the traveling-wave principle was developed and successfully operated within B.C. Hydro. A transmission line fault produces a fast-risetime traveling wave at the fault point which propagates along the transmission line. This fault locator system consists of traveling wave detectors located at key substations which detect and time tag the leading edge of the fault-generated traveling wave as if passes through. A master station gathers the time-tagged information from the remote detectors and determines the location of the fault. Precise time is a key element to the success of this system. This fault locator system derives its timing from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. System tests confirmed the accuracy of locating faults to within the design objective of +/-300 meters.

  1. Tectonic history and setting of a seismogenic intraplate fault system that lacks microseismicity: The Saline River fault system, southern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Randel Tom; Hall, J. Luke; Gardner, Chris S.

    2013-11-01

    Although the northwest-striking Saline River fault system of southeastern Arkansas is not defined by microseismicity, it is associated with sand blows and shows evidence of Pleistocene and Holocene surface ruptures, suggesting a significant seismogenic potential. This fault system is within the northern Gulf of Mexico interior coastal plain, a region only recently recognized as containing seismogenic faults. To better characterize this active fault system, we reconstructed its post-Paleozoic history using petroleum and coal industry wire-line well log and seismic reflection subsurface data. The Saline river fault system initiated as a series of northwest-striking grabens during Triassic/Jurassic uplift and incipient Gulf of Mexico rifting along the basement Alabama-Oklahoma transform margin of the North American Proterozoic craton. During post-rift subsidence, these grabens were buried by Gulf sediments until mid-Cretaceous uplift and igneous activity resulted in minor extensional reactivation of graben faults. Faulting style changed from extension to transpression during the Late Cretaceous due to compression of eastern North America as the North Atlantic rapidly widened and due to thermal weakening of the Alabama-Oklahoma transform lithospheric discontinuity as it obliquely crossed a mantle hot spot. In the Late Cretaceous, graben faults experienced contractional reactivation and steep, deeply-rooted transpressional faults developed within and parallel to the graben system. These transpressional faults locally displace Eocene, Pleistocene, and Holocene sediments. Fault activity continues on the Saline River fault system due to thin crust along the Alabama-Oklahoma transform and to high heat flow, which act together to weaken the crust and promote seismogenic tectonism. The fault system may lack appreciable microseismicity because the aftershock sequence of the last large earthquake has had time to dissipate.

  2. Fault-tolerant reactor protection system

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, Donald C.

    1997-01-01

    A reactor protection system having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Each division performs independently of the others (asynchronous operation). All communications between the divisions are asynchronous. Each chassis substitutes its own spare sensor reading in the 2/3 vote if a sensor reading from one of the other chassis is faulty or missing. Therefore the presence of at least two valid sensor readings in excess of a set point is required before terminating the output to the hardware logic of a scram inhibition signal even when one of the four sensors is faulty or when one of the divisions is out of service.

  3. Fault-tolerant reactor protection system

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, D.C.

    1997-04-15

    A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Each division performs independently of the others (asynchronous operation). All communications between the divisions are asynchronous. Each chassis substitutes its own spare sensor reading in the 2/3 vote if a sensor reading from one of the other chassis is faulty or missing. Therefore the presence of at least two valid sensor readings in excess of a set point is required before terminating the output to the hardware logic of a scram inhibition signal even when one of the four sensors is faulty or when one of the divisions is out of service. 16 figs.

  4. Meteoric water in normal fault systems: Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic phases in brittle fault rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. H.; Anderson, R.; Mulch, A.; Solum, J. G.; Valley, J. W.; van der Pluijm, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of fluid circulation systems in normal fault systems is fundamental to understanding the nature of fluid movement within the upper crust, and has important implications for the on-going controversy about the strength of faults. Authigenic phases in clay gouges and fault breccias record the isotopic signature of the fluids they formed in equilibrium with, and can be used to understand the ‘plumbing system’ of brittle fault environments. We obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on authigenic illite and/or smectite in clay gouge from normal faults in two geologic environments, 1.) low-angle normal faults (Ruby Mountains detachment, NV; Badwater Turtleback, CA; Panamint range-front detachment; CA; Amargosa detachment; CA; Waterman Hills detachment, CA), and 2.) An intracratonic high-angle normal fault (Moab Fault, UT). All authigenic phases in these clay gouges are moderately light isotopically with respect to oxygen (illite δ18O -2.0 - + 11.5 ‰ SMOW, smectite δ18O +3.6 and 17.9 ‰) and very light isotopically with respect to hydrogen (illite δD -148 to -98 ‰ SMOW, smectite δD -147 to -92 ‰). Fluid compositions calculated from the authigenic clays at temperatures of 50 - 130 ○C (as indicated by clay mineralogy) indicate that both illite and smectite in normal fault clay gouge formed in the presence of near-pristine to moderately-evolved meteoric fluids and that igneous or metamorphic fluids are not involved in clay gouge formation in these normal fault settings. We also obtained paired oxygen and hydrogen isotopic measurements on chlorites derived from footwall chlorite breccias in 4 low-angle normal fault detachment systems (Badwater and Mormon Point Turtlebacks, CA, the Chemehuevi detachment, CA, and the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment, AZ). All chlorites are isotopically light to moderately light with respect to oxygen (δ18O +0.29 to +8.1 ‰ SMOW) and very light with respect to hydrogen (δD -97 to -113 ‰) and indicate

  5. Hidden Markov models for fault detection in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, Padhraic J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a system failure monitoring method and apparatus which learns the symptom-fault mapping directly from training data. The invention first estimates the state of the system at discrete intervals in time. A feature vector x of dimension k is estimated from sets of successive windows of sensor data. A pattern recognition component then models the instantaneous estimate of the posterior class probability given the features, p(w(sub i) perpendicular to x), 1 less than or equal to i is less than or equal to m. Finally, a hidden Markov model is used to take advantage of temporal context and estimate class probabilities conditioned on recent past history. In this hierarchical pattern of information flow, the time series data is transformed and mapped into a categorical representation (the fault classes) and integrated over time to enable robust decision-making.

  6. Hidden Markov models for fault detection in dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, Padhraic J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a system failure monitoring method and apparatus which learns the symptom-fault mapping directly from training data. The invention first estimates the state of the system at discrete intervals in time. A feature vector x of dimension k is estimated from sets of successive windows of sensor data. A pattern recognition component then models the instantaneous estimate of the posterior class probability given the features, p(w(sub i) (vertical bar)/x), 1 less than or equal to i isless than or equal to m. Finally, a hidden Markov model is used to take advantage of temporal context and estimate class probabilities conditioned on recent past history. In this hierarchical pattern of information flow, the time series data is transformed and mapped into a categorical representation (the fault classes) and integrated over time to enable robust decision-making.

  7. Bounded-time fault-tolerant rule-based systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, James C.; Emerson, Allen; Gouda, Mohamed; Miranker, Daniel; Mok, Aloysius; Rosier, Louis

    1990-01-01

    Two systems concepts are introduced: bounded response-time and self-stabilization in the context of rule-based programs. These concepts are essential for the design of rule-based programs which must be highly fault tolerant and perform in a real time environment. The mechanical analysis of programs for these two properties is discussed. The techniques are used to analyze a NASA application.

  8. Decomposition in reliability analysis of fault-tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, K. S.; Geist, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The existing approaches to reliability modeling are briefly reviewed. An examination of the limitations of the existing approaches in modeling ultrareliable fault-tolerant systems illustrates the need to use decomposition techniques. The notion of behavioral decomposition is introduced for dealing with reliability models with a large number of states, and a series of examples is presented. The CARE (computer-aided reliability estimation) and HARP (hybrid automated reliability predictor) approaches to reliability are discussed.

  9. The art of fault-tolerant system reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Johnson, Sally C.

    1990-01-01

    A step-by-step tutorial of the methods and tools used for the reliability analysis of fault-tolerant systems is presented. Emphasis is on the representation of architectural features in mathematical models. Details of the mathematical solution of complex reliability models are not presented. Instead the use of several recently developed computer programs--SURE, ASSIST, STEM, PAWS--which automate the generation and solution of these models is described.

  10. Dynamics, Patterns, and Migration in Earthquake Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Sachs, M. K.; Holliday, J. R.; Heien, E. M.; Turcotte, D. L.; Donnellan, A.; Meadows, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Space-time patterns of earthquakes have been described for many years. These include migration of major earthquakes along fault systems, precursory quiescence, precursory activation, aftershock diffusion, Mogi donuts, long range triggering as in the Landers earthquake, episodic tremor and slip, and precursory chains. A major goal is to use understanding of space time patterns to inform predictions and forecasts of future activity. Online catalogs of earthquakes combined with new analysis techniques based on statistical mechanics, and newly developed sophisticated numerical simulations of fault systems have led to new approaches for understanding these complex dynamical phenomena. In this talk, we summarize a number of these developments, and show how these new methods can be used to deliver information on earthquake occurrence over the web. Examples of these methods include the Virtual California simulation, and the Natural Time Weibull method for computing earthquake probabilities. In the former, we use information about fault system geometry, slip rates, and historic events to build a topologically realistic model of the fault system dynamics. Models of this type show evidence of many of the types of migration and chain behavior that natural earthquakes demonstrate. In the latter, the Natural Time Weibull model makes use of the fat tailed statistics observed for natural earthquakes to compute earthquake probabilities. Using this method for example, it can be seen that earthquake activity south of the island of Japan may have led to the triggering of the devastating M9.1, March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami. We describe prospects for active use of these models and methods of analysis in the future.

  11. Modeling and Measurement Constraints in Fault Diagnostics for HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, Massieh; Auslander, David M.; Bartlett, Peter L.; Haves, Philip; Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-05-30

    Many studies have shown that energy savings of five to fifteen percent are achievable in commercial buildings by detecting and correcting building faults, and optimizing building control systems. However, in spite of good progress in developing tools for determining HVAC diagnostics, methods to detect faults in HVAC systems are still generally undeveloped. Most approaches use numerical filtering or parameter estimation methods to compare data from energy meters and building sensors to predictions from mathematical or statistical models. They are effective when models are relatively accurate and data contain few errors. In this paper, we address the case where models are imperfect and data are variable, uncertain, and can contain error. We apply a Bayesian updating approach that is systematic in managing and accounting for most forms of model and data errors. The proposed method uses both knowledge of first principle modeling and empirical results to analyze the system performance within the boundaries defined by practical constraints. We demonstrate the approach by detecting faults in commercial building air handling units. We find that the limitations that exist in air handling unit diagnostics due to practical constraints can generally be effectively addressed through the proposed approach.

  12. Development of a component centered fault monitoring and diagnosis knowledge based system for space power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C.; Lollar, Louis F.

    1988-01-01

    The overall approach currently being taken in the development of AMPERES (Autonomously Managed Power System Extendable Real-time Expert System), a knowledge-based expert system for fault monitoring and diagnosis of space power systems, is discussed. The system architecture, knowledge representation, and fault monitoring and diagnosis strategy are examined. A 'component-centered' approach developed in this project is described. Critical issues requiring further study are identified.

  13. Fault Analysis of Space Station DC Power Systems-Using Neural Network Adaptive Wavelets to Detect Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun; Dolce, James L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the application of neural network adaptive wavelets for fault diagnosis of space station power system. The method combines wavelet transform with neural network by incorporating daughter wavelets into weights. Therefore, the wavelet transform and neural network training procedure become one stage, which avoids the complex computation of wavelet parameters and makes the procedure more straightforward. The simulation results show that the proposed method is very efficient for the identification of fault locations.

  14. Faults delineation and stress orientations from the microseismicity analysis of the Servita Fault System, Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza García, P.; Dimate, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Servita Fault System (SFS) is located in the eastern foothills of the Colombian Andes Eastern Cordillera. This region is a structurally complex area with high seismogenic potential. The refined analysis of the microseismicity registered by a portable seismic network allows to delineate the main active faults and to estimate the direction of the regional tectonic stress. We analyzed a high quality microearthquake data-set consisting of 890 events occurred during 2011-2012 with a local magnitude range between 0.1 and 3.2 and depths up to 40km. The refined locations of the events show a general SW-NE trend that follows the trace of the SFS. Selected focal mechanisms show predominantly right-lateral strike slip motion. Results show that seismicity to the northern sector of the SFS is distributed in two groups, one on the axial zone of the cordillera and the other on the eastern flank. Most of the microearthquakes are concentrated in the rupture zone of Quetame earthquake (2008, Mw=5.9). Alignment of hypocenters along the eastern flank and some focal mechanisms suggest a fault plane dipping to the west, which is interpreted as the Servita Fault plane. Southwards of the Rio Negro, seismicity decreases and loses continuity. This feature coincides with the trace of the WSW-ENE Rio Blanco Fault which possibly segments the Servita Fault. Southwards, seismicity is spread over a wider area and exhibits deeper hypocenters compared to the northern sector. Hypocenter distribution and focal mechanisms in this sector suggest two planes dipping to the west which we interpret as segments of the Algeciras Fault and another plane (northwards) steeply dipping to the southeast interpreted as the fault plane of the Altamira Fault.

  15. Development of a Digital Ground Fault Monitoring System for NCSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peel, Justin; Schneider, Hans

    2003-10-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) currently uses an analog-based lock-in amplifer system to detect ground faults and ground loops. An alternate system using Digital Signal Processing (DSP) was designed and tested for possible use with NSTX and the National Compact Stellerator Experiment (NCSX), which will be built at PPPL in the future. The DSP system uses Finite Impulse Response (FIR) and Moving Average (MA) filters to implement a digital lock-in analyzer on a single DSP board.

  16. Fault-tolerant software for aircraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Concepts for software to implement real time aircraft control systems on a centralized digital computer were discussed. A fault tolerant software structure employing functionally redundant routines with concurrent error detection was proposed for critical control functions involving safety of flight and landing. A degraded recovery block concept was devised to allow collocation of critical and noncritical software modules within the same control structure. The additional computer resources required to implement the proposed software structure for a representative set of aircraft control functions were discussed. It was estimated that approximately 30 percent more memory space is required to implement the total set of control functions. A reliability model for the fault tolerant software was described and parametric estimates of failure rate were made.

  17. Incipient fault detection study for advanced spacecraft systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, G. Martin; Black, Michael C.; Hovenga, J. Mike; Mcclure, Paul F.

    1986-01-01

    A feasibility study to investigate the application of vibration monitoring to the rotating machinery of planned NASA advanced spacecraft components is described. Factors investigated include: (1) special problems associated with small, high RPM machines; (2) application across multiple component types; (3) microgravity; (4) multiple fault types; (5) eight different analysis techniques including signature analysis, high frequency demodulation, cepstrum, clustering, amplitude analysis, and pattern recognition are compared; and (6) small sample statistical analysis is used to compare performance by computation of probability of detection and false alarm for an ensemble of repeated baseline and faulted tests. Both detection and classification performance are quantified. Vibration monitoring is shown to be an effective means of detecting the most important problem types for small, high RPM fans and pumps typical of those planned for the advanced spacecraft. A preliminary monitoring system design and implementation plan is presented.

  18. Fault detection and fault tolerant control of a smart base isolation system with magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Song, Gangbing

    2011-08-01

    Fault detection and isolation (FDI) in real-time systems can provide early warnings for faulty sensors and actuator signals to prevent events that lead to catastrophic failures. The main objective of this paper is to develop FDI and fault tolerant control techniques for base isolation systems with magneto-rheological (MR) dampers. Thus, this paper presents a fixed-order FDI filter design procedure based on linear matrix inequalities (LMI). The necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a solution for detecting and isolating faults using the H_{\\infty } formulation is provided in the proposed filter design. Furthermore, an FDI-filter-based fuzzy fault tolerant controller (FFTC) for a base isolation structure model was designed to preserve the pre-specified performance of the system in the presence of various unknown faults. Simulation and experimental results demonstrated that the designed filter can successfully detect and isolate faults from displacement sensors and accelerometers while maintaining excellent performance of the base isolation technology under faulty conditions.

  19. Insights on the youngest segment of the Altyn Tagh fault: the Longmu Co - Gozha Co fault system, Western Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, M.; Li, H.; Pan, J.; Sun, Z.; Liu, D.; Wu, C.; Pei, J.; Xu, W.; Huang, X.

    2013-12-01

    The Longmu Co - Gozha Co left-lateral strike-slip fault system (LGCF) is located in the narrowest, highest, coldest and driest part of the remote western Tibetan Plateau. Three main faults, the Longmu Co, Gozha Co and Ashikule faults, from SW to NE, are clear and distinct right-stepping en-echelon faults that connect through an extension zone about halfway between the Altyn Tagh fault (ATF) and the Karakorum fault (KF), the two major strike-slip faults on the Tibetan Plateau. The ~500 km-long LGCF system merges to the NE with the horsetail splays of the western ATF, and to the SW, it connects with, and deforms the KF to create a 27 km-wide restraining double fault bend, near Bangong Lake. Recent tectonic-related events, such as the 1951 volcanic eruption along the Ashikule fault and the 2008 Mw7.2 Yutian earthquake, are additional evidence that the LGCF segment of the ATF constitutes its most recent segment and is currently still propagating to the SW. Other evidence include the fact that its initiation age (~9 Ma) is younger than that of the KF (>14-23 Ma). Although poorly quantitatively documented, partly due to its very remote location at very high elevation making it difficult for field studies, and because the LGCF system is located between two major active faults (ATF and KF) together forming a triple junction, quantifying its activity remains a key problem to understand the kinematics and the tectonics history of the westernmost Tibetan Plateau, and to correlate the various terranes identified eastwards and westwards. The Karakax fault (westernmost segment of the ATF), LGCF and KF together control the tectonics of Western Tibet which itself controls the extrusion of Tibet towards the east. Each of the three faults shows clear and impressive morphological indications of left-lateral active shear that leave no doubt about its left-lateral sense of shear, which is debated. Here, we use field observations, satellite images, topographic maps, total station

  20. Reliability of Fault Tolerant Control Systems. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, N. Eva

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports Part II of a two part effort that is intended to delineate the relationship between reliability and fault tolerant control in a quantitative manner. Reliability properties peculiar to fault-tolerant control systems are emphasized, such as the presence of analytic redundancy in high proportion, the dependence of failures on control performance, and high risks associated with decisions in redundancy management due to multiple sources of uncertainties and sometimes large processing requirements. As a consequence, coverage of failures through redundancy management can be severely limited. The paper proposes to formulate the fault tolerant control problem as an optimization problem that maximizes coverage of failures through redundancy management. Coverage modeling is attempted in a way that captures its dependence on the control performance and on the diagnostic resolution. Under the proposed redundancy management policy, it is shown that an enhanced overall system reliability can be achieved with a control law of a superior robustness, with an estimator of a higher resolution, and with a control performance requirement of a lesser stringency.

  1. Reliable H∞ control of discrete-time systems against random intermittent faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuan; Shen, Dong; Fang, Mengqi; Wang, Youqing

    2016-07-01

    A passive fault-tolerant control strategy is proposed for systems subject to a novel kind of intermittent fault, which is described by a Bernoulli distributed random variable. Three cases of fault location are considered, namely, sensor fault, actuator fault, and both sensor and actuator faults. The dynamic feedback controllers are designed not only to stabilise the fault-free system, but also to guarantee an acceptable performance of the faulty system. The robust H∞ performance index is used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. In terms of linear matrix inequality, the sufficient conditions of the existence of controllers are given. An illustrative example indicates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control method.

  2. PV Systems Reliability Final Technical Report: Ground Fault Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrova, Olga; Flicker, Jack David; Johnson, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We have examined ground faults in PhotoVoltaic (PV) arrays and the efficacy of fuse, current detection (RCD), current sense monitoring/relays (CSM), isolation/insulation (Riso) monitoring, and Ground Fault Detection and Isolation (GFID) using simulations based on a Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis SPICE ground fault circuit model, experimental ground faults installed on real arrays, and theoretical equations.

  3. Fault kinematics of the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, southern Chile; an example of diffuse strain and sinistral transtension along a continental transform margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betka, Paul; Klepeis, Keith; Mosher, Sharon

    2016-04-01

    A system of left-lateral faults that separates the South American and Scotia plates, known as the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, defines the modern tectonic setting of the southernmost Andes and is superimposed on the Late Cretaceous - Paleogene Patagonian fold-thrust belt. Fault kinematic data and crosscutting relationships from populations of thrust, strike-slip and normal faults from Peninsula Brunswick adjacent to the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, presented herein, show kinematic and temporal relationships between thrust faults and sets of younger strike-slip and normal faults. Thrust fault kinematics are homogeneous in the study area and record subhorizontal northeast-directed shortening. Strike-slip faults record east-northeast-directed horizontal shortening, west-northwest-directed horizontal extension and form Riedel and P-shear geometries compatible with left-lateral slip on the main splay of the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system. Normal faults record north-south trending extension that is compatible with the strike-slip faults. The study area occurs in a releasing step-over between overlapping segments of the Magallanes-Fagnano fault system, which localized on antecedent sutures between basement terranes with differing geological origin. Results are consistent with regional tectonic models that suggest sinistral shearing and transtension in the southernmost Andes was contemporaneous with the onset of seafloor spreading in the Western Scotia Sea during the Early Miocene.

  4. Rate-State Modeling of Stress Relaxation in Geometrically Complex Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, J.; Smith, D. E.

    2007-12-01

    Slip of geometrically complex faults involves interactions and processes that do not occur in standard planar fault models. These include off-fault yielding and stress relaxation, which are required to prevent the development of pathological stress conditions on the fault (or in extreme cases fault lock-up). Nielsen and Knopoff [1988] introduced yielding through a simplified form of viscoelastic stress relaxation. However, the mechanical characteristics of the brittle seismogenic crust indicate that faulting processes will dominate the stress relaxation processes. The fractal-like character of fault systems and fault roughness, together with the finite strength of rocks, insures that slight movements of secondary faults, at all scales, will be necessary to accommodate slip of major through-going faults. To model the integrated effect of these processes, we employ an earthquake rate formulation [Dieterich, 1994], which incorporates laboratory-derived rate- and state-dependent frictional properties, on geometrically complex faults. With the rate-state formulation we find that stress relaxation occurs co-seismically during large earthquakes, as delayed stress relaxation in the form of aftershocks, and as spatially distributed background seismicity. During aftershocks the spatial mean of stresses decay at a rate proportional to 1/t. We find large spatial and temporal differences in models of slip of faults with relaxation compared to faults in purely elastic media. We conclude that that yielding and relaxation are important controlling processes that are the mechanics of slip on geometically complex faults

  5. A System for Fault Management for NASA's Deep Space Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombano, Silvano P.; Spirkovska, Liljana; Aaseng, Gordon B.; Mccann, Robert S.; Baskaran, Vijayakumar; Ossenfort, John P.; Smith, Irene Skupniewicz; Iverson, David L.; Schwabacher, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's exploration program envisions the utilization of a Deep Space Habitat (DSH) for human exploration of the space environment in the vicinity of Mars and/or asteroids. Communication latencies with ground control of as long as 20+ minutes make it imperative that DSH operations be highly autonomous, as any telemetry-based detection of a systems problem on Earth could well occur too late to assist the crew with the problem. A DSH-based development program has been initiated to develop and test the automation technologies necessary to support highly autonomous DSH operations. One such technology is a fault management tool to support performance monitoring of vehicle systems operations and to assist with real-time decision making in connection with operational anomalies and failures. Toward that end, we are developing Advanced Caution and Warning System (ACAWS), a tool that combines dynamic and interactive graphical representations of spacecraft systems, systems modeling, automated diagnostic analysis and root cause identification, system and mission impact assessment, and mitigation procedure identification to help spacecraft operators (both flight controllers and crew) understand and respond to anomalies more effectively. In this paper, we describe four major architecture elements of ACAWS: Anomaly Detection, Fault Isolation, System Effects Analysis, and Graphic User Interface (GUI), and how these elements work in concert with each other and with other tools to provide fault management support to both the controllers and crew. We then describe recent evaluations and tests of ACAWS on the DSH testbed. The results of these tests support the feasibility and strength of our approach to failure management automation and enhanced operational autonomy.

  6. Upper crustal fault reactivation and the potential of triggered earthquakes on the Atacama Fault System, N-Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Pia; Ewiak, Oktawian; Thomas, Ziegenhagen; Monika, Sobiesiak; Bernd, Schurr; Gabriel, Gonzalez; Onno, Oncken

    2016-04-01

    The Atacama Fault System (AFS) is an active trench-parallel fault system, located in the forearc of N-Chile directly above the subduction zone interface. Due to its well-exposed position in the hyper arid forearc of N-Chile it is the perfect target to investigate the interaction between the deformation cycle in the overriding forearc and the subduction zone seismic cycle of the underlying megathrust. Although the AFS and large parts of the upper crust are devoid of any noteworthy seismicity, at least three M=7 earthquakes in the past 10 ky have been documented in the paleoseismological record, demonstrating the potential of large events in the future. We apply a two-fold approach to explore fault activation and reactivation patterns through time and to investigate the triggering potential of upper crustal faults. 1) A new methodology using high-resolution topographic data allows us to investigate the number of past earthquakes for any given segment of the fault system as well as the amount of vertical displacement of the last increment. This provides us with a detailed dataset of past earthquake rupture of upper plate faults which is potentially linked to large subduction zone earthquakes. 2) The IPOC Creepmeter array (http://www.ipoc-network.org/index.php/observatory/creepmeter.html) provides us with high-resolution time series of fault displacement accumulation for 11 stations along the 4 most active branches of the AFS. This array monitors the displacement across the fault with 2 samples/min with a resolution of 1μm. Collocated seismometers record the seismicity at two of the creepmeters, whereas the regional seismicity is provided by the IPOC Seismological Networks. Continuous time series of the creepmeter stations since 2009 show that the shallow segments of the fault do not creep permanently. Instead the accumulation of permanent deformation occurs by triggered slip caused by local or remote earthquakes. The 2014 Mw=8.2 Pisagua Earthquake, located close to

  7. Slip rates across the sinistral slip fault system of the Shan Plateau, northern SE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Sieh, K.; Wang, Y.; Liu, J.; Weldon, R. J.; Feng, L.; Chan, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The sinistral-slip fault system of the Shan Plateau, arcing around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis and extending > 700 km from northwest to southeast, poses a high seismic hazard in northern SE Asia. Knowing slip rates and earthquake recurrence intervals of these faults is key to better quantification of that hazard. However, estimates of slip rates along the fault system remain poorly constrained. Here we report a preliminary estimate of the slip rate across the fault system from available campaign GPS velocities. We projected the horizontal GPS velocity vectors relative to the Sunda block reference frame perpendicular to the general strike (~ 240°) of the sinistral faults. The velocity profile shows a gradient of ~ 9 mm/yr over a distance of ~ 550 km that crosses 8 faults, from the Dayingjiang fault in the northwest to the Mengxing fault in the southeast. This suggests the average slip rate across each fault in the system is ~ 1 mm/yr. The 9 mm/yr of GPS velocity gradient across the fault system, however, is only half of the long-term rates determined from offsets of major rivers, ridges and plutons. These geological determinations suffer, however, from poor dating constraints. The discrepancy between the geodetic and geological analyses highlights the need of reliable constraints on slip rates along each of the faults. We have begun field work aimed at determining the slip rate of one of these, the Jinghong fault.

  8. Fault depth and seismic moment rate estimates of the San Andreas Fault System: Observations from seismology and geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, B. R.; Sandwell, D. T.; Shearer, P. M.

    2010-12-01

    The depth of the seismogenic zone is a critical parameter for earthquake hazard models of the San Andreas Fault System. Independent observations from both seismology and geodesy can provide insight into the depths of faulting, however these depths do not always agree. Here we inspect variations in fault depths of 12 segments of the southern San Andreas Fault System derived from over 1000 GPS velocities and 66,000 relocated earthquake hypocenters. Geodetically-determined locking depths range from 6-22 km, while seismogenic thicknesses are largely limited to depths of 11-20 km. Seismogenic depths best match the geodetic locking depths when estimated at the 95% cutoff depth in seismicity and most fault segment depths agree to within 2 km. However, we identify 3 outliers (Imperial, Coyote Creek, and Borrego segments) with significant discrepancies. In these cases the geodetically-inferred locking depths are much shallower than the seismogenic depths. We also inspect seismic moment accumulation rates per unit fault length, with the highest rates estimated for the Mojave and Carrizo segments (~1.8 x 1013 Nm/yr/km) and the lowest rates (~0.2 x 1013 Nm/yr/km) found along several San Jacinto segments. The largest variation in seismic moment is calculated for the Imperial segment, where the moment rate from seismic depths is nearly a factor of 2.5 larger than that from geodetic depths. Such variability has important implications for the accuracy to which the magnitude of future major earthquakes can be estimated.

  9. Active Fault Topography and Fault Outcrops in the Central Part of the Nukumi fault, the 1891 Nobi Earthquake Fault System, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Ueta, K.; Inoue, D.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yanagida, M.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, N.

    2010-12-01

    It is important to evaluate the magnitude of earthquake caused by multiple active faults, taking into account the simultaneous effects. The simultaneity of adjacent active faults are often decided on the basis of geometric distances except for known these paleoseismic records. We have been studied the step area between the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault, which appeared as consecutive ruptures in the 1891 Nobi earthquake, since 2009. The purpose of this study is to establish innovation in valuation technique of the simultaneity of adjacent active faults in addition to the paleoseismic record and the geometric distance. Geomorphological, geological and reconnaissance microearthquake surveys are concluded. The present work is intended to clarify the distribution of tectonic geomorphology along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault by high-resolution interpretations of airborne LiDAR DEM and aerial photograph, and the field survey of outcrops and location survey. The study area of this work is the southeastern Nukumi fault and the northwestern Neodani fault. We interpret DEM using shaded relief map and stereoscopic bird's-eye view made from 2m mesh DEM data which is obtained by airborne laser scanner of Kokusai Kogyo Co., Ltd. Aerial photographic survey is for confirmation of DEM interpretation using 1/16,000 scale photo. As a result of topographic survey, we found consecutive tectonic topography which is left lateral displacement of ridge and valley lines and reverse scarplets along the Nukumi fault and the Neodani fault . From Ogotani 2km southeastern of Nukumi pass which is located at the southeastern end of surface rupture along the Nukumi fault by previous study to Neooppa 9km southeastern of Nukumi pass, we can interpret left lateral topographies and small uphill-facing fault scarps on the terrace surface by detail DEM investigation. These topographies are unrecognized by aerial photographic survey because of heavy vegetation. We have found several new

  10. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, William; Basso, Thomas; Coddington, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  11. Actuator fault estimation and accommodation for switched systems with time delay: Discrete-time case.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongsheng; Jiang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the problems of actuator fault estimation and accommodation for discrete-time switched systems with state delay. By using reduced-order observer method and switched Lyapunov function technique, a fault estimation algorithm is achieved for the discrete-time switched system with actuator fault and state delay. Then based on the obtained online fault estimation information, a switched dynamic output feedback controller is employed to compensate for the effect of faults by stabilizing the closed-loop systems. Finally, an example is proposed to illustrate the obtained results. PMID:26924247

  12. Modeling the Fault Tolerant Capability of a Flight Control System: An Exercise in SCR Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Chris; Cortellessa, Vittorio; DelGobbo, Diego; Mili, Ali; Napolitano, Marcello

    2000-01-01

    In life-critical and mission-critical applications, it is important to make provisions for a wide range of contingencies, by providing means for fault tolerance. In this paper, we discuss the specification of a flight control system that is fault tolerant with respect to sensor faults. Redundancy is provided by analytical relations that hold between sensor readings; depending on the conditions, this redundancy can be used to detect, identify and accommodate sensor faults.

  13. Development and implementation of a power system fault diagnosis expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Minakawa, T.; Ichikawa, Y.; Kunugi, M.; Wada, N.; Shimada, K.; Utsunomiya, M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a fault diagnosis expert system installed at the tohoku Electric Power Company. The main features of this system are careful selection of the inferencing input data, rapid inferencing, integration of the expert system with other systems in a practical structure, and the adoption of a domain shell. This system aims for improved practicability by using time-tagged data from circuit breakers, protective relays, and automatic reclosing relays in addition to the input data used in earlier systems. Furthermore, this system also uses data from fault detection systems that locate fault points within electric stations. This system uses an AI-specific back-end processor to perform inferencing rapidly. Additionally, this fault diagnosis expert system is interfaced and integrated with a restorative operations expert system, an intelligent alarm processing system, and a protective relay setting and management system. Authors developed and adopted a power system fault diagnosis domain shell to ease system development, and used the protective relay operation simulation function of a protective relay setting and management system for system verification.

  14. ISHM-oriented adaptive fault diagnostics for avionics based on a distributed intelligent agent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiuping; Zhong, Zhengqiang; Xu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, an integrated system health management-oriented adaptive fault diagnostics and model for avionics is proposed. With avionics becoming increasingly complicated, precise and comprehensive avionics fault diagnostics has become an extremely complicated task. For the proposed fault diagnostic system, specific approaches, such as the artificial immune system, the intelligent agents system and the Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, are used to conduct deep fault avionics diagnostics. Through this proposed fault diagnostic system, efficient and accurate diagnostics can be achieved. A numerical example is conducted to apply the proposed hybrid diagnostics to a set of radar transmitters on an avionics system and to illustrate that the proposed system and model have the ability to achieve efficient and accurate fault diagnostics. By analyzing the diagnostic system's feasibility and pragmatics, the advantages of this system are demonstrated.

  15. Functional Fault Modeling of a Cryogenic System for Real-Time Fault Detection and Isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrell, Bob; Lewis, Mark; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Perotti, Jose

    2009-01-01

    When setting out to model and/or simulate a complex mechanical or electrical system, a modeler is faced with a vast array of tools, software, equations, algorithms and techniques that may individually or in concert aid in the development of the model. Mature requirements and a well understood purpose for the model may considerably shrink the field of possible tools and algorithms that will suit the modeling solution. Is the model intended to be used in an offline fashion or in real-time? On what platform does it need to execute? How long will the model be allowed to run before it outputs the desired parameters? What resolution is desired? Do the parameters need to be qualitative or quantitative? Is it more important to capture the physics or the function of the system in the model? Does the model need to produce simulated data? All these questions and more will drive the selection of the appropriate tools and algorithms, but the modeler must be diligent to bear in mind the final application throughout the modeling process to ensure the model meets its requirements without needless iterations of the design. The purpose of this paper is to describe the considerations and techniques used in the process of creating a functional fault model of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) system that will be used in a real-time environment to automatically detect and isolate failures.

  16. Shallow Hydrothermal Flow in a Strike-Slip Fault System, Mt Isa, Australia: A Proterozoic Analog for Modern Geothermal Systems Along Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F.; Begbie, M.

    2014-12-01

    Strong E-W shortening during the Isan Orogeny (1590-1500 Ma) led to crustal thickening and compressional inversion of former intracontinental rift basins. The resulting metamorphic/plutonic basement complex is disrupted by conjugate, mutually cross-cutting sets of brittle, late-orogenic strike-slip faults. Dextral strike-slip faults (separations < 25 km) strike NE-NNE, while conjugate sinistral faults strike SE-SSE, defining a wrench regime (σv = σ2) with horizontal maximum compression, σ1, trending c. 100°. The strike-slip faults are recessive except in dilational sites where upwelling hydrothermal fluids have silicified the cataclastic shear zones (CSZ) which protrude as blade-like ridges extending for kilometres across the semi-arid terrain. The mineralized fault segments include sinuous releasing bends where the fault trace is deflected <10° as well as more abrupt dilational stepovers with distributed extension fracturing linking en echelon fault segments. Other components of structural permeability include: (1) innumerable fault-parallel quartz-veins (cm to m thickness) within the CSZ; (2) irregular stringer veins; and (3) a regional set of predominantly extensional, subvertical planar quartz veins oriented 080-120° at moderate angles to the main faults. Broad contemporaneity is indicated by mutual cross-cutting relationships between all structural components. Measured strike separations along shear fractures are consistent with seismic slip increments which refreshed fracture permeability and promoted hydrothermal flow. Textures suggest the faults were exhumed from epithermal boiling environments (<1-2 km depth). Restoration of fault cohesive strength by hydrothermal cementation was critical in allowing continued vein formation by hydraulic extension fracturing. The distribution of hydrothermal quartz within the fault system provides a guide to structural localization of upflow zones in geothermal fields developed along strike-slip faults.

  17. Reactive system verification case study: Fault-tolerant transputer communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, D. Francis; Hamory, Philip J.

