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Sample records for nano-scale intermembrane contact

  1. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y M; Zeng, J F; Wang, S; Sun, B A; Wang, Q; Lu, J; Gravier, S; Bladin, J J; Wang, W H; Pan, M X; Liu, C T; Yang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3-0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs. PMID:27383387

  2. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs. PMID:27383387

  3. Structural Signature of Plasticity Unveiled by Nano-Scale Viscoelastic Contact in a Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. M.; Zeng, J. F.; Wang, S.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, Q.; Lu, J.; Gravier, S.; Bladin, J. J.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Room-temperature plasticity in metallic glasses (MGs) is commonly associated with local structural heterogeneity; however, direct observation of the subtle structural change caused by plasticity is vitally important but the data are extremely scarce. Based on dynamic atomic force microscopy (DAFM), here we show that plasticity-induced structural evolution in a Zr-Ni MG can be revealed via nano-scale viscoelastic contacts between an AFM tip and plastically deformed MG surface layers. Our experimental results clearly show a spatial amplification of the nano-scale structural heterogeneity caused by the distributed plastic flow, which can be linked to the limited growth, reorientation and agglomeration of some nano-scale energy-absorbing regions, which are reminiscent of the behavior of the defect-like regions with non-affine deformation as conceived in many theories and models. Furthermore, we are able to experimentally extract the thermodynamic properties of these nano-scale regions, which possess an energy barrier of 0.3–0.5 eV, about half of that for a typical shear transformation event that usually occurs at the onset of plasticity. The outcome of our current work sheds quantitative insights into the correlation between plasticity and structural heterogeneity in MGs.

  4. Nano-scale sliding contact deformation behaviour of enamel under wet and dry conditions.

    PubMed

    Guidoni, Griselda; Swain, Michael; Jäger, Ingomar

    2010-04-01

    The abrasion response of cross sectional areas of enamel was studied by sliding a rounded diamond conical nano-indenter tip across the surface. The nano-indenter tip (radius approximately 1,200 nm) was scanned over a specific squared area with a load of 400 microN. Two different environments were chosen: Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) and atmospheric laboratory condition. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) were used to characterize the final abraded areas. In addition, single scratches with linear incremented load were performed. The normal load and displacement data were utilized in a complementary manner to support the proposed deformation mechanisms. Greater orientation dependence for the case of the single scratches in relation to the abrasion tests was found. The latter results are discussed in terms of plastic deformation effects. The abrasion mechanisms were found to be the same for both wet and dry measurements and similar to that described in a previous study (Guidoni et al., Wear 266:60-68, 2009; Guidoni, Nano-scale mechanical and tribological properties of mineralized tissues. PhD. Montan University Leoben, Leoben, Austria, 2008). However, scratch deformation under fluid measurements shows greater recovery effects and abrasion resistance. PMID:20145979

  5. Evolution and structural organization of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex and the mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging (MIB) complex.

    PubMed

    Huynen, Martijn A; Mühlmeister, Mareike; Gotthardt, Katherina; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Brandt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the distribution of mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex proteins and mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging complex (MIB) proteins over (sub)complexes and over species. The MICOS proteins are associated with the formation and maintenance of mitochondrial cristae. Indeed, the presence of MICOS genes in genomes correlates well with the presence of cristae: all cristae containing species have at least one MICOS gene and cristae-less species have none. Mic10 is the most widespread MICOS gene, while Mic60 appears be the oldest one, as it originates in the ancestors of mitochondria, the proteobacteria. In proteobacteria the gene occurs in clusters with genes involved in heme synthesis while the protein has been observed in intracellular membranes of the alphaproteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In contrast, Mic23 and Mic27 appear to be the youngest MICOS proteins, as they only occur in opisthokonts. The remaining MICOS proteins, Mic10, Mic19, Mic25 and Mic12, the latter we show to be orthologous to human C19orf70/QIL1, trace back to the root of the eukaryotes. Of the remaining MIB proteins, also DNAJC11 shows a high correlation with the presence of cristae. In mitochondrial protein complexome profiles, the MIB complex occurs as a defined complex and as separate subcomplexes, potentially reflecting various assembly stages. We find three main forms of the complex: A) The MICOS complex, containing all the MICOS proteins, B) a membrane bridging subcomplex, containing in addition SAMM50, MTX2 and the previously uncharacterized MTX3, and C) the complete MIB complex containing in addition DNAJC11 and MTX1. PMID:26477565

  6. Opto-Electronic Characterization CdTe Solar Cells from TCO to Back Contact with Nano-Scale CL Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, John; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Paudel, Naba; Mahabaduge, Hasitha; Kuciauskas, Darius; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Duenow, Joel; Yan, Yanfa; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    2015-06-14

    We used cathodoluminescence (CL) (spectrum-per-pixel) imaging on beveled CdTe solar cell sections to investigate the opto-electronic properties of these devices from the TCO to the back contact. We used a nano-scale CL probe to resolve luminescence from grain boundary (GB) and grain interior (GI) locations near the CdS/CdTe interface where the grains are very small. As-deposited, CdCl2-treated, Cu-treated, and (CdCl2+Cu)-treated cells were analyzed. Color-coded CL spectrum imaging maps on bevels illustrate the distribution of the T=6 K luminescence transitions through the depth of devices with unprecedented spatial resolution. The CL at the GBs and GIs is shown to vary significantly from the front to the back of devices and is a sensitive function of processing. Supporting D-SIMS depth profile, TRPL lifetime, and C-V measurements are used to link the CL data to the J-V performance of devices.

  7. Development of single shot soft x-ray contact microscopy system for nano-scale dynamics measurement of living biological specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Maki; Kado, Masataka; Ishino, Masahiko; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Shinohara, Kunio

    2012-07-01

    We have been developing a picosecond single shot soft x-ray contact microscopy system for observing the nanometer-scale inner structure of the living biological specimen in a hydrated condition. The microscopy system consists of an intense IR pump laser system for generating laser-induced plasma as a soft x-ray source and x-ray microscope chamber. The pump laser system employs OPCPA (Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification) technique to obtain a high contrast pump laser pulse, and we can generate water-window x-rays effectively by combining it to an ultra-thin metal target. The x-ray microscope chamber is composed of a vacuum chamber, a focusing lens, a metal film target, an in-vacuum type sample holder. The pump laser pulse is focused on the metal film target with a focusing lens. The soft x-rays from the laser-induced plasma illuminates bio-specimens on the PMMA photo resist set in the in-vacuum sample holder. The photo resist is developed and the x-ray transmission image recorded on the photo resist is read out by AFM. We took x-ray images of hydrated Leydig cells from mouse testicle and demonstrated that the developed x-ray microscopy system has a spatial resolution of about 100 nm.

  8. Computer simuations for the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štich, I.

    2007-02-01

    A review of methods for computations for the nano-scale is presented. The paper should provide a convenient starting point into computations for the nano-scale as well as a more in depth presentation for those already working in the field of atomic/molecular-scale modeling. The argument is divided in chapters covering the methods for description of the (i) electrons, (ii) ions, and (iii) techniques for efficient solving of the underlying equations. A fairly broad view is taken covering the Hartree-Fock approximation, density functional techniques and quantum Monte-Carlo techniques for electrons. The customary quantum chemistry methods, such as post Hartree-Fock techniques, are only briefly mentioned. Description of both classical and quantum ions is presented. The techniques cover Ehrenfest, Born-Oppenheimer, and Car-Parrinello dynamics. The strong and weak points of both principal and technical nature are analyzed. In the second part we introduce a number of applications to demonstrate the different approximations and techniques introduced in the first part. They cover a wide range of applications such as non-simple liquids, surfaces, molecule-surface interactions, applications in nanotechnology, etc. These more in depth presentations, while certainly not exhaustive, should provide information on technical aspects of the simulations, typical parameters used, and ways of analysis of the huge amounts of data generated in these large-scale supercomputer simulations.

  9. Nano-scale Cu 6Sn 5 anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenstine, J.; Campos, S.; Foster, D.; Read, J.; Behl, W. K.

    Nano-scale (<100 nm) Cu 5Sn 6 powders were prepared by a chemical method that used a NaBH 4 solution to reduce the metal ions. A significant improvement in capacity retention was obtained in the nano-scale Cu 6Sn 5 alloy, compared to the alloy having micron-sized particles. The volumetric capacity of the nano-scale Cu 6Sn 5 alloy at 100 cycles was almost twice the theoretical capacity of graphite.

  10. Doubled power density from salinity gradients at reduced intermembrane distance.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, David A; Saakes, Michel; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    2011-08-15

    The mixing of sea and river water can be used as a renewable energy source. The Gibbs free energy that is released when salt and fresh water mix can be captured in a process called reverse electrodialysis (RED). This research investigates the effect of the intermembrane distance and the feedwater flow rate in RED as a route to double the power density output. Intermembrane distances of 60, 100, 200, and 485 μm were experimentally investigated, using spacers to impose the intermembrane distance. The generated (gross) power densities (i.e., generated power per membrane area) are larger for smaller intermembrane distances. A maximum value of 2.2 W/m(2) is achieved, which is almost double the maximum power density reported in previous work. In addition, the energy efficiency is significantly higher for smaller intermembrane distances. New improvements need to focus on reducing the pressure drop required to pump the feedwater through the RED-device using a spacerless design. In that case power outputs of more than 4 W per m(2) of membrane area at small intermembrane distances are envisaged. PMID:21736348

  11. Redox regulation of protein folding in the mitochondrial intermembrane space

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Carla M.; Tienson, Heather L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein translocation pathways to the mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane have been well characterized. However, translocation into the intermembrane space, which was thought to be simply a modification of the traditional translocation pathways, is complex. The mechanism by which a subset of intermembrane space proteins, those with disulfide bonds, are translocated has been largely unknown until recently. Specifically, the intermembrane space proteins with disulfide bonds are imported via the mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly (MIA) pathway. Substrates are imported via a disulfide exchange relay with two components Mia40 and Erv1. This new breakthrough has resulted in novel concepts for assembly of proteins in the intermembrane space, suggesting that this compartment may be similar to that of the endoplasmic reticulum and the prokaryotic periplasm. As a better understanding of this pathway emerges, new paradigms for thiol-disulfide exchange mechanisms may be developed. Given that the intermembrane space is important for disease processes including apoptosis and neurodegeneration, new roles in regulation by oxidation–reduction chemistry seem likely to be relevant. PMID:18761382

  12. Magnetic resonances in nano-scale metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhao; Liddle, Alex; Martin, Michael

    2006-03-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and optically measured several different kinds of nano-scale metamaterials. We make use e-beam nano-lithography technology at LBNL's Center for X-Ray Optics for fabricating these structures on extremely thin SiN substrates so that they are close to free-standing. Optical properties were measured as a function of incidence angle and polarization. We directly observe a strong magnetic resonance consistent with a negative magnetic permeability in our samples at mid- and near-IR optical frequencies. We will discuss the results in comparison with detailed simulations, and will discuss the electric dipole or quadrupole resonances observed in the samples. Finally, we will report on our progress towards constructing a fully negative index of refraction meta-material.

  13. Interaction of the Intermembrane Space Domain of Tim23 Protein with Mitochondrial Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Munari, Francesca; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tim23 mediates protein translocation into mitochondria. Although inserted into the inner membrane, the dynamic association of its intermembrane space (IMS) domain with the outer membrane promotes protein import. However, little is known about the molecular basis of this interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the IMS domain of Tim23 tightly associates with both inner and outer mitochondrial membrane-like membranes through a hydrophobic anchor at its N terminus. The structure of membrane-bound Tim23IMS is highly dynamic, allowing recognition of both the incoming presequence and other translocase components at the translocation contact. Cardiolipin enhances Tim23 membrane attachment, suggesting that cardiolipin can influence preprotein import. PMID:25349212

  14. Method of producing nano-scaled inorganic platelets

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites.

  15. Electrochemical method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Joan; Jang, Bor Z.

    2013-09-03

    A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets with an average thickness smaller than 30 nm from a layered graphite material. The method comprises (a) forming a carboxylic acid-intercalated graphite compound by an electrochemical reaction; (b) exposing the intercalated graphite compound to a thermal shock to produce exfoliated graphite; and (c) subjecting the exfoliated graphite to a mechanical shearing treatment to produce the nano-scaled graphene platelets. Preferred carboxylic acids are formic acid and acetic acid. The exfoliation step in the instant invention does not involve the evolution of undesirable species, such as NO.sub.x and SO.sub.x, which are common by-products of exfoliating conventional sulfuric or nitric acid-intercalated graphite compounds. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  16. La3+-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine liposomes. Close approach, intermembrane intermediates, and the electrostatic surface potential.

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, J; Alford, D; Cohen, J; Düzgüneş, N

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of large unilamellar phosphatidylserine liposomes (PS LUV) induced by La3+ has been monitored using the 1-aminoapthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid/p-xylenebis(pyridinium bromide) (ANTS/DPX) fluorescence assay for the mixing of aqueous contents. The fusion event is extensive and nonleaky, with up to 95% mixing of contents in the fused liposomes. However, addition of excess EDTA leads to disruption of the fusion products in a way that implies the existence of metastable intermembrane contact sites. The maximal fusion activity occurs between 10 and 100 microM La3+ and fusion can be terminated rapidly, without loss of contents, by the addition of excess La3+, e.g., 1 mM La3+ at pH 7.4. This observation is explained by the very large intrinsic binding constant (approximately 10(5) M-1) of La3+ to the PS headgroup, as measured by microelectrophoresis. Addition of 1 mM La3+ causes charge reversal of the membrane and a large positive surface potential. La3+ binding to PS causes the release of a proton. These data can be explained if La3+ can chelate to PS at two sites, with one of the sites being the primary amino group. This binding model successfully predicts that at pH 4.5 fusion occurs up to 2 mM La3+, due to reduced La3+ binding at low pH. We conclude that the general mechanism of membrane fusion includes three kinetic steps. In addition to (a) aggregation, there is (b) the close approach of the surfaces, or thinning of the hydration layer, and (c) the formation of intermembrane intermediates which determine the extent to which membrane destabilization leads to fusion (mixing of aqueous contents), as opposed to lysis. The lifetime of these intermembrane intermediates appears to depend upon La3+ binding to both PS sites. PMID:3382713

  17. Failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar Das, Pradip; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Chanda, Dipak Kr; Dalui, Srikanta; Acharya, Saikat; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report two qualitative models on failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay (AACL), a material of extraordinary importance as a low cost building material. The models were based on experimental data of compressive failure and nanoindentation response of the AACL materials. A 420% improvement in compressive strength (σ c) of the AACL was achieved after 28 days (d) of curing at room temperature and it correlated well with the decrements in the residual alkali and pH concentrations with the increase in curing time. Based on extensive post-mortem FE-SEM examinations, a schematic model for the compressive failure mechanism of AACL was proposed. In addition, the nanoindentation results of AACL provided the first ever experimental evidence of the presence of nano-scale plasticity and a nano-scale contact deformation resistance that increased with the applied load. These results meant the development of a unique strain tolerant microstructure in the AACL of Indian origin. The implications of these new observations were discussed in terms of a qualitative model based on the deformation of layered clay structure.

  18. Retro-translocation of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bragoszewski, Piotr; Wasilewski, Michal; Sakowska, Paulina; Gornicka, Agnieszka; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; Wiedemann, Nils; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The content of mitochondrial proteome is maintained through two highly dynamic processes, the influx of newly synthesized proteins from the cytosol and the protein degradation. Mitochondrial proteins are targeted to the intermembrane space by the mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly pathway that couples their import and oxidative folding. The folding trap was proposed to be a driving mechanism for the mitochondrial accumulation of these proteins. Whether the reverse movement of unfolded proteins to the cytosol occurs across the intact outer membrane is unknown. We found that reduced, conformationally destabilized proteins are released from mitochondria in a size-limited manner. We identified the general import pore protein Tom40 as an escape gate. We propose that the mitochondrial proteome is not only regulated by the import and degradation of proteins but also by their retro-translocation to the external cytosolic location. Thus, protein release is a mechanism that contributes to the mitochondrial proteome surveillance. PMID:26056291

  19. Intermembrane Docking Reactions Are Regulated by Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Kunding, Andreas H.; Mortensen, Michael W.; Christensen, Sune M.; Bhatia, Vikram K.; Makarov, Ivan; Metzler, Ralf; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    The polymorphism of eukaryotic cellular membranes is a tightly regulated and well-conserved phenotype. Recent data have revealed important regulatory roles of membrane curvature on the spatio-temporal localization of proteins and in membrane fusion. Here we quantified the influence of membrane curvature on the efficiency of intermembrane docking reactions. Using fluorescence microscopy, we monitored the docking of single vesicle–vesicle pairs of different diameter (30–200 nm) and therefore curvature, as mediated by neuronal soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and streptavidin-biotin. Surprisingly, the intermembrane docking efficiency exhibited an ∼30–60 fold enhancement as a function of curvature. In comparison, synaptotagmin and calcium accelerate SNARE-mediated fusion in vitro by a factor of 2–10. To explain this finding, we formulated a biophysical model. On the basis of our findings, we propose that membrane curvature can regulate intermembrane tethering reactions and consequently any downstream process, including the fusion of vesicles and possibly viruses with their target membranes. PMID:22261058

  20. Plasmonic Nanostructures for Nano-Scale Bio-Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Taerin; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Song, Eui Young; Chun, Honggu; Lee, Byoungho

    2011-01-01

    The optical properties of various nanostructures have been widely adopted for biological detection, from DNA sequencing to nano-scale single molecule biological function measurements. In particular, by employing localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), we can expect distinguished sensing performance with high sensitivity and resolution. This indicates that nano-scale detections can be realized by using the shift of resonance wavelength of LSPR in response to the refractive index change. In this paper, we overview various plasmonic nanostructures as potential sensing components. The qualitative descriptions of plasmonic nanostructures are supported by the physical phenomena such as plasmonic hybridization and Fano resonance. We present guidelines for designing specific nanostructures with regard to wavelength range and target sensing materials. PMID:22346679

  1. "Nano" Scale Biosignatures and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Robert, F.; Meibom, A.; Mostefaoui, S.; Selo, M.; Walter, M. R.; Sugitani, K.; Allwood, A.; Mimura, K.; Gibson, E. K.

    2008-01-01

    A critical step in the search for remnants of potential life forms on other planets lies in our ability to recognize indigenous fragments of ancient microbes preserved in some of Earth's oldest rocks. To this end, we are building a database of nano-scale chemical and morphological characteristics of some of Earth's oldest organic microfossils. We are primarily using the new technology of Nano-Secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) which provides in-situ, nano-scale elemental analysis of trace quantities of organic residues. The initial step was to characterize element composition of well-preserved, organic microfossils from the late Proterozoic (0.8 Ga) Bitter Springs Formation of Australia. Results from that work provide morphologic detail and nitrogen/carbon ratios that appear to reflect the well-established biological origin of these 0.8 Ga fossils.

  2. Fracture strength of micro- and nano-scale silicon components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelRio, Frank W.; Cook, Robert F.; Boyce, Brad L.

    2015-06-01

    Silicon devices are ubiquitous in many micro- and nano-scale technological applications, most notably microelectronics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Despite their widespread usage, however, issues related to uncertain mechanical reliability remain a major factor inhibiting the further advancement of device commercialization. In particular, reliability issues related to the fracture of MEMS components have become increasingly important given continued reductions in critical feature sizes coupled with recent escalations in both MEMS device actuation forces and harsh usage conditions. In this review, the fracture strength of micro- and nano-scale silicon components in the context of MEMS is considered. An overview of the crystal structure and elastic and fracture properties of both single-crystal silicon (SCS) and polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) is presented. Experimental methods for the deposition of SCS and polysilicon films, fabrication of fracture-strength test components, and analysis of strength data are also summarized. SCS and polysilicon fracture strength results as a function of processing conditions, component size and geometry, and test temperature, environment, and loading rate are then surveyed and analyzed to form overarching processing-structure-property-performance relationships. Future studies are suggested to advance our current view of these relationships and their impacts on the manufacturing yield, device performance, and operational reliability of micro- and nano-scale silicon devices.

  3. Nano-scale surface modification of a segmented polyurethane with a phospholipid polymer.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Akihiko; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2004-10-01

    Nano-scale modification of a segmented polyurethane (SPU) with cross-linked 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer was performed to obtain a biocompatible elastomer. To control the domain size and the depth of the modified layer, various compositions of monomers, including MPC, 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate (EHMA), and glycerol 1,3-diglycerolate diacrylate, were examined. SPU film was immersed in the monomer solution and visible light irradiation was applied to initiate polymerization to the SPU film that was held by mica to condense MPC units at the surface. The surfaces of the obtained film were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle measurement. The surface density of MPC units changed with the monomer concentration, and the density was the highest when the ratio between MPC and EHMA was 7:3. In modified SPU films, 6- to 25-nm MPC unit-enriched domains were observed and the density of these domains gradually decreased with depth. The sizes of the domains depended on the MPC composition in the monomer solution. The mechanical properties of the modified films as evaluated by tensile strength measurement under wet conditions were not significantly different from those of SPU. With increase in the existence of MPC unit-enriched domains on the MEG film surface, platelet adhesion and activation were remarkably reduced compared to the SPU film. This nano-scale surface modification may be a useful technique for applying elastic polymer biomaterials. PMID:15130720

  4. Nuclear Reactions in Micro/Nano-Scale Metal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. E.

    2013-03-01

    Low-energy nuclear reactions in micro/nano-scale metal particles are described based on the theory of Bose-Einstein condensation nuclear fusion (BECNF). The BECNF theory is based on a single basic assumption capable of explaining the observed LENR phenomena; deuterons in metals undergo Bose-Einstein condensation. The BECNF theory is also a quantitative predictive physical theory. Experimental tests of the basic assumption and theoretical predictions are proposed. Potential application to energy generation by ignition at low temperatures is described. Generalized theory of BECNF is used to carry out theoretical analyses of recently reported experimental results for hydrogen-nickel system.

  5. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Hattori, Mitsuru; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2012-01-01

    Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs), biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents. PMID:23235326

  6. Design Optimization of Radionuclide Nano-Scale Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, D.W.; Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.; Smith, B.

    2004-10-06

    Radioisotopes have been used for power sources in heart pacemakers and space applications dating back to the 50's. Two key properties of radioisotope power sources are high energy density and long half-life compared to chemical batteries. The tritium battery used in heart pacemakers exceeds 500 mW-hr, and is being evaluated by the University of Florida for feasibility as a MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) power source. Conversion of radioisotope sources into electrical power within the constraints of nano-scale dimensions requires cutting-edge technologies and novel approaches. Some advances evolving in the III-V and II-IV semiconductor families have led to a broader consideration of radioisotopes rather free of radiation damage limitations. Their properties can lead to novel battery configurations designed to convert externally located emissions from a highly radioactive environment. This paper presents results for the analytical computational assisted design and modeling of semiconductor prototype nano-scale radioisotope nuclear batteries from MCNP and EGS programs. The analysis evaluated proposed designs and was used to guide the selection of appropriate geometries, material properties, and specific activities to attain power requirements for the MEMS batteries. Plans utilizing high specific activity radioisotopes were assessed in the investigation of designs employing multiple conversion cells and graded junctions with varying band gap properties. Voltage increases sought by serial combination of VOC s are proposed to overcome some of the limitations of a low power density. The power density is directly dependent on the total active areas.

  7. Prepare dispersed CIS nano-scale particles and spray coating CIS absorber layers using nano-scale precursors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Mo-electrode thin films were deposited by a two-stepped process, and the high-purity copper indium selenide-based powder (CuInSe2, CIS) was fabricated by hydrothermal process by Nanowin Technology Co. Ltd. From the X-ray pattern of the CIS precursor, the mainly crystalline phase was CIS, and the almost undetectable CuSe phase was observed. Because the CIS powder was aggregated into micro-scale particles and the average particle sizes were approximately 3 to 8 μm, the CIS power was ground into nano-scale particles, then the 6 wt.% CIS particles were dispersed into isopropyl alcohol to get the solution for spray coating method. Then, 0.1 ml CIS solution was sprayed on the 20 mm × 10 mm Mo/glass substrates, and the heat treatment for the nano-scale CIS solution under various parameters was carried out in a selenization furnace. The annealing temperature was set at 550°C, and the annealing time was changed from 5 to 30 min, without extra Se content was added in the furnace. The influences of annealing time on the densification, crystallization, resistivity (ρ), hall mobility (μ), and carrier concentration of the CIS absorber layers were well investigated in this study. PMID:24380376

  8. Analysis of nano-scale films and particles.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2003-12-01

    This one-year feasibility study was aimed at developing finite element modeling capabilities for simulating nano-scale tests. This work focused on methods to model: (1) the adhesion of a particle to a substrate, and (2) the delamination of a thin film from a substrate. Adhesion was modeled as a normal attractive force that depends on the distance between opposing material surfaces while delamination simulations used a cohesive zone model. Both of these surface interaction models had been implemented in a beta version of the three-dimensional, transient dynamics, PRESTO finite element code, and the present study verified that implementation. Numerous illustrative calculations have been performed using these models, and when possible comparisons were made with existing solutions. These capabilities are now available in PRESTO version 1.07.

  9. Controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2013-09-01

    Interest in nano-scale manufacturing research and development is growing. The reason is to accelerate the translation of discoveries and inventions of nanoscience and nanotechnology into products that would benefit industry, economy and society. Ongoing research in nanomanufacturing is focused primarily on developing novel nanofabrication techniques for a variety of applications—materials, energy, electronics, photonics, biomedical, etc. Our goal is to foster the development of high-throughput methods of fabricating nano-enabled products. Large-area parallel processing and highspeed continuous processing are high-throughput means for mass production. An example of large-area processing is step-and-repeat nanoimprinting, by which nanostructures are reproduced again and again over a large area, such as a 12 in wafer. Roll-to-roll processing is an example of continuous processing, by which it is possible to print and imprint multi-level nanostructures and nanodevices on a moving flexible substrate. The big pay-off is high-volume production and low unit cost. However, the anticipated cost benefits can only be realized if the increased production rate is accompanied by high yields of high quality products. To ensure product quality, we need to design and construct manufacturing systems such that the processes can be closely monitored and controlled. One approach is to bring cyber-physical systems (CPS) concepts to nanomanufacturing. CPS involves the control of a physical system such as manufacturing through modeling, computation, communication and control. Such a closely coupled system will involve in-situ metrology and closed-loop control of the physical processes guided by physics-based models and driven by appropriate instrumentation, sensing and actuation. This paper will discuss these ideas in the context of controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale.

  10. Import of small Tim proteins into the mitochondrial intermembrane space

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Thomas; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2003-01-01

    Proteins of the intermembrane space (IMS) of mitochondria are typically synthesized without presequences. Little is known about their topogenesis. We used Tim13, a member of the ‘small Tim protein’ family, as model protein to investigate the mechanism of translocation into the IMS. Tim13 contains four conserved cysteine residues that bind a zinc ion as cofactor. Import of Tim13 did not depend on the membrane potential or ATP hydrolysis. Upon import into mitochondria Tim13 adopted a stably folded conformation in the IMS. Mutagenesis of the cysteine residues or pretreatment with metal chelators interfered with folding of Tim13 in vitro and impaired its import into mitochondria. Upon depletion of metal ions or modification of cysteine residues, imported Tim13 diffused back out of the IMS. We propose an import pathway in which (1) Tim13 can pass through the TOM complex into and out of the IMS in an unfolded conformation, and (2) cofactor acquisition stabilizes folding on the trans side of the outer membrane and traps Tim13 in the IMS, and drives unidirectional movement of the protein across the outer membrane of mitochondria. PMID:12941692

  11. Ratiometric Tension Probes for Mapping Receptor Forces and Clustering at Intermembrane Junctions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Victor Pui-Yan; Liu, Yang; Blanchfield, Lori; Su, Hanquan; Evavold, Brian D; Salaita, Khalid

    2016-07-13

    Short-range communication between cells is required for the survival of multicellular organisms. One mechanism of chemical signaling between adjacent cells employs surface displayed ligands and receptors that only bind when two cells make physical contact. Ligand-receptor complexes that form at the cell-cell junction and physically bridge two cells likely experience mechanical forces. A fundamental challenge in this area pertains to mapping the mechanical forces experienced by ligand-receptor complexes within such a fluid intermembrane junction. Herein, we describe the development of ratiometric tension probes for direct imaging of receptor tension, clustering, and lateral transport within a model cell-cell junction. These probes employ two fluorescent reporters that quantify both the ligand density and the ligand tension and thus generate a tension signal independent of clustering. As a proof-of-concept, we applied the ratiometric tension probes to map the forces experienced by the T-cell receptor (TCR) during activation and showed the first direct evidence that the TCR-ligand complex experiences sustained pN forces within a fluid membrane junction. We envision that the ratiometric tension probes will be broadly useful for investigating mechanotransduction in juxtacrine signaling pathways. PMID:27192323

  12. Nano-scale effects in bulk nanostructured thermoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyala, Nikhil

    The technique of energy harvesting via thermoelectric (TE) materials is one of the favorable directions towards manifesting sustainable energy resources. The ability of TE materials to directly convert heat energy to electricity facilitates the reduction in consumption of natural resources for power generation. The requirements of high electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient while maintaining a low thermal conductivity for attaining higher TE performance introduced newer material processing techniques. Several efficient techniques for nano-scale structural modifications such as alloying, point defects, nanostructuring etc. were implemented for improvement in the figure-of-merit. Quantum confinement techniques based on nanostructuring of compounds gained prominence due to the resulting reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity. In this dissertation, various aspects of theoretical and experimental techniques pertaining to the nano-scale effects in TE materials were investigated. As a first step, in order to better understand the advantages and disadvantages of nanostructuring, TE characteristics of silicide based materials such as Mg2Si and Si1-xGex were theoretically modeled. A comprehensive comparison of effects of nanostructuring in both the materials was deduced. The fact that nanostructuring may not always be beneficial was highlighted through estimation of phonon mean free path in nanostructured compounds. In the second phase of this dissertation, a novel technique through mixing of a conductive glass-frit for improving the mechanical stability of Mg2Si was successfully developed. The studies were followed up by investigations on the benefits of combinatorial effects of nano-inclusions, nanostructuring and long duration annealing based on Bi2Te 3. In the final phase of this dissertation work, the technique of rapid decrystallization of single crystal silicon by high energy microwaves was introduced and the beneficial effects of rapid

  13. Nano-scale polar-nonpolar oxide heterostructures for photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongli; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yang, Jinlong; Zhao, Jin

    2016-03-01

    We proposed based on first principles density functional theory calculations that a nano-scale thin film based on a polar-nonpolar transition-metal oxide heterostructure can be used as a highly-efficient photocatalyst. This is demonstrated using a SrTiO3/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 sandwich-like heterostructure with photocatalytic activity in the near-infrared region. The effect of the polar nature of LaAlO3 is two-fold. First, the induced electrostatic field accelerates the photo-generated electrons and holes into opposite directions and minimizes their recombination rates. Hence, the reduction and oxidation reactions can be instigated at the SrTiO3 surfaces located on the opposite sides of the heterostructure. Second, the electric field reduces the band gap of the system making it photoactive in the infrared region. We also show that charge separation can be enhanced by using compressive strain engineering that creates ferroelectric instability in STO. The proposed setup is ideal for tandem oxide photocatalysts especially when combined with photoactive polar materials.We proposed based on first principles density functional theory calculations that a nano-scale thin film based on a polar-nonpolar transition-metal oxide heterostructure can be used as a highly-efficient photocatalyst. This is demonstrated using a SrTiO3/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 sandwich-like heterostructure with photocatalytic activity in the near-infrared region. The effect of the polar nature of LaAlO3 is two-fold. First, the induced electrostatic field accelerates the photo-generated electrons and holes into opposite directions and minimizes their recombination rates. Hence, the reduction and oxidation reactions can be instigated at the SrTiO3 surfaces located on the opposite sides of the heterostructure. Second, the electric field reduces the band gap of the system making it photoactive in the infrared region. We also show that charge separation can be enhanced by using compressive strain engineering that creates

  14. Electron transport in nano-scaled piezoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhengping; Kuroda, Marcelo A.; Tan, Yaohua; Newns, Dennis M.; Povolotskyi, Michael; Boykin, Timothy B.; Kubis, Tillmann; Klimeck, Gerhard; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2013-05-01

    The Piezoelectronic Transistor (PET) has been proposed as a post-CMOS device for fast, low-power switching. In this device, the piezoresistive channel is metalized via the expansion of a relaxor piezoelectric element to turn the device on. The mixed-valence compound SmSe is a good choice of PET channel material because of its isostructural pressure-induced continuous metal insulator transition, which is well characterized in bulk single crystals. Prediction and optimization of the performance of a realistic, nano-scaled PET based on SmSe requires the understanding of quantum confinement, tunneling, and the effect of metal interface. In this work, a computationally efficient empirical tight binding (ETB) model is developed for SmSe to study quantum transport in these systems and the scaling limit of PET channel lengths. Modulation of the SmSe band gap under pressure is successfully captured by ETB, and ballistic conductance shows orders of magnitude change under hydrostatic strain, supporting operability of the PET device at nanoscale.

  15. Nano-scale processes behind ion-beam cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Garcia, Gustavo; Mason, Nigel; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-04-01

    This topical issue collates a series of papers based on new data reported at the third Nano-IBCT Conference of the COST Action MP1002: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy, held in Boppard, Germany, from October 27th to October 31st, 2014. The Nano-IBCT COST Action was launched in December 2010 and brought together more than 300 experts from different disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology) with specialists in radiation damage of biological matter from hadron-therapy centres, and medical institutions. This meeting followed the first and the second conferences of the Action held in October 2011 in Caen, France and in May 2013 in Sopot, Poland respectively. This conference series provided a focus for the European research community and has highlighted the pioneering research into the fundamental processes underpinning ion beam cancer therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo Garcia and Eugene Surdutovich.

  16. Characterizing nano-scale electrocatalysis during partial oxidation of methane

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Kim, Dongha; Kim, Joosun; Moon, Jooho

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical analysis allows in situ characterization of solid oxide electrochemical cells (SOCs) under operating conditions. However, the SOCs that have been analyzed in this way have ill-defined or uncommon microstructures in terms of porosity and tortuosity. Therefore, the nano-scale characterization of SOCs with respect to three-phase boundaries has been hindered. We introduce novel in situ electrochemical analysis for SOCs that uses combined solid electrolyte potentiometry (SEP) and impedance measurements. This method is employed to investigate the oscillatory behavior of a porous Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode during the partial oxidation of methane under ambient pressure at 800°C. The cyclic oxidation and reduction of nickel induces the oscillatory behavior in the impedance and electrode potential. The in situ characterization of the nickel surface suggests that the oxidation of the nickel occurs predominantly at the two-phase boundaries, whereas the nickel at the three-phase boundaries remains in the metallic state during the cyclic redox reaction. PMID:24487242

  17. Molecular basis of the dynamic structure of the TIM23 complex in the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Jaremko, Łukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-10-01

    The presequence translocase TIM23 is a highly dynamic complex in which its subunits can adopt multiple conformations and undergo association-dissociation to facilitate import of proteins into mitochondria. Despite the importance of protein-protein interactions in TIM23, little is known about the molecular details of these processes. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we characterized the dynamic interaction network of the intermembrane space domains of Tim23, Tim21, Tim50, and Tom22 at single-residue level. We show that Tim23(IMS) contains multiple sites to efficiently interact with the intermembrane space domain of Tim21 and to bind to Tim21, Tim50, and Tom22. In addition, we reveal the atomic details of the dynamic Tim23(IMS)-Tim21(IMS) complex. The combined data support a central role of the intermembrane space domain of Tim23 in the formation and regulation of the presequence translocase. PMID:25263020

  18. Fracture and Failure in Micro- and Nano-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charitidis, Costas A.

    Indentation and scratch in micro- and nano-scale are the most commonly used techniques for quantifying thin film and systems properties. Among them are different failure modes such as deformation, friction, fracture toughness, fatigue. Failure modes can be activated either by a cycle of indentation or by scratching of the samples to provide an estimation of the fracture toughness and interfacial fracture energies. In the present study, we report on the failure and fracture modes in two cases of engineering materials; that is transparent SiOx thin films onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes and glass-ceramic materials. The SiOx/PET system meets the demands regarding scratch-resistance, wettability, biocompatibility, gas transmission, or friction, while maintaining the bulk characteristics of PET (such as easy processing, good mechanical properties, reasonably low permeability to oxygen and carbon dioxide gases (barrier properties), and good chemical coupling with antibacterial coatings). Glass-ceramic materials, since their first accidental production in the mid fifties by S.D. Stookey, have been used in a vast area of applications, from household cooktops and stoves, to missile nose cones and mirror mounts of orbital telescopes and from decorative wall coverings to medical applications. The fracture modes, namely transgranular and intergranular modes in glass-ceramic materials have paid less attention in literature comparing with ceramic materials. In the former case the crack paves its way irrespectively of the direction of the grain boundaries, i.e., the interfaces between the different phases. In the latter case the crack preferentially follows them, i.e., debonds the interfaces.

  19. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-11-02

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  20. A quasi-cyclic RNA nano-scale molecular object constructed using kink turns.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Lilley, David M J

    2016-08-18

    k-Turns are widespread RNA architectural elements that mediate tertiary interactions. We describe a double-kink-turn motif comprising two inverted k-turns that forms a tight horse-shoe structure that can assemble into a variety of shapes by coaxial association of helical ends. Using X-ray crystallography we show that these assemble with two (dumbell), three (triangle) and four units (square), with or without bound protein, within the crystal lattice. In addition, exchange of a single basepair can almost double the pore radius or shape of a molecular assembly. On the basis of this analysis we synthesized a 114 nt self-complementary RNA containing six k-turns. The crystal structure of this species shows that it forms a quasi-cyclic triangular object. These are randomly disposed about the three-fold axis in the crystal lattice, generating a circular RNA of quasi D3 symmetry with a shape reminiscent of that of a cyclohexane molecule in its chair conformation. This work demonstrates that the k-turn is a powerful building block in the construction of nano-scale molecular objects, and illustrates why k-turns are widely used in natural RNA molecules to organize long-range architecture and mediate tertiary contacts. PMID:27506301

  1. Simulation and Experimental Realization of a Nano-scale Thermal Cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen; Chen, Xudong; Thong, John T. L.

    Manipulation of heat flow at microstructures plays an important role in modern industry, especially for electronic and optoelectronic devices, for their performance and reliability are highly temperature dependent. Analogous to the invisible cloak in transformation optics, the thermal cloak can hide objects from heat and realize isothermal region in transformation thermodynamics. However, due to the macro-scale thermal properties may not be suitable for nano-materials, the realization of the nano-scale thermal cloak highly relies on the thermal transport in nanostructures. Here, we report our recent work of the realization of nano-scale thermal cloak based on the thermal property study of nano- materials via a spatially resolved thermal resistance measurement technique. The simulation and experiment verified its maintenance of isothermal region and heat protection capabilities. This work may provide a new way to manipulate heat transport in nano-scale devices.

  2. Validation of Bubble Dynamics Equation for a Nano-scale Bubble via Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, S.; Hyodo, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-12-01

    For a validation of the application of conventional bubble dynamics to a nano-scale bubble behaviour, we simulated a nano-scale bubble collapsing or vibration by Molecular Dynamics (MD) method and compared the result with the solution of Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation and that of Confined RP (CRP) equation, whose boundary condition was corrected to be consistent with that of MD simulation. As a result, a good coincidence was obtained between MD, RP, and CRP in the case of one-component fluid. In addition, also a good correspondence was obtained particularly in the comparison between MD and CRP in the case of two-component fluid containing non-condensable gas. The present results indicate that conventional bubble dynamics equation can be applied even to a nano-scale tiny bubble.

  3. Rational control of nano-scale metal-catalysts for biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunzhu; De, Sudipta; Yan, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Nano-scale metal particles have huge potential due to their wide range of diverse catalytic applications. Recently, they have found numerous applications in the field of biomass conversion. The proposed contribution is aimed at providing a brief account of remarkable recent findings and advances in the design of metal-based nanocatalysts for biomass valorization. We have discussed the rational control of the size, shape, composition and surface properties of nano-scale metal catalysts. Following that, the interplay between various structural parameters and the catalytic properties in the transformation of cellulose, chitin, lignin and lipids has been critically discussed. PMID:27022992

  4. Special Issue on the Second International Workshop on Micro- and Nano-Scale Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Liu, Linhua; Zhu, Qunzhi; Mengüç, M. Pinar

    2015-06-01

    Micro- and nano-scale thermal radiation has become one of the fastest growing research areas because of advances in nanotechnology and the development of novel materials. The related research and development includes near-field radiation transfer, spectral and directional selective emitters and receivers, plasmonics, metamaterials, and novel nano-scale fabrication techniques. With the advances in these areas, important applications in energy harvesting such as solar cells and thermophotovoltaics, nanomanufacturing, biomedical sensing, thermal imaging as well as data storage with the localized heating/cooling have been pushed to higher levels.

  5. Mitochondria use different mechanisms for transport of multispanning membrane proteins through the intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Ann E; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Truscott, Kaye N; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Rehling, Peter

    2003-11-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane contains numerous multispanning integral proteins. The precursors of these hydrophobic proteins are synthesized in the cytosol and therefore have to cross the mitochondrial outer membrane and intermembrane space to reach the inner membrane. While the import pathways of noncleavable multispanning proteins, such as the metabolite carriers, have been characterized in detail by the generation of translocation intermediates, little is known about the mechanism by which cleavable preproteins of multispanning proteins, such as Oxa1, are transferred from the outer membrane to the inner membrane. We have identified a translocation intermediate of the Oxa1 preprotein in the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and found that there are differences from the import mechanisms of carrier proteins. The intermembrane space domain of the receptor Tom22 supports the stabilization of the Oxa1 intermediate. Transfer of the Oxa1 preprotein to the inner membrane is not affected by inactivation of the soluble TIM complexes. Both the inner membrane potential and matrix heat shock protein 70 are essential to release the preprotein from the TOM complex, suggesting a close functional cooperation of the TOM complex and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane. We conclude that mitochondria employ different mechanisms for translocation of multispanning proteins across the aqueous intermembrane space. PMID:14560025

  6. Designing digital circuits with nano-scale devices: Challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belleville, Marc; Thomas, Olivier; Valentian, Alexandre; Clermidy, Fabien

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the challenges and opportunities when designing digital integrated circuits in nano-scale technologies. Major applications requirements and nano-technologies design limitations are introduced. Design solutions currently under development like adaptive techniques aiming to cope with variations and to track an optimal energy operating point are presented.