    1993-01-01

    A reactive program is one which engages in an ongoing interaction with its environment. A system which is controlled by an embedded reactive program is called a reactive system. Examples of reactive systems are aircraft flight management systems, bank automatic teller machine (ATM) networks, airline reservation systems, and computer operating systems. Reactive systems are often naturally modeled (for logical design purposes) as a composition of autonomous processes which progress concurrently and which communicate to share information and/or to coordinate activities. Formal (i.e., mathematical) frameworks for system verification are tools used to increase the users' confidence that a system design satisfies its specification. A framework for reactive system verification includes formal languages for system modeling and for behavior specification and decision procedures and/or proof-systems for verifying that the system model satisfies the system specifications. Using the Ostroff framework for reactive system verification, an approach to achieving fault-tolerant communication between transputers was shown to be effective. The key components of the design, the decoupler processes, may be viewed as discrete-event-controllers introduced to constrain system behavior such that system specifications are satisfied. The Ostroff framework was also effective. The expressiveness of the modeling language permitted construction of a faithful model of the transputer network. The relevant specifications were readily expressed in the specification language. The set of decision procedures provided was adequate to verify the specifications of interest. The need for improved support for system behavior visualization is emphasized.

  18. Slip rate variability over the Holocene period in the middle Aterno fault system (Italy), retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide dating of exhumed fault-plane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla; Pucci, Stefano; Villani, Fabio; Bourles, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim; Aumaitre, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Numerous numerical modeling studies have described and quantified non-stochastic spatio-temporal variations of earthquake occurrences within fault-networks, such as temporal clustered earthquakes or fault synchronization. However, very few long-enough paleoseismological and geological records are available to test those models against well-constrained dataset and thus account for such variability in the fault behavior. The prerequisites for improving our understanding of fault-rupture processes and thus our capacity to better assess seismic hazard are to acquire paleoseismological records that enable to derive both long-term slip-rate and short-term variability, on a large population of faults and/or within a fault system. These conditions met in Central Apennines, an extensional province where substantial paleoseismological dataset accurately described the Holocene seismic history of a dense network of normal faults. In this study we use 36Cl in situ cosmogenic nuclide to retrieve the seismic history of 3 faults belonging to the Middle Aterno fault system, from north to south: the Bazzano fault, the Roccapreturo fault and the Sulmona fault, a portion of which ruptured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake in Italy. We use a new modeling approach to determine the age and slip of past seismic events from the 36Cl concentration profiles. This model is based on an inverse approach and uses an optimization algorithm enabling all the parameter space (number of events, age and slip of events, pre-exposure) to be explored without a priori constraints (see Tesson et al. in session TS4.2/NH4.16/SM3.8). Using this new approach, we precisely determine the slip events occurrences over the Holocene period of those three faults. The results indicate that the three studied faults have ruptured between 4.5 and 5.5 ka, while the southernmost part of the system has also ruptured between at 1.5-3 ka (Sulmona fault and southern segment of Roccapreturo). Those results are in agreement

  19. Knowledge-based fault diagnosis system for refuse collection vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, CheeFai; Juffrizal, K.; Khalil, S. N.; Nidzamuddin, M. Y.

    2015-05-01

    The refuse collection vehicle is manufactured by local vehicle body manufacturer. Currently; the company supplied six model of the waste compactor truck to the local authority as well as waste management company. The company is facing difficulty to acquire the knowledge from the expert when the expert is absence. To solve the problem, the knowledge from the expert can be stored in the expert system. The expert system is able to provide necessary support to the company when the expert is not available. The implementation of the process and tool is able to be standardize and more accurate. The knowledge that input to the expert system is based on design guidelines and experience from the expert. This project highlighted another application on knowledge-based system (KBS) approached in trouble shooting of the refuse collection vehicle production process. The main aim of the research is to develop a novel expert fault diagnosis system framework for the refuse collection vehicle.

  20. Knowledge-based fault diagnosis system for refuse collection vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, CheeFai; Juffrizal, K.; Khalil, S. N.; Nidzamuddin, M. Y.

    2015-05-15

    The refuse collection vehicle is manufactured by local vehicle body manufacturer. Currently; the company supplied six model of the waste compactor truck to the local authority as well as waste management company. The company is facing difficulty to acquire the knowledge from the expert when the expert is absence. To solve the problem, the knowledge from the expert can be stored in the expert system. The expert system is able to provide necessary support to the company when the expert is not available. The implementation of the process and tool is able to be standardize and more accurate. The knowledge that input to the expert system is based on design guidelines and experience from the expert. This project highlighted another application on knowledge-based system (KBS) approached in trouble shooting of the refuse collection vehicle production process. The main aim of the research is to develop a novel expert fault diagnosis system framework for the refuse collection vehicle.

  1. Map and Data for Quaternary Faults and Fault Systems on the Island of Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Eric C.; Burgmann, Roland; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Dart, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report and digitally prepared, GIS-based map is one of a series of similar products covering individual states or regions of United States that show the locations, ages, and activity rates of major earthquake-related features such as faults and fault-related folds. It is part of a continuing the effort to compile a comprehensive Quaternary fault and fold map and database for the United States, which is supported by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program. Guidelines for the compilation of the Quaternary fault and fold maps for the United States were published by Haller and others (1993) at the onset of this project. This compilation of Quaternary surface faulting and folding in Hawai`i is one of several similar state and regional compilations that were planned for the United States. Reports published to date include West Texas (Collins and others, 1996), New Mexico (Machette and others, 1998), Arizona (Pearthree, 1998), Colorado (Widmann and others, 1998), Montana (Stickney and others, 2000), Idaho (Haller and others, 2005), and Washington (Lidke and others, 2003). Reports for other states such as California and Alaska are still in preparation. The primary intention of this compilation is to aid in seismic-hazard evaluations. The report contains detailed information on the location and style of faulting, the time of most recent movement, and assigns each feature to a slip-rate category (as a proxy for fault activity). It also contains the name and affiliation of the compiler, date of compilation, geographic and other paleoseismologic parameters, as well as an extensive set of references for each feature. The map (plate 1) shows faults, volcanic rift zones, and lineaments that show evidence of Quaternary surface movement related to faulting, including data on the time of most recent movement, sense of movement, slip rate, and continuity of surface expression. This compilation is presented as a digitally prepared map product

  2. Computer-aided reliability estimation. [for fault-tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiffler, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Computer-aided reliability estimation (CARE) programs are developed to improve the tools available for estimating the reliability of fault-tolerant systems. A description is presented of a program, called CARE II, which was developed after the first program reported by Mathur (1971). Attention is given to the CARE II reliability model, the CARE II coverage model, and CARE II limitations which are to be rectified in CARE III. It is pointed out that the present coverage model in CARE II is extremely versatile. The major limitation is related to the burden placed on the user to determine the basic parameters from which the coverage calculations are made.

  3. Design of fault diagnosis system for inertial navigation system based on virtual technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Baiqing; Wang, Boxiong; Li, An; Zhang, Mingzhao; Qin, Fangjun; Pan, Hua

    2006-11-01

    With regard to the complex structure of the inertial navigation system and the low rate of fault detection with BITE (built-in test equipment), a fault diagnosis system for INS based on virtual technologies (virtual instrument and virtual equipment) is proposed in this paper. The hardware of the system is a PXI computer with highly stable performance and strong extensibility. In addition to the basic functions of digital multimeter, oscilloscope and cymometer, it can also measure the attitude of the ship in real-time, connect and control the measurement instruments with digital interface. The software is designed with the languages of Measurement Studio for VB, JAVA, and CULT3D. Using the extensively applied fault-tree reasoning and fault cases makes fault diagnosis. To suit the system to the diagnosis for various navigation electronic equipments, the modular design concept is adopted for the software programming. Knowledge of the expert system is digitally processed and the parameters of the system's interface and the expert diagnosis knowledge are stored in the database. The application shows that system is stable in operation, easy to use, quick and accurate in fault diagnosis.

  4. Earthquakes, Segments, Bends, and Fault-Face Geology: Correlations Within the San Andreas System, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachens, R. C.; Simpson, R. W.; Thurber, C. H.; Murray, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Three-dimensional geologic maps of regions surrounding parts of the San Andreas Fault system reveal correlations between fault face geology and both short- and long-term behavior of the faults. The Loma Prieta fault segment that ruptured during the 1989 M6.9 earthquake, as defined by its aftershocks, closely corresponds to the subsurface reach (80 km long) where a large body of Logan gabbro is truncated at the fault, as defined by its magnetic anomaly. This Jurassic ophiolitic gabbro and its related rocks occupy an unusual fault-bounded basement block within Salinaa, a largely Cretaceous granitic terrane SW of the San Andreas Fault. The along-fault reach of the Logan gabbro also coincides with essentially the entire Santa Cruz Mountains left-bend in the San Andreas Fault. Rejecting a chance coincidence, the position of the Logan gabbro with respect to the left bend implies that the bend is fixed relative to Salinia and that the block NE of the San Andreas Fault has been forced to negotiate around the bend as the blocks moved past each other. Thus the basement rocks of the Logan block appear to define (control?) the Loma Prieta segment in terms both of short-term behavior (earthquakes) and long-term behavior (restraining bend fault geometry). The Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault also closely corresponds to a characteristic geologic unit in the NE face of the fault, the greenstone-rich Permanente terrane of the Franciscan Complex. The along-fault subsurface extent of the Permanente terrane at the fault face, as inferred from a recent 3D tomographic wavespeed model, corresponds to the reach filled by the aftershocks of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Furthermore, the 2004 co-seismic slip inferred from geodetic observations also coincides with the Permanente terrane at the fault face. To test whether these observations are directly related to the presence of the Permanente terrane along the fault face, we looked at fault behavior at the location of its offset

  5. Intelligent fault-tolerant control for swing-arm system in the space-borne spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yufeng; Zhou, Chunjie; Huang, Xiongfeng; Yin, Quan

    2012-04-01

    Fault-tolerant control (FTC) for the space-borne equipments is very important in the engineering design. This paper presents a two-layer intelligent FTC approach to handle the speed stability problem in the swing-arm system suffering from various faults in space. This approach provides the reliable FTC at the performance level, and improves the control flow error detection capability at the code level. The faults degrading the system performance are detected by the performance-based fault detection mechanism. The detected faults are categorized as the anticipated faults and unanticipated faults by the fault bank. Neural network is used as an on-line estimator to approximate the unanticipated faults. The compensation control and intelligent integral sliding mode control are employed to accommodate two types of faults at the performance level, respectively. To guarantee the reliability of the FTC at the code level, the key parts of the program codes are modified by control flow checking by software signatures (CFCSS) to detect the control flow errors caused by the single event upset. Meanwhile, some of the undetected control flow errors can be detected by the FTC at the performance level. The FTC for the anticipated fault and unanticipated fault are verified in Synopsys Saber, and the detection of control flow error is tested in the DSP controller. Simulation results demonstrate the efficiency of the novel FTC approach.

  6. A preliminary transient-fault experiment on the SIFT computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Elks, Carl R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary experiment to study the effectiveness of a fault-tolerant system's ability to handle transient faults. The primary goal of the experiment was to develop the techniques to measure the parameters needed for a reliability analysis of the SIFT computer system which includes th effects of transient faults. A key aspect of such an analysis is the determination of the effectiveness of the operating system's ability to discriminate between transient and permanent faults. A detailed description of the preliminary transient fault experiment along with the results from 297 transient fault injections are given. Although not enough data was obtained to draw statistically significant conclusions, the foundation has been laid for a large-scale transient fault experiment.

  7. UIO design for singular delayed LPV systems with application to actuator fault detection and isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanabadi, Amir Hossein; Shafiee, Masoud; Puig, Vicenc

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the unknown input observer (UIO) design for singular delayed linear parameter varying (LPV) systems is considered regarding its application to actuator fault detection and isolation. The design procedure assumes that the LPV system is represented in the polytopic framework. Existence and convergence conditions for the UIO are established. The design procedure is formulated by means of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Actuator fault detection and isolation is based on using the UIO approach for designing a residual generator that is completely decoupled from unknown inputs and exclusively sensitive to faults. Fault isolation is addressed considering two different strategies: dedicated and generalised bank of observers' schemes. The applicability of these two schemes for the fault isolation is discussed. An open flow canal system is considered as a case study to illustrate the performance and usefulness of the proposed fault detection and isolation method in different fault scenarios.

  8. Incipient fault detection and identification in process systems using accelerating neural network learning

    SciTech Connect

    Parlos, A.G.; Muthusami, J.; Atiya, A.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the development and numerical testing of a robust fault detection and identification (FDI) system using artificial neural networks (ANNs), for incipient (slowly developing) faults occurring in process systems. The challenge in using ANNs in FDI systems arises because of one's desire to detect faults of varying severity, faults from noisy sensors, and multiple simultaneous faults. To address these issues, it becomes essential to have a learning algorithm that ensures quick convergence to a high level of accuracy. A recently developed accelerated learning algorithm, namely a form of an adaptive back propagation (ABP) algorithm, is used for this purpose. The ABP algorithm is used for the development of an FDI system for a process composed of a direct current motor, a centrifugal pump, and the associated piping system. Simulation studies indicate that the FDI system has significantly high sensitivity to incipient fault severity, while exhibiting insensitivity to sensor noise. For multiple simultaneous faults, the FDI system detects the fault with the predominant signature. The major limitation of the developed FDI system is encountered when it is subjected to simultaneous faults with similar signatures. During such faults, the inherent limitation of pattern-recognition-based FDI methods becomes apparent. Thus, alternate, more sophisticated FDI methods become necessary to address such problems. Even though the effectiveness of pattern-recognition-based FDI methods using ANNs has been demonstrated, further testing using real-world data is necessary.

  9. Fault detection and isolation for an active wheelset control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzapour, Mohammad; Mei, T. X.; Xuesong, Jin

    2014-05-01

    Active control for railway wheelsets in the primary suspension has been shown to offer a number of performance gains, and especially it can be used to stabilise the wheelsets without compromising the vehicle's performance on curves. However, the use of actuators, sensors and data processors to replace the traditional passive suspension raises the issue of system safety in the event of a failure of the active control, which could result in the loss of stability (i.e. wheelset hunting), and in more severe cases, derailment. This paper studies the key issue of condition monitoring for an actively controlled railway system, with a focus on actuator failures to detect and isolate failure modes in such a system. It seeks to establish the necessary basis for fault detection to ensure system reliability in the event of malfunction in one of the two actuators. Computer simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  10. FINDS: A fault inferring nonlinear detection system. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancraft, R. E.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The computer program FINDS is written in FORTRAN-77, and is intended for operation on a VAX 11-780 or 11-750 super minicomputer, using the VMS operating system. The program detects, isolates, and compensates for failures in navigation aid instruments and onboard flight control and navigation sensors of a Terminal Configured Vehicle aircraft in a Microwave Landing System environment. In addition, FINDS provides sensor fault tolerant estimates for the aircraft states which are then used by an automatic guidance and control system to land the aircraft along a prescribed path. FINDS monitors for failures by evaluating all sensor outputs simultaneously using the nonlinear analytic relationships between the various sensor outputs arising from the aircraft point mass equations of motion. Hence, FINDS is an integrated sensor failure detection and isolation system.

  11. Investigation of an advanced fault tolerant integrated avionics system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, W. R.; Cottrell, D.; Flanders, J.; Javornik, A.; Rusovick, M.

    1986-01-01

    Presented is an advanced, fault-tolerant multiprocessor avionics architecture as could be employed in an advanced rotorcraft such as LHX. The processor structure is designed to interface with existing digital avionics systems and concepts including the Army Digital Avionics System (ADAS) cockpit/display system, navaid and communications suites, integrated sensing suite, and the Advanced Digital Optical Control System (ADOCS). The report defines mission, maintenance and safety-of-flight reliability goals as might be expected for an operational LHX aircraft. Based on use of a modular, compact (16-bit) microprocessor card family, results of a preliminary study examining simplex, dual and standby-sparing architectures is presented. Given the stated constraints, it is shown that the dual architecture is best suited to meet reliability goals with minimum hardware and software overhead. The report presents hardware and software design considerations for realizing the architecture including redundancy management requirements and techniques as well as verification and validation needs and methods.

  12. Fault zone development and strain partitioning in an extensional strike-slip duplex: A case study from the Mesozoic Atacama fault system, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cembrano, J.; González, G.; Arancibia, G.; Ahumada, I.; Olivares, V.; Herrera, V.

    2005-05-01

    Upper crustal strike-slip duplexes provide an excellent opportunity to address the fundamental question of fault zone development and strain partitioning in an evolving system. Detailed field mapping of the Mesozoic Atacama fault system in the Coastal Cordillera of Northern Chile documents the progressive development of second- and third-order faults forming a duplex at a dilational jog between two overstepping master faults: the sinistral strike-slip, NNW-striking, Jorgillo and Bolfin faults. These are constituted by a meter-wide core of foliated S-C ultracataclasite and cataclasite, flanked by a damage zone of protocataclasite, splay faults and veins. Lateral separation of markers along master faults is on the order of a few kilometers. Second-order, NW-striking, oblique-slip subsidiary fault zones do not show foliated ultracataclasite; lateral sinistral separations are in the range of ˜ 10 to 200 m with a relatively minor normal dip-slip component. In turn, third-order, east-west striking normal faults exhibit centimetric displacement. Oblique-slip (sinistral-normal) fault zones located at the southern termination of the Bolfin fault form a well-developed imbricate fan structure. They exhibit a relatively simple architecture of extensional and extensional-shear fractures bound by low displacement shear fractures. Kinematic analysis of fault slip data from mesoscopic faults within the duplex area, document that the NW-striking and the EW-striking faults accommodate transtension and extension, respectively. Examination of master and subsidiary faults of the duplex indicates a strong correlation between total displacement and internal fault structure. Faults started from arrays of en echelon extensional/extensional-shear fractures that then coalesced into throughgoing strike-slip faults. Further displacement leads to the formation of discrete bands of cataclasite and ultracataclasite that take up a significant part of the total displacement. We interpret that the

  13. The Termination Of The Northwest Basin And Range Into A Northwest Trending Extensional Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trench, D.; Meigs, A.

    2007-12-01

    Extensional provinces terminate along-strike where extension dissipates to zero, at transform faults, or at triple junctions. Termination of the northern Basin and Range province in western North America has long been thought to be controlled by an intracontinental transform fault, the Brothers Fault zone (BFz). New mapping in the boundary region between a major Basin and Range fault, the Hart Mountain fault system (HFz), and the BFz was conducted to test this model and to determine the structural and temporal relationship between the two fault zones. Stratigraphic separation and topography were used to determine fault orientations, displacement gradients, and sense of motion in the two fault zones. N-S trending faults of the HFz show predominantly normal displacement. Displacement in the HFz decreases northward from a maximum of ~940 m at Hart Mountain to ~173 m to 0 m at the BFz. Fault orientations smoothly change from the N-S Basin and Range trend in the south to the NW BFz trend in the north. Topography and stratigraphic separation indicate that the BFz is a series of isolated faults with maximum slip of ~106 m and lengths of up to a few kilometers. Piercing points within the BFz indicate that down-to-the-north motion predominates with the fault system and that strike-slip motion is minimal. Uncertainty on observed fault displacements is + 5m. Stratigraphic separation of the Rattlesnake Tuff indicates that activity on the NW trending fault system post-dates the 7 Ma tuff. That displacement along the HFz effectively goes to zero at the BFz suggests Basin and Range faults have propagated northward into an existing northeast- facing extensional province represented by the BFz.

  14. Tsunamigenic potential of Mediterranean fault systems and active subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, Patrizio; Babeyko, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Since the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System (NEAMTWS) is under development by the European scientific community, it becomes necessary to define guidelines for the characterization of the numerous parameters must be taken into account in a fair assessment of the risk. Definition of possible tectonic sources and evaluation of their potential is one of the principal issues. In this study we systematically evaluate tsunamigenic potential of up-to-now known real fault systems and active subduction interfaces in the NEAMTWS region. The task is accomplished by means of numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation. We have simulated all possible uniform-slip ruptures populating fault and subduction interfaces with magnitudes ranging from 6.5 up to expected Mmax. A total of 15810 individual ruptures were processed. For each rupture, a tsunami propagation scenario was computed in linear shallow-water approximation on 1-arc minute bathymetric grid (Gebco_08) implying normal reflection boundary conditions. Maximum wave heights at coastal positions (totally - 23236 points of interest) were recorded for four hours of simulation and then classified according to currently adopted warning level thresholds. The resulting dataset allowed us to classify the sources in terms of their tsunamigenic potential as well as to estimate their minimum tsunamigenic magnitude. Our analysis shows that almost every source in the Mediterranean Sea is capable to produce local tsunami at the advisory level (i.e., wave height > 20 cm) starting from magnitude values of Mw=6.6. In respect to the watch level (wave height > 50 cm), the picture is less homogeneous: crustal sources in south-west Mediterranean as well as East-Hellenic arc need larger magnitudes (around Mw=7.0) to trigger watch levels even at the nearby coasts. In the context of the regional warning (i.e., source-to-coast distance > 100 km) faults also behave more heterogeneously in respect to the minimum

  15. The Influence of the Geometry of the San Andreas Fault System on Earthquakes in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Liu, M.

    2004-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault is believed to be the main surface trace of the plate boundary between the North American and the Pacific plates. From 1800 to present, three large historical earthquakes (1857 M7.9, 1906 M8.25, and 1989 M7.1) ruptured the San Andreas Fault. At the same time, more than a dozen M>7.0 earthquakes occurred outside the main trace of the San Andreas Fault. Most of the off-main-trace large earthquakes were scattered in Southern California, whereas in northern and central California, earthquakes were clustered along the main trace of the San Andreas Fault. Such a seismic distribution may be related to the geometry of the San Andreas Fault, which is curved with a major bending in southern California. In this study, we constructed a finite element model to explore the influence of the geometry of the San Andreas Fault system on stress distribution and seismicity in California. In the model, the San Andreas Fault is simulated with a weak zone that obeys the Coulomb Friction Law. The model results show that along relative straight segments of the San Andreas Fault in northern and central California, fault slip on the main fault trace causes low level stresses in nearby regions. Along the bended San Andreas Fault in southern California, however, the relative plate motion causes significant off-main-trace stress buildup, consistent with the distribution of large historical earthquakes outside the San Andreas Fault.

  16. Design of a fault diagnosis system for next generation nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Wood, R.T.

    2004-07-01

    A new design approach for fault diagnosis is developed for next generation nuclear power plants. In the nuclear reactor design phase, data reconciliation is used as an efficient tool to determine the measurement requirements to achieve the specified goal of fault diagnosis. In the reactor operation phase, the plant measurements are collected to estimate uncertain model parameters so that a high fidelity model can be obtained for fault diagnosis. The proposed algorithm of fault detection and isolation is able to combine the strength of first principle model based fault diagnosis and the historical data based fault diagnosis. Principal component analysis on the reconciled data is used to develop a statistical model for fault detection. The updating of the principal component model based on the most recent reconciled data is a locally linearized model around the current plant measurements, so that it is applicable to any generic nonlinear systems. The sensor fault diagnosis and process fault diagnosis are decoupled through considering the process fault diagnosis as a parameter estimation problem. The developed approach has been applied to the IRIS helical coil steam generator system to monitor the operational performance of individual steam generators. This approach is general enough to design fault diagnosis systems for the next generation nuclear power plants. (authors)

  17. Distributed Evaluation Functions for Fault Tolerant Multi-Rover Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agogino, Adrian; Turner, Kagan

    2005-01-01

    The ability to evolve fault tolerant control strategies for large collections of agents is critical to the successful application of evolutionary strategies to domains where failures are common. Furthermore, while evolutionary algorithms have been highly successful in discovering single-agent control strategies, extending such algorithms to multiagent domains has proven to be difficult. In this paper we present a method for shaping evaluation functions for agents that provide control strategies that both are tolerant to different types of failures and lead to coordinated behavior in a multi-agent setting. This method neither relies of a centralized strategy (susceptible to single point of failures) nor a distributed strategy where each agent uses a system wide evaluation function (severe credit assignment problem). In a multi-rover problem, we show that agents using our agent-specific evaluation perform up to 500% better than agents using the system evaluation. In addition we show that agents are still able to maintain a high level of performance when up to 60% of the agents fail due to actuator, communication or controller faults.

  18. Coverage modeling for dependability analysis of fault-tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Trivedi, Kishor S.

    1989-01-01

    Several different models for predicting coverage in a fault-tolerant system, including models for permanent, intermittent, and transient errors, are discussed. Markov, semi-Markov, nonhomogeneous Markov, and extended stochastic Petri net models for computing coverage are developed. Two types of events that interfere with recovery are examined; and methods for modeling such events, whether they are deterministic or random, are given. The sensitivity of system reliability/availability to the coverage parameter and the sensitivity of the coverage parameter to various error-handling strategies are investigated. It is found that a policy of attempting transient recovery upon detection of an error can actually increase the unreliability of the system. This result is true if the error detectability is not nearly perfect, so that the risk of producing an undetectable error is greater than the benefit gained by not discarding the component.

  19. Hidden Markov Models for Fault Detection in Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, Padhraic

    1994-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of complex dynamic systems is an increasingly important issue in diverse areas such as nuclear plant safety, production line reliability, and medical health monitoring systems. Recent advances in both sensor technology and computational capabilities have made on-line permanent monitoring much more feasible than it was in the past. In this paper it is shown that a pattern recognition system combined with a finite-state hidden Markov model provides a particularly useful method for modelling temporal context in continuous monitoring. The parameters of the Markov model are derived from gross failure statistics such as the mean time between failures. The model is validated on a real-world fault diagnosis problem and it is shown that Markov modelling in this context offers significant practical benefits.

  20. Association of the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina, earthquake and seismicity near Summervile with a 12º bend in the East Coast fault system and triple-fault junctions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marple, R.; Miller, R.

    2006-01-01

    Seismic-reflection data were integrated with other geophysical, geologic, and seismicity data to better determine the location and nature of buried faults in the Charleston, South Carolina, region. Our results indicate that the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina, earthquake and seismicity near Summerville are related to local stresses caused by a 12?? bend in the East Coast fault system (ECFS) and two triple-fault junctions. One triple junction is formed by the intersection of the northwest-trending Ashley River fault with the two segments of the ECFS north and south of the bend. The other triple junction is formed by the intersection of the northeast-trending Summerville fault and a newly discovered northwest-trending Berkeley fault with the ECFS about 10 km north of the bend. The Summerville fault is a northwest-dipping border fault of the Triassic-age Jedburg basin that is undergoing reverse-style reactivation. This reverse-style reactivation is unusual because the Summerville fault parallels the regional stress field axis, suggesting that the reactivation is from stresses applied by dextral motion on the ECFS. The southwest-dip and reverse-type motion of the Berkeley fault are interpreted from seismicity data and a seismic-reflection profile in the western part of the study area. Our results also indicate that the East Coast fault system is a Paleozoic basement fault and that its reactivation since early Mesozoic time has fractured through the overlying allochthonous terranes.

  1. Uncertainty and Characterization of the Baton Rouge Fault System in a Bayesian Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshall, A. S.; Tsai, F. T.; Hanor, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Under a Bayesian framework, we developed an indicator-kriging-based method to characterize the Baton Rouge fault system in Louisiana. The fault system includes the Baton Rouge fault and the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault. The hydrostratigraphy of the Baton Rouge fault is of particular importance from a resource standpoint since it acts as a conduit-barrier to a series of fresh water aquifers north of the fault and saltwater aquifers south of the fault. In characterizing the complex spatial variations of subsurface geology, uncertainty always exists and multiple possible stratigraphy fault models are usually resulted. By utilizing electrical resistivity, driller logs and geological information, we constructed and calibrated several hydrostratigraphic fault models using different data sets, variogram models, and geological conceptualizations. In this study, to select only the best fault model was not an effective use of resources since the best fault model did not significantly dominate over other possible fault models. To advance beyond the typical model selection approach, an epistemic framework is needed to integrate all information from different models. This study introduced a hierarchical Bayesian model averaging (HBMA) method as a framework for organizing different models to present the importance of the different assumptions that we considered in the fault characterization process. Most importantly, the HBMA integrated multiple models and avoided over-confidence in the best model. The HBMA provided an insight on the model selection and model averaging through a BMA tree. A BMA model at a vertex in the BMA tree presented an integrated model of all models and information considered under this vertex. The results provide valuable insights on the fault structure and leaky areas that have resulted in salinization in the fresh water aquifers adjacent to the northern area of the Baton Rouge fault, thus elucidating previous geological studies and transport

  2. Oblique Fault Systems Crossing the Seattle Basin: Seismic and Aeromagnetic Evidence for Additional Shallow Fault Systems in the Central Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keranen, K. M.; Mace, C.

    2011-12-01

    Upper-plate seismicity in the Puget Lowland is more broadly distributed than mapped fault systems and presents a conundrum for understanding the active tectonics of the region. Although many previous studies have mapped faulting in the Puget Lowland from subsurface geophysical data, many of these efforts have focused specifically on mapping the structure of the Seattle Fault Zone and the South Whidbey Island Fault. The thick glacial sediments and extensive water bodies may conceal additional active faults away from these major structures. To extend the results of the previous work, we mapped fault networks and patterns of sediment deposition in Quaternary sediments broadly throughout the central Puget Lowland using a combination of existing multi-channel seismic reflection datasets with widely distributed profiles and aeromagnetic data. We identify a NE-SW zone of high-angle faulting and shallow sediment deformation crossing the Seattle Uplift and the Seattle Basin that segments the Seattle Fault Zone (SFZ), offsetting aeromagnetic anomalies along the SFZ by 1.2 km in a dextral sense. Aeromagnetic lineations trace the NE-SW trend of deformation across the Seattle Uplift and connect deformation within the Puget Sound and the Hood Canal. Two additional zones of faulting trend NW-SE and cut through the Seattle Basin and the Kingston Arch, respectively. We also interpreted five regional seismic horizons, representing erosional unconformities, throughout our dataset, and created sediment thickness maps for each time interval. The thickness maps reveal changing patterns of sediment deposition through time, possibly controlled by changes in the regional pattern of deformation. Holocene sediment deposition shows strong control by the oblique fault systems. These oblique fault structures may be partially responsible for the wide distribution of seismicity within the central Puget Lowland.

  3. Contribution of high resolution PLEIADES imagery to active faults analysis. Case study of the Longriba Fault System, eastern Tibet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansberque, Claire; Bellier, Olivier; Godard, Vincent; Lasserre, Cécile; Wang, Mingming; Xu, Xiwei; Tan, Xibin

    2015-04-01

    High resolution imagery has largely developed during those two last decades allowing the possibility to observe and quantify geological and geomorphological features ranging from meter to few centimeters. Active tectonic and geomorphological studies have greatly benefited from the systematic use of such data. For that reason, we tested the contribution of PLEAIDES images to the analysis of an active strike-slip fault system in eastern Tibet. We used 50 cm resolution panchromatic PLEIADES images in order to map active fault segmentation, localize offsets of geomorphic markers and quantify vertical and horizontal displacements. We propose a preliminary study using PLEIADES images along the Longriba Fault System (LFS). The LFS, located at the eastern Tibetan Plateau margin, is constituted of two NW-SE dextral strike-slip and parallel fault zones: Longriqu and Maoergai, 80 and 120 km-long, respectively. It accommodates ~4 mm/yr dextral slip and very few vertical motion. We used stereo-pairs to build relative Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) (without ground control points) with a horizontal resolution ranging from 2 to 5 m, in order to understand the geometry of the system. We measured fault segments with lengths ranging from a hundred meters to several kilometers which are relatively close from each others, and several offsets of geomorphic markers (alluvial fans, ridges, rivers) ranging from a few meters to ~40 m. According to the segmentation deduced from those results we suggest that the fault has a high seismic potential (>Mw7.0) and that probably many surface rupturing earthquakes occurred along the LFS over the Holocene.

  4. Advanced power system protection and incipient fault detection and protection of spaceborne power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don

    1989-01-01

    This research concentrated on the application of advanced signal processing, expert system, and digital technologies for the detection and control of low grade, incipient faults on spaceborne power systems. The researchers have considerable experience in the application of advanced digital technologies and the protection of terrestrial power systems. This experience was used in the current contracts to develop new approaches for protecting the electrical distribution system in spaceborne applications. The project was divided into three distinct areas: (1) investigate the applicability of fault detection algorithms developed for terrestrial power systems to the detection of faults in spaceborne systems; (2) investigate the digital hardware and architectures required to monitor and control spaceborne power systems with full capability to implement new detection and diagnostic algorithms; and (3) develop a real-time expert operating system for implementing diagnostic and protection algorithms. Significant progress has been made in each of the above areas. Several terrestrial fault detection algorithms were modified to better adapt to spaceborne power system environments. Several digital architectures were developed and evaluated in light of the fault detection algorithms.

  5. Crustal structure of the North Anatolian and East Anatolian Fault Systems from magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkoğlu, Erşan; Unsworth, Martyn; Bulut, Fatih; Çağlar, İlyas

    2015-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) studies can map subsurface resistivity structure and have located zones of low resistivity (high conductivity) within major strike-slip fault zones worldwide which have been interpreted as regions of elevated fluid content. This study describes MT data from the eastern part of the North Anatolian and the East Anatolian Fault Systems (NAFS and EAFS) and presents the results of the first MT studies of these faults. The inversion of the MT data produced 2-D resistivity models which showed that both fault systems are underlain by a broad low resistivity zone that extended into the lower crust. However, the resistivity beneath the East Anatolian Fault System was much lower than beneath the eastern part of the North Anatolian Fault System. These conductors begin at a depth of 10 km - not at the surface as on the central San Andreas Fault (SAFS). This difference is interpreted as being due to the fact that the EAFS and NAFS are young fault systems characterized in the upper crust by multiple fault traces - as opposed to the SAFS that has evolved into a single through going fault. Different stages of the seismic cycle may also influence the resistivity structure, although this is difficult to constrain without knowledge of time variations in resistivity structure at each location.

  6. An expert system for fault diagnosis in a Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Moonis; Gupta, U. K.

    1990-01-01

    The detection and diagnosis of SSME faults in an early stage is important in order to allow enough time for fault preventive or corrective measurements. Since most of the faults in a complex system like SSME develop rapidly, early detection and diagnosis of faults is critical for the survival of space vehicles. An expert system has been designed for automatic learning, detection, identification, verification, and correction of anomalous propulsion system operations. This paper describes an innovative machine learning approach which is employed for the automatic training of this expert system.

  7. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 2: Army fault tolerant architecture design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) hardware architecture and components and the operating system. The architectural and operational theory of the AFTA Fault Tolerant Data Bus is discussed. The test and maintenance strategy developed for use in fielded AFTA installations is presented. An approach to be used in reducing the probability of AFTA failure due to common mode faults is described. Analytical models for AFTA performance, reliability, availability, life cycle cost, weight, power, and volume are developed. An approach is presented for using VHSIC Hardware Description Language (VHDL) to describe and design AFTA's developmental hardware. A plan is described for verifying and validating key AFTA concepts during the Dem/Val phase. Analytical models and partial mission requirements are used to generate AFTA configurations for the TF/TA/NOE and Ground Vehicle missions.

  8. The X-38 Spacecraft Fault-Tolerant Avionics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouba,Coy; Buscher, Deborah; Busa, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    In 1995 NASA began an experimental program to develop a reusable crew return vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station. The purpose of the CRV was threefold: (i) to bring home an injured or ill crewmember; (ii) to bring home the entire crew if the Shuttle fleet was grounded; and (iii) to evacuate the crew in the case of an imminent Station threat (i.e., fire, decompression, etc). Built at the Johnson Space Center, were two approach and landing prototypes and one spacecraft demonstrator (called V201). A series of increasingly complex ground subsystem tests were completed, and eight successful high-altitude drop tests were achieved to prove the design concept. In this program, an unprecedented amount of commercial-off-the-shelf technology was utilized in this first crewed spacecraft NASA has built since the Shuttle program. Unfortunately, in 2002 the program was canceled due to changing Agency priorities. The vehicle was 80% complete and the program was shut down in such a manner as to preserve design, development, test and engineering data. This paper describes the X-38 V201 fault-tolerant avionics system. Based on Draper Laboratory's Byzantine-resilient fault-tolerant parallel processing system and their "network element" hardware, each flight computer exchanges information on a strict timescale to process input data, compare results, and issue voted vehicle output commands. Major accomplishments achieved in this development include: (i) a space qualified two-fault tolerant design using mostly COTS (hardware and operating system); (ii) a single event upset tolerant network element board, (iii) on-the-fly recovery of a failed processor; (iv) use of synched cache; (v) realignment of memory to bring back a failed channel; (vi) flight code automatically generated from the master measurement list; and (vii) built in-house by a team of civil servants and support contractors. This paper will present an overview of the avionics system and the hardware

  9. Fault-tolerance in Two-dimensional Topological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    This thesis is a collection of ideas with the general goal of building, at least in the abstract, a local fault-tolerant quantum computer. The connection between quantum information and topology has proven to be an active area of research in several fields. The introduction of the toric code by Alexei Kitaev demonstrated the usefulness of topology for quantum memory and quantum computation. Many quantum codes used for quantum memory are modeled by spin systems on a lattice, with operators that extract syndrome information placed on vertices or faces of the lattice. It is natural to wonder whether the useful codes in such systems can be classified. This thesis presents work that leverages ideas from topology and graph theory to explore the space of such codes. Homological stabilizer codes are introduced and it is shown that, under a set of reasonable assumptions, any qubit homological stabilizer code is equivalent to either a toric code or a color code. Additionally, the toric code and the color code correspond to distinct classes of graphs. Many systems have been proposed as candidate quantum computers. It is very desirable to design quantum computing architectures with two-dimensional layouts and low complexity in parity-checking circuitry. Kitaev's surface codes provided the first example of codes satisfying this property. They provided a new route to fault tolerance with more modest overheads and thresholds approaching 1%. The recently discovered color codes share many properties with the surface codes, such as the ability to perform syndrome extraction locally in two dimensions. Some families of color codes admit a transversal implementation of the entire Clifford group. This work investigates color codes on the 4.8.8 lattice known as triangular codes. I develop a fault-tolerant error-correction strategy for these codes in which repeated syndrome measurements on this lattice generate a three-dimensional space-time combinatorial structure. I then develop an

  10. Geology and structure of the North Boqueron Bay-Punta Montalva Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig Silva, Coral Marie

    The North Boqueron Bay-Punta Montalva Fault Zone is an active fault system that cuts across the Lajas Valley in southwestern Puerto Rico. The fault zone has been recognized and mapped based upon detailed analysis of geophysical data, satellite images and field mapping. The fault zone consists of a series of Cretaceous bedrock faults that reactivated and deformed Miocene limestone and Quaternary alluvial fan sediments. The fault zone is seismically active (ML < 5.0) with numerous locally felt earthquakes. Focal mechanism solutions and structural field data suggest strain partitioning with predominantly east-west left-lateral displacements with small normal faults oriented mostly toward the northeast. Evidence for recent displacement consists of fractures and small normal faults oriented mostly northeast found in intermittent streams that cut through the Quaternary alluvial fan deposits along the southern margin of the Lajas Valley, Areas of preferred erosion, within the alluvial fan, trend toward the west-northwest parallel to the on-land projection of the North Boqueron Bay Fault. Beyond the faulted alluvial fan and southeast of the Lajas Valley, the Northern Boqueron Bay Fault joins with the Punta Montalva Fault. The Punta Montalva Fault is defined by a strong topographic WNW lineament along which stream channels are displaced left laterally 200 meters and Miocene strata are steeply tilted to the south. Along the western end of the fault zone in northern Boqueron Bay, the older strata are only tilted 3° south and are covered by flat lying Holocene sediments. Focal mechanisms solutions along the western end suggest NW-SE shortening, which is inconsistent with left lateral strain partitioning along the fault zone. The limited deformation of older strata and inconsistent strain partitioning may be explained by a westerly propagation of the fault system from the southwest end. The limited geomorphic structural expression along the North Boqueron Bay Fault segment

  11. Fault detection and isolation in manufacturing systems with an identified discrete event model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Matthias; Schneider, Stefan; Lesage, Jean-Jacques; Litz, Lothar

    2012-10-01

    In this article a generic method for fault detection and isolation (FDI) in manufacturing systems considered as discrete event systems (DES) is presented. The method uses an identified model of the closed-loop of plant and controller built on the basis of observed fault-free system behaviour. An identification algorithm known from literature is used to determine the fault detection model in form of a non-deterministic automaton. New results of how to parameterise this algorithm are reported. To assess the fault detection capability of an identified automaton, probabilistic measures are proposed. For fault isolation, the concept of residuals adapted for DES is used by defining appropriate set operations representing generic fault symptoms. The method is applied to a case study system.

  12. Using Ada for a distributed, fault tolerant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewolf, J. B.; Sodano, N. M.; Whittredge, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that advanced avionics applications increasingly require underlying machine architectures which are damage and fault tolerant, and which provide access to distributed sensors, effectors and high-throughput computational resources. The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS), sponsored by NASA, is to provide an architecture which can meet the considered requirements. Ada was selected for implementing the AIPS system software. Advantages of Ada are related to its provisions for real-time programming, error detection, modularity and separate compilation, and standardization and portability. Chief drawbacks of this language are currently limited availability and maturity of language implementations, and limited experience in applying the language to real-time applications. The present investigation is concerned with current plans for employing Ada in the design of the software for AIPS. Attention is given to an overview of AIPS, AIPS software services, and representative design issues in each of four major software categories.

  13. Slip distribution, strain accumulation and aseismic slip on the Chaman Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Chaman fault system is a transcurrent fault system developed due to the oblique convergence of the India and Eurasia plates in the western boundary of the India plate. To evaluate the contemporary rates of strain accumulation along and across the Chaman Fault system, we use 2003-2011 Envisat SAR imagery and InSAR time-series methods to obtain a ground velocity field in radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction. We correct the InSAR data for different sources of systematic biases including the phase unwrapping errors, local oscillator drift, topographic residuals and stratified tropospheric delay and evaluate the uncertainty due to the residual delay using time-series of MODIS observations of precipitable water vapor. The InSAR velocity field and modeling demonstrates the distribution of deformation across the Chaman fault system. In the central Chaman fault system, the InSAR velocity shows clear strain localization on the Chaman and Ghazaband faults and modeling suggests a total slip rate of ~24 mm/yr distributed on the two faults with rates of 8 and 16 mm/yr, respectively corresponding to the 80% of the total ~3 cm/yr plate motion between India and Eurasia at these latitudes and consistent with the kinematic models which have predicted a slip rate of ~17-24 mm/yr for the Chaman Fault. In the northern Chaman fault system (north of 30.5N), ~6 mm/yr of the relative plate motion is accommodated across Chaman fault. North of 30.5 N where the topographic expression of the Ghazaband fault vanishes, its slip does not transfer to the Chaman fault but rather distributes among different faults in the Kirthar range and Sulaiman lobe. Observed surface creep on the southern Chaman fault between Nushki and north of City of Chaman, indicates that the fault is partially locked, consistent with the recorded M<7 earthquakes in last century on this segment. The Chaman fault between north of the City of Chaman to North of Kabul, does not show an increase in the rate of strain

  14. Reliability model derivation of a fault-tolerant, dual, spare-switching, digital computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A computer based reliability projection aid, tailored specifically for application in the design of fault-tolerant computer systems, is described. Its more pronounced characteristics include the facility for modeling systems with two distinct operational modes, measuring the effect of both permanent and transient faults, and calculating conditional system coverage factors. The underlying conceptual principles, mathematical models, and computer program implementation are presented.

  15. Cenozoic right-lateral wrench tectonics in the Western Pyrenees (Spain): The Ubierna Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, S.; Quintà, A.; Granado, P.

    2011-08-01

    A study of macro and mesostructural deformation patterns of the southern margin of the Cantabrian area (Western Pyrenees, Spain) has revealed a complex Cenozoic tectonic framework. Right-lateral tectonics reactivated inherited WNW-ESE striking faults, which developed during Late Paleozoic and Early Triassic events, and Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous main rifting stage. The Ubierna Fault represents the southern boundary of the Mesozoic basin. During the Oligocene (even Eocene) to present day deformation, this fault and the Ventaniella Fault located to the south in the study area acted as right-lateral slightly transpressive elements forming a 120 km long and 15 km wide overstep area, here named Ubierna Fault System, where the cumulative right-lateral displacement exceeds 15 km. The Cenozoic tectonic framework of the Ubierna Fault System includes reactivation along the WNW-ESE faults, development of negative and, mostly, positive flower structures, branch faults, strike-slip duplexes, and releasing and restraining bends. NE-SW to ENE-WSW striking reverse faults and contractional horsetail terminations, and NNW-SSE striking normal faults and joints are produced by the WNW-ESE right-lateral strike-slip motion. The extensional elements are well developed and deformation progression implied their incorporation in the strike-slip system as right-lateral faults (forming part of strike-slip duplexes). The abundance of flower structures striking WNW-ESE and paralleling the main strike-slip faults, together with the overall uplift of the overstep area, testifies for a slight compressional component. At a regional scale, the Ubierna Fault System represents the most prominent element of a Cenozoic transpressional belt, which incorporates the western portion of the Basque-Cantabrian Basin and the Asturian Massif area. Lateral transition between this transpressive belt and the dip-slip belt located to the east, occurs across an area experiencing along strike-shortening, which

  16. The stress shadow effect: a mechanical analysis of the evenly-spaced parallel strike-slip faults in the San Andreas fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuza, A. V.; Yin, A.; Lin, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Parallel evenly-spaced strike-slip faults are prominent in the southern San Andreas fault system, as well as other settings along plate boundaries (e.g., the Alpine fault) and within continental interiors (e.g., the North Anatolian, central Asian, and northern Tibetan faults). In southern California, the parallel San Jacinto, Elsinore, Rose Canyon, and San Clemente faults to the west of the San Andreas are regularly spaced at ~40 km. In the Eastern California Shear Zone, east of the San Andreas, faults are spaced at ~15 km. These characteristic spacings provide unique mechanical constraints on how the faults interact. Despite the common occurrence of parallel strike-slip faults, the fundamental questions of how and why these fault systems form remain unanswered. We address this issue by using the stress shadow concept of Lachenbruch (1961)—developed to explain extensional joints by using the stress-free condition on the crack surface—to present a mechanical analysis of the formation of parallel strike-slip faults that relates fault spacing and brittle-crust thickness to fault strength, crustal strength, and the crustal stress state. We discuss three independent models: (1) a fracture mechanics model, (2) an empirical stress-rise function model embedded in a plastic medium, and (3) an elastic-plate model. The assumptions and predictions of these models are quantitatively tested using scaled analogue sandbox experiments that show that strike-slip fault spacing is linearly related to the brittle-crust thickness. We derive constraints on the mechanical properties of the southern San Andreas strike-slip faults and fault-bounded crust (e.g., local fault strength and crustal/regional stress) given the observed fault spacing and brittle-crust thickness, which is obtained by defining the base of the seismogenic zone with high-resolution earthquake data. Our models allow direct comparison of the parallel faults in the southern San Andreas system with other similar strike

  17. Sensor fault diagnosis for fast steering mirror system based on Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongju; Bao, Qiliang; Yang, Haifeng; Tao, Sunjie

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, to improve the reliability of a two-axis fast steering mirror system with minimum hardware consumption, a fault diagnosis method based on Kalman filter was developed. The dynamics model of the two-axis FSM was established firstly, and then the state-space form of the FSM was adopted. A bank of Kalman filters for fault detection was designed based on the state-space form. The effects of the sensor faults on the innovation sequence were investigated, and a decision approach called weighted sum-squared residual (WSSR) was adopted to isolate the sensor faults. Sensor faults could be detected and isolated when the decision statistics changed. Experimental studies on a prototype system show that the faulty sensor can be isolated timely and accurately. Meanwhile, the mathematical model of FSM system was used to design fault diagnosis scheme in the proposed method, thus the consumption of the hardware and space is decreased.

  18. In-flight Fault Detection and Isolation in Aircraft Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azam, Mohammad; Pattipati, Krishna; Allanach, Jeffrey; Poll, Scott; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of test design for real-time fault detection and isolation (FDI) in the flight control system of fixed-wing aircraft. We focus on the faults that are manifested in the control surface elements (e.g., aileron, elevator, rudder and stabilizer) of an aircraft. For demonstration purposes, we restrict our focus on the faults belonging to nine basic fault classes. The diagnostic tests are performed on the features extracted from fifty monitored system parameters. The proposed tests are able to uniquely isolate each of the faults at almost all severity levels. A neural network-based flight control simulator, FLTZ(Registered TradeMark), is used for the simulation of various faults in fixed-wing aircraft flight control systems for the purpose of FDI.

  19. An Ontology for Identifying Cyber Intrusion Induced Faults in Process Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieb, Jeffrey; Graham, James; Guan, Jian

    This paper presents an ontological framework that permits formal representations of process control systems, including elements of the process being controlled and the control system itself. A fault diagnosis algorithm based on the ontological model is also presented. The algorithm can identify traditional process elements as well as control system elements (e.g., IP network and SCADA protocol) as fault sources. When these elements are identified as a likely fault source, the possibility exists that the process fault is induced by a cyber intrusion. A laboratory-scale distillation column is used to illustrate the model and the algorithm. Coupled with a well-defined statistical process model, this fault diagnosis approach provides cyber security enhanced fault diagnosis information to plant operators and can help identify that a cyber attack is underway before a major process failure is experienced.

  20. From experiment to design -- Fault characterization and detection in parallel computer systems using computational accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Keun Soo

    This dissertation summarizes experimental validation and co-design studies conducted to optimize the fault detection capabilities and overheads in hybrid computer systems (e.g., using CPUs and Graphics Processing Units, or GPUs), and consequently to improve the scalability of parallel computer systems using computational accelerators. The experimental validation studies were conducted to help us understand the failure characteristics of CPU-GPU hybrid computer systems under various types of hardware faults. The main characterization targets were faults that are difficult to detect and/or recover from, e.g., faults that cause long latency failures (Ch. 3), faults in dynamically allocated resources (Ch. 4), faults in GPUs (Ch. 5), faults in MPI programs (Ch. 6), and microarchitecture-level faults with specific timing features (Ch. 7). The co-design studies were based on the characterization results. One of the co-designed systems has a set of source-to-source translators that customize and strategically place error detectors in the source code of target GPU programs (Ch. 5). Another co-designed system uses an extension card to learn the normal behavioral and semantic execution patterns of message-passing processes executing on CPUs, and to detect abnormal behaviors of those parallel processes (Ch. 6). The third co-designed system is a co-processor that has a set of new instructions in order to support software-implemented fault detection techniques (Ch. 7). The work described in this dissertation gains more importance because heterogeneous processors have become an essential component of state-of-the-art supercomputers. GPUs were used in three of the five fastest supercomputers that were operating in 2011. Our work included comprehensive fault characterization studies in CPU-GPU hybrid computers. In CPUs, we monitored the target systems for a long period of time after injecting faults (a temporally comprehensive experiment), and injected faults into various types of

  1. Sensor scheduling strategies for fault isolation in networked control system.

    PubMed

    Sid, M A

    2015-01-01

    A framework for the joint design of sensor scheduling and fault isolation is proposed. First, the synthesis of fault isolation filter and the communication sequence that ensures the isolability of fault is given. The proposed filter can be viewed as a special structure of the traditional Kalman filter. Several sensor scheduling strategies are proposed in order to ensure the minimization of the noise effect on the generated residual. A numerical example illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25109542

  2. From accommodation zones to metamorphic core complexes: Tracking the progressive development of major normal fault systems

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, J.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The along-strike dimension in rifted continental crust is critical to assessing models of continental extension because individual normal faults or fault systems can potentially be traced from their tips in accommodation zones to their culminations in metamorphic core complexes. Accommodation zones and the linkages between the zones and core complexes have not been thoroughly studied or incorporated extensively into models of continental extension. Regionally extensive, gently dipping normal faults (i.e., detachment faults) that surface in metamorphic core complexes terminate and flip polarity in accommodation zones. Diametrical lateral transport of upper-plate rocks in positively dipping detachment terranes should presumably induce strike-slip faulting on segments of accommodation zones paralleling the extension direction. Most accommodation zones correspond, however, to belts of intermeshing conjugate normal faults with little strike-slip faulting. Normal faults simply terminate along-strike in the zones with little, if any, transfer of slip to strike-slip faults. Decreases in cumulative strain within individual normal fault systems toward some accommodation zones cannot alone account for the lack of strike-slip faulting. These findings pose a serious challenge to generally accepted notions of large-magnitude, lateral motion of parts of detachment terranes. Large-scale lateral translations of rifted continental crust may be governed more by discrete axes of extension than by detachment geometries. The dovetail-like interfingering of conjugate normal fault systems and attendant tilt-block domains observed in some accommodation zones (e.g., Colorado River extensional corridor, US) does suggest, however, that at least some major normal faults projecting into the zones from metamorphic core complexes have listric geometries that flatten out at relatively shallow depths.

  3. Validating Requirements for Fault Tolerant Systems Using Model Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Francis; Easterbrook, Steve M.; Callahan, John R.; Holzmann, Gerard J.

    1997-01-01

    Model checking is shown to be an effective tool in validating the behavior of a fault tolerant embedded spacecraft controller. The case study presented here shows that by judiciously abstracting away extraneous complexity, the state space of the model could be exhaustively searched allowing critical functional requirements to be validated down to the design level. Abstracting away detail not germane to the problem of interest leaves by definition a partial specification behind. The success of this procedure shows that it is feasible to effectively validate a partial specification with this technique. Three anomalies were found in the system one of which is an error in the detailed requirements, and the other two are missing/ambiguous requirements. Because the method allows validation of partial specifications, it also is an effective methodology towards maintaining fidelity between a co-evolving specification and an implementation.

  4. The Cottage Grove fault system (Illinois Basin): Late Paleozoic transpression along a Precambrian crustal boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duchek, A.B.; McBride, J.H.; Nelson, W.J.; Leetaru, H.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois has long been interpreted as an intracratonic dextral strike-slip fault system. We investigated its structural geometry and kinematics in detail using (1) outcrop data, (2) extensive exposures in underground coal mines, (3) abundant borehole data, and (4) a network of industry seismic reflection profiles, including data reprocessed by us. Structural contour mapping delineates distinct monoclines, broad anticlines, and synclines that express Paleozoic-age deformation associated with strike slip along the fault system. As shown on seismic reflection profiles, prominent near-vertical faults that cut the entire Paleozoic section and basement-cover contact branch upward into outward-splaying, high-angle reverse faults. The master fault, sinuous along strike, is characterized along its length by an elongate anticline, ???3 km wide, that parallels the southern side of the master fault. These features signify that the overall kinematic regime was transpressional. Due to the absence of suitable piercing points, the amount of slip cannot be measured, but is constrained at less than 300 m near the ground surface. The Cottage Grove fault system apparently follows a Precambrian terrane boundary, as suggested by magnetic intensity data, the distribution of ultramafic igneous intrusions, and patterns of earthquake activity. The fault system was primarily active during the Alleghanian orogeny of Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time, when ultramatic igneous magma intruded along en echelon tensional fractures. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  5. Imaging the complexity of an active normal fault system: The 1997 Colfiorito (central Italy) case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiaraluce, L.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Chiarabba, C.; Cocco, M.

    2003-01-01

    Six moderate magnitude earthquakes (5 < Mw < 6) ruptured normal fault segments of the southern sector of the North Apennine belt (central Italy) in the 1997 Colfiorito earthquake sequence. We study the progressive activation of adjacent and nearby parallel faults of this complex normal fault system using ???1650 earthquake locations obtained by applying a double-difference location method, using travel time picks and waveform cross-correlation measurements. The lateral extent of the fault segments range from 5 to 10 km and make up a broad, ???45 km long, NW trending fault system. The geometry of each segment is quite simple and consists of planar faults gently dipping toward SW with an average dip of 40??-45??. The fault planes are not listric but maintain a constant dip through the entire seismogenic volume, down to 8 km depth. We observe the activation of faults on the hanging wall and the absence of seismicity in the footwall of the structure. The observed fault segmentation appears to be due to the lateral heterogeneity of the upper crust: preexisting thrusts inherited from Neogene's compressional tectonic intersect the active normal faults and control their maximum length. The stress tensor obtained by inverting the six main shock focal mechanisms of the sequence is in agreement with the tectonic stress active in the inner chain of the Apennine, revealing a clear NE trending extension direction. Aftershock focal mechanisms show a consistent extensional kinematics, 70% of which are mechanically consistent with the main shock stress field.

  6. First Results from a Forward, 3-Dimensional Regional Model of a Transpressional San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Miller, S. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a 3-dimensional fault interaction model, with the fault system specified by the geometry and tectonics of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) system. We use the forward model for earthquake generation on interacting faults of Fitzenz and Miller [2001] that incorporates the analytical solutions of Okada [85,92], GPS-constrained tectonic loading, creep compaction and frictional dilatancy [Sleep and Blanpied, 1994, Sleep, 1995], and undrained poro-elasticity. The model fault system is centered at the Big Bend, and includes three large strike-slip faults (each discretized into multiple subfaults); 1) a 300km, right-lateral segment of the SAF to the North, 2) a 200km-long left-lateral segment of the Garlock fault to the East, and 3) a 100km-long right-lateral segment of the SAF to the South. In the initial configuration, three shallow-dipping faults are also included that correspond to the thrust belt sub-parallel to the SAF. Tectonic loading is decomposed into basal shear drag parallel to the plate boundary with a 35mm yr-1 plate velocity, and East-West compression approximated by a vertical dislocation surface applied at the far-field boundary resulting in fault-normal compression rates in the model space about 4mm yr-1. Our aim is to study the long-term seismicity characteristics, tectonic evolution, and fault interaction of this system. We find that overpressured faults through creep compaction are a necessary consequence of the tectonic loading, specifically where high normal stress acts on long straight fault segments. The optimal orientation of thrust faults is a function of the strike-slip behavior, and therefore results in a complex stress state in the elastic body. This stress state is then used to generate new fault surfaces, and preliminary results of dynamically generated faults will also be presented. Our long-term aim is to target measurable properties in or around fault zones, (e.g. pore pressures, hydrofractures, seismicity

  7. Development of rules for single-line fault diagnosis in delta-delta connected distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Momoh, J.A.; Dias, L.G.; Thor, T.; Laird, D.N.

    1994-12-31

    Single-line fault diagnosis in delta-delta connected distribution systems suffers due to the low fault currents associated with such faults. Simulation tests on this type of system reveals that rule based decision support can be used of such diagnosis. This paper describes the development of rules for single-line fault diagnosis utilizing simulation test results. The key parameters used are the voltage magnitude of each phase at the bus bar and the currents on the feeders including their sequence components.

  8. Fault tolerance of artificial neural networks with applications in critical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protzel, Peter W.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Arras, Michael K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the fault tolerance characteristics of time continuous recurrent artificial neural networks (ANN) that can be used to solve optimization problems. The principle of operations and performance of these networks are first illustrated by using well-known model problems like the traveling salesman problem and the assignment problem. The ANNs are then subjected to 13 simultaneous 'stuck at 1' or 'stuck at 0' faults for network sizes of up to 900 'neurons'. The effects of these faults is demonstrated and the cause for the observed fault tolerance is discussed. An application is presented in which a network performs a critical task for a real-time distributed processing system by generating new task allocations during the reconfiguration of the system. The performance degradation of the ANN under the presence of faults is investigated by large-scale simulations, and the potential benefits of delegating a critical task to a fault tolerant network are discussed.

  9. Subsurface electrical resistivity structure around the Noubi fault system, central Japan, by MT survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, K.; Matsuda, T.; Yamada, R.

    2009-12-01

    Subsurface electrical resistivity around active faults is an important property to investigate the position and the geometry of the faults, the scale of the fracture zones related to the fault activity, and the amount of water and/or clay minerals in fault zones. We performed MT (magnetotelluric) surveys with remote reference method across the Noubi active fault system, central Japan, in order to image the electrical resistivity structure in and around the faults, and to obtain fundamental information on the earthquake generation mechanism. The Noubi fault system, about 80 km long, activated at 1891 Noubi Earthquake, consisting of the Nukumi, the Neodani, and the Umehara faults, which slipped left laterally by 1 - 7 m at the 1891 earthquake. Seismological and geomorphologic studies revealed different features between these three faults; the amount of lateral slip of the Neodani fault was larger than those of the Nukumi and the Umehara fault at 1891 Noubi earthquake (Matsuda, 1974; Mikumo and Ando, 1976); the average recurrence intervals of activation of the Nukumi and the Neodani fault were shorter than that of the Umehara fault (The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, 2005). Survey areas are mainly covered by the Mino sedimentary complex formed in the Jurassic - Cretaceous period that consists of mudstone, sandstone, limestone, basalt, chart, and siliceous mudstone. But the Hida belt that consists of metamorphic and granitic rocks covers northeast area of the Nukumi fault. Three survey lines of about 20 km length were set crossing normal to the surface fault traces of the Nukumi, Neodani and Umehara faults. And 10 - 12 MT measurement sites were arranged with the same interval on the survey lines. We measured two components of electric field and three components of magnetic field by a 'MTU-5' system made by Phoenix Geophysics Ltd. at three different sampling frequencies to cover frequency bands of 0.0003 - 317 Hz of electric and magnetic field. Applying

  10. Orion GN&C Fault Management System Verification: Scope And Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Denise; Weiler, David; Flanary, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure long-term ability to meet mission goals and to provide for the safety of the public, ground personnel, and any crew members, nearly all spacecraft include a fault management (FM) system. For a manned vehicle such as Orion, the safety of the crew is of paramount importance. The goal of the Orion Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) fault management system is to detect, isolate, and respond to faults before they can result in harm to the human crew or loss of the spacecraft. Verification of fault management/fault protection capability is challenging due to the large number of possible faults in a complex spacecraft, the inherent unpredictability of faults, the complexity of interactions among the various spacecraft components, and the inability to easily quantify human reactions to failure scenarios. The Orion GN&C Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) team has developed a methodology for bounding the scope of FM system verification while ensuring sufficient coverage of the failure space and providing high confidence that the fault management system meets all safety requirements. The methodology utilizes a swarm search algorithm to identify failure cases that can result in catastrophic loss of the crew or the vehicle and rare event sequential Monte Carlo to verify safety and FDIR performance requirements.

  11. Nonlinear dynamic failure process of tunnel-fault system in response to strong seismic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihua; Lan, Hengxing; Zhang, Yongshuang; Gao, Xing; Li, Langping

    2013-03-01

    Strong earthquakes and faults have significant effect on the stability capability of underground tunnel structures. This study used a 3-Dimensional Discrete Element model and the real records of ground motion in the Wenchuan earthquake to investigate the dynamic response of tunnel-fault system. The typical tunnel-fault system was composed of one planned railway tunnel and one seismically active fault. The discrete numerical model was prudentially calibrated by means of the comparison between the field survey and numerical results of ground motion. It was then used to examine the detailed quantitative information on the dynamic response characteristics of tunnel-fault system, including stress distribution, strain, vibration velocity and tunnel failure process. The intensive tunnel-fault interaction during seismic loading induces the dramatic stress redistribution and stress concentration in the intersection of tunnel and fault. The tunnel-fault system behavior is characterized by the complicated nonlinear dynamic failure process in response to a real strong seismic event. It can be qualitatively divided into 5 main stages in terms of its stress, strain and rupturing behaviors: (1) strain localization, (2) rupture initiation, (3) rupture acceleration, (4) spontaneous rupture growth and (5) stabilization. This study provides the insight into the further stability estimation of underground tunnel structures under the combined effect of strong earthquakes and faults.

  12. Award ER25750: Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance Systems Indiana University Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    2013-03-08

    The main purpose of the Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance in Systems initiative has been to conduct research with a goal of providing end-to-end fault tolerance on a systemwide basis for applications and other system software. While fault tolerance has been an integral part of most high-performance computing (HPC) system software developed over the past decade, it has been treated mostly as a collection of isolated stovepipes. Visibility and response to faults has typically been limited to the particular hardware and software subsystems in which they are initially observed. Little fault information is shared across subsystems, allowing little flexibility or control on a system-wide basis, making it practically impossible to provide cohesive end-to-end fault tolerance in support of scientific applications. As an example, consider faults such as communication link failures that can be seen by a network library but are not directly visible to the job scheduler, or consider faults related to node failures that can be detected by system monitoring software but are not inherently visible to the resource manager. If information about such faults could be shared by the network libraries or monitoring software, then other system software, such as a resource manager or job scheduler, could ensure that failed nodes or failed network links were excluded from further job allocations and that further diagnosis could be performed. As a founding member and one of the lead developers of the Open MPI project, our efforts over the course of this project have been focused on making Open MPI more robust to failures by supporting various fault tolerance techniques, and using fault information exchange and coordination between MPI and the HPC system software stack from the application, numeric libraries, and programming language runtime to other common system components such as jobs schedulers, resource managers, and monitoring tools.

  13. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION..., SFAR No. 88 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88—Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance...

  14. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION..., SFAR No. 88 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88—Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance...

  15. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION..., SFAR No. 88 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88—Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance...

  16. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION..., SFAR No. 88 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88—Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance...

  17. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION..., SFAR No. 88 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88—Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance...

  18. Validation Methods for Fault-Tolerant avionics and control systems, working group meeting 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The proceedings of the first working group meeting on validation methods for fault tolerant computer design are presented. The state of the art in fault tolerant computer validation was examined in order to provide a framework for future discussions concerning research issues for the validation of fault tolerant avionics and flight control systems. The development of positions concerning critical aspects of the validation process are given.

  19. Mechanical and lithological controls on the development of heterogeneous fault zones: an example from the southern Dead Sea Fault System, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Siân; Holdsworth, Bob; Imber, Jonny; de Paola, Nicola; Marco, Shmuel; Weinberger, Rami

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical weakening processes involved in the development of major crustal fault systems have been widely documented, and it is recognised that clay-bearing fault rocks frequently have a significant influence on fault strength and slip behaviour in the upper crust. It is less well-understood how mechanical processes, such as cataclasis and the mechanical entrainment of fault rock materials along fault zones (e.g. "smearing"), interact with chemical processes, such as clay mineral transformations and phyllonitisation during fault rock development. These processes can combine to form fault zones that may be both lithologically and mechanically heterogeneous, and which may also evolve over time, changing the nature of observed heterogeneities. We present here data from exhumed sections of the southern Dead Sea Fault System, Israel, an active continental transform fault that has accumulated 105 km of sinistral displacement since the mid-Miocene. These faults are estimated to have been active at shallow depths (<5 km, but potentially significantly less. The so-called "fault cores" of these sections are highly heterogeneous and are comprised of material formed by a variety of processes: fault gouges formed by cataclasis; coarser-grained, variably crushed crystalline basement rocks; mechanically entrained highly mobile units, derived from shale in adjacent cover sequence wall rocks; and growth of authegenic mineral phases through alteration and pressure solution. Through operation of grain-size reduction and diffusive mass transfer processes, we see a bulk change from fault rocks dominated by relatively strong phases displaying no obvious fabric, such as feldspars and calcite, through to foliated phyllosilicate-rich (illite, chlorite, smectite) fault rocks which likely have much lower frictional strengths. Mechanically entrained shale that has not undergone significant brittle deformation can also efficiently introduce large volumes of relatively weak material into

  20. Residual generation for fault detection and isolation in a class of uncertain nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Jun; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2013-02-01

    This article studies the problem of fault detection and isolation (FDI) for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems via a residual signal generated by a novel nonlinear adaptive observer. The considered faults are modelled by a set of time-varying vectors, in which a prescribed subset of faults are specially monitored and thus separable from the other faults. In the presence of Lipschitz-like nonlinearities and modelling uncertainties, the sensitivity of the residual signal to the monitored faults and its insensitivity to the other faults are rigorously analysed. Under a persistent excitation condition, the performances of the proposed fault diagnosis scheme, including the robustness to uncertainties, the quickness of estimation, the accuracy of estimation, the sensitivity to the monitored faults and the insensitivity to the complement faults, are quantified by a series of explicit design functions relevant to the observer parameters. It turns out that the number of faults which can be completely diagnosed is independent of the number of output sensors. A simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed FDI method.

  1. Tertiary sedimentation along the Lake Mead fault system, Virgin Mountains, Nevada-Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, L.S. ); Ward, S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Sedimentary rocks of the Thumb and Rainbow Gardens Members of the Tertiary Horse Spring Formation crop out within the Virgin and South Virgin Mountains in Nevada-Arizona. The Virgins are cut by a broad zone of northeast-striking left-lateral and north-striking normal faults collectively part of the Lake Mead oblique left-lateral fault system (LMFS). Horse Spring rocks are faulted and variably eastward tilted (10--50[degree]) within the LMFS and extend northward from the Gold Butte left-lateral fault across the Lime Ridge left-lateral fault to the south flank of the Virgin Mountains. The Rainbow Gardens Member (24--18 Ma) was deposited in a shallow basin; gradual facies changes show no influence of active faulting. In contrast, lateral and vertical facies in the Thumb (16--14) Ma change abruptly and are strongly influenced by oblique-slip faulting and uplift. An unconformity separates pedogenically altered limestone of the Rainbow Gardens from overlying well-bedded lacustrine limestones of the Thumb. Locally the unconformity is overlain by conglomerate and megabreccia deposits composed of underlying Rainbow Gardens carbonate clasts derived from energy fault scarps. Thumb carbonates above the unconformity grade laterally and vertically into thick deposits of lacustrine gypsum and fine-grained sandstone, which in turn intertongue laterally and vertically with marginal lake and alluvial fan facies. Abrupt influx of megabreccia and coarse conglomerate into Thumb lacustrine deposits northward from both the Gold Butte and Lime Ridge faults indicates continued faulting.

  2. Interseismic strain accumulation and the earthquake potential on the southern San Andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Fialko, Yuri

    2006-06-22

    The San Andreas fault in California is a mature continental transform fault that accommodates a significant fraction of motion between the North American and Pacific plates. The two most recent great earthquakes on this fault ruptured its northern and central sections in 1906 and 1857, respectively. The southern section of the fault, however, has not produced a great earthquake in historic times (for at least 250 years). Assuming the average slip rate of a few centimetres per year, typical of the rest of the San Andreas fault, the minimum amount of slip deficit accrued on the southern section is of the order of 7-10 metres, comparable to the maximum co-seismic offset ever documented on the fault. Here I present high-resolution measurements of interseismic deformation across the southern San Andreas fault system using a well-populated catalogue of space-borne synthetic aperture radar data. The data reveal a nearly equal partitioning of deformation between the southern San Andreas and San Jacinto faults, with a pronounced asymmetry in strain accumulation with respect to the geologically mapped fault traces. The observed strain rates confirm that the southern section of the San Andreas fault may be approaching the end of the interseismic phase of the earthquake cycle. PMID:16791192

  3. Forearc deformation and megasplay fault system of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S.; Yeh, Y.; Sibuet, J.; Tsai, C.; Doo, W.

    2011-12-01

    A great tsunami caused by a subduction earthquake had struck south Ryukyu islands and killed ~12000 people in 1771. Here we report the existence of a megasplay fault system along the south Ryukyu forearc. Analyses of deep multi-channel seismic reflection profiles indicate that the megasplay fault system is rising from the summit of a ~1 km high mount sitting on a ~5° landward dipping subducted plate interface. The fault system has accumulated large strain as evidenced by the active and widespread normal faults in the inner wedge. The along-trench length of the megasplay fault system is estimated to be ~450 km. The origin of this south Ryukyu megasplay fault system is linked to the subduction of elevated ridges parallel to the fracture zones. In contrast, no similar splay fault system is found in the west of 125. 5°E where the oblique subduction has produced shear zones along the south Ryukyu forearc. We infer that the megasplay fault system is responsible for the 1771 south Ryukyu tsunami. Likewise, after a quiescence of ~240 years, a near-future great earthquake and tsunami is anticipated as the extensional feature is strongly widespread over the south Ryukyu forearc.

  4. Reasoning about fault diagnosis for the space station common module thermal control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachtsevanos, G.; Hexmoor, H.; Purves, B.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed common module thermal control system for the Space Station is designed to integrate thermal distribution and thermal control functions in order to transport heat and provide environmental temperature control through the common module. When the thermal system is operating in an off-normal state, due to component faults, an intelligent controller is called upon to diagnose the fault type, identify the fault location and determine the appropriate control action required to isolate the faulty component. A methodology is introduced for fault diagnosis based upon a combination of signal redundancy techniques and fuzzy logic. An expert system utilizes parity space representation and analytic redundancy to derive fault symptoms, the aggregate of which is assessed by a multivalued rule based system. A subscale laboratory model of the thermal control system designed is used as the testbed for the study.

  5. Fault-tolerant flight control system combining expert system and analytical redundancy concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handelman, Dave

    1987-01-01

    This research involves the development of a knowledge-based fault-tolerant flight control system. A software architecture is presented that integrates quantitative analytical redundancy techniques and heuristic expert system problem solving concepts for the purpose of in-flight, real-time failure accommodation.