  7. Phototoxicity and Dosimetry of Nano-scale Titanium Dioxide in Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have been testing nanoscale TiO2 (primarily Evonik P25) in acute exposures to identify and quantify its phototoxicity under solar simulated radiation (SSR), and to develop dose metrics reflective of both nano-scale properties and the photon component of its potency. Several e...

  8. Phototoxicity and Dosimetry of Nano-scaleTitanium Dioxide in Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have been testing nanoscale TiO2 (primarily Evonik P25) in acute exposures to identify and quantify its phototoxicity under solar simulated radiation (SSR), and to develop dose metrics reflective of both nano-scale properties and the photon component of its potency. Several e...

  9. Cylindrical hybrid plasmonic waveguide for a nano-scale light confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Mei; Yun, Maojin; Kong, Weijin

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve integration density, it is essential to develop a nano-scale optical waveguide which is the key element to build varies of optical components. In this paper, a novel cylindrical hybrid plasmonic waveguide, which has an air core surrounded by a metal layer and a silicon layer, is proposed to achieve nano-scale confinement of light at the operating wavelength of 1550nm. And there is a low-index material nano-layer between the metal layer and the silicon layer, in which the field enhancement provides a nano-scale confinement of the optical field. The relations between the characteristics of the bound modes, including the effective mode indices, propagation lengths, mode sizes, mode shapes and parameters of the plasmonic waveguide are numerically investigated in detail. The simulation results show that the nano-scale confinement can be realized and the proposed hybrid plasmonic waveguide has a potential application in high density photonic integration. Keywords: Surface Plasmon, Mode confinement, Subwavelength structure

  10. Mechanical properties of materials at micro/nano scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei-Hua

    Mechanical properties of materials in small dimensions, including the depth-dependent hardness at the nano/micrometer scales, and the mechanical characterization of thin films and nanotubes, are reported. The surface effect on the depth-dependent nano/microhardness was studied and an apparent surface stress was introduced to represent the energy dissipated per unit area of a solid surface. A plastic bearing ratio model was proposed for the nanoindentation of rough surfaces. The energy dissipation occurring at the indented surface is among the factors that cause the Indentation Size Effect (ISE) at the micro/nanometer scales. Furthermore, an elastic-plastic bearing ratio model was developed for nanoindentation of rough surfaces with a flat indenter tip. The theoretical predictions agree with the experimental results and finite element simulations, from which the elastic constant and the surface hardness were extracted. The surface hardness exhibits an inverse ISE due to the interaction of asperities. The nanoindentation tests on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) may lead to the formation of carbon tubes, which are rolled up by the delaminated graphite layers. The nanoindentation loading-unloading curves reveal single pop-in and multiple pop-in phenomena, which is induced by fracture of the graphite layers and/or by delamination between the layers. From the load at pop-in, the fracture strength of the layers and/or the bonding strength between the layers can be estimated by the elastic field model for Hertzian contact including sliding friction for transverse isotropy. Two novel methods were developed to estimate the mechanical properties of films, including the Raman spectra method for the estimation of residual stresses in thin ferroelectric films and the microbridge testing method for the mechanical characterization of trilayer thin films. Mechanical characterization was also carried out on Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) nanotubes with each being comprised of

  11. Mitochondrial Disulfide Relay: Redox-regulated Protein Import into the Intermembrane Space*

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Johannes M.; Riemer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    99% of all mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytosol, from where they are imported into mitochondria. In contrast to matrix proteins, many proteins of the intermembrane space (IMS) lack presequences and are imported in an oxidation-driven reaction by the mitochondrial disulfide relay. Incoming polypeptides are recognized and oxidized by the IMS-located receptor Mia40. Reoxidation of Mia40 is facilitated by the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1 and the respiratory chain. Although structurally unrelated, the mitochondrial disulfide relay functionally resembles the Dsb (disufide bond) system of the bacterial periplasm, the compartment from which the IMS was derived 2 billion years ago. PMID:22157015

  12. Mechanisms and physiological impact of the dual localization of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins.

    PubMed

    Petrungaro, Carmelina; Riemer, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells developed diverse mechanisms to guide proteins to more than one destination within the cell. Recently, the proteome of the IMS (intermembrane space) of mitochondria of yeast cells was identified showing that approximately 20% of all soluble IMS proteins are dually localized to the IMS, as well as to other cellular compartments. Half of these dually localized proteins are important for oxidative stress defence and the other half are involved in energy homoeostasis. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms leading to the dual localization of IMS proteins and the implications for mitochondrial function. PMID:25109985

  13. Integrated chemical and biological systems in nanowire structures towards nano-scale sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Rose M.

    Nanowires composed of metal and conducting polymers with integrated proteins and chemical systems have been investigated as building blocks for next-generation nano-scale sensors and assemblies. These nanowires were fabricated by combining chemical and electrochemical methods of synthesis of gold and conducting polymers in nanopores of anodized alumina membranes. Polymer nanowires were synthesized from buffer solutions as a mean to promote a biocompatible environment for the incorporation of proteins. A variety of proteins were incorporated into the polymer matrix by entrapment during polymerization that imparted the polymer material with biological functionality. Another class of composite nanowires containing electro-active conducting polymer junctions was developed for applications in chemical sensor arrays. The methodologies described in this thesis provide an inexpensive and straightforward approach to the synthesis of anisotropic nanoparticles incorporating a variety of biological and inorganic species that can be integrated to current microelectronic technologies for the development of nano-scale sensor arrays.

  14. Investigation on the special Smith-Purcell radiation from a nano-scale rectangular metallic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiwei; Liu, Weihao; Jia, Qika

    2016-03-01

    The special Smith-Purcell radiation (S-SPR), which is from the radiating eigen modes of a grating, has remarkable higher intensity than the ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation. Yet in previous studies, the gratings were treated as perfect conductor without considering the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) which are of significance for the nano-scale gratings especially in the optical region. In present paper, the rigorous theoretical investigations on the S-SPR from a nano-grating with SPPs taken into consideration are carried out. The dispersion relations and radiation characteristics are obtained, and the results are verified by simulations. According to the analyses, the tunable light radiation can be achieved by the S-SPR from a nano-grating, which offers a new prospect for developing the nano-scale light sources.

  15. Nano-Scale Interpenetrating Phase Composites (IPC S) for Industrial and Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hemrick, James Gordon; Hu, Michael Z.

    2010-06-01

    A one-year project was completed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to explore the technical and economic feasibility of producing nano-scale Interpenetrating Phase Composite (IPC) components of a usable size for actual testing/implementation in a real applications such as high wear/corrosion resistant refractory shapes for industrial applications, lightweight vehicle braking system components, or lower cost/higher performance military body and vehicle armor. Nano-scale IPC s with improved mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties have previously been demonstrated at the lab scale, but have been limited in size. The work performed under this project was focused on investigating the ability to take the current traditional lab scale processes to a manufacturing scale through scaling of these processes or through the utilization of an alternative high-temperature process.

  16. Nano-scaled graphene platelets with a high length-to-width aspect ratio

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2010-09-07

    This invention provides a nano-scaled graphene platelet (NGP) having a thickness no greater than 100 nm and a length-to-width ratio no less than 3 (preferably greater than 10). The NGP with a high length-to-width ratio can be prepared by using a method comprising (a) intercalating a carbon fiber or graphite fiber with an intercalate to form an intercalated fiber; (b) exfoliating the intercalated fiber to obtain an exfoliated fiber comprising graphene sheets or flakes; and (c) separating the graphene sheets or flakes to obtain nano-scaled graphene platelets. The invention also provides a nanocomposite material comprising an NGP with a high length-to-width ratio. Such a nanocomposite can become electrically conductive with a small weight fraction of NGPs. Conductive composites are particularly useful for shielding of sensitive electronic equipment against electromagnetic interference (EMI) or radio frequency interference (RFI), and for electrostatic charge dissipation.

  17. Cobalt oxide hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure: Fabrication and electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Feifei; Gao, Cuiling; Wen, Zhenhai; Wang, Qiang; Li, Jinghong; Xu, Zheng

    2009-05-01

    Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres with micro- and nano-scale composite structure self-assembled by nanosheets were successfully fabricated by the template-free wet-chemical approach. This method is simple, facile and effective. The Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres with good purity and homogeneous size were well characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP). The formation mechanism was deeply studied. The micro- and nano-scale composite structure constructed by the porous nanosheets promotes to improve the electrochemical properties of Co 3O 4 hollow microspheres. The high discharge capacity of 1048 mAh g -1 indicates it to be the potential application in electrode materials of Li-ion battery.

  18. Direct observation of size scaling and elastic interaction between nano-scale defects in collision cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, X.; Sand, A. E.; Mason, D. R.; Kirk, M. A.; Roberts, S. G.; Nordlund, K.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2015-05-01

    Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we have directly observed nano-scale defects formed in ultra-high-purity tungsten by low-dose high-energy self-ion irradiation at 30 K. At cryogenic temperature lattice defects have reduced mobility, so these microscope observations offer a window on the initial, primary damage caused by individual collision cascade events. Electron microscope images provide direct evidence for a power-law size distribution of nano-scale defects formed in high-energy cascades, with an upper size limit independent of the incident ion energy, as predicted by Sand et al. (EPL, 103 (2013) 46003). Furthermore, the analysis of pair distribution functions of defects observed in the micrographs shows significant intra-cascade spatial correlations consistent with strong elastic interaction between the defects.

  19. Extensible Flexible Optical System for Nano-scale Remote Sensing Satellite “PRISM”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Kim, Sang Kyun; Kusakawa, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Kensuke; Tanaka, Takashi; Komatsu, Mitsuhito; Lambert, Casey; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    As traditional satellites successfully utilize extensible structures such as long magnetic booms or large antennae, the variety of space missions to be realized by nano-scale satellites would be greatly expanded if they employed such structures. Specifically for remote sensing applications, extensible structures are convenient for achieving long focal lengths required by the optics system. In our laboratory, a nano-scale remote sensing satellite “PRISM” has been developed with an expected launch date in the 2008 fiscal year. PRISM has an extensible boom with a telephoto lens at its tip, creating a refractive telescope, which on the orbit can acquire earth images with a resolution better than 30m. In this paper, we describe the design of the boom and present results from a micro-gravity experiment where the operation and system identification tests were performed.

  20. Characterization of Nano-scale Aluminum Oxide Transport through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, S.; Reynolds, M.; Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Johnson, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal material (including that in the nanoparticle size range) is naturally present in most subsurface environments. Mobilization of these colloidal materials via particle disaggregation may occur through abrupt changes in flow rate and/or via chemical perturbations, such as rapid changes in ionic strength or solution pH. While concentrations of natural colloidal materials in the subsurface are typically small, those concentrations may be greatly increased at contaminated sites such as following the application of metal oxides for groundwater remediation efforts. Additionally, while land application of biosolids has become common practice in the United States as an alternative to industrial fertilizers, biosolids have been shown to contain a significant fraction of organic and inorganic nano-scale colloidal materials such as oxides of iron, titanium, and aluminum. Given their reactivity and small size, there are many questions concerning the potential migration of nano-scale colloidal materials through the soil column and their potential participation in the facilitated transport of contaminants, such as heavy metals and emerging pollutants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles through porous media. The impacts of pH, ionic strength, pore-water velocity (i.e., residence time), and aqueous-phase concentration on transport was investigated. All experiments were conducted with large injection pulses to fully characterize the impact of long-term retention and transport behavior relevant for natural systems wherein multiple retention processes may be operative. The results indicate that the observed nonideal transport behavior of the nano-scale colloids is influenced by multiple retention mechanisms/processes. Given the ubiquitous nature of these nano-scale colloids in the environment, a clear understanding of their transport and fate is necessary in further resolving the potential for

  1. High-efficiency solar cells based on micro-nano scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Achyut K.; Olah, Robert; Mizuno, Genki; Sengupta, Rabi; Park, Jin-Hong; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2010-04-01

    Higher efficiency solar cells are required to reduce solar array mass, stowed volume, and cost for numerous commercial and military applications. Conventional solar cell made of thin-film or crystal-Si (c-Si) or other thin films have limited conversion efficiency of 10 to 20% with the cost of 3-5/Wp. Current state-of-the-art crystalline multijunction solar cells are 30 % efficient with the cost of 30 to 40 /Wp. Increasing conversion efficiency of > 30% will enable to reduce the cost < $1/Wp and useful for various power platforms supporting mobile wireless, laptop, tent applications. Solar cell comprises with three dimensional blocks are shown to be higher conversion-efficiency than standard flat-type solar cell. Incorporating nano-scaled blocks in solar cell structures are shown to be increased performances due to (i) increase of the surface area to volume ratio, (ii) brining the junction closer to the carrier generation region which eliminate the carrier recombination , (iii) absorption of all incident photon flux, and (iv) broadening the absorption spectrum. Our activities on next generation high performance solar cells based on micro-nano scaled structures and various material systems will be presented. Details fabrication process of micro-nano scaled solar cell friendly to mass scale manufacturing will be also be described. We have achieved more than 20x optical performance enhancement for the solar cell based on micro-scaled structures, than that of flat-type (standard) solar cell, fabricated on the same Si substrate and same process. Simulation results showed that significant improvement in conversion efficiency more than 30% is possible for even c-Si solar cell based on the micro-nano scaled structures. Key issues and challenges for bringing it to the manufacturing will be discussed.

  2. A discrete pathway for the transfer of intermembrane space proteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gornicka, Agnieszka; Bragoszewski, Piotr; Chroscicki, Piotr; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Schulz, Christian; Rehling, Peter; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2014-12-15

    Mitochondrial proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and imported into mitochondria with the help of protein translocases. For the majority of precursor proteins, the role of the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and mechanisms of their transport across the outer mitochondrial membrane are well recognized. However, little is known about the mode of membrane translocation for proteins that are targeted to the intermembrane space via the redox-driven mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly (MIA) pathway. On the basis of the results obtained from an in organello competition import assay, we hypothesized that MIA-dependent precursor proteins use an alternative pathway to cross the outer mitochondrial membrane. Here we demonstrate that this alternative pathway involves the protein channel formed by Tom40. We sought a translocation intermediate by expressing tagged versions of MIA-dependent proteins in vivo. We identified a transient interaction between our model substrates and Tom40. Of interest, outer membrane translocation did not directly involve other core components of the TOM complex, including Tom22. Thus MIA-dependent proteins take another route across the outer mitochondrial membrane that involves Tom40 in a form that is different from the canonical TOM complex. PMID:25318675

  3. A discrete pathway for the transfer of intermembrane space proteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Gornicka, Agnieszka; Bragoszewski, Piotr; Chroscicki, Piotr; Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Schulz, Christian; Rehling, Peter; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and imported into mitochondria with the help of protein translocases. For the majority of precursor proteins, the role of the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and mechanisms of their transport across the outer mitochondrial membrane are well recognized. However, little is known about the mode of membrane translocation for proteins that are targeted to the intermembrane space via the redox-driven mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly (MIA) pathway. On the basis of the results obtained from an in organello competition import assay, we hypothesized that MIA-dependent precursor proteins use an alternative pathway to cross the outer mitochondrial membrane. Here we demonstrate that this alternative pathway involves the protein channel formed by Tom40. We sought a translocation intermediate by expressing tagged versions of MIA-dependent proteins in vivo. We identified a transient interaction between our model substrates and Tom40. Of interest, outer membrane translocation did not directly involve other core components of the TOM complex, including Tom22. Thus MIA-dependent proteins take another route across the outer mitochondrial membrane that involves Tom40 in a form that is different from the canonical TOM complex. PMID:25318675

  4. Effects of nano-scaled particles on endothelial cell function in vitro: studies on viability, proliferation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kirsten; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James; Gatti, Antonietta M; Monari, Emanuela

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies give support for a connection between the presence of inorganic particles (of microm and nm size) in different organs and tissues and the development of inflammatory foci, called granulomas. As the potential source of particles (e.g. porcelain dental bridges) and the location of particle detection were topographically far apart, a distribution via the blood stream appears highly probable. Thus, endothelial cells, which line the inner surface of blood vessels, would come into direct contact with these particles, making particle-endothelial interactions potentially pathogenically relevant. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects that five different nano-scaled particles (PVC, TiO2, SiO2, Co, Ni) have on endothelial cell function and viability. Therefore, human endothelial cells were exposed to different amounts of the above-mentioned particles. Although most particle types are shown to be internalised (except Ni-particles), only Co-particles possessed cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, an impairment of the proliferative activity and a pro-inflammatory stimulation of endothelial cells were induced by exposure to Co- and, to a lesser extent, by SiO2-particles. If a pro-inflammatory stimulation of endothelial cells occurs in vivo, a chronic inflammation could be a possible consequence. PMID:15332593

  5. Nano-scale displacement sensing based on van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lin; Zhao, Jin; Yang, Jinlong

    2015-05-01

    We propose that a nano-scale displacement sensor with high resolution in weak-force systems can be realized based on vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) atomic corrugated layer materials bound through van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Using first-principles calculations, we found that the electronic structures of bi-layer blue phosphorus (BLBP) vary appreciably with lateral and vertical interlayer displacements. The variation of the electronic structure is attributed to the change of the interlayer distance dz for both the lateral and vertical displacement. For lateral displacement, the change of dz is induced by atomic layer corrugation. Despite the different stacking configurations of BLBP, we find that the change of the indirect band gap is proportional to dz-2. Furthermore, this dz-2 dependence is found to be applicable to other graphene-like corrugated bi-layer materials such as MoS2. BLBP represents a large family of bi-layer 2D atomic corrugated materials for which the electronic structure is sensitive to the interlayer vertical and lateral displacement, and thus could be used for a nano-scale displacement sensor. This can be done by monitoring the tunable electronic structure using absorption spectroscopy. Because this type of sensor is established on atomic layers coupled through vdW interactions, it provides unique applications in the measurements of nano-scale displacement induced by tiny external forces.We propose that a nano-scale displacement sensor with high resolution in weak-force systems can be realized based on vertically stacked two-dimensional (2D) atomic corrugated layer materials bound through van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Using first-principles calculations, we found that the electronic structures of bi-layer blue phosphorus (BLBP) vary appreciably with lateral and vertical interlayer displacements. The variation of the electronic structure is attributed to the change of the interlayer distance dz for both the lateral and vertical

  6. Proteomic mapping of the human mitochondrial intermembrane space in live cells via ratiometric APEX tagging

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Victoria; Zou, Peng; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Cracan, Valentin; Svinkina, Tanya; Carr, Steven A.; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Ting, Alice Y.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Obtaining complete protein inventories for subcellular regions is a challenge that often limits our understanding of cellular function, especially for regions that are impossible to purify and are therefore inaccessible to traditional proteomic analysis. We recently developed a method to map proteomes in living cells with an engineered peroxidase (APEX) that bypasses the need for organellar purification when applied to membrane-bound compartments; however, it lacked specificity when applied to unbounded regions that allow APEX-generated radicals to escape. Here, we combine APEX technology with a SILAC-based ratiometric tagging strategy to substantially reduce unwanted background and achieve nanometer spatial resolution. This is applied to map the proteome of the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS), which can freely exchange small molecules with the cytosol. Our IMS proteome of 127 proteins has >94% specificity and includes nine novel mitochondrial proteins. This approach will enable scientists to map proteomes of cellular regions that were previously inaccessible. PMID:25002142

  7. Detecting Nano-Scale Vibrations in Rotating Devices by Using Advanced Computational Methods

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raúl M.; Haber, Rodolfo E.; Schmittdiel, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a computational method for detecting vibrations related to eccentricity in ultra precision rotation devices used for nano-scale manufacturing. The vibration is indirectly measured via a frequency domain analysis of the signal from a piezoelectric sensor attached to the stationary component of the rotating device. The algorithm searches for particular harmonic sequences associated with the eccentricity of the device rotation axis. The detected sequence is quantified and serves as input to a regression model that estimates the eccentricity. A case study presents the application of the computational algorithm during precision manufacturing processes. PMID:22399918

  8. Detecting nano-scale vibrations in rotating devices by using advanced computational methods.

    PubMed

    del Toro, Raúl M; Haber, Rodolfo E; Schmittdiel, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a computational method for detecting vibrations related to eccentricity in ultra precision rotation devices used for nano-scale manufacturing. The vibration is indirectly measured via a frequency domain analysis of the signal from a piezoelectric sensor attached to the stationary component of the rotating device. The algorithm searches for particular harmonic sequences associated with the eccentricity of the device rotation axis. The detected sequence is quantified and serves as input to a regression model that estimates the eccentricity. A case study presents the application of the computational algorithm during precision manufacturing processes. PMID:22399918

  9. High Temperature In Situ Compression of Thermoplastically Formed Nano-scale Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, Sanghita; Arora, Harpreet Singh; Lefebvre, Joseph; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-05-01

    The mechanical behavior of nano-scale metallic glasses was investigated by in situ compression tests in a scanning electron microscope. Platinum-based metallic glass nano-pillars were fabricated by thermoplastic forming. The nano-pillars and corresponding bulk substrate were tested in compression over the range of room temperature to glass transition. Stress-strain curves of the nano-pillars were obtained along with in situ observation of their deformation behavior. The bulk substrate as well as nano-pillars showed an increase in elastic modulus with temperature which is explained by diffusive rearrangement of atomic-scale viscoelastic units.

  10. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F.; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Huang, Cher X.; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Bell, George W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  11. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  12. 3D positioning scheme exploiting nano-scale IR-UWB orthogonal pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nammoon; Kim, Youngok

    2011-01-01

    In these days, the development of positioning technology for realizing ubiquitous environments has become one of the most important issues. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a well-known positioning scheme, but it is not suitable for positioning in in-door/building environments because it is difficult to maintain line-of-sight condition between satellites and a GPS receiver. To such problem, various positioning methods such as RFID, WLAN, ZigBee, and Bluetooth have been developed for indoor positioning scheme. However, the majority of positioning schemes are focused on the two-dimension positioning even though three-dimension (3D) positioning information is more useful especially in indoor applications, such as smart space, U-health service, context aware service, etc. In this paper, a 3D positioning system based on mutually orthogonal nano-scale impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) signals and cross array antenna is proposed. The proposed scheme uses nano-scale IR-UWB signals providing fine time resolution and high-resolution multiple signal specification algorithm for the time-of-arrival and the angle-of-arrival estimation. The performance is evaluated over various IEEE 802.15.4a channel models, and simulation results show the effectiveness of proposed scheme. PMID:21970578

  13. Integration of nano-scale components and supports in micromachined 3D silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Azimi, S.; Y Dang, Z.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a process for the three-dimensional (3D) machining of p-type silicon on a micro- and nano-scale using high-energy ion beam irradiation with one or more energies and fluences, followed by electrochemical anodization in hydrofluoric acid. We present a study of the dependence of our fabricated structures on irradiating ion energies, fluences, geometries and wafer resistivity. All these factors determine whether the micro- and nano-scale features are properly connected to the supports in the 3D silicon structures. If wrongly chosen, any of these factors may cause a breakage at the connection through localized over-etching. Under optimum irradiation and anodization conditions, free-standing patterned membranes can be fabricated with feature dimensions of 100 nm over areas of many square millimeters. This investigation is based on silicon structures but is relevant to any electro-assisted etching process for 3D fabrication, paving the way for achieving free-standing silicon photonics, mechanical resonators and micro-/nano-electromechanical systems.

  14. Nano-scale Topographical Studies on the Growth Cones of Nerve Cells using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    Nerve cells are the fundamental units which are responsible for intercommunication within the nervous system. The neurites, fibrous cable-like extensions for information delivery, of nerve cells are tipped by highly motile sensory structures known as the growth cones which execute important functions; neural construction, decision making and navigation during development and regeneration of the nervous system. The highly dynamic subcomponents of the growth cones are important in neural activity. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the most powerful microscopy technique which is capable of imaging without conductivity constraint and in liquid media. AFM providing nano-scale topographical information on biological structures is also informative on the physical properties such as: elasticity, adhesion, and softness. This contribution focuses on AFM analysis of the growth cones of the nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis. The results of nano-scale topography and softness analysis on growth cone central domain, filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) are presented. The subcomponents of the growth cones of different nerve cells are compared to each other. The results of the analysis are linked to the mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution of the growth cones.

  15. Evaporation characteristics of thin film liquid argon in nano-scale confinement: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the evaporation characteristics of thin liquid argon film in nano-scale confinement. The present study has been conducted to realize the nano-scale physics of simultaneous evaporation and condensation inside a confined space for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of surface wetting conditions. The simulation domain consisted of two parallel platinum plates; one at the top and another at the bottom. The fluid comprised of liquid argon film at the bottom plate and vapor argon in between liquid argon and upper plate of the domain. Considering hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of top and bottom surfaces, two different cases have been investigated: (i) Case A: Both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophilic, (ii) Case B: both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophobic. For all cases, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. Then the lower wall was set to four different temperatures such as 110 K, 120 K, 130 K and 140 K to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat fluxes normal to top and bottom walls were estimated and discussed to illuminate the effectiveness of heat transfer in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic confinement at various boundary temperatures of the bottom plate.

  16. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coso, Dusan

    The first part of the dissertation presents a study that implements micro and nano scale engineered surfaces for enhancement of evaporation and boiling phase change heat transfer in both capillary wick structures and pool boiling systems. Capillary wicking surfaces are integral components of heat pipes and vapor chamber thermal spreaders often used for thermal management of microelectronic devices. In addition, pool boiling systems can be encountered in immersion cooling systems which are becoming more commonly investigated for thermal management applications of microelectronic devices and even data centers. The latent heat associated with the change of state from liquid to vapor, and the small temperature differences required to drive this process yield great heat transfer characteristics. Additionally, since no external energy is required to drive the phase change process, these systems are great for portable devices and favorable for reduction of cost and energy consumption over alternate thermal management technologies. Most state of the art capillary wicks used in these devices are typically constructed from sintered copper media. These porous structures yield high surface areas of thin liquid film where evaporation occurs, thus promoting phase change heat transfer. However, thermal interfaces at particle point contacts formed during the sintering process and complex liquid/vapor flow within these wick structures yield high thermal and liquid flow resistances and limit the maximum heat flux they can dissipate. In capillary wicks the maximum heat flux is typically governed by the capillary or boiling limits and engineering surfaces that delay these limitations and yield structures with large surface areas of thin liquid film where phase change heat transfer is promoted is highly desired. In this study, biporous media consisting of microscale pin fins separated by microchannels are examined as candidate structures for the evaporator wick of a vapor chamber heat

  17. Application of exergetic sustainability index to a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with ideal Bose and Fermi gasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkkalp, Emin; Caner, Necmettin

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with quantum gasses including Bose and Fermi gasses is researched. Developments in the nano-technology cause searching the nano-scale machines including thermal systems to be unavoidable. Thermodynamic analysis of a nano-scale irreversible Brayton cycle operating with Bose and Fermi gasses was performed (especially using exergetic sustainability index). In addition, thermodynamic analysis involving classical evaluation parameters such as work output, exergy output, entropy generation, energy and exergy efficiencies were conducted. Results are submitted numerically and finally some useful recommendations were conducted. Some important results are: entropy generation and exergetic sustainability index are affected mostly for Bose gas and power output and exergy output are affected mostly for the Fermi gas by x. At the high temperature conditions, work output and entropy generation have high values comparing with other degeneracy conditions.

  18. TEM Investigation of Nano-scale Precipitates in Ultrahigh-Pressure Clinopyroxenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Tina Renee

    This investigation details the TEM characterization of epitaxially-exsolved nano-scale siliceous precipitates in cores of ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) clinopyroxenes from eclogites of the Bohemian Massif and Western Gneiss Region, and a Kokchetav Massif garnet pyroxenite. Siliceous precipitates are observed in cores of UHP clinopyroxenes from multiple UHP metamorphic terranes, and are often used as indicators for UHP metamorphism. Without atomic-scale characterization, these precipitates have been identified only as quartz or coesite. The close structural and orientation relationships of siliceous phases and their host clinopyroxenes are revealed by High Resolution TEM and Scanning TEM (HRTEM/STEM) images and Selected Area Electron Diffraction. Low pressure, low density siliceous phases of keatite, α-cristobalite, tridymite, siliceous glasses, and albite are reported here, not the previously described higher density silica polymorphs. The phase that precipitates may be controlled by a complex combination of factors. Particularly, calculated vacancy content (Ca-Eskola component) in clinopyroxenes may be the overriding factor in creating localized low pressure micro-environments for nano-precipitate exsolution. Higher vacancy content may be linked with the lowest density silica, tridymite; lower vacancy contents may be linked with somewhat higher density polymorphs of silica, including α-cristobalite and the first confirmed natural occurrences of keatite. Mechanisms of exsolution are closely related to the interfaces that develop between phases. The geometry of the substrate in epitaxial mineral growth may cause growth of phases not stable at existing P-T-X conditions. Little strain in HRTEM/STEM images is observed and shows favorable lattice matching between siliceous precipitates/hosts; interface models detailing a calculated 5.4% difference in unit cells at most support this. Nano-scale size effects are also important—they stabilize nano-scale and metastable

  19. Free-standing nano-scale graphite saturable absorber for passively mode-locked erbium doped fiber ring laser Free-standing nano-scale graphite saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-H.; Lin, G.-R.

    2012-05-01

    The free-standing graphite nano-particle located between two FC/APC fiber connectors is employed as the saturable absorber to passively mode-lock the ring-type Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL). The host-solvent-free graphite nano-particles with sizes of 300 - 500 nm induce a comparable modulation depth of 54%. The interlayer-spacing and lattice fluctuations of polished graphite nano-particles are observed from the weak 2D band of Raman spectrum and the azimuth angle shift of -0.32° of {002}-orientation dependent X-ray diffraction peak. The graphite nano-particles mode-locked EDFL generates a 1.67-ps pulsewidth at linearly dispersion-compensated regime with a repetition rate of 9.1 MHz. The time-bandwidth product of 0.325 obtained under a total intra-cavity group-delay-dispersion of -0.017 ps2 is nearly transform-limited. The extremely high stability of the nano-scale graphite saturable absorber during mode-locking is observed at an intra-cavity optical energy density of 7.54 mJ/cm2. This can be attributed to its relatively high damage threshold (one order of magnitude higher than the graphene) on handling the optical energy density inside the EDFL cavity. The graphite nano-particle with reduced size and sufficient coverage ratio can compete with other fast saturable absorbers such as carbon nanotube or graphene to passively mode-lock fiber lasers with decreased insertion loss and lasing threshold.

  20. Effects of nano-scaled fish bone on the gelation properties of Alaska pollock surimi.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2014-05-01

    Gelation properties of Alaska pollock surimi as affected by addition of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) at different levels (0%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2%) were investigated. Breaking force and penetration distance of surimi gels after setting increased significantly as NFB concentration increased up to 1%. The first peak temperature and value of storage modulus (G'), which is known to relate to the unfolding and aggregation of light meromyosin, increased as NFB concentration increased. In addition, 1% NFB treatment demonstrated the highest G' after gelation was completed. The activity of endogenous transglutaminase (TGase) in Alaska pollock surimi increased as NFB calcium concentration increased. The intensity of myosin heavy chain cross-links also increased as NFB concentration increased indicating the formation of more ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine covalent bond by endogenous TGase and calcium ions from NFB. PMID:24360476

  1. Low-temperature method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets and their nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z.

    2012-03-13

    A method of exfoliating a layered material to produce separated nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm. The method comprises: (a) providing a graphite intercalation compound comprising a layered graphite containing expandable species residing in an interlayer space of the layered graphite; (b) exposing the graphite intercalation compound to an exfoliation temperature lower than 650.degree. C. for a duration of time sufficient to at least partially exfoliate the layered graphite without incurring a significant level of oxidation; and (c) subjecting the at least partially exfoliated graphite to a mechanical shearing treatment to produce separated platelets. The method can further include a step of dispersing the platelets in a polymer or monomer solution or suspension as a precursor step to nanocomposite fabrication.

  2. Design of plasmonic photodetector with high absorptance and nano-scale active regions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingshu; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel plasmonic photodetector with high responsivity, utilizing nano-scale active regions. This design can be applied to diverse materials (group III-V or IV materials) and different operation wavelengths covering the O-U bands. The periodic structure utilizing Surface Plasmon Polariton Bloch Waves (SPP-BWs) has low optical power loss. FDTD simulation shows an absorptance of 74.4% which means a responsivity of about 0.74 A/W at 1550 nm. The low capacitance brings low noise, reduced power consumption, and a high electrical bandwidth which is estimated to be 140 GHz. Among the plasmonic PDs with inherent high speeds but low responsivities, our design makes the obvious progress on improving the absorptance. PMID:27505787

  3. Colloidal processing and sintering of nano-scale TiN

    SciTech Connect

    Nab, R.; Albayrak, S.; Aslan, M.; Schmidt, H.

    1995-09-01

    Surface modification of nano-scale TiN powder with guanidine propionic acid was used for the preparation of well dispersed slurries. The starting powder could be completely deagglomerated for modifier concentrations exeeding 7.5 wt.-% at pH = 9. Such slurries ({le} 40 wt.-% solid content) behave like an ideal Netwonian liquid. Green compacts with relative densities around 50 % were prepared by pressure filtration. The specimens are characterized by a homogeneous green microstructure with pore sizes in the range of 3 to 10 mn, which could be sintered to high density (> 96 %) below 1400{degrees}C. Up to densities of 96 % grain coarsening can be neglected, but further densification was accompanied by an exaggregated grain growth.

  4. Titanium bone implants with superimposed micro/nano-scale porosity and antibacterial capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necula, B. S.; Apachitei, I.; Fratila-Apachitei, L. E.; van Langelaan, E. J.; Duszczyk, J.

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed at producing a multifunctional layer with micro/nano-interconnected porosity and antibacterial capability on a rough macro-porous plasma sprayed titanium surface using the plasma electrolytic oxidation process. The layers were electrochemically formed in electrolytes based on calcium acetate and calcium glycerophosphate salts bearing dispersed Ag nanoparticles. They were characterized with respect to surface morphology and chemical composition using a scanning electron microscope equipped with the energy dispersive spectroscopy and back scattering detectors. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the formation of a micro/nano-scale porous layer, comprised of TiO2 bearing Ca and P species and Ag nanoparticles, following accurately the surface topography of the plasma sprayed titanium coating. The Ca/P atomic ratio was found to be close to that of bone apatite. Ag nanoparticles were incorporated on both on top and inside the porous structure of the TiO2 layer.

  5. Nano-Scale Alignment of Proteins on a Flexible DNA Backbone

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Tatsuya; Konno, Hiroki; Kodera, Noriyuki; Seio, Kohji; Taguchi, Hideki; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-01-01

    Nano-scale alignment of several proteins with freedom of motion is equivalent to an enormous increase in effective local concentration of proteins and will enable otherwise impossible weak and/or cooperative associations between them or with their ligands. For this purpose, a DNA backbone made of six oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) chains is designed in which five double-stranded segments are connected by four single-stranded flexible linkers. A desired protein with an introduced cysteine is connected covalently to the 5′-end of azido-ODN by catalyst-free click chemistry. Then, six protein-ODN conjugates are assembled with their complementary nucleotide sequences into a single multi-protein-DNA complex, and six proteins are aligned along the DNA backbone. Flexible alignment of proteins is directly observed by high-speed AFM imaging, and association of proteins with weak interaction is demonstrated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between aligned proteins. PMID:23300700

  6. Fabrication of ordered micro- and nano-scale patterns based on optical discs and nanoimprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hui-jing; Zhang, Xiao-liang; Li, Xiao-chun

    2016-07-01

    A simple method to fabricate one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) ordered micro- and nano-scale patterns is developed based on the original masters from optical discs, using nanoimprint technology and soft stamps. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used to replicate the negative image of the 1-D grating pattern on the masters of CD-R, DVD-R and BD-R optical discs, respectively, and then the 1-D pattern on one of the PDMS stamps was transferred to a blank polycarbonate (PC) substrate by nanoimprint. The 2-D ordered patterns were fabricated by the second imprinting using another PDMS stamp. Different 2-D periodic patterns were obtained depending on the PDMS stamps and the angle between the two times of imprints. This method may provide a way for the fabrication of complex 2-D patterns using simple 1-D masters.

  7. Nano-scale hydrogen-bond network improves the durability of greener cements

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Johan; Rodrigues, Michelle Santos; Telling, Mark T. F.; Beraldo, Antonio Ludovico; Santos, Sérgio Francisco; Aldridge, Laurence P.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-01-01

    More than ever before, the world's increasing need for new infrastructure demands the construction of efficient, sustainable and durable buildings, requiring minimal climate-changing gas-generation in their production. Maintenance-free “greener” building materials made from blended cements have advantages over ordinary Portland cements, as they are cheaper, generate less carbon dioxide and are more durable. The key for the improved performance of blends (which substitute fine amorphous silicates for cement) is related to their resistance to water penetration. The mechanism of this water resistance is of great environmental and economical impact but is not yet understood due to the complexity of the cement's hydration reactions. Using neutron spectroscopy, we studied a blend where cement was replaced by ash from sugar cane residuals originating from agricultural waste. Our findings demonstrate that the development of a distinctive hydrogen bond network at the nano-scale is the key to the performance of these greener materials. PMID:24036676

  8. BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO NANO-SCALE TIO2: ROLE OF PARTICLE DOSE, SHAPE AND RETENTION

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rona M.; TeeSy, Christel; Franzi, Lisa; Weir, Alex; Westerhoff, Paul; Evans, James E.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    TiO2 is one of the most widely used nanomaterials, valued for its highly refractive, photocatalytic and pigmenting properties. TiO2 is also classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible human carcinogen. The objectives of this study were to establish a lowest observed effect level (LOEL) for nano-scale TiO2, determine TiO2 uptake in the lungs, and estimate toxicity based on physico-chemical properties and retention in the lungs. In vivo lung toxicity of nano-scale TiO2 using varying forms of well-characterized, highly-dispersed TiO2 was assessed. Anatase/rutile P25 spheres (TiO2-P25), pure anatase spheres (TiO2-A), and anatase nanobelts (TiO2-NB) were tested. To determine the effects of dose and particle characteristics, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given TiO2 (0, 20, 70, or 200 µg) via intratracheal instillation. Broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were obtained for analysis 1 and 7 days post exposure. Despite abundant TiO2 inclusions in all exposed animals, only TiO2-NB elicited any significant degree of inflammation seen in BALF at the 1-day time-point. This inflammation resolved by 7 days; although, TiO2 particles had not cleared from alveolar macrophages recovered from the lung. Histological examination showed TiO2-NB caused cellular changes at day 1 which were still evident at day 7. We conclude TiO2-NB is the most inflammatory with a lowest observable effect level of 200 µg at 1 day post instillation. PMID:24156719

  9. Nano-scale machining of polycrystalline coppers - effects of grain size and machining parameters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive investigation on nano-scale machining of polycrystalline copper structures is carried out by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Simulation cases are constructed to study the impacts of grain size, as well as various machining parameters. Six polycrystalline copper structures are produced, which have the corresponding equivalent grain sizes of 5.32, 6.70, 8.44, 13.40, 14.75, and 16.88 nm, respectively. Three levels of depth of cut, machining speed, and tool rake angle are also considered. The results show that greater cutting forces are required in nano-scale polycrystalline machining with the increase of depth of cut, machining speed, and the use of the negative tool rake angles. The distributions of equivalent stress are consistent with the cutting force trends. Moreover, it is discovered that in the grain size range of 5.32 to 14.75 nm, the cutting forces and equivalent stress increase with the increase of grain size for the nano-structured copper, while the trends reserve after the grain size becomes even higher. This discovery confirms the existence of both the regular Hall–Petch relation and the inverse Hall–Petch relation in polycrystalline machining, and the existence of a threshold grain size allows one of the two relations to become dominant. The dislocation-grain boundary interaction shows that the resistance of the grain boundary to dislocation movement is the fundamental mechanism of the Hall–Petch relation, while grain boundary diffusion and movement is the reason of the inverse Hall–Petch relation. PMID:24267785

  10. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate

  11. A Microbead Supported Membrane-Based Fluorescence Imaging Assay Reveals Intermembrane Receptor-Ligand Complex Dimension with Nanometer Precision.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kabir H; Groves, Jay T

    2016-07-01

    Receptor-ligand complexes spanning a cell-cell interface inevitably establish a preferred intermembrane spacing based on the molecular dimensions and orientation of the complexes. This couples molecular binding events to membrane mechanics and large-scale spatial organization of receptors on the cell surface. Here, we describe a straightforward, epi-fluorescence-based method to precisely determine intermembrane receptor-ligand dimension at adhesions established by receptor-ligand binding between apposed membranes in vitro. Adhesions were reconstituted between planar and silica microbead supported membranes via specific interaction between cognate receptor/ligand pairs (EphA2/EphrinA1 and E-cadherin/anti-E-cadherin antibody). Epi-fluorescence imaging of the ligand enrichment zone in the supported membrane beneath the adhering microbead, combined with a simple geometrical interpretation, proves sufficient to estimate intermembrane receptor-ligand dimension with better than 1 nm precision. An advantage of this assay is that no specialized equipment or imaging methods are required. PMID:27264296

  12. Translocation of Mitochondrially Synthesized Cox2 Domains from the Matrix to the Intermembrane Space▿

    PubMed Central

    Fiumera, Heather L.; Broadley, Sarah A.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2007-01-01

    The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of mitochondrially synthesized cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, Cox2, are translocated through the inner membrane to the intermembrane space (IMS). We investigated the distinct mechanisms of N-tail and C-tail export by analysis of epitope-tagged Cox2 variants encoded in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DNA. Both the N and C termini of a truncated protein lacking the Cox2 C-terminal domain were translocated to the IMS via a pathway dependent upon the conserved translocase Oxa1. The topology of this Cox2 variant, accumulated at steady state, was largely but not completely unaffected in mutants lacking proteins required for export of the C-tail domain, Cox18 and Mss2. C-tail export was blocked by truncation of the last 40 residues from the C-tail domain, indicating that sequence and/or structural features of this domain are required for its translocation. Mss2, a peripheral protein bound to the inner surface of the inner membrane, coimmunoprecipitated with full-length newly synthesized Cox2, whose leader peptide had already been cleaved in the IMS. Our data suggest that the C-tail domain is recognized posttranslationally by a specialized translocation apparatus after the N-tail has been translocated by Oxa1. PMID:17452441

  13. Nucleoside diphosphate kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ynk1p: localization to the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed Central