  6. Analysis of high-resolution lidar digital topographic data along the Marlborough Fault System: The Awatere and Clarence faults, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinke, R. W.; Dolan, J. F.; Rhodes, E. J.; Van Dissen, R. J.; Langridge, R.; Grenader, J.; McGuire, C. P.; Nicol, A.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze newly acquired lidar high-resolution digital topographic data to measure offset geomorphic markers along the Awatere and Clarence faults in the Marlborough Fault System, northern South Island, New Zealand. With an average shot density of ≥ 12 shots/m2, these lidar data, which were acquired for us by the US National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) and New Zealand Aerial Mapping, offer a uniquely detailed view of the topography along ~90 km of the Awatere fault and ~160 km of the Clarence fault, allowing us to measure geomorphic offsets ranging in size from ~1 m to 100s of meters. In this specific study, we examine offset river terraces at the well-known Saxton River site on the Awatere fault, and at Tophouse Road on the Clarence fault. By constraining the ages of those river terraces using post-IR IRSL (225 °C) single-grain K-feldspar dating protocols, we determine latest Pleistocene to late-Holocene slip histories of the Awatere and Clarence faults at those locations. This project is part of a broader effort to generate incremental slip rates and paleoearthquake ages from the four main faults that comprise the Marlborough Fault System with the goal of further understanding how mechanically complementary faults work together to accommodate relative plate motions.

  7. Early Tertiary transtension-related deformation and magmatism along the Tintina fault system, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, A.B.; Roeske, S.M.; Bradley, D.C.; Friedman, R.; Layer, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    Transtensional deformation was concentrated in a zone adjacent to the Tintina strike-slip fault system in Alaska during the early Tertiary. The deformation occurred along the Victoria Creek fault, the trace of the Tintina system that connects it with the Kaltag fault; together the Tintina and Kaltag fault systems girdle Alaska from east to west. Over an area of ???25 by 70 km between the Victoria Creek and Tozitna faults, bimodal volcanics erupted; lacustrine and fluvial rocks were deposited; plutons were emplaced and deformed; and metamorphic rocks cooled, all at about the same time. Plutonic and volcanic rocks in this zone yield U-Pb zircon ages of ca. 60 Ma; 40Ar/ 39Ar cooling ages from those plutons and adjacent metamorphic rocks are also ca. 60 Ma. Although early Tertiary magmatism occurred over a broad area in central Alaska, meta- morphism and ductile deformation accompanied that magmatism in this one zone only. Within the zone of deformation, pluton aureoles and metamorphic rocks display consistent NE-SW-stretching lineations parallel to the Victoria Creek fault, suggesting that deformation processes involved subhorizontal elongation of the package. The most deeply buried metamorphic rocks, kyanite-bearing metapelites, occur as lenses adjacent to the fault, which cuts the crust to the Moho (Beaudoin et al., 1997). Geochronologic data and field relationships suggest that the amount of early Tertiary exhumation was greatest adjacent to the Victoria Creek fault. The early Tertiary crustal-scale events that may have operated to produce transtension in this area are (1) increased heat flux and related bimodal within-plate magmatism, (2) movement on a releasing stepover within the Tintina fault system or on a regional scale involving both the Tintina and the Kobuk fault systems, and (3) oroclinal bending of the Tintina-Kaltag fault system with counterclockwise rotation of western Alaska. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America. All rights reserved.

  8. Stress field rotation or block rotation: An example from the Lake Mead fault system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1990-01-01

    The Coulomb criterion, as applied by Anderson (1951), has been widely used as the basis for inferring paleostresses from in situ fault slip data, assuming that faults are optimally oriented relative to the tectonic stress direction. Consequently if stress direction is fixed during deformation so must be the faults. Freund (1974) has shown that faults, when arranged in sets, must generally rotate as they slip. Nur et al., (1986) showed how sufficiently large rotations require the development of new sets of faults which are more favorably oriented to the principal direction of stress. This leads to the appearance of multiple fault sets in which older faults are offset by younger ones, both having the same sense of slip. Consequently correct paleostress analysis must include the possible effect of fault and material rotation, in addition to stress field rotation. The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were investigated in the Lake Meade Fault System (LMFS) especially in the Hoover Dam area. Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 degrees clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast structural data from the rest of the Great Basin suggest only a 30 degrees CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic and seismic evidence, the 30 degrees discrepancy can be neatly resolved. Based on paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on NW trending right lateral faults caused a local 30 degrees counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area. Consequently the inferred 60 degrees CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS consists of an actual 30 degrees CW rotation of the stress field (as for the entire Great Basin) plus a local 30 degrees CCW material rotation of the LMFS fault blocks.

  9. Stress field rotation or block rotation: An example from the Lake Mead fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1990-02-01

    The Coulomb criterion, as applied by Anderson (1951), has been widely used as the basis for inferring paleostresses from in situ fault slip data, assuming that faults are optimally oriented relative to the tectonic stress direction. Consequently if stress direction is fixed during deformation so must be the faults. Freund (1974) has shown that faults, when arranged in sets, must generally rotate as they slip. Nur et al., (1986) showed how sufficiently large rotations require the development of new sets of faults which are more favorably oriented to the principal direction of stress. This leads to the appearance of multiple fault sets in which older faults are offset by younger ones, both having the same sense of slip. Consequently correct paleostress analysis must include the possible effect of fault and material rotation, in addition to stress field rotation. The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were investigated in the Lake Meade Fault System (LMFS) especially in the Hoover Dam area. Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 degrees clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast structural data from the rest of the Great Basin suggest only a 30 degrees CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic and seismic evidence, the 30 degrees discrepancy can be neatly resolved. Based on paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on NW trending right lateral faults caused a local 30 degrees counter-clockwise (CCW) rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area. Consequently the inferred 60 degrees CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS consists of an actual 30 degrees CW rotation of the stress field (as for the entire Great Basin) plus a local 30 degrees CCW material rotation of the LMFS fault blocks.

  10. New evidence on the state of stress of the san andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Zoback, M D; Zoback, M L; Mount, V S; Suppe, J; Eaton, J P; Healy, J H; Oppenheimer, D; Reasenberg, P; Jones, L; Raleigh, C B; Wong, I G; Scotti, O; Wentworth, C

    1987-11-20

    Contemporary in situ tectonic stress indicators along the San Andreas fault system in central California show northeast-directed horizontal compression that is nearly perpendicular to the strike of the fault. Such compression explains recent uplift of the Coast Ranges and the numerous active reverse faults and folds that trend nearly parallel to the San Andreas and that are otherwise unexplainable in terms of strike-slip deformation. Fault-normal crustal compression in central California is proposed to result from the extremely low shear strength of the San Andreas and the slightly convergent relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Preliminary in situ stress data from the Cajon Pass scientific drill hole (located 3.6 kilometers northeast of the San Andreas in southern California near San Bernardino, California) are also consistent with a weak fault, as they show no right-lateral shear stress at approximately 2-kilometer depth on planes parallel to the San Andreas fault. PMID:17839366

  11. Variations in strength and slip rate along the san andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Jones, C H; Wesnousky, S G

    1992-04-01

    Convergence across the San Andreas fault (SAF) system is partitioned between strike-slip motion on the vertical SAF and oblique-slip motion on parallel dip-slip faults, as illustrated by the recent magnitude M(s) = 6.0 Palm Springs, M(s) = 6.7 Coalinga, and M(s) = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquakes. If the partitioning of slip minimizes the work done against friction, the direction of slip during these recent earthquakes depends primarily on fault dip and indicates that the normal stress coefficient and frictional coefficient (micro) vary among the faults. Additionally, accounting for the active dip-slip faults reduces estimates of fault slip rates along the vertical trace of the SAF by about 50 percent in the Loma Prieta and 100 percent in the North Palm Springs segments. PMID:17802597

  12. Software-Implemented Fault Tolerance in Communications Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantenbein, Rex E.

    1994-01-01

    Software-implemented fault tolerance (SIFT) is used in many computer-based command, control, and communications (C(3)) systems to provide the nearly continuous availability that they require. In the communications subsystem of Space Station Alpha, SIFT algorithms are used to detect and recover from failures in the data and command link between the Station and its ground support. The paper presents a review of these algorithms and discusses how such techniques can be applied to similar systems found in applications such as manufacturing control, military communications, and programmable devices such as pacemakers. With support from the Tracking and Communication Division of NASA's Johnson Space Center, researchers at the University of Wyoming are developing a testbed for evaluating the effectiveness of these algorithms prior to their deployment. This testbed will be capable of simulating a variety of C(3) system failures and recording the response of the Space Station SIFT algorithms to these failures. The design of this testbed and the applicability of the approach in other environments is described.

  13. Research into a distributed fault diagnosis system and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Suxiang; Jiao, Weidong; Lou, Yongjian; Shen, Xiaomei

    2005-12-01

    CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture) is a solution to distributed computing methods over heterogeneity systems, which establishes a communication protocol between distributed objects. It takes great emphasis on realizing the interoperation between distributed objects. However, only after developing some application approaches and some practical technology in monitoring and diagnosis, can the customers share the monitoring and diagnosis information, so that the purpose of realizing remote multi-expert cooperation diagnosis online can be achieved. This paper aims at building an open fault monitoring and diagnosis platform combining CORBA, Web and agent. Heterogeneity diagnosis object interoperate in independent thread through the CORBA (soft-bus), realizing sharing resource and multi-expert cooperation diagnosis online, solving the disadvantage such as lack of diagnosis knowledge, oneness of diagnosis technique and imperfectness of analysis function, so that more complicated and further diagnosis can be carried on. Take high-speed centrifugal air compressor set for example, we demonstrate a distributed diagnosis based on CORBA. It proves that we can find out more efficient approaches to settle the problems such as real-time monitoring and diagnosis on the net and the break-up of complicated tasks, inosculating CORBA, Web technique and agent frame model to carry on complemental research. In this system, Multi-diagnosis Intelligent Agent helps improve diagnosis efficiency. Besides, this system offers an open circumstances, which is easy for the diagnosis objects to upgrade and for new diagnosis server objects to join in.

  14. Rotation of stress and blocks in the Lake Mead, Nevada, Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Hagai; Nur, Amos; Aydin, Atilla

    1993-08-01

    The combined effects of stress field rotation and material rotation were found in the Lake Mead, Nevada Fault System (LMFS). Fault inversion results imply an apparent 60 deg clockwise (CW) rotation of the stress field since mid-Miocene time. In contrast, structural data from the Great Basin suggest only a 30 deg CW stress field rotation. By incorporating paleomagnetic declination anomalies, it is inferred that slip on faults caused a local 30 deg counterclockwise rotation of blocks and faults in the Lake Mead area, so that the inferred 60 deg CW rotation of the stress field in the LMFS is actually only 30 deg.

  15. Fault tolerant control for switching discrete-time systems with delays: an improved cone complementarity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzaouia, Abdellah; Ouladsine, Mustapha; Ananou, Bouchra

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, fault tolerant control problem for discrete-time switching systems with delay is studied. Sufficient conditions of building an observer are obtained by using multiple Lyapunov function. These conditions are worked out in a new way, using cone complementarity technique, to obtain new LMIs with slack variables and multiple weighted residual matrices. The obtained results are applied on a numerical example showing fault detection, localisation of fault and reconfiguration of the control to maintain asymptotic stability even in the presence of a permanent sensor fault.

  16. The accommodation of relative motion at depth on the San Andreas fault system in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescott, W. H.; Nur, A.

    1981-01-01

    Plate motion below the seismogenic layer along the San Andreas fault system in California is assumed to form by aseismic slip along a deeper extension of the fault or may result from lateral distribution of deformation below the seismogenic layer. The shallow depth of California earthquakes, the depth of the coseismic slip during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and the presence of widely separated parallel faults indicate that relative motion is distributed below the seismogenic zone, occurring by inelastic flow rather than by aseismic slip on discrete fault planes.

  17. Remote Fault Information Acquisition and Diagnosis System of the Combine Harvester Based on LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Wu, Pei; Xu, Kai

    Most combine harvesters have not be equipped with online fault diagnosis system. A fault information acquisition and diagnosis system of the Combine Harvester based on LabVIEW is designed, researched and developed. Using ARM development board, by collecting many sensors' signals, this system can achieve real-time measurement, collection, displaying and analysis of different parts of combine harvesters. It can also realize detection online of forward velocity, roller speed, engine temperature, etc. Meanwhile the system can judge the fault location. A new database function is added so that we can search the remedial measures to solve the faults and also we can add new faults to the database. So it is easy to take precautions against before the combine harvester breaking down then take measures to service the harvester.

  18. What electrical measurements can say about changes in fault systems.

    PubMed Central

    Madden, T R; Mackie, R L

    1996-01-01

    Earthquake zones in the upper crust are usually more conductive than the surrounding rocks, and electrical geophysical measurements can be used to map these zones. Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements across fault zones that are parallel to the coast and not too far away can also give some important information about the lower crustal zone. This is because the long-period electric currents coming from the ocean gradually leak into the mantle, but the lower crust is usually very resistive and very little leakage takes place. If a lower crustal zone is less resistive it will be a leakage zone, and this can be seen because the MT phase will change as the ocean currents leave the upper crust. The San Andreas Fault is parallel to the ocean boundary and close enough to have a lot of extra ocean currents crossing the zone. The Loma Prieta zone, after the earthquake, showed a lot of ocean electric current leakage, suggesting that the lower crust under the fault zone was much more conductive than normal. It is hard to believe that water, which is responsible for the conductivity, had time to get into the lower crustal zone, so it was probably always there, but not well connected. If this is true, then the poorly connected water would be at a pressure close to the rock pressure, and it may play a role in modifying the fluid pressure in the upper crust fault zone. We also have telluric measurements across the San Andreas Fault near Palmdale from 1979 to 1990, and beginning in 1985 we saw changes in the telluric signals on the fault zone and east of the fault zone compared with the signals west of the fault zone. These measurements were probably seeing a better connection of the lower crust fluids taking place, and this may result in a fluid flow from the lower crust to the upper crust. This could be a factor in changing the strength of the upper crust fault zone. PMID:11607664

  19. What electrical measurements can say about changes in fault systems.

    PubMed

    Madden, T R; Mackie, R L

    1996-04-30

    Earthquake zones in the upper crust are usually more conductive than the surrounding rocks, and electrical geophysical measurements can be used to map these zones. Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements across fault zones that are parallel to the coast and not too far away can also give some important information about the lower crustal zone. This is because the long-period electric currents coming from the ocean gradually leak into the mantle, but the lower crust is usually very resistive and very little leakage takes place. If a lower crustal zone is less resistive it will be a leakage zone, and this can be seen because the MT phase will change as the ocean currents leave the upper crust. The San Andreas Fault is parallel to the ocean boundary and close enough to have a lot of extra ocean currents crossing the zone. The Loma Prieta zone, after the earthquake, showed a lot of ocean electric current leakage, suggesting that the lower crust under the fault zone was much more conductive than normal. It is hard to believe that water, which is responsible for the conductivity, had time to get into the lower crustal zone, so it was probably always there, but not well connected. If this is true, then the poorly connected water would be at a pressure close to the rock pressure, and it may play a role in modifying the fluid pressure in the upper crust fault zone. We also have telluric measurements across the San Andreas Fault near Palmdale from 1979 to 1990, and beginning in 1985 we saw changes in the telluric signals on the fault zone and east of the fault zone compared with the signals west of the fault zone. These measurements were probably seeing a better connection of the lower crust fluids taking place, and this may result in a fluid flow from the lower crust to the upper crust. This could be a factor in changing the strength of the upper crust fault zone. PMID:11607664

  20. Newport-Inglewood-Carlsbad-Coronado Bank Fault System Nearshore Southern California: Testing models for Quaternary deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J. T.; Sorlien, C. C.; Cormier, M.; Bauer, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The San Andreas fault system is distributed across hundreds of kilometers in southern California. This transform system includes offshore faults along the shelf, slope and basin- comprising part of the Inner California Continental Borderland. Previously, offshore faults have been interpreted as being discontinuous and striking parallel to the coast between Long Beach and San Diego. Our recent work, based on several thousand kilometers of deep-penetration industry multi-channel seismic reflection data (MCS) as well as high resolution U.S. Geological Survey MCS, indicates that many of the offshore faults are more geometrically continuous than previously reported. Stratigraphic interpretations of MCS profiles included the ca. 1.8 Ma Top Lower Pico, which was correlated from wells located offshore Long Beach (Sorlien et. al. 2010). Based on this age constraint, four younger (Late) Quaternary unconformities are interpreted through the slope and basin. The right-lateral Newport-Inglewood fault continues offshore near Newport Beach. We map a single fault for 25 kilometers that continues to the southeast along the base of the slope. There, the Newport-Inglewood fault splits into the San Mateo-Carlsbad fault, which is mapped for 55 kilometers along the base of the slope to a sharp bend. This bend is the northern end of a right step-over of 10 kilometers to the Descanso fault and about 17 km to the Coronado Bank fault. We map these faults for 50 kilometers as they continue over the Mexican border. Both the San Mateo - Carlsbad with the Newport-Inglewood fault and the Coronado Bank with the Descanso fault are paired faults that form flower structures (positive and negative, respectively) in cross section. Preliminary kinematic models indicate ~1km of right-lateral slip since ~1.8 Ma at the north end of the step-over. We are modeling the slip on the southern segment to test our hypothesis for a kinematically continuous right-lateral fault system. We are correlating four

  1. Vibration model of rolling element bearings in a rotor-bearing system for fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Feiyun; Chen, Jin; Dong, Guangming; Pecht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Rolling element bearing faults are among the main causes of breakdown in rotating machines. In this paper, a rolling bearing fault model is proposed based on the dynamic load analysis of a rotor-bearing system. The rotor impact factor is taken into consideration in the rolling bearing fault signal model. The defect load on the surface of the bearing is divided into two parts, the alternate load and the determinate load. The vibration response of the proposed fault signal model is investigated and the fault signal calculating equation is derived through dynamic and kinematic analysis. Outer race and inner race fault simulations are realized in the paper. The simulation process includes consideration of several parameters, such as the gravity of the rotor-bearing system, the imbalance of the rotor, and the location of the defect on the surface. The simulation results show that different amplitude contributions of the alternate load and determinate load will cause different envelope spectrum expressions. The rotating frequency sidebands will occur in the envelope spectrum in addition to the fault characteristic frequency. This appearance of sidebands will increase the difficulty of fault recognition in intelligent fault diagnosis. The experiments given in the paper have successfully verified the proposed signal model simulation results. The test rig design of the rotor bearing system simulated several operating conditions: (1) rotor bearing only; (2) rotor bearing with loader added; (3) rotor bearing with loader and rotor disk; and (4) bearing fault simulation without rotor influence. The results of the experiments have verified that the proposed rolling bearing signal model is important to the rolling bearing fault diagnosis of rotor-bearing systems.

  2. 4D modelling of the Alto Tiberina Fault system (Northern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Donatis, Mauro; Susini, Sara; Mirabella, Francesco; Lupattelli, Andrea; Barchi, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Alto Tiberina Fault (ATF) in the Northern Apennines of Italy is a low-angle normal fault dipping to the East and accommodating up to 10 km of extension. The fault is ~70 km long and is the detachment for the SW-dipping Gubbio normal fault. The ATF fault system has been dramatically exhumed and the ATF footwall has evolved in a horst bounded to the east by ATF synthetic faults and to the west by the Corciano west-dipping normal fault. The fault has been widely studied over the last years in order to understand its mechanical behaviour, its present-day deformation rate and its seismological role. By using a wide data-set including subsurface data (seismic reflection profiles and boreholes) and surface geological data (new maps of the CARG project of Italy), we have reconstructed the 3D geometry of both the fault and of the main lithostratigraphic boundaries at the fault hanging-wall and foot-wall. The CARG map data were integrated by local observations and mapping using mobile GIS software (BeeGIS) and Android app (Geopaparazzi). Surface data were combined with seismic reflection profiles and wells interpretation and other data from available literature. The large amount of information were combined in MOVE software (Midland Valley Exploration ltd). Our reconstruction allows to i) build up a three-dimensional geological model of the subsurface including the main faults and lithostratigraphic boundaries; ii) identify a set of east-west trending faults the role of which was previously underestimated; iii) test a 3D-restoration of extension for the visualization of the time evolution and for the validation of the structural reconstruction. The restored structures are the main normal faults in the region. The sequential restoration was performed by taking into account the timing of deformation as derived from the literature. The model was sequentially restored according to the following chronological order from the latest to the oldest: 1a) last deformational event

  3. Design of a fault-tolerant decision-making system for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Faust, Oliver; Acharya, U Rajendra; Sputh, Bernhard H C; Tamura, Toshiyo

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a fault-tolerant classification system for medical applications. The design process follows the systems engineering methodology: in the agreement phase, we make the case for fault tolerance in diagnosis systems for biomedical applications. The argument extends the idea that machine diagnosis systems mimic the functionality of human decision-making, but in many cases they do not achieve the fault tolerance of the human brain. After making the case for fault tolerance, both requirements and specification for the fault-tolerant system are introduced before the implementation is discussed. The system is tested with fault and use cases to build up trust in the implemented system. This structured approach aided in the realisation of the fault-tolerant classification system. During the specification phase, we produced a formal model that enabled us to discuss what fault tolerance, reliability and safety mean for this particular classification system. Furthermore, such a formal basis for discussion is extremely useful during the initial stages of the design, because it helps to avoid big mistakes caused by a lack of overview later on in the project. During the implementation, we practiced component reuse by incorporating a reliable classification block, which was developed during a previous project, into the current design. Using a well-structured approach and practicing component reuse we follow best practice for both research and industry projects, which enabled us to realise the fault-tolerant classification system on time and within budget. This system can serve in a wide range of future health care systems. PMID:22288838

  4. Fault diagnostic instrumentation design for environmental control and life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, P. Y.; You, K. C.; Wynveen, R. A.; Powell, J. D., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    As a development phase moves toward flight hardware, the system availability becomes an important design aspect which requires high reliability and maintainability. As part of continous development efforts, a program to evaluate, design, and demonstrate advanced instrumentation fault diagnostics was successfully completed. Fault tolerance designs for reliability and other instrumenation capabilities to increase maintainability were evaluated and studied.

  5. Surveillance system and method having an operating mode partitioned fault classification model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickford, Randall L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A system and method which partitions a parameter estimation model, a fault detection model, and a fault classification model for a process surveillance scheme into two or more coordinated submodels together providing improved diagnostic decision making for at least one determined operating mode of an asset.

  6. Delivery and application of precise timing for a traveling wave powerline fault locator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has successfully operated an in-house developed powerline fault locator system since 1986. The BPA fault locator system consists of remotes installed at cardinal power transmission line system nodes and a central master which polls the remotes for traveling wave time-of-arrival data. A power line fault produces a fast rise-time traveling wave which emanates from the fault point and propagates throughout the power grid. The remotes time-tag the traveling wave leading edge as it passes through the power system cardinal substation nodes. A synchronizing pulse transmitted via the BPA analog microwave system on a wideband channel sychronizes the time-tagging counters in the remote units to a different accuracy of better than one microsecond. The remote units correct the raw time tags for synchronizing pulse propagation delay and return these corrected values to the fault locator master. The master then calculates the power system disturbance source using the collected time tags. The system design objective is a fault location accuracy of 300 meters. BPA's fault locator system operation, error producing phenomena, and method of distributing precise timing are described.

  7. Using unknown input observers for robust adaptive fault detection in vector second-order systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriou, Michael A.

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to construct natural observers for vector second-order systems by utilising unknown input observer (UIO) methods. This observer is subsequently used for a robust fault detection scheme and also as an adaptive detection scheme for a certain class of actuator faults wherein the time instance and characteristics of an incipient actuator fault are detected. Stability of the adaptive scheme is provided by a parameter-dependent Lyapunov function for second-order systems. Numerical example on a mechanical system describing an automobile suspension system is used to illustrate the theoretical results.

  8. Study on Unified Chaotic System-Based Wind Turbine Blade Fault Diagnostic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ying-Che; Hsieh, Chin-Tsung; Yau, Her-Terng; Li, Yu-Chung

    At present, vibration signals are processed and analyzed mostly in the frequency domain. The spectrum clearly shows the signal structure and the specific characteristic frequency band is analyzed, but the number of calculations required is huge, resulting in delays. Therefore, this study uses the characteristics of a nonlinear system to load the complete vibration signal to the unified chaotic system, applying the dynamic error to analyze the wind turbine vibration signal, and adopting extenics theory for artificial intelligent fault diagnosis of the analysis signal. Hence, a fault diagnostor has been developed for wind turbine rotating blades. This study simulates three wind turbine blade states, namely stress rupture, screw loosening and blade loss, and validates the methods. The experimental results prove that the unified chaotic system used in this paper has a significant effect on vibration signal analysis. Thus, the operating conditions of wind turbines can be quickly known from this fault diagnostic system, and the maintenance schedule can be arranged before the faults worsen, making the management and implementation of wind turbines smoother, so as to reduce many unnecessary costs.

  9. Development of fault diagnosis system for transformer based on multi-class support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Qian, Suxiang; Hu, Hongsheng; Yan, Gongbiao

    2007-12-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) is an algorithm based on structure risk minimizing principle and having high generalization ability. It is strong to solve the problem with small sample, nonlinear and high dimension. The fundamental theory of DGA (Dissolved Gas Analysis, DGA) and fault characteristic of transformer is firstly researched in this paper, and then the disadvantages of traditional method of transformer fault diagnosis are analyzed, finally, a new fault diagnosis method using multi-class support vector machines (M-SVMs) based on DGA theory for transformer is put forward. Then the fault diagnosis model based on M-SVMs for transformer is established. At the same time, the fault diagnosis system based on M-SVMs for transformer is developed. The system can realize the acquisition of the dissolving gas in the transformer oil and data timely and low cost transmission by GPRS (General Packet Radio Service, GPRS). And it can identify out the transformer running state according to the acquisition data. The test results show that the method proposed has an excellent performance on correct ratio. And it can overcome the disadvantage of the traditional three-ratio method which lacks of fault coding and no fault types in the existent coding. Combining the wireless communication technology with the monitoring technology, the designed and developed system can greatly improve the real-time and continuity for the transformer' condition monitoring and fault diagnosis.

  10. A hierarchically distributed architecture for fault isolation expert systems on the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miksell, Steve; Coffer, Sue

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station Axiomatic Fault Isolating Expert Systems (SAFTIES) system deals with the hierarchical distribution of control and knowledge among independent expert systems doing fault isolation and scheduling of Space Station subsystems. On its lower level, fault isolation is performed on individual subsystems. These fault isolation expert systems contain knowledge about the performance requirements of their particular subsystem and corrective procedures which may be involved in repsonse to certain performance errors. They can control the functions of equipment in their system and coordinate system task schedules. On a higher level, the Executive contains knowledge of all resources, task schedules for all systems, and the relative priority of all resources and tasks. The executive can override any subsystem task schedule in order to resolve use conflicts or resolve errors that require resources from multiple subsystems. Interprocessor communication is implemented using the SAFTIES Communications Interface (SCI). The SCI is an application layer protocol which supports the SAFTIES distributed multi-level architecture.

  11. Bayesian probabilities of earthquake occurrences in Longmenshan fault system (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Keyin; Gan, Qigang; Zhou, Wen; Xiong, Liang; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Chao

    2015-01-01

    China has a long history of earthquake records, and the Longmenshan fault system (LFS) is a famous earthquake zone. We believed that the LFS could be divided into three seismogenic zones (north, central, and south zones) based on the geological structures and the earthquake catalog. We applied the Bayesian probability method using extreme-value distribution of earthquake occurrences to estimate the seismic hazard in the LFS. The seismic moment, slip rate, earthquake recurrence rate, and magnitude were considered as the basic parameters for computing the Bayesian prior estimates of the seismicity. These estimates were then updated in terms of Bayes' theorem and historical estimates of seismicity in the LFS. Generally speaking, the north zone seemingly is quite peaceful compared with the central and south zones. The central zone is the most dangerous; however, the periodicity of earthquake occurrences for M s = 8.0 is quite long (1,250 to 5,000 years). The selection of upper bound probable magnitude influences the result, and the upper bound magnitude of the south zone maybe 7.5. We obtained the empirical relationship of magnitude conversion for M s and ML, the values of the magnitude of completeness Mc (3.5), and the Gutenberg-Richter b value before applying the Bayesian extreme-value distribution of earthquake occurrences method.

  12. System and method for motor fault detection using stator current noise cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Wei; Lu, Bin; Nowak, Michael P.; Dimino, Steven A.

    2010-12-07

    A system and method for detecting incipient mechanical motor faults by way of current noise cancellation is disclosed. The system includes a controller configured to detect indicia of incipient mechanical motor faults. The controller further includes a processor programmed to receive a baseline set of current data from an operating motor and define a noise component in the baseline set of current data. The processor is also programmed to acquire at least on additional set of real-time operating current data from the motor during operation, redefine the noise component present in each additional set of real-time operating current data, and remove the noise component from the operating current data in real-time to isolate any fault components present in the operating current data. The processor is then programmed to generate a fault index for the operating current data based on any isolated fault components.

  13. System and method for bearing fault detection using stator current noise cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Wei; Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.; Harley, Ronald G.; Theisen, Peter J.

    2010-08-17

    A system and method for detecting incipient mechanical motor faults by way of current noise cancellation is disclosed. The system includes a controller configured to detect indicia of incipient mechanical motor faults. The controller further includes a processor programmed to receive a baseline set of current data from an operating motor and define a noise component in the baseline set of current data. The processor is also programmed to repeatedly receive real-time operating current data from the operating motor and remove the noise component from the operating current data in real-time to isolate any fault components present in the operating current data. The processor is then programmed to generate a fault index for the operating current data based on any isolated fault components.

  14. Fault tree synthesis for software design analysis of PLC based safety-critical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, S. R.; Cho, C. H.; Seong, P. H.

    2006-07-01

    As a software verification and validation should be performed for the development of PLC based safety-critical systems, a software safety analysis is also considered in line with entire software life cycle. In this paper, we propose a technique of software safety analysis in the design phase. Among various software hazard analysis techniques, fault tree analysis is most widely used for the safety analysis of nuclear power plant systems. Fault tree analysis also has the most intuitive notation and makes both qualitative and quantitative analyses possible. To analyze the design phase more effectively, we propose a technique of fault tree synthesis, along with a universal fault tree template for the architecture modules of nuclear software. Consequently, we can analyze the safety of software on the basis of fault tree synthesis. (authors)

  15. Influence of growth faults on coastal fluvial systems: Examples from the late Miocene to Recent Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Christopher; Mohrig, David; Hess, Thomas; George, Terra; Straub, Kyle M.

    2014-03-01

    The details of how fluvial systems respond to spatial changes in land-surface subsidence produced by active faulting remain incompletely understood. Here, we examine the degree to which the positioning of individual channels and channel-belts is affected by local maxima in subsidence associated with the hanging walls of growth faults. The channel forms and faults are imaged using a seismic volume covering 1400 km2 of Breton Sound and Barataria Bay in southern Louisiana, USA. We look at the consequences of interactions between channels, channel-belts, and faults in late Miocene to Recent strata. More than fifty individual channels that crossed the traces of active growth faults were examined. Of these channels, only three appear to have been redirected by the faults. There also appeared to be no systematic change in the cross-sectional geometries of channels or channel-belts associated with crossing a fault, though the orientation of the channel-belts appears to be more influenced by faulting than the orientation of individual channels. Seven out of ten mapped channel-belts appear to have been steered by growth faults. We propose that channel belts are more likely to be influenced by faults than individual channels because channel-belts are longer lived features, unlikely to shift their overall position before experiencing a discrete faulting event. In addition, the style of influence in the few cases where an individual channel is affected by a fault is different from that of larger systems. While downstream of a fault channel-belts generally become oriented perpendicular to fault strike, the individual channels are directed along the hanging wall of the fault, running parallel to the fault trace. We relate this to the ratio of the length-scale of fault rollover relative to the channel or channel-belt width. Fluvial-fault interactions with higher values for this ratio are more likely to be carried parallel to the fault trace than systems with lower ratio values.

  16. Investigation of Ground-Fault Protection Devices for Photovoltaic Power Systems Applications

    SciTech Connect

    BOWER,WARD I.; WILES,JOHN

    2000-10-03

    Photovoltaic (PV) power systems, like other electrical systems, may be subject to unexpected ground faults. Installed PV systems always have invisible elements other than those indicated by their electrical schematics. Stray inductance, capacitance and resistance are distributed throughout the system. Leakage currents associated with the PV modules, the interconnected array, wires, surge protection devices and conduit add up and can become large enough to look like a ground-fault. PV systems are frequently connected to other sources of power or energy storage such as batteries, standby generators, and the utility grid. This complex arrangement of distributed power and energy sources, distributed impedance and proximity to other sources of power requires sensing of ground faults and proper reaction by the ground-fault protection devices. The different dc grounding requirements (country to country) often add more confusion to the situation. This paper discusses the ground-fault issues associated with both the dc and ac side of PV systems and presents test results and operational impacts of backfeeding commercially available ac ground-fault protection devices under various modes of operation. Further, the measured effects of backfeeding the tripped ground-fault devices for periods of time comparable to anti-islanding allowances for utility interconnection of PV inverters in the United States are reported.

  17. Robust Model-Based Sensor Fault Monitoring System for Nonlinear Systems in Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dejun; Song, Shiyao

    2014-01-01

    A new model-based sensor fault diagnosis (FD) scheme, using an equivalent model, is developed for a kind of Multiple Inputs Multiple Outputs (MIMO) nonlinear system which fulfills the Lipschitz condition. The equivalent model, which is a bank of one-dimensional linear state equations with the bounded model uncertainty, can take the place of a plant's exact nonlinear model in the case of sensor FD. This scheme shows a new perspective whereby, by using the equivalent model, it doesn't have to study the nonlinear internal structure character or get the exact model. The influence of the model uncertainty on the residuals is explained in this paper. A method, called pretreatment, is utilized to minimize the model uncertainty. The eigenstructure assignment method with assistant state is employed to solve the problem of perfect decoupling against the model uncertainty, disturbance, system faults, the relevant actuator faults, or even the case of no input from the relevant actuator. The realization of the proposed scheme is given by an algorithm according to a single sensor FD, and verified by a simulation example. Depending on the above, a sensor fault monitoring system is established by the sensor network and diagnosis logic, then the effectiveness is testified by a simulation. PMID:25320904

  18. Sensor configuration and test for fault diagnoses of subway braking system based on signed digraph method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Jianyong; Chen, Zhongkai

    2014-05-01

    Fault diagnosis of various systems on rolling stock has drawn the attention of many researchers. However, obtaining an optimized sensor set of these systems, which is a prerequisite for fault diagnosis, remains a major challenge. Available literature suggests that the configuration of sensors in these systems is presently dependent on the knowledge and engineering experiences of designers, which may lead to insufficient or redundant development of various sensors. In this paper, the optimization of sensor sets is addressed by using the signed digraph (SDG) method. The method is modified for use in braking systems by the introduction of an effect-function method to replace the traditional quantitative methods. Two criteria are adopted to evaluate the capability of the sensor sets, namely, observability and resolution. The sensors configuration method of braking system is proposed. It consists of generating bipartite graphs from SDG models and then solving the set cover problem using a greedy algorithm. To demonstrate the improvement, the sensor configuration of the HP2008 braking system is investigated and fault diagnosis on a test bench is performed. The test results show that SDG algorithm can improve single-fault resolution from 6 faults to 10 faults, and with additional four brake cylinder pressure (BCP) sensors it can cover up to 67 double faults which were not considered by traditional fault diagnosis system. SDG methods are suitable for reducing redundant sensors and that the sensor sets thereby obtained are capable of detecting typical faults, such as the failure of a release valve. This study investigates the formal extension of the SDG method to the sensor configuration of braking system, as well as the adaptation supported by the effect-function method.

  19. Fault zone characteristics, fracture systems and permeability implications of Middle Triassic Muschelkalk in Southwest Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2015-01-01

    Fault zone structure and lithology affect permeability of Triassic Muschelkalk limestone-marl-alternations in Southwest Germany, a region characterized by a complex tectonic history. Field studies of eight fault zones provide insights into fracture system parameters (orientation, density, aperture, connectivity, vertical extension) within fault zone units (fault core, damage zone). Results show decreasing fracture lengths with distances to the fault cores in well-developed damage zones. Fracture connectivity at fracture tips is enhanced in proximity to the slip surfaces, particularly caused by shorter fractures. Different mechanical properties of limestone and marl layers obviously affect fracture propagation and thus fracture system connectivity and permeability. Fracture apertures are largest parallel and subparallel to fault zones and prominent regional structures (e.g., Upper Rhine Graben) leading to enhanced fracture-induced permeabilities. Mineralized fractures and mineralizations in fault cores indicate past fluid flow. Permeability is increased by the development of hydraulically active pathways across several beds (non-stratabound fractures) to a higher degree than by the formation of fractures interconnected at fracture tips. We conclude that there is an increase of interconnected fractures and fracture densities in proximity to the fault cores. This is particularly clear in more homogenous rocks. The results help to better understand permeability in Muschelkalk rocks.

  20. Seismic characterization of the Wasatch fault system beneath Salt Lake City using a land streamer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, B.; Liberty, L. M.; Gribler, G.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the active Wasatch fault system beneath downtown Salt Lake City by measuring p- and s-wave velocities and seismic reflection profiling. Our focus was on the segment boundary between the Warm Springs and East Bench faults. We collected 14.5 km along 9 west-east profiles in 3 field days using a 60 m aperture seismic land streamer and 200 kg weight drop system. From a p-wave refraction analysis, we measure velocities from 230-3900 m/s for the upper 20-25 meters. Shear wave velocities for the upper 30 m, derived from a multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) approach, show velocities that range from 100-1800 m/s. P-wave reflection images from the upper 100 m depth indicate offset and truncated (mostly) west-dipping strata (Bonneville Lake deposits?) that suggest active faults extend beneath the downtown urban corridor. We identify saturated sediments on the lower elevation (western) portions of the profiles and shallow high velocity (dry) strata to the east of the mapped faults. We observe slow p-wave velocities near identified faults that may represent the fault's colluvial wedge. These velocity results are best highlighted with Vp/Vs ratios. Analyzing shear wave velocities by NEHRP class, we estimate soft soil (NEHRP D) limited less than 1 m depth along most profiles, and stiff soil (NEHRP C) to up to 25 m depth in some locations. However near steep topographic slopes (footwall deposits), we identify NEHRP Class D stiff soil velocities to less than 2 m depth before transition to NEHRP Class C soft rock. Depth to hard rock (velocities >760 m/s) are as shallow as 20 m below the land surface on some steep slopes beneath north Salt Lake City and greater than our imaging depths along the western portions of our profiles. Our findings suggest large variations in seismic velocities beneath the Salt Lake City corridor and that multiple fault strands related to the Warm Springs fault segment extend beneath downtown.

  1. Crustal Deformation Along the Northern San Andreas Fault System From Geodetic and Geologic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    The San Andreas fault system north of the San Francisco Bay area is composed of three sub-parallel right-lateral faults: the San Andreas, Rodgers Creek-Ma'acama, and Green Valley-Bartlett Springs. The San Andreas has been essentially aseismic since it last ruptured in 1906, and no major historical earthquakes have occurred on the more seismically active Ma'acama and Bartlett Springs faults, although the slip deficit on the Ma'acama fault may now be large enough to generate a magnitude 7 earthquake. Since 2002, we have been collecting GPS measurements at about 80 monuments that form roughly 10-station profiles across the northern San Andreas fault system from Pt. Reyes to Cape Mendocino. Most of the monuments were last observed in 1993 or 1995, so the new observations significantly improve estimates of their relative motion and models of average interseismic strain accumulation, including possible spatial variations along the fault system. We use angular velocity-backslip block modeling to determine a self-consistent northern California deformation field and rates of strain accumulation along the northern San Andreas fault system. Preliminary results from our modeling, which includes 2 blocks within the San Andreas fault system, as well as a Sierran-Great Valley block, and the Pacific and North America plates, show agreement between observed and predicted velocities at less than 2 mm/yr. Fault-parallel deformation across the entire San Andreas fault system is 38 mm/yr, but deep slip rates on the sub-parallel faults are poorly constrained due to significant correlations between the deep slip rates and locking depths, which we fully characterize using Monte Carlo techniques. We use Bayesian techniques to combine the GPS observations with constraints derived from other seismic, geodetic, and paleoseismic observations, such as locking depths, surface creep rates, and inferred geologic slip rates. These additional constraints significantly improve the estimates of the

  2. Designing Fault-Injection Experiments for the Reliability of Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the long-standing problem of conducting fault-injections experiments to establish the ultra-reliability of embedded systems. There have been extensive efforts in fault injection, and this paper offers a partial summary of the efforts, but these previous efforts have focused on realism and efficiency. Fault injections have been used to examine diagnostics and to test algorithms, but the literature does not contain any framework that says how to conduct fault-injection experiments to establish ultra-reliability. A solution to this problem integrates field-data, arguments-from-design, and fault-injection into a seamless whole. The solution in this paper is to derive a model reduction theorem for a class of semi-Markov models suitable for describing ultra-reliable embedded systems. The derivation shows that a tight upper bound on the probability of system failure can be obtained using only the means of system-recovery times, thus reducing the experimental effort to estimating a reasonable number of easily-observed parameters. The paper includes an example of a system subject to both permanent and transient faults. There is a discussion of integrating fault-injection with field-data and arguments-from-design.

  3. Development of Fault Point Locating System for Underground Transmission Lines using Optical Fiber Current Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Reishi; Nasukawa, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Tatsushi; Amano, Kazuo

    Fault point locating systems based on surge current detection have recently been used for fast recovery of underground transmission line from the fault. Electromagnetic induction type sensors have mainly been used for detection of the surge current. However they are susceptible to electromagnetic noise which causes unstable system operation. To solve this problem, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Toko Electric Corporation and Fujikura Ltd., by a joint research, have developed a new system that applies optical fiber current sensors.

  4. A novel mathematical setup for fault tolerant control systems with state-dependent failure process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitraganti, S.; Aberkane, S.; Aubrun, C.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we consider a fault tolerant control system (FTCS) with state- dependent failures and provide a tractable mathematical model to handle the state-dependent failures. By assuming abrupt changes in system parameters, we use a jump process modelling of failure process and the fault detection and isolation (FDI) process. In particular, we assume that the failure rates of the failure process vary according to which set the state of the system belongs to.

  5. Surface deformation along the Carmel Fault System, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinking, Joerg; Smit-Philipp, Hillrich; Even-Tzur, Gilad

    2011-10-01

    The existing knowledge about the recent crustal deformations along the Carmel Fault in Northern Israel which passes the city of Haifa is to a certain degree ambiguous. Depending on geological, geophysical or geodetic sources the movement rates and senses range from 1 mm/yr sinistral up to 4 mm/yr dextral. In this paper we analyze GPS data from a regional network observed between 1999 and 2009 and derive global and regional velocities for 23 sites along the fault. The regional site velocities were estimated with respect to a local datum that was defined by a stable cluster of sites on one side of the fault and the horizontal velocity field shows deformations of up to 4.5 mm/yr dextral. In combination with an S-transformation the site velocities were used to estimate the parameters of a dislocation model based on elastic half space theory. We compare the results with expectations from slip rate analysis of seismicity parameters. In addition the resulting fault slip field is used to derive a fault-related velocity field.

  6. A Dynamic Finite Element Method for Simulating the Physics of Faults Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saez, E.; Mora, P.; Gross, L.; Weatherley, D.

    2004-12-01

    We introduce a dynamic Finite Element method using a novel high level scripting language to describe the physical equations, boundary conditions and time integration scheme. The library we use is the parallel Finley library: a finite element kernel library, designed for solving large-scale problems. It is incorporated as a differential equation solver into a more general library called escript, based on the scripting language Python. This library has been developed to facilitate the rapid development of 3D parallel codes, and is optimised for the Australian Computational Earth Systems Simulator Major National Research Facility (ACcESS MNRF) supercomputer, a 208 processor SGI Altix with a peak performance of 1.1 TFlops. Using the scripting approach we obtain a parallel FE code able to take advantage of the computational efficiency of the Altix 3700. We consider faults as material discontinuities (the displacement, velocity, and acceleration fields are discontinuous at the fault), with elastic behavior. The stress continuity at the fault is achieved naturally through the expression of the fault interactions in the weak formulation. The elasticity problem is solved explicitly in time, using the Saint Verlat scheme. Finally, we specify a suitable frictional constitutive relation and numerical scheme to simulate fault behaviour. Our model is based on previous work on modelling fault friction and multi-fault systems using lattice solid-like models. We adapt the 2D model for simulating the dynamics of parallel fault systems described to the Finite-Element method. The approach uses a frictional relation along faults that is slip and slip-rate dependent, and the numerical integration approach introduced by Mora and Place in the lattice solid model. In order to illustrate the new Finite Element model, single and multi-fault simulation examples are presented.

  7. Active displacements recorded along major fault systems in caves (Eastern Alps, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrovic, Ivanka; Plan, Lukas; Baron, Ivo; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Seismic data and GPS observations suggest that several major tectonic fault systems in the Eastern Alps are still active. However, direct geological evidences for recent movements along individual fault systems are rather scarce and limited to local observations in the Vienna Basin. Recently, tectonically damaged speleothems have been described from a cave close to the Salzach Ennstal Mariazeller Puchberger (SEMP) strike-slip fault, which accommodated the lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps towards the Pannonian Basin. The project SPELEOTECT investigates the Quaternary tectonic activity and recent dynamics of micro-displacements along major fault systems of the Eastern Alps recorded in caves. The work focuses on cave passages, which have been displaced by active faulting and on speleothems, which have been damaged by fault movements. In order to bracket the tectonic events, flowstones, which have grown before and after the tectonic event are dated using the U-series disequilibrium method. For the reconstruction of the local stress field during (re)activation of the faults, the paleostress and the active stress field will be calculated from the fault-slip data of the recent micro-dislocations monitored with high-accuracy 3D crack-gauges. Cataclasites and fault gouges from sheared flowstones are investigated with high-resolution electron beam analytical techniques in order to characterize the microstructures caused by various deformation mechanisms within principal slip surfaces. Cathodoluminescense images are combined with electron backscattered diffraction maps in order to discriminating between fault displacements caused by seismic slip or aseismic creep. The major aim of SPELEOTECT is the record of a solid and broad data base of the paleoseismic record of the Eastern Alps for regional earthquake hazard assessment.

  8. Neotectonics of the Western Nepal Fault System: Implications for Himalayan strain partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Calvin R. P.; Murphy, Michael A.; Taylor, Michael H.; Gosse, John; Baltz, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Oblique convergence at the Himalayan margin is hypothesized to be partitioned by orogen-normal thrusting and orogen-parallel strike-slip faulting. We conducted field mapping and remote sensing in the Dhaulagiri Range of Nepal, and the results reveal an active regional fault system termed the Western Nepal Fault System (WNFS). Right and normally offset Quaternary deposits and brittly deformed bedrock demarcate dextral slip along two strike-slip faults striking N40-50°W linked via an extensional right step over striking N10-20°E. The strike-slip attitudes subparallel bedrock foliation, while the step over cuts at a high angle (~70°). Fault slip data along the strike-slip segments trend N70°W with minor dip component, top to north. Fault slip data and observed kinematics along the WNFS support our interpretation that the WNFS formed via arc-parallel stress. On the basis of geometry, kinematics, and structural position we correlate the WNFS to active faults between the Karakoram and Bari Gad faults. This suggests an ~350 km long dextral fault system extending obliquely across the Western Nepal Himalaya which appears to intersect the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) near 83°30'E, coinciding with a large gradient in the arc-parallel component of GPS velocities. We interpret the WNFS to represent a class of orogen-parallel strike-slip faults working with subduction to accommodate obliquely convergent plate motion. Our observations support the hypothesis that the region lying between the MFT and the WNFS is a continental version of a fore-arc sliver bounded at its base by the Main Himalayan Thrust.

  9. Autonomous power expert fault diagnostic system for Space Station Freedom electrical power system testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.; Walters, Jerry L.; Roth, Mary Ellen; Quinn, Todd M.; Krawczonek, Walter M.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the Autonomous Power System (APS) program is to develop and apply intelligent problem solving and control to the Space Station Freedom Electrical Power System (SSF/EPS) testbed being developed and demonstrated at NASA Lewis Research Center. The objectives of the program are to establish artificial intelligence technology paths, to craft knowledge-based tools with advanced human-operator interfaces for power systems, and to interface and integrate knowledge-based systems with conventional controllers. The Autonomous Power EXpert (APEX) portion of the APS program will integrate a knowledge-based fault diagnostic system and a power resource planner-scheduler. Then APEX will interface on-line with the SSF/EPS testbed and its Power Management Controller (PMC). The key tasks include establishing knowledge bases for system diagnostics, fault detection and isolation analysis, on-line information accessing through PMC, enhanced data management, and multiple-level, object-oriented operator displays. The first prototype of the diagnostic expert system for fault detection and isolation has been developed. The knowledge bases and the rule-based model that were developed for the Power Distribution Control Unit subsystem of the SSF/EPS testbed are described. A corresponding troubleshooting technique is also described.

  10. Geophysical characterization of transtensional fault systems in the Eastern California Shear Zone-Walker Lane Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M.; Keranen, K. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Feldman, J. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) and Walker Lane belt (WL) accommodate ~25% of plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates. Faults within the Mina deflection link the ECSZ and the WL, transferring strain from the Owens Valley and Death Valley-Fish Lake Valley fault systems to the transcurrent faults of the central Walker Lane. During the mid to late Miocene the majority of strain between these systems was transferred through the Silver Peak-Lone Mountain (SPLM) extensional complex via a shallowly dipping detachment. Strain transfer has since primarily migrated north to the Mina Deflection; however, high-angle faults bounding sedimentary basins and discrepancies between geodetic and geologic models indicate that the SPLM complex may still actively transfer a portion of the strain from the ECSZ to the WL on a younger set of faults. Establishing the pattern and amount of active strain transfer within the SPLM region is required for a full accounting of strain accommodation, and provides insight into strain partitioning at the basin scale within a broader transtensional zone. To map the active structures in and near Clayton Valley, within the SPLM region, we collected seismic reflection and refraction profiles and a dense grid of gravity readings that were merged with existing gravity data. The primary goals were to determine the geometry of the high-angle fault system, the amount and sense of offset along each fault set, connectivity of the faults, and the relationship of these faults to the Miocene detachment. Seismic reflection profiles imaged the high-angle basin-bounding normal faults and the detachment in both the footwall and hanging wall. The extensional basin is ~1 km deep, with a steep southeastern boundary, a gentle slope to the northwest, and a sharp boundary on the northwest side, suggestive of another fault system. Two subparallel dip-slip faults bound the southeast (deeper) basin margin with a large lateral velocity change (from ~2

  11. System for detecting and limiting electrical ground faults within electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Gaubatz, Donald C.

    1990-01-01

    An electrical ground fault detection and limitation system for employment with a nuclear reactor utilizing a liquid metal coolant. Elongate electromagnetic pumps submerged within the liquid metal coolant and electrical support equipment experiencing an insulation breakdown occasion the development of electrical ground fault current. Without some form of detection and control, these currents may build to damaging power levels to expose the pump drive components to liquid metal coolant such as sodium with resultant undesirable secondary effects. Such electrical ground fault currents are detected and controlled through the employment of an isolated power input to the pumps and with the use of a ground fault control conductor providing a direct return path from the affected components to the power source. By incorporating a resistance arrangement with the ground fault control conductor, the amount of fault current permitted to flow may be regulated to the extent that the reactor may remain in operation until maintenance may be performed, notwithstanding the existence of the fault. Monitors such as synchronous demodulators may be employed to identify and evaluate fault currents for each phase of a polyphase power, and control input to the submerged pump and associated support equipment.

  12. Development of fault section detecting system for gas insulated transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, E.; Uchida, K.; Koshilishi, M.; Mitsui, T.; Miyamoto, S.; Nakamura, K.; Itaka, K.; Hara, T.; Yoda, T.

    1986-01-01

    A fault section detecting system using optical magnetic field sensors developed for gas insulated transmission lines (GIL) is reported. A bismuth silicon oxide (Bi/sub 12/SiO/sub 20/, or BSO) single crystal was adopted for the optical magnetic field sensor. A method of mounting the sensors to GIL which enables the sensors to detect the conductor current from outside the enclosure was developed. With the developed fault detector, faults occurring inside a section of GIL between sensors are detected by discriminating the phases of conductor currents detected by the sensors. The system was confirmed to have sufficient performance for application to commerical GILS.

  13. Experimental application of nonlinear minimum variance estimation for fault detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkaya, Alkan; Grimble, Michael John

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an experimental design and application of a novel model-based fault detection technique by using a nonlinear minimum variance (NMV) estimator. The NMV estimation technique is used to generate a residual signal which is then used to detect faults in the system. The main advantage of the approach is the simplicity of the nonlinear estimator theory and the straightforward structure of the resulting solution. The proposed method is implemented and validated experimentally on DC servo system. Experimental results demonstrate that the technique can produce acceptable performance in terms of fault detection and false alarm.

  14. Fault injection via on-chip debugging in the internal memory of systems-on-chip processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekmarev, S. A.; Khanov, V. Kh

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an on-chip debugging method for the injection of single faults in the processor cores of systems-on-chip. The method consists in the placement of faults injection infrastructure in a system-on-chip as an intellectual property core. This simplifies the fault injection environment, reduces delays injection and improves the performance, as well as allows doing long autonomous campaign for injection of faults without the use of external devices.

  15. Qualitative Fault Isolation of Hybrid Systems: A Structural Model Decomposition-Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregon, Anibal; Daigle, Matthew; Roychoudhury, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Quick and robust fault diagnosis is critical to ensuring safe operation of complex engineering systems. A large number of techniques are available to provide fault diagnosis in systems with continuous dynamics. However, many systems in aerospace and industrial environments are best represented as hybrid systems that consist of discrete behavioral modes, each with its own continuous dynamics. These hybrid dynamics make the on-line fault diagnosis task computationally more complex due to the large number of possible system modes and the existence of autonomous mode transitions. This paper presents a qualitative fault isolation framework for hybrid systems based on structural model decomposition. The fault isolation is performed by analyzing the qualitative information of the residual deviations. However, in hybrid systems this process becomes complex due to possible existence of observation delays, which can cause observed deviations to be inconsistent with the expected deviations for the current mode in the system. The great advantage of structural model decomposition is that (i) it allows to design residuals that respond to only a subset of the faults, and (ii) every time a mode change occurs, only a subset of the residuals will need to be reconfigured, thus reducing the complexity of the reasoning process for isolation purposes. To demonstrate and test the validity of our approach, we use an electric circuit simulation as the case study.

  16. San Simeon-Hosgri fault system, coastal California: economic and environmental implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, C.A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Comparison of stratigraphic sections exposed on opposite sides of the late Quaternary San Simeon-Hosgri fault system at Point Sal and near San Simeon (Fig. 1) strongly suggests large-scale lateral displacement.

  17. Considerations for ground fault protection in medium-voltage industrial and cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Love, D.J.; Hashemi, N.

    1988-07-01

    Industrial plants utilize medium-voltage systems for in-plant distribution of purchased and cogenerated electrical energy. During the planning stage, system protection is generally specified, including the type of source neutral grounding and ground fault protection. Where medium-voltage systems have expanded, circuit-breaker interrupting ratings have also been increased. Accordingly, grounding consideration should be reviewed, particularly because charging and/or ground fault current values have also increased. The typical methods for grounding of medium-voltage neutral systems - high resistance, low resistance, and ungrounded, as well as methods used to detect the presence of a ground fault - are reviewed. Also, the effects of charging current and how the ground fault protection method could affect conductor ratings are analyzed.

  18. Fault-Tolerant Consensus of Multi-Agent System With Distributed Adaptive Protocol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun; Ho, Daniel W C; Li, Lulu; Liu, Ming

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, fault-tolerant consensus in multi-agent system using distributed adaptive protocol is investigated. Firstly, distributed adaptive online updating strategies for some parameters are proposed based on local information of the network structure. Then, under the online updating parameters, a distributed adaptive protocol is developed to compensate the fault effects and the uncertainty effects in the leaderless multi-agent system. Based on the local state information of neighboring agents, a distributed updating protocol gain is developed which leads to a fully distributed continuous adaptive fault-tolerant consensus protocol design for the leaderless multi-agent system. Furthermore, a distributed fault-tolerant leader-follower consensus protocol for multi-agent system is constructed by the proposed adaptive method. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical analysis. PMID:25415998

  19. An Integrated Fault Tolerant Robotic Controller System for High Reliability and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Tso, Kam S.; Hecht, Myron

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the concepts and features of a fault-tolerant intelligent robotic control system being developed for applications that require high dependability (reliability, availability, and safety). The system consists of two major elements: a fault-tolerant controller and an operator workstation. The fault-tolerant controller uses a strategy which allows for detection and recovery of hardware, operating system, and application software failures.The fault-tolerant controller can be used by itself in a wide variety of applications in industry, process control, and communications. The controller in combination with the operator workstation can be applied to robotic applications such as spaceborne extravehicular activities, hazardous materials handling, inspection and maintenance of high value items (e.g., space vehicles, reactor internals, or aircraft), medicine, and other tasks where a robot system failure poses a significant risk to life or property.

  20. Fault and partial discharge location systems for gas-insulated transmission lines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.A.; Ford, G.L.; Fujimoto, N.; Stone, G.C.

    1983-12-01

    Partial discharge and faults in gas-insulated transmission line (GITL) can be difficult to locate. This report describes the development, testing, and application of systems for fault and partial discharge location in GITL. Both systems are based on timing of electromagnetic transients generated by a fault/partial discharge source. Both systems employ microcomputers to facilitate automated data acquisition and analysis. The major problems solved in developing the fault location system were coupling of high frequency signals from and between phases and isolation of high voltage short risetime signals from high speed digital logic. The problems addressed in the partial discharge location project include handling a large number of pulses which may include noise, the large dynamic range of partial discharge induced transients (> 80 dB), and achieving an accurate correlation resolution of 2 ns.

  1. On-line fault diagnosis of power substation using connectionist expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.T.; Chang, W.Y.; Huang, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    This paper proposes a new connectionist (or neural network) expert system for on-line fault diagnosis of a power substation. The Connectionist Expert Diagnosis System has similar profile of an expert system, but can be constructed much more easily from elemental samples. These samples associate the faults with their protective relays and breakers as well as the bus voltages and feeder currents. Through an elaborately designed structure, alarm signals are processed by different connectionist models. The output of the connectionist models is then integrated to provide the final conclusion with a confidence level. The proposed approach has been practically verified by testing on a typical Taiwan Power (Taipower) secondary substation. The test results show that rapid and exactly correct diagnosis is obtained even for the fault conditions involving multiple faults or failure operation of protective relay and circuit breaker. Moreover, the system can be transplanted into various substations with little additional implementation effort.

  2. Robust Fault Detection of Wind Energy Conversion Systems Based on Dynamic Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Nasser; Sadrnia, Mohammad Ali; Darabi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Occurrence of faults in wind energy conversion systems (WECSs) is inevitable. In order to detect the occurred faults at the appropriate time, avoid heavy economic losses, ensure safe system operation, prevent damage to adjacent relevant systems, and facilitate timely repair of failed components; a fault detection system (FDS) is required. Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) have gained a noticeable position in FDSs and they have been widely used for modeling of complex dynamical systems. One method for designing an FDS is to prepare a dynamic neural model emulating the normal system behavior. By comparing the outputs of the real system and neural model, incidence of the faults can be identified. In this paper, by utilizing a comprehensive dynamic model which contains both mechanical and electrical components of the WECS, an FDS is suggested using dynamic RNNs. The presented FDS detects faults of the generator's angular velocity sensor, pitch angle sensors, and pitch actuators. Robustness of the FDS is achieved by employing an adaptive threshold. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme is capable to detect the faults shortly and it has very low false and missed alarms rate. PMID:24744774

  3. Robust fault detection of wind energy conversion systems based on dynamic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nasser; Sadrnia, Mohammad Ali; Darabi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Occurrence of faults in wind energy conversion systems (WECSs) is inevitable. In order to detect the occurred faults at the appropriate time, avoid heavy economic losses, ensure safe system operation, prevent damage to adjacent relevant systems, and facilitate timely repair of failed components; a fault detection system (FDS) is required. Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) have gained a noticeable position in FDSs and they have been widely used for modeling of complex dynamical systems. One method for designing an FDS is to prepare a dynamic neural model emulating the normal system behavior. By comparing the outputs of the real system and neural model, incidence of the faults can be identified. In this paper, by utilizing a comprehensive dynamic model which contains both mechanical and electrical components of the WECS, an FDS is suggested using dynamic RNNs. The presented FDS detects faults of the generator's angular velocity sensor, pitch angle sensors, and pitch actuators. Robustness of the FDS is achieved by employing an adaptive threshold. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme is capable to detect the faults shortly and it has very low false and missed alarms rate. PMID:24744774

  4. Explaining the current geodetic field with geological models: A case study of the Haiyuan fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daout, S.; Jolivet, R.; Lasserre, C.; Doin, M. P.; Barbot, S.; Peltzer, G.; Tapponnier, P.

    2015-12-01

    Oblique convergence across Tibet leads to slip partitioning with the co-existence of strike-slip, normal and thrust motion in major fault systems. While such complexity has been shown at the surface, the question is to understand how faults interact and accumulate strain at depth. Here, we process InSAR data across the central Haiyuan restraining bend, at the north-eastern boundary of the Tibetan plateau and show that the surface complexity can be explained by partitioning of a uniform deep-seated convergence rate. We construct a time series of ground deformation, from Envisat radar data spanning from 2001-2011 period, across a challenging area because of the high jump in topography between the desert environment and the plateau. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio, we used the latest Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry methodology, such as Global Atmospheric Models (ERA Interim) and Digital Elevation Model errors corrections before unwrapping. We then developed a new Bayesian approach, jointly inverting our InSAR time series together with published GPS displacements. We explore fault system geometry at depth and associated slip rates and determine a uniform N86±7E° convergence rate of 8.45±1.4 mm/yr across the whole fault system with a variable partitioning west and east of a major extensional fault-jog. Our 2D model gives a quantitative understanding of how crustal deformation is accumulated by the various branches of this thrust/strike-slip fault system and demonstrate the importance of the geometry of the Haiyuan Fault, controlling the partitioning or the extrusion of the block motion. The approach we have developed would allow constraining the low strain accumulation along deep faults, like for example for the blind thrust faults or possible detachment in the San Andreas "big bend", which are often associated to a poorly understood seismic hazard.

  5. Method and system for fault accommodation of machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Kai Frank (Inventor); Subbu, Rajesh Venkat (Inventor); Rausch, Randal Thomas (Inventor); Frederick, Dean Kimball (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for multi-objective fault accommodation using predictive modeling is disclosed. The method includes using a simulated machine that simulates a faulted actual machine, and using a simulated controller that simulates an actual controller. A multi-objective optimization process is performed, based on specified control settings for the simulated controller and specified operational scenarios for the simulated machine controlled by the simulated controller, to generate a Pareto frontier-based solution space relating performance of the simulated machine to settings of the simulated controller, including adjustment to the operational scenarios to represent a fault condition of the simulated machine. Control settings of the actual controller are adjusted, represented by the simulated controller, for controlling the actual machine, represented by the simulated machine, in response to a fault condition of the actual machine, based on the Pareto frontier-based solution space, to maximize desirable operational conditions and minimize undesirable operational conditions while operating the actual machine in a region of the solution space defined by the Pareto frontier.

  6. A hybrid approach for detecting and isolating faults in nuclear power plant interacting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, J.W.; Miller, D.W.; Hajek, B.K.

    1996-09-01

    A fault detection and isolation (FDI) system is presented that can detect and isolate nuclear power plant (NPP) faults occurring in interacting systems. The proposed methodology combines two tools, observer-based residual generation and neural network pattern matching, into a powerful, hybrid diagnostic system. A computer-based model of a commercial boiling water reactor (BWR) is used as the reference plant. Two FDI methods are implemented on each of two BWR systems, and their performance characteristics are compared. One method uses conventional neural network techniques that use parameter values for input, and a second, hybrid methodology uses system models to create residuals for input to a neural network. Both FDI systems show good generalization abilities, but only the hybrid system decouples system interactions. Although implementation is impractical for all NPP systems, this hybrid technique is most useful in specific applications where operators have difficulty diagnosing faults in strongly interacting systems.

  7. Automated Generation of Fault Management Artifacts from a Simple System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Andrew K.; Day, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of off-nominal behavior - failure modes and fault propagation - in complex systems is often based purely on engineering intuition; specific cases are assessed in an ad hoc fashion as a (fallible) fault management engineer sees fit. This work is an attempt to provide a more rigorous approach to this understanding and assessment by automating the creation of a fault management artifact, the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) through querying a representation of the system in a SysML model. This work builds off the previous development of an off-nominal behavior model for the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We further developed the previous system model to more fully incorporate the ideas of State Analysis, and it was restructured in an organizational hierarchy that models the system as layers of control systems while also incorporating the concept of "design authority". We present software that was developed to traverse the elements and relationships in this model to automatically construct an FMEA spreadsheet. We further discuss extending this model to automatically generate other typical fault management artifacts, such as Fault Trees, to efficiently portray system behavior, and depend less on the intuition of fault management engineers to ensure complete examination of off-nominal behavior.

  8. The origin of detachment fault systems in core complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.J.; Lister, G.S. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    At Planet Peak in the Buckskin Mountains, AZ, lower plate rocks are cut by numerous faults, the largest being moderate to gently, N to NE dipping normal faults with displacements from 10--100 meters. Superficially the structure of the lower plate appears similar to that of the upper plate, emphasizing the importance of brittle deformation in the evolution of the lower plate. This feature is inconsistent with recent models for core complexes in which the lower plate has low flexural strength. Mylonitic fabrics are best developed in the vicinity of Tertiary, mafic to intermediate intrusives. Where the intrusives are absent, lower plate rocks preserve the steeply dipping, NE-trending Proterozoic fabric. Typically the intrusives are far more intensely deformed than the adjacent wallrocks, indicating strain was localized within them. Local discordance between the mylonitic fabric in the intrusives and that in the wallrocks is the result of both intrusives cross-cutting earlier mylonitic fabrics and fault localization along intrusive contacts. The authors infer the association of mylonites and Tertiary intrusives to imply transient ductile deformation occurred in the thermal aureoles of shallow level intrusives, at less sand possibly much less than 10 km depth. Although thin igneous bodies implaced at shallow levels would be expected to cool extremely rapidly, the initial localization of strain may result in strain softening [+-] shear heating sufficient to enable further localized strain well after the initial heat input should have dissipated. Along the western Planet Peak, the Buckskin fault forms the upper contact to a thick suite of syn-extensional intrusives, lithologically similar to those of the Oligocene-Miocene lutonic complex that comprises 30% of the exposed lower plate in the Buckskin and Rawhide Mountains. They propose that core complex formation and detachment faulting are related to shallow level intrusion during Oligocene-Miocene extension of the region.

  9. Interseismic deformation of the Shahroud fault system (NE Iran) from space-borne radar interferometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Z.; Pathier, E.; Walker, R. T.; Walpersdorf, A.; Tavakoli, F.; Nankali, H.; Sedighi, M.; Doin, M.-P.

    2015-07-01

    The Shahroud fault system is a major active structure in the Alborz range of NE Iran whose slip rate is not well constrained despite its potential high seismic hazard. In order to constrain the slip rate of the eastern Shahroud fault zone, we use space-borne synthetic aperture radar interferometry with both ascending and descending Envisat data to determine the rate of interseismic strain accumulation across the system. We invert the slip rate from surface velocity measurements using a half-space elastic dislocation model. The modeling results are consistent with a left-lateral slip rate of 4.75 ± 0.8 mm/yr on the Abr and Jajarm, strands of the Shahroud fault, with a 10 ± 4 km locking depth. This is in good agreement with the 4-6 mm/yr of left-lateral displacement rate accumulated across the total Shahroud fault system obtained from GPS measurements.

  10. Eocene activity on the Western Sierra Fault System and its role incising Kings Canyon, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Francis J.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Saleeby, Jason; Clark, Marin

    2016-04-01

    Combining new and published apatite (U-Th)/He and apatite 4He/3He data from along the Kings River canyon, California we rediscover a west-down normal fault on the western slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, one of a series of scarps initially described by Hake (1928) which we call the Western Sierra Fault System. Integrating field observations with apatite (U-Th)/He data, we infer a single fault trace 30 km long, and constrain the vertical offset across this fault to be roughly a kilometer. Thermal modeling of apatite 4He/3He data documents a pulse of footwall cooling near the fault and upstream in the footwall at circa 45-40 Ma, which we infer to be the timing of a kilometer-scale incision pulse resulting from the fault activity. In the context of published data from the subsurface of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys, our data from the Western Sierra Fault System suggests an Eocene tectonic regime dominated by low-to-moderate magnitude extension, surface uplift, and internal structural deformation of the southern Sierra Nevada and proximal Great Valley forearc.

  11. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards: November 2012 - October 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, William

    2015-02-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  12. Deformation rates across the San Andreas Fault system, central California determined by geology and geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Sarah J.

    The San Andreas fault system is a transpressional plate boundary characterized by sub-parallel dextral strike-slip faults separating internally deformed crustal blocks in central California. Both geodetic and geologic tools were used to understand the short- and long-term partitioning of deformation in both the crust and the lithospheric mantle across the plate boundary system. GPS data indicate that the short-term discrete deformation rate is ˜28 mm/yr for the central creeping segment of the San Andreas fault and increases to 33 mm/yr at +/-35 km from the fault. This gradient in deformation rates is interpreted to reflect elastic locking of the creeping segment at depth, distributed off-fault deformation, or some combination of these two mechanisms. These short-term fault-parallel deformation rates are slower than the expected geologic slip rate and the relative plate motion rate. Structural analysis of folds and transpressional kinematic modeling were used to quantify long-term distributed deformation adjacent to the Rinconada fault. Folding accommodates approximately 5 km of wrench deformation, which translates to a deformation rate of ˜1 mm/yr since the start of the Pliocene. Integration with discrete offset on the Rinconada fault indicates that this portion of the San Andreas fault system is approximately 80% strike-slip partitioned. This kinematic fold model can be applied to the entire San Andreas fault system and may explain some of the across-fault gradient in deformation rates recorded by the geodetic data. Petrologic examination of mantle xenoliths from the Coyote Lake basalt near the Calaveras fault was used to link crustal plate boundary deformation at the surface with models for the accommodation of deformation in the lithospheric mantle. Seismic anisotropy calculations based on xenolith petrofabrics suggest that an anisotropic mantle layer thickness of 35-85 km is required to explain the observed shear wave splitting delay times in central

  13. Method and system for controlling a permanent magnet machine during fault conditions

    DOEpatents

    Krefta, Ronald John; Walters, James E.; Gunawan, Fani S.

    2004-05-25

    Method and system for controlling a permanent magnet machine driven by an inverter is provided. The method allows for monitoring a signal indicative of a fault condition. The method further allows for generating during the fault condition a respective signal configured to maintain a field weakening current even though electrical power from an energy source is absent during said fault condition. The level of the maintained field-weakening current enables the machine to operate in a safe mode so that the inverter is protected from excess voltage.

  14. Fault-tolerant interconnection network and image-processing applications for the PASM parallel processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.B. III

    1984-01-01

    The demand for very high speed data processing coupled with falling hardware costs has made large-scale parallel and distributed computer systems both desirable and feasible. Two modes of parallel processing are single instruction stream-multiple data stream (SIMD) and multiple instruction stream-multiple data stream (MIMD). PASM, a partitionable SIMD/MIMD system, is a reconfigurable multimicroprocessor system being designed for image processing and pattern recognition. An important component of these systems is the interconnection network, the mechanism for communication among the computation nodes and memories. Assuring high reliability for such complex systems is a significant task. Thus, a crucial practical aspect of an interconnection network is fault tolerance. In answer to this need, the Extra Stage Cube (ESC), a fault-tolerant, multistage cube-type interconnection network, is define. The fault tolerance of the ESC is explored for both single and multiple faults, routing tags are defined, and consideration is given to permuting data and partitioning the ESC in the presence of faults. The ESC is compared with other fault-tolerant multistage networks. Finally, reliability of the ESC and an enhanced version of it are investigated.

  15. Application of padmounted fault interrupters to single-phase URD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, W.F.

    1995-12-31

    Underground distribution has proven itself to be a highly effective means of eliminating the temporary faults that plague overhead distribution, however, the permanent faults that do occur are often cable or splice failures which are unpredictable, difficult to locate and require a lot of time and expense to repair. One of the ways that the designer seeks to minimize the impact of such events on service reliability is by incorporating an overcurrent protection scheme which removes the faulted section from the rest of the system and contingency scheme which allows isolation of the faulted section and restoration of service in the shortest possible time with a minimal number of switching operations. As a result there has been a continuing interest in the development of devices, equipment, and methods which help to realize the ideals of rapid service restoration and isolation of faults to the smallest segment of the system. Overcurrent protection of the single-phase URD system has, traditionally, been the province of fused cutouts and fused padmounted sectionalizing terminals and switchgear. Recently however, padmounted vacuum fault interrupters, that utilize electronic controls for tripping, have become available from several manufacturers and are beginning to make inroads into this portion of the distribution system. This paper will discuss the characteristics and potential applications of a new product offered by Cooper Power Systems, the Shrubline VFI, which was designed specifically for use in single phase residential underground distribution.