    Amutha, Boominathan; Pain, Debkumar

    2003-01-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) is a highly conserved multifunctional enzyme. It catalyses the transfer of gamma phosphates from nucleoside triphosphates to nucleoside diphosphates by a mechanism that involves formation of an autophosphorylated enzyme intermediate. The phosphate is usually supplied by ATP. NDPK activity in different subcellular compartments may regulate the crucial balance between ATP and GTP or other nucleoside triphosphates. NDPKs are homo-oligomeric proteins and are predominantly localized in the cytosol. In this paper, we demonstrate that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae a small fraction of total NDPK activity encoded by YNK1 is present in the intermembrane space (IMS) of mitochondria, and the corresponding protein Ynk1p in the IMS represents approx. 0.005% of total mitochondrial proteins. Ynk1p, synthesized as a single gene product, must therefore be partitioned between cytoplasm and mitochondrial IMS fractions. A mechanism for this partitioning is suggested by our observations that interaction with a 40 kDa protein of the translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane (Tom40p), occurs preferentially with unfolded, unphosphorylated forms of Ynk1p. A population of newly translated, but not yet folded or autophosphorylated, Ynk1p intermediates may be imported into the IMS of mitochondria and trapped there by subsequent folding and oligomerization. Within the small volume of the IMS, Ynk1p may be more concentrated and may be required to supply GTP to several important proteins in this compartment. PMID:12472466

  14. A novel intermembrane space–targeting signal docks cysteines onto Mia40 during mitochondrial oxidative folding

    PubMed Central

    Sideris, Dionisia P.; Petrakis, Nikos; Katrakili, Nitsa; Mikropoulou, Despina; Gallo, Angelo; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano

    2009-01-01

    Mia40 imports Cys-containing proteins into the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) by ensuring their Cys-dependent oxidative folding. In this study, we show that the specific Cys of the substrate involved in docking with Mia40 is substrate dependent, the process being guided by an IMS-targeting signal (ITS) present in Mia40 substrates. The ITS is a 9-aa internal peptide that (a) is upstream or downstream of the docking Cys, (b) is sufficient for crossing the outer membrane and for targeting nonmitochondrial proteins, (c) forms an amphipathic helix with crucial hydrophobic residues on the side of the docking Cys and dispensable charged residues on the other side, and (d) fits complementary to the substrate cleft of Mia40 via hydrophobic interactions of micromolar affinity. We rationalize the dual function of Mia40 as a receptor and an oxidase in a two step–specific mechanism: an ITS-guided sliding step orients the substrate noncovalently, followed by docking of the substrate Cys now juxtaposed to pair with the Mia40 active Cys. PMID:20026652

  15. Peroxiredoxin-5 targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space attenuates hypoxia-induced reactive oxygen species signalling.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Simran S; Waypa, Gregory B; Marks, Jeremy D; Schumacker, Paul T

    2013-12-15

    The ability to adapt to acute and chronic hypoxia is critical for cellular survival. Two established functional responses to hypoxia include the regulation of gene transcription by HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor), and the constriction of pulmonary arteries in response to alveolar hypoxia. The mechanism of O2 sensing in these responses is not established, but some studies implicate hypoxia-induced mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) signalling. To further test this hypothesis, we expressed PRDX5 (peroxiredoxin-5), a H2O2 scavenger, in the IMS (mitochondrial intermembrane space), reasoning that the scavenging of ROS in that compartment should abrogate cellular responses triggered by the release of mitochondrial oxidants to the cytosol. Using adenoviral expression of IMS-PRDX5 (IMS-targeted PRDX5) in PASMCs (pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells) we show that IMS-PRDX5 inhibits hypoxia-induced oxidant signalling in the IMS and cytosol. It also inhibits HIF-1α stabilization and HIF activity in a dose-dependent manner without disrupting cellular oxygen consumption. IMS-PRDX5 expression also attenuates the increase in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in PASMCs during hypoxia. These results extend previous work by demonstrating the importance of IMS-derived ROS signalling in both the HIF and lung vascular responses to hypoxia. PMID:24044889

  16. Kinetic control by limiting glutaredoxin amounts enables thiol oxidation in the reducing mitochondrial intermembrane space

    PubMed Central

    Kojer, Kerstin; Peleh, Valentina; Calabrese, Gaetano; Herrmann, Johannes M.; Riemer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) harbors an oxidizing machinery that drives import and folding of small cysteine-containing proteins without targeting signals. The main component of this pathway is the oxidoreductase Mia40, which introduces disulfides into its substrates. We recently showed that the IMS glutathione pool is maintained as reducing as that of the cytosol. It thus remained unclear how equilibration of protein disulfides with the IMS glutathione pool is prevented in order to allow oxidation-driven protein import. Here we demonstrate the presence of glutaredoxins in the IMS and show that limiting amounts of these glutaredoxins provide a kinetic barrier to prevent the thermodynamically feasible reduction of Mia40 substrates by the IMS glutathione pool. Moreover, they allow Mia40 to exist in a predominantly oxidized state. Consequently, overexpression of glutaredoxin 2 in the IMS results in a more reduced Mia40 redox state and a delay in oxidative folding and mitochondrial import of different Mia40 substrates. Our findings thus indicate that carefully balanced glutaredoxin amounts in the IMS ensure efficient oxidative folding in the reducing environment of this compartment. PMID:25392302

  17. Protein oxidative folding in the intermembrane mitochondrial space: more than protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Hugo; Ventura, Salvador

    2012-05-01

    The process of oxidative folding in the intermembrane mitochondrial space (IMS) is an exciting field of research because folding is simultaneously coupled to protein translocation and functional regulation. Contrary to the endoplasmatic reticulum ER where several chaperones of the disulfide isomerase family exist, oxidative folding in the IMS is exclusively catalyzed by the oxoreductase Mia40 that recognizes a group of proteins with characteristic cysteine motifs organized in twin CX(3)C, twin CX(9)C or CX(2)C motifs. In this review, we discuss the structural and biochemical studies leading to our current understanding of the Mia40 pathway as well as the open questions on the field. In fact, despite significant advances, several key points on the Mia40 pathway remain to clarify namely on the molecular mechanism trough which substrate oxidative folding is catalyzed. This issue is receiving increasing attention since failures in the import, sorting and folding of mitochondrial proteins is related to an increasing number of debilitating human disorders. PMID:22612783

  18. In vivo pathogenic role of mutant SOD1 localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Igoudjil, Anissa; Magrané, Jordi; Fischer, Lindsey R; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Hervias, Isabel; Dumont, Magali; Cortez, Czrina; Glass, Jonathan D; Starkov, Anatoly A; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-11-01

    Mutations in Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutant SOD1 causes a complex array of pathological events, through toxic gain of function mechanisms, leading to selective motor neuron degeneration. Mitochondrial dysfunction is among the well established toxic effects of mutant SOD1, but its mechanisms are just starting to be elucidated. A portion of mutant SOD1 is localized in mitochondria, where it accumulates mostly on the outer membrane and inside the intermembrane space (IMS). Evidence in cultured cells suggests that mutant SOD1 in the IMS causes mitochondrial dysfunction and compromises cell viability. Therefore, to test its pathogenic role in vivo we generated transgenic mice expressing G93A mutant or wild-type (WT) human SOD1 targeted selectively to the mitochondrial IMS (mito-SOD1). We show that mito-SOD1 is correctly localized in the IMS, where it oligomerizes and acquires enzymatic activity. Mito-G93ASOD1 mice, but not mito-WTSOD1 mice, develop a progressive disease characterized by body weight loss, muscle weakness, brain atrophy, and motor impairment, which is more severe in females. These symptoms are associated with reduced spinal motor neuron counts and impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics, characterized by decreased cytochrome oxidase activity and defective calcium handling. However, there is no evidence of muscle denervation, a cardinal pathological feature of ALS. Together, our findings indicate that mutant SOD1 in the mitochondrial IMS causes mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration, but per se it is not sufficient to cause a full-fledged ALS phenotype, which requires the participation of mutant SOD1 localized in other cellular compartments. PMID:22049426

  19. Analysis and Correction of Dynamic Geometric Misalignment for Nano-Scale Computed Tomography at BSRF

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Due to its high spatial resolution, synchrotron radiation x-ray nano-scale computed tomography (nano-CT) is sensitive to misalignments in scanning geometry, which occurs quite frequently because of mechanical errors in manufacturing and assembly or from thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. Misalignments degrade the imaging results by imposing artifacts on the nano-CT slices. In this paper, the geometric misalignment of the synchrotron radiation nano-CT has been analyzed by partial derivatives on the CT reconstruction algorithm and a correction method, based on cross correlation and least-square sinusoidal fitting, has been reported. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission x-ray microscope nano-CT at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The numerical and experimental results have demonstrated the validity of the proposed approach. It can be applied for dynamic geometric misalignment and needs neither phantom nor additional correction scanning. We expect that this method will simplify the experimental operation of synchrotron radiation nano-CT. PMID:26509552

  20. Atom probe characterization of nano-scaled features in irradiated ODS Eurofer steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhkin, S. V.; Aleev, A. A.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Nikitin, A. A.; Iskandarov, N. A.; Vladimirov, P.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.

    2011-02-01

    Our previous investigations of unirradiated ODS Eurofer by tomographic atom probe (TAP) revealed numerous nano-scaled features (nanoclusters) enriched in vanadium, yttrium and oxygen. In this work the effect of neutron irradiation on nanostructure behaviour of ODS Eurofer (9%-CrWVTa) was investigated. The irradiation was performed in the research reactor BOR-60 (Dimitrovgrad, Russia) where materials were irradiated at 330 °С to 32 dpa. TAP studies were performed on the needles prepared from parts of broken Charpy specimens. For all specimens except one, which was tested at 500 °C, the Charpy tests were performed at temperatures not exceeding the irradiation temperature. A high number density 2-4 × 10 24 m -3 of ultra fine 1-3 nm diameter nanoclusters enriched in yttrium, oxygen, manganese and chromium was observed in the irradiated state. The composition of detected clusters differs from that for unirradiated ODS Eurofer. It was observed in this work that after neutron irradiation vanadium atoms had left the clusters, moving from the core into solid solution. The concentrations of yttrium and oxygen in the matrix, as it was detected, increase several times under irradiation. In the samples tested at 500 °C both the number density of clusters and the yttrium concentration in the matrix decrease by a factor of two.

  1. Reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy for noninvasive detection of reflective index alternations at nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuanhao; Ding, Zhihua

    2011-01-01

    Cancer has been one of the most serious threats to human life. However, there is no substantial improvement in overall treatment of cancer patients. One of the key reasons is the unavailability of convenient method to detect cellular alterations in ultra-early stage of carcinogenesis processes, where genetic aberrations at nano-scale have not yet resulted in histological changes. In this paper, we described an optical method based on reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy for ultra-early cancer detection. According to mesoscopic light transport theory, photons propagating in one dimension (1D) within a weakly disordered medium have the non-self-averaging effect. Reflected signal after 1D propagating is sensitive to any length scale of refractive index fluctuations due to multiple interferences of light waves travelling along 1D trajectory. The principle of mesoscopic spectroscopy for perceiving reflective index fluctuations at length scale of nanometers is introduced. A system for the measurement of reflective mesoscopic spectroscopy based on spatial-incoherence broadband source and spectrometer is established. Simulations on light propagation in cell-emulating model with controlled refractive index distribution are done by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach.

  2. Modeling the Charge Transport in Graphene Nano Ribbon Interfaces for Nano Scale Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Engles, Derick

    2015-05-01

    In this research work we have modeled, simulated and compared the electronic charge transport for Metal-Semiconductor-Metal interfaces of Graphene Nano Ribbons (GNR) with different geometries using First-Principle calculations and Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) method. We modeled junctions of Armchair GNR strip sandwiched between two Zigzag strips with (Z-A-Z) and Zigzag GNR strip sandwiched between two Armchair strips with (A-Z-A) using semi-empirical Extended Huckle Theory (EHT) within the framework of Non-Equilibrium Green Function (NEGF). I-V characteristics of the interfaces were visualized for various transport parameters. The distinct changes in conductance and I-V curves reported as the Width across layers, Channel length (Central part) was varied at different bias voltages from -1V to 1 V with steps of 0.25 V. From the simulated results we observed that the conductance through A-Z-A graphene junction is in the range of 10-13 Siemens whereas the conductance through Z-A-Z graphene junction is in the range of 10-5 Siemens. These suggested conductance controlled mechanisms for the charge transport in the graphene interfaces with different geometries is important for the design of graphene based nano scale electronic devices like Graphene FETs, Sensors.

  3. Effect of nano-scale characteristics of graphene on electrochemical performance of activated carbon supercapacitor electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasni, M. R. M.; Deraman, M.; Suleman, M.; Hamdan, E.; Sazali, N. E. S.; Nor, N. S. M.; Shamsudin, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Graphene with its typical nano-scale characteristic properties has been widely used as an additive in activated carbon electrodes in order to enhance the performance of the electrodes for their use in high performance supercapacitors. Activated carbon monoliths (ACMs) electrodes have been prepared by carbonization and activation of green monoliths (GMs) of pre-carbonized fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunches or self-adhesive carbon grains (SACGs) and SACGs added with 6 wt% of KOH-treated multi-layer graphene. ACMs electrodes have been assembled in symmetrical supercapacitor cells that employed aqueous KOH electrolyte (6 M). The cells have been tested with cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanostatic charge discharge methods to investigate the effect of graphene addition on the specific capacitance (Csp), specific energy (E), specific power (P), equivalent series resistance (ESR) and response time (τo) of the supercapacitor cells. The results show that the addition of graphene in the GMs change the values of Csp, Emax, Pmax, ESR and τo from (61-96) F/g, 2 Wh/kg, 104 W/kg, 2.6 Ω and 38 s, to the respective values of (110-124) F/g, 3 Wh/kg, 156 W/kg, 3.4 Ω and 63 s. This study demonstrates that the graphene addition in the GMs has a significant effect on the electrochemical behavior of the electrodes.

  4. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  5. Nano-Scale Hydroxyapatite: Synthesis, Two-Dimensional Transport Experiments, and Application for Uranium Remediation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanel, S. R.; Clement, T. P.; Barnett, M. O.; Goltz, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic nano-scale hydroxyapatite (NHA) was prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. The XRD data confirmed that the crystalline structure and chemical composition of NHA correspond to Ca 5 OH(PO 4 ) 3 . The SEM data confirmed the size of NHA to be less than 50 nm. A two-dimensional physical model packed with saturated porous media was used to study the transport characteristics of NHA under constant flow conditions. The data show that the transport patterns of NHA were almost identical to tracer transport patterns. This result indicates that the NHA material canmore » move with water like a tracer, and its movement was neither retarded nor influenced by any physicochemical interactions and/or density effects. We have also tested the reactivity of NHA with 1 mg/L hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) and found that complete removal of U(VI) is possible using 0.5 g/L NHA at pH 5 to 6. Our results demonstrate that NHA has the potential to be injected as a dilute slurry for in situ treatment of U(VI)-contaminated groundwater systems.« less

  6. Method of producing nano-scaled graphene and inorganic platelets and their nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Jang, Bor Z.; Zhamu, Aruna

    2011-02-22

    Disclosed is a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm, and often between 0.34 nm and 1.02 nm. The method comprises: (a) subjecting the layered material in a powder form to a halogen vapor at a first temperature above the melting point or sublimation point of the halogen at a sufficient vapor pressure and for a duration of time sufficient to cause the halogen molecules to penetrate an interlayer space of the layered material, forming a stable halogen-intercalated compound; and (b) heating the halogen-intercalated compound at a second temperature above the boiling point of the halogen, allowing halogen atoms or molecules residing in the interlayer space to exfoliate the layered material to produce the platelets. Alternatively, rather than heating, step (a) is followed by a step of dispersing the halogen-intercalated compound in a liquid medium which is subjected to ultrasonication for exfoliating the halogen-intercalated compound to produce the platelets, which are dispersed in the liquid medium. The halogen can be readily captured and re-used, thereby significantly reducing the impact of halogen to the environment. The method can further include a step of dispersing the platelets in a polymer or monomer solution or suspension as a precursor step to nanocomposite fabrication.

  7. Method of producing nano-scaled graphene and inorganic platelets and their nanocomposites

    DOEpatents

    Jang, Bor Z.; Zhamu, Aruna

    2012-02-14

    Disclosed is a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm, and often between 0.34 nm and 1.02 nm. The method comprises: (a) subjecting the layered material in a powder form to a halogen vapor at a first temperature above the melting point or sublimation point of the halogen at a sufficient vapor pressure and for a duration of time sufficient to cause the halogen molecules to penetrate an interlayer space of the layered material, forming a stable halogen-intercalated compound; and (b) heating the halogen-intercalated compound at a second temperature above the boiling point of the halogen, allowing halogen atoms or molecules residing in the interlayer space to exfoliate the layered material to produce the platelets. Alternatively, rather than heating, step (a) is followed by a step of dispersing the halogen-intercalated compound in a liquid medium which is subjected to ultrasonication for exfoliating the halogen-intercalated compound to produce the platelets, which are dispersed in the liquid medium. The halogen can be readily captured and re-used, thereby significantly reducing the impact of halogen to the environment. The method can further include a step of dispersing the platelets in a polymer or monomer solution or suspension as a precursor step to nanocomposite fabrication.

  8. Long-Duration Carbon Dioxide Anesthesia of Fish Using Ultra Fine (Nano-Scale) Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kugino, Kenji; Tamaru, Shizuka; Hisatomi, Yuko; Sakaguchi, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated whether adding ultrafine (nano-scale) oxygen-carrying bubbles to water concurrently with dissolved carbon-dioxide (CO2) could result in safe, long-duration anesthesia for fish. Results: To confirm the lethal effects of CO2 alone, fishes were anesthetized with dissolved CO2 in 20°C seawater. Within 30 minutes, all fishes, regardless of species, died suddenly due to CO2-induced narcosis, even when the water was saturated with oxygen. Death was attributed to respiration failure caused by hypoxemia. When ultrafine oxygen-carrying bubbles were supplied along with dissolved CO2, five chicken grunts were able to remain anesthetized for 22 hours and awoke normally within 2–3 hours after cessation of anesthesia. Conclusions: The high internal pressures and oxygen levels of the ultrafine bubbles enabled efficient oxygen diffusion across the branchia and permitted the organismal oxygen demands of individual anesthetized fish to be met. Thus, we demonstrated a method for safe, long-duration carbon dioxide anesthesia in living fish under normal water temperatures. PMID:27100285

  9. Analysis and Correction of Dynamic Geometric Misalignment for Nano-Scale Computed Tomography at BSRF.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Li, Chen; Liu, Zhenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Due to its high spatial resolution, synchrotron radiation x-ray nano-scale computed tomography (nano-CT) is sensitive to misalignments in scanning geometry, which occurs quite frequently because of mechanical errors in manufacturing and assembly or from thermal expansion during the time-consuming scanning. Misalignments degrade the imaging results by imposing artifacts on the nano-CT slices. In this paper, the geometric misalignment of the synchrotron radiation nano-CT has been analyzed by partial derivatives on the CT reconstruction algorithm and a correction method, based on cross correlation and least-square sinusoidal fitting, has been reported. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with the full-field transmission x-ray microscope nano-CT at the beamline 4W1A of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The numerical and experimental results have demonstrated the validity of the proposed approach. It can be applied for dynamic geometric misalignment and needs neither phantom nor additional correction scanning. We expect that this method will simplify the experimental operation of synchrotron radiation nano-CT. PMID:26509552

  10. Molecular mechanism of vinculin activation and nano-scale spatial organization in focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Case, Lindsay B.; Baird, Michelle A.; Shtengel, Gleb; Campbell, Sharon L.; Hess, Harald F.; Davidson, Michael W.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) link the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the actin cytoskeleton to mediate cell adhesion, migration, mechanosensing and signaling. FAs have conserved nanoscale protein organization, suggesting that the position of proteins within FAs regulates their activity and function. Vinculin binds different FA proteins to mediate distinct cellular functions, but how vinculin’s interactions are spatiotemporally organized within FA is unknown. Using interferometric photo-activation localization (iPALM) super-resolution microscopy to assay vinculin nanoscale localization and a FRET biosensor to assay vinculin conformation, we found that upward repositioning within the FA during FA maturation facilitates vinculin activation and mechanical reinforcement of FA. Inactive vinculin localizes to the lower integrin signaling layer in FA by binding to phospho-paxillin. Talin binding activates vinculin and targets active vinculin higher in FA where vinculin can engage retrograde actin flow. Thus, specific protein interactions are spatially segregated within FA at the nano-scale to regulate vinculin activation and function. PMID:26053221

  11. Nano-Scale Tensile Testing and Sample Preparation Techniques for Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Sudoh, Koichi; Sakakihara, Shouichi; Naito, Muneyuki; Inoue, Shozo; Namazu, Takahiro

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we describe an experimental technique to achieve a highly reliable characterization of the mechanical properties of silicon (Si) nanowires (NWs). A reusable on-chip Si device consisting of comb-drive electrostatic actuator for generating tensile force and capacitive sensors for measuring tensile force and displacement was designed and developed for quasi-static tensile test of Si NWs. The combination of focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication, FIB-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and probe manipulation enabled us to directly fabricate the NWs on the device. This sampling technique led to high yielding percentage of nano-scale tensile testing. The NWs were made from 200-nm-thick Si membranes that were produced by using silicon-on-nothing membrane fabrication technique. Several Si NWs were annealed at 700 °C in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) for 5 min in order to examine the influence of annealing on the mechanical characteristics. The mean Young's modulus for nonannealed NWs was 129.1+/-10.1 GPa. After UHV annealing, the mean value was improved to be 168.1+/-1.3 GPa, comparable to the ideal value for Si(001)[110]. The annealing process gave rise to improving the Young's modulus, whereas it degraded the strength. Transmission electron microscopy suggested that recrystallization and gallium nanoclusters formation by annealing would have changed the mechanical characteristics.

  12. Nano-scale surface wrinkling in chiral liquid crystals and plant-based plywoods.

    PubMed

    Rofouie, Pardis; Pasini, Damiano; Rey, Alejandro D

    2015-02-14

    We present theoretical scaling and computational analysis of nanostructured free surfaces formed in chiral liquid crystals (LC) and plant-based twisted plywoods. A nemato-capillary model is used to derive a generalized equation that governs the shape of cholesteric free surfaces. It is shown that the shape equation includes three distinct contributions to the capillary pressure: area dilation, area rotation, and director curvature. To analyse the origin of periodic reliefs in plywood surfaces, these three pressure contributions and corresponding surface energies are systematically investigated. It is found that for weak homeotropic surface anchoring, the nano-wrinkling is driven by the director curvature pressure mechanism. Consequently, the model predicts that for a planar surface with a uniform tangential helix vector, no surface nano-scale wrinkling can be observed because the director curvature pressure is zero. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relation between the wrinkling's amplitude to the wavelength ratio as a function of the anisotropic surface tension, which is then validated with experimental values. These new findings can be used to characterize plant-based twisted plywoods, as well as to inspire the design of biomimetic chiro-optical devices. PMID:25531936

  13. Single-electron tunneling by using a two-dimensional Corbino nano-scale disk

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, H.; Suzuki, A.

    2015-09-15

    We investigate a single-electron tunneling effect of two-dimensional electron systems formed in the Corbino nano-scale disk. By controlling bias and gate voltages, the transistor using this effect is able to control electrons one by one. The present study focuses on the electronic transmission probability affected by the charging energy in the Corbino-type single-electron transistor. We reformulated the Schrödinger equation for an electron in the Corbino disk in order to consider the effect of the curvature of the disk, taking into account the charging effect on the performance of the Corbino-type single-electron transistor. We formulated the transmission probability of the electron by applying the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method. The electron’s energy in the formula of the transmission probability is then associated to the energy eigenvalue of the Schrödinger equation for an electron in an effective confining potential. We numerically solved the Schrödinger equation to evaluate the transmission probability. Our results show that the transmission probability strongly depends on the charging energy stored in the Corbino disk depending on its size.

  14. Protein adsorption on nano-scaled, rippled TiO2 and Si surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, Jana; Richter, Jessica; Niepelt, Raphael; Kosan, Stefanie; Keller, Thomas F; Jandt, Klaus D; Ronning, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    We synthesized nano-scaled periodic ripple patterns on silicon and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) surfaces by xenon ion irradiation, and performed adsorption experiments with human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) on such surfaces as a function of the ripple wavelength. Atomic force microscopy showed the adsorption of HPF in mostly globular conformation on crystalline and amorphous flat Si surfaces as well as on nano-structured Si with long ripple wavelengths. For short ripple wavelengths the proteins seem to adsorb in a stretched formation and align across or along the ripples. In contrast to that, the proteins adsorb in a globular assembly on flat and long-wavelength rippled TiO(2), but no adsorbed proteins could be observed on TiO(2) with short ripple wavelengths due to a decrease of the adsorption energy caused by surface curvature. Consequently, the adsorption behavior of HPF can be tuned on biomedically interesting materials by introducing a nano-sized morphology while not modifying the stoichiometry/chemistry. PMID:22956465

  15. Direct mapping of local director field of nematic liquid crystals at the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Serra, Francesca; Yang, Shu; Kamien, Randall

    2015-03-01

    The director field in liquid crystals (LCs) has been characterized mainly via polarized optical microscopy, fluorescence confocal microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, all of which are limited by optical wavelengths - from hundreds of nanometers to several micrometers. Since LC orientation cannot be resolved directly by these methods, theory is needed to interpret the local director field of LC alignment. In this work, we introduce a new approach to directly visualize the local director field of a nematic LC (NLC) at the nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A new type of NLC monomer bearing crosslinkable groups was designed and synthesized. It can be well-oriented at particle surfaces and patterned polymer substrates, including micron-sized silica colloids, porous membranes, micropillar arrays, and 1D channels. After carefully crosslinking, the molecular orientation of NLCs around the particles or within the patterns could be directly visualized by SEM, showing oriented nanofibers representing LC director from the fractured samples. Here, we could precisely resolve not only the local director field by this approach, but the defect structures of NLCs, including hedgehogs and line defects. The direct mapping of LC directors at the nanoscale using this method will improve our understanding of NLC local director field, and thus their manipulation and applications. More importantly, a theoretical interpretation will no longer be a necessity to resolve a new material system in this field.

  16. Nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic devices based on 2D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan

    In the last few years, the research community has been rapidly growing interests in two-dimensional (2D) crystals and their applications. The properties of these 2D crystals are diverse -- ranging from semi-metal such as graphene, semiconductors such as MoS2, to insulator such as boron nitride. These 2D crystals have many unique properties as compared to their bulk counterparts due to their reduced dimensionality and symmetry. A key difference is the band structures, which lead to distinct electronic and photonic properties. The 2D nature of the material also plays an important role in defining their exceptional properties of mechanical strength, surface sensitivity, thermal conductivity, tunable band-gap and their interaction with light. These unique properties of 2D crystals open up a broad territory of applications in computing, communication, energy, and medicine. In this talk, I will present our work on understanding the electrical properties of graphene and MoS2, in particular current transport and band-gap engineering in graphene, interface between gate dielectrics and graphene, and gap states in MoS2. I will also present our work on the nano-scale electronic devices (RF and logic devices) and photonic devices (plasmonic devices and photo-detectors) based on these 2D crystals.

  17. Tribological characteristics of corrugated nano-scale dimpled and nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Gyu; Lee, Chang-Soon; Cho, In-Shik

    2013-12-01

    The effects of ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) on the tribological characteristics of two different Cu-based alloys sintered on low carbon steel were investigated using a ball-on-disk reciprocating tribometer with a hardened bearing steel ball under oil-lubricated conditions. Experimental results showed that both the UNSM-treated Cu-based alloy specimens reduced the friction coefficient and enhanced the wear resistance compared to those of the polished specimens. Improvements in tribological characteristics of the UNSM-treated specimens may be attributed to the corrugated nano-scale dimpled and nanostructured surfaces and increased hardness. Addition of the 0.52% ferrum to Cu-based alloy is found to be beneficial in improving the tribological characteristics and in reducing the grain size. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to analyze the worn surfaces and characterize the wear mechanisms of the polished and UNSM-treated specimens. SEM analyses showed that the UNSM could reduce the abrasive wear which was the dominant wear mechanism of both Cu-based alloys specimens. In addition, the density and porosity measurement of both sintered Cu-based alloys revealed that the density increased and the porosity decreased after UNSM. PMID:24266221

  18. Turbulent Channel Flow Measurements with a Nano-scale Thermal Anemometry Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Sean; Witte, Brandon

    2014-11-01

    Using a Nano-scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP), streamwise velocity was measured in a turbulent channel flow wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ = 500 to Reτ = 4000 . Use of these probes results in the a sensing-length-to-viscous-length-scale ratio of just 5 at the highest Reynolds number measured. Thus measured results can be considered free of spatial filtering effects. Point statistics are compared to recently published DNS and LDV data at similar Reynolds numbers and the results are found to be in good agreement. However, comparison of the measured spectra provide further evidence of aliasing at long wavelengths due to application of Taylor's frozen flow hypothesis, with increased aliasing evident with increasing Reynolds numbers. In addition to conventional point statistics, the dissipative scales of turbulence are investigated with focus on the wall-dependent scaling. Results support the existence of a universal pdf distribution of these scales once scaled to account for large-scale anisotropy. This research is supported by KSEF Award KSEF-2685-RDE-015.

  19. Measurement profiles of nano-scale ion beam for optimized radiation energy losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, T. H.; Cho, H. S.

    2011-10-01

    The behavior of charged particles is investigated for nano-scale ion beam therapy using a medical accelerator. Computational work is performed for the Bragg-peak simulation, which is focused on human organ material of pancreas and thyroid. The Results show that the trends of the dose have several different kinds of distributions. Before constructing a heavy ion collider, this study can give us the reliability of the therapeutic effect. Realistic treatment using human organs is calculated in a simple and cost effective manner using the computational code, the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter 2008 (SRIM 2008). Considering the safety of the therapy, it is suggested to give a patient orient planning of the cancer therapy. The energy losses in ionization and phonon are analyzed, which are the behaviors in the molecular level nano-scopic investigation. The different fluctuations are shown at 150 MeV, where the lowest temperature is found in proton and pancreas case. Finally, the protocol for the radiation therapy is constructed by the simulation in which the procedure for a better therapy is selected. An experimental measurement incorporated with the simulations could be programmed by this protocol.

  20. Development of a Cryostat to Characterize Nano-scale Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Mathew; Matheny, Matthew; Knudsen, Jasmine

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a low-noise vacuum cryostat to be used for the characterization of nano-scale superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Such devices are very sensitive to magnetic fields and can measure changes in flux on the order of a single electron magnetic moment. As a part of the design process, we calculated the separation required between the cryogenic preamplifier and superconducting magnet, including a high-permeability magnetic shield, using a finite-element model of the apparatus. The cryostat comprises a vacuum cross at room temperature for filtered DC and shielded RF electrical connections, a thin-wall stainless steel support tube, a taper-sealed cryogenic vacuum can, and internal mechanical support and wiring for the nanoSQUID. The Dewar is modified with a room-temperature flange with a sliding seal for the cryostat. The flange supports the superconducting 3 Tesla magnet and thermometry wiring. Upon completion of the cryostat fabrication and Dewar modifications, operation of the nanoSQUIDs as transported from our collaborator's laboratory in Israel will be confirmed, as the lead forming the SQUID is sensitive to oxidation and the SQUIDs must be shipped in a vacuum container. After operation of the nanoSQUIDs is confirmed, the primary work of characterizing their high-speed properties will begin. This will include looking at the measurement of relaxation oscillations at high bandwidth in comparison to the theoretical predictions of the current model.

  1. Wear properties of H13 with micron scale and nano scale grains bionic units processed by laser remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Cheng-tao; Liu, Yan; Ren, Lu-quan

    2013-12-01

    By simulating the cuticles of some soil animals, a combination of soft part (untreated substrate) and hard part (laser remelting area) structure was designed on metal surface to get an improved performance. Different specimens were prepared which contained units with micro and nano scale grains. The microstructures were observed by environmental field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the phases. The results of these tests indicate that due to the rapid solidification condition in the water, nano scale grains have a high microhardness between 1300 and 1000 HV. Retained austenite was found in it. Some of them transform to martensite in block on ring wear test. Specimens with bionic unit have a better wear resistance. Especially, the units with nano grains bring a further enhancement. The alternate soft and hard in macroscopic (substrate and laser remelting area) and microscopic (austenite and martensite) structure played a key role in improving the H13 wear resistance.

  2. Production of ultra-thin nano-scaled graphene platelets from meso-carbon micro-beads

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-11-11

    A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets (NGPs) having an average thickness no greater than 50 nm, typically less than 2 nm, and, in many cases, no greater than 1 nm. The method comprises (a) intercalating a supply of meso-carbon microbeads (MCMBs) to produce intercalated MCMBs; and (b) exfoliating the intercalated MCMBs at a temperature and a pressure for a sufficient period of time to produce the desired NGPs. Optionally, the exfoliated product may be subjected to a mechanical shearing treatment, such as air milling, air jet milling, ball milling, pressurized fluid milling, rotating-blade grinding, or ultrasonicating. The NGPs are excellent reinforcement fillers for a range of matrix materials to produce nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  3. A molecular dynamics simulation study on Bauschinger's effect in nano-scaled copper systems with and without interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Di

    Employing the molecular dynamics simulation method, we investigated the responses of nano-scaled Cu systems, including single crystal(SC), and crystals with twin boundaries(TW) and grain boundaries(GB) to cyclic deformation in different strain ranges. Bauschinger’s effect occurring during the cyclic processes was quantified, which showed a decreasing trend in the sequence of SC, GB and TW. The simulation results show that in the nano-scaled systems the annihilation of partial dislocations with opposite signs and shrinkage of associated stacking faults could be more responsible for the Bauchinger’s effect due to the narrowed spacing between boundaries, which may confine reversible movement of generated dislocations. The suggestion is supported by changes in some crucial parameters during cyclic loading processes, such as fluctuations of absorbed strain energy, variations in the amount of defect atoms, failure strains and stress concentrations before fracture. Efforts are made to elucidate possible mechanisms responsible for the observed phenomena.

  4. Density functional theory studies on the nano-scaled composites consisted of graphene and acyl hydrazone molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, J. L.; Zhou, L.; Lv, Z. C.; Ding, C. H.; Wu, Y. H.; Bai, H. C.

    2016-07-01

    Graphene, which is the first obtained single atomic layer 2D materials, has drawn a great of concern in nano biotechnology due to the unique property. On one hand, acyl hydrazone compounds belonging to the Schif bases have aroused considerable attention in medicine, pharmacy, and analytical reagent. However, few understanding about the interaction between graphene and acyl hydrazone molecules is now available. And such investigations are much crucial for the applications of these new nano-scaled composites. The current work revealed theoretical investigations on the nano-scaled composites built by acyl hydrazone molecules loaded on the surface of graphene. The relative energy, electronic property and the interaction between the counterparts of graphene/acyl hydrazone composites are investigated based on the density functional theory calculations. According to the obtained adsorption energy, the formation of the nano-scaled composite from the isolated graphene and acyl hydrazone molecule is exothermic, and thus it is energetically favorable to form these nano composites in viewpoint of total energy change. The frontier molecular orbital for the nano composite is mainly distributed at the graphene part, leading to that the energy levels of the frontier molecular orbital of the nano composites are very close to that of isolated graphene. Moreover, the counterpart interaction for the graphene/acyl hydrazone composites is also explored based on the discussions of orbital hybridization, charge redistribution and Van der Waals interaction.

  5. A nano-scale mirror-like surface of Ti–6Al–4V attained by chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenliang, Liang; Weili, Liu; Shasha, Li; Hui, Kong; Zefang, Zhang; Zhitang, Song

    2016-05-01

    Metal Ti and its alloys have been widely utilized in the fields of aviation, medical science, and micro-electro-mechanical systems, for its excellent specific strength, resistance to corrosion, and biological compatibility. As the application of Ti moves to the micro or nano scale, however, traditional methods of planarization have shown their short slabs. Thus, we introduce the method of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) to provide a new way for the nano-scale planarization method of Ti alloys. We obtain a mirror-like surface, whose flatness is of nano-scale, via the CMP method. We test the basic mechanical behavior of Ti–6Al–4V (Ti64) in the CMP process, and optimize the composition of CMP slurry. Furthermore, the possible reactions that may take place in the CMP process have been studied by electrochemical methods combined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An equivalent circuit has been built to interpret the dynamic of oxidation. Finally, a model has been established to explain the synergy of chemical and mechanical effects in the CMP of Ti–6Al–4V. Project supported by the National Major Scientific and Technological Special Project during the Twelfth Five-year Plan Period of China (Grant No. 2009ZX02030-1), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51205387), the Support by Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. 11nm0500300), and the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. 14XD1425300).

  6. Direct nano-scale observations of CO2 sequestration during brucite (Mg(OH)2) dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hövelmann, J.; Putnis, C. V.; Austrheim, H.; Ruiz-Agudo, E.

    2012-04-01

    Mineralization of CO2 is regarded as the safest and most permanent option for carbon sequestration (e.g., O'Connor et al. 2005). So far, research has been concentrated on the carbonation of silicates such as olivine ((Mg,Fe)2SiO4) and serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4). However, also the less common hydroxide mineral brucite (Mg(OH)2) has recently become a focus of interest, owing to its much higher reactivity relative to silicate minerals at low temperature and P CO2 conditions(e.g., Zhao et al. 2010; Schaef et al. 2011). Utilization of brucite for carbon sequestration requires an in-depth understanding of the associated reaction mechanisms from the macro- to the nano-scale. Therefore, we have conducted a series of in-situ and ex-situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments enabling direct nano-scale observations of dissolution and precipitation features on brucite (001) cleavage surfaces. In particular, we tested the effects of pH (2-12), aqueous NaHCO3 concentration (1μM - 1M) and P CO2 (0-1 bar) on brucite dissolution and carbonation. Brucite dissolution proceeded by the formation and spreading of etch pits with equilateral triangular shapes. Measured etch pit spreading rates increased with decreasing pH (from 0.030±0.008 nm/s at pH 9 to 0.70±0.07 nm/s at pH 2) and increasing NaHCO3 concentration (from 0.038±0.004 nm/s in 1μM to 0.38±0.07 nm/s in 1M solution). In pure NaHCO3 solutions (pH 7.2-9.3) secondary phase precipitation was relatively minor. Enhanced precipitation was observed in slightly acidified NaHCO3 solutions (pH 5) as well as in solutions that were equilibrated with 1 bar CO2 (pH 4). Nucleation predominantly occurred in areas of high dissolution such as larger step edges. Initially, nucleating particles were only 1-2 nm and weakly attached to the brucite surface as they could be easily pushed away by the scanning tip during in-situ AFM experiments. Growth of the particles was observed after ex-situ AFM experiments lasting for several hours. The

  7. Nano-scale optical and electrical probes of materials and processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the investigations and milestones of the Nano-Scale Optical and Electrical Probes of Materials and Processes Junior/Senior LDRD. The goal of this LDRD was to improve our understanding of radiative and non-radiative mechanisms at the nanometer scale with the aim of increasing LED and solar cell efficiencies. These non-radiative mechanisms were investigated using a unique combination of optical and scanning-probe microscopy methods for surface, materials, and device evaluation. For this research we utilized our new near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) system to aid in understanding of defect-related emission issues for GaN-based materials. We observed micrometer-scale variations in photoluminescence (PL) intensity for GaN films grown on Cantilever Epitaxy pattern substrates, with lower PL intensity observed in regions with higher dislocation densities. By adding electrical probes to the NSOM system, the photocurrent and surface morphology could be measured concurrently. Using this capability we observed reduced emission in InGaN MQW LEDs near hillock-shaped material defects. In spatially- and spectrally-resolved PL studies, the emission intensity and measured wavelength varied across the wafer, suggesting the possibility of indium segregation within the InGaN quantum wells. Blue-shifting of the InGaN MQW wavelength due to thinning of quantum wells was also observed on top of large-scale ({micro}m) defect structures in GaN. As a direct result of this program, we have expanded the awareness of our new NSOM/multifunctional SPM capability at Sandia and formed several collaborations within Sandia and with NINE Universities. Possible future investigations with these new collaborators might include GaN-based compound semiconductors for green LEDs, nanoscale materials science, and nanostructures, novel application of polymers for OLEDs, and phase imprint lithography for large area 3D nanostructures.

  8. Challenges for the Modern Science in its Descend Towards Nano Scale

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2013-01-01

    The current rise in the interest in physical phenomena at nano spatial scale is described hereby as a natural consequence of the scientific progress in manipulation with matter with an ever higher sensitivity. The reason behind arising of the entirely new field of nanoscience is that the properties of nanostructured materials may significantly differ from their bulk counterparts and cannot be predicted by extrapolations of the size-dependent properties displayed by materials composed of microsized particles. It is also argued that although a material can comprise critical boundaries at the nano scale, this does not mean that it will inevitably exhibit properties that endow a nanomaterial. This implies that the attribute of “nanomaterial” can be used only in relation with a given property of interest. The major challenges faced with the expansion of resolution of the materials design, in terms of hardly reproducible experiments, are further discussed. It is claimed that owing to an unavoidable interference between the experimental system and its environment to which the controlling system belongs, an increased fineness of the experimental settings will lead to ever more difficulties in rendering them reproducible and controllable. Self-assembly methods in which a part of the preprogrammed scientific design is substituted with letting physical systems spontaneously evolve into attractive and functional structures is mentioned as one of the ways to overcome the problems inherent in synthetic approaches at the ultrafine scale. The fact that physical systems partly owe their properties to the interaction with their environment implies that each self-assembly process can be considered a co-assembly event. PMID:26491428

  9. Advances in micro/nano scale materials processing by ultrafast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotakis, Costas

    2009-03-01

    Materials processing by ultrafast lasers offers several attractive possibilities for micro/nano scale applications based on surface and in bulk laser induced modifications. The origin of these applications lies in the reduction of undesirable thermal effects, the non-equilibrium surface and volume structural modifications which may give rise to complex and unusual structures, the supression of photochemical effects in molecular substrates, the possibility of optimization of energy dissipation by temporal pulse shaping and the exploitation of filamentation effects. Diverse applications will be discussed, including the development and functionalization of laser engineered surfaces, the laser transfer of biomolecules and the functionalization of 3D structures constructed by multiphoton stereolithography. Two examples will be presented in this context: A new approach for the development of superhydrophobic, self-cleaning surfaces [1,2] and the fabrication of functional scaffolds for tissue engineering applications [3-5]. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] V. Zorba et al., ``Biomimetic artificial surfaces quantitatively reproduce the water repellency of a Lotus leaf'', Advanced Materials 20, 4049 (2008).[0pt] [2] V. Zorba et al., ``Tailoring the wetting response of silicon surfaces via fs laser structuring'', Applied Physics A 93, 819 (2008).[0pt] [3] V. Dinca et al., ``Quantification of the activity of biomolecules in microarrays obtained by direct laser transfer'', Biomedical Microdevices 10, 719 (2008).[0pt] [4] B. Hopp et al., ``Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation'', Applied Physics A 93, 45 (2008).[0pt] [5] V. Dinca et al., ``Directed three-dimensional patterning of self-assembled peptide fibrils'', Nano Letters 8, 538 (2008).

  10. Molecular- and Nano-Scale Structure and Reactivity of Biogenic Uranium(IV) Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, E. J.; Bargar, J. R.; Veeramani, H.; Sharp, J. O.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Survova, E.; Giammar, D. E.; Ulrich, K.; Mehta, A.; Webb, S. M.; Conradson, S. D.; Clark, D. L.; Ilton, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    Bioremediation has been proposed and extensively researched as an in-situ immobilization strategy for uranium contamination in the subsurface with nanoparticulate uraninite (UO2) being the commonly reported product. Little detail is known about the structure and reactivity of this material, but based on comparison to its closest abiotic analog, UO2+x (0 < x < 0.25), we expect that it is complex and disordered and capable of structurally incorporating common groundwater cations. In addition, it has been predicted that the nanoparticulate form would induce strain and increase the solubility, and therefore reduce the effectiveness of this method as a remediation technology. In this study, the local-, intermediate- and long-range atomic and nano-scale structure of biogenic UO2 (formed at varying pH and divalent cation concentration, using Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1) was characterized using EXAFS, SR-based powder diffraction and TEM. The lattice parameter of the nanoparticulate phase is seen to be consistent with bulk UO2. There is no evidence for hyperstoichiometry or strain of the UO2 particles, the latter indicating that surface energy is relatively modest. Similar results were obtained for biogenic UO2 particles produced by other metal reducing bacteria indicating that biological variability may play a minimal role in structure. In agreement with the structural analysis, the surface area-normalized dissolution rate of the biogenic UO2 was found to be comparable to that of coarser, synthetic UO2.00. Mn2+ was found to attenuate the particle size of biogenic UO2+xand to be structurally incorporated. This finding suggests that groundwater composition can have a pronounced impact on the structure and properties of biogenic uraninite.

  11. Structure-mechanical function relations at nano-scale in heat-affected human dental tissue.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tan; Sandholzer, Michael A; Le Bourhis, Eric; Baimpas, Nikolaos; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2014-04-01

    The knowledge of the mechanical properties of dental materials related to their hierarchical structure is essential for understanding and predicting the effect of microstructural alterations on the performance of dental tissues in the context of forensic and archaeological investigation as well as laser irradiation treatment of caries. So far, few studies have focused on the nano-scale structure-mechanical function relations of human teeth altered by chemical or thermal treatment. The response of dental tissues to thermal treatment is thought to be strongly affected by the mineral crystallite size, their spatial arrangement and preferred orientation. In this study, synchrotron-based small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) techniques were used to investigate the micro-structural alterations (mean crystalline thickness, crystal perfection and degree of alignment) of heat-affected dentine and enamel in human dental teeth. Additionally, nanoindentation mapping was applied to detect the spatial and temperature-dependent nano-mechanical properties variation. The SAXS/WAXS results revealed that the mean crystalline thickness distribution in dentine was more uniform compared with that in enamel. Although in general the mean crystalline thickness increased both in dentine and enamel as the temperature increased, the local structural variations gradually reduced. Meanwhile, the hardness and reduced modulus in enamel decreased as the temperature increased, while for dentine, the tendency reversed at high temperature. The analysis of the correlation between the ultrastructure and mechanical properties coupled with the effect of temperature demonstrates the effect of mean thickness and orientation on the local variation of mechanical property. This structural-mechanical property alteration is likely to be due to changes of HAp crystallites, thus dentine and enamel exhibit different responses at different temperatures. Our results enable an improved understanding of

  12. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seungmin Mondal, Paramita

    2014-06-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage.

  13. Nano-Scale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry - A new analytical tool in biogeochemistry and soil ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, A M; Ritz, K; Nunan, N; Clode, P L; Pett-Ridge, J; Kilburn, M R; Murphy, D V; O'Donnell, A G; Stockdale, E A

    2006-10-18

    Soils are structurally heterogeneous across a wide range of spatio-temporal scales. Consequently, external environmental conditions do not have a uniform effect throughout the soil, resulting in a large diversity of micro-habitats. It has been suggested that soil function can be studied without explicit consideration of such fine detail, but recent research has indicated that the micro-scale distribution of organisms may be of importance for a mechanistic understanding of many soil functions. Due to a lack of techniques with adequate sensitivity for data collection at appropriate scales, the question 'How important are various soil processes acting at different scales for ecological function?' is challenging to answer. The nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometer (NanoSIMS) represents the latest generation of ion microprobes which link high-resolution microscopy with isotopic analysis. The main advantage of NanoSIMS over other secondary ion mass spectrometers is the ability to operate at high mass resolution, whilst maintaining both excellent signal transmission and spatial resolution ({approx}50 nm). NanoSIMS has been used previously in studies focusing on presolar materials from meteorites, in material science, biology, geology and mineralogy. Recently, the potential of NanoSIMS as a new tool in the study of biophysical interfaces in soils has been demonstrated. This paper describes the principles of NanoSIMS and discusses the potential of this tool to contribute to the field of biogeochemistry and soil ecology. Practical considerations (sample size and preparation, simultaneous collection of isotopes, mass resolution, isobaric interference and quantification of the isotopes of interest) are discussed. Adequate sample preparation avoiding biases in the interpretation of NanoSIMS data due to artifacts and identification of regions-of interest are of most concerns in using NanoSIMS as a new tool in biogeochemistry and soil ecology. Finally, we review the areas of

  14. Nano-Scale Sample Acquisition Systems for Small Class Exploration Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, G.

    2015-12-01

    The paradigm for space exploration is changing. Large and expensive missions are very rare and the space community is turning to smaller, lighter, and less expensive missions that could still perform great exploration. These missions are also within reach of commercial companies such as the Google Lunar X Prize teams that develop small scale lunar missions. Recent commercial endeavors such as "Planet Labs inc." and Sky Box Imaging, inc. show that there are new benefits and business models associated with miniaturization of space hardware. The Nano-Scale Sample Acquisition System includes NanoDrill for capture of small rock cores and PlanetVac for capture of surface regolith. These two systems are part of the ongoing effort to develop "Micro Sampling" systems for deployment by the small spacecraft with limited payload capacities. The ideal applications include prospecting missions to the Moon and Asteroids. The MicroDrill is a rotary-percussive coring drill that captures cores 7 mm in diameter and up to 2 cm long. The drill weighs less than 1 kg and can capture a core from a 40 MPa strength rock within a few minutes, with less than 10 Watt power and less than 10 Newton of preload. The PlanetVac is a pneumatic based regolith acquisition system that can capture surface sample in touch-and-go maneuver. These sampling systems were integrated within the footpads of commercial quadcopter for testing. As such, they could also be used by geologists on Earth to explore difficult to get to locations.

  15. Polypeptide Transport-Associated Domains of the Toc75 Channel Protein Are Located in the Intermembrane Space of Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yih-Lin; Chen, Lih-Jen; Li, Hsou-Min

    2016-09-01

    Toc75 is the channel for protein translocation across the chloroplast outer envelope membrane. Toc75 belongs to the Omp85 protein family and consists of three N-terminal polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains that are essential for the functions of Toc75, followed by a membrane-spanning β-barrel domain. In bacteria, POTRA domains of Omp85 family members are located in the periplasm, where they interact with other partner proteins to accomplish protein secretion and outer membrane protein assembly. However, the orientation and therefore the molecular function of chloroplast Toc75 POTRA domains remain a matter of debate. We investigated the topology of Toc75 using bimolecular fluorescence complementation and immunogold electron microscopy. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses showed that in stably transformed plants, Toc75 N terminus is located on the intermembrane space side, not the cytosolic side, of the outer membrane. Immunogold labeling of endogenous Toc75 POTRA domains in pea (Pisum sativum) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confirmed that POTRA domains are located in the intermembrane space of the chloroplast envelope. PMID:27388682

  16. Elasto-plastic characteristics and mechanical properties of as-sprayed 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia coating under nano-scales measured by nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J. M.; Dai, C. Y.; Shen, Y. G.; Mao, W. G.

    2014-08-01

    The elasto-plastic characteristics and mechanical properties of as-received 8 mol% Y2O3-ZrO2 (8YSZ) coatings were studied by nanoindentation at ultra-low loads with a Berkovich indenter at room temperature. All experimental data including hardness H and elastic modulus E were analyzed by the Weibull statistical method due to the porous and heterogeneous nature of the tested samples. It was found that the hardness firstly exhibits interesting reverse indentation size effect, and then shows normal indentation size effect within different indentation scales. The average elastic modulus of 8YSZ was estimated as 214.8 ± 13.2 GPa. In order to reveal the elasto-plastic characteristics of 8YSZ at nano-scales, the distribution of resolved shear stresses underneath the indenter tip region was evaluated by Hertzian contact theory when the deformation behavior of 8YSZ changed from fully elastic to elasto-plastic stages. The results shed light on understanding possible foreign object damage mechanisms of thermal barrier coating systems.

  17. Engineered interfaces and nano-scale thin films for solid oxide fuel cell electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandasiri, Manjula I.

    Solid state electrolytes with high oxygen ionic conductivity at low temperatures are required to develop cost effective and efficient solid oxide fuel cells. This study investigates the influence of engineered interfaces on the oxygen ionic conductivity of nano-scale multilayer thin film electrolytes. The epitaxial Sm2O3 doped CeO2 (SDC) and Sc2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (ScSZ) are selected as the alternative layers for the proposed multilayer thin film electrolyte based on the optimum structural, chemical, and electrical properties reported in the previous studies. The epitaxial SDC(111)/ScSZ(111) multilayer thin films are grown on high purity Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Prior to the deposition of multilayers, the growth parameters are optimized for epitaxial CeO 2, ZrO2, SDC, and ScSZ thin films. The epitaxial orientation and surface morphology of CeO2 thin films shows dependency on the growth rate. Epitaxial CeO2(111) is obtained at relatively high growth rates (>9 A/min) at a substrate temperature of 650°C and an oxygen partial pressure of 2 x 10 -5 Torr. The same growth parameters are used for the deposition of ZrO2 thin films. ZrO2 exhibits both monoclinic and cubic phases, which is stabilized in the cubic structure by doping with Sc 2O3. The Sm and Sc evaporation rates are varied during the growth to obtain thin films of 15 mol % SmO1.5 doped CeO2 and 20 mol % ScO1.5 stabilized ZrO2, respectively. The SDC/ScSZ multilayer thin films are grown using the same growth parameters by varying the number of layers. The SDC/ScSZ multilayer thin films show significant enhancement in the oxygen ionic conductivity in comparison to single layer SDC and ScSZ thin films. The increase in the oxygen ionic conductivity with the increase in number of layers can be attributed to lattice mismatch induced ionic conductivity along the interfaces. The 8-layer film exhibits the maximum oxygen ionic conductivity with one order of magnitude

  18. Nano-scale evidence of organic matter mineralization in recent tufa deposits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Elena; Perri, Edoardo; Tucker, Maurice

    2010-05-01

    0,4 to 1 μm and during their growth develop elongate, needle-like crystals or are connected in a pyramidal-shaped solid. Successively triads can be found closely stacked along their C axis, laterally spaced, to form polyhedrons of calcite (mainly tetrahedrons) that create a mineral framework within the biofilm. Single polyhedrons cannot often be distinguished from the external walls of the columns and pinnacles. Neomorphic micro-scale precipitates are extensively observed in close association with either organic living matter or non-living components within the biofilm. The nano-scale mineral units begin their formation mainly by replacing the degrading organic matter substrates.

  19. Using Laser Scanning Cytometry to investigate the transport of nano-scale latex particles in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; May, R.

    2011-12-01

    The increased production and widespread application of nanomaterials in recent years has been unprecedented. Once entering water environment, many engineered nanomaterials may form stable aggregates sized from several nanometers to several microns. While classic filtration theory predicts enhanced deposition for small-sized particles, different observations have been reported on the influences of particle size on the deposition. Therefore, further investigation on the effects of nano-scale particle size on their transport is necessary. While typical column experiments can provide valuable insights, such methods do not clearly distinguish how spatial and temporal changes in hydrodynamic conditions affect particle transport. Pore scale experiments can be setup to directly visualize particle transport and retention in pore spaces. Such techniques require high resolution to observe nano-scale particles, which is thus typically limited to observe only several pore spaces. In this work, we explored the possibility of using Laser Scanning Cytometery (LSC) to investigate the transport of nano-scale particles in porous media. Retention of 510nm, 210nm and 57 nm florescent latex particles in a flow cell (50mm x 5mm x 0.8mm) packed with 20-30 mesh glass beads were scanned by LSC. We were able to obtain the spatial distribution of retained nanoparticles in the flow cell (Figure 1). Particle spatial distributions corresponding to different environmental factors (e.g. ionic strength, flow velocity, injection duration) were statistically compared for different sized particles. Insights gained from this work could be beneficial for both nanomaterial-based remediation technology design and evaluation of the potential risks of engineered nanomaterials.

  20. HPV-Associated Head and Neck Cancer: Molecular and Nano-Scale Markers for Prognosis and Therapeutic Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Adam J.; Torres, Alexandra D.; Yang, Robert Z.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, it has become clear that patients with head and neck cancer can be stratified into two distinct subgroups on the basis of the etiology of their disease. Patients with human papillomavirus-related cancers have significantly better survival rates and may necessitate different therapeutic approaches than those with tobacco and/or alcohol related cancers. This review discusses the various biomarkers currently in use for identification of patients with HPV-positive cancers with a focus on the advantages and limitations of molecular and nano-scale markers. PMID:22666080

  1. HPV-associated head and neck cancer: molecular and nano-scale markers for prognosis and therapeutic stratification.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Torres, Alexandra D; Yang, Robert Z; Kimple, Randall J

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, it has become clear that patients with head and neck cancer can be stratified into two distinct subgroups on the basis of the etiology of their disease. Patients with human papillomavirus-related cancers have significantly better survival rates and may necessitate different therapeutic approaches than those with tobacco and/or alcohol related cancers. This review discusses the various biomarkers currently in use for identification of patients with HPV-positive cancers with a focus on the advantages and limitations of molecular and nano-scale markers. PMID:22666080

  2. Long-term superelastic cycling at nano-scale in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy micropillars

    SciTech Connect

    San Juan, J. Gómez-Cortés, J. F.

    2014-01-06

    Superelastic behavior at nano-scale has been studied along cycling in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy micropillars. Arrays of square micropillars were produced by focused ion beam milling, on slides of [001] oriented Cu-Al-Ni single crystals. Superelastic behavior of micropillars, due to the stress-induced martensitic transformation, has been studied by nano-compression tests during thousand cycles, and its evolution has been followed along cycling. Each pillar has undergone more than thousand cycles without any detrimental evolution. Moreover, we demonstrate that after thousand cycles they exhibit a perfectly reproducible and completely recoverable superelastic behavior.

  3. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  4. Microstructural Analysis of Cold-Sprayed Ti-6Al-4V at the Micro- and Nano-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birt, A. M.; Champagne, V. K.; Sisson, R. D.; Apelian, D.

    2015-10-01

    The microstructure of cold-sprayed Ti-6Al-4V is unlike the structure resulting from any other processing technique. The unique characteristics are derived from the solid state thermomechanical processing of predominantly martensitic feedstock powders. During deposition, these powders undergo high strain rate deformation, leading to shear band-induced transformation of martensitic grains into nano-scale martensite, equiaxed alpha structures, and nanostructured alpha grains. The resultant microstructure evolution is dependent on the magnitude and direction of shear undergone by the particles. The specific structure and mechanism for formation of these regions will be discussed in detail using nanohardness mapping, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Femtosecond pulsed laser processing of electronic materials: Fundamentals and micro/nano-scale applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Tae-Youl

    ultrashort laser pulse accompanied by the pre-pulse induces air breakdown that can be detrimental to materials processing. A time-resolved pump-and-probe experiment provides distinct evidence for the occurrence of an air plasma and air breakdown. This highly nonlinear phenomenon takes place before the commencement of the ablation process, which is traced beyond elapsed time of the order of 10 ps with respect to the ablating pulse. The nonlinear refractive index of the generated air plasma is calculated as a function of electron density. The self-focusing of the main pulse is identified by the third order nonlinear susceptibility. A crystalline silicon sample is subjected to two optically separated ultra-fast laser pulses of full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) duration of about 80 femtoseconds. These pulses are delivered at wavelength, lambda = 800 nm. Femtosecond-resolved imaging pump-and-probe experiments in reflective and Schlieren configurations have been performed to investigate plasma dynamics and shock wave propagation during the sample ablation process. By using a diffractive optical element (DOE) for beam shaping, microchannels were fabricated. A super-long working distance objective lens was used to machine silicon materials in the sub-micrometer scale. As an extension of micro-machining, the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to assess the feasibility of using near-field distribution of laser light. Gold coated films were machined with nano-scale dimensions and characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  6. Characterization of Nano-scale Aluminum Oxide Transport Through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, Sasha Norien

    Land application of biosolids has become common practice in the United States as an alternative to industrial fertilizers. Although nutrient rich, biosolids have been found to contain high concentrations of unregulated and/or unrecognized emerging contaminants (e.g., pharmaceuticals, personal care products) while containing a significant fraction of inorganic nano-scale colloidal materials such as oxides of iron, titanium, and aluminum. Given their reactivity and small size, there are many questions concerning the potential migration of these nano-sized colloidal materials through the soil column and into our surface and groundwater bodies. Transport of emerging pollutants of concern through the soil column, at minimum, is impacted by colloidal properties (e.g., chemical composition, shape, aggregation kinetics), solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter), and water flow velocity. The purpose of this current research was to characterize the long-term transport behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al 2O3) through a natural porous media with changes in pH, aqueous-phase concentration, pore-water velocity and electrolyte valence. Additionally, deposition rates during the initial stages of deposition were compared to several models developed based on colloid filtration theory and DLVO stability theory. Benchtop column laboratory experiments showed that, under environmentally relevant groundwater conditions, Al2O3 nanoparticles are mobile through saturated porous media. Mobility increased under conditions in which the nanoparticles and porous media were of like charge (pH 9). Changes in linear pore water velocity, under these same high pH conditions, showed similar transport behavior with little mass retained in the system. Deposition is believed to be kinetically controlled at pH 9, as evidenced by the slightly earlier breakthrough as flow rate increased and was further supported by observed concentration effects on the arrival wave

  7. Performance assessment and optimization of an irreversible nano-scale Stirling engine cycle operating with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad-Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah

    2015-09-01

    Developing new technologies like nano-technology improves the performance of the energy industries. Consequently, emerging new groups of thermal cycles in nano-scale can revolutionize the energy systems' future. This paper presents a thermo-dynamical study of a nano-scale irreversible Stirling engine cycle with the aim of optimizing the performance of the Stirling engine cycle. In the Stirling engine cycle the working fluid is an Ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas. Moreover, two different strategies are proposed for a multi-objective optimization issue, and the outcomes of each strategy are evaluated separately. The first strategy is proposed to maximize the ecological coefficient of performance (ECOP), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F . Furthermore, the second strategy is suggested to maximize the thermal efficiency ( η), the dimensionless ecological function (ecf) and the dimensionless thermo-economic objective function ( F). All the strategies in the present work are executed via a multi-objective evolutionary algorithms based on NSGA∥ method. Finally, to achieve the final answer in each strategy, three well-known decision makers are executed. Lastly, deviations of the outcomes gained in each strategy and each decision maker are evaluated separately.

  8. Optic imaging of single and two-phase pressure-driven flows in nano-scale channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihua; Ok, Jeong Tae; Sun, Yongpeng; Retterer, S T; Neeves, Keith B; Yin, Xiaolong; Bai, Baojun; Ma, Yinfa

    2013-03-21

    Microfluidic and nanofluidic devices have undergone rapid development in recent years. Functions integrated onto such devices provide lab-on-a-chip solutions for many biomedical, chemical, and engineering applications. In this paper, a lab-on-a-chip technique for direct visualization of the single- and two-phase pressure-driven flows in nano-scale channels was developed. The nanofluidic chip was designed and fabricated; concentration dependent fluorescence signal correlation was developed for the determination of flow rate. Experiments of single and two-phase flow in nano-scale channels with 100 nm depth were conducted. The linearity correlation between flow rate and pressure drop in nanochannels was obtained and fit closely into Poiseuille's Law. Meanwhile, three different flow patterns, single, annular, and stratified, were observed from the two-phase flow in the nanochannel experiments and their special features were described. A two-phase flow regime map for nanochannels is presented. Results are of critical importance to both fundamental study and many applications. PMID:23370894

  9. Nonreciprocal lasing and polarization selectivity in silicon ring Raman lasers based on micro- and nano-scale waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, N.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper I present a generic model that describes the lasing characteristics of continuous-wave circular and racetrack-shaped ring Raman lasers based on micro- and nano-scale silicon waveguides, including their lasing directionality and polarization behavior. This model explicitly takes into account the effective Raman gain values for forward and backward lasing, the Raman amplification in the bus waveguide, and the spatial gain variations for different polarization states in the ring structure. I show numerically that ring lasers based on micro-scale waveguides generate unidirectional lasing in either the forward or backward direction because of an asymmetry in nonlinear losses at near-infrared telecommunication wavelengths, whereas those based on nanowires yield only backward lasing due to a non-reciprocity in effective gain. Furthermore, the model indicates that backward lasing can yield a significantly higher lasing output at the bus waveguide facets than lasing in the forward direction. Finally, considering a TE-polarized pump input for a (100) grown silicon ring Raman laser, I demonstrate numerically that the polarization state of the lasing radiation strongly depends on whether micro-scale or nano-scale waveguides are used.

  10. Inkjet-based deposition of polymer thin films enabled by a lubrication model incorporating nano-scale parasitics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Shrawan; Meissl, Mario J.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    Thin film lubrication theory has been widely used to model multi-scale fluid phenomena. Variations of the same have also found application in fluid-based manufacturing process steps for micro- and nano-scale devices over large areas where a natural disparity in length scales exists. Here, a novel inkjet material deposition approach has been enabled by an enhanced thin film lubrication theory that accounts for nano-scale substrate parasitics. This approach includes fluid interactions with a thin flexible superstrate towards a new process called Jet and Coat of Thin-films (JCT). Numerical solutions of the model have been verified, and also validated against controlled experiments of polymer film deposition with good agreement. Understanding gleaned from the experimentally validated model has then been used to facilitate JCT process synthesis resulting in substantial reduction in the influence of parasitics and a concomitant improvement in the film thickness uniformity. Polymer films ranging from 20 to 500 nm mean thickness have been demonstrated with standard deviation of less than 2% of the mean film thickness. The JCT process offers advantages over spin coating which is not compatible with roll-to-roll processing and large area processing for displays. It also improves over techniques such as knife edge coating, slot die coating, as they are limited in the range of thicknesses of films that can be deposited without compromising uniformity.

  11. Three-dimensional micro/nano-scale structure fabricated by combination of non-volatile polymerizable RTIL and FIB irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabata, Susumu; Minamimoto, Hiro; Inoue, Kosuke; Imanishi, Akihito; Hosoya, Ken; Uyama, Hiroshi; Torimoto, Tsukasa; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Seki, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) has been widely investigated as a nonvolatile solvent as well as a unique liquid material because of its interesting features, e.g., negligible vapor pressure and high thermal stability. Here we report that a non-volatile polymerizable RTIL is a useful starting material for the fabrication of micro/nano-scale polymer structures with a focused-ion-beam (FIB) system operated under high-vacuum condition. Gallium-ion beam irradiation to the polymerizable 1-allyl-3-ethylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethane)sulfonyl)amide RTIL layer spread on a Si wafer induced a polymerization reaction without difficulty. What is interesting to note is that we have succeeded in provoking the polymerization reaction anywhere on the Si wafer substrate by using FIB irradiation with a raster scanning mode. By this finding, two- and three-dimensional micro/nano-scale polymer structure fabrications were possible at the resolution of 500,000 dpi. Even intricate three-dimensional micro/nano-figures with overhang and hollow moieties could be constructed at the resolution of approximately 100 nm. PMID:24430465

  12. Discussion on the Applicability of Rayleigh-Plesset Equation for a Nano-scale bubble using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Shin-Ichi; Ogasawara, Kazuki; Itakura, Takumi

    2014-11-01

    Multi-phase flows such as cavitation and boiling have much variety on the scale in time and space compared with single phase flows. It is necessary to recognize the multi-scale structure accurately to construct a sophisticated numerical method for the prediction of various multi-phase flow phenomena. In this point of view, clarification of the valid range of continuum mechanics would be very important. Here, an interesting problem in the case of cavitation is, to what extent Rayleigh-Plesset (R-P) equation, which describes the radius change of a spherical bubble under a pressure given at far from the bubble, can express the behavior of a tiny bubble quantitatively. In this work, we discussed the validity of the application of R-P equation to a nano-scale bubble using Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation. In the simulation, liquid argon at a decompressed state in a cubic domain was simulated. As a result, a nano-scale bubble was generated after a waiting time, and it rapidly grew to several nanometers, and it reached to an equilibrium state showing a transient behavior. We compared the bubble radius change observed in the MD simulation with the numerical result of R-P equation, and confirmed that R-P equation can well predict the behavior of such tiny bubble.

  13. Cellular evidence for nano-scale exosome secretion and interactions with spermatozoa in the epididymis of the Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Ping; Chu, Xiaoya; Huang, Yufei; Liu, Tengfei; Zhang, Qian; Li, Quanfu; Hu, Lisi; Waqas, Yasir; Ahmed, Nisar; Chen, Qiusheng

    2016-04-12

    The epididymis is the location of sperm maturation and sperm storage. Recent studies have shown that nano-scale exosomes play a vital role during these complicated processes. Our aim was to analyze the secretory properties of epididymal exosomes and their ultrastructural interaction with maturing spermatozoa in the Chinese soft-shelled turtle. The exosome marker CD63 was primarily localized to the apices of principal cells throughout the epididymal epithelium. Identification of nano-scale exosomes and their secretory processes were further investigated via transmission electron microscopy. The epithelium secreted epididymal exosomes (50~300 nm in diameter) through apocrine secretion and the multivesicular body (MVB) pathway. Spermatozoa absorbed epididymal exosomes through endocytosis or membrane fusion pathways. This study shows, for the first time, that nano-scale exosomes use two secretion and two absorption pathways in the reptile, which may be contribute to long-term sperm storage. PMID:26992236

  14. Cellular evidence for nano-scale exosome secretion and interactions with spermatozoa in the epididymis of the Chinese soft-shelled turtle, Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Ping; Chu, Xiaoya; Huang, Yufei; Liu, Tengfei; Zhang, Qian; Li, Quanfu; Hu, Lisi; Waqas, Yasir; Ahmed, Nisar; Chen, Qiusheng

    2016-01-01

    The epididymis is the location of sperm maturation and sperm storage. Recent studies have shown that nano-scale exosomes play a vital role during these complicated processes. Our aim was to analyze the secretory properties of epididymal exosomes and their ultrastructural interaction with maturing spermatozoa in the Chinese soft-shelled turtle. The exosome marker CD63 was primarily localized to the apices of principal cells throughout the epididymal epithelium. Identification of nano-scale exosomes and their secretory processes were further investigated via transmission electron microscopy. The epithelium secreted epididymal exosomes (50~300 nm in diameter) through apocrine secretion and the multivesicular body (MVB) pathway. Spermatozoa absorbed epididymal exosomes through endocytosis or membrane fusion pathways. This study shows, for the first time, that nano-scale exosomes use two secretion and two absorption pathways in the reptile, which may be contribute to long-term sperm storage. PMID:26992236

  15. Real-time intermembrane force measurements and imaging of lipid domain morphology during hemifusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Woog; Kristiansen, Kai; Donaldson, Jr., Stephen H.; Cadirov, Nicholas; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is the core process in membrane trafficking and is essential for cellular transport of proteins and other biomacromolecules. During protein-mediated membrane fusion, membrane proteins are often excluded from the membrane–membrane contact, indicating that local structural transformations in lipid domains play a major role. However, the rearrangements of lipid domains during fusion have not been thoroughly examined. Here using a newly developed Fluorescence Surface Forces Apparatus (FL-SFA), migration of liquid-disordered clusters and depletion of liquid-ordered domains at the membrane–membrane contact are imaged in real time during hemifusion of model lipid membranes, together with simultaneous force–distance and lipid membrane thickness measurements. The load and contact time-dependent hemifusion results show that the domain rearrangements decrease the energy barrier to fusion, illustrating the significance of dynamic domain transformations in membrane fusion processes. Importantly, the FL-SFA can unambiguously correlate interaction forces and in situ imaging in many dynamic interfacial systems. PMID:26006266

  16. Real-time intermembrane force measurements and imaging of lipid domain morphology during hemifusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Woog; Kristiansen, Kai; Donaldson, Stephen H., Jr.; Cadirov, Nicholas; Banquy, Xavier; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-05-01

    Membrane fusion is the core process in membrane trafficking and is essential for cellular transport of proteins and other biomacromolecules. During protein-mediated membrane fusion, membrane proteins are often excluded from the membrane-membrane contact, indicating that local structural transformations in lipid domains play a major role. However, the rearrangements of lipid domains during fusion have not been thoroughly examined. Here using a newly developed Fluorescence Surface Forces Apparatus (FL-SFA), migration of liquid-disordered clusters and depletion of liquid-ordered domains at the membrane-membrane contact are imaged in real time during hemifusion of model lipid membranes, together with simultaneous force-distance and lipid membrane thickness measurements. The load and contact time-dependent hemifusion results show that the domain rearrangements decrease the energy barrier to fusion, illustrating the significance of dynamic domain transformations in membrane fusion processes. Importantly, the FL-SFA can unambiguously correlate interaction forces and in situ imaging in many dynamic interfacial systems.

  17. Ordered nano-scale domains in lithium niobate single crystals via phase-mask assisted all-optical poling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellington, I. T.; Valdivia, C. E.; Sono, T. J.; Sones, C. L.; Mailis, S.; Eason, R. W.

    2007-02-01

    We report the formation of directionally ordered nano-scale surface domains on the +z face of undoped congruent lithium niobate single crystals by using UV illumination through a phase mask of sub-micron periodicity with an energy fluence between ˜90 mJ/cm 2 and 150 mJ/cm 2 at λ = 266 nm. We clearly show here that the UV-induced surface ferroelectric domains only nucleate at and propagate along maxima of laser intensity. Although the domain line separation varies and is greater than 2 μm for this set of experimental conditions, this enables a degree of control over the all-optical poling process.

  18. Probing mechanical properties of thin film and ceramic materials in micro- and nano-scale using indentation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charitidis, Costas A.

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we report on the mechanical properties, failure and fracture modes in two cases of engineering materials; that is transparent silicon oxide thin films onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes and glass-ceramic materials. The first system was studied by the quazi-static indentation technique at the nano-scale and the second by the static indentation technique at the micro-scale. Nanocomposite laminates of silicon oxide thin films onto PET were found to sustain higher scratch induced stresses and were effective as protective coating material for PET membranes. Glass-ceramic materials with separated crystallites of different morphologies sustained a mixed crack propagation pattern in brittle fracture mode.

  19. Enhanced reactivity of mechanically-activated nano-scale gasless reactive materials consolidated via the cold-spray technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciochini, Antoine; Radulescu, Matei; Meydanoglu, Onur; Charron-Tousignant, Yannick; van Dyke, Jason; Jodoin, Bertrand; Nganbe, Michel; Yandouzi, Mohamed; Lee, Julian J.

    2011-06-01

    It has been speculated that gasless reactive systems can sustain supersonic detonations waves, provided the local decomposition rate is sufficiently fast and the initial density is sufficiently close to the theoretical maximal density. The present study presents a novel method to prepare nano-scale energetic materials with high reactivity, vanishing porosity, structural integrity and arbitrary shape. The experiments have focused on the Ni-Al system. To increase the reactivity, an initial mechanical activation was achieved by the technique of ball milling. The consolidation of the materials used the supersonic cold gas spray technique, where the particles are accelerated to high speeds and consolidated via plastic deformation upon impact, forming activated nano-composites in arbitrary shapes with close to zero porosity. This technique permits to retain the micro-structures in the powders and prevents any reactions during the consolidation phase. Deflagration tests of the obtained samples showed an increase in the deflagration rate by up to two orders of magnitude.

  20. The influence of the ion beam on the structure and optical properties of titanium nitride nano-scale thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odeh, Ibrahim; Elian, Rajaa

    2015-12-01

    Titanium nitride nano-scale thin films have been prepared by ion beam assisted reactive DC magnetron sputtering. The films are characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. The films are found to be amorphous. The effect of the ion beam during deposition was evident from smoothness of film surface (SEM and TEM images) and modifications in optical properties. Investigation of the optical constants shows stable refractive index dominating most of the visible range. The films are not highly absorptive in the visible range. An energy gap of 2.9 ± 0.1 eV is estimated for the IBAD amorphous titanium nitride nano-thin films. The stability of the films at normal room environment in addition to the golden color makes the nano-thin films suitable for hard and decorative coatings.

  1. Entransy analysis and optimization of performance of nano-scale irreversible Otto cycle operating with Maxwell-Boltzmann ideal gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad H.; Ahmadi, Mohammad Ali; Pourfayaz, Fathollah; Bidi, Mokhtar

    2016-08-01

    This paper made attempt to investigate thermodynamically a nano scale irreversible Otto cycle for optimizing its performance. This system employed an ideal Maxwell-Boltzmann gas as a working fluid. Two different scenarios were proposed in the multi-objective optimization process and the results of each of the scenarios were examined separately. The first scenario made attempt to maximize the dimensionless ecological function and minimize the dimensionless entransy dissipation of the system. Furthermore, the second scenario tried to maximize the ecological coefficient of performance and minimize the dimensionless entransy dissipation of the system. The multi objective evolutionary method integrated with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm was used to optimize the proposed objective functions. To determine the final output of each scenario, three efficient decision makers were employed. Finally, error analysis was employed to determine the deviation of solutions chosen by decision makers.

  2. Multiscale modeling of lithium-ion battery electrodes based on nano-scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkooli, Ali Ghorbani; Farhad, Siamak; Lee, Dong Un; Feng, Kun; Litster, Shawn; Babu, Siddharth Komini; Zhu, Likun; Chen, Zhongwei

    2016-03-01

    A multiscale platform has been developed to model lithium ion battery (LIB) electrodes based on the real microstructure morphology. This multiscale framework consists of a microscale level where the electrode microstructure architecture is modeled and a macroscale level where discharge/charge is simulated. The coupling between two scales are performed in real time unlike using common surrogate based models for microscale. For microscale geometry 3D microstructure is reconstructed based on the nano-scale X-ray computed tomography data replacing typical computer generated microstructure. It is shown that this model can predict the experimental performance of LiFePO4 (LFP) cathode at different discharge rates more accurate than the conventional homogenous models. The approach employed in this study provides valuable insight into the spatial distribution of lithium -ion inside the real microstructure of LIB electrodes. The inhomogenous microstructure of LFP causes a wider range of physical and electrochemical properties in microscale compared to homogenous models.

  3. Signal Processing for Wireless Communication MIMO System with Nano- Scaled CSDG MOSFET based DP4T RF Switch.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Viranjay M

    2015-01-01

    In the present technological expansion, the radio frequency integrated circuits in the wireless communication technologies became useful because of the replacement of increasing number of functions, traditional hardware components by modern digital signal processing. The carrier frequencies used for communication systems, now a day, shifted toward the microwave regime. The signal processing for the multiple inputs multiple output wireless communication system using the Metal- Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) has been done a lot. In this research the signal processing with help of nano-scaled Cylindrical Surrounding Double Gate (CSDG) MOSFET by means of Double- Pole Four-Throw Radio-Frequency (DP4T RF) switch, in terms of Insertion loss, Isolation, Reverse isolation and Inter modulation have been analyzed. In addition to this a channel model has been presented. Here, we also discussed some patents relevant to the topic. PMID:25986227

  4. Surface force at the nano-scale: observation of non-monotonic surface tension and disjoining pressure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tiefeng; Firouzi, Mahshid; Li, Qibin; Peng, Kang

    2015-08-28

    Nano bubbles and films are important in theory and various applications, such as the specific ion effect of bubble coalescence, flotation and porous medium seepage; these rely greatly on the fundamental aspects of extended-DLVO surface forces. However, the origin and validation of the non-DLVO forces are still obscure, especially at the nano scale (1-5 nm). Herein, we report the first determination of the disjoining pressures of aqueous electrolyte nano-films using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results showed that adding salt does not lead to a decrease in the disjoining pressure. On the contrary, higher concentrations results in greater disjoining pressures. In addition, the temperature was found to significantly change the pattern of the disjoining pressure isotherm. These results aid the understanding of a number of underlying mechanisms, involving nano solid-liquid-gas surfaces. PMID:26171587

  5. Carbopol 934, 940 and Ultrez 10 as viscosity modifiers of palm olein esters based nano-scaled emulsion containing ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Ghassan Zuhair; Abdulkarim, Muthanna Fawzy; Mallikarjun, Chitneni; Mahdi, Elrashid Saleh; Basri, Mahiran; Sattar, Munavvar Abdul; Noor, Azmin Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Micro-emulsions and sometimes nano-emulsions are well known candidates to deliver drugs locally. However, the poor rheological properties are marginally affecting their acceptance pharmaceutically. This work aimed to modify the poor flow properties of a nano-scaled emulsion comprising palm olein esters as the oil phase and ibuprofen as the active ingredient for topical delivery. Three Carbopol ® resins: 934, 940 and Ultrez 10, were utilized in various concentrations to achieve these goals. Moreover, phosphate buffer and triethanolamine solutions pH 7.4 were used as neutralizing agents to assess their effects on the gel-forming and swelling properties of Carbopol ® 940. The addition of these polymers caused the produced nano-scaled emulsion to show a dramatic droplets enlargement of the dispersed globules, increased intrinsic viscosity, consistent zeta potential and transparent-to-opaque change in appearance. These changes were relatively influenced by the type and the concentration of the resin used. Carbopol ® 940 and triethanolamine appeared to be superior in achieving the proposed tasks compared to other materials. The higher the pH of triethanolamine solution, the stronger the flow-modifying properties of Carbopol ® 940. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation of a well-arranged gel network of Carbopol ® 940, which was the major cause for all realized changes. Later in vitro permeation studies showed a significant decrease in the drug penetration, thus further modification using 10% w/w menthol or limonene as permeation promoters was performed. This resulted in in vitro and in vivo pharmacodynamics properties that are comparably higher than the reference chosen for this study. PMID:23261730

  6. Simulation of self-organized waveguides for self-aligned coupling between micro- and nano-scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tetsuzo

    2015-05-01

    We propose an optical coupling technique based on the reflective self-organized lightwave network (R-SOLNET), where optical devices with different core sizes are connected, for nano-scale-waveguide-based optical interconnects. Growth of R-SOLNET between a 3-μm-wide waveguide and a 600-nm-wide waveguide, on the core edge of which a luminescent target has been deposited, is simulated by the finite-difference time-domain method. The two waveguides are placed with gap distances ranging from 16 to 64 μm in a photopolymer with a refractive index that increases upon exposure to a write beam and luminescence. When a 400 nm wavelength write beam is introduced from the micro-scale waveguide, 470 nm luminescence is generated from the target. In the area where the write beam and the luminescence overlap, the refractive index increases rapidly. The write beam and the luminescence thus attract each other to merge into one through the self-focusing, forming a self-aligned coupling waveguide of R-SOLNET with a coupling loss of 1.5-1.8 dB, even when a lateral misalignment of 600 nm exists between them. This indicates that the R-SOLNET can be used as an optical solder to connect a micro-scale waveguide to a nano-scale waveguide. The optimum writing time required to attain the minimum coupling loss increases with increasing lateral misalignment. The dependence of the optimum writing time on the misalignment is reduced with increasing gap distance, and it almost vanishes when the distance is 64 μm, enabling unmonitored optical solder formation. R-SOLNET utilizing the two-photon photochemistry is briefly described as the next-generation SOLNET.

  7. Mobility and Deposition of pre-Synthesis Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron in Long Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, C. V.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive zero-valent iron is currently being used for remediation of contaminated groundwater. Permeable reactive barriers are the current state-of-the-art method for using zero-valent iron. Instead of an excavated trench filled with granular zero-valent iron, a relatively new and promising method is the injection of a nano -scale zero-valent iron colloid suspension (nZVI) into the subsurface using injection wells. One goal of nZVI injection can be to deposit the iron in the aquifer and form a reactive permeable zone which is no longer bound to limited depths and plume treatment, but can also be used for source zone remediation. A good understanding of the transport behavior of nZVI is necessary to design a field application. So far transport was mainly tested using commercially available nZVI, however these studies suggest that further work is required as commercial nZVI was prone to aggregation, resulting in low physical stability of the suspension and very short travel distances in the subsurface. In the presented work, nZVI is stabilized during synthesis to significantly increase the physical suspension stability. To improve our understanding of nZVI transport, the feasibility for injection into various types of porous media and controlled nZVI deposition, a suite of column experiments are conducted. The column experiments are performed using a long 1.5m column and a novel nZVI measuring technique. The measuring technique was developed to non-destructively determine the concentration of nano-scale iron during the injection. It records the magnetic susceptibility, which makes it possible to get transient nZVI retention profiles along the column. These transient nZVI retention profiles of long columns provide unique insights in the transport behavior of nZVI which cannot be obtained using short columns or effluent breakthrough curves.

  8. Study of Micro and Nano Scale Features in the Fabrication, Performance, and Degradation of Advanced Engineering Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey John

    Increasingly, modern engineering materials are designed on a micron or nano scale to fulfill a given set of requirements or to enhance the material's performance. In this dissertation several such materials will be studied including catalyst particles for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth by use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by reactor scale modeling, hermetic carbon coatings by focused ion beam/ scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) the latter of which was performed by Andrei Stolov at OFS Specialty Photonics Division (Avon, CT), and Ni/Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes using X-ray nanotomography (XNT) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) the second of which was performed by Barry Lai at APS (Argonne National Lab, IL). For each material, a subset of the material properties will be looked at to determine how the selected property affects either the fabrication, performance, or degradation of the material. Following the analysis of these materials, it was found that although the materials are different, the study of micron and nano scale features has many related traits. X-rays and electrons are frequently used to examine nanoscale structures, numerical study can be exploited to expedite measurements and extract additional information from experiments, and the study of these requires knowledge across many scientific fields. As a product of this research, detailed information about all of the materials studied has been contributed to the scientific literature including size dependance information about the oxidation states of nanometer size iron particles, optimal CVD reactor growth conditions for different CNT catalyst particle sizes and number of walls, a technique for rapid measurement of hermetic carbon film thickness, and detailed microstructural detail and sulfur poisoning mapping for Ni/YSZ SOFC anodes.