  16. Incipient multiple fault diagnosis in real time with applications to large-scale systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.Y.; Bien, Z.; Park, J.H.; Seon, P.H. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    By using a modified signed directed graph (SDG) together with the distributed artificial neutral networks and a knowledge-based system, a method of incipient multi-fault diagnosis is presented for large-scale physical systems with complex pipes and instrumentations such as valves, actuators, sensors, and controllers. The proposed method is designed so as to (1) make a real-time incipient fault diagnosis possible for large-scale systems, (2) perform the fault diagnosis not only in the steady-state case but also in the transient case as well by using a concept of fault propagation time, which is newly adopted in the SDG model, (3) provide with highly reliable diagnosis results and explanation capability of faults diagnosed as in an expert system, and (4) diagnose the pipe damage such as leaking, break, or throttling. This method is applied for diagnosis of a pressurizer in the Kori Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) unit 2 in Korea under a transient condition, and its result is reported to show satisfactory performance of the method for the incipient multi-fault diagnosis of such a large-scale system in a real-time manner.

  17. Response of deformation patterns to reorganizations of the southern San Andreas fault system since ca. 1.5 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.; Fattaruso, L.; Dorsey, R. J.; Housen, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Between ~1.5 and 1.1 Ma, the southern San Andreas fault system underwent a major reorganization that included initiation of the San Jacinto fault and termination of slip on the extensional West Salton detachment fault. The southern San Andreas fault itself has also evolved since this time, with several shifts in activity among fault strands within San Gorgonio Pass. We use three-dimensional mechanical Boundary Element Method models to investigate the impact of these changes to the fault network on deformation patterns. A series of snapshot models of the succession of active fault geometries explore the role of fault interaction and tectonic loading in abandonment of the West Salton detachment fault, initiation of the San Jacinto fault, and shifts in activity of the San Andreas fault. Interpreted changes to uplift patterns are well matched by model results. These results support the idea that growth of the San Jacinto fault led to increased uplift rates in the San Gabriel Mountains and decreased uplift rates in the San Bernardino Mountains. Comparison of model results for vertical axis rotation to data from paleomagnetic studies reveals a good match to local rotation patterns in the Mecca Hills and Borrego Badlands. We explore the mechanical efficiency at each step in the evolution, and find an overall trend toward increased efficiency through time. Strain energy density patterns are used to identify regions of off-fault deformation and potential incipient faulting. These patterns support the notion of north-to-south propagation of the San Jacinto fault during its initiation. The results of the present-day model are compared with microseismicity focal mechanisms to provide additional insight into the patterns of off-fault deformation within the southern San Andreas fault system.

  18. A logic based expert system (LBES) for fault diagnosis of power system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.M.; Kim, G.W.; Sohn, J.M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper proposes an expert system for fault diagnosis of power system using a new inference method. Expertise is, in this paper, represented by logical implications and converted into a Boolean function. Unlike conventional rule-based expert systems, the expertise is converted into Prime Implicants (PIs) which are logically complete and sound. Therefore, off-line inference is possible by off-line identification of PIs, which reduces the on-line inference time considerably and makes it possible to utilize the proposed expert system in real-time environment. This paper also presents alarm verification and correction method for relay and circuit breaker (CB) using pre-identified PIs.

  19. Rift Fault Geometry and Distribution in Layered Basaltic Rocks: A Comparison Between the Koa'e (Hawai'i) and Krafla (Iceland) Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubeck, A.; Walker, R. J.; MacLeod, C. J.; Imber, J.

    2014-12-01

    Fault systems within incipient rifts that cut basaltic rocks comprise an array of fine-scale structures, including networks of fractures and small displacement (<15 m) faults that accommodate regional extension. These zones of damaged rock have mechanical and physical properties distinct from the surrounding intact host rock. As the rift system evolves this early-formed damage can be reactivated, and influence the distribution and growth of new fractures. Constraining the role of this inter-fault deformation in rift zone development is therefore important to characterizing the regional distribution of extensional strains, and the evolving physical and fluid flow properties of the host rock. Here we use high resolution field and remote mapping of the Koa'e insipient rift fault system on the south flank of Kilauea Volcano on Hawaii's Big Island, and the Krafla rift system, Iceland, to investigate the evolution of segmented rift fault systems in layered basalts, formed at low confining pressures. Extension in the Koa'e system is accommodated dominantly by interaction of zones of opening-mode fractures and areas of surface flexure rather than surface-breaching normal faults, which is attributed to gravitational collapse of Kilauea. Extension in the Krafla system is localised on segmented, large displacement (>20 m) normal faults, the development of which may have been controlled by dyke emplacement. Preliminary comparison between the Koa'e and Krafla systems suggests that strain rate and/or the effective stress path plays a primary role in controlling the geometry, characteristics, and distribution of major faults, and the scale and distribution of secondary (oblique) brittle structures within rift zones.

  20. Techniques for Fault Detection and Visualization of Telemetry Dependence Relationships for Root Cause Fault Analysis in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Nathaniel

    This thesis explores new ways of looking at telemetry data, from a time-correlative perspective, in order to see patterns within the data that may suggest root causes of system faults. It was thought initially that visualizing an animated Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) matrix for telemetry channels would be sufficient to give new understanding; however, testing showed that the high dimensionality and inability to easily look at change over time in this approach impeded understanding. Different correlative techniques, combined with the time curve visualization proposed by Bach et al (2015), were adapted to visualize both raw telemetry and telemetry data correlations. Review revealed that these new techniques give insights into the data, and an intuitive grasp of data families, which show the effectiveness of this approach for enhancing system understanding and assisting with root cause analysis for complex aerospace systems.

  1. The 2009 L'Aquila sequence (Central Italy): fault system anatomy by aftershock distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaraluce, Lauro

    2010-05-01

    On April 6 (01:32 UTC) 2009 a destructive MW 6.13 earthquake struck the Abruzzi region in Central Italy, causing nearly 300 deaths, 40.000 homeless people and strong damage to the cultural heritage of the L'Aquila city and its province. Two strong earthquakes hit the same area in historical times (e.g. the 1461 and 1703 events), but the main fault that drives the extension in this portion of the Apennines was unknown. Seismic data was recorded at both permanent stations of the Centralised Italian National Seismic Network managed by the INGV and 45 temporary stations installed in the epicentral area together with the LGIT of Grenoble (Fr). The resulting geometry of the dense monitoring network allows us to gain very high resolution earthquake locations that we use to investigate the geometry of the activated fault system and to report on seismicity pattern and kinematics of the whole sequence. The mainshock was preceded by a foreshock sequence that activated the main fault plane during the three months before, while the largest foreshock (MW 4.08) occurred one week before (30th of March) nucleated on a antithetic (e.g. off-fault) segment. The distribution of the aftershocks defines a complex, 50 km long, NW-trending normal fault system, with seismicity nucleating within the upper 10-12 km of the crust. There is an exception of an event (MW 5.42) nucleating a couple of kilometers deeper that the 7th of April that activates a high angle normal fault antithetic to the main system. Its role is still unclear. We reconstruct the geometry of the two major SW-dipping normal faults forming a right lateral en-echelon system. The main fault (L'Aquila fault) is activated by the 6th of April mainshock unluckily located right below the city of L'Aquila. A 50°SW-dipping plane with planar geometry about 16 km long. The related seismicity interests the entire first 12 km of the upper crust from the surface. The ground surveys carried out soon after the occurrence of the earthquake

  2. Seismic Velocity Structure and Seismotectonics of the Hayward Fault System, East San Francisco Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebeck, J. L.; Michael, A. J.; Brocher, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    The Hayward Fault is considered the most likely fault in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, to have a major earthquake in the next 30 years, posing a serious earthquake risk to more than 2 million people. In order to accurately evaluate various earthquake scenarios for this fault, it is important to understand its structure, kinematics, and physical properties. We present a new seismological study of the Hayward Fault system, including a new 3D seismic velocity model for the East San Francisco Bay, relocated earthquake hypocenters, and improved focal mechanisms. We use these new constraints on structure and seismicity to study the geometry and kinematics of the Hayward Fault. The new East Bay 3D tomography model, based on travel times from earthquakes and controlled-source experiments, reveals a clear velocity contrast across the Hayward Fault. In the upper 10 km, the P-wave velocity in the Franciscan rocks to the west are up to 0.8 km/s faster than in the Great Valley sequence rocks to the east. Below 10 km, where Franciscan rocks are thought to be present on both sides of the fault, there is negligible contrast. The observed P-wave velocities are comparable with velocities observed in deep boreholes in the East Bay. Anomalously low S-wave velocities are observed east of the Hayward Fault, near the Livermore Basin. We relocated more than 20,000 East Bay earthquakes, 1967-2004, with the 3D model. The events illuminate the Hayward Fault at depth, shifting from near-vertical in the north to steeply east-dipping in the south. New focal mechanisms were also computed, using take-off angles from ray tracing in the 3D seismic velocity model. Previous authors found heterogeneous focal mechanisms along the Hayward Fault near San Leandro, interpreted it as a zone of complex fracturing, and speculated that San Leandro marks a probable boundary for major Hayward Fault earthquakes. We find, however, that our high-quality focal mechanisms for events all along the Hayward

  3. Interseismic deformation and moment deficit along the Manila subduction zone and the Philippine Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Y. J.; Yu, S. B.; Loveless, J. P.; Bacolcol, T.; Woessner, J.; Solidum, R., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The Sunda plate converges obliquely with the Philippine Sea plate with a rate of ~100 mm/yr and results in the sinistral slip along the 1300 km-long Philippine fault. Using GPS data from 1998 to 2013 as well as a block modeling approach, we decompose the crustal motion into multiple rotating blocks and elastic deformation associated with fault slip at block boundaries. Our preferred model composed of 8 blocks, produces a mean residual velocity of 3.4 mm/yr at 93 GPS stations. Estimated long-term slip rates along the Manila subduction zone show a gradual southward decrease from 66 mm/yr at the northwest tip of Luzon to 60 mm/yr at the southern portion of the Manila Trench. We infer a low coupling fraction of 11% offshore northwest Luzon and a coupling fraction of 27% near the subduction of Scarborough Seamount. The accumulated strain along the Manila subduction zone at latitudes 15.5°~18.5°N could be balanced by earthquakes with composite magnitudes of Mw 8.7 and Mw 8.9 based on a recurrence interval of 500 years and 1000 years, respectively. Estimates of sinistral slip rates on the major splay faults of the Philippine fault system in central Luzon increase from east to west: sinistral slip rates are 2 mm/yr on the Dalton fault, 8 mm/yr on the Abra River fault, and 12 mm/yr on the Tubao fault. On the southern segment of the Philippine fault (Digdig fault), we infer left-lateral slip of ~20 mm/yr. The Vigan-Aggao fault in northwest Luzon exhibits significant reverse slip of up to 31 mm/yr, although deformation may be distributed across multiple offshore thrust faults. On the Northern Cordillera fault, we calculate left-lateral slip of ~7 mm/yr. Results of block modeling suggest that the majority of active faults in Luzon are fully locked to a depth of 15-20 km. Inferred moment magnitudes of inland large earthquakes in Luzon fall in the range of Mw 7.0-7.5 based on a recurrence interval of 100 years. Using the long-term plate convergence rate between the Sunda plate

  4. Reflection seismic imaging of the end-glacial Pärvie Fault system, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhlin, C.; Dehghannejad, M.; Lund, B.; Malehmir, A.; Pratt, G.

    2010-04-01

    Reflection seismic data were acquired along a c. 23 km long profile over the Pärvie Fault system with a nominal receiver and source spacing of 20 m. An hydraulic breaking hammer was used as a source, generating signals with a penetration depth of about 5-6 km. Steeply dipping reflections from the end-glacial faults are observed, as well as sub-horizontal reflections. The location and orientation of the reflections from the faults agree well with surface geological observations of fault geometries. Reflections from a potential fourth end-glacial fault is observed further to the east along the profile. The more sub-horizontal reflections may originate from gabbroic bodies within the granitic basement or from deeper lying greenstones. Our results indicate that the end-glacial faults dip at moderate to steep dips down to at least 2-3 km depth, and possibly continue at this dip to depths of 6 km. This result has significant implications for determining the state of stress required to activate the faults in the past and in the future.

  5. A Novel Mittag-Leffler Kernel Based Hybrid Fault Diagnosis Method for Wheeled Robot Driving System.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xianfeng; Song, Mumin; Zhou, Fengyu; Chen, Zhumin; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The wheeled robots have been successfully applied in many aspects, such as industrial handling vehicles, and wheeled service robots. To improve the safety and reliability of wheeled robots, this paper presents a novel hybrid fault diagnosis framework based on Mittag-Leffler kernel (ML-kernel) support vector machine (SVM) and Dempster-Shafer (D-S) fusion. Using sensor data sampled under different running conditions, the proposed approach initially establishes multiple principal component analysis (PCA) models for fault feature extraction. The fault feature vectors are then applied to train the probabilistic SVM (PSVM) classifiers that arrive at a preliminary fault diagnosis. To improve the accuracy of preliminary results, a novel ML-kernel based PSVM classifier is proposed in this paper, and the positive definiteness of the ML-kernel is proved as well. The basic probability assignments (BPAs) are defined based on the preliminary fault diagnosis results and their confidence values. Eventually, the final fault diagnosis result is archived by the fusion of the BPAs. Experimental results show that the proposed framework not only is capable of detecting and identifying the faults in the robot driving system, but also has better performance in stability and diagnosis accuracy compared with the traditional methods. PMID:26229526

  6. Numerical model of formation of a 3-D strike-slip fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemenda, Alexandre I.; Cavalié, Olivier; Vergnolle, Mathilde; Bouissou, Stéphane; Delouis, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    The initiation and the initial evolution of a strike-slip fault are modeled within an elastoplasticity constitutive framework taking into account the evolution of the hardening modulus with inelastic straining. The initial and boundary conditions are similar to those of the Riedel shear experiment. The models first deform purely elastically. Then damage (inelastic deformation) starts at the model surface. The damage zone propagates both normal to the forming fault zone and downwards. Finally, it affects the whole layer thickness, forming flower-like structure in cross-section. At a certain stage, a dense set of parallel Riedel shears forms at shallow depth. A few of these propagate both laterally and vertically, while others die. The faults first propagate in-plane, but then rapidly change direction to make a larger angle with the shear axis. New fault segments form as well, resulting in complex 3-D fault zone architecture. Different fault segments accommodate strike-slip and normal displacements, which results in the formation of valleys and rotations along the fault system.

  7. Tectonic reversal of the western Doruneh Fault System: Implications for Central Asian tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Hamid Reza; Esterabi Ashtiani, Marzieh; Guest, Bernard; Yassaghi, Ali; Ghassemi, Mohammad Reza; Shahpasandzadeh, Majid; Naeimi, Amir

    2015-10-01

    The left-lateral Doruneh Fault System (DFS) bounds the north margin of the Central Iranian microplate and has played an important role in the structural evolution of the Turkish-Iranian plateau. The western termination of the DFS is a sinistral synthetic branch fault array that shows clear kinematic evidence of having undergone recent slip sense inversion from a dextral array to a sinistral array in the latest Neogene or earliest Quaternary. Similarly, kinematic evidence from the Anarak Metamorphic complex suggests that this complex initially developed at a transpressive left-stepping termination of the DFS and that it was inverted in the latest Neogene to a transtensional fault termination. The recognition that the DFS and other faults in NE Iran were inverted from dextral to sinistral strike slip in the latest Neogene and the likely connection between the DFS and the Herat Fault of Afghanistan suggests that prior to the latest Miocene, all of the north Iranian and northern Afghan ranges were part of a distributed dextral fault network that extended from the west Himalayan syntaxes to the western Alborz. Also, the recognition that regional slip sense inversion occurred across northern and northeastern Iran after the latest Miocene invalidates tectonic models that extrapolate Pleistocene to recent fault slip kinematics and rates back beyond this time.

  8. A Novel Mittag-Leffler Kernel Based Hybrid Fault Diagnosis Method for Wheeled Robot Driving System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xianfeng; Song, Mumin; Zhou, Fengyu; Chen, Zhumin; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The wheeled robots have been successfully applied in many aspects, such as industrial handling vehicles, and wheeled service robots. To improve the safety and reliability of wheeled robots, this paper presents a novel hybrid fault diagnosis framework based on Mittag-Leffler kernel (ML-kernel) support vector machine (SVM) and Dempster-Shafer (D-S) fusion. Using sensor data sampled under different running conditions, the proposed approach initially establishes multiple principal component analysis (PCA) models for fault feature extraction. The fault feature vectors are then applied to train the probabilistic SVM (PSVM) classifiers that arrive at a preliminary fault diagnosis. To improve the accuracy of preliminary results, a novel ML-kernel based PSVM classifier is proposed in this paper, and the positive definiteness of the ML-kernel is proved as well. The basic probability assignments (BPAs) are defined based on the preliminary fault diagnosis results and their confidence values. Eventually, the final fault diagnosis result is archived by the fusion of the BPAs. Experimental results show that the proposed framework not only is capable of detecting and identifying the faults in the robot driving system, but also has better performance in stability and diagnosis accuracy compared with the traditional methods. PMID:26229526

  9. Pressure dependence of fluid transport properties of shallow fault systems in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Wataru; Mukoyoshi, Hideki; Lin, Weiren; Hirose, Takehiro; Tsutsumi, Akito

    2014-12-01

    We measured fluid transport properties at an effective pressure of 40 MPa in core samples of sediments and fault rocks collected by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) NanTroSEIZE drilling project Expedition 316 from the megasplay fault system (site C0004) and the frontal thrust (site C0007) in the Nankai subduction zone. Permeability decreased with effective pressure as a power law function. Permeability values in the fault zones were 8 × 10-18 m2 at site C0004 and 9 × 10-18 m2 at site C0007. Stratigraphic variation in transport properties suggests that the megasplay fault zone may act as a barrier to fluid flow, but the frontal thrust fault zone might not. Depth variation in permeability at site C0007 is probably controlled by the mechanical compaction of sediment. Hydraulic diffusivity at shallow depths was approximately 1 × 10-6 m2 s-1 in both fault zones, which is small enough to lead to pore pressure generation that can cause dynamic fault weakening. However, absence of a very low permeable zone, which may have formed in the Japan Trench subduction zone, might prevent facilitation of huge shallow slips during Nankai subduction zone earthquakes. Porosity tests under dry conditions might have overestimated the porosity.

  10. Detection of High-impedance Arcing Faults in Radial Distribution DC Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Button, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    High voltage, low current arcing faults in DC power systems have been researched at the NASA Glenn Research Center in order to develop a method for detecting these 'hidden faults', in-situ, before damage to cables and components from localized heating can occur. A simple arc generator was built and high-speed and low-speed monitoring of the voltage and current waveforms, respectively, has shown that these high impedance faults produce a significant increase in high frequency content in the DC bus voltage and low frequency content in the DC system current. Based on these observations, an algorithm was developed using a high-speed data acquisition system that was able to accurately detect high impedance arcing events induced in a single-line system based on the frequency content of the DC bus voltage or the system current. Next, a multi-line, radial distribution system was researched to see if the arc location could be determined through the voltage information when multiple 'detectors' are present in the system. It was shown that a small, passive LC filter was sufficient to reliably isolate the fault to a single line in a multi-line distribution system. Of course, no modification is necessary if only the current information is used to locate the arc. However, data shows that it might be necessary to monitor both the system current and bus voltage to improve the chances of detecting and locating high impedance arcing faults

  11. Palaeopermeability structure within fault-damage zones: A snap-shot from microfracture analyses in a strike-slip system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, Rodrigo; Arancibia, Gloria; Mitchell, Thomas M.; Cembrano, Jose M.; Faulkner, Daniel R.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding fault zone permeability and its spatial distribution allows the assessment of fluid-migration leading to precipitation of hydrothermal minerals. This work is aimed at unraveling the conditions and distribution of fluid transport properties in fault zones based on hydrothermally filled microfractures, which reflect the ''frozen-in'' instantaneous advective hydrothermal activity and record palaeopermeability conditions of the fault-fracture system. We studied the Jorgillo Fault, an exposed 20 km long, left-lateral strike-slip fault, which juxtaposes Jurassic gabbro against metadiorite belonging to the Atacama Fault System in northern Chile. Tracings of microfracture networks of 19 oriented thin sections from a 400 m long transect across the main fault trace was carried out to estimate the hydraulic properties of the low-strain fault damagezone, adjacent to the high-strain fault core, by assuming penny-shaped microfractures of constant radius and aperture within an anisotropic fracture system. Palaeopermeability values of 9.1*10-11 to 3.2*10-13 m2 in the gabbro and of 5.0*10-10 to 1.2*10-13 m2 in the metadiorite were determined, both decreasing perpendicularly away from the fault core. Fracture porosity values range from 40.00% to 0.28%. The Jorgillo Fault has acted as a left-lateral dilational fault-bend, generating large-scale dilation sites north of the JF during co-seismic activity.

  12. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating constraints on the high-angle normal faulting along the southern segment of the Tan-Lu fault system: An implication for the onset of eastern China rift-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Zhou, Su

    2009-01-01

    High-angle normal faulting in eastern China was an important tectonic process responsible for the rifting of the eastern Asian continental margin. Along the southern segment of the Tan-Lu fault system, part of the eastern China rift-system, 55-70° east-dipping normal faults are the oldest structures within this rift-system. Chlorite, pseudotachylite, and fault breccia are found in fault zones, which are characterized by microstructures and syn-deformation chlorite minerals aligned parallel to a down-dip stretching lineation. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of syn-deformation chlorite and K-feldspar from the fault gouge zone yields cooling ages of ˜75-70 Ma, interpreted as the timing of slip along the normal faults. This age is older than that of opening of the Japanese sea and back-arc extension in the west Pacific, but similar to the onset of the Indo-Asian (soft?) collision.

  13. New mapping and structural constraints on the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault system, southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levoir, M. A.; Roland, E. C.; Gulick, S. P.; Haeussler, P. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Van Avendonk, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    The dextral Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault lies along the western margin of Canada and southeastern Alaska, a transform plate boundary accommodating motion between the North American and Pacific Plates. The Fairweather Fault is the northern extension of the Queen Charlotte Fault and has numerous and complex splays, including the Chichagof-Baranof Fault, the Peril Strait Fault, the Chatham Strait Fault, and the Icy Point-Lituya Bay Fault. Except for a few small areas, these fault systems have not been mapped in detail. We present updated geometries and fault maps of the entirety of the strike-slip system using seismic reflection and bathymetric data, including a 2004 seismic reflection survey (EW0408), 2005 United Nations Commission on Law of the Sea multibeam bathymetry, and legacy data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Geophysical Data Center. This work is highly relevant for earthquake hazard research and mitigation in southeast Alaska. Several large (> Mw 7.0) earthquakes have occurred along this margin in the last century, impacting communities of southeastern Alaska and western Canada. Two large, recent events include 1) a Mw 7.7 earthquake that took place on 28 October 2012 near the Haida Gwaii Islands offshore of western Canada, and 2) a Mw 7.5 event which occurred on 05 January 2013, 330 km to the northwest and offshore of Craig, Alaska. Interestingly, the Haida Gwaii earthquake ruptured as a thrust event and the Craig earthquake ruptured with a near-vertical dextral strike-slip mechanism. Since a change in Pacific Plate motion around 4 million years ago, the southern Queen Charlotte Fault system has been obliquely converging at a rate of 20 mm/year, with the boundary accommodating about 80 km of perpendicular motion over that time. This convergence explains the Haida Gwaii thrust earthquake, but leaves questions about the along-strike fault structure. Two opposing end-member theories suggest convergence is accommodated by either: 1

  14. Artificial neural network application for space station power system fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Oliver, Walter E.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1995-01-01

    This study presents a methodology for fault diagnosis using a Two-Stage Artificial Neural Network Clustering Algorithm. Previously, SPICE models of a 5-bus DC power distribution system with assumed constant output power during contingencies from the DDCU were used to evaluate the ANN's fault diagnosis capabilities. This on-going study uses EMTP models of the components (distribution lines, SPDU, TPDU, loads) and power sources (DDCU) of Space Station Alpha's electrical Power Distribution System as a basis for the ANN fault diagnostic tool. The results from the two studies are contrasted. In the event of a major fault, ground controllers need the ability to identify the type of fault, isolate the fault to the orbital replaceable unit level and provide the necessary information for the power management expert system to optimally determine a degraded-mode load schedule. To accomplish these goals, the electrical power distribution system's architecture can be subdivided into three major classes: DC-DC converter to loads, DC Switching Unit (DCSU) to Main bus Switching Unit (MBSU), and Power Sources to DCSU. Each class which has its own electrical characteristics and operations, requires a unique fault analysis philosophy. This study identifies these philosophies as Riddles 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The results of the on-going study addresses Riddle-1. It is concluded in this study that the combination of the EMTP models of the DDCU, distribution cables and electrical loads yields a more accurate model of the behavior and in addition yielded more accurate fault diagnosis using ANN versus the results obtained with the SPICE models.

  15. Energy-efficient fault tolerance in multiprocessor real-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yifeng

    The recent progress in the multiprocessor/multicore systems has important implications for real-time system design and operation. From vehicle navigation to space applications as well as industrial control systems, the trend is to deploy multiple processors in real-time systems: systems with 4 -- 8 processors are common, and it is expected that many-core systems with dozens of processing cores will be available in near future. For such systems, in addition to general temporal requirement common for all real-time systems, two additional operational objectives are seen as critical: energy efficiency and fault tolerance. An intriguing dimension of the problem is that energy efficiency and fault tolerance are typically conflicting objectives, due to the fact that tolerating faults (e.g., permanent/transient) often requires extra resources with high energy consumption potential. In this dissertation, various techniques for energy-efficient fault tolerance in multiprocessor real-time systems have been investigated. First, the Reliability-Aware Power Management (RAPM) framework, which can preserve the system reliability with respect to transient faults when Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS) is applied for energy savings, is extended to support parallel real-time applications with precedence constraints. Next, the traditional Standby-Sparing (SS) technique for dual processor systems, which takes both transient and permanent faults into consideration while saving energy, is generalized to support multiprocessor systems with arbitrary number of identical processors. Observing the inefficient usage of slack time in the SS technique, a Preference-Oriented Scheduling Framework is designed to address the problem where tasks are given preferences for being executed as soon as possible (ASAP) or as late as possible (ALAP). A preference-oriented earliest deadline (POED) scheduler is proposed and its application in multiprocessor systems for energy-efficient fault tolerance is

  16. Fault self-diagnosis designing method of the automotive electronic control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yangyan; Yang, Zhigang; Fu, Xiaolin

    2005-12-01

    The fault self-diagnosis system is an important component of an the automotive electronic control system. Designers of automotive electronic control systems urgently require or need a complete understanding of the self-diagnosis designing method of the control system in order to apply it in practice. Aiming at this exigent need, self-diagnosis methods of designing sensors, electronic control unit (ECU), and actuators, which are the three main parts of automotive electronic control systems, are discussed in this paper. According to the fault types and characteristics of commonly used sensors, self-diagnosis designing methods of the sensors are discussed. Then fault diagnosis techniques of sensors utilizing signal detection and analytical redundancy are analysed and summarized respectively, from the viewpoint of the self-diagnosis designing method. Also, problems about failure self-diagnosis of ECU are analyzed here. For different fault types of an ECU, setting up a circuit monitoring method and a self-detection method of the hardware circuit are adopted respectively. Using these two methods mentioned above, a real-time and on-line technique of failure self-diagnosis is presented. Furthermore, the failure self-diagnosis design method of ECU are summarized. Finally, common faults of actuators are analyzed and the general design method of the failure self-diagnosis system is presented. It is suggested that self-diagnosis design methods relative to the failure of automotive electronic control systems can offer a useful approach to designers of control systems.

  17. Investigation of the synthetic experiment system of machine equipment fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyu; Xu, Zening; Yu, Xiaoguang

    2008-12-01

    The invention and manufacturing of the synthetic experiment system of machine equipment fault diagnosis filled in the blank of this kind of experiment equipment in China and obtained national practical new type patent. By the motor speed regulation system, machine equipment fault imitation system, measuring and monitoring system and analysis and diagnosis system of the synthetic experiment system, students can regulate motor speed arbitrarily, imitate multi-kinds of machine equipment parts fault, collect the signals of acceleration, speed, displacement, force and temperature and make multi-kinds of time field, frequency field and figure analysis. The application of the synthetic experiment system in our university's teaching practice has obtained good effect on fostering professional eligibility in measuring, monitoring and fault diagnosis of machine equipment. The synthetic experiment system has the advantages of short training time, quick desirable result and low test cost etc. It suits for spreading in university extraordinarily. If the systematic software was installed in portable computer, user can fulfill measuring, monitoring, signal processing and fault diagnosis on multi-kinds of field machine equipment conveniently. Its market foreground is very good.

  18. Data and Visualizations in the Southern California Earthquake Center's Fault Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center's Fault Information System (FIS) provides a single point of access to fault-related data and models from multiple databases and datasets. The FIS is built of computer code, metadata and Web interfaces based on Web services technology, which enables queries and data interchange irrespective of computer software or platform. Currently we have working prototypes of programmatic and browser-based access. The first generation FIS may be searched and downloaded live, by automated processes, as well as interactively, by humans using a browser. Users get ascii data in plain text or encoded in XML. Via the Earthquake Information Technology (EIT) Interns (Juve and others, this meeting), we are also testing the effectiveness of querying multiple databases using a fault database ontology. For more than a decade, the California Geological Survey (CGS), SCEC, and the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) have put considerable, shared resources into compiling and assessing published fault data, then providing the data on the Web. Several databases now exist, with different formats, datasets, purposes, and users, in various stages of completion. When fault databases were first envisioned, the full power of today's internet was not yet recognized, and the databases became the Web equivalents of review papers, where one could read an overview summation of a fault, then copy and paste pertinent data. Today, numerous researchers also require rapid queries and downloads of data. Consequently, the first components of the FIS are MySQL databases that deliver numeric values from earlier, text-based databases. Another essential service provided by the FIS is visualizations of fault representations such as those in SCEC's Community Fault Model. The long term goal is to provide a standardized, open-source, platform-independent visualization technique. Currently, the FIS makes available fault model viewing software for users with access to Matlab or Java3D

  19. Wavelet transform-based fault diagnosis and line selection method of small current grounding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ni; Zhang, Shuqing; Zhang, Liguo; Zhang, Kexin; Sun, Lingyun

    2008-12-01

    Small current grounding system is the system that the neutral point doesn't ground or grounds across the arc suppressing coils, which has been applied commonly in distribution system of many countries. As the grounding fault occurs, current is the one caused by capacity of circuit to ground only and it is rather small. The status of fault is complexity, e.g., the electromagnet interferes together with the amplified impact of zero-order loops to high-order singularity waves and various temporary variables. All these result in the lower ratio of the fault element signal to noise caused by zero-order current. In this paper, the position of signal singularity and the magnitude of the singularity degree are analyzed based on the variable focus character of wavelet, and the time fault occurs is then determined. The series db wavelet with close sustain is adopted, and the line selection is according to the zero-order voltage of the generatrix and the current of various outlet line. It is proved by the experiment that the fault circuit diagnosis method based on wavelet analysis to the character of temporary status of single-phase grounding fault plays an important role to a finer line selection.

  20. Validation Methods Research for Fault-Tolerant Avionics and Control Systems: Working Group Meeting, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, J. W. (Editor); Trivedi, K. S. (Editor); Clary, J. B. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The validation process comprises the activities required to insure the agreement of system realization with system specification. A preliminary validation methodology for fault tolerant systems documented. A general framework for a validation methodology is presented along with a set of specific tasks intended for the validation of two specimen system, SIFT and FTMP. Two major areas of research are identified. First, are those activities required to support the ongoing development of the validation process itself, and second, are those activities required to support the design, development, and understanding of fault tolerant systems.

  1. Time-Dependent Coulomb Stres along the San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. R.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2003-12-01

    Many questions remain regarding the evolution of stress along the San Andreas Fault System: Which segments of the San Andreas System are approaching failure? What is the stress interaction along different fault segments for likely slip scenarios? To what extent does locking depth influence the regional stress field? To better address these questions, we have developed and tested a semi-analytic, time-dependent model for 3-D displacement and stress caused by a dislocation in an elastic layer over a viscoelastic half-space. Our model is remarkably efficient: a single time-step computation of 2048 by 2048 horizontal grid cells, containing over 400 fault elements within a 900 x 1700 km fault zone, requires approximately 1 minute of CPU time on an ordinary workstation. This speed enables us to rapidly explore various full 3-D viscoelastic models with realistic 1000-year faulting scenarios. Our approach for investigating time-dependent deformation and stress evolution of the San Andreas Fault System is as follows: We represent far-field plate motion by continuous slip in the lower portion of a 50 km thick elastic layer. Earthquakes are modeled by episodic slip along individual faults using spatially-variable locking depth and geologically-estimated recurrence intervals. Each co-seismic event results in an instantaneous change of stress within the viscoelastic half-space that slowly relaxes with time and is coupled with the evolution of stresses within the elastic plate. We investigate such evolving stresses by computing time-dependent Coulomb stress within the seismogenic zone. We find that the evolving stress field is sensitive to plate thickness, half-space viscosity, and faulting scenario. We are currently establishing a suite of models, consistent with both geodetic and geological observations, that will increase our understanding of how temporal plate-boundary deformation and stress variations within the seismogenic crust can result from different tectonic settings

  2. Performance test results of a fault-tolerant inertial reference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeerage, Mahesh K.

    This paper presents the performance test results of a fault-tolerant inertial reference system featuring skewed axis inertial sensors, sensor redundancy management scheme, and fault-tolerant electronics. This system, built by Honeywell Commercial Flight Systems Group, was calibrated and tested in the laboratory by Honeywell Systems and Research Center. This system was flight tested in 1989, by Boeing Commercial Aiplane Company, with excellent navigation and failure detection and isolation performance. A brief description of the system is presented in the paper with emphasis on the fault-tolerant aspects. The performance test results presented include nominal navigation performance and navigation performance under sensor failures. Performance of the failure detection and isolation scheme is also presented.

  3. Comparative study of superconducting fault current limiter both for LCC-HVDC and VSC-HVDC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Geon; Khan, Umer Amir; Lim, Sung-Woo; Shin, Woo-ju; Seo, In-Jin; Lee, Bang-Wook

    2015-11-01

    High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) system has been evaluated as the optimum solution for the renewable energy transmission and long-distance power grid connections. In spite of the various advantages of HVDC system, it still has been regarded as an unreliable system compared to AC system due to its vulnerable characteristics on the power system fault. Furthermore, unlike AC system, optimum protection and switching device has not been fully developed yet. Therefore, in order to enhance the reliability of the HVDC systems mitigation of power system fault and reliable fault current limiting and switching devices should be developed. In this paper, in order to mitigate HVDC fault, both for Line Commutated Converter HVDC (LCC-HVDC) and Voltage Source Converter HVDC (VSC-HVDC) system, an application of resistive superconducting fault current limiter which has been known as optimum solution to cope with the power system fault was considered. Firstly, simulation models for two types of LCC-HVDC and VSC-HVDC system which has point to point connection model were developed. From the designed model, fault current characteristics of faulty condition were analyzed. Second, application of SFCL on each types of HVDC system and comparative study of modified fault current characteristics were analyzed. Consequently, it was deduced that an application of AC-SFCL on LCC-HVDC system with point to point connection was desirable solution to mitigate the fault current stresses and to prevent commutation failure in HVDC electric power system interconnected with AC grid.

  4. A mega-splay fault system and tsunami hazard in the southern Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Kun; Yeh, Yi-Ching; Sibuet, Jean-Claude; Doo, Wen-Bin; Tsai, Ching-Hui

    2013-01-01

    In April 1771, a subduction earthquake generated a great tsunami that struck the south Ryukyu islands and killed ˜12,000 people, whereas its mechanism is still enigmatic (Nakata and Kawana, 1995; Nakamura, 2006; Matsumoto et al., 2009). In this paper, we show its probable source on a mega-splay fault system existing along the southern Ryukyu forearc. Analyses of deep multi-channel seismic reflection profiles indicate that the mega-splay fault system is rising from the summit of a ˜1 km high ridge situated at a ˜5° landward dipping plate interface. An outer ridge marks the seafloor outcrop of the splay fault system and separates the landward inner wedge and the oceanward outer wedge. The inner wedge is uplifting and exhibits widespread normal faulting while the outer wedge shows folded structures. The mega-splay fault system is parallel to the Ryukyu Trench east of 125.5°E and is estimated to be ˜450 km long. The origin of this south Ryukyu mega-splay fault system is ascribed to a resistant subduction of the elevated transverse ridges associated with the subducting portion of the trench-parallel Luzon-Okinawa Fracture Zone. In contrast, no similar splay fault is found west of 125.5°E where the oblique subduction has produced large shear zones along the south Ryukyu forearc. We infer that a thrust earthquake linked to the mega-splay fault system is responsible for the south Ryukyu tsunami. However, another possible scenario of generating a large tsunami affecting the south Ryukyu islands is that the subducted ridge in the western end of the mega-splay fault system nucleated a large earthquake and simultaneously triggered the ˜100 km long E-W trending strike-slip fault west of 125.5°E and induced a southward-dipping tsunami-genic subsidence. In any case, after a quiescence of ˜241 yr, a large earthquake and tsunami is anticipated in the south Ryukyu forearc in the near future.