  9. Towards nano-scale photonics with micro-scale photons: the opportunities and challenges of mid-infrared plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Stephanie; Podolskiy, Viktor; Wasserman, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons and their localized counterparts, surface plasmons, are widely used at visible and near-infrared (near-IR) frequencies to confine, enhance, and manipulate light on the subwavelength scale. At these frequencies, surface plasmons serve as enabling mechanisms for future on-chip communications architectures, high-performance sensors, and high-resolution imaging and lithography systems. Successful implementation of plasmonics-inspired solutions at longer wavelengths, in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) frequency range, would benefit a number of highly important technologies in health- and defense-related fields that include trace-gas detection, heat-signature sensing, mimicking, and cloaking, and source and detector development. However, the body of knowledge of visible/near-IR frequency plasmonics cannot be easily transferred to the mid-IR due to the fundamentally different material response of metals in these two frequency ranges. Therefore, mid-IR plasmonic architectures for subwavelength light manipulation require both new materials and new geometries. In this work we attempt to provide a comprehensive review of recent approaches to realize nano-scale plasmonic devices and structures operating at mid-IR wavelengths. We first discuss the motivation for the development of the field of mid-IR plasmonics and the fundamental differences between plasmonics in the mid-IR and at shorter wavelengths. We then discuss early plasmonics work in the mid-IR using traditional plasmonic metals, illuminating both the impressive results of this work, as well as the challenges arising from the very different behavior of metals in the mid-IR, when compared to shorter wavelengths. Finally, we discuss the potential of new classes of mid-IR plasmonic materials, capable of mimicking the behavior of traditional metals at shorter wavelengths, and allowing for true subwavelength, and ultimately, nano-scale confinement at long wavelengths.

  10. Biological response to nano-scale titanium dioxide (TiO2): role of particle dose, shape, and retention.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rona M; Teesy, Christel; Franzi, Lisa; Weir, Alex; Westerhoff, Paul; Evans, James E; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely used nanomaterials, valued for its highly refractive, photocatalytic, and pigmenting properties. TiO2 is also classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible human carcinogen. The objectives of this study were to (1) establish a lowest-observed-effect level (LOEL) for nano-scale TiO2, (2) determine TiO2 uptake in the lungs, and (3) estimate toxicity based on physicochemical properties and retention in the lungs. In vivo lung toxicity of nano-scale TiO2 using varying forms of well-characterized, highly dispersed TiO2 was assessed. Anatase/rutile P25 spheres (TiO2-P25), pure anatase spheres (TiO2-A), and anatase nanobelts (TiO2-NB) were tested. To determine the effects of dose and particle characteristics, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered TiO2 (0, 20, 70, or 200 μg) via intratracheal instillation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were obtained for analysis 1 and 7 d post exposure. Despite abundant TiO2 inclusions in all exposed animals, only TiO2-NB displayed any significant degree of inflammation seen in BALF at the 1-d time point. This inflammation resolved by 7 d, although TiO2 particles had not cleared from alveolar macrophages recovered from the lung. Histological examination showed TiO2-NB produced cellular changes at d 1 that were still evident at d 7. Data indicate TiO2-NB is the most inflammatory with a LOEL of 200 μg at 1 d post instillation. PMID:24156719

  11. First-principles study of the nano-scaling effect on the electrochemical behavior in LiNi(0.5)Mn(1.5)O4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunseok; Persson, Kristin A

    2013-10-25

    Nano-scaling of electrode materials is often used in battery applications to enhance performance, particularly relating to rate capability. However, for the high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 conflicting results have been reported on the benefits of nano-scaling. In this study, we present first-principles calculations to investigate the effect of nano-scaling on LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, specifically focusing on the roles and coupling between surface stability, cation ordering and phase behavior. We calculate and compare the surface energy for the low index facets (100), (110), and (111), and find that the most stable facet is dependent on the cation ordering at the surface layer. In this context, we predict a spontaneous surface reconstruction in the cation-ordered structure which leads to a deviation from the perfect surface cation ordering and results in an enhanced accessibility to solid solution behavior as a function of Li content. Our results imply that nano-scaling will be more beneficial for the cation-ordered structure, as compared to the disordered structure where the solid solution region is already intrinsically accessible for a broad range of Li concentrations. PMID:24067535

  12. First-principles study of the nano-scaling effect on the electrochemical behavior in LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunseok; Persson, Kristin A.

    2013-10-01

    Nano-scaling of electrode materials is often used in battery applications to enhance performance, particularly relating to rate capability. However, for the high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 conflicting results have been reported on the benefits of nano-scaling. In this study, we present first-principles calculations to investigate the effect of nano-scaling on LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, specifically focusing on the roles and coupling between surface stability, cation ordering and phase behavior. We calculate and compare the surface energy for the low index facets (100), (110), and (111), and find that the most stable facet is dependent on the cation ordering at the surface layer. In this context, we predict a spontaneous surface reconstruction in the cation-ordered structure which leads to a deviation from the perfect surface cation ordering and results in an enhanced accessibility to solid solution behavior as a function of Li content. Our results imply that nano-scaling will be more beneficial for the cation-ordered structure, as compared to the disordered structure where the solid solution region is already intrinsically accessible for a broad range of Li concentrations.

  13. Organic photosensitive cells grown on rough electrode with nano-scale morphology control

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Fan; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2011-06-07

    An optoelectronic device and a method for fabricating the optoelectronic device includes a first electrode disposed on a substrate, an exposed surface of the first electrode having a root mean square roughness of at least 30 nm and a height variation of at least 200 nm, the first electrode being transparent. A conformal layer of a first organic semiconductor material is deposited onto the first electrode by organic vapor phase deposition, the first organic semiconductor material being a small molecule material. A layer of a second organic semiconductor material is deposited over the conformal layer. At least some of the layer of the second organic semiconductor material directly contacts the conformal layer. A second electrode is deposited over the layer of the second organic semiconductor material. The first organic semiconductor material is of a donor-type or an acceptor-type relative to the second organic semiconductor material, which is of the other material type.

  14. Mobility, Deposition and Remobilization of pre-Synthesis Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron in Long Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, C. V.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive zero-valent iron is currently being used for remediation of contaminated groundwater. Permeable reactive barriers are the current state-of-the-practice method for using zero-valent iron. Instead of an excavated trench filled with granular zero-valent iron, a relatively new and promising method is the injection of a nano-scale zero-valent iron colloid suspension (nZVI) into the subsurface using injection wells. One goal of nZVI injection can be to deposit zero valent iron in the aquifer and form a reactive permeable zone which is no longer bound to limited depths and plume treatment, but can also be used directly at the source. It is very important to have a good understanding of the transport behavior of nZVI during injection as well as the fate of nZVI after injection due to changes in the flow regime or water chemistry changes. So far transport was mainly tested using commercially available nZVI, however these studies suggest that further work is required as commercial nZVI was prone to aggregation, resulting in low physical stability of the suspension and very short travel distances in the subsurface. In the presented work, nZVI is stabilized during synthesis to significantly increase the physical suspension stability. To improve our understanding of nZVI transport, the feasibility for injection into various porous media materials and controlled deposition, a suite of column experiments are conducted. The column experiments are performed using a long 1.5m column and a novel nZVI measuring technique. The measuring technique was developed to non-destructively determine the concentration of nano-scale iron during the injection. It records the magnetic susceptibility, which makes it possible to get transient nZVI retention profiles along the column. These transient nZVI retention profiles of long columns provide unique insights in the transport behavior of nZVI which cannot be obtained using short columns or effluent breakthrough curves.

  15. Hetero-twin formation during growth of nano-scale Al-TiN composites - experimental and DFT studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Liu, Xiang - Yang; Hoagland, Richard G; Misra, Amit; Genc, A; Fraser, H L

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that high stacking fault energy metals such as Al do not form either growth twins or mechanical twins easily. Although mechanical twins in nanocrystalline Al have been observed under certain conditions, growth twins have never been observed. In this work, the authors report for the first time, through transmission electron microscopy (TEM), that Al layers, when deposited on TiN layers, tend to grow in a twin relationship to both the TiN layer and the underlying Al layer. The TiN layers assume the orientation of the Al layers below. Calculations using density functional theory (DFT) show that nitrogen termination in the {l_brace}111{r_brace} growth plane of the TiN layers favors the growth of twin oriented Al layers over these TiN layers. This finding provides a way to create a twin-modulated structure in Al with the inclusion of intermediate nm-scale layer of an ionic solid such as TiN. Al metal is resistant to twinning, as it has a high stacking fault energy (SFE) of > 150 mJ/m. Although twins have been observed in nano-scale grains of Al, and predicted by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in conditions when the nanoscale grains are plastically deformed, no process or phenomenon has been reported yet in which the deposition of an intermediate layer of a different material phase causes the subsequent layer of Al to be deposited in the twin orientation. The authors show in this paper that it is possible to form Al layers in twin orientation to each other across polar TiN layers, if these are grown so that both the Al and TiN layers have a {l_brace}111{r_brace} surface as their growth front. Since the deposition of Al and TiN layers is used in the formation of diffusion barriers, and the mechanical properties of these nanoscale multilayers are also seen to be exceptional, it is important to investigate and understand their structure at the nanometer length scale, and thence to be able to control it. Moreover, these findings point out a method of

  16. Development of an optimum end-effector with a nano-scale uneven surface for non-adhesion cell manipulation using a micro-manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horade, M.; Kojima, M.; Kamiyama, K.; Kurata, T.; Mae, Y.; Arai, T.

    2015-11-01

    In order to realize effective micro-manipulation using a micro-manipulator system, an optimum end-effector is proposed. Cell-manipulation experiments using mouse fibroblast cells are conducted, and the usability of the proposed end-effector is confirmed. A key advantage of the micro-manipulator is high-accuracy, high-speed 3D micro- and nano-scale positioning. Micro-manipulation has often been used in research involving biological cells. However, there are two important concerns with the micro-manipulator system: gripping efficiency and the release of gripped objects. When it is not possible to grip a micro-object, such as a cell, near its center, the object may be dropped during manipulation. Since the acquisition of exact position information for a micro-object in the vertical direction is difficult using a microscope, the gripping efficiency of the end-effector should be improved. Therefore, technical skill or operational support is required. Since, on the micro-scale, surface forces such as the adsorption force are greater than body forces, such as the gravitational force, the adhesion force between the end-effector and the object is strong. Therefore, manipulation techniques without adhesion are required for placed an object at an arbitrary position. In the present study, we consider direct physical contact between the end-effector and objects. First, the design and materials of the end-effector for micro-scale manipulation were optimized, and an end-effector with an optimum shape to increase the grip force was fabricated. Second, the surface of the end-effector tip was made uneven, and the adhesion force from increasing on the micro-scale was prevented. When an end-effector with an uneven surface was used, release without adhesion was successful 85.0% of the time. On the other hand, when an end-effector without an uneven surface was used, release without adhesion was successful 6.25% of the time. Therefore, the superiority of a structure with an uneven

  17. Electroless Deposition and Nanolithography Can Control the Formation of Materials at the Nano-Scale for Plasmonic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Francardi, Marco; Perozziello, Gerardo; Malara, Natalia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical mechanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection. PMID:24681672

  18. Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting surimi as affected by nano-scaled fish bone and heating rates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2015-08-01

    Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting (PW) surimi were investigated at various heating rates with the use of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) and calcium chloride. Addition of NFB and slow heating improved gel strength significantly. Activity of endogenous transglutaminase (ETGase) from PW surimi was markedly induced by both NFB calcium and calcium chloride, showing an optimal temperature at 30°C. Initial storage modulus increased as NFB calcium concentration increased and the same trend was maintained throughout the temperature sweep. Rheograms with temperature sweep at slow heating rate (1°C/min) exhibited two peaks at ∼ 35°C and ∼ 70°C. However, no peak was observed during temperature sweep from 20 to 90°C at fast heating rate (20°C/min). Protein patterns of surimi gels were affected by both heating rate and NFB calcium concentration. Under slow heating, myosin heavy chain intensity decreased with NFB calcium concentration, indicating formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-links by ETGase and NFB calcium ion. PMID:25766799

  19. Micro- and nano-scale hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers by coaxial electrospinning: Preparation and gas sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jin; Choi, Sun-Woo; Kim, Sang Sub

    2011-11-15

    We report the preparation of micro- and nano-scale hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers using a coaxial electrospinning technique and their gas sensing properties in terms of CO. The diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers can be controlled from 200 nm to several micrometers by changing the viscosity of electrospinning solutions. Lower viscosities produce slim hollow nanofibers. In contrast, fat hollow microfibers are obtained in the case of higher viscosities. A simple mathematical expression is presented to predict the change in diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers as a function of viscosity. The successful control over the diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers is expected to bring extensive applications. To test a potential use of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers in chemical gas sensors, their sensing properties to CO are investigated at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Microstructures of as-prepared and calcined hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers prepared by the electrospinning technique with a coaxial needle. Dynamic response at various CO concentrations for the sensor fabricated with the hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers. Highlights: > Hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers were synthesized using a coaxial electrospinning technique. > Their diameter can be controlled by changing the viscosity of electrospinning solutions. > Lower viscosities produce slim hollow nanofibers. > In contrast, fat hollow microfibers are obtained in the case of higher viscosities. > Successful control over the diameter of hollow TiO{sub 2} fibers will bring extensive applications.

  20. Innovative automatic resonant mode identification for nano-scale dynamic full-field characterization of MEMS using interferometric fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Chia; Huang, Yao-Ting; Lai, Huang-Wen; Chen, Jin-Liang; Chang, Calvin C.

    2008-12-01

    A dynamic 3D nano-scale surface profilometer was successfully developed for novel automatic resonant frequency identification using stroboscopic interferometric principle. With rapid increase in the application of micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) to industries, the needs of accurate dynamic characterization have become a major challenge in design and fabrication. In view of such, an interferometric microscopy was developed using LED stroboscopic interferometry to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry and characterization of MEMS with a measurement bandwidth exceeding 1 MHz. Most importantly, a novel detection algorithm was also developed employing interferogram fringe density measure for automatic resonant frequency identification. Natural resonant modes of a series of microstructures can be accurately detected, giving values consistent with theoretical ones. To verify the effectiveness of the developed methodology, an AFM cantilever microbeam and a cross-bridge microbeam were measured to analyze their full-field resonant vibratory shapes. Our experimental results confirmed that the resonant vibration of the tested beams can be fully characterized while achieving an accuracy in vertical measurement of 3-5 nm with a vertical measurement range of tens of micrometers.

  1. Addressing the Recalcitrance of Cellulose Degradation through Cellulase Discovery, Nano-scale Elucidation of Molecular Mechanisms, and Kinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Larry P., Bergstrom, Gary; Corgie, Stephane; Craighead, Harold; Gibson, Donna; Wilson, David

    2011-06-13

    This research project was designed to play a vital role in the development of low cost sugars from cellulosic biomass and contributing to the national effort to displace fossil fuel usage in the USA transportation sector. The goal was to expand the portfolio of cell wall degrading enzymes through innovative research at the nano-scale level, prospecting for novel cellulases and building a kinetic framework for the development of more effective enzymatic conversion processes. More precisely, the goal was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms for some cellulases that are very familiar to members of our research team and to investigate what we hope are novel cellulases or new enzyme combinations from the world of plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Hydrolytic activities of various cellulases and cellulase cocktails were monitored at the nanoscale of cellulose fibrils and the microscale of pretreated cellulose particles, and we integrated this insight into a heterogeneous reaction framework. The over-riding approach for this research program was the application of innovative and cutting edge optical and high-throughput screening and analysis techniques for observing how cellulases hydrolyze real substrates.

  2. Synthesis of nano-scale fast ion conducting cubic Li7La3Zr2O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Kim, Hyunjoung; Kim, Yunsung; Wolfenstine, Jeff

    2013-10-01

    A solution-based process was investigated for synthesizing cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO), which is known to exhibit the unprecedented combination of fast ionic conductivity, and stability in air and against Li. Sol-gel chemistry was developed to prepare solid metal-oxide networks consisting of 10 nm cross-links that formed the cubic LLZO phase at 600 ° C. Sol-gel LLZO powders were sintered into 96% dense pellets using an induction hot press that applied pressure while heating. After sintering, the average LLZO grain size was 260 nm, which is 13 times smaller compared to LLZO prepared using a solid-state technique. The total ionic conductivity was 0.4 mS cm-1 at 298 K, which is the same as solid-state synthesized LLZO. Interestingly, despite the same room temperature conductivity, the sol-gel LLZO total activation energy is 0.41 eV, which 1.6 times higher than that observed in solid-state LLZO (0.26 eV). We believe the nano-scale grain boundaries give rise to unique transport phenomena that are more sensitive to temperature when compared to the conventional solid-state LLZO.

  3. Effect of Nano-Scale and Micro-Scale Yttria Reinforcement on Powder Forged AA-7075 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Tilak C.; Prakash, U.; Dabhade, Vikram V.

    2016-04-01

    The present investigation deals with the development of AA-7075 metal matrix composites reinforced with nano yttria particles (0.1 to 3 vol.%) and micron yttria particles (1 to 15 vol.%) by powder forging. Matrix powders (AA-7075) and reinforcement powders (yttria) were blended, cold compacted, sintered under pure nitrogen, and finally hot forged in a closed floating die. The hot forged samples were artificially age hardened at 121 °C for various time durations to determine the peak aging time. The mechanical properties in the peak-aged condition as well as density and microstructure were determined and correlated with the reinforcement size and content. The nano composites exhibited a well-densified structure as well as better hardness and tensile/compressive strength as compared to micro-scale composites. The mechanical properties in nano-scale composites peaked at 0.5 vol.% yttria addition while for micro-scale composites these properties peaked at 5 vol.% yttria addition.

  4. Synthesis of nano-scale fast ion conducting cubic Li7La3Zr2O12.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Jeff; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Kim, Hyunjoung; Kim, Yunsung; Wolfenstine, Jeff

    2013-10-25

    A solution-based process was investigated for synthesizing cubic Li7La3Zr2O12 (LLZO), which is known to exhibit the unprecedented combination of fast ionic conductivity, and stability in air and against Li. Sol-gel chemistry was developed to prepare solid metal-oxide networks consisting of 10 nm cross-links that formed the cubic LLZO phase at 600 ° C. Sol-gel LLZO powders were sintered into 96% dense pellets using an induction hot press that applied pressure while heating. After sintering, the average LLZO grain size was 260 nm, which is 13 times smaller compared to LLZO prepared using a solid-state technique. The total ionic conductivity was 0.4 mS cm(-1) at 298 K, which is the same as solid-state synthesized LLZO. Interestingly, despite the same room temperature conductivity, the sol-gel LLZO total activation energy is 0.41 eV, which 1.6 times higher than that observed in solid-state LLZO (0.26 eV). We believe the nano-scale grain boundaries give rise to unique transport phenomena that are more sensitive to temperature when compared to the conventional solid-state LLZO. PMID:24067448

  5. LENS (lithography enhancement toward nano scale): a European project to support double exposure and double patterning technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Pietro; Baldi, Livio; Piacentini, Paolo; Sytsma, Joost; Le Gratiet, Bertrand; Gaugiran, Stéphanie; Wong, Patrick; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Atzei, Luisa R.; Buch, Xavier; Verkleij, Dick; Toublan, Olivier; Perez-Murano, Francesco; Mecerreyes, David

    2010-04-01

    In 2009 a new European initiative on Double Patterning and Double Exposure lithography process development was started in the framework of the ENIAC Joint Undertaking. The project, named LENS (Lithography Enhancement Towards Nano Scale), involves twelve companies from five different European Countries (Italy, Netherlands, France, Belgium Spain; includes: IC makers (Numonyx and STMicroelectronics), a group of equipment and materials companies (ASML, Lam Research srl, JSR, FEI), a mask maker (Dai Nippon Photomask Europe), an EDA company (Mentor Graphics) and four research and development institutes (CEA-Leti, IMEC, Centro Nacional de Microelectrónica, CIDETEC). The LENS project aims to develop and integrate the overall infrastructure required to reach patterning resolutions required by 32nm and 22nm technology nodes through the double patterning and pitch doubling technologies on existing conventional immersion exposure tools, with the purpose to allow the timely development of 32nm and 22nm technology nodes for memories and logic devices, providing a safe alternative to EUV, Higher Refraction Index Fluids Immersion Lithography and maskless lithography, which appear to be still far from maturity. The project will cover the whole lithography supply chain including design, masks, materials, exposure tools, process integration, metrology and its final objective is the demonstration of 22nm node patterning on available 1.35 NA immersion tools on high complexity mask set.

  6. Dielectric strength of voidless BaTiO{sub 3} films with nano-scale grains fabricated by aerosol deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Lee, Young-Hie; Lee, Seung-Hwan; In Kim, Soo; Woo Lee, Chang; Rag Yoon, Jung; Lee, Sung-Gap

    2014-01-07

    In order to investigate the dielectric strength properties of the BaTiO{sub 3} films with nano-scale grains with uniform grain size and no voids, BaTiO{sub 3} films were fabricated with a thickness of 1 μm by an AD process, and the fabricated films were sintered at 800, 900, and 1000 °C in air and reducing atmosphere. The films have superior dielectric strength properties due to their uniform grain size and high density without any voids. In addition, based on investigation of the leakage current (intrinsic) properties, it was confirmed that the sintering conditions of the reducing atmosphere largely increase leakage currents due to generated electrons and doubly ionized oxygen vacancies following the Poole-Frenkel emission mechanism, and increased leakage currents flow at grain boundary regions. Therefore, we conclude that the extrinsic breakdown factors should be eliminated for superior dielectric strength properties, and it is important to enhance grain boundaries by doping acceptors and rare-earth elements.

  7. Advances in Computational Radiation Biophysics for Cancer Therapy: Simulating Nano-Scale Damage by Low-Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncic, Zdenka

    Computational radiation biophysics is a rapidly growing area that is contributing, alongside new hardware technologies, to ongoing developments in cancer imaging and therapy. Recent advances in theoretical and computational modeling have enabled the simulation of discrete, event-by-event interactions of very low energy (≪ 100 eV) electrons with water in its liquid thermodynamic phase. This represents a significant advance in our ability to investigate the initial stages of radiation induced biological damage at the molecular level. Such studies are important for the development of novel cancer treatment strategies, an example of which is given by microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). Here, new results are shown demonstrating that when excitations and ionizations are resolved down to nano-scales, their distribution extends well outside the primary microbeam path, into regions that are not directly irradiated. This suggests that radiation dose alone is insufficient to fully quantify biological damage. These results also suggest that the radiation cross-fire may be an important clue to understanding the different observed responses of healthy cells and tumor cells to MRT.

  8. Effect of Nano-Scale and Micro-Scale Yttria Reinforcement on Powder Forged AA-7075 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Tilak C.; Prakash, U.; Dabhade, Vikram V.

    2016-05-01

    The present investigation deals with the development of AA-7075 metal matrix composites reinforced with nano yttria particles (0.1 to 3 vol.%) and micron yttria particles (1 to 15 vol.%) by powder forging. Matrix powders (AA-7075) and reinforcement powders (yttria) were blended, cold compacted, sintered under pure nitrogen, and finally hot forged in a closed floating die. The hot forged samples were artificially age hardened at 121 °C for various time durations to determine the peak aging time. The mechanical properties in the peak-aged condition as well as density and microstructure were determined and correlated with the reinforcement size and content. The nano composites exhibited a well-densified structure as well as better hardness and tensile/compressive strength as compared to micro-scale composites. The mechanical properties in nano-scale composites peaked at 0.5 vol.% yttria addition while for micro-scale composites these properties peaked at 5 vol.% yttria addition.

  9. Electroless deposition and nanolithography can control the formation of materials at the nano-scale for plasmonic applications.

    PubMed

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Francardi, Marco; Perozziello, Gerardo; Malara, Natalia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical mechanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection. PMID:24681672

  10. Advances in Computational Radiation Biophysics for Cancer Therapy: Simulating Nano-Scale Damage by Low-Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncic, Zdenka

    2015-10-01

    Computational radiation biophysics is a rapidly growing area that is contributing, alongside new hardware technologies, to ongoing developments in cancer imaging and therapy. Recent advances in theoretical and computational modeling have enabled the simulation of discrete, event-by-event interactions of very low energy (≪ 100 eV) electrons with water in its liquid thermodynamic phase. This represents a significant advance in our ability to investigate the initial stages of radiation induced biological damage at the molecular level. Such studies are important for the development of novel cancer treatment strategies, an example of which is given by microbeam radiation therapy (MRT). Here, new results are shown demonstrating that when excitations and ionizations are resolved down to nano-scales, their distribution extends well outside the primary microbeam path, into regions that are not directly irradiated. This suggests that radiation dose alone is insufficient to fully quantify biological damage. These results also suggest that the radiation cross-fire may be an important clue to understanding the different observed responses of healthy cells and tumor cells to MRT.

  11. Degradation of nano-scale cathodes: a new paradigm for selecting low-temperature solid oxide cell materials.

    PubMed

    Call, Ann V; Railsback, Justin G; Wang, Hongqian; Barnett, Scott A

    2016-05-11

    Oxygen electrodes have been able to meet area specific resistance targets for solid oxide cell operating temperatures as low as ∼500 °C, but their stability over expected device operation times of up to 50 000 h is unknown. Achieving good performance at such temperatures requires mixed ionically and electronically-conducting electrodes with nano-scale structure that makes the electrode susceptible to particle coarsening and, as a result, electrode resistance degradation. Here we describe accelerated life testing of nanostructured Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-Ce0.9Gd0.1O2 electrodes combining impedance spectroscopy and microstructural evaluation. Measured electrochemical performance degradation is accurately fitted using a coarsening model that is then used to predict cell operating conditions where required performance and long-term stability are both achieved. A new electrode material figure of merit based on both performance and stability metrics is proposed. An implication is that cation diffusion, which determines the coarsening rate, must be considered along with oxygen transport kinetics in the selection of optimal electrode materials. PMID:27117343

  12. High voltage stability of LiCoO2 particles with a nano-scale Lipon coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoongu; Veith, Gabriel M; Nanda, Jagjit; Unocic, Raymond R; Dudney, Nancy J

    2011-01-01

    For high-voltage cycling of rechargeable Li batteries, a nano-scale amorphous Li-ion conductor, lithium phosphorus oxynitride (Lipon), has been coated on surfaces of LiCoO{sub 2} particles by combining a RF-magnetron sputtering technique and mechanical agitation of LiCoO{sub 2} powders. LiCoO{sub 2} particles coated with 0.36 wt% ({approx}1 nm thick) of the amorphous Lipon, retain 90% of their original capacity compared to non-coated cathode materials that retain only 65% of their original capacity after more than 40 cycles in the 3.0-4.4 V range with a standard carbonate electrolyte. The reason for the better high-voltage cycling behavior is attributed to reduction in the side reactions that cause increase of the cell resistance during cycling. Further, Lipon coated particles are not damaged, whereas uncoated particles are badly cracked after cycling. Extending the charge of Lipon-coated LiCoO{sub 2} to higher voltage enhances the specific capacity, but more importantly the Lipon-coated material is also more stable and tolerant of high voltage excursions. A drawback of Lipon coating, particularly as thicker films are applied to cathode powders, is the increased electronic resistance that reduces the power performance.

  13. Micro/nano-scale fabrication of integrated polymer optical wire circuit arrays for optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, Seung G.; Park, Se G.; Kim, Kyong H.; Kang, Jin K.; Chin, In J.; Kwon, Y. K.; Choi, Young W.

    2005-02-01

    We report on the results of our study on the micro/nano-scale design, fabrication and integration of waveguide arrays for optical printed circuit boards (O-PCBs) and VLSI micro/nano-photonic applications. The O-PCBs are designed to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards or substrates. We have assembled O-PCBs using optical waveguide arrays and circuits made of polymer materials and have examined information handling performances. We also designed power beam splitters and waveguide filters, using nano-scale photonic band-gap crystals, for VLSI photonic integration application. We discuss potential applications of polymer optical waveguide devices and arrays for O-PCB and VLSI micro/nano-photonics for computers, telecommunications, and transportation systems.

  14. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition. PMID:26658159

  15. Nicholas Metropolis Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Work in Computational Physics Talk: Understanding Nano-scale Electronic Systems via Large-scale Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chao

    2009-03-01

    Nano-scale physical phenomena and processes, especially those in electronics, have drawn great attention in the past decade. Experiments have shown that electronic and transport properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes are sensitive to adsorption of gas molecules such as H2, NO2, and NH3. Similar measurements have also been performed to study adsorption of proteins on other semiconductor nano-wires. These experiments suggest that nano-scale systems can be useful for making future chemical and biological sensors. Aiming to understand the physical mechanisms underlying and governing property changes at nano-scale, we start off by investigating, via first-principles method, the electronic structure of Pd-CNT before and after hydrogen adsorption, and continue with coherent electronic transport using non-equilibrium Green’s function techniques combined with density functional theory. Once our results are fully analyzed they can be used to interpret and understand experimental data, with a few difficult issues to be addressed. Finally, we discuss a newly developed multi-scale computing architecture, OPAL, that coordinates simultaneous execution of multiple codes. Inspired by the capabilities of this computing framework, we present a scenario of future modeling and simulation of multi-scale, multi-physical processes.

  16. Non-linear, non-monotonic effect of nano-scale roughness on particle deposition in absence of an energy barrier: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Glawdel, Tomasz; Ren, Carolyn L.; Emelko, Monica B.

    2015-12-01

    Deposition of colloidal- and nano-scale particles on surfaces is critical to numerous natural and engineered environmental, health, and industrial applications ranging from drinking water treatment to semi-conductor manufacturing. Nano-scale surface roughness-induced hydrodynamic impacts on particle deposition were evaluated in the absence of an energy barrier to deposition in a parallel plate system. A non-linear, non-monotonic relationship between deposition surface roughness and particle deposition flux was observed and a critical roughness size associated with minimum deposition flux or “sag effect” was identified. This effect was more significant for nanoparticles (<1 μm) than for colloids and was numerically simulated using a Convective-Diffusion model and experimentally validated. Inclusion of flow field and hydrodynamic retardation effects explained particle deposition profiles better than when only the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) force was considered. This work provides 1) a first comprehensive framework for describing the hydrodynamic impacts of nano-scale surface roughness on particle deposition by unifying hydrodynamic forces (using the most current approaches for describing flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation effects) with appropriately modified expressions for DLVO interaction energies, and gravity forces in one model and 2) a foundation for further describing the impacts of more complicated scales of deposition surface roughness on particle deposition.

  17. Nano-scale zero valent iron transport in a variable aperture dolomite fracture and a glass fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Sleep, B. E.; Cui, Z.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations are being performed to understand the transport behavior of carboxymethyl cellulose polymer stabilized nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) in a variable aperture dolomite rock fracture and a variable aperture glass replica of a fractured slate. The rock fracture was prepared by artificially inducing a fracture in a dolomite block along a stylolite, and the glass fracture was prepared by creating molds with melted glass on two opposing sides of a fractured slate rock block. Both of the fractures were 0.28 m in length and 0.21 m in width. Equivalent hydraulic apertures are about 110 microns for the rock fracture and 250 microns for the glass replica fracture. Sodium bromide and lissamine green B (LGB) serve as conservative tracers in the rock fracture and glass replica fracture, respectively. A dark box set-up with a light source and digital camera is being used to visualize the LGB and CMC-nZVI movement in the glass fracture. Experiments are being performed to determine the effects of water specific discharge and CMC concentration on nZVI transport in the fractures. Transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-visual spectrophotometry were performed to determine the stability and characteristics of the CMC-nZVI mixture. The transport of bromide, LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI in both fractures is being evaluated through analysis of the effluent concentrations. Time-lapse images are also being captured for the glass fracture. Bromide, LGB, and CMC recoveries have exceeded 95% in both fractures. Significant channeling has been observed in the fractures for CMC transport due to viscous effects.

  18. VDAC3 as a sensor of oxidative state of the intermembrane space of mitochondria: the putative role of cysteine residue modifications

    PubMed Central

    Saletti, Rosaria; Guardiani, Carlo; Guarino, Francesca; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Magrì, Andrea; Foti, Salvatore; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Messina, Angela Anna; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan; Szabo, Ildiko; De Pinto, Vito

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-Dependent Anion selective Channels (VDAC) are pore-forming mitochondrial outer membrane proteins. In mammals VDAC3, the least characterized isoform, presents a set of cysteines predicted to be exposed toward the intermembrane space. We find that cysteines in VDAC3 can stay in different oxidation states. This was preliminary observed when, in our experimental conditions, completely lacking any reducing agent, VDAC3 presented a pattern of slightly different electrophoretic mobilities. This observation holds true both for rat liver mitochondrial VDAC3 and for recombinant and refolded human VDAC3. Mass spectroscopy revealed that cysteines 2 and 8 can form a disulfide bridge in native VDAC3. Single or combined site-directed mutagenesis of cysteines 2, 8 and 122 showed that the protein mobility in SDS-PAGE is influenced by the presence of cysteine and by the redox status. In addition, cysteines 2, 8 and 122 are involved in the stability control of the pore as shown by electrophysiology, complementation assays and chemico-physical characterization. Furthermore, a positive correlation between the pore conductance of the mutants and their ability to complement the growth of porin-less yeast mutant cells was found. Our work provides evidence for a complex oxidation pattern of a mitochondrial protein not directly involved in electron transport. The most likely biological meaning of this behavior is to buffer the ROS load and keep track of the redox level in the inter-membrane space, eventually signaling it through conformational changes. PMID:26760765

  19. VDAC3 as a sensor of oxidative state of the intermembrane space of mitochondria: the putative role of cysteine residue modifications.

    PubMed

    Reina, Simona; Checchetto, Vanessa; Saletti, Rosaria; Gupta, Ankit; Chaturvedi, Deepti; Guardiani, Carlo; Guarino, Francesca; Scorciapino, Mariano Andrea; Magrì, Andrea; Foti, Salvatore; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Messina, Angela Anna; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan; Szabo, Ildiko; De Pinto, Vito

    2016-01-19

    Voltage-Dependent Anion selective Channels (VDAC) are pore-forming mitochondrial outer membrane proteins. In mammals VDAC3, the least characterized isoform, presents a set of cysteines predicted to be exposed toward the intermembrane space. We find that cysteines in VDAC3 can stay in different oxidation states. This was preliminary observed when, in our experimental conditions, completely lacking any reducing agent, VDAC3 presented a pattern of slightly different electrophoretic mobilities. This observation holds true both for rat liver mitochondrial VDAC3 and for recombinant and refolded human VDAC3. Mass spectroscopy revealed that cysteines 2 and 8 can form a disulfide bridge in native VDAC3. Single or combined site-directed mutagenesis of cysteines 2, 8 and 122 showed that the protein mobility in SDS-PAGE is influenced by the presence of cysteine and by the redox status. In addition, cysteines 2, 8 and 122 are involved in the stability control of the pore as shown by electrophysiology, complementation assays and chemico-physical characterization. Furthermore, a positive correlation between the pore conductance of the mutants and their ability to complement the growth of porin-less yeast mutant cells was found. Our work provides evidence for a complex oxidation pattern of a mitochondrial protein not directly involved in electron transport. The most likely biological meaning of this behavior is to buffer the ROS load and keep track of the redox level in the inter-membrane space, eventually signaling it through conformational changes. PMID:26760765

  20. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dermatitis - contact; Allergic dermatitis; Dermatitis - allergic; Irritant contact dermatitis; Skin rash - contact dermatitis ... There are 2 types of contact dermatitis. Irritant dermatitis: This ... can be by contact with acids, alkaline materials such as soaps ...

  1. Modeling Polymer Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport Experiments in Porous Media to Understand the Transport Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of groundwater contaminants can be treated with nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). However, delivery of nZVI in the subsurface to the treatment zones is challenging as the bare nZVI particles have a higher tendency to agglomerate. The subsurface mobility of nZVI can be enhanced by stabilizing nZVI with polymer, such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate CMC stabilized nZVI transport behavior in porous media. The numerical simulations were based on a set of laboratory-scale transport experiments that were conducted in a two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (length - 55 cm; height - 45 cm; width - 1.4 cm), uniformly packed with silica sand. In the transport experiments: CMC stabilized nZVI and a non-reactive dye tracer Lissamine Green B (LGB) were used; water specific discharge and CMC concentration were varied; movements of LGB, and CMC-nZVI in the sandbox were tracked using a camera, a light source and a dark box. The concentrations of LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI at the sandbox outlet were analyzed. A 2D multiphase flow and transport model was applied to simulate experimental results. The images from LGB dye transport experiments were used to determine the pore water velocities and media permeabilities in various layers in the sand box. These permeability values were used in the subsequent simulations of CMC-nZVI transport. The 2D compositional simulator, modified to include colloid filtration theory (CFT), treated CMC as a solute and nZVI as a colloid. The simulator included composition dependent viscosity to account for CMC injection and mixing, and attachment efficiency as a fitting parameter for nZVI transport modeling. In the experiments, LGB and CMC recoveries were greater than 95%; however, CMC residence time was significantly higher than the LGB residence time and the higher CMC concentration caused higher pressure drops in the sandbox. The nZVI recovery was lower than 40

  2. Characterization of particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters: Visual and analytical approach in macro-, micro- and nano-scales

    SciTech Connect

    Liati, Anthi; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis

    2010-09-15

    Multi-scale analytical investigations of particulate matter (soot and ash) of two loaded diesel particulate filters (DPF) from (a) a truck (DPF1) and (b) a passenger car (DPF2) reveal the following: in DPF1 (without fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 130-270 {mu}m thick, homogeneous porous cake with pronounced orientation. Soot aggregates consist of 15-30 nm large individual particles exhibiting relatively mature internal nanostructures, however, far from being graphite. Ash aggregates largely accumulate at the outlet part of DPF1, while minor amounts are deposited directly on the channel walls all along the filter length. They consist of crystalline phases with individual particles of sizes down to the nanoscale range. Chemically, the ash consists mainly of Mg, S, Ca, Zn and P, elements encountered in lubricating oil additives. In the passenger car DPF2 (with fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 200-500 {mu}m thick, inhomogeneous porous cake consisting of several superposed layers corresponding to different soot generations. The largest part of the soot cake is composed of unburned, oriented soot aggregates left behind despite repeated regenerations, while a small part constitutes a loose layer with randomly oriented aggregates, which was deposited last and has not seen any regeneration. Fe-oxide particles of micro- to nano-scale sizes, originating from the fuel-borne additive, are often dispersed within the part of the soot cake composed of the unburned soot leftovers. The individual soot nanoparticles in DPF2 are approximately 15-40 nm large and generally less mature than in the truck DPF1. The presence of soot leftovers in DPF2 indicates that the addition of fuel-borne material does not fully compensate for the temperatures needed for complete soot removal. Ash in DPF2 is filling up more than half of the filter volume (at the downstream part) and is dominated by Fe-oxide aggregates, due to the Fe-based fuel

  3. The Acoustic Signature of Woodford Shale and Upscale Relationship from Nano-Scale Mechanical Properties and Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, M. H.; Abousleiman, Y. N.; Hoang, S. K.; Ortega, A. J.; Bobko, C.; Ulm, F.

    2007-12-01

    The complex composition of shale, the most encountered and problematic lithology in the Earth's crust, has puzzled many researchers attempting to find the key for understanding their micro- and macro-scale acoustic and mechanical signatures. Recent advances in nano-technology, in particular the progress of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) base indentation technique, have made it possible to mechanically study porous material at a nano scale (10-9 m) and consequently have allowed linking shale mechanical properties to intrinsic micro- and macro-properties such as porosity, packing density, and mineralogy. Based on more than 20,000 nano- indentation tests conducted on a number of shales with varying physical properties, a GeoGenomeTM model was developed to upscale macroscopic shale mechanical parameters from mineralogy composition, porosity, and packing density. In this work, the mechanical properties such as the elastic stiffness coefficients, Cij, and the anisotropic Biot's Pore Pressure Coefficients, αij, of the Woodford shale, were acquired using sonic log data and Ultra-Sonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) measurements conducted on preserved retrieved shale core samples from a 200-ft well drilled in the Woodford formation, in Oklahoma. Furthermore, the dependency of the Cij and αij, on applied stresses and the relationship between the dynamic moduli and the quasi-static moduli were also investigated using an array of piezoelectric crystals mounted around the samples while subjecting the samples to different applied stress states using a series of tri-axial tests. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and mercury injection tests were also performed on the retrieved core samples to obtain mineralogy composition and porosity of the shale at different depths. Comparison of the simulated mechanical and poromechanical properties and stiffness coefficients using the Quantitative GeoGenomeTM Mineralogy Simulator (QGGMSTM) with field and acoustic lab measurements showed excellent agreement

  4. Assessment of nano-scale Stirling refrigerator using working fluid as Maxwell-Boltzmann gases by thermo-ecological and sustainability criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Açıkkalp, Emin; Savaş, Ahmet Fevzi; Caner, Necmettin; Yamık, Hasan

    2016-08-01

    Purpose of this paper is to investigate a nano scale irreversible Stirling refrigerator regarding size effects and presents one novel thermo-ecological criteria. System is researched by using four thermo-ecological and sustainable criteria. One novel criteria called modified ecological coefficient of performance (MECOP) is presented. Calculations are performed for irreversible cycle and results are obtained numerically. Finally, performance of the considered cycle is discussed and regarded criteria are compared. According to results, ESI is the most stable ecological criteria and MECOP is more stable than ECOP and x should be chosen as big as possible.

  5. Theory of Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for deuteron-induced nuclear reactions in micro/nano-scale metal grains and particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong E

    2009-07-01

    Recently, there have been many reports of experimental results which indicate occurrences of anomalous deuteron-induced nuclear reactions in metals at low energies. A consistent conventional theoretical description is presented for anomalous low-energy deuteron-induced nuclear reactions in metal. The theory is based on the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) state occupied by deuterons trapped in a micro/nano-scale metal grain or particle. The theory is capable of explaining most of the experimentally observed results and also provides theoretical predictions, which can be tested experimentally. Scalabilities of the observed effects are discussed based on theoretical predictions. PMID:19440686

  6. Influence of gradual cobalt substitution on lithium nickel phosphate nano-scale composites for high voltage applications

    SciTech Connect

    Örnek, Ahmet; Bulut, Emrah; Can, Mustafa

    2015-08-15

    The carbon-free LiNiPO{sub 4} and cobalt doped LiNi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}PO{sub 4}/C (x = 0.0–1.0) were synthesized and investigated for high voltage applications (> 4 V) for Li-ion batteries. Nano-scale composites were prepared by handy sol–gel approach using citric acid under slightly reductive gas atmosphere (Ar-H{sub 2}, 85:15%). Structural and morphological characteristics of the powders were revealed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Except for a small impurity phase (Ni{sub 3}P), phase pure samples crystallized in the olivine-lattice structure with a linear relationship between lattice parameters (a, b and c) and chemical composition. The FE-SEM images proved that LiNiPO{sub 4}/C particles (50–80 nm) did not agglomerate, and showed that as the cobalt content was higher agglomeration had increased. The electrochemical properties of all electrodes were investigated by galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements. Substitution of Ni{sup 2} {sup +} by Co{sup 2} {sup +} caused higher electronic conductivities and showed more effective Li{sup +} ion mobility. When the cobalt content is 100%, the capacity reached to a higher level (146.2 mA h g{sup −} {sup 1}) and good capacity retention of 85.1% at the end of the 60 cycles was observed. The cycling voltammogram (CV) revealed that LiCoPO{sub 4}/C electrode improved the electrochemical properties. The Ni{sup 3} {sup +}–Ni{sup 2} {sup +} redox couple was not observed for carbon free LiNiPO{sub 4}. Nevertheless, it was observed that carbon coated LiNiPO{sub 4} sample exhibits a significant oxidation (5.26 V)–reduction (5.08 V) peaks. With this study, characteristics of the LiNi{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}PO{sub 4}/C series were deeply evaluated and discussed. - Highlights: • Structural, morphological and electrochemical effects of Co doped LiNi{sub 1−} {sub x

  7. Carboxymethyl Cellulose Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport in Porous Media: An Experimental and Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, P.; Rrokaj, E.; Sleep, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    An experimental and modeling study is being conducted to evaluate carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI) transport in porous media. A two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (55 cm x 45 cm x 1.3 cm in size) is being used for the study. The sandbox was packed uniformly with silica sand (600 μm to 425 μm grain diameter) under water-saturated conditions. From a series of hydraulic tests permeability of the system was calculated to be 1.0 x 10-12 m2. The transport tests are being conducted at pore-water velocities of 3, 5, and 10 m.d-1 to identify any shear-thinning effects associated with the CMC (MW = 90,000) solution, and effects of velocity on nZVI attachment to the porous media. A set of transport tests is being carried out using LissamineTM Green B (LGB) dye and CMC mixtures to characterize the CMC transport without nZVI. The transport tests are being conducted at various CMC concentrations ranging from 0.2% to 0.8% (w/v) to determine the effect of CMC concentration on nZVI transport under flowing conditions. For the CMC stabilized nZVI transport tests, nZVI is synthesized freshly in CMC solution before each experiment using sodium borohydride and ferrous sulfate. The synthesized nZVI concentrations range from 0.1 to 2.5 g.L-1. While higher nZVI concentration is desired for higher contaminant degradation, the higher nZVI concentration may cause greater aggregation and attachment to the porous media limiting the delivery distance for nZVI. In each transport experiment, the LGB-CMC solution or nZVI-CMC solution is injected into the sandbox as a pulse of 0.25 pore volume (PV). For LGB, the mass recovery was calculated to be ~ 96.5% indicating non-reactive transport in silica sand. The preliminary results also show that increased concentration of CMC (from 0.2% to 0.4 %) causes higher pressure drop across the sandbox, indicating that use of high CMC concentrations will limit injection rates with a corresponding

  8. Temperature variations at nano-scale level in phase transformed nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloys adjacent to graphene layers.

    PubMed

    Amini, Abbas; Cheng, Chun; Naebe, Minoo; Church, Jeffrey S; Hameed, Nishar; Asgari, Alireza; Will, Frank

    2013-07-21

    The detection and control of the temperature variation at the nano-scale level of thermo-mechanical materials during a compression process have been challenging issues. In this paper, an empirical method is proposed to predict the temperature at the nano-scale level during the solid-state phase transition phenomenon in NiTi shape memory alloys. Isothermal data was used as a reference to determine the temperature change at different loading rates. The temperature of the phase transformed zone underneath the tip increased by ∼3 to 40 °C as the loading rate increased. The temperature approached a constant with further increase in indentation depth. A few layers of graphene were used to enhance the cooling process at different loading rates. Due to the presence of graphene layers the temperature beneath the tip decreased by a further ∼3 to 10 °C depending on the loading rate. Compared with highly polished NiTi, deeper indentation depths were also observed during the solid-state phase transition, especially at the rate dependent zones. Larger superelastic deformations confirmed that the latent heat transfer through the deposited graphene layers allowed a larger phase transition volume and, therefore, more stress relaxation and penetration depth. PMID:23744099

  9. Nano-scale NiSi and n-type silicon based Schottky barrier diode as a near infra-red detector for room temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Midya, K.; Duttagupta, S. P.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2014-09-28

    The fabrication of nano-scale NiSi/n-Si Schottky barrier diode by rapid thermal annealing process is reported. The characterization of the nano-scale NiSi film was performed using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the film (27 nm) has been measured by cross-sectional Secondary Electron Microscopy and XPS based depth profile method. Current–voltage (I–V) characteristics show an excellent rectification ratio (I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} = 10⁵) at a bias voltage of ±1 V. The diode ideality factor is 1.28. The barrier height was also determined independently based on I–V (0.62 eV) and high frequency capacitance–voltage technique (0.76 eV), and the correlation between them has explained. The diode photo-response was measured in the range of 1.35–2.5 μm under different reverse bias conditions (0.0–1.0 V). The response is observed to increase with increasing reverse bias. From the photo-responsivity study, the zero bias barrier height was determined to be 0.54 eV.

  10. Nano-scale NiSi and n-type silicon based Schottky barrier diode as a near infra-red detector for room temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Midya, K.; Duttagupta, S. P.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The fabrication of nano-scale NiSi/n-Si Schottky barrier diode by rapid thermal annealing process is reported. The characterization of the nano-scale NiSi film was performed using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the film (27 nm) has been measured by cross-sectional Secondary Electron Microscopy and XPS based depth profile method. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics show an excellent rectification ratio (ION/IOFF = 105) at a bias voltage of ±1 V. The diode ideality factor is 1.28. The barrier height was also determined independently based on I-V (0.62 eV) and high frequency capacitance-voltage technique (0.76 eV), and the correlation between them has explained. The diode photo-response was measured in the range of 1.35-2.5 μm under different reverse bias conditions (0.0-1.0 V). The response is observed to increase with increasing reverse bias. From the photo-responsivity study, the zero bias barrier height was determined to be 0.54 eV.

  11. Fabrication, investigation and modification of magnetic states in nano-scale patterned cobalt films by using scanning ion microscopy with polarization analysis (SIMPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Rau, Carl

    2007-03-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) lithography is used to fabricate patterned Co nano-elements from ultra-thin (30 nm thick), electron-beam-evaporated Co films. The spin- and spatially-resolved surface magnetic structure (SMS) of the nano-scale Co elements is imaged in situ by using scanning ion microscopy with polarization analysis (SIMPA). SIMPA spin maps directly reveal the detailed spin structure of magnetic vortex and antivortex states, which can be utilized for ultra-high density, non-volatile magnetic memory devices. It is found that the SMS of the nano-magnetic structures depends strongly on the size of the patterned Co elements. In addition, FIB etching is utilized in situ to create well-defined defects (antidots) in the patterned Co elements, which strongly modify the previously existing SMSs leading to novel nano-magnetic states. The results show that ion-surface interaction, as provided by SIMPA spin mapping and in situ FIB processing, can be profitably exploited for studying SMSs of patterned magnetic systems to be used for nano-scale magnetic memory and magnetic logic devices.

  12. Time-Dependent Measure of a Nano-Scale Force-Pulse Driven by the Axonemal Dynein Motors in Individual Live Sperm Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M J; Rudd, R E; McElfresh, M W; Balhorn, R

    2009-04-23

    Nano-scale mechanical forces generated by motor proteins are crucial to normal cellular and organismal functioning. The ability to measure and exploit such forces would be important to developing motile biomimetic nanodevices powered by biological motors for Nanomedicine. Axonemal dynein motors positioned inside the sperm flagellum drive microtubule sliding giving rise to rhythmic beating of the flagellum. This force-generating action makes it possible for the sperm cell to move through viscous media. Here we report new nano-scale information on how the propulsive force is generated by the sperm flagellum and how this force varies over time. Single cell recordings reveal discrete {approx}50 ms pulses oscillating with amplitude 9.8 {+-} 2.6 nN independent of pulse frequency (3.5-19.5 Hz). The average work carried out by each cell is 4.6 x 10{sup -16} J per pulse, equivalent to the hydrolysis of {approx}5,500 ATP molecules. The mechanochemical coupling at each active dynein head is {approx}2.2 pN/ATP, and {approx}3.9 pN per dynein arm, in agreement with previously published values obtained using different methods.

  13. Effect of micro/nano-scale textures on anti-adhesive wear properties of WC/Co-based TiAlN coated tools in AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kedong; Deng, Jianxin; Sun, Jialin; Jiang, Chao; Liu, Yayun; Chen, Shuai

    2015-11-01

    In cutting of stainless steel with coated tool, the steel chip adhering to tool surface is usually severe and consequently causes serious adhesive and frictional problems, which is the major reason for the failure of coated tool. To solve the problem, a surface engineering approach, namely, a highly functionalization of tool surfaces by textures may be of great importance. Thus, the effect of micro/nano-scale textures on anti-adhesive wear properties of TiAlN coated tools in AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel cutting was investigated. For this purpose, two types of surface textures were fabricated on the rake faces of WC/Co carbide tools: (i) micro-scale textures fabricated by Nd:YAG laser, (ii) micro/nano-scales textures fabricated by Nd:YAG laser and femtosecond laser. Then, these textured tools were deposited with TiAlN coatings using cathode arc-evaporation technique. Wet cutting experiments were carried out with the micro-scale textured coated tool (MCT), micro/nano-scale textured coated tool (MNCT), and the conventional coated tool (CCT). Results obtained in this work demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating micro- or micro/nano-scale textures on tools substrate surfaces to improve the anti-adhesive wear properties of TiAlN coated tool. The rake face micro/nano-scale textured tool was the most effective. Moreover, mechanisms for the anti-adhesive properties enhancement were proposed.

  14. Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... care Kids’ zone Video library Find a dermatologist Contact dermatitis Overview Contact dermatitis: Many health care workers ... to touching her face while wearing latex gloves. Contact dermatitis: Overview Almost everyone gets this type of ...

  15. From micro- to nano-scale molding of metals : size effect during molding of single crystal Al with rectangular strip punches.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.; Meng, W. J.; Mei, F.; Hiller, J.; Miller, D. J.

    2011-02-01

    A single crystal Al specimen was molded at room temperature with long, rectangular, strip diamond punches. Quantitative molding response curves were obtained at a series of punch widths, ranging from 5 {micro}m to 550 nm. A significant size effect was observed, manifesting itself in terms of significantly increasing characteristic molding pressure as the punch width decreases to 1.5 {micro}m and below. A detailed comparison of the present strip punch molding results was made with Berkovich pyramidal indentation on the same single crystal Al specimen. The comparison reveals distinctly different dependence of the characteristic pressure on corresponding characteristic length. The present results show the feasibility of micro-/nano-scale compression molding as a micro-/nano-fabrication technique, and offer an experimental test case for size-dependent plasticity theories.

  16. Micro- and nano-scale damage on the surface of W divertor component during exposure to high heat flux loads with He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Greuner, H.; Zhao, S. X.; Böswirth, B.; Luo, G. N.; Zhou, X.; Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Micro- and nano-scale surface damage on a W divertor component sample exposed to high heat flux loads generated with He atoms has been investigated through SEM, EBSD, AFM and FIB-SEM. The component sample was supplied by the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) and AT&M company, China, and the loading experiment was performed in the GLADIS facility at IPP Garching, Germany. Two typical damage structures were observed on the surface: the first one is characterized by obvious blisters and some grooves formed from ruptured blisters, and the other one is a kind of porous structure accompanying with at least ∼25 nm surface material loss. As the grain orientation is further away from <111>, the damage morphology gradually changes from the former structure to the latter. The possible damage mechanism is discussed.

  17. A transmission electron microscopy study of the deformation behavior underneath nanoindents in nano-scale Al-TiN multilayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Mara, Nathan A; Dickerson, Patricia O; Misra, Amit; Hoagland, R G

    2009-01-01

    Nano-scale multilayered Al-TiN composites were deposited with DC magnetron sputtering technique in two different layer thickness ratios - Al:TiN = 1:1 and Al:TiN = 9:1. The Al layer thickness varied from 2 nm to 450 nm. The hardness of the samples was tested by nanoindentation using a Berkovich tip. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was carried out on samples extracted with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) from below the nanoindents. This paper presents the results of the hardness tests in the Al-TiN multilayers with the two different thickness ratios and the observations from the cross-sectional TEM studies of the regions underneath the indents. These studies showed remarkable strength in the multilayers, as well as some very interesting deformation behavior in the TiN layers at extremely small length scales, where the hard TiN layers undergo co-deformation with the Al layers.

  18. Radiation damage of biomolecular systems: Nano-scale insights into Ion-beam cancer therapy. 2nd Nano-IBCT conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Mason, Nigel J.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-10-01

    The second Nano-IBCT conference of the COST Action MP1002: Nanoscale Insights into Ion Beam Cancer Therapy was held in Sopot, Poland, from May 20th to May 24th, 2013. The Nano-IBCT action had been launched in December 2010 and brings together experts from different disciplines (physics, chemistry, biology, hadron-therapy centres, medical institutions), with specialisms in the radiation damage of biological matter. This meeting follows up the first one that was held in October, 2011 in Caen, France and we were pleased to see again so many of the participants of the previous meeting as well as to welcome some new colleagues joining and sharing their knowledge and expertise in this field. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Nano-scale Insights into Ion-beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Paulo Limão-Vieira and Malgorzata Smialek-Telega.

  19. Application of the self-consistent quantum method for simulating the size quantization effect in the channel of a nano-scale dual gate MOSFET

    SciTech Connect

    Pratap, Surender; Sarkar, Niladri

    2015-06-24

    Self-Consistent Quantum Method using Schrodinger-Poisson equations have been used for determining the Channel electron density of Nano-Scale MOSFETs for 6nm and 9nm thick channels. The 6nm thick MOSFET show the peak of the electron density at the middle where as the 9nm thick MOSFET shows the accumulation of the electrons at the oxide/semiconductor interface. The electron density in the channel is obtained from the diagonal elements of the density matrix; [ρ]=[1/(1+exp(β(H − μ)))] A Tridiagonal Hamiltonian Matrix [H] is constructed for the oxide/channel/oxide 1D structure for the dual gate MOSFET. This structure is discretized and Finite-Difference method is used for constructing the matrix equation. The comparison of these results which are obtained by Quantum methods are done with Semi-Classical methods.

  20. An investigation of the effects of history dependent damage in time dependent fracture mechanics: nano-scale studies of damage evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Brust, F.W. Jr; Mohan, R.; Yang, Y.P.; Oh, J.; Katsube, N.

    2002-12-01

    High-temperature operation of technical engineering systems is critical for system efficiency, and will be a key driver in the future US DOE energy policy. Developing an understanding of high-temperature creep and creep-fatigue failure processes is a key driver for the research work described here. The focus is on understanding the high-temperature deformation and damage development on the nano-scale (50 to 500 nm) level. The high-temperature damage development process, especially with regard to low and high cyclic loading, which has received little attention to date, is studied. Damage development under cyclic loading develops in a fashion quite different from the constant load situation. The development of analytical methodologies so that high-temperature management of new systems can be realized is the key goal of this work.

  1. Direct comparison of the performance of commonly used e-beam resists during nano-scale plasma etching of Si, SiO2, and Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodyear, Andy; Boettcher, Monika; Stolberg, Ines; Cooke, Mike

    2015-03-01

    Electron beam writing remains one of the reference pattern generation techniques, and plasma etching continues to underpin pattern transfer. We report a systematic study of the plasma etch resistance of several e-beam resists, both negative and positive as well as classical and Chemically Amplified Resists: HSQ[1,2] (Dow Corning), PMMA[3] (Allresist GmbH), AR-P6200 (Allresist GmbH), ZEP520 (Zeon Corporation), CAN028 (TOK), CAP164 (TOK), and an additional pCAR (non-disclosed provider). Their behaviour under plasma exposure to various nano-scale plasma etch chemistries was examined (SF6/C4F8 ICP silicon etch, CHF3/Ar RIE SiO2 etch, Cl2/O2 RIE and ICP chrome etch, and HBr ICP silicon etch). Samples of each resist type were etched simultaneously to provide a direct comparison of their etch resistance. Resist thicknesses (and hence resist erosion rates) were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometer in order to provide the highest accuracy for the resist comparison. Etch selectivities (substrate:mask etch rate ratio) are given, with recommendations for the optimum resist choice for each type of etch chemistry. Silicon etch profiles are also presented, along with the exposure and etch conditions to obtain the most vertical nano-scale pattern transfer. We identify one resist that gave an unusually high selectivity for chlorinated and brominated etches which could enable pattern transfer below 10nm without an additional hard mask. In this case the resist itself acts as a hard mask. We also highlight the differing effects of fluorine and bromine-based Silicon etch chemistries on resist profile evolution and hence etch fidelity.

  2. Redox-regulated dynamic interplay between Cox19 and the copper-binding protein Cox11 in the intermembrane space of mitochondria facilitates biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Manuela; Woellhaf, Michael W.; Bohnert, Maria; van der Laan, Martin; Sommer, Frederik; Jung, Martin; Zimmermann, Richard; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the twin Cx9C protein family constitute the largest group of proteins in the intermembrane space (IMS) of mitochondria. Despite their conserved nature and their essential role in the biogenesis of the respiratory chain, the molecular function of twin Cx9C proteins is largely unknown. We performed a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis to identify interaction partners of the conserved twin Cx9C protein Cox19. We found that Cox19 interacts in a dynamic manner with Cox11, a copper transfer protein that facilitates metalation of the Cu(B) center of subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase. The interaction with Cox11 is critical for the stable accumulation of Cox19 in mitochondria. Cox19 consists of a helical hairpin structure that forms a hydrophobic surface characterized by two highly conserved tyrosine-leucine dipeptides. These residues are essential for Cox19 function and its specific binding to a cysteine-containing sequence in Cox11. Our observations suggest that an oxidative modification of this cysteine residue of Cox11 stimulates Cox19 binding, pointing to a redox-regulated interplay of Cox19 and Cox11 that is critical for copper transfer in the IMS and thus for biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:25926683

  3. Role of membrane contact sites in protein import into mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Susanne E; Rampelt, Heike; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria import more than 1,000 different proteins from the cytosol. The proteins are synthesized as precursors on cytosolic ribosomes and are translocated by protein transport machineries of the mitochondrial membranes. Five main pathways for protein import into mitochondria have been identified. Most pathways use the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) as the entry gate into mitochondria. Depending on specific signals contained in the precursors, the proteins are subsequently transferred to different intramitochondrial translocases. In this article, we discuss the connection between protein import and mitochondrial membrane architecture. Mitochondria possess two membranes. It is a long-standing question how contact sites between outer and inner membranes are formed and which role the contact sites play in the translocation of precursor proteins. A major translocation contact site is formed between the TOM complex and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex), promoting transfer of presequence-carrying preproteins to the mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix. Recent findings led to the identification of contact sites that involve the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) of the inner membrane. MICOS plays a dual role. It is crucial for maintaining the inner membrane cristae architecture and forms contacts sites to the outer membrane that promote translocation of precursor proteins into the intermembrane space and outer membrane of mitochondria. The view is emerging that the mitochondrial protein translocases do not function as independent units, but are embedded in a network of interactions with machineries that control mitochondrial activity and architecture. PMID:25514890

  4. Micro- and Nano-scale Measurement of the Thermophysical Properties of Polymeric Materials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Angela; Rides, Martin; Cuenat, Alexandre; Winkless, Laurie

    2013-05-01

    To realize the benefits and optimize the performance of micro- and nano-structured materials and thin films, designers need to understand and thus be able to characterize their thermal, thermophysical, and thermomechanical properties on appropriate length scales. This paper describes the determination of glass-transition temperatures of polymers on the micro-scale, obtained from contact force-distance curves for poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl acetate) measured using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Measurements were made using a standard AFM tip where thin films were heated using a temperature controlled hot stage and by using a scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) probe. The latter was used either with the hot stage or with the SThM probe providing a localized heating source via Joule heating. Differences in the glass-transition temperature measured using the hot stage and Joule heating were apparent and considered to be due to heat transfer effects between the probe, specimen, and surroundings. Gradients of force-distance curves, pull-off and snap-in forces, and adhesion energy were obtained. The results suggest that the onset of changes in the material's mechanical properties at the glass transition was found to be dependent on the mechanical property measured, with pull-off force values changing at lower temperatures than the snap-in force and adhesion energy.

  5. Differential Expression of Adenine Nucleotide Converting Enzymes in Mitochondrial Intermembrane Space: A Potential Role of Adenylate Kinase Isozyme 2 in Neutrophil Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tanimura, Ayako; Horiguchi, Taigo; Miyoshi, Keiko; Hagita, Hiroko; Noma, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide dynamics in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) play a key role in oxidative phosphorylation. In a previous study, Drosophila adenylate kinase isozyme 2 (Dak2) knockout was reported to cause developmental lethality at the larval stage in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition, two other studies reported that AK2 is a responsible gene for reticular dysgenesis (RD), a human disease that is characterized by severe combined immunodeficiency and deafness. Therefore, mitochondrial AK2 may play an important role in hematopoietic differentiation and ontogenesis. Three additional adenine nucleotide metabolizing enzymes, including mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1 and CKMT2) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase isoform D (NDPK-D), have been found in IMS. Although these kinases generate ADP for ATP synthesis, their involvement in RD remains unclear and still an open question. In this study, mRNA and protein expressions of these mitochondrial kinases were firstly examined in mouse ES cells, day 8 embryos, and 7-week-old adult mice. It was found that their expressions are spatiotemporally regulated, and Ak2 is exclusively expressed in bone marrow, which is a major hematopoietic tissue in adults. In subsequent experiments, we identified increased expression of both AK2 and CKMT1 during macrophage differentiation and exclusive production of AK2 during neutrophil differentiation using HL-60 cells as an in vitro model of hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, AK2 knockdown specifically inhibited neutrophil differentiation without affecting macrophage differentiation. These data suggest that AK2 is indispensable for neutrophil differentiation and indicate a possible causative link between AK2 deficiency and neutropenia in RD. PMID:24587121

  6. Telocyte's contacts.

    PubMed

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2016-07-01

    Telocytes (TC) are an interstitial cell type located in the connective tissue of many organs of humans and laboratory mammals. By means of homocellular contacts, TC build a scaffold whose meshes integrity and continuity are guaranteed by those contacts having a mechanical function; those contacts acting as sites of intercellular communication allow exchanging information and spreading signals. Heterocellular contacts between TC and a great variety of cell types give origin to mixed networks. TC, by means of all these types of contacts, their interaction with the extracellular matrix and their vicinity to nerve endings, are part of an integrated system playing tissue/organ-specific roles. PMID:26826524

  7. Nano-scale, planar and multi-tiered current pathways from a carbon nanotube-copper composite with high conductivity, ampacity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    New lithographically processable materials with high ampacity are in demand to meet the increasing requirement for high operational current density at high temperatures existing in current pathways within electronic devices. To meet this demand, we report an approach to fabricate a high ampacity (~100 times higher than Cu) carbon nanotube-copper (CNT-Cu) composite into a variety of complex nano-scale, planar and multi-tiered current pathways. The approach involved the use of a two-stage electrodeposition of copper into a pre-patterned template of porous, thin CNT sheets acting as the electrode. The versatility of this approach enabled the realization of completely suspended multi-tier, dielectric-less `air-gap' CNT-Cu circuits that could be electrically isolated from each other and are challenging to fabricate with pure Cu or any metal. Importantly, all such complex structures, ranging from 500 nm to 20 μm in width, exhibited ~100-times higher ampacity than any known metal, with comparable electrical conductivity as Cu. In addition, CNT-Cu structures also exhibited a superior temperature stability compared to the ~10-times wider Cu counterparts. We believe that the combination of our approach and the properties demonstrated here are vital achievements for the future development of efficient and powerful electrical devices.

  8. Nano-scale, planar and multi-tiered current pathways from a carbon nanotube-copper composite with high conductivity, ampacity and stability.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don N; Hata, Kenji

    2016-02-21

    New lithographically processable materials with high ampacity are in demand to meet the increasing requirement for high operational current density at high temperatures existing in current pathways within electronic devices. To meet this demand, we report an approach to fabricate a high ampacity (∼100 times higher than Cu) carbon nanotube-copper (CNT-Cu) composite into a variety of complex nano-scale, planar and multi-tiered current pathways. The approach involved the use of a two-stage electrodeposition of copper into a pre-patterned template of porous, thin CNT sheets acting as the electrode. The versatility of this approach enabled the realization of completely suspended multi-tier, dielectric-less 'air-gap' CNT-Cu circuits that could be electrically isolated from each other and are challenging to fabricate with pure Cu or any metal. Importantly, all such complex structures, ranging from 500 nm to 20 μm in width, exhibited ∼100-times higher ampacity than any known metal, with comparable electrical conductivity as Cu. In addition, CNT-Cu structures also exhibited a superior temperature stability compared to the ∼10-times wider Cu counterparts. We believe that the combination of our approach and the properties demonstrated here are vital achievements for the future development of efficient and powerful electrical devices. PMID:26486752

  9. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiacker, K.; McKeown, J. T.; Liu, C.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.

    2016-08-01

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of the metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ˜1.3 m s-1 to ˜2.5 m s-1 during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s-1 have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. Using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.

  10. A three-dimensional imaging detector based on nano-scale silver-related defects in X- and gamma-ray-irradiated glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Yanagida, Yuka; Chen, Yao Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Ag-activated phosphate glass, which is the most commonly known radiophotoluminescent (RPL) material, has the capability to operate not only dosimeters but also two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) dose imaging detectors in the same host. This passive detector is based on radiation-induced, optically active nano-scale defects. In this work, the transient-state optical properties of the blue and orange RPL were investigated using a time-resolved spectrum technique for 137Cs and 60Co gamma-ray-irradiated Ag-activated phosphate glass. Specifically, the blue RPL intensity with a decay time of 5 ns as a function of the depth at the vicinity of the surface was systematically examined to clarify an accurate dose distribution within the glass. Moreover, a feasibility study into the use of an RPL Ag-activated phosphate glass detector for fluorescent nuclear track imaging was demonstrated using a confocal fluorescence image microscope for the first time.

  11. Nano scale self-emulsifying oil based carrier system for improved oral bioavailability of camptothecin derivative by P-Glycoprotein modulation.

    PubMed

    Negi, Lalit Mohan; Tariq, Mohammad; Talegaonkar, Sushama

    2013-11-01

    Irinotecan is a camptothecin derivative with low oral bioavailability due to active efflux by intestinal P-glycoprotein receptors. Hence, no oral formulation is marketed for Irinotecan till date. However, an optimized Self micro emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS), formulated to produce nano range oil droplets by using P-gp modulator excipients can tackle the issue and elevate the systemic availability of Irinotecan. The present work focuses on the development of SMEDDS for Irinotecan and evaluation of its in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo potentials. The SMEDDS were developed using Capmul MCM-C8, Cremophor EL and Pluronic L-121 as oil, surfactant and co-surfactant respectively and has good oil carrying capacity (30%) with competence to produce nano-scale oil droplets (130 ± 2.13 nm) on spontaneous emulsification. A much deeper penetration to the intestine was observed with SMEDDS by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Flow-cytometric studies also revealed the greater uptake of fluorescent probe in Caco-2 cell-lines with the use of SMEDDS. Biochemical estimation of LDH from the intestinal tissues treated with SMEDDS and free drug suspension confirmed that the developed formulation is safe for use. Furthermore, the AUC0 → t of Irinotecan from the optimized SMEDDS formulation was found to be 4 folds higher than that from Irinotecan suspension on oral administration. The optimized SMEDDS formulation was found to be capable of maintaining the sustained plasma drug level of Irinotecan with better bioavailability. PMID:23850745

  12. Fabrication and integration of micro/nano-scale polymer optical waveguides and devices for optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, Seung Gol; O, Beom Hoan; Park, Se Geun; Kim, Kyong Heon; Kang, Jin Ku; Chin, I.; Kwon, Y. K.; Choi, Young Wan

    2005-04-01

    We report on the results of our study on the design, fabrication and integration of micro/nano-scale waveguide arrays and devices for applications for a modular system that we newly proposed and call "optical printed circuit board (O-PCB)," which we envision to use as a platform for VLSI micro/nano-photonic applications. The O-PCBs are designed to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards or substrates. We have designed and assembled O-PCBs using polymer-based optical waveguide arrays and circuits. We describe the procedures for the synthesis of polymers, procedures of forming masters and stamps, and procedures of forming waveguides using embossing techniques. We also describe the procedures of design, fabrication and construction of O-PCBs and describe the procedures for light coupling between light sources, detectors, waveguides and other functional devices. We also describe design of power beam splitters and waveguide filters using photonic band-gap crystals for VLSI photonic integration application. We also discuss the characteristics of the assembled O-PCBs and discuss their potential applications.

  13. Comparison of focused ion beam versus nano-scale X-ray computed tomography for resolving 3-D microstructures of porous fuel cell materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargo, E. A.; Kotaka, T.; Tabuchi, Y.; Kumbur, E. C.

    2013-11-01

    Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) have emerged as two popular nanotomography techniques for quantifying the 3-D microstructure of porous materials. The objective of this study is to assess the unique features and limitations of FIB-SEM and nano-CT in capturing the 3-D microstructure and structure-related transport properties of porous fuel cell materials. As a test case, a sample of a micro-porous layer used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells is analyzed to obtain 3-D microstructure datasets using these two nanotomography techniques. For quantitative comparison purposes, several key transport properties are determined for these two datasets, including the porosity, pore connectivity, tortuosity, structural diffusivity coefficient, and chord length (i.e., void size) distributions. The results obtained for both datasets are evaluated against each other and experimental data when available. Additionally, these two techniques are compared qualitatively in terms of the acquired images, image segmentation, and general systems operation. The particular advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are highlighted, along with suggestions for best practice.

  14. Three-dimensional phase segregation of micro-porous layers for fuel cells by nano-scale X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andisheh-Tadbir, Mehdi; Orfino, Francesco P.; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Modern hydrogen powered polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) utilize a micro-porous layer (MPL) consisting of carbon nanoparticles and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to enhance the transport phenomena and performance while reducing cost. However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet completely understood due to a lack of information about the detailed MPL structure and properties. In the present work, the 3D phase segregated nanostructure of an MPL is revealed for the first time through the development of a customized, non-destructive procedure for monochromatic nano-scale X-ray computed tomography visualization. Utilizing this technique, it is discovered that PTFE is situated in conglomerated regions distributed randomly within connected domains of carbon particles; hence, it is concluded that PTFE acts as a binder for the carbon particles and provides structural support for the MPL. Exposed PTFE surfaces are also observed that will aid the desired hydrophobicity of the material. Additionally, the present approach uniquely enables phase segregated calculation of effective transport properties, as reported herein, which is particularly important for accurate estimation of electrical and thermal conductivity. Overall, the new imaging technique and associated findings may contribute to further performance improvements and cost reduction in support of fuel cell commercialization for clean energy applications.

  15. Characterization of multi-scale porous structure of fly ash/phosphate geopolymer hollow sphere structures: from submillimeter to nano-scale.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruifeng; Wu, Gaohui; Jiang, Longtao; Sun, Dongli

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the porous structure of fly ash/phosphate geopolymer hollow sphere structures (FPGHSS), prepared by pre-bonding and curing technology, has been characterized by multi-resolution methods from sub-millimeter to nano-scale. Micro-CT and confocal microscopy could provide the macroscopic distribution of porous structure on sub-millimeter scale, and hollow fly ashes with sphere shape and several sub-millimeter open cells with irregular shape were identified. SEM is more suitable to illustrate the distribution of micro-sized open and closed cells, and it was found that the open cells of FPGHSS were mainly formed in the interstitial porosity between fly ashes. Mercury porosimeter measurement showed that the micro-sized open cell of FPGHSS demonstrated a normal/bimodal distribution, and the peaks of pore size distribution were mainly around 100 and 10 μm. TEM observation revealed that the phosphate geopolymer was mainly composed of the porous area with nano-pores and dense areas, which were amorphous Al-O-P phase and α-Al2O3 respectively. The pore size of nano-pores demonstrated a quasi-normal distribution from about 10 to 100 nm. Therefore, detailed information of the porous structure of FPGHSS could be revealed using multiple methods. PMID:25282522

  16. Effects of washing solution and drying condition on reactivity of nano-scale zero valent irons (nZVIs) synthesized by borohydride reduction.

    PubMed

    Woo, Heesoo; Park, Junboum; Lee, Seockheon; Lee, Seunghak

    2014-02-01

    Washing and drying processes are essential when synthesizing nano-scale zero valent irons (nZVIs) by borohydride reduction of iron salts in aqueous phase. However, effects of these processes on nZVI reactivity have not been investigated in detail, although different washing and drying conditions might alter surface characteristics of nZVIs and thus vary their reactivity towards reducible contaminants. In this study, effects of three washing solutions and drying conditions on the reactivity of nZVIs for nitrate were investigated. Washing with volatile solvents and drying under anaerobic condition decreased thickness of Fe-oxide layer on nZVIs and increased content of Fe(2+)-containing oxides in the layer, which enhanced nZVI reactivity toward nitrate. Volatile solvent washing could minimize the decrease in nZVI reactivity according to changing anaerobic drying condition to aerobic. Findings from this study suggest that application of washing with volatile solvents and drying under aerobic condition should be recommended as effective processes to obtain nZVIs with maximum reactivity at reasonable costs and efforts. PMID:24290304

  17. Toward giga-pixel nanoscopy on a chip: a computational wide-field look at the nano-scale without the use of lenses

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Euan; Luo, Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Greenbaum, Alon

    2013-01-01

    The development of lensfree on-chip microscopy in the past decade has opened up various new possibilities for biomedical imaging across ultra-large fields of view using compact, portable, and cost-effective devices. However, until recently, its ability to resolve fine features and detect ultra-small particles has not rivalled the capabilities of the more expensive and bulky laboratory-grade optical microscopes. In this Frontier Review, we highlight the developments over the last two years that have enabled computational lensfree holographic on-chip microscopy to compete with and, in some cases, surpass conventional bright-field microscopy in its ability to image nano-scale objects across large fields of view, yielding giga-pixel phase and amplitude images. Lensfree microscopy has now achieved a numerical aperture as high as 0.92, with a spatial resolution as small as 225 nm across a large field of view e.g., >20 mm2. Furthermore, the combination of lensfree microscopy with self-assembled nanolenses, forming nano-catenoid minimal surfaces around individual nanoparticles has boosted the image contrast to levels high enough to permit bright-field imaging of individual particles smaller than 100 nm. These capabilities support a number of new applications, including, for example, the detection and sizing of individual virus particles using field-portable computational on-chip microscopes. PMID:23592185

  18. Generation and performance of localised surface plasmons utilising nano-scale structured multi-layered thin films deposited upon D-shaped optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, T.; Neal, R.; Mou, C.; Dvorak, M.; Rozhin, A.; Kalli, K.; Webb, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    A new generation of surface plasmonic optical fibre sensors is fabricated using multiple coatings deposited on a lapped section of a single mode fibre. Post-deposition UV laser irradiation using a phase mask produces a nano-scaled surface relief grating structure, resembling nano-wires. The overall length of the individual corrugations is approximately 14 μm with an average full width half maximum of 100 nm. Evidence is presented to show that these surface structures result from material compaction created by the silicon dioxide and germanium layers in the multi-layered coating and the surface topology is capable of supporting localised surface plasmons. The coating compaction induces a strain gradient into the D-shaped optical fibre that generates an asymmetric periodic refractive index profile which enhances the coupling of the light from the core of the fibre to plasmons on the surface of the coating. Experimental data are presented that show changes in spectral characteristics after UV processing and that the performance of the sensors increases from that of their pre-UV irradiation state. The enhanced performance is illustrated with regards to change in external refractive index and demonstrates high spectral sensitivities in gaseous and aqueous index regimes ranging up to 4000 nm/RIU for wavelength and 800 dB/RIU for intensity. The devices generate surface plasmons over a very large wavelength range, (visible to 2 μm) depending on the polarization state of the illuminating light.

  19. Closed-form approximation and numerical validation of the influence of van der Waals force on electrostatic cantilevers at nano-scale separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Asghar; Alasty, Aria; Akbari, Javad

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the two-point boundary value problem (BVP) of the cantilever deflection at nano-scale separations subjected to van der Waals and electrostatic forces is investigated using analytical and numerical methods to obtain the instability point of the beam. In the analytical treatment of the BVP, the nonlinear differential equation of the model is transformed into the integral form by using the Green's function of the cantilever beam. Then, closed-form solutions are obtained by assuming an appropriate shape function for the beam deflection to evaluate the integrals. In the numerical method, the BVP is solved with the MATLAB BVP solver, which implements a collocation method for obtaining the solution of the BVP. The large deformation theory is applied in numerical simulations to study the effect of the finite kinematics on the pull-in parameters of cantilevers. The centerline of the beam under the effect of electrostatic and van der Waals forces at small deflections and at the point of instability is obtained numerically. In computing the centerline of the beam, the axial displacement due to the transverse deformation of the beam is taken into account, using the inextensibility condition. The pull-in parameters of the beam are computed analytically and numerically under the effects of electrostatic and/or van der Waals forces. The detachment length and the minimum initial gap of freestanding cantilevers, which are the basic design parameters, are determined. The results of the analytical study are compared with the numerical solutions of the BVP. The proposed methods are validated by the results published in the literature.

  20. Effects of Bias Pulsing on Etching of SiO2 Pattern in Capacitively-Coupled Plasmas for Nano-Scale Patterning of Multi-Level Hard Masks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sechan; Choi, Gyuhyun; Chae, Heeyeop; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-05-01

    In order to study the effects of bias pulsing on the etching characteristics of a silicon dioxide (SiO2) layer using multi-level hard mask (MLHM) structures of ArF photoresist/bottom anti-reflected coating/SiO2/amorphous carbon layer (ACL)/SiO2, the effects of bias pulsing conditions on the etch characteristics of a SiO2 layer with an ACL mask pattern in C4F8/CH2F2/O2/Ar etch chemistries were investigated in a dual-frequency capacitively-coupled plasma (CCP) etcher. The effects of the pulse frequency, duty ratio, and pulse-bias power in the 2 MHz low-frequency (LF) power source were investigated in plasmas generated by a 27.12 MHz high-frequency (HF) power source. The etch rates of ACL and SiO2 decreased, but the etch selectivity of SiO2/ACL increased with decreasing duty ratio. When the ACL and SiO2 layers were etched with increasing pulse frequency, no significant change was observed in the etch rates and etch selectivity. With increasing LF pulse-bias power, the etch rate of ACL and SiO2 slightly increased, but the etch selectivity of SiO2/ACL decreased. Also, the precise control of the critical dimension (CD) values with decreasing duty ratio can be explained by the protection of sidewall etching of SiO2 by increased passivation. Pulse-biased etching was successfully applied to the patterning of the nano-scale line and space of SiO2 using an ACL pattern. PMID:27483889

  1. Micro- and Nano-scale Diffusion Domains Acting as Kinetic Controls for U(VI) Release to the Hanford 300-Area Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D. L.; Hay, M. B.; Davis, J. A.; Zachara, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    The 300-Area of the Hanford reservation, a cold-war era nuclear processing facility, is plagued by long-term elevated concentrations of U(VI) in the underlying aquifer. While the sediment U(VI) concentration is relatively low, it continues to act as a source and sink for the contaminant, allowing for persistent groundwater concentrations well above the maximum contamination limit (MCL). Simple Kd modeling of the attenuation of U(VI) in the aquifer predicted that groundwater U(VI) concentrations would decrease to below the drinking water standard by the year 2002. However, grain-scale morphology of the aquifer material suggests that intra-grain flow paths and mineral coatings, in which sorption complexes and precipitates formed over years of waste disposal, provide a significant kinetic constraint that slows groundwater flushing of the sediments. In order to quantify the impact of diffusion kinetics on the release of U(VI), high-resolution, non-reactive tracer studies were conducted on vadose zone sediments in both column and batch reactors. Systems were equilibrated for long time scales with tritated artificial groundwater and then flushed with flow and stop-flow events included for columns. Previously collected U(VI) release data from batch dissolution/desorption studies is compared with tritium tracer diffusion kinetics as well as porosimetry and detailed microscopy characterization. The micro-scale and nano-scale diffusion regimes, including intra-granular regions as well as mineral coatings, represent a significant potential long-term source of contaminant U(VI). Understanding the physical kinetic limitations coupled with the complex chemistry of U(VI) sorption processes within natural systems is an important step forward in providing information to strengthen field-scale reactive transport simulations.

  2. Scattering effects and high-spatial-frequency nanostructures on ultrafast laser irradiated surfaces of zirconium metallic alloys with nano-scaled topographies.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Cheng, Guanghua; Sedao, Xxx; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Faure, Nicolas; Jamon, Damien; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Stoian, Razvan

    2016-05-30

    The origin of high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures (HSFL) driven by incident ultrafast laser fields, with their ability to achieve structure resolutions below λ/2, is often obscured by the overlap with regular ripples patterns at quasi-wavelength periodicities. We experimentally demonstrate here employing defined surface topographies that these structures are intrinsically related to surface roughness in the nano-scale domain. Using Zr-based bulk metallic glass (Zr-BMG) and its crystalline alloy (Zr-CA) counterpart formed by thermal annealing from its glassy precursor, we prepared surfaces showing either smooth appearances on thermoplastic BMG or high-density nano-protuberances from randomly distributed embedded nano-crystallites with average sizes below 200 nm on the recrystallized alloy. Upon ultrashort pulse irradiation employing linearly polarized 50 fs, 800 nm laser pulses, the surfaces show a range of nanoscale organized features. The change of topology was then followed under multiple pulse irradiation at fluences around and below the single pulse threshold. While the former material (Zr-BMG) shows a specific high quality arrangement of standard ripples around the laser wavelength, the latter (Zr-CA) demonstrates strong predisposition to form high spatial frequency rippled structures (HSFL). We discuss electromagnetic scenarios assisting their formation based on near-field interaction between particles and field-enhancement leading to structure linear growth. Finite-difference-time-domain simulations outline individual and collective effects of nanoparticles on electromagnetic energy modulation and the feedback processes in the formation of HSFL structures with correlation to regular ripples (LSFL). PMID:27410083

  3. Nano-scale Au supported on Fe3O4: characterization and application in the catalytic treatment of 2,4-dichlorophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Quero, Santiago; Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A.