  5. The fault monitoring and diagnosis knowledge-based system for space power systems: AMPERES, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to develop a real time fault monitoring and diagnosis knowledge-based system (KBS) for space power systems which can save costly operational manpower and can achieve more reliable space power system operation. The proposed KBS was developed using the Autonomously Managed Power System (AMPS) test facility currently installed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), but the basic approach taken for this project could be applicable for other space power systems. The proposed KBS is entitled Autonomously Managed Power-System Extendible Real-time Expert System (AMPERES). In Phase 1 the emphasis was put on the design of the overall KBS, the identification of the basic research required, the initial performance of the research, and the development of a prototype KBS. In Phase 2, emphasis is put on the completion of the research initiated in Phase 1, and the enhancement of the prototype KBS developed in Phase 1. This enhancement is intended to achieve a working real time KBS incorporated with the NASA space power system test facilities. Three major research areas were identified and progress was made in each area. These areas are real time data acquisition and its supporting data structure; sensor value validations; development of inference scheme for effective fault monitoring and diagnosis, and its supporting knowledge representation scheme.

  6. Method and system for early detection of incipient faults in electric motors

    DOEpatents

    Parlos, Alexander G; Kim, Kyusung

    2003-07-08

    A method and system for early detection of incipient faults in an electric motor are disclosed. First, current and voltage values for one or more phases of the electric motor are measured during motor operations. A set of current predictions is then determined via a neural network-based current predictor based on the measured voltage values and an estimate of motor speed values of the electric motor. Next, a set of residuals is generated by combining the set of current predictions with the measured current values. A set of fault indicators is subsequently computed from the set of residuals and the measured current values. Finally, a determination is made as to whether or not there is an incipient electrical, mechanical, and/or electromechanical fault occurring based on the comparison result of the set of fault indicators and a set of predetermined baseline values.

  7. Development of New Type Gap Arrester for Earth Fault Protection in AC Feeding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiki, Kohji; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Hisamizu, Yasuzi; Kinoshita, Nobuo; Takai, Wataru; Sato, Ryogo

    A gap arrester is being used for ground fault protection in AC Feeding System. However there are faults in which a conventional gap arrester burns down in a normal state of circuit. We investigated the cause of the fault in which a gap arrester burns. Then, it was found out that the cause of the fault was the discharge of AC current from the surge voltage. Therefore, we developed a new type gap arrester which does not burn down. The new type gap arrester is composed of a discharge tube and a zinc oxide element which are connected in series. Unnecessary AC current discharge is prevented by this structure. The new type gap arrester is actually used at the railroad track.

  8. Cyclical Stress Field Switching and (Total?) Relief of Fault Shear Stress Recorded in Quartz Vein Systems Hosted by Proterozoic Strike-Slip Faults, Mt Isa, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Begbie, M. J.; Ghisetti, F. C.; Blenkinsop, T. G.

    2003-12-01

    slip increments. A preliminary interpretation is that the differently oriented systematic vein-sets reflect changing orientations of the local stress field at different stages of the earthquake stress cycle. Minimum compressional stress oblique to the fault through the interseismic interval alternates with minimum compression oriented subperpendicular to the fault immediately postfailure, suggesting that each slip episode was accompanied by near-total relief of shear stress along the fault. The presence of amethystine quartz, open-space filling textures, and calcite-quartz intergrowths in the vein sets are consistent with hydrothermal precipitation occurring within 1-2 km of the former ground surface. Consequently, it is not yet clear whether these extensive vein systems developed under hydrostatic or overpresssured fluid conditions.

  9. Active tectonics in southern Xinjiang, China: Analysis of terrace riser and normal fault scarp degradation along the Hotan-Qira fault system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Peltzer, Gilles

    1993-01-01

    The northern piedmont of the western Kunlun mountains (Xinjiang, China) is marked at its easternmost extremity, south of the Hotan-Qira oases, by a set of normal faults trending N50E for nearly 70 km. Conspicuous on Landsat and SPOT images, these faults follow the southeastern border of a deep flexural basin and may be related to the subsidence of the Tarim platform loaded by the western Kunlun northward overthrust. The Hotan-Qira normal fault system vertically offsets the piedmont slope by 70 m. Highest fault scarps reach 20 m and often display evidence for recent reactivations about 2 m high. Successive stream entrenchments in uplifted footwallls have formed inset terraces. We have leveled topographic profiles across fault scarps and transverse abandoned terrace risers. The state of degradation of each terrace edge has been characterized by a degradation coefficient tau, derived by comparison with analytical erosion models. Edges of highest abandoned terraces yield a degradation coefficient of 33 +/- 4 sq.m. Profiles of cumulative fault scarps have been analyzed in a similar way using synthetic profiles generated with a simple incremental fault scarp model.

  10. Active tectonics in southern Xinjiang, China: Analysis of terrace riser and normal fault scarp degradation along the Hotan-Qira fault system

    SciTech Connect

    Avouac, J.P.; Peltzer, G. |

    1993-12-01

    The northern piedmont of the western Kunlun mountains (Xinjiang, China) is marked at its easternmost extremity, south of the Hotan-Qira oases, by a set of normal faults trending N50E for nearly 70 km. Conspicuous on Landsat and SPOT images, these faults follow the southeastern border of a deep flexural basin and may be related to the subsidence of the Tarim platform loaded by the western Kunlun northward overthrust. The Hotan-Qira normal fault system vertically offsets the piedmont slope by 70 m. Highest fault scarps reach 20 m and often display evidence for recent reactivations about 2 m high. Successive stream entrenchments in uplifted footwallls have formed inset terraces. We have leveled topographic profiles across fault scarps and transverse abandoned terrace risers. The state of degradation of each terrace edge has been characterized by a degradation coefficient tau, derived by comparison with analytical erosion models. Edges of highest abandoned terraces yield a degradation coefficient of 33 +/- 4 sq.m. Profiles of cumulative fault scarps have been analyzed in a similar way using synthetic profiles generated with a simple incremental fault scarp model.

  11. Effect of faults on fluid flow and chloride contamination in a carbonate aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maslia, M.L.; Prowell, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A unified, multidiscipline hypothesis is proposed to explain the anomalous pattern by which chloride has been found in water of the Upper Floridan aquifer in Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia. Analyses of geophysical, hydraulic, water chemistry, and aquifer test data using the equivalent porous medium (EPM) approach are used to support the hypothesis and to improve further the understanding of the fracture-flow system in this area. Using the data presented herein we show that: (1) four major northeast-southwest trending faults, capable of affecting the flow system of the Upper Floridan aquifer, can be inferred from structural analysis of geophysical data and from regional fault patterns; (2) the proposed faults account for the anomalous northeastward elongation of the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer; (3) the faults breach the nearly impermeable units that confine the Upper Floridan aquifer from below, allowing substantial quantities of water to leak vertically upward; as a result, aquifer transmissivity need not be excessively large (as previously reported) to sustain the heavy, long-term pumpage at Brunswick without developing a steep cone of depression in the potentiometric surface; (4) increased fracturing at the intersection of the faults enhances the development of conduits that allow the upward migration of high-chloride water in response to pumping from the Upper Floridan aquifer; and (5) the anomalous movement of the chloride plume is almost entirely controlled by the faults. ?? 1990.

  12. Fault-sensitivity and wear-out analysis of VLSI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Gwan S.

    1995-06-01

    This thesis describes simulation approaches to conduct fault sensitivity and wear-out failure analysis of VLSI systems. A fault-injection approach to study transient impact in VLSI systems is developed. Through simulated fault injection at the device level and subsequent fault propagation at the gate, functional and software levels, it is possible to identify critical bottlenecks in dependability. Techniques to speed up the fault simulation and to perform statistical analysis of fault impact are developed. A wear-out simulation environment is also developed to closely mimic dynamic sequences of wear-out events in a device through time, to localize weak location/aspect of target chip and to allow generation of Time-to-Failure (TTF) distribution of a VLSI chip as whole. First, an accurate simulation of a target chip and its application code is performed to acquire real workload trace data on switch activity. Then, using this switch activity information, wear-out of the each component of the chip is simulated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  13. Modeling of the fault-controlled hydrothermal ore-forming systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pek, A.A.; Malkovsky, V.I.

    1993-07-01

    A necessary precondition for the formation of hydrothermal ore deposits is a strong focusing of hydrothermal flow as fluids move from the fluid source to the site of ore deposition. The spatial distribution of hydrothermal deposits favors the concept that such fluid flow focusing is controlled, for the most part, by regional faults which provide a low resistance path for hydrothermal solutions. Results of electric analog simulations, analytical solutions, and computer simulations of the fluid flow, in a fault-controlled single-pass advective system, confirm this concept. The influence of the fluid flow focusing on the heat and mass transfer in a single-pass advective system was investigated for a simplified version of the metamorphic model for the genesis of greenstone-hosted gold deposits. The spatial distribution of ore mineralization, predicted by computer simulation, is in reasonable agreement with geological observations. Computer simulations of the fault-controlled thermoconvective system revealed a complex pattern of mixing hydrothermal solutions in the model, which also simulates the development of the modern hydrothermal systems on the ocean floor. The specific feature of the model considered, is the development under certain conditions of an intra-fault convective cell that operates essentially independently of the large scale circulation. These and other results obtained during the study indicate that modeling of natural fault-controlled hydrothermal systems is instructive for the analysis of transport processes in man-made hydrothermal systems that could develop in geologic high-level nuclear waste repositories.

  14. Pumping system fault detection and diagnosis utilizing pattern recognition and fuzzy inference techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C. ); Humenik, K.E. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    An integrated fault detection and diagnostic system with a capability of providing extremely early detection of disturbances in a process through the analysis of the stochastic content of dynamic signals is described. The sequential statistical analysis of the signal noise (a pattern-recognition technique) that is employed has been shown to provide the theoretically shortest sampling time to detect disturbances and thus has the potential of providing incipient fault detection information to operators sufficiently early to avoid forced process shutdowns. This system also provides a diagnosis of the cause of the initiating fault(s) by a physical-model-derived rule-based expert system in which system and subsystem state uncertainties are handled using fuzzy inference techniques. This system has been initially applied to the monitoring of the operational state of the primary coolant pumping system on the EBR-II nuclear reactor. Early validation studies have shown that a rapidly developing incipient fault on centrifugal pumps can be detected well in advance of any changes in the nominal process signals. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Comparison between wavelet and wavelet packet transform features for classification of faults in distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvind, Pratul

    2012-11-01

    The ability to identify and classify all ten types of faults in a distribution system is an important task for protection engineers. Unlike transmission system, distribution systems have a complex configuration and are subjected to frequent faults. In the present work, an algorithm has been developed for identifying all ten types of faults in a distribution system by collecting current samples at the substation end. The samples are subjected to wavelet packet transform and artificial neural network in order to yield better classification results. A comparison of results between wavelet transform and wavelet packet transform is also presented thereby justifying the feature extracted from wavelet packet transform yields promising results. It should also be noted that current samples are collected after simulating a 25kv distribution system in PSCAD software.

  16. The Impact of a Fault Tolerant MPI on Scalable Systems Services and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Richard L; Hursey, Joshua J; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Boehm, Swen

    2012-01-01

    Exascale targeted scientific applications must be prepared for a highly concurrent computing environment where failure will be a regular event during execution. Natural and algorithm-based fault tolerance (ABFT) techniques can often manage failures more efficiently than traditional checkpoint/restart techniques alone. Central to many petascale applications is an MPI standard that lacks support for ABFT. The Run-Through Stabilization (RTS) proposal, under consideration for MPI 3, allows an application to continue execution when processes fail. The requirements of scalable, fault tolerant MPI implementations and applications will stress the capabilities of many system services. System services must evolve to efficiently support such applications and libraries in the presence of system component failures. This paper discusses how the RTS proposal impacts system services, highlighting specific requirements. Early experimentation results from Cray systems at ORNL using prototype MPI and runtime implementations are presented. Additionally, this paper outlines fault tolerance techniques targeted at leadership class applications.

  17. Observer-based fault-tolerant control for a class of nonlinear networked control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, M. S.; Memon, A. M.; Shi, Peng

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a fault-tolerant control (FTC) scheme for nonlinear systems which are connected in a networked control system. The nonlinear system is first transformed into two subsystems such that the unobservable part is affected by a fault and the observable part is unaffected. An observer is then designed which gives state estimates using a Luenberger observer and also estimates unknown parameter of the system; this helps in fault estimation. The FTC is applied in the presence of sampling due to the presence of a network in the loop. The controller gain is obtained using linear-quadratic regulator technique. The methodology is applied on a mechatronic system and the results show satisfactory performance.

  18. 3D Dynamics of Oblique Rift Systems: Fault Evolution from Rift to Break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, S.

    2014-12-01

    Rift evolution and passive margin formation has been thoroughly investigated using conceptual and numerical models in two dimensions. However, the 2D assumption that the extension direction is perpendicular to the rift trend is often invalid. In fact, the majority of rift systems that lead to continental break-up during the last 150 My involved moderate to high rift obliquity. Yet, the degree to which oblique lithospheric extension affects first-order rift and passive margin properties like surface stress pattern, fault azimuths, and basin geometry, is still not entirely clear. This contribution provides insight in crustal stress patterns and fault orientations by applying a 3D numerical rift model to oblique extensional settings. The presented forward experiments cover the whole spectrum of oblique extension (i.e. rift-orthogonal extension, low obliquity, high obliquity, strike-slip deformation) from initial deformation to breakup. They are conducted using an elasto-visco-plastic finite element model and involve crustal and mantle layers accounting for self-consistent necking of the lithosphere. Even though the model setup is very simple (horizontally layered, no inherited faults), its evolution exhibits a variety of fault orientations that are solely caused by the interaction of far-field stresses with rift-intrinsic buoyancy and strength. Depending on rift obliquity, these orientations involve rift-parallel, extension-orthogonal, and intermediate normal fault directions as well as strike-slip faults. Allowing new insights on fault patterns of the proximal and distal margins, the model shows that individual fault populations are activated in a characteristic multi-phase evolution driven by lateral density variations of the evolving rift system. Model results are in very good agreement with inferences from the well-studied Gulf of Aden and provide testable predictions for other rifts and passive margins worldwide.

  19. Tectonic dynamics and correlation of major earthquake sequences of the Xiaojiang and Qujiang-Shiping fault systems, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue-Ze, Wen; Fang, Du; Feng, Long; Jun, Fan; Hang, Zhu

    2013-04-01

    The N-S trending Xiaojiang fault zone and the NW-SE trending Qujiang-Shiping fault zone are adjacent active fault systems and seismogenic zones associated with strong and major earthquakes in Yunnan, China. To understand the interaction of the two fault systems, and its probable influence on earthquake occurrences, we conduct a synthetic study based on data of active tectonics, historical earthquakes, relocated small earthquakes, GPS station velocities and focal mechanism resolutions. Our study makes several conclusions. (1) The active southward motion of the western side of the Xiaojiang fault zone (i.e. the side of the Sichuan-Yunnan block) has a persistent and intensive effect on the Qujiang-Shiping fault zone. The later fault zone has absorbed and transformed the southward motion of the western side of the former fault zone through dextral strike-slip/shearing as well as transverse shortening/thrusting. (2) Along the Xiaojiang fault zone, the present sinistral strike-slip/shearing rate decreases from 10 and 8 mm/a on the northern, central and central-southern segments to 4 mm/a on the southern segment. The decreased rate has been adjusted in the area along and surrounding the Qujiang-Shiping fault zone through reverse-dextral faulting and distributed shearing and shortening. (3) The tectonic-dynamic relation between the Xiaojiang fault zone and the Qujiang-Shiping fault zone is also manifested by a close correlation of earthquake occurrences on the two fault zones. From 1500 to 1850 a sequence of strong and major earthquakes occurred along the Xiaojiang fault zone and its northern neighbor, the Zemuhe fault zone, which was characterized by gradually accelerating strain release, gradually shortening intervals between M≥7 events, and major releases occurring in the mid to later stages of the sequence. As a response to this sequence, after an 88-year delay, another sequence of 383 years (from 1588 to 1970) of strong and major earthquakes occurred on the Qujiang

  20. Using the GeoFEST Faulted Region Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jay W.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Donnellan, Andrea; Judd, Michele A.; Norton, Charles D.; Baker, Teresa; Tisdale, Edwin R.; Li, Peggy

    2004-01-01

    GeoFEST (the Geophysical Finite Element Simulation Tool) simulates stress evolution, fault slip and plastic/elastic processes in realistic materials, and so is suitable for earthquake cycle studies in regions such as Southern California. Many new capabilities and means of access for GeoFEST are now supported. New abilities include MPI-based cluster parallel computing using automatic PYRAMID/Parmetis-based mesh partitioning, automatic mesh generation for layered media with rectangular faults, and results visualization that is integrated with remote sensing data. The parallel GeoFEST application has been successfully run on over a half-dozen computers, including Intel Xeon clusters, Itanium II and Altix machines, and the Apple G5 cluster. It is not separately optimized for different machines, but relies on good domain partitioning for load-balance and low communication, and careful writing of the parallel diagonally preconditioned conjugate gradient solver to keep communication overhead low. Demonstrated thousand-step solutions for over a million finite elements on 64 processors require under three hours, and scaling tests show high efficiency when using more than (order of) 4000 elements per processor. The source code and documentation for GeoFEST is available at no cost from Open Channel Foundation. In addition GeoFEST may be used through a browser-based portal environment available to approved users. That environment includes semi-automated geometry creation and mesh generation tools, GeoFEST, and RIVA-based visualization tools that include the ability to generate a flyover animation showing deformations and topography. Work is in progress to support simulation of a region with several faults using 16 million elements, using a strain energy metric to adapt the mesh to faithfully represent the solution in a region of widely varying strain.

  1. Fault recovery characteristics of the fault tolerant multi-processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1990-01-01

    The fault handling performance of the fault tolerant multiprocessor (FTMP) was investigated. Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles byzantine or lying faults. It is pointed out that these weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good LRU (line replaceable unit) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software. It is concluded that fault injection can help detect and analyze the behavior of a system in the ultra-reliable regime. Although fault injection testing cannot be exhaustive, it has been demonstrated that it provides a unique capability to unmask problems and to characterize the behavior of a fault-tolerant system.

  2. Theory of reliable systems. [reliability analysis and on-line fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Research is reported in the program to refine the current notion of system reliability by identifying and investigating attributes of a system which are important to reliability considerations, and to develop techniques which facilitate analysis of system reliability. Reliability analysis, and on-line fault diagnosis are discussed.

  3. TROUBLE 3: A fault diagnostic expert system for Space Station Freedom's power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manner, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Designing Space Station Freedom has given NASA many opportunities to develop expert systems that automate onboard operations of space based systems. One such development, TROUBLE 3, an expert system that was designed to automate the fault diagnostics of Space Station Freedom's electric power system is described. TROUBLE 3's design is complicated by the fact that Space Station Freedom's power system is evolving and changing. TROUBLE 3 has to be made flexible enough to handle changes with minimal changes to the program. Three types of expert systems were studied: rule-based, set-covering, and model-based. A set-covering approach was selected for TROUBLE 3 because if offered the needed flexibility that was missing from the other approaches. With this flexibility, TROUBLE 3 is not limited to Space Station Freedom applications, it can easily be adapted to handle any diagnostic system.

  4. Performance Evaluation of SCADA System Isolating Fault Section in a Demand Area Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Hiromu; Koda, Yoshiyuki

    SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems for demand area power systems (one of the next-generation distribution grids) would be required; 1) to be flexible, 2) to provide various functions on restricted computing resources, and 3) to complete processing within the period required. We have proposed a system design based on mobile agents and Ethernet in order to fulfill the first and second requirements. This paper shows that this system design would satisfy the third requirement. In order to validate the system performance, we constructed an experimental system composed of a distribution line, generators, power devices, computers, mobile agents and Ethernet. The experiment results illustrate that a system based on this design could complete the fault isolation process that has the most stringent execution period.

  5. Fault tree analysis of the EBR-II reactor shutdown system

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, S.A.; Hill, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), detailed fault trees for the reactor shutdown system are developed. Fault tree analysis is performed for two classes of transient events that are of particular importance to EBR-II operation: loss-of-flow and transient-overpower. In all parts of EBR-II reactor shutdown system, redundancy has been utilized in order to reduce scram failure probability. Therefore, heavy emphasis is placed in the fault trees on the common cause failures (CCFs) among similar mechanical components of the control and safety rods and among similar electrical components in redundant detection channels and shutdown strings. Generic beta-factors that cover all types of similar components and reflect redundancy level are used to model the CCFs. Human errors are addressed in the fault trees in two major areas: errors that would prevent the automatic scram channels from detecting the abnormal events and errors that would prevent utilization of the manual scram capability. The fault tree analysis of the EBR-II shutdown system has provided not only a systematic process for calculating the probabilities of system failures but also useful insights into the system and how its elements interact during transient events that require shutdown.

  6. Fault tree analysis of the EBR-II reactor shutdown system

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, S.A.; Hill, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    As part of the level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), detailed fault trees for the reactor shutdown system are developed. Fault tree analysis is performed for two classes of transient events that are of particular importance to EBR-II operation: loss-of-flow and transient-overpower. In all parts of EBR-II reactor shutdown system, redundancy has been utilized in order to reduce scram failure probability. Therefore, heavy emphasis is placed in the fault trees on the common cause failures (CCFs) among similar mechanical components of the control and safety rods and among similar electrical components in redundant detection channels and shutdown strings. Generic beta-factors that cover all types of similar components and reflect redundancy level are used to model the CCFs. Human errors are addressed in the fault trees in two major areas: errors that would prevent the automatic scram channels from detecting the abnormal events and errors that would prevent utilization of the manual scram capability. The fault tree analysis of the EBR-II shutdown system has provided not only a systematic process for calculating the probabilities of system failures but also useful insights into the system and how its elements interact during transient events that require shutdown.

  7. Predictive Upper Cretaceous to Early Miocene Paleogeography of the San Andreas Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, K.

    2006-12-01

    Paleogeographic reconstruction of the region of the San Andreas fault was hampered for more than twenty years by the apparent incompatibility of authoritative lithologic correlations. These led to disparate estimates of dextral strike-slip offsets, notably 315 km between Pinnacles and Neenach Volcanics (Matthews, 1976), versus 563 km between Anchor Bay and Eagle Rest Peak (Ross et al., 1973). In addition, estimates of total dextral slip on the San Gregorio fault have ranged from 5 km to 185 km. Sixteen upper Cretaceous and Paleogene conglomerates of the California Coast Ranges, from Anchor Bay to Simi Valley, have been included in a multidisciplinary study. Detailed analysis, including microscopic petrography and microprobe geochemistry, verified Seiders and Cox's (1992) and Wentworth's (1996) correlation of the upper Cretaceous Strata of Anchor Bay with an unnamed conglomerate east of Half Moon Bay. Similar detailed study, with the addition of SHRIMP U/Pb zircon dating, verified that the Paleocene or Eocene Point Reyes Conglomerate at Point Reyes is a tectonically displaced segment of the Carmelo Formation of Point Lobos. These studies centered on identification of matching unique clast varieties, rather than on simply counting general clast types, and included analyses of matrices, fossils, paleocurrents, diagenesis, adjacent rocks, and stratigraphy. The work also led to three new correlations: the Point Reyes Conglomerate with granitic source rock at Point Lobos; a magnetic anomaly at Black Point with a magnetic anomaly near San Gregorio; and the Strata of Anchor Bay with previously established source rock, the potassium-poor Logan Gabbro (Ross et al., 1973) at a more recently recognized location (Brabb and Hanna, 1981; McLaughlin et al., 1996) just east of the San Gregorio fault, south of San Gregorio. From these correlations, an upper Cretaceous early Oligocene paleogeography of the San Andreas fault system was constructed that honors both the Anchor Bay

  8. A multi-fault diagnosis method for sensor systems based on principle component analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Daqi; Bai, Jie; Yang, Simon X

    2010-01-01

    A model based on PCA (principal component analysis) and a neural network is proposed for the multi-fault diagnosis of sensor systems. Firstly, predicted values of sensors are computed by using historical data measured under fault-free conditions and a PCA model. Secondly, the squared prediction error (SPE) of the sensor system is calculated. A fault can then be detected when the SPE suddenly increases. If more than one sensor in the system is out of order, after combining different sensors and reconstructing the signals of combined sensors, the SPE is calculated to locate the faulty sensors. Finally, the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by simulation and comparison studies, in which two sensors in the system are out of order at the same time. PMID:22315537

  9. The containment set approach to digital system tolerance of lightning-induced transient faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. M.; Glaser, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    A fault model and a system model are necessary to assess the tolerance or resilience of a digital system to lightning-induced transients. It is noted that these models are usually developed separately. A new approach is outlined here for this assessment problem which combines the fault and system models into an overall model. With this approach, referred to as the containment set approach, an assessment of the effects of lightning-induced transients can be made in terms of a state transition matrix. This matrix can be generated by means of fault injection experiments. In addition, certain nonredundancy-oriented design alternatives to the achievement of lightning-induced transient tolerance in digital systems are indicated by the containment set approach.

  10. Assessment on the influence of resistive superconducting fault current limiter in VSC-HVDC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Geon; Khan, Umer Amir; Hwang, Jae-Sang; Seong, Jae-Kyu; Shin, Woo-Ju; Park, Byung-Bae; Lee, Bang-Wook

    2014-09-01

    Due to fewer risk of commutation failures, harmonic occurrences and reactive power consumptions, Voltage Source Converter (VSC) based HVDC system is known as the optimum solution of HVDC power system for the future power grid. However, the absence of suitable fault protection devices for HVDC system hinders the efficient VSC-HVDC power grid design. In order to enhance the reliability of the VSC-HVDC power grid against the fault current problems, the application of resistive Superconducting Fault Current Limiters (SFCLs) could be considered. Also, SFCLs could be applied to the VSC-HVDC system with integrated AC Power Systems in order to enhance the transient response and the robustness of the system. In this paper, in order to evaluate the role of SFCLs in VSC-HVDC systems and to determine the suitable position of SFCLs in VSC-HVDC power systems integrated with AC power System, a simulation model based on Korea Jeju-Haenam HVDC power system was designed in Matlab Simulink/SimPowerSystems. This designed model was composed of VSC-HVDC system connected with an AC microgrid. Utilizing the designed VSC-HVDC systems, the feasible locations of resistive SFCLs were evaluated when DC line-to-line, DC line-to-ground and three phase AC faults were occurred. Consequently, it was found that the simulation model was effective to evaluate the positive effects of resistive SFCLs for the effective suppression of fault currents in VSC-HVDC systems as well as in integrated AC Systems. Finally, the optimum locations of SFCLs in VSC-HVDC transmission systems were suggested based on the simulation results.

  11. Criteria for design of the Yucca Mountain structures, systems and components for fault displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Stepp, C.; Hossain, Q.; Nesbit, S.; Hardy, M.

    1995-12-31

    The DOE intends to design the Yucca Mountain high-level waste facility structures, systems and components (SSCs) for fault displacements to provide reasonable assurance that they will meet the preclosure safety performance objectives established by 10 CFR Part 60. To the extent achievable, fault displacement design of the facility will follow guidance provided in the NRC Staff Technical Position. Fault avoidance will be the primary design criterion, especially for spatially compact or clustered SSCs. When fault avoidance is not reasonably achievable, expected to be the case for most spatially extended SSCs, engineering design procedures and criteria or repair and rehabilitation actions, depending on the SSC`s importance to safety, are provided. SSCs that have radiological safety importance will be designed for fault displacements that correspond to the hazard exceedance frequency equal to their established seismic safety performance goals. Fault displacement loads are generally localized and may cause local inelastic response of SSCs. For this reason, the DOE intends to use strain-based design acceptance criteria similar to the strain-based criteria used to design nuclear plant SSCs for impact and impulsive loads.

  12. Structural system reliability calculation using a probabilistic fault tree analysis method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torng, T. Y.; Wu, Y.-T.; Millwater, H. R.

    1992-01-01

    The development of a new probabilistic fault tree analysis (PFTA) method for calculating structural system reliability is summarized. The proposed PFTA procedure includes: developing a fault tree to represent the complex structural system, constructing an approximation function for each bottom event, determining a dominant sampling sequence for all bottom events, and calculating the system reliability using an adaptive importance sampling method. PFTA is suitable for complicated structural problems that require computer-intensive computer calculations. A computer program has been developed to implement the PFTA.

  13. Towards an operational fault isolation expert system for French telecommunication satellite Telecom 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haziza, M.

    1990-10-01

    The DIAMS satellite fault isolation expert system shell concept is described. The project, initiated in 1985, has led to the development of a prototype Expert System (ES) dedicated to the Telecom 1 attitude and orbit control system. The prototype ES has been installed in the Telecom 1 satellite control center and evaluated by Telecom 1 operations. The development of a fault isolation ES covering a whole spacecraft (the French telecommunication satellite Telecom 2) is currently being undertaken. Full scale industrial applications raise stringent requirements in terms of knowledge management and software development methodology. The approach used by MATRA ESPACE to face this challenge is outlined.

  14. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  15. Developing a new transformer fault diagnosis system through evolutionary fuzzy logic

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.C.; Huang, C.L.; Yang, H.T.

    1997-04-01

    To improve the diagnosis accuracy of the conventional dissolved gas analysis (DGA) approaches, this paper proposes an evolutionary programming (EP) based fuzzy system development technique to identify the incipient faults of the power transformers. Using the IEC/IEEE DGA criteria as references, a preliminary framework of the fuzzy diagnosis system is first built. Based on previous dissolved gas test records and their actual fault types, the proposed EP-based development technique is then employed to automatically modify the fuzzy if-then rules and simultaneously adjust the corresponding membership functions. In comparison to results of the conventional DGA and the artificial neural networks (ANN) classification methods, the proposed method has been verified to possess superior performance both in developing the diagnosis system and in identifying the practical transformer fault cases.

  16. The fault diagnosis of large-scale wind turbine based on expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changzheng; Li, Yun

    2011-10-01

    The wind turbine is the critical equipment for wind power, due to the poor working environment and the long running, the wind turbine components will have a variety of failures. Planned maintenance which has long been used is unable to understand the operational status of equipment comprehensively and timely in a way, especially for large wind machine, the repair work took too long time and cause serious damage. Therefore, fault diagnosis and predictive maintenance becomes more imminent. In this paper, the fault symptoms and corresponding reason of the large-scale wind turbine parts are analyzed and summarized ,such as gear box, generator, yaw system, and so on . And on this basis, the large-scale wind turbine fault diagnosis expert system was constructed by using expert system tool CLIPS and Visual C + +.

  17. Redundancy management for efficient fault recovery in NASA's distributed computing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malek, Miroslaw; Pandya, Mihir; Yau, Kitty

    1991-01-01

    The management of redundancy in computer systems was studied and guidelines were provided for the development of NASA's fault-tolerant distributed systems. Fault recovery and reconfiguration mechanisms were examined. A theoretical foundation was laid for redundancy management by efficient reconfiguration methods and algorithmic diversity. Algorithms were developed to optimize the resources for embedding of computational graphs of tasks in the system architecture and reconfiguration of these tasks after a failure has occurred. The computational structure represented by a path and the complete binary tree was considered and the mesh and hypercube architectures were targeted for their embeddings. The innovative concept of Hybrid Algorithm Technique was introduced. This new technique provides a mechanism for obtaining fault tolerance while exhibiting improved performance.

  18. Using gravity as a proxy for stress accumulation in complex fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Tyler Joseph

    The gravity signal contains information regarding changes in density at all depths and can be used as a proxy for the strain accumulation in fault networks. A general method for calculating the total, dilatational, and free-air gravity for fault systems with arbitrary geometry, slip motion, and number of fault segments is presented. The technique uses a Green's function approach for a fault buried within an elastic half-space with an underlying driver plate forcing the system. A stress-evolution time-dependent earthquake fault model was used to create simulated slip histories over the San Andreas Fault network in California. Using a sum of the gravity signals from each fault segment in the model, via coseismic gravity Green's functions, a time-dependent gravity model was created. The steady-state gravity from the long term plate motion generates a signal over five years with magnitudes of +/- ˜2 muGal; the current limit of portable instrument observations. Moderate to large events generate signal magnitudes in the range of ˜10 muGal to ˜80 muGal, well within the range of ground based observations. The complex fault network geometry of California significantly affects the spatial extent of the gravity signal from the three events studied. Statistical analysis of 55 000 years of simulated slip histories were used to investigate the use of the dilatational gravity signal as a proxy for precursory stress and strain changes. Results indicate that the precursory dilatational gravity signal is dependent upon the fault orientation with respect the tectonic loading plate velocity. This effect is interpreted as a consequence of preferential amplification of the shear stress or reduction of the normal stress, depending on the steady-state regime investigated. Finally, solutions for the corresponding gravity gradients of the coseismic dilatational gravity signals are developed for a vertical strike-slip fault. Gravity gradient solutions exhibit similar spatial distributions

  19. Fault tolerance control of phase current in permanent magnet synchronous motor control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kele; Chen, Ke; Chen, Xinglong; Li, Jinying

    2014-08-01

    As the Photoelectric tracking system develops from earth based platform to all kinds of moving platform such as plane based, ship based, car based, satellite based and missile based, the fault tolerance control system of phase current sensor is studied in order to detect and control of failure of phase current sensor on a moving platform. By using a DC-link current sensor and the switching state of the corresponding SVPWM inverter, the failure detection and fault control of three phase current sensor is achieved. Under such conditions as one failure, two failures and three failures, fault tolerance is able to be controlled. The reason why under the method, there exists error between fault tolerance control and actual phase current, is analyzed, and solution to weaken the error is provided. The experiment based on permanent magnet synchronous motor system is conducted, and the method is proven to be capable of detecting the failure of phase current sensor effectively and precisely, and controlling the fault tolerance simultaneously. With this method, even though all the three phase current sensors malfunction, the moving platform can still work by reconstructing the phase current of the motor.

  20. Flight elements: Fault detection and fault management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Edge, J. T.; Lawler, D.

    1990-01-01

    Fault management for an intelligent computational system must be developed using a top down integrated engineering approach. An approach proposed includes integrating the overall environment involving sensors and their associated data; design knowledge capture; operations; fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration; testability; causal models including digraph matrix analysis; and overall performance impacts on the hardware and software architecture. Implementation of the concept to achieve a real time intelligent fault detection and management system will be accomplished via the implementation of several objectives, which are: Development of fault tolerant/FDIR requirement and specification from a systems level which will carry through from conceptual design through implementation and mission operations; Implementation of monitoring, diagnosis, and reconfiguration at all system levels providing fault isolation and system integration; Optimize system operations to manage degraded system performance through system integration; and Lower development and operations costs through the implementation of an intelligent real time fault detection and fault management system and an information management system.

  1. A Fault Tree Approach to Analysis of Behavioral Systems: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Kent G.

    Developed at Brigham Young University, Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) is a technique for enhancing the probability of success in any system by analyzing the most likely modes of failure that could occur. It provides a logical, step-by-step description of possible failure events within a system and their interaction--the combinations of potential…

  2. Development of the Task-Based Expert System for Machine Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Ma; Zhi-nong, Jiang; Zhong-qing, Wei

    2012-05-01

    The operating mechanism of expert systems widely used in fault diagnosis is to formulate a set of diagnostic rules, according to the mechanism and symptoms of faults, in order to instruct the fault diagnosis or directly give diagnostic results. In practice, due to differences existing in such aspects as production technology, drivers, etc., a certain fault may derive from different causes, which will lead to a lower diagnostic accuracy of expert systems. Besides, a variety of expert systems now available have a dual problem of low generality and low expandability, of which the former can lead to the repeated development of expert systems for different machines, while the latter restricts users from expanding the system. Aimed at these problems, a type of task-based software architecture of expert system is proposed in this paper, which permits a specific optimization based on a set of common rules, and allows users to add or modify rules on a man-machine dialog so as to keep on absorbing and improving the expert knowledge. Finally, the integration of the expert system with the condition monitoring system to implement the automatic and semi-automatic diagnosis is introduced.

  3. Investigation of candidate data structures and search algorithms to support a knowledge based fault diagnosis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, Edward L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The focus of this research is the investigation of data structures and associated search algorithms for automated fault diagnosis of complex systems such as the Hubble Space Telescope. Such data structures and algorithms will form the basis of a more sophisticated Knowledge Based Fault Diagnosis System. As a part of the research, several prototypes were written in VAXLISP and implemented on one of the VAX-11/780's at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This report describes and gives the rationale for both the data structures and algorithms selected. A brief discussion of a user interface is also included.

  4. Self-stabilizing byzantine-fault-tolerant clock synchronization system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Systems and methods for rapid Byzantine-fault-tolerant self-stabilizing clock synchronization are provided. The systems and methods are based on a protocol comprising a state machine and a set of monitors that execute once every local oscillator tick. The protocol is independent of specific application specific requirements. The faults are assumed to be arbitrary and/or malicious. All timing measures of variables are based on the node's local clock and thus no central clock or externally generated pulse is used. Instances of the protocol are shown to tolerate bursts of transient failures and deterministically converge with a linear convergence time with respect to the synchronization period as predicted.

  5. Multi-constrained fault estimation observer design with finite frequency specifications for continuous-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ke; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng; Xu, Jinfa

    2014-08-01

    The design of a multi-constrained full-order fault estimation observer (FFEO) with finite frequency specifications is studied for continuous-time systems. By constructing an augmented system, a multi-constrained FFEO in finite frequency domain is proposed to achieve fault estimation. Meanwhile, the presented FFEO can avoid the overdesign problem generated by the entire frequency domain by the generalised Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov lemma. Furthermore, by introducing slack variables, improved results on FFEO design in different frequency domains are obtained such that different Lyapunov matrices can be separately designed for each constraint. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and potentials of the proposed techniques.

  6. ZOCT and chaotic oscillator applied to fault section determination in distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Qiufeng; Zhou, Wenchang

    2006-11-01

    It's a new idea for using zero-sequence optical current transducer (ZOCT) to solve the measure problem of single-phase-to-ground fault section determination in distribution system. However the outputs of ZOCT are weak and mixed with noises, decreasing the detection sensitivity. Chaotic oscillator system is sensitive to certain signal and immune to noise, so the signal detection based on Duffing oscillator can improve the detection sensitivity and anti-interference capability. In this paper, combining Duffing oscillator with ZOCT, a new scheme of fault section determination is presented, with good sensitivity and reliability. The results of simulation and experiments proved this method is effective and feasible.

  7. Formal specification of requirements for analytical redundancy-based fault-tolerant flight control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gobbo, Diego

    2000-10-01

    Flight control systems are undergoing a rapid process of automation. The use of Fly-By-Wire digital flight control systems in commercial aviation (Airbus 320 and Boeing FBW-B777) is a clear sign of this trend. The increased automation goes in parallel with an increased complexity of flight control systems with obvious consequences on reliability and safety. Flight control systems must meet strict fault-tolerance requirements. The standard solution to achieving fault tolerance capability relies on multi-string architectures. On the other hand, multi-string architectures further increase the complexity of the system inducing a reduction of overall reliability. In the past two decades a variety of techniques based on analytical redundancy have been suggested for fault diagnosis purposes. While research on analytical redundancy has obtained desirable results, a design methodology involving requirements specification and feasibility analysis of analytical redundancy based fault tolerant flight control systems is missing. The main objective of this research work is to describe within a formal framework the implications of adopting analytical redundancy as a basis to achieve fault tolerance. The research activity involves analysis of the analytical redundancy approach, analysis of flight control system informal requirements, and re-engineering (modeling and specification) of the fault tolerance requirements. The USAF military specification MIL-F-9490D and supporting documents are adopted as source for the flight control informal requirements. The De Havilland DHC-2 general aviation aircraft equipped with standard autopilot control functions is adopted as pilot application. Relational algebra is adopted as formal framework for the specification of the requirements. The detailed analysis and formalization of the requirements resulted in a better definition of the fault tolerance problem in the framework of analytical redundancy. Fault tolerance requirements and related

  8. Fault diagnosing system of steam generator for nuclear power plant based on fuzzy neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ming-Yu; Bian, Xin-Qian; Shi, Ji

    2002-06-01

    All kinds of reasons are analysed in theory and a fault repository combined with local expert experiences is established according to the structure and the operation characteristic of steam generator in this paper. At the same time, Kohonen algorithm is used for fault diagnoses system based on fuzzy neural networks. Fuzzy arithmetic is inducted into neural networks to solve uncertain diagnosis induced by uncertain knowledge. According to its self-association in the course of default diagnosis, the system is provided with non-supervise, self-organizing, self-learning, and has strong cluster ability and fast cluster velocity.

  9. Holocene displacement field at an emerged oceanic transform-ridge junction: The Husavik-Flatey Fault - Gudfinnugja Fault system, North Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquarè Mariotto, F.; Bonali, F. L.; Tibaldi, A.; Rust, D.; Oppizzi, P.; Cavallo, A.

    2015-06-01

    Our research focuses on Holocene tectonics in a broad area surrounding the junction between the active NW-SE trending Husavik-Flatey transform fault (HFF) and the N-S Gudfinnugja normal fault (GF), an exceptional example of onshore transform-ridge intersection. We mapped 637 minor and major faults, and measured the dip-slip and strike-slip offset components on the major faults. We also mapped 1016 individual tension fractures, as well as opening directions on the most reliable ones. The results indicate that this portion of the HFF comprises major right-stepping segments, with both normal and right-lateral strike-slip components, linked by local normal faults. The entire GF always shows pure dip-slip normal displacements, with a strong decrease in offset at the junction with the HFF. Fissure opening directions are in the range N45°-65°E along the HFF, N90°E along the GF, and N110°E within the area south of the HFF and west of the GF. Fault kinematics and fissure openings suggest a displacement field in good agreement with most of present-day GPS measurements, although our data indicate the possible long-term Holocene effects of the superimposition of magma-related stresses on the regional tectonic stresses. The HFF and the GF work together as a structural system able to accommodate differential crustal block motion, and possibly past dyke intrusions.

  10. Orthorhombic faults system at the onset of the Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic Barents Sea rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collanega, Luca; Breda, Anna; Massironi, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    The structures of the Late Mesozoic/Cenozoic Barents Sea rifting have been investigated with multichannel 3D seismics, covering an area of 7700 sqKm in the Hoop Fault Complex, a transitional area between the platform and the marginal basins. The main structural lineaments have been mapped in a time domain 3D surface and their activity ranges have been constrained through the sin-sedimentary thickness variations detected in time-thickness maps. Two main fault systems have been identified: an orthorhombic fault system consisting of two fault sets trending almost perpendicularly one to the other (WNW-ESE and NNE-SSW) and a graben/half-graben system, elongated approximately N-S in the central part of the study area. While the graben/half-graben system can be explained through the theory of Anderson, this landmark theory fails to explain the simultaneous activity of the two fault sets of the orthorhombic system. So far, the models that can better explain orthorhombic fault arrangements are the slip model by Reches (Reches, 1978; Reches, 1983; Reches and Dieterich, 1983) and the odd-axis model by Krantz (Krantz, 1988). However, these models are not definitive and a strong quest to better understand polymodal faulting is actual (Healy et al., 2015). In the study area, the presence of both a classical Andersonian and an orthorhombic system indicates that these models are not alternative but are both effective and necessary to explain faulting in different circumstances. Indeed, the Andersonian plain strain and the orthorhombic deformation have affected different part of the succession during different phases of the rifting. In particular, the orthorhombic system has affected only the Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic interval of the succession and it was the main active system during the initial phase of the rifting. On the other hand, the graben/half-graben system has affected the whole sedimentary succession, with an increasing activity during the development of the rifting. It has

  11. Kozu-Matsuda fault system in northern Izu collision zone, western part of Kanagawa Prefecture, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odawara, K.; Aketagawa, T.; Yoshida, A.

    2010-12-01

    Western area of Kanagawa Prefecture is techtonically highlighted by its geological setting that the Izu-Bonin volcanic arc collides with the Japan Island arc there. The Kozu-Matsuda fault system which consists of the Kozu-Matsuda fault, the Matsuda-kita fault, the Hinata fault and the Hirayama fault is a surface manifestation of the plate boundary. Research of the Kozu-Matsuda fault has advanced dramatically after the 1995 Kobe Earthquake. Having conducted a trench survey, Kanagawa Prefectural Government (2004) reported that the Kozu-Matsuda fault was activated at least four times in the past 4000 years and the latest activity occurred 650-950 years ago (AD. 1350-1050). However, details of the activity of the Hinata and Hirayama faults, the northern extension of the Kozu-Matsuda fault, are not well understood. The Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Urban areas (DaiDaiToku) made a 2040 m deep drilling in 2004 in Yamakita Town (Hayashi et al., 2006). DaiDaiToku also carried out the seismic reflection profiling along a route from Odawara to Yamanashi in 2005 (Sato et al., 2005). The study done by DaiDaiToku elucidated presence of two north-dipping thrusts. The northern thrust corresponds to the Hinata fault, and the southern one which is also considered to be a continuation of the Kozu-Matsuda fault probably represents a frontal thrust (Miyauchi et al., 2006). We have conducted paleoseismic investigations using data from boreholes across these thrusts.

  12. An Automated Intelligent Fault Detection System for Inspection of Sewer Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrary, Alireza; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Masumi

    Automation is an important issue in industry, particularly in inspection of underground facilities. This paper describes an intelligent system for automatically detecting faulty areas in a sewer pipe system based on images. The proposed system can detect various types of faults and be implemented in a real time system. The present paper describes system architecture and focuses on two modules of image preprocessing and detection of faulty areas. The proposed approach demonstrates high performance in detection and reduction of time and cost.

  13. Growth of lithospheric-scale fault system in NE Tibet: numerical modeling constrained by high-resolution seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhen; Zhang, Haiming

    2016-04-01

    The growth of lithospheric-scale fault system is strongly coupled with the deformation of continental lithosphere in Tibetan Plateau. Therefore, prediction of fault growth is important to understand the tectonic history of continental deformation with fault system. Recently, high-resolution seismic reflection profiling across the Kunlun fault in northeasten Tibet reveals several fault systems at the scale of lithosphere. A 2D mid-crustal strain-transfer model, which emphasized on the lateral heterogeneity of crust, was proposed to explain the seismic reflection profiling under the condition of compression. In order to understand the dynamic process of lithospheric deformation, an elastic-plastic constitutive relationship in finite element modeling is used to investigate the mechanism of the fault growth in the section under the condition of compression by allowing permanent strains to develop in response to the applied loads. The vertical and lateral heterogeneity of material, effect of plastic parameters and geometry of models from nature structure are all discussed in this study. The results compared with high-resolution seismic image show that well-designed geomechanical modeling can produce overall process of fault growth for both continuum without preexisting fault and discontinuous deformation with a peexisting fault. But the model of the Kunlun fault cutting down the Moho is not supported by the results compared with the seismic data.

  14. Fault diagnosis for the heat exchanger of the aircraft environmental control system based on the strong tracking filter.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Lu, Chen; Liu, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft environmental control system (ECS) is a critical aircraft system, which provides the appropriate environmental conditions to ensure the safe transport of air passengers and equipment. The functionality and reliability of ECS have received increasing attention in recent years. The heat exchanger is a particularly significant component of the ECS, because its failure decreases the system's efficiency, which can lead to catastrophic consequences. Fault diagnosis of the heat exchanger is necessary to prevent risks. However, two problems hinder the implementation of the heat exchanger fault diagnosis in practice. First, the actual measured parameter of the heat exchanger cannot effectively reflect the fault occurrence, whereas the heat exchanger faults are usually depicted by utilizing the corresponding fault-related state parameters that cannot be measured directly. Second, both the traditional Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and the EKF-based Double Model Filter have certain disadvantages, such as sensitivity to modeling errors and difficulties in selection of initialization values. To solve the aforementioned problems, this paper presents a fault-related parameter adaptive estimation method based on strong tracking filter (STF) and Modified Bayes classification algorithm for fault detection and failure mode classification of the heat exchanger, respectively. Heat exchanger fault simulation is conducted to generate fault data, through which the proposed methods are validated. The results demonstrate that the proposed methods are capable of providing accurate, stable, and rapid fault diagnosis of the heat exchanger. PMID:25823010

  15. Monitoring seismic and silent faulting along the Atacama Fault System and its relation to the subduction zone seismic cycle: A Creepmeter Study in N-CHile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Pia; Ziegenhagen, Thomas; Bach, Christoph; Walter, Thomas; Oncken, Onno

    2010-05-01

    The relationship between crustal forearc faults and subduction zone processes is little understood and therefore the modern seismogenic capacity of these faults cannot be determined. The Atacama Fault System (AFS) is the dominant trench parallel fault in N-Chile with an along strike extent of 1000km. In order to characterize the mode of deformation accumulation and its spatio-temporal distribution, we are continuously monitoring displacement accumulation along active fault branches with a recently installed Creepmeter array. All the installed Creepmeters use 12 mm thick Invar-rod as length standard buried up to 0.7 m depth to reduce the signal to noise ratio, and measure the length standard change across a fault on outcrop scale. The currently deployed 9 sites are designed for displacement detection in the range of 0.001 - 50 mm/yr with a sampling rate of 1/min. The monitored fault branches have been chosen such that 3 Creepmeter sites are located in the Iquique seismic gap of the subduction zone, 5 instruments are located in the segment that recently ruptured in the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake, whereof 2 are located on the Mejillones Peninsula and one is located in the Antofagasta segment that last ruptured in the 1995 Antofagasta Earthquake. This enables us to compare the mode of strain accumulation in different stages of the subduction zone seismic cycle. The first datasets (> 1 yr) show that the instruments both in the Antofagasta and Tocopilla segments display a continuous creep signal equivalent to extensional displacement across the fault zone superimposed by sudden displacement events related to subduction zone earthquakes. The sum of both amounts to 0.02 mm/y - 0.1 mm/y of displacement which is less than predicted by the geological long-term observation. The data from the Chomache Fault located in the Iquique segment shows only a creep signal for the first year after installation with an average extensional displacement rate of 0.05 mm/y. No sudden

  16. State Tracking and Fault Diagnosis for Dynamic Systems Using Labeled Uncertainty Graph

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gan; Feng, Wenquan; Zhao, Qi; Zhao, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Cyber-physical systems such as autonomous spacecraft, power plants and automotive systems become more vulnerable to unanticipated failures as their complexity increases. Accurate tracking of system dynamics and fault diagnosis are essential. This paper presents an efficient state estimation method for dynamic systems modeled as concurrent probabilistic automata. First, the Labeled Uncertainty Graph (LUG) method in the planning domain is introduced to describe the state tracking and fault diagnosis processes. Because the system model is probabilistic, the Monte Carlo technique is employed to sample the probability distribution of belief states. In addition, to address the sample impoverishment problem, an innovative look-ahead technique is proposed to recursively generate most likely belief states without exhaustively checking all possible successor modes. The overall algorithms incorporate two major steps: a roll-forward process that estimates system state and identifies faults, and a roll-backward process that analyzes possible system trajectories once the faults have been detected. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by applying it to a real world domain: the power supply control unit of a spacecraft. PMID:26556358

  17. Human Factors Considerations for Safe Recovery from Faults In Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy; Belcastro, C. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    It is now possible - and important - to develop systems to help resolve Flight Control System (FCS) faults. From a human factors viewpoint, it is imperative that these systems take on roles, and provide functions, that are the most supportive to the pilot, given the stress, time pressure and workload they may experience following a FCS fault. FCS fault recovery systems may provide several different functions, including alerting, control assistance, and decision aiding. The biggest human factors questions are in the role suitable for the technology, and its specific functioning to achieve that role. Specifically, for these systems to be effective, they must meet the fundamental requirements that (1) they alert pilots to problems early enough that the pilot can reasonably resolve the fault and regain control of the aircraft and that (2) if the aircraft s handling qualities are severely degraded the HMS provide the appropriate stability augmentation to help the pilot stabilize and control the aircraft. This project undertook several research steps to develop such systems, focusing on the capabilities of pilots and on realistically attainable technologies. The ability to estimate which functions are the most valuable will help steer system development in the directions that can establish the highest safety levels.

  18. State Tracking and Fault Diagnosis for Dynamic Systems Using Labeled Uncertainty Graph.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gan; Feng, Wenquan; Zhao, Qi; Zhao, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Cyber-physical systems such as autonomous spacecraft, power plants and automotive systems become more vulnerable to unanticipated failures as their complexity increases. Accurate tracking of system dynamics and fault diagnosis are essential. This paper presents an efficient state estimation method for dynamic systems modeled as concurrent probabilistic automata. First, the Labeled Uncertainty Graph (LUG) method in the planning domain is introduced to describe the state tracking and fault diagnosis processes. Because the system model is probabilistic, the Monte Carlo technique is employed to sample the probability distribution of belief states. In addition, to address the sample impoverishment problem, an innovative look-ahead technique is proposed to recursively generate most likely belief states without exhaustively checking all possible successor modes. The overall algorithms incorporate two major steps: a roll-forward process that estimates system state and identifies faults, and a roll-backward process that analyzes possible system trajectories once the faults have been detected. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by applying it to a real world domain: the power supply control unit of a spacecraft. PMID:26556358

  19. Advanced information processing system: The Army fault tolerant architecture conceptual study. Volume 1: Army fault tolerant architecture overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. E.; Alger, L. S.; Babikyan, C. A.; Butler, B. P.; Friend, S. A.; Ganska, R. J.; Lala, J. H.; Masotto, T. K.; Meyer, A. J.; Morton, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Digital computing systems needed for Army programs such as the Computer-Aided Low Altitude Helicopter Flight Program and the Armored Systems Modernization (ASM) vehicles may be characterized by high computational throughput and input/output bandwidth, hard real-time response, high reliability and availability, and maintainability, testability, and producibility requirements. In addition, such a system should be affordable to produce, procure, maintain, and upgrade. To address these needs, the Army Fault Tolerant Architecture (AFTA) is being designed and constructed under a three-year program comprised of a conceptual study, detailed design and fabrication, and demonstration and validation phases. Described here are the results of the conceptual study phase of the AFTA development. Given here is an introduction to the AFTA program, its objectives, and key elements of its technical approach. A format is designed for representing mission requirements in a manner suitable for first order AFTA sizing and analysis, followed by a discussion of the current state of mission requirements acquisition for the targeted Army missions. An overview is given of AFTA's architectural theory of operation.

  20. Anatomy of landslides along the Dead Sea Transform Fault System in NW Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, H. G.; Hahne, K.; Shaqour, F.

    2012-03-01

    In the mountainous region north of Amman, Jordan, Cenomanian calcareous rocks are being monitored constantly for their mass wasting processes which occasionally cause severe damage to the Amman-Irbid Highway. Satellite remote sensing data (Landsat TM, ASTER, and SRTM) and ground measurements are applied to investigate the anatomy of landslides along the Dead Sea Transform Fault System (DSTFS), a prominent strike-slip fault. The joints and faults pertinent to the DSTFS match the architectural elements identified in landslides of different size. This similarity attests to a close genetic relation between the tectonic setting of one of the most prominent fault zones on the earth and modern geomorphologic processes. Six indicators stand out in particular: 1) The fractures developing in N-S and splay faults represent the N-S lateral movement of the DSTFS. They governed the position of the landslides. 2) Cracks and faults aligned in NE-SW to NNW-SSW were caused by compressional strength. They were subsequently reactivated during extensional processes and used in some cases as slip planes during mass wasting. 3) Minor landslides with NE-SW straight scarps were derived from compressional features which were turned into slip planes during the incipient stages of mass wasting. They occur mainly along the slopes in small wadis or where a wide wadi narrows upstream. 4) Major landslides with curved instead of straight scarps and rotational slides are representative of a more advanced level of mass wasting. These areas have to be marked in the maps and during land management projects as high-risk area mainly and may be encountered in large wadis with steep slopes or longitudinal slopes undercut by road construction works. 5) The spatial relation between minor faults and slope angle is crucial as to the vulnerability of the areas in terms of mass wasting. 6) Springs lined up along faults cause serious problems to engineering geology in that they step up the behavior of marly

  1. Current Sensor Fault Diagnosis Based on a Sliding Mode Observer for PMSM Driven Systems

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; Huang, Yi-Shan; Zhao, Kai-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a current sensor fault detection method based on a sliding mode observer for the torque closed-loop control system of interior permanent magnet synchronous motors. First, a sliding mode observer based on the extended flux linkage is built to simplify the motor model, which effectively eliminates the phenomenon of salient poles and the dependence on the direct axis inductance parameter, and can also be used for real-time calculation of feedback torque. Then a sliding mode current observer is constructed in αβ coordinates to generate the fault residuals of the phase current sensors. The method can accurately identify abrupt gain faults and slow-variation offset faults in real time in faulty sensors, and the generated residuals of the designed fault detection system are not affected by the unknown input, the structure of the observer, and the theoretical derivation and the stability proof process are concise and simple. The RT-LAB real-time simulation is used to build a simulation model of the hardware in the loop. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25970258

  2. Current Sensor Fault Diagnosis Based on a Sliding Mode Observer for PMSM Driven Systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; Huang, Yi-Shan; Zhao, Kai-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a current sensor fault detection method based on a sliding mode observer for the torque closed-loop control system of interior permanent magnet synchronous motors. First, a sliding mode observer based on the extended flux linkage is built to simplify the motor model, which effectively eliminates the phenomenon of salient poles and the dependence on the direct axis inductance parameter, and can also be used for real-time calculation of feedback torque. Then a sliding mode current observer is constructed in αβ coordinates to generate the fault residuals of the phase current sensors. The method can accurately identify abrupt gain faults and slow-variation offset faults in real time in faulty sensors, and the generated residuals of the designed fault detection system are not affected by the unknown input, the structure of the observer, and the theoretical derivation and the stability proof process are concise and simple. The RT-LAB real-time simulation is used to build a simulation model of the hardware in the loop. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25970258

  3. Fault diagnosis using noise modeling and a new artificial immune system based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Farshid; Mojtahedi, Alireza; Ettefagh, Mir Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    A new fault classification/diagnosis method based on artificial immune system (AIS) algorithms for the structural systems is proposed. In order to improve the accuracy of the proposed method, i.e., higher success rate, Gaussian and non-Gaussian noise generating models are applied to simulate environmental noise. The identification of noise model, known as training process, is based on the estimation of the noise model parameters by genetic algorithms (GA) utilizing real experimental features. The proposed fault classification/diagnosis algorithm is applied to the noise contaminated features. Then, the results are compared to that obtained without noise modeling. The performance of the proposed method is examined using three laboratory case studies in two healthy and damaged conditions. Finally three different types of noise models are studied and it is shown experimentally that the proposed algorithm with non-Gaussian noise modeling leads to more accurate clustering of memory cells as the major part of the fault classification procedure.

  4. Neurosurgical Assessment of Metrics Including Judgment and Dexterity Using the Virtual Reality Simulator NeuroTouch (NAJD Metrics).

    PubMed

    Alotaibi, Fahad E; AlZhrani, Gmaan A; Sabbagh, Abulrahman J; Azarnoush, Hamed; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2015-12-01

    Advances in computer-based technology has created a significant opportunity for implementing new training paradigms in neurosurgery focused on improving skill acquisition, enhancing procedural outcome, and surgical skills assessment. NeuroTouch is a computer-based virtual reality system that can generate output data known as metrics from operator performance during simulated brain tumor resection. These measures of quantitative assessment are used to track and compare psychomotor performance during simulated operative procedures. Data output from the NeuroTouch system is recorded in a comma-separated values file. Data mining from this file and subsequent metrics development requires the use of sophisticated software and engineering expertise. In this article, we introduce a system to extract a series of new metrics using the same data file using Excel software. Based on the data contained in the NeuroTouch comma-separated values file, 13 novel NeuroTouch metrics were developed and classified. Tier 1 metrics include blood loss, tumor percentage resected, and total simulated normal brain volume removed. Tier 2 metrics include total instrument tip path length, maximum force applied, sum of forces utilized, and average forces utilized by the simulated ultrasonic aspirator and suction instrument along with pedal activation frequency of the ultrasonic aspirator. Advanced tier 2 metrics include instrument tips average separation distance, efficiency index, ultrasonic aspirator path length index, coordination index, and ultrasonic aspirator bimanual forces ratio. This system of data extraction provides researchers expedited access for analyzing the data files available for NeuroTouch platform to assess the multiple psychomotor and cognitive neurosurgical skills involved in complex surgical procedures. PMID:25851146

  5. Fault-tolerant system considerations for a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motyka, P.; Ornedo, R.; Mangoubi, R.

    1984-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a fault-tolerant system for the Redundant Strapdown Inertial Measurement Unit (RSDIMU) being developed and evaluated by the NASA Langley Research Center was continued. The RSDIMU consists of four two-degree-of-freedom gyros and accelerometers mounted on the faces of a semi-octahedron which can be separated into two halves for damage protection. Compensated and uncompensated fault-tolerant system failure decision algorithms were compared. An algorithm to compensate for sensor noise effects in the fault-tolerant system thresholds was evaluated via simulation. The effects of sensor location and magnitude of the vehicle structural modes on system performance were assessed. A threshold generation algorithm, which incorporates noise compensation and filtered parity equation residuals for structural mode compensation, was evaluated. The effects of the fault-tolerant system on navigational accuracy were also considered. A sensor error parametric study was performed in an attempt to improve the soft failure detection capability without obtaining false alarms. Also examined was an FDI system strategy based on the pairwise comparison of sensor measurements. This strategy has the specific advantage of, in many instances, successfully detecting and isolating up to two simultaneously occurring failures.

  6. Adaptive Fault-Tolerant Control of Uncertain Nonlinear Large-Scale Systems With Unknown Dead Zone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mou; Tao, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme is proposed and analyzed for a class of uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems with unknown dead zone and external disturbances. To tackle the unknown nonlinear interaction functions in the large-scale system, the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is employed to approximate them. To further handle the unknown approximation errors and the effects of the unknown dead zone and external disturbances, integrated as the compounded disturbances, the corresponding disturbance observers are developed for their estimations. Based on the outputs of the RBFNN and the disturbance observer, the adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme is designed for uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems by using a decentralized backstepping technique. The closed-loop stability of the adaptive control system is rigorously proved via Lyapunov analysis and the satisfactory tracking performance is achieved under the integrated effects of unknown dead zone, actuator fault, and unknown external disturbances. Simulation results of a mass-spring-damper system are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme for uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems. PMID:26340792

  7. Geochemistry and fluid inclusions across a crustal strike-slip Mesozoic fault: insights of fluid-flow / rock interaction in the Atacama Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, R.; Mitchell, T. M.; Arancibia, G.; Jensen, E.; Rempe, M.; Cembrano, J. M.; Hoshino, K.; Faulkner, D.

    2012-12-01

    Faults architecture and their permeability related fractures play a first order role in fluid-flow migration throughout the upper crust. Commonly, the interaction between fluid-flow migration and host rock is reflected as mineral precipitation in a vein mesh and/or as mineralogical changes (alteration) of the host rock. Often, however, the relationship between a fault zone and the fluid-flow passing through it is poorly understood. In order to improve our understanding of this process we have chosen, as a case study, the Jorgillo Fault (JF), which lies within the Atacama Fault System, a trench-parallel large-scale structure developed within Mesozoic rocks of the present-day Coastal Cordillera in northern Chile. The JF is represented as a ca. 18 km long NNW-SSE, in its southern end, to NW-SE, in its northern part, west-ward concave-shape sinistral strike-slip fault showing a maximum left-lateral displacement of about 4 km and a subvertical dip. The fault cuts through crystalline rocks of gabbric, dioritic and granodioritic composition. The JF core is composed by a ca. 1 m wide cataclasite zone bounded by two fault gouge zones ca. 40 cm in average while its minimum damage zone extension, based in field observations, is ca. 2 m wide each side of the core zone. A fault perpendicular transect was mapped and sampled in order to run XRF and XRD analyses of the fault core, damage zone and undeformed protolith. XRF analyses of the rocks revealed that contents of Al and Ca decrease with increasing Si, while Na increases towards the fault core. Fujita et al. (2012) interpreted similar behavior in analysis of rocks belonging to the Coloso Fault, which is genetically and spatially related to the JF, as compositional changes of plagioclase to albite-rich ones due to chloritic-propilitic alteration processes. In the damage zone, L.O.I. data increase towards the fault core but decrease inside the core in its cataclastic zone. This behavior of L.O.I. data is explained by the

  8. Fault Diagnosis for the Heat Exchanger of the Aircraft Environmental Control System Based on the Strong Tracking Filter

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Lu, Chen; Liu, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    The aircraft environmental control system (ECS) is a critical aircraft system, which provides the appropriate environmental conditions to ensure the safe transport of air passengers and equipment. The functionality and reliability of ECS have received increasing attention in recent years. The heat exchanger is a particularly significant component of the ECS, because its failure decreases the system’s efficiency, which can lead to catastrophic consequences. Fault diagnosis of the heat exchanger is necessary to prevent risks. However, two problems hinder the implementation of the heat exchanger fault diagnosis in practice. First, the actual measured parameter of the heat exchanger cannot effectively reflect the fault occurrence, whereas the heat exchanger faults are usually depicted by utilizing the corresponding fault-related state parameters that cannot be measured directly. Second, both the traditional Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and the EKF-based Double Model Filter have certain disadvantages, such as sensitivity to modeling errors and difficulties in selection of initialization values. To solve the aforementioned problems, this paper presents a fault-related parameter adaptive estimation method based on strong tracking filter (STF) and Modified Bayes classification algorithm for fault detection and failure mode classification of the heat exchanger, respectively. Heat exchanger fault simulation is conducted to generate fault data, through which the proposed methods are validated. The results demonstrate that the proposed methods are capable of providing accurate, stable, and rapid fault diagnosis of the heat exchanger. PMID:25823010

  9. High Resolution Analysis of the Pollino Mts. Seisimc Sequence (south Italy): Unraveling the Fault System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, Cristina; Seeber, Leonardo; Waldhauser, Felix; Steckler, Michael; Gervasi, Anna; Guerra, Ignazio; Orecchio, Barbara; Presti, Debora

    2014-05-01

    The Pollino Mts. region is located in a junction area between the Calabrian Arc and the southern Apennines domains (south Italy) and has been proposed, according to paleoseismological evidences, as a seismic gap capable to generate earthquakes of magnitude 6.5-7. In this area a seismic crisis of thousands of small to moderate earthquakes, with maximum magnitude Ml 5.0, has been occurring since Spring 2010 (Totaro & al., SRL 2013). We investigate the space-time evolution of the seismic activity in order to unravel the fault system architecture and its mechanical behaviour. We first obtained hi-precision hypocenter locations by applying the double-difference method and then refined them by relative timing by cross-correlation of seismograms (Waldhauser & Ellsworth, BSSA 2000; Schaff & al., BSSA 2004; Waldhauser & Schaff, JGR 2008). We also computed focal mechanisms by applying the waveform inversion "Cut And Paste" method (Zhao & Helmberger, BSSA 1994; Zhu & Helmberger, BSSA 1996). The combined use of high-resolution seismic catalogue, information on clusters of similar earthquakes and high quality focal mechanisms plus comparison with surface geology allow us to highlight important aspects of the mechanical behaviour of major and minor faults in the Pollino area. Seismicity defines multiple clusters, but the one furthest west is by far the most intense and is the main subject of our interpretation so far. The 3D pattern of hypocenters and focal mechanisms are consistent and image a NNW-striking and west-dipping fault zone between 5 and 10 km deep and 10 km along strike, with predominantly normal motion. This fault kinematics fits the overall pattern of active faults in the Mercure Basin and western Pollino area, although the strike of this currently seismogenic fault is more northerly than most faults highlighted in the area (Ghisetti & Vezzani, 1983; Brozzetti & al., Tectonophysics 2009). The cluster has a sharp floor at a depth of about 10 km and most of the

  10. Damage and the Gutenberg-Richter Law: from simple models to natural earthquake fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K. F.; Klein, W.; Rundle, J. B.; Dominguez, R.; Serino, C.

    2010-12-01

    Natural earthquake fault systems are highly nonhomogeneous in space, where these inhomogeneities occur because the earth is made of a variety of materials which hold and dissipate stress differently. One way that the inhomogeneous nature of fault systems manifests itself is in the spatial patterns which emerge in seismicity graphs (Tiampo et al., 2002, 2007). Despite their inhomogeneous nature, real faults are often modeled as spatially homogeneous systems. One argument for this approach is that earthquake faults experience long range stress transfer, and if this range is longer than the length scales associated with the inhomogeneities of the system, the dynamics of the system may be unaffected by their presence. However, it is not clear that this is the case. In this work we study the scaling of an earthquake model that is a variation of the Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model, in order to explore the effect of spatial inhomogeneities on earthquake-like systems when interaction ranges are long, but not necessarily longer than the distances associated with those inhomogeneities (Rundle and Jackson, 1977; Olami et al., 1988). For long ranges and without inhomogeneities, such models have been found to produce scaling similar to GR scaling found in real earthquake systems (Rundle and Klein, 1993). In the earthquake models discussed here, damage is distributed inhomogeneously throughout and the interaction ranges, while long, are not longer than all of the damage length scales. We find that the scaling depends not only on the amount of damage, but also on the spatial distribution of that damage. In addition, we study the behaviour of particular natural earthquake faults and the spatial and temporal variation of GR scaling in those systems, in order to compare them with various damage cases from the simulations.

  11. Fault Diagnosis System of Wind Turbine Generator Based on Petri Net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han

    Petri net is an important tool for discrete event dynamic systems modeling and analysis. And it has great ability to handle concurrent phenomena and non-deterministic phenomena. Currently Petri nets used in wind turbine fault diagnosis have not participated in the actual system. This article will combine the existing fuzzy Petri net algorithms; build wind turbine control system simulation based on Siemens S7-1200 PLC, while making matlab gui interface for migration of the system to different platforms.

  12. Sliding Mode Approaches for Robust Control, State Estimation, Secure Communication, and Fault Diagnosis in Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablay, Gunyaz

    Using traditional control methods for controller design, parameter estimation and fault diagnosis may lead to poor results with nuclear systems in practice because of approximations and uncertainties in the system models used, possibly resulting in unexpected plant unavailability. This experience has led to an interest in development of robust control, estimation and fault diagnosis methods. One particularly robust approach is the sliding mode control methodology. Sliding mode approaches have been of great interest and importance in industry and engineering in the recent decades due to their potential for producing economic, safe and reliable designs. In order to utilize these advantages, sliding mode approaches are implemented for robust control, state estimation, secure communication and fault diagnosis in nuclear plant systems. In addition, a sliding mode output observer is developed for fault diagnosis in dynamical systems. To validate the effectiveness of the methodologies, several nuclear plant system models are considered for applications, including point reactor kinetics, xenon concentration dynamics, an uncertain pressurizer model, a U-tube steam generator model and a coupled nonlinear nuclear reactor model.

  13. Fault Diagnosis in Discrete-Event Systems with Incomplete Models: Learnability and Diagnosability.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond H; Yonge-Mallo, David L

    2015-07-01

    Most model-based approaches to fault diagnosis of discrete-event systems require a complete and accurate model of the system to be diagnosed. However, the discrete-event model may have arisen from abstraction and simplification of a continuous time system, or through model building from input-output data. As such, it may not capture the dynamic behavior of the system completely. In a previous paper, we addressed the problem of diagnosing faults given an incomplete model of the discrete-event system. We presented the learning diagnoser which not only diagnoses faults, but also attempts to learn missing model information through parsimonious hypothesis generation. In this paper, we study the properties of learnability and diagnosability. Learnability deals with the issue of whether the missing model information can be learned, while diagnosability corresponds to the ability to detect and isolate a fault after it has occurred. We provide conditions under which the learning diagnoser can learn missing model information. We define the notions of weak and strong diagnosability and also give conditions under which they hold. PMID:25204002

  14. Synthetic earthquake catalogs simulating seismic activity in the Corynth Gulf, Greece, fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Console, R.; Carluccio, R.; Papadimitriou, E. E.; Karakostas, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    The characteristic earthquake hypothesis is the basis of time-dependent modeling of earthquake recurrence on major faults, using the renewal process methodology. However, the characteristic earthquake hypothesis is not strongly supported by observational data. Few fault segments have long historical or paleoseismic records of individually dated ruptures, and when data and parameter uncertainties are allowed for, the form of the recurrence-distribution is difficult to establish. This is the case, for instance, of the Corinth gulf fault system, for which documents about strong earthquakes exist for at least two thousand years, but they can be considered complete for magnitudes > 6.0 only for the latest 300 years, during which only few characteristic earthquakes are reported for single fault segments. The use of a physics-based earthquake simulator has allowed the production o