    2012-07-01

    Catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) is an effective means of detoxifying chlorinated waste. Gold nanoparticles supported on Fe3O4 have been tested in the gas phase (1 atm, 423 K) HDC of 2,4-dichlorophenol. Two 1% w/w supported gold catalysts have been prepared by: (i) stepwise deposition of Au on α-Fe2O3 with subsequent temperature-programmed reduction at 673 K (Au/Fe3O4-step); (ii) direct deposition of Au on Fe3O4 (Au/Fe3O4-dir). TEM analysis has established the presence of Au at the nano-scale with a greater mean diameter (7.6 nm) on Au/Fe3O4-dir relative to Au/Fe3O4-step (4.5 nm). We account for this difference in terms of stronger (electrostatic) precursor/support interactions in the latter that can be associated with the lower pH point of zero charge (with respect to the final deposition pH) for Fe2O3. Both catalysts promoted the preferential removal of the ortho-Cl substituent in 2,4-dichlorophenol, generating 4-chlorophenol and phenol as products of partial and total HDC, respectively, where Au/Fe3O4-step delivered a two-fold higher rate (2 × 10-4 molCl h-1 mAu-2) when compared with Au/Fe3O4-dir. This unprecedented selectivity response is attributed to activation of the ortho-C-Cl bond via interaction with electron-deficient Au nanoparticles. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a controlled recovery/recycling of chlorophenol waste using nano-structured Au catalysts.

  4. Closed-form approximation and numerical validation of the influence of van der Waals force on electrostatic cantilevers at nano-scale separations.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Asghar; Alasty, Aria; Akbari, Javad

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the two-point boundary value problem (BVP) of the cantilever deflection at nano-scale separations subjected to van der Waals and electrostatic forces is investigated using analytical and numerical methods to obtain the instability point of the beam. In the analytical treatment of the BVP, the nonlinear differential equation of the model is transformed into the integral form by using the Green's function of the cantilever beam. Then, closed-form solutions are obtained by assuming an appropriate shape function for the beam deflection to evaluate the integrals. In the numerical method, the BVP is solved with the MATLAB BVP solver, which implements a collocation method for obtaining the solution of the BVP. The large deformation theory is applied in numerical simulations to study the effect of the finite kinematics on the pull-in parameters of cantilevers. The centerline of the beam under the effect of electrostatic and van der Waals forces at small deflections and at the point of instability is obtained numerically. In computing the centerline of the beam, the axial displacement due to the transverse deformation of the beam is taken into account, using the inextensibility condition. The pull-in parameters of the beam are computed analytically and numerically under the effects of electrostatic and/or van der Waals forces. The detachment length and the minimum initial gap of freestanding cantilevers, which are the basic design parameters, are determined. The results of the analytical study are compared with the numerical solutions of the BVP. The proposed methods are validated by the results published in the literature. PMID:21730532

  5. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy for mapping nano-scale distribution of organic carbon forms in soil: Application to black carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Johannes; Liang, Biqing; Solomon, Dawit; Lerotic, Mirna; LuizãO, Flavio; Kinyangi, James; SchäFer, Thorsten; Wirick, Sue; Jacobsen, Chris

    2005-03-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity of organic carbon (C) forms in soils is poorly quantified since appropriate analytical techniques were not available up to now. Specifically, tools for the identification of functional groups on the surface of micrometer-sized black C particles were not available up to now. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) using synchrotron radiation was used in conjunction with Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to investigate nano-scale distribution (50-nm resolution) of C forms in black C particles and compared to synchrotron-based FTIR spectroscopy. A new embedding technique was developed that did not build on a C-based embedding medium and did not pose the risk of heat damage to the sample. Elemental sulfur (S) was melted to 220°C until it polymerized and quenched with liquid N2 to obtain a very viscous plastic S in which the black C could be embedded until it hardened to a noncrystalline state and was ultrasectioned. Principal component and cluster analysis followed by singular value decomposition was able to resolve distinct areas in a black carbon particle. The core of the studied biomass-derived black C particles was highly aromatic even after thousands of years of exposure in soil and resembled the spectral characteristics of fresh charcoal. Surrounding this core and on the surface of the black C particle, however, much larger proportions of carboxylic and phenolic C forms were identified that were spatially and structurally distinct from the core of the particle. Cluster analysis provided evidence for both oxidation of the black C particle itself as well as adsorption of non-black C. NEXAFS spectroscopy has great potential to allow new insight into black C properties with important implications for biogeochemical cycles such as mineralization of black C in soils and sediments, and adsorption of C, nutrients, and pollutants as well as transport in the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere.

  6. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zweiacker, K.; McKeown, J. T.; Liu, C.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.

    2016-08-04

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of themore » metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ~1.3 m s–1 to ~2.5 m s–1 during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s–1 have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. As a result, using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.« less

  7. Combination of metamorphism and deformation affect the nano-scale pore structures and macromolecule characteristics of high-rank deformed coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Li, H.; Ju, Y.

    2013-12-01

    experiments indicates that adsorption/desorption capacity shows a 'U' type with nano-pores volume and specific surface area, coals with best adsorption capacity contained both vitrinite and inertinite with an approximate ratio of 4:1 or 1:4, the increase of aromatic and aliphatic content individually facilitated the adsorption of CBM. Generally speaking, the adsorption/desorption capacity of ductile deformed coals is higher than that of brittle ones, but metamorphism could dramatically affects the final results. To enhance CBM production and reduce carbon emission, the appropriate coal-bearing strata need to be chosen. Our research shows that metamorphism and deformation affect the nano-scale pore structures and macromolecule characteristics of different coals. Therefore brittle-ductile superposed zone with medium-high rank coals has high gas content and permeability which is promising to exploit and helpful to environmental protection.

  8. High electron mobility AlGaN/AlN/GaN HEMT structure with a nano-scale AlN interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Chun; Chen, Wen-Ray; Hsu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Jia-Ching; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Lin, Wen-Jen

    2012-10-01

    Epitaxies of AlGaN/AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with different thickness of nano-scale AlN interlayers have been realized by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology. After epitaxy, high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), temperature-dependent Hall Effect and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were used to characterize the properties of these samples. First, it was found that the Al composition of AlGaN layer increases from 21.6 to 34.2% with increasing the thickness of AlN interlayer from 0 to 5 nm under the same AlGaN growth conditions. This result may due to the influences of compressive stress and Al incorporation induced by the AlN interlayer. Then, we also found that the room-temperature (RT) electron mobility stays higher than 1500 cm2/Vs in the samples within AlN interlayer thickness range of 1.5 nm, on the other hand, the low-temperature (80K) electron mobility drops dramatically from 8180 to 5720 cm2/Vs in the samples with AlN interlayer thickness increasing from 1 to 1.5 nm. Furthermore, it was found that the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density increases from 1.15×1013 to 1.58×1013 cm-2 beyond the AlN interlayer thickness of 1 nm. It was also found that the temperature independent 2DEG densities are observed in the samples with AlN interlayer thickness of 0.5 and 1 nm. The degenerated characteristics of the samples with AlN thickness thicker than 1.5 nm show the degraded crystalline quality which matched the observation of surface defects and small cracks formations from their AFM images. Finally, the 2DEG mobilities of the proposed structures can be achieved as high as 1705 and 8180 cm2/Vs at RT and 80K, respectively.

  9. Thermodynamics of nano-scale precipitate-strengthened Fe-Cu and Al-transition-metal systems from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe

    The thermodynamic properties of two nano-scale precipitate-strengthened alloys, Fe-Cu and Al-TM(=Ti, Zr and Hf) systems, are investigated within framework of first-principles thermodynamics methods. In particular, thermodynamic properties of the metastable precipitate phases are calculated, where direct experimental measurements are not available. Atomic volumes, magnetic moments, mixing energies and elastic properties of bcc Fe1-xCux solid solutions are studied by first-principles calculations based on the cluster expansion (CE) framework. We introduce a generalization of the CE technique for the calculation of concentration-dependent elastic moduli in disordered phase. Calculated mixing energies, atomic volumes and magnetic moments agree well with measurements for metastable alloys prepared through non-equilibrium processing techniques. The variations of the bulk modulus B, shear moduli C44 and C', with respect to copper concentration are calculated for the disordered bcc phase. While the B and C44 are positive for all concentrations, C' is positive only for Cu concentrations less than 50 atomic%. The implications of present results are discussed in relation to the observed metastability of bcc Fe-Cu alloys, and the strengthening mechanism of nanoscale bcc precipitates in an alpha-Fe matrix. Vibrational entropy, which is often omitted in first-principles phase-diagram calculations, has been shown to be an essential contribution in the phase stability of many Al-based alloys. In this work, we study the effect of lattice vibrations on the solubility limit for Al-TM(=Ti, Zr and Hf) systems. We propose a transferable force constant approach (TFC), in which the relations between bond force constants, bond length and TM composition are assumed to be transferable among different structures, to substantially reduce the heavy computational expense associated with first-principles lattice dynamics calculations. Our results demonstrate that the TFC can predict the

  10. Micro- to nano-scale mapping and characterization of low-temperature metamorphism in Archean subseafloor metabasalts with implications for early life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosch, Eugene; McLoughlin, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    biosignatures [3]. In-situ U-Pb dating of the titanite microtextures by laser-ablation multi-collector ICP-MS has been combined with the microscale metamorphic temperature mapping to test their syngenicity and biogenicity [4]. On-going work includes high-resolution nano-scale investigation of the mineral interfaces between titanite, chlorite and carbonate by FIB-TEM (Focussed ion beam - transmission electron microscopy). Our current results indicate that the filamentous titanite microtextures are not reliable biosignatures [4], but that microscopic sulphides may preserve sulphur isotope evidence for early Archean subseafloor microbial sulphate reduction. The search for earliest traces of life has not only contributed to developing state-of-the art analytical techniques, but has also led to development of new biogenicity criteria for subseafloor life. We propose that these new criteria and analytical mapping techniques may prove useful also in the search for microbial life in extra-terrestrial metabasalts and altered ultramafics from Mars, and/or meteorites [3]. [1]. Furnes et al., (2004), Science, 304 (5670) 578-581. [2]. McLoughlin et al., (2012) Geology, 40(11), 1031-1034. [3]. Grosch et al., (2014) Astrobiology, 14, 216-228. [4]. Grosch & McLoughlin, (2014) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111, 8380 - 8385.

  11. Role of contact electrification and electrostatic interactions in gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Stewart, Katherine M E; Penlidis, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Geckos, which are capable of walking on walls and hanging from ceilings with the help of micro-/nano-scale hierarchical fibrils (setae) on their toe pads, have become the main prototype in the design and fabrication of fibrillar dry adhesives. As the unique fibrillar feature of the toe pads of geckos allows them to develop an intimate contact with the substrate the animal is walking on or clinging to, it is expected that the toe setae exchange significant numbers of electric charges with the contacted substrate via the contact electrification (CE) phenomenon. Even so, the possibility of the occurrence of CE and the contribution of the resulting electrostatic interactions to the dry adhesion of geckos have been overlooked for several decades. In this study, by measuring the magnitude of the electric charges, together with the adhesion forces, that gecko foot pads develop in contact with different materials, we have clarified for the first time that CE does contribute effectively to gecko adhesion. More importantly, we have demonstrated that it is the CE-driven electrostatic interactions which dictate the strength of gecko adhesion, and not the van der Waals or capillary forces which are conventionally considered as the main source of gecko adhesion. PMID:25008078

  12. Fabrication and integration of micro/nano-scale optical wire circuit arrays and devices for high-speed and compact optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) and VLSI photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, S. G.; O, B. H.; Park, S. G.; Kim, K. H.; Kang, J. K.; Choi, Y. W.; Song, S. H.

    2005-09-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and integration of micro/nano-scale optical wire circuit arrays and devices for high-speed, compact, light-weight, low power optical printed circuit boards (O-PCBs) and VLSI photonic applications. The optical wires are formed in the form of waveguides by thermal embossing and ultraviolet (UV) radiated embossing of polymer materials. The photonic devices include vertically coupled surface emitting laser (VCSEL) microlasers, microlenses, 45-degree reflection couplers, directional couplers, arrayed waveguide grating structures, multimode interference (MMI) devices and photodetectors. These devices are optically interconnected and integrated for O-PCB assembly and VLSI micro/nano-photonics. The O-PCBs are to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards or substrates. We report on the result of the optical transmission performances of these assembled O-PCBs. For the design, fabrication, and VLSI integration of nano-scale photonic devices, we used photonic crystal structures and plasmonic metallic waveguide structures. We examined the bandwidth, power dissipation, thermal stability, weight, and the miniaturization and density of optical wires and the O-PCB module. Characteristics of these devices are also described.

  13. Transglutaminase-induced or citric acid-mediated cross-linking of whey proteins to tune the characteristics of subsequently desolvated sub-micron and nano-scaled particles.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Leila; Yarmand, Mohammadsaeed; Madadlou, Ashkan; Mousavi, Mohammad E

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins were inter-connected either by the enzyme transglutaminase or citric acid and then desolvated with ethanol to generate particles. Both samples comprised of sub-micron (>300 nm) and nano-scaled (~100 nm) particles based on the hydrodynamic size measurements. Enzyme-induced cross-linking of proteins yielded more monodisperse particles and decreased the mean size of the major (nano-scaled) fraction of particles. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed a spherical morphology for all samples with mean sizes of <40 nm. Atomic force microscopy indicated a lower height for the particles from enzymatically cross-linked proteins. The mediating role of citric acid in bridging the proteins was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that pre-heating of protein solution before cross-linking and desolvation denatured the proteins entirely. In vitro degradation of whey protein particles in a simulated gastric fluid demonstrated that cross-linking of whey proteins before desolvation stage enhanced significantly the digestion stability of particles. PMID:24766206

  14. Proposal for New Experimental Tests of the Bose-Einstein Condensation Mechanism for Low-Energy Nuclear Reaction and Transmutation Processes in Deuterium Loaded - and Nano-Scale Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Koltick, David S.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-02-01

    Most of experimental results of low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) reported so far cannot be reproduced on demand. There have been persistent experimental results indicating that the LENR and transmutation processes in condensed matters (LENRTPCM) are surface phenomena rather than bulk phenomena. Recently proposed Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) mechanism may provide a suitable theoretical description of the surface phenomena. New experiments are proposed and described for testing the BEC mechanism for LENR and transmutation processes in micro- and nano-scale traps. (1) We propose the use of micro- or nano-porous conducting materials as a cathode in electrolysis experiments with heavy water with or without Li in order to stabilize the active surface spots and to enhance the effect for the purpose of improving the reproducibility of excess heat generation and nuclear emission. (2) We propose new experimental tests of the BEC mechanism by measuring the pressure and temperature dependence of LENR events using deuterium gas and these deuterated metals with or without Li. If the LENRTPCM are surface phenomena, the proposed use of micro-/nano-scale porous materials is expected to enhance and scale up the LENRTPCM effects by many order of magnitude, and thus may lead to better reproductivity and theoretical understanding of the phenomena.

  15. Prioritized Contact Transport Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Walter Lee, Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A detection process, contact recognition process, classification process, and identification process are applied to raw sensor data to produce an identified contact record set containing one or more identified contact records. A prioritization process is applied to the identified contact record set to assign a contact priority to each contact record in the identified contact record set. Data are removed from the contact records in the identified contact record set based on the contact priorities assigned to those contact records. A first contact stream is produced from the resulting contact records. The first contact stream is streamed in a contact transport stream. The contact transport stream may include and stream additional contact streams. The contact transport stream may be varied dynamically over time based on parameters such as available bandwidth, contact priority, presence/absence of contacts, system state, and configuration parameters.

  16. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  17. Nucleation at the Contact Line Observed on Nanotextured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostinski, A. B.; Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Shaw, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Surface nucleation, and contact nucleation in particular, are important for many physical processes, including pharmaceutical drug synthesis, metallurgy, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. It has been conjectured that roughness plays a role in surface nucleation, the tendency for freezing to begin preferentially at the liquid-gas interface. Using high speed imaging, we sought evidence for freezing at the contact line on catalyst substrates with imposed characteristic length scales (texture). It is found that nano-scale texture causes a shift in the nucleation of ice in super-cooled water to the three-phase contact line, while micro-scale texture does not. The reduction in the Gibbs barrier for nucleation at the droplet triple line suggests that a line tension, inversely proportional to the surface feature length scale, may be the relevant physical mechanism. A survey of line tension values in literature supports this hypothesis. This work suggests that the physical morphology of a particle, and not just its chemical composition, is important for characterizing a nucleation catalyst.

  18. Some Characteristics of Free Cell Population in the Airways of Rats after Intratracheal Instillation of Copper-Containing Nano-Scale Particles

    PubMed Central

    Privalova, Larisa I.; Katsnelson, Boris A.; Loginova, Nadezhda V.; Gurvich, Vladimir B.; Shur, Vladimir Y.; Beikin, Yakov B.; Sutunkova, Marina P.; Minigalieva, Ilzira A.; Shishkina, Ekaterina V.; Pichugova, Svetlana V.; Tulakina, Ludmila G.; Beljayeva, Svetlana V.

    2014-01-01

    We used stable water suspensions of copper oxide particles with mean diameter 20 nm and of particles containing copper oxide and element copper with mean diameter 340 nm to assess the pulmonary phagocytosis response of rats to a single intratracheal instillation of these suspensions using optical, transmission electron, and semi-contact atomic force microscopy and biochemical indices measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Although both nano and submicron ultrafine particles were adversely bioactive, the former were found to be more toxic for lungs as compared with the latter while evoking more pronounced defense recruitment of alveolar macrophages and especially of neutrophil leukocytes and more active phagocytosis. Based on our results and literature data, we consider both copper solubilization and direct contact with cellular organelles (mainly, mitochondria) of persistent particles internalized by phagocytes as probable mechanisms of their cytotoxicity. PMID:25421246

  19. Digital sampling Moiré as a substitute for microscope scanning Moiré for high-sensitivity and full-field deformation measurement at micron/nano scales.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghua; Ri, Shien; Tsuda, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    This study proposed to generate digital sampling Moiré fringes by two-pixel down-sampling as a substitute for microscope scanning Moiré fringes, and further reconstruct multiplication Moiré fringes for micron/nano-scale deformation measurement. The displacement and strain sensitivities of the proposed reconstructed multiplication Moiré method are 2 times higher in a wide field of view. Besides, two-dimensional deformation is easily measurable without rotating the sample stage or the scanning lines, no matter whether the scanning resolution is adjustable or not. As an example, the deformations of a carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimen were measured and analyzed. The proposed method effectively expands the application range of the Moiré technique to deformation measurement. PMID:27607259

  20. Design, fabrication, and integration of micro/nano-scale optical waveguide arrays and devices for optical printed circuit board (O-PCB) and VLSI micro/nano-photonic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, El-Hang; Lee, S. G.; O, B. H.; Kim, K. H.; Kang, J. K.; Kwon, Y. K.; Chin, I.-J.; Choi, Y. W.; Song, S. H.

    2005-09-01

    We present a review of our work on the micro/nano-scale design, fabrication and integration of optical waveguide arrays and devices for applications in a newly-conceived optical module system that we call "optical printed circuit board" (O-PCBs) and VLSI micro/nano-photonic integrated circuit. The O-PCBs consist of planar circuits and arrays of waveguides and devices of various dimensions and characteristics to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards. The VLSI micro/nano-photonic integrated circuits perform similar functions on a chip scale. O-PCBs consist of planar circuits and arrays of waveguides and devices of various dimensions and characteristics to perform the functions of transporting, switching, routing and distributing optical signals on flat modular boards. Fundamentally it contrasts with the electrical printed circuit board (E-PCB), which is designed to perform transporting, processing and distributing electrical signals. We have assembled O-PCBs using optical waveguide arrays and circuits made of polymer materials and have examined information handling performances when they are interconnected with the micro-laser arrays, detector arrays and optoelectronic devices. For VLSI nano-scale photonic inte-gration and applications, we designed power splitters and waveguide filters using photonic band-gap crystals and plasmonic waveguide structures. We discuss scientific issues and technological issues concerning the minia-turization, interconnection, and integration of micro/nano-photonic devices and circuits and discuss potential utilities of O-PCBs and VLSI micro/nano-photonics for applications in computers, telecommunication systems, transportation systems, and bio-sensing microsystems.

  1. EDITORIAL: Close contact Close contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-07-01

    The development of scanning probe techniques, such as scanning tunnelling microscopy [1], has often been touted as the catalyst for the surge in activity and progress in nanoscale science and technology. Images of nanoscale structural detail have served as an invaluable investigative resource and continue to fascinate with the fantastical reality of an intricate nether world existing all around us, but hidden from view of the naked eye by a disparity in scale. As is so often the case, the invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope heralded far more than just a useful new apparatus, it demonstrated the scope for exploiting the subtleties of electronic contact. The shrinking of electronic devices has been a driving force for research into molecular electronics, in which an understanding of the nature of electronic contact at junctions is crucial. In response, the number of experimental techniques in molecular electronics has increased rapidly in recent years. Scanning tunnelling microscopes have been used to study electron transfer through molecular films on a conducting substrate, and the need to monitor the contact force of scanning tunnelling electrodes led to the use of atomic force microscopy probes coated in a conducting layer as studied by Cui and colleagues in Arizona [2]. In this issue a collaboration of researchers at Delft University and Leiden University in the Netherlands report a new device architecture for the independent mechanical and electrostatic tuning of nanoscale charge transport, which will enable thorough studies of molecular transport in the future [3]. Scanning probes can also be used to pattern surfaces, such as through spatially-localized Suzuki and Heck reactions in chemical scanning probe lithography. Mechanistic aspects of spatially confined Suzuki and Heck chemistry are also reported in this issue by researchers in Oxford [4]. All these developments in molecular electronics fabrication and characterization provide alternative

  2. Adhesion in the contact of a spherical indenter with a layered elastic half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onur Sergici, A.; Adams, George G.; Müftü, Sinan

    2006-09-01

    With the emergence of micro- and nano-technology, the contact mechanics of MEMS and NEMS devices and components is becoming more important. Thus it is important to gain a better understanding of the role of coatings and thin films on micro- and nano-scale contact phenomena, and to understand the interactions of measurement devices, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM), with layered media. More specifically, in this work the frictionless contact, with adhesion, between a spherical indenter and an elastic-layered medium is investigated. This configuration can be viewed as either a single contact model or as a building block of a multi-asperity rough surface contact model. As the scale decreases to the nano level, adhesion becomes an important issue. The presence of adhesion affects the relationships among the applied force, the penetration of the indenter, and the size of the contact area. This axisymmetric problem includes the effect of adhesion using a Maugis type of adhesion model. This model spans the range of the Tabor parameter between the JKR and DMT regions. The key parameters in this analysis are the elastic moduli ratio of the layer and the substrate, the dimensionless layer thickness, and the Maugis adhesion parameter. The results can be applied to a rigid or to an elastic indenter.

  3. Irritant Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Irritant Contact Dermatitis Information for adults A A A This ... severe involvement in the patient's armpit. Overview Irritant contact dermatitis is an inflammatory rash caused by direct ...

  4. Contact Lens Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Contact Lens Risks Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... redness blurred vision swelling pain Serious Hazards of Contact Lenses Symptoms of eye irritation can indicate a ...

  5. Contact Lens Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Contact Lens Care Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... 1088, www.fda.gov/medwatch Learn More about Contact Lens Care Other Tips on Contact Lenses Decorative ...

  6. Contact Lens Solution Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Contact Lens Solution Toxicity Information for adults A A A This image shows a reaction to contact lens solution. The prominent blood vessels and redness ...

  7. Velocity measurements near a moving contact line with sub-micron resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2010-11-01

    Employing high-speed particle tracking, we experimentally investigate the slip boundary condition in the vicinity of a moving contact line. A liquid bridge was established between a stationary hydrophobic glass slide and a rod. By translating the rod at a controlled speed, we establish a well-controlled moving contact line. The liquid was seeded, either with nano-scale fluorescent particles or with quantum dots. Evanescent wave illumination, with exponentially decaying intensity, was used for particle illumination, which allows for three dimensional measurements of the flow field near the liquid/solid interface. The motions of the contact line and the particles were captured using a high speed camera coupled to a high-resolution microscope. Slip length was extracted from the particle motions and shown to be a function of the distance to the contact line. Different behaviors were observed between advancing and receding motions of the contact line. Measurements with different-sized particles were performed to correct for tracer particle effects.

  8. Mitochondrial translocation contact sites: separation of dynamic and stabilizing elements in formation of a TOM-TIM-preprotein supercomplex.

    PubMed

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; Rehling, Peter; Guiard, Bernard; Frazier, Ann E; Schulze-Specking, Agnes; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Voos, Wolfgang; Meisinger, Chris

    2003-10-15

    Preproteins with N-terminal presequences are imported into mitochondria at translocation contact sites that include the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex). Little is known about the functional cooperation of these translocases. We have characterized translocation contact sites by a productive TOM-TIM-preprotein supercomplex to address the role of three translocase subunits that expose domains to the intermembrane space (IMS). The IMS domain of the receptor Tom22 is required for stabilization of the translocation contact site supercomplex. Surprisingly, the N-terminal segment of the channel Tim23, which tethers the TIM23 complex to the outer membrane, is dispensable for both protein import and generation of the TOM-TIM supercomplex. Tim50, with its large IMS domain, is crucial for generation but not for stabilization of the supercomplex. Thus, Tim50 functions as a dynamic factor and the IMS domain of Tom22 represents a stabilizing element in formation of a productive translocation contact site supercomplex. PMID:14532110

  9. Colored Contact Lens Dangers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Halloween Hazard: The Hidden Dangers of Buying Decorative Contact Lenses Without a Prescription Sep. 26, 2013 It ... she first put in a pair of colored contact lenses, Laura Butler of Parkersburg, W.Va., had " ...

  10. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes of allergic contact dermatitis include nickel, chromates, rubber chemicals, and topical antibiotic ointments and creams. Frequent ... construction workers who are in contact with cement. Rubber chemicals are found in gloves, balloons, elastic in ...

  11. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Glasses and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > Glasses and Contact Lenses Print A A A Text Size What's ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...

  12. Contact lens in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Rathi, Varsha M; Mandathara, Preeji S; Dumpati, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Contact lenses are required for the visual improvement in patients with keratoconus. Various contact lens options, such as rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses, soft and soft toric lenses, piggy back contact lenses (PBCL), hybrid lenses and scleral lenses are availble. This article discusses about selection of a lens depending on the type of keratoconus and the fitting philosophies of various contact lenses including the starting trial lens. A Medline search was carried out for articles in the English language with the keywords keratoconus and various contact lenses such as Rose k lens, RGP lens, hybrid lens, scleral lens and PBCL. PMID:23925325

  13. Thermite at the Nano-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mily, Edward Joseph, Jr.

    Physical vapor deposition of thin film thermites allow for a clean avenue for probing fundamental properties of nanoenergetic materials that prove difficult for traditional powder processing. Precise control over diffusion dimensions, microstructure, and total amount of material are able to be realized with this fabrication technique and the testing of such materials provide valuable insight into how oxidation occurs. This thesis provides several examples of how existing PVD techniques can be coupled with thermite constituents to further the energetic community's understanding of how oxidation occurs in the solid state with the variation of geometric and chemical alterations. The goal of these investigations was to elucidate which material properties and mechanisms drive exothermic activity. The thermite thin films of Al/CuO, Zr/CuO, and Mg/Cuo with varied reducing metal constituents were tested under slow heating conditions. The trend of the metal variation demonstrated the importance of terminal oxide diffusion properties in either impeding or enhancing oxygen exchange. When the reducing metal forms a terminal oxide with limited oxygen diffusivity, exothermicity requires elevated activation energies to commence self-sustaining reaction. In addition to the effects of chemical variation, bilayer thicknesses were varied and found to decrease exothermic peak temperatures similar to the trends found in intermetallic thin film energetics and powder energetic materials. The thin film thermites were also subjected to extreme initiation methods via laser driven flyer plate impact ignition and high heating rate heat treatment (105 K/s). General insight into nano thermite behavior at environments characteristic of applications was sought, and similar trends discovered among slow vs rapid testing. Decreasing reaction dimensions yielded higher reactivity and diffusion barrier properties role in impacting exothermic behavior persist to into the microsecond regime. Ultimately through this work it has been shown that the process of thermite exothermicity proceeds through more than one pathway and more than the free energy of oxidation of reducing metals should be considered when describing how oxygen exchange occurs. It has been shown that these self-sustaining reactivity can be realized in the solid and.

  14. Modeling Thermal Contact Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittel, Peter; Sperans, Joel (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    One difficulty in using cryocoolers is making good thermal contact between the cooler and the instrument being cooled. The connection is often made through a bolted joint. The temperature drop associated with this joint has been the subject of many experimental and theoretical studies. The low temperature behavior of dry joints have shown some anomalous dependence on the surface condition of the mating parts. There is also some doubts on how well one can extrapolate from the test samples to predicting the performance of a real system. Both finite element and analytic models of a simple contact system have been developed. The model assumes (a) the contact is dry (contact limited to a small portion of the total available area and the spaces in-between the actual contact patches are perfect insulators), (b) contacts are clean (conductivity of the actual contact is the same as the bulk), (c) small temperature gradients (the bulk conductance may be assumed to be temperature independent), (d) the absolute temperature is low (thermal radiation effects are ignored), and (e) the dimensions of the nominal contact area are small compared to the thickness of the bulk material (the contact effects are localized near the contact). The models show that in the limit of actual contact area much less than the nominal area (a much less than A), that the excess temperature drop due to a single point of contact scales as a(exp -1/2). This disturbance only extends a distance approx. A(exp 1/2) into the bulk material. A group of identical contacts will result in an excess temperature drop that scales as n(exp -1/2), where n is the number of contacts and n dot a is constant. This implies that flat rough surfaces will have a lower excess temperature drop than flat polished surfaces.

  15. Combined Whole-Rock to Nano-Scale Investigations Reveal Contrasting Response of Pt-Os and Re-Os Isotope Systematics During Magmatic and Post-Magmatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggon, J. A.; Luguet, A.; Lorand, J. P.; Fonseca, R.; Wainwright, A.; Appel, P.; Hoffmann, J. E.; Nowell, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in single-grain and micro- and nano-analytical techniques in recent years have been particularly important to the study of highly siderophile elements (HSE) and have contributed significantly to our knowledge and understanding of their host phases and behaviour. Furthermore, whole-rock- to nano-scale studies provide new perspectives for investigation of HSE isotope systematics. Recent multi-scale 187Re-187Os and 190Pt-186Os studies facilitate comparison, to a previously unattainable degree, of the differing responses of these two decay systems to magmatic and post-magmatic processes. It is well established that mafic-ultramafic melts are sensitive to disturbance of their Re-Os isotope systematics by crustal assimilation, due to the incompatibility and resulting enrichment of Re in crustal lithologies. In contrast the very long half-life and extremely low atomic abundance of 190Pt, combined with relatively low Pt concentrations in crustal rocks, generally render the Pt-Os isotope system insensitive to modification during assimilation. However, using new single chromite grain data (Coggon et al., 2015) from the >3.811 Ga Ujaragssuit nunât layered ultramafic body, Greenland, we show that it is possible to distinguish two distinct episodes of 187Os/188Os modification; Country rock contamination of the parent melt was followed by later metamorphic disturbance of the isotope system. The Pt-Os data (Coggon et al., 2013) from the same samples show no evidence of crustal assimilation, but preserve signatures of mantle melting at ~4.1 Ga as well as disturbance during metamorphism. Macro- to micro-petrographic study clearly demonstrates that Pt, Re and Os are hosted by different mineral phases, of different origins, in these samples. This, together with the physical parameters of the decay systems reported above, leads to the dissimilar behaviour and response of the 187Re-187Os and 190Pt-186Os isotope systems during both magmatic and post-magmatic processes and

  16. Colors and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of skin diseases relies on several clinical signs, among which color is of paramount importance. In this review, we consider certain clinical presentations of both eczematous and noneczematous contact dermatitis in which color plays a peculiar role orientating toward the right diagnosis. The conditions that will be discussed include specific clinical-morphologic subtypes of eczematous contact dermatitis, primary melanocytic, and nonmelanocytic contact hyperchromia, black dermographism, contact chemical leukoderma, and others. Based on the physical, chemical, and biologic factors underlying a healthy skin color, the various skin shades drawing a disease picture are thoroughly debated, stressing their etiopathogenic origins and histopathologic aspects. PMID:25000236

  17. Constructions of contact manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiges, Hansjörg

    1997-05-01

    1. IntroductionIt has been known for some time that contact structures show a high degree of topological flexibility in the sense that many topological operations can be performed on contact manifolds while preserving the contact property. For instance, Martinet [14] used a surgery description of 3-manifolds to show that every closed, oriented 3-manifold admits a contact structure, and alternative proofs of this result were given later by Thurston and Winkelnkemper [18], who based their proof on an open book decomposition, and Gonzalo [8], who used branched covers. These, however, are all strictly 3-dimensional constructions.

  18. Optical contact micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Steven D.

    2014-08-19

    Certain examples provide optical contact micrometers and methods of use. An example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable lenses to receive an object and immobilize the object in a position. The example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable mirrors positioned with respect to the pair of lenses to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses. The example optical contact micrometer includes a microscope to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses via the mirrors; and an interferometer to obtain one or more measurements of the object.

  19. Language Contact: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Sarah G.

    This book surveys situations in which language contact arises and focuses on what happens to the languages themselves: sometimes nothing, sometimes the incorporation of new words, sometimes the spread of new sounds and sentence structures across many languages and wide swathes of territory. It outlines the origins and results of contact-induced…

  20. Miniature intermittent contact switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, A.

    1972-01-01

    Design of electric switch for providing intermittent contact is presented. Switch consists of flexible conductor surrounding, but separated from, fixed conductor. Flexing of outside conductor to contact fixed conductor completes circuit. Advantage is small size of switch compared to standard switches.

  1. Noneczematous Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Caterina; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Irritant or allergic contact dermatitis usually presents as an eczematous process, clinically characterized by erythematoedematovesicous lesions with intense itching in the acute phase. Such manifestations become erythematous-scaly as the condition progresses to the subacute phase and papular-hyperkeratotic in the chronic phase. Not infrequently, however, contact dermatitis presents with noneczematous features. The reasons underlying this clinical polymorphism lie in the different noxae and contact modalities, as well as in the individual susceptibility and the various targeted cutaneous structures. The most represented forms of non-eczematous contact dermatitis include the erythema multiforme-like, the purpuric, the lichenoid, and the pigmented kinds. These clinical entities must obviously be discerned from the corresponding “pure” dermatitis, which are not associated with contact with exogenous agents. PMID:24109520

  2. Electrical Contacts to Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, P R; Faraby, H; DiBattista, M

    2015-12-01

    The efficient passage of electrical current from an external contact to a nanomaterial is necessary for harnessing characteristics unique to the nanoscale, such as those relevant to energy quantization. However, an intrinsic resistance pertinent to dimensionality crossover and the presence of impurities precludes optimal electrical contact formation. In this review, we first discuss the relevant principles and contact resistance measurement methodologies, with modifications necessary for the nanoscale. Aspects related to the deposition of the contact material are deemed to be crucial. Consequently, the use of focused ion beam (FIB) based deposition, which relies on the ion-induced decomposition of a metallorganic precursor, and which has been frequently utilized for nanoscale contacts is considered in detail. PMID:26682353

  3. Recent progress of probing correlated electron states by point contact spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Cheng; Greene, Laura H

    2016-09-01

    We review recent progress in point contact spectroscopy (PCS) to extract spectroscopic information out of correlated electron materials, with the emphasis on non-superconducting states. PCS has been used to detect bosonic excitations in normal metals, where signatures (e.g. phonons) are usually less than 1% of the measured conductance. In the superconducting state, point contact Andreev reflection (PCAR) has been widely used to study properties of the superconducting gap in various superconductors. It has been well-recognized that the corresponding conductance can be accurately fitted by the Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) theory in which the AR occurring near the point contact junction is modeled by three parameters; the superconducting gap, the quasiparticle scattering rate, and a dimensionless parameter, Z, describing the strength of the potential barrier at the junction. AR can be as large as 100% of the background conductance, and only arises in the case of superconductors. In the last decade, there have been more and more experimental results suggesting that the point contact conductance could reveal new features associated with the unusual single electron dynamics in non-superconducting states, shedding a new light on exploring the nature of the competing phases in correlated materials. To correctly interpret these new features, it is crucial to re-examine the modeling of the point contact junctions, the formalism used to describe the single electron dynamics particularly in point contact spectroscopy, and the physical quantity that should be computed to understand the conductance. We will summarize the theories for point contact spectroscopy developed from different approaches and highlight these conceptual differences distinguishing point contact spectroscopy from tunneling-based probes. Moreover, we will show how the Schwinger-Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh (SKBK) formalism together with the appropriate modeling of the nano-scale point contacts randomly distributed

  4. Recent progress of probing correlated electron states by point contact spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Cheng; Greene, Laura H.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent progress in point contact spectroscopy (PCS) to extract spectroscopic information out of correlated electron materials, with the emphasis on non-superconducting states. PCS has been used to detect bosonic excitations in normal metals, where signatures (e.g. phonons) are usually less than 1% of the measured conductance. In the superconducting state, point contact Andreev reflection (PCAR) has been widely used to study properties of the superconducting gap in various superconductors. It has been well-recognized that the corresponding conductance can be accurately fitted by the Blonder–Tinkham–Klapwijk (BTK) theory in which the AR occurring near the point contact junction is modeled by three parameters; the superconducting gap, the quasiparticle scattering rate, and a dimensionless parameter, Z, describing the strength of the potential barrier at the junction. AR can be as large as 100% of the background conductance, and only arises in the case of superconductors. In the last decade, there have been more and more experimental results suggesting that the point contact conductance could reveal new features associated with the unusual single electron dynamics in non-superconducting states, shedding a new light on exploring the nature of the competing phases in correlated materials. To correctly interpret these new features, it is crucial to re-examine the modeling of the point contact junctions, the formalism used to describe the single electron dynamics particularly in point contact spectroscopy, and the physical quantity that should be computed to understand the conductance. We will summarize the theories for point contact spectroscopy developed from different approaches and highlight these conceptual differences distinguishing point contact spectroscopy from tunneling-based probes. Moreover, we will show how the Schwinger–Kadanoff–Baym–Keldysh (SKBK) formalism together with the appropriate modeling of the nano-scale point contacts randomly

  5. Telescopic vision contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Eric J.; Beer, R. Dirk; Arianpour, Ashkan; Ford, Joseph E.

    2011-03-01

    We present the concept, optical design, and first proof of principle experimental results for a telescopic contact lens intended to become a visual aid for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), providing magnification to the user without surgery or external head-mounted optics. Our contact lens optical system can provide a combination of telescopic and non-magnified vision through two independent optical paths through the contact lens. The magnified optical path incorporates a telescopic arrangement of positive and negative annular concentric reflectors to achieve 2.8x - 3x magnification on the eye, while light passing through a central clear aperture provides unmagnified vision.

  6. Optical contacting of quartz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The strength of the bond between optically contacted quartz surfaces was investigated. The Gravity Probe-B (GP-B) experiment to test the theories of general relativity requires extremely precise measurements. The quartz components of the instruments to make these measurements must be held together in a very stable unit. Optical contacting is suggested as a possible method of joining these components. The fundamental forces involved in optical contacting are reviewed and relates calculations of these forces to the results obtained in experiments.

  7. Occupational Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis accounts for 90% of all cases of work-related cutaneous disorders. It can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis, which occurs in 80% of cases, and allergic contact dermatitis. In most cases, both types will present as eczematous lesions on exposed parts of the body, notably the hands. Accurate diagnosis relies on meticulous history taking, thorough physical examination, careful reading of Material Safety Data Sheets to distinguish between irritants and allergens, and comprehensive patch testing to confirm or rule out allergic sensitization. This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of occupational contact dermatitis and provides diagnostic guidelines and a rational approach to management of these often frustrating cases. PMID:20525126

  8. Contacting American Overseas Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, David

    1993-01-01

    Provides contacts for architects or educational consultants who wish to work overseas. Cites a directory, newsletters, newspapers, and associations focused on educators involved with independent overseas schools that are organized around the United States curriculum. (MLF)

  9. ELECTRIC CONTACT MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Grear, J.W. Jr.

    1959-03-10

    A switch adapted to maintain electrical connections under conditions of vibration or acceleration is described. According to the invention, thc switch includes a rotatable arm carrying a conductive bar arranged to close against two contacts spaced in the same plane. The firm and continuous engagement of the conductive bar with the contacts is acheived by utilizeing a spring located betwenn the vbar and athe a rem frzme and slidable mounting the bar in channel between two arms suspendef from the arm frame.

  10. The impact of contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, B.

    1986-10-01

    Scenarios of the impact on human society of radio contact with an extraterrestrial civilization are presented. Some believe that contact with advanced extraterrestrials would quickly devastate the human spirit, while others believe that these super-intelligent beings would show the inhabitants of the earth how to live in peace. It is proposed that the possible existence of extraterrestrial civilizations and the development of means of studying and communicating with them need to be considered.

  11. Contact dermatitis complicating pinnaplasty.

    PubMed

    Singh-Ranger, G; Britto, J A; Sommerlad, B C

    2001-04-01

    Proflavine allergy is uncommon, occurring in approximately 6% of patients attending contact dermatitis clinics. Proflavine wool is used by many surgeons in the UK as a dressing that can be moulded to conform to the contours of a corrected prominent ear. It may have bacteriostatic properties. We present a case where contact dermatitis in response to proflavine developed after pinnaplasty. This caused diagnostic confusion, a lengthened hospital stay and an unsightly hypertrophic scar. PMID:11254419

  12. Lettuce contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Evy; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-02-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and its varieties are important vegetable crops worldwide. They are also well-known, rarely reported, causes of contact allergy. As lettuce allergens and extracts are not commercially available, the allergy may be underdiagnosed. The aims of this article are to present new data on lettuce contact allergy and review the literature. Lettuce is weakly allergenic, and occupational cases are mainly reported. Using aimed patch testing in Compositae-allergic patients, two recent Danish studies showed prevalence rates of positive lettuce reactions of 11% and 22%. The majority of cases are non-occupational, and may partly be caused by cross-reactivity. The sesquiterpene lactone mix seems to be a poor screening agent for lettuce contact allergy, as the prevalence of positive reactions is significantly higher in non-occupationally sensitized patients. Because of the easy degradability of lettuce allergens, it is recommended to patch test with freshly cut lettuce stem and supplement this with Compositae mix. As contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis may present as dermatitis, it is important to perform prick-to-prick tests, and possibly scratch patch tests as well. Any person who is occupationally exposed to lettuce for longer periods, especially atopics, amateur gardeners, and persons keeping lettuce-eating pets, is potentially at risk of developing lettuce contact allergy. PMID:26289653

  13. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Brenda ... on the surface of the eye. They correct vision like eyeglasses do and are safe when used ...

  14. Contact binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochnacki, S. W.

    1981-04-01

    Densities, corrected primary colors, minimum periods, inferred masses, luminosities, and specific angular momenta are computed from data on 37 W Ursae Majoris systems. A-type systems, having lower densities and angular momenta than the W-type systems, are shown to be evolved, and a new class of contact binary is identified, the OO Aquilae systems, whose members have evolved into contact. Evolutionary grids based on the contact condition agree with observation, except in that the evolved A-type systems have lost more angular momentum than predicted by gravitational radiation alone. This is accounted for by stellar wind magnetic braking, which is shown to be effective on a shorter time scale and to be important in other kinds of binaries containing a cool, tidally coupled component.

  15. Shoe allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Erin; Zahir, Amir; Ehrlich, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Foot dermatitis is a widespread condition, affecting men and women of all ages. Because of the location, this condition may present as a debilitating problem to those who have it. Allergic contact dermatitis involving the feet is frequently due to shoes or socks. The allergens that cause shoe dermatitis can be found in any constituent of footwear, including rubber, adhesives, leather, dyes, metals, and medicaments. The goal of treatment is to identify and minimize contact with the offending allergen(s). The lack of product information released from shoe manufacturers and the continually changing trends in footwear present a challenge in treating this condition. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on allergic contact shoe dermatitis; clinical presentation, allergens, patch testing, and management will be discussed. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were used for the search, with a focus on literature updates from the last 15 years. PMID:25000234

  16. Contact sensitization in children.

    PubMed

    Manzini, B M; Ferdani, G; Simonetti, V; Donini, M; Seidenari, S

    1998-01-01

    Our study concerns contact sensitization in children, the frequency of which is still debated in the literature, even though specific reports are increasing. During a 7 year period (1988-1994) 670 patients, 6 months to 12 years of age, were patch tested with the European standard series, integrated with 24 haptens, at the same concentrations as for adults. We observed positive results in 42% of our patients. Thimerosal, nickel sulfate, Kathon CG, fragrance mix, neomycin, wool alcohols, and ammoniated mercury induced most of the positive responses. The highest sensitization rate was found in children from 0 to 3 years of age. Comments on main positive haptens are reported. Seventy-seven percent of our sensitized patients were atopics, suggesting that atopy represents a predisposing factor for contact hypersensitivity. Patch testing represents a useful diagnostic procedure for the definition of childhood eczematous dermatitis and for the identification of agents inducing contact sensitization which is frequently associated with atopic dermatitis. PMID:9496796

  17. Cross-contact chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, Udo (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A system is provided for use with wafers that include multiple integrated circuits that include two conductive layers in contact at multiple interfaces. Contact chains are formed beside the integrated circuits, each contact chain formed of the same two layers as the circuits, in the form of conductive segments alternating between the upper and lower layers and with the ends of the segments connected in series through interfaces. A current source passes a current through the series-connected segments, by way of a pair of current tabs connected to opposite ends of the series of segments. While the current flows, voltage measurements are taken between each of a plurality of pairs of voltage tabs, the two tabs of each pair connected to opposite ends of an interface that lies along the series-connected segments. A plot of interface conductances on a normal probability chart, enables prediction of the yield of good integrated circuits from the wafer.

  18. Cross-contact chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, U. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A system is provided for use with wafers that include multiple integrated circuits that include two conductive layers in contact at multiple interfaces. Contact chains are formed beside the integrated circuits, each contact chain formed of the same two layers as the circuits, in the form of conductive segments alternating between the upper and lower layers and with the ends of the segments connected in series through interfaces. A current source passes a current through the series-connected segments, by way of a pair of current tabs connected to opposite ends of the series of segments. While the current flows, voltage measurements are taken between each of a plurality of pairs of voltage tabs, the two tabs of each pair connected to opposite ends of an interface that lies along the series-connected segments. A plot of interface conductances on normal probability chart enables prediction of the yield of good integrated circuits from the wafer.

  19. Thermal contact conductance for cylindrical and spherical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil Kumar, S.; Abilash, P. M.; Ramamurthi, K.

    A prediction methodology based on Monte-Carlo simulation model, developed for flat conforming surfaces in contact, is modified and extended to predict contact conductance between curvilinear surfaces like cylinders and spheres. Experiments are also conducted in vacuum for the measurement of contact conductance between stainless steel and aluminium cylindrical contacts and stainless steel spherical contacts over a range of contact pressures. The contact conductance between cylindrical and spherical bodies is, in general, about an order of magnitude lower than for flat surfaces in contact. Increase of surface roughness and decrease in contact pressure lowers the contact conductance. However, the influence of these parameters is larger than those obtained for flat surfaces. The prediction for different parametric conditions agree closely with those measured in the experiments.

  20. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  1. [Contact allergies in musicians].

    PubMed

    Gasenzer, E R; Neugebauer, E A M

    2012-12-01

    During the last years, the problem of allergic diseases has increased. Allergies are errant immune responses to a normally harmless substance. In musicians the allergic contact dermatitis to exotic woods is a special problem. Exotic rosewood contains new flavonoids, which trigger an allergic reaction after permanent contact with the instrument. High quality woodwind instruments such as baroque flute or clarinets are made in ebony or palisander because of its great sound. Today instruments for non-professional players are also made in these exotic materials and non-professionals may have the risk to develop contact dermatitis, too. Brass-player has the risk of an allergic reaction to the different metals contained in the metal sheets of modern flutes and brass instruments. Specially nickel and brass alloys are used to product flute tubes or brass instruments. Special problem arises in children: patients who are allergic to plants or foods have a high risk to develop contact dermatitis. Parents don't know the materials of low-priced instruments for beginners. Often unknown cheap woods from exotic areas are used. Low-priced brass instruments contain high amount of brass and other cheap metals. Physicians should advice musician-patients or parents about the risks of the different materials and look for the reason of eczema on mouth, face, or hands. PMID:23233303

  2. [Current contact allergens].

    PubMed

    Geier, J; Uter, W; Lessmann, H; Schnuch, A

    2011-10-01

    Ever-changing exposure to contact allergens, partly due to statutory directives (e.g. nickel, chromate, methyldibromo glutaronitrile) or recommendations from industrial associations (e.g. hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde), requires on-going epidemiologic surveillance of contact allergy. In this paper, the current state with special focus in fragrances and preservatives is described on the basis of data of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) of the year 2010. In 2010, 12,574 patients were patch tested in the dermatology departments belonging to the IVDK. Nickel is still the most frequent contact allergen. However the continuously improved EU nickel directive already has some beneficial effect; sensitization frequency in young women is dropping. In Germany, chromate-reduced cement has been in use now for several years, leading to a decline in chromate sensitization in brick-layers. Two fragrance mixes are part of the German baseline series; they are still relevant. The most important fragrances in these mixes still are oak moss absolute and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde. However, in relation to these leading allergens, sensitization frequency to other fragrances contained in the mixes seems to be increasing. Among the preservatives, MCI/MI has not lost its importance as contact allergen, in contrast to MDBGN. Sources of MCI/MI sensitization obviously are increasingly found in occupational context. Methylisothiazolinone is a significant allergen in occupational settings, and less frequently in body care products. PMID:21901563

  3. Thermal Contact Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kittel, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The performance of cryogenic instruments is often a function of their operating temperature. Thus, designers of cryogenic instruments often are required to predict the operating temperature of each instrument they design. This requires accurate thermal models of cryogenic components which include the properties of the materials and assembly techniques used. When components are bolted or otherwise pressed together, a knowledge of the thermal performance of such joints are also needed. In some cases, the temperature drop across these joints represents a significant fraction of the total temperature difference between the instrument and its cooler. While extensive databases exist on the thermal properties of bulk materials, similar databases for pressed contacts do not. This has often lead to instrument designs that avoid pressed contacts or to the over-design of such joints at unnecessary expense. Although many people have made measurements of contact conductances at cryogenic temperatures, this data is often very narrow in scope and even more often it has not been published in an easily retrievable fashion, if published at all. This paper presents a summary of the limited pressed contact data available in the literature.

  4. Multigrid contact detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kejing; Dong, Shoubin; Zhou, Zhaoyao

    2007-03-01

    Contact detection is a general problem of many physical simulations. This work presents a O(N) multigrid method for general contact detection problems (MGCD). The multigrid idea is integrated with contact detection problems. Both the time complexity and memory consumption of the MGCD are O(N) . Unlike other methods, whose efficiencies are influenced strongly by the object size distribution, the performance of MGCD is insensitive to the object size distribution. We compare the MGCD with the no binary search (NBS) method and the multilevel boxing method in three dimensions for both time complexity and memory consumption. For objects with similar size, the MGCD is as good as the NBS method, both of which outperform the multilevel boxing method regarding memory consumption. For objects with diverse size, the MGCD outperform both the NBS method and the multilevel boxing method. We use the MGCD to solve the contact detection problem for a granular simulation system based on the discrete element method. From this granular simulation, we get the density property of monosize packing and binary packing with size ratio equal to 10. The packing density for monosize particles is 0.636. For binary packing with size ratio equal to 10, when the number of small particles is 300 times as the number of big particles, the maximal packing density 0.824 is achieved.

  5. Compact contacting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, Arun (Inventor); Gottzmann, Christian F. (Inventor); Lockett, Michael J. (Inventor); Schneider, James S. (Inventor); Victor, Richard A. (Inventor); Zawierucha, Robert (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus comprising a rotatable mass of structured packing for mass or heat transfer between two contacting fluids of different densities wherein the packing mass is made up of corrugated sheets of involute shape relative to the axis of the packing mass and form a logarithmic spiral curved counter to the direction of rotation.

  6. Religious Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Alina; Matiz, Catalina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    Henna, derived from a combination of natural leaves and coloring additives, is a common decorative dye traditionally used in many Islamic religious celebrations. Para-phenylenediamine (PPD), a major component of black henna tattoo, is a strong sensitizer and common allergen. We report a case of severe connubial allergic contact dermatitis after black henna heterotransfer in a girl. PMID:25968562

  7. Have Confidence in Contact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Richard J.; Turner, Rhiannon N.

    2010-01-01

    In an article in the May-June 2009 "American Psychologist," we discussed a new approach to reducing prejudice and encouraging more positive intergroup relations (Crisp & Turner, 2009). We named the approach imagined intergroup contact and defined it as "the mental simulation of a social interaction with a member or members of an outgroup category"…

  8. Contact Graph Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic

  9. Contact dynamics math model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.; Tobbe, Patrick A.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station Mechanism Test Bed consists of a hydraulically driven, computer controlled six degree of freedom (DOF) motion system with which docking, berthing, and other mechanisms can be evaluated. Measured contact forces and moments are provided to the simulation host computer to enable representation of orbital contact dynamics. This report describes the development of a generalized math model which represents the relative motion between two rigid orbiting vehicles. The model allows motion in six DOF for each body, with no vehicle size limitation. The rotational and translational equations of motion are derived. The method used to transform the forces and moments from the sensor location to the vehicles' centers of mass is also explained. Two math models of docking mechanisms, a simple translational spring and the Remote Manipulator System end effector, are presented along with simulation results. The translational spring model is used in an attempt to verify the simulation with compensated hardware in the loop results.

  10. Simulating Contact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Frank, Juhan; Tohline, Joel E.; Staff, Jan E.; Motl, Patrick M.; Marcello, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    About one in every 150 stars is a contact binary system of WUMa type and it was thought for a long time that such a binary would naturally proceed towards merger, forming a single star. In September 2008 such a merger was observed in the eruption of a “red nova", V1309 Sco. We are developing a hydrodynamics simulation for contact binaries using Self Consistent Field (SCF) techniques, so that their formation, structural, and merger properties could be studied. This model can also be used to probe the stability criteria such as the large-scale equatorial circulations and the minimum mass ratio. We also plan to generate light curves from the simulation data in order to compare with the observed case of V1309 Sco. A comparison between observations and simulations will help us better understand the nova-like phenomena of stellar mergers.

  11. Contact dermatitis in children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Contact dermatitis in pediatric population is a common but (previously) under recognized disease. It is usually divided into the allergic and the irritant forms. The diagnosis is usually obtained with the patch test technique after conducting a thorough medical history and careful physical examination but patch testing in infants may be particularly difficult, and false-positive reactions may occur. This study also provides an overview of the most common allergens in pediatric population and discusses various therapeutic modalities. PMID:20205907

  12. Contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  13. Contact stress sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2012-02-07

    A contact stress sensor includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a thermal compensator and a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  14. Functional modular contact lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Angela J.; Cowan, Melissa; Lähdesmäki, Ilkka; Lingley, Andrew; Otis, Brian; Parviz, Babak A.

    2009-08-01

    Tear fluid offers a potential route for non-invasive sensing of physiological parameters. Utilization of this potential depends on the ability to manufacture sensors that can be placed on the surface of the eye. A contact lens makes a natural platform for such sensors, but contact lens polymers present a challenge for sensor fabrication. This paper describes a microfabrication process for constructing sensors that can be integrated into the structure of a functional contact lens in the future. To demonstrate the capabilities of the process, an amperometric glucose sensor was fabricated on a polymer substrate. The sensor consists of platinum working and counter electrodes, as well as a region of indium-tin oxide (ITO) for glucose oxidase immobilization. An external silver-silver chloride electrode was used as the reference electrode during the characterization experiments. Sensor operation was validated by hydrogen peroxide measurements in the 10- 20 μM range and glucose measurements in the 0.125-20 mM range.

  15. Acrylate Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Maxwell B; Pratt, Melanie D

    2015-01-01

    Acrylates, the 2012 American Contact Dermatitis Society allergen of the year, are found in a range of products including the absorbent materials within feminine hygiene pads. When fully polymerized, acrylates are nonimmunogenic; however, if not completely cured, the monomers can be potent allergens.A 28-year-old woman is presented, who had her teeth varnished with Isodan (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France) containing HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with no initial reaction. Approximately 1 month later, the patient developed a genital dermatitis secondary to her feminine hygiene pads. The initial reaction resolved, but 5 months later, the patient developed a systemic contact dermatitis after receiving a second varnishing.The patient was dramatically patch test positive to many acrylates. This case demonstrates a reaction to likely unpolymerized acrylates within a feminine hygiene pad, as well as broad cross-reactivity or cosensitivity to acrylates, and possibly a systemic contact dermatitis with systemic re-exposure to unpolymerized acrylates. PMID:26367207

  16. Pediatric contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinod K; Asati, Dinesh P

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in children, until recently, was considered rare. ACD was considered as a disorder of the adult population and children were thought to be spared due to a lack of exposure to potential allergens and an immature immune system. Prevalence of ACD to even the most common allergens in children, like poison ivy and parthenium, is relatively rare as compared to adults. However, there is now growing evidence of contact sensitization of the pediatric population, and it begins right from early childhood, including 1-week-old neonates. Vaccinations, piercing, topical medicaments and cosmetics in younger patients are potential exposures for sensitization. Nickel is the most common sensitizer in almost all studies pertaining to pediatric contact dermatitis. Other common allergens reported are cobalt, fragrance mix, rubber, lanolin, thiomersol, neomycin, gold, mercapto mix, balsum of Peru and colophony. Different factors like age, sex, atopy, social and cultural practices, habit of parents and caregivers and geographic changes affect the patterns of ACD and their variable clinical presentation. Patch testing should be considered not only in children with lesions of a morphology suggestive of ACD, but in any child with dermatitis that is difficult to control. PMID:20826990

  17. Dual contact pogo pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Stephen McGarry

    2016-06-21

    A contact assembly includes a base and a pair of electrical contacts supported by the base. A first end of the first electrical contact corresponds to a first end of the base and is configured to engage a first external conductive circuit element. A first end of the second electrical contact also corresponds to the first end of the base and is configured to engage a second external conductive circuit element. The first contact and the second contact are electrically isolated from one another and configured to compress when engaging an external connector element. The base includes an aperture positioned on a second end of the base outboard of a second end of the first and second electrical contacts. The aperture presents a narrowing shape with a wide mouth distal the electrical contacts and a narrow internal through-hole proximate the electrical contacts.

  18. Dual contact pogo pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, Stephen McGarry

    2015-01-20

    A contact assembly includes a base and a pair of electrical contacts supported by the base. A first end of the first electrical contact corresponds to a first end of the base and is configured to engage a first external conductive circuit element. A first end of the second electrical contact also corresponds to the first end of the base and is configured to engage a second external conductive circuit element. The first contact and the second contact are electrically isolated from one another and configured to compress when engaging an external connector element. The base includes an aperture positioned on a second end of the base outboard of a second end of the first and second electrical contacts. The aperture presents a narrowing shape with a wide mouth distal the electrical contacts and a narrow internal through-hole proximate the electrical contacts.

  19. Measuring the specific contact resistance of contacts to semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohney, S. E.; Wang, Y.; Cabassi, M. A.; Lew, K. K.; Dey, S.; Redwing, J. M.; Mayer, T. S.

    2005-02-01

    Ohmic contacts to semiconductor nanowires are essential components of many new nanoscale electronic devices. Equations for extracting specific contact resistance (or contact resistivity) from several different test structures have been developed by modeling the metal/semiconductor contact as a transmission line, leading to the development of equations analogous to those used for planar contacts. The advantages and disadvantages of various test structures are discussed. To fabricate test structures using a convenient four-point approach, silicon nanowires have been aligned using field-assisted assembly and contacts fabricated. Finally, specific contact resistances near 5 × 10 -4 Ω cm 2 have been measured for Ti/Au contacts to p-type Si nanowires with diameters of 78 and 104 nm.

  20. Contact resistivities of metal-insulator-semiconductor contacts and metal-semiconductor contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Schaekers, Marc; Barla, Kathy; Horiguchi, Naoto; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron Voon-Yew; De Meyer, Kristin

    2016-04-01

    Applying simulations and experiments, this paper systematically compares contact resistivities (ρc) of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) contacts and metal-semiconductor (MS) contacts with various semiconductor doping concentrations (Nd). Compared with the MS contacts, the MIS contacts with the low Schottky barrier height are more beneficial for ρc on semiconductors with low Nd, but this benefit diminishes gradually when Nd increases. With high Nd, we find that even an "ideal" MIS contact with optimized parameters cannot outperform the MS contact. As a result, the MIS contacts mainly apply to devices that use relatively low doped semiconductors, while we need to focus on the MS contacts to meet the sub-1 × 10-8 Ω cm2 ρc requirement for future Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) technology.

  1. Contact dermatitis in hairdressers.

    PubMed

    Nethercott, J R; MacPherson, M; Choi, B C; Nixon, P

    1986-02-01

    18 cases of hand dermatitis in hairdressers seen over a 5-year period are reviewed. The diagnoses in these patients are discussed with reference to other studies of hand dermatitis in hairdressers. Contact allergy due to paraphenylenediamine and related hair dyes was the presenting complaint in younger hairdressers, while formaldehyde allergy occurred in those who were older. The prognosis in the former group of workers with respect to continued employment in the trade tended to be poorer than the latter. Follow-up revealed that hand dermatitis often resulted in the worker not continuing to work in the hairdressing trade. PMID:2940055

  2. Adhesive Contact Sweeper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Jonathan D.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesive contact sweeper removes hair and particles vacuum cleaner leaves behind, without stirring up dust. Also cleans loose rugs. Sweeper holds commercially available spools of inverted adhesive tape. Suitable for use in environments in which air kept free of dust; optics laboratories, computer rooms, and areas inhabited by people allergic to dust. For carpets, best used in tandem with vacuum cleaner; first pass with vacuum cleaner removes coarse particles, and second pass with sweeper extracts fine particles. This practice extends useful life of adhesive spools.

  3. Contact dermatitis to methylisothiazolinone*

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Maria Antonieta Rios; Rocha, Vanessa Barreto; Andrade, Ana Regina Coelho

    2015-01-01

    Methylisothiazolinone (MI) is a preservative found in cosmetic and industrial products. Contact dermatitis caused by either methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI or Kathon CG) or MI has shown increasing frequency. The latter is preferably detected through epicutaneous testing with aqueous MI 2000 ppm, which is not included in the Brazilian standard tray. We describe a series of 23 patients tested using it and our standard tray. A case with negative reaction to MCI/MI and positive to MI is emphasized. PMID:26734880

  4. Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jenny L.

    2010-01-01

    Epicutaneous patch testing is the gold standard method for the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. Despite this knowledge, many clinical dermatologists do not offer patch testing in their offices or offer testing with only a limited number of allergens. Introduced in 1995, the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test originally contained 23 allergens and one control. In 2007, five additional allergens were added. This United States Food and Drug Administration-approved patch testing system made patch testing more convenient, and after its introduction, more dermatologists offered patch testing services. However, the number of allergens in the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test remains relatively low. Every two years, the North American Contact Dermatitis Group collects and reports the data from patch testing among its members to a standardized series of allergens. In 2005-2006, the Group used a series of 65 allergens. Of the top 30 allergens reported in 2005-2006, 10 were not included in the Thin-Layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous Test. Knowledge of and testing for additional allergens such as these may increase patch testing yield. PMID:20967194

  5. [Systemic contact dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Daria; Gomułka, Krzysztof; Dziemieszonek, Paulina; Panaszek, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Systemic contact dermatitis (SCD) is a skin inflammation occurring in a patient after systemic administration of a hapten, which previously caused an allergic contact skin reaction in the same person. Most frequently, hypersensitivity reactions typical for SCD occur after absorption of haptens with food or inhalation. Haptens occur mainly in the forms of metals and compounds present in natural resins, preservatives, food thickeners, flavorings and medicines. For many years, several studies have been conducted on understanding the pathogenesis of SCD in which both delayed type hypersensitivity (type IV) and immediate type I are observed. Components of the complement system are also suspected to attend there. Helper T cells (Th) (Th1 and Th2), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (Tc), and NK cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of SCD. They secrete a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have an important role. They control and inhibit activity of the immune system during inflammation. Tregs release suppressor cytokines and interact directly with a target cell through presentation of immunosuppressive particles at the cell surface. Diagnostic methods are generally the patch test, oral provocation test, elimination diet and lymphocyte stimulation test. There are many kinds of inflammatory skin reactions caused by systemic haptens' distribution. They are manifested in a variety of clinical phenotypes of the disease. PMID:26943310

  6. Contact heat transfer and thermal contact conductance between nonconforming surfaces in an abrupt contact

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.K.; Kroeger, V.D.

    1996-08-01

    An understanding of the thermal contact conductance behavior when a fuel pin contacts the pressure tube is important in the safety analyses of CANDU reactors. Experiments were therefore performed in a small-scale apparatus with fuel element and pressure tube specimens coming into contact in an argon/oxygen atmosphere, which kinetically simulated steam. The contact was initiated when the fuel-element and pressure-tube specimens were at {approximately} 1,000 C and {approximately} 400 C respectively. The experiments were analyzed using a finite-element code. Heat transfer rates through the contact and thermal contact conductances were determined for contact loads ranging from 20 to 80 N. For most contact loads, the contact conductance increased with time during the transient heat-up of the fuel element specimen. It was found that the calculated thermal contact conductances were in the range of 1 to 30 kW/(m{sup 2} K) based on a reference contact width of 2.5 mm. The variation of contact conductance with contact load was nearly linear.

  7. Disproportionate minority contact.

    PubMed

    Piquero, Alex R

    2008-01-01

    For many years, notes Alex Piquero, youth of color have been overrepresented at every stage of the U.S. juvenile justice system. As with racial disparities in a wide variety of social indicators, the causes of these disparities are not immediately apparent. Some analysts attribute the disparities to "differential involvement"--that is, to differences in offending by minorities and whites. Others attribute them to "differential selection"--that is, to the fact that the justice system treats minority and white offenders in different ways. Still others believe the explanation lies in a combination of the two. Differential involvement may be important earlier in the judicial process, especially in youths' contacts with police, and may influence differential selection later as individuals make their way through the juvenile justice system. Adjudicating between these options, says Piquero, is difficult and may even be impossible. Asking how much minority overrepresentation is due to differences in offending and how much to differences in processing no longer seems a helpful way to frame the discussion. Piquero urges future research to move beyond the debate over "which one matters more" and seek to understand how each of the two hypotheses can explain both the fact of minority overrepresentation in the juvenile justice system and how best to address it. Piquero cites many sizable gaps in the research and policy-relevant literature. Work is needed especially, he says, in analyzing the first stage of the justice system that juveniles confront: police contacts. The police are a critical part of the juvenile justice decision-making system and are afforded far more discretion than any other formal agent of social control, but researchers have paid surprisingly little attention to contacts between police and citizens, especially juveniles. Piquero notes that some states and localities are undertaking initiatives to reduce racial and ethnic disparities. He urges researchers and

  8. Contact Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Samantha

    2015-05-01

    Recent observations have found that some contact binaries are oriented such that the secondary impacts with the primary at a high inclination. This research investigates the evolution of how such contact binaries came to exist. This process begins with an asteroid pair, where the secondary lies on the Laplace plane. The Laplace plane is a plane normal to the axis about which the pole of a satellites orbit precesses, causing a near constant inclination for such an orbit. For the study of the classical Laplace plane, the secondary asteroid is in circular orbit around an oblate primary with axial tilt. This system is also orbiting the Sun. Thus, there are two perturbations on the secondarys orbit: J2 and third body Sun perturbations. The Laplace surface is defined as the group of orbits that lie on the Laplace plane at varying distances from the primary. If the secondary is very close to the primary, the inclination of the Laplace plane will be near the equator of the asteroid, while further from the primary the inclination will be similar to the asteroid-Sun plane. The secondary will lie on the Laplace plane because near the asteroid the Laplace plane is stable to large deviations in motion, causing the asteroid to come to rest in this orbit. Assuming the secondary is asymmetrical in shape and the bodys rotation is synchronous with its orbit, the secondary will experience the BYORP effect. BYORP can cause secular motion such as the semi-major axis of the secondary expanding or contracting. Assuming the secondary expands due to BYORP, the secondary will eventually reach the unstable region of the Laplace plane. The unstable region exists if the primary has an obliquity of 68.875 degrees or greater. The unstable region exists at 0.9 Laplace radius to 1.25 Laplace radius, where the Laplace radius is defined as the distance from the central body where the inclination of the Laplace plane orbit is half the obliquity. In the unstable region, the eccentricity of the orbit

  9. Contact urticaria from rice.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Y; Ohsuna, H; Aihara, M; Tsubaki, K; Ikezawa, Z

    2001-02-01

    A 30-year-old man with atopic dermatitis had had erythema and itching of the hands after washing rice in water, though he had always eaten cooked rice without problems. Handling test with water used to wash regular rice was performed on abraded hands, and produced urticarial erythema after several minutes. Applications of water used to wash allergen-reduced rice were negative for urticarial reaction. Prick test with water used to wash regular rice was +++. However prick test reaction with water used to wash allergen-reduced rice was +. Histamine-release test of regular rice-washing water was grade 3 and that of allergen-reduced rice grade 1. In immunoblotting analysis with regular rice washing water, there were no bands with this patient. These results suggest that the allergen responsible for contact urticaria in this patient might be water-soluble, heat-unstable, and not contained in allergen-reduced rice. PMID:11205411

  10. Contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria.

    PubMed

    Santucci, B; Picardo, M; Iavarone, C; Trogolo, C

    1985-04-01

    A study was carried out on 50 workers in a floriculture centre to evaluate the incidence of contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria. 3 subjects gave positive reactions to aqueous and ethanolic extracts of cut flowers, stems and leaves. By column chromatography, the allergen was isolated and its chemical structure identified as 6-tuliposide A by proton magnetic resonance and carbon-13 magnetic resonance. Only 6-tuliposide A was isolated from cut flowers, and this gave positive reactions when patch tested at 0.01%; a-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone at 10(-5) (v/v) was positive in the same 3 subjects. Other lactones (gamma-methylene-gamma-butyrolactone, alantolactone, isoalantolactone) were negative at all concentrations used. PMID:3160533

  11. Contact dermatitis in blacks.

    PubMed

    Berardesca, E; Maibach, H I

    1988-07-01

    Black skin is characterized by structural and functional differences such as increased stratum corneum cohesion, melanin content, and stratum corneum layers. These differences seem to make black skin difficult for irritants and light to penetrate, thus explaining the common opinion that skin in blacks is harder and develops contact dermatitis less frequently. The paucity of interpretable epidemiologic data and of clinical and experimental studies does not permit confirmation of this hypothesis, and the few data available are controversial. This article describes the main physiologic differences between black and white barrier function and reviews the literature on irritation, sensitization, and transcutaneous penetration. We found that the data are still too incomplete to generalize on the resistance, or lack thereof, of black skin (versus white skin) to chemical irritation, sensitization, and penetration. PMID:3048818

  12. Reducing contact resistance in graphene devices through contact area patterning.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua T; Franklin, Aaron D; Farmer, Damon B; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos D

    2013-04-23

    Performance of graphene electronics is limited by contact resistance associated with the metal-graphene (M-G) interface, where unique transport challenges arise as carriers are injected from a 3D metal into a 2D-graphene sheet. In this work, enhanced carrier injection is experimentally achieved in graphene devices by forming cuts in the graphene within the contact regions. These cuts are oriented normal to the channel and facilitate bonding between the contact metal and carbon atoms at the graphene cut edges, reproducibly maximizing "edge-contacted" injection. Despite the reduction in M-G contact area caused by these cuts, we find that a 32% reduction in contact resistance results in Cu-contacted, two-terminal devices, while a 22% reduction is achieved for top-gated graphene transistors with Pd contacts as compared to conventionally fabricated devices. The crucial role of contact annealing to facilitate this improvement is also elucidated. This simple approach provides a reliable and reproducible means of lowering contact resistance in graphene devices to bolster performance. Importantly, this enhancement requires no additional processing steps. PMID:23473291

  13. Point contacts in encapsulated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Handschin, Clevin; Fülöp, Bálint; Csonka, Szabolcs; Makk, Péter; Blanter, Sofya; Weiss, Markus; Schönenberger, Christian; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-11-02

    We present a method to establish inner point contacts with dimensions as small as 100 nm on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulated graphene heterostructures by pre-patterning the top-hBN in a separate step prior to dry-stacking. 2- and 4-terminal field effect measurements between different lead combinations are in qualitative agreement with an electrostatic model assuming point-like contacts. The measured contact resistances are 0.5–1.5 kΩ per contact, which is quite low for such small contacts. By applying a perpendicular magnetic field, an insulating behaviour in the quantum Hall regime was observed, as expected for inner contacts. The fabricated contacts are compatible with high mobility graphene structures and open up the field for the realization of several electron optical proposals.

  14. A Prototype Antifungal Contact Lens

    PubMed Central

    Ciolino, Joseph B.; Hudson, Sarah P.; Mobbs, Ashley N.; Hoare, Todd R.; Iwata, Naomi G.; Fink, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To design a contact lens to treat and prevent fungal ocular infections. Methods. Curved contact lenses were created by encapsulating econazole-impregnated poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) films in poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) by ultraviolet photopolymerization. Release studies were conducted in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C with continuous shaking. The contact lenses and their release media were tested in an antifungal assay against Candida albicans. Cross sections of the pre- and postrelease contact lenses were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by Raman spectroscopy. Results. Econazole-eluting contact lenses provided extended antifungal activity against Candida albicans fungi. Fungicidal activity varied in duration and effectiveness depending on the mass of the econazole-PLGA film encapsulated in the contact lens. Conclusions. An econazole-eluting contact lens could be used as a treatment for fungal ocular infections. PMID:21527380

  15. Wireless Measurement of Contact and Motion Between Contact Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2007-01-01

    This method uses a magnetic-field- response contact sensor that is designed to identify surface contact and motion between contact locations. The sensor has three components: (1) a capacitor-inductor circuit with two sets of electrical contact pads, (2) a capacitor with a set of electrical contact pads, and (3) an inductor with a set of electrical contact pads. A unique feature of this sensor is that it is inherently multifunctional. Information can be derived from analyzing such sensor response attributes as amplitude, frequency, and bandwidth. A change in one attribute can be due to a change in a physical property of a system. A change in another attribute can be due to another physical property, which has no relationship to the first one.

  16. JKR adhesion in cylindrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Narayan; Farris, T. N.; Chandrasekar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Planar JKR adhesive solutions use the half-plane assumption and do not permit calculation of indenter approach or visualization of adhesive force-displacement curves unless the contact is periodic. By considering a conforming cylindrical contact and using an arc crack analogy, we obtain closed-form indenter approach and load-contact size relations for a planar adhesive problem. The contact pressure distribution is also obtained in closed-form. The solutions reduce to known cases in both the adhesion-free and small-contact solution ( Barquins, 1988) limits. The cylindrical system shows two distinct regimes of adhesive behavior; in particular, contact sizes exceeding the critical (maximum) size seen in adhesionless contacts are possible. The effects of contact confinement on adhesive behavior are investigated. Some special cases are considered, including contact with an initial neat-fit and the detachment of a rubbery cylinder from a rigid cradle. A comparison of the cylindrical solution with the half-plane adhesive solution is carried out, and it indicates that the latter typically underestimates the adherence force. The cylindrical adhesive system is novel in that it possesses stable contact states that may not be attained even on applying an infinite load in the absence of adhesion.

  17. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle. PMID:20060981

  18. Wearable telescopic contact lens.

    PubMed

    Arianpour, Ashkan; Schuster, Glenn M; Tremblay, Eric J; Stamenov, Igor; Groisman, Alex; Legerton, Jerry; Meyers, William; Amigo, Goretty Alonso; Ford, Joseph E

    2015-08-20

    We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of a 1.6 mm thick scleral contact lens providing both 1× and 2.8× magnified vision paths, intended for use as a switchable eye-borne telescopic low-vision aid. The F/9.7 telescopic vision path uses an 8.2 mm diameter annular entrance pupil and 4 internal reflections in a polymethyl methacrylate precision optic. This gas-impermeable insert is contained inside a smooth outer casing of rigid gas-permeable polymer, which also provides achromatic correction for refraction at the curved lens face. The unmagnified F/4.1 vision path is through the central aperture of the lens, with additional transmission between the annular telescope rings to enable peripheral vision. We discuss potential solutions for providing oxygenation for an extended wear version of the lens. The prototype lenses were characterized using a scale-model human eye, and telescope functionality was confirmed in a small-scale clinical (nondispensed) demonstration. PMID:26368753

  19. Protein folding using contact maps.

    PubMed

    Vendruscolo, M; Domany, E

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the problem of representations of protein structure and give the definition of contact maps. We present a method to obtain a three-dimensional polypeptide conformation from a contact map. We also explain how to deal with the case of nonphysical contact maps. We describe a stochastic method to perform dynamics in contact map space. We explain how the motion is restricted to physical regions of the space. First, we introduce the exact free energy of a contact map and discuss two simple approximations to it. Second, we present a method to derive energy parameters based on perception learning. We prove in an extensive number of situations that the pairwise contact approximation both when alone and when supplemented with a hydrophobic term is unsuitable for stabilizing proteins' native states. PMID:10668399

  20. Method for forming metal contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Reddington, Erik; Sutter, Thomas C; Bu, Lujia; Cannon, Alexandra; Habas, Susan E; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Ginley, David S; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria

    2013-09-17

    Methods of forming metal contacts with metal inks in the manufacture of photovoltaic devices are disclosed. The metal inks are selectively deposited on semiconductor coatings by inkjet and aerosol apparatus. The composite is heated to selective temperatures where the metal inks burn through the coating to form an electrical contact with the semiconductor. Metal layers are then deposited on the electrical contacts by light induced or light assisted plating.

  1. Ion Implanted Passivated Contacts for Interdigitated Back Contacted Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Reedy, Robert; Bateman, Nicholas; Stradins, Pauls

    2015-06-14

    We describe work towards an interdigitated back contacted (IBC) solar cell utilizing ion implanted, passivated contacts. Formation of electron and hole passivated contacts to n-type CZ wafers using tunneling SiO2 and ion implanted amorphous silicon (a-Si) are described. P and B were ion implanted into intrinsic amorphous Si films at several doses and energies. A series of post-implant anneals showed that the passivation quality improved with increasing annealing temperatures up to 900 degrees C. The recombination parameter, Jo, as measured by a Sinton lifetime tester, was Jo ~ 14 fA/cm2 for Si:P, and Jo ~ 56 fA/cm2 for Si:B contacts. The contact resistivity for the passivated contacts, as measured by TLM patterns, was 14 milliohm-cm2 for the n-type contact and 0.6 milliohm-cm2 for the p-type contact. These Jo and pcontact values are encouraging for forming IBC cells using ion implantation to spatially define dopants.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of contact mechanics: contact area and interfacial separation from small to full contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunyan; Persson, Bo

    2008-03-01

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the contact between a rigid solid with a randomly rough surface and an elastic block with a flat surface. We study the contact area and the interfacial separation from small contact (low load) to full contact (high load). For small load the contact area varies linearly with the load and the interfacial separation depends logarithmically on the load [1-4]. For high load the contact area approaches to the nominal contact area (i.e., complete contact), and the interfacial separation approaches to zero. The present results may be very important for soft solids, e.g., rubber, or for very smooth surfaces, where complete contact can be reached at moderate high loads without plastic deformation of the solids. References: [1] C. Yang and B.N.J. Persson, arXiv:0710.0276, (to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.) [2] B.N.J. Persson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 125502 (2007) [3] L. Pei, S. Hyun, J.F. Molinari and M.O. Robbins, J. Mech. Phys. Sol. 53, 2385 (2005) [4] M. Benz, K.J. Rosenberg, E.J. Kramer and J.N. Israelachvili, J. Phy. Chem. B.110, 11884 (2006)

  3. Contact dermatitis to methyl methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Kassis, V; Vedel, P; Darre, E

    1984-07-01

    2 cases of contact dermatitis to methyl methacrylate monomer are presented. The patients are nurses who mixed bone cement at orthopedic operations. During the procedure, they used 2 pairs of gloves (latex). Butyl rubber gloves are recommended for methyl methacrylate monomer to avoid sensitization and/or cumulative irritant contact dermatitis on the hands. PMID:6204812

  4. Contact sensitization in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Balato, Anna; Balato, Nicola; Di Costanzo, Luisa; Ayala, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Contact dermatitis from irritant and allergic sources is the reason for 6% to 10% of all dermatologic visits with considerable morbidity and economic impact. Allergic contact dermatitis is a T-cell-mediated inflammatory reaction and develops in predisposed individuals as a consequence of environmental exposure to allergens. Aging is correlated with the rate and type of contact sensitization because of "immunosenescence." The number of old people is growing around the world. This contribution reviews the main findings from published epidemiologic studies on contact allergy in elderly populations. In all examined studies, patch testing was performed in patients with cutaneous manifestations possibly related to contact dermatitis; the prevalence of contact dermatitis in the elderly was from 33% to 64%. Establishing the most frequent allergens responsible for allergic contact dermatitis in the elderly is a hard task. The commonest allergens reported were nickel sulfate, fragrance mix, diamino diphenylmethane, lanolin alcohols, paraben mix, Euxyl K400, quinoline mix, and balsam of Peru. We emphasize that allergens surveillance is needed to realize an "elderly series" for having a useful adjunct to contact allergy that may help the treatment of each patient. PMID:21146728

  5. Contact modeling for robotics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lafarge, R.A.; Lewis, C.

    1998-08-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the authors are developing the ability to accurately predict motions for arbitrary numbers of bodies of arbitrary shapes experiencing multiple applied forces and intermittent contacts. In particular, the authors are concerned with the simulation of systems such as part feeders or mobile robots operating in realistic environments. Preliminary investigation of commercial dynamics software packages led them to the conclusion that they could use commercial software to provide everything they needed except for the contact model. They found that ADAMS best fit their needs for a simulation package. To simulate intermittent contacts, they need collision detection software that can efficiently compute the distances between non-convex objects and return the associated witness features. They also require a computationally efficient contact model for rapid simulation of impact, sustained contact under load, and transition to and from contact conditions. This paper provides a technical review of a custom hierarchical distance computation engine developed at Sandia, called the C-Space Toolkit (CSTk). In addition, they describe an efficient contact model using a non-linear damping term developed by SNL and Ohio State. Both the CSTk and the non-linear damper have been incorporated in a simplified two-body testbed code, which is used to investigate how to correctly model the contact using these two utilities. They have incorporated this model into the ADAMS software using the callable function interface. An example that illustrates the capabilities of the 9.02 release of ADAMS with their extensions is provided.

  6. CHARACTERIZING HUMAN CONTACT WITH SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    People contact sediment during a variety of activities such as fishing, wading and boating. A number of default assumptions are used today to characterize dermal contact with sediments in terms of magnitude, frequency and duration. The accuracy of these default values are widel...

  7. Tobacco-induced contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Vestita, Michelangelo; Filoni, Angela; Mastrolonardo, Mario; Angelini, Gianni; Foti, Caterina

    2016-06-01

    Tobacco and tobacco smoke are strongly associated with various skin conditions, among which contact dermatitis is of prime importance. The aetiological and clinical aspects vary according to the different tobacco production and processing steps. Contact dermatitis is frequent in tobacco harvesters, curers and cigar makers, whereas it rarely affects smokers and, only exceptionally, cigarette packaging workers. The skin sites involved also vary, according to whether the exposure is occupational or non-occupational. Tobacco contact irritation is far more frequent than contact allergy. The sensitizing compound in tobacco is unknown; nicotine, while highly toxic, does not seem to cause sensitization, except in rare cases. Besides natural substances, several compounds are added to tobacco during processing and manufacturing. For this reason, identifying the aetiological factors is exceedingly difficult. Another important aspect to take into account is the co-causative role of tobacco in eliciting or exacerbating contact dermatitis in response to other agents, occupational or extra-occupational. PMID:27020490

  8. Bosonics: Phononics, Magnonics, Plasmonics in Nano-Scale Disorder(Nanonics), Metamaterials, Astro-Seismology (Meganonics): Brillouin-Siegel GENERIC: Generalized-Disorder Collective-Boson Mode-Softening Universality-Principle (G...P) With PIPUB Many-Body Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Edward

    Siegel and Matsubara[Statphys-13(`77) Intl.Conf.Lattice-Dyn.(`77)Scripta Met.13,913(`80)]JMMM:5, 1, 84 (`77)22,1:41,58(`80)Mag.Lett.(`80)Phys./Chem.Liquids:4,(4) (`75)5,(1)(76)] generalization to GENERIC Siegel[J.Non-Xline-Sol.40,453(`80)] G...P GENERIC Brillouin[Wave-Propagation in Periodic-Structures(`22)]-Landau[`41]-Feynman[`51]-de Boer[in Phonons/Phonon-Interactions(`64)]-Egelstaff[Intro.Liquid-State(`65)]-Hubbard-Beebe[J.Phys.C(`67)]-``Anderson''[1958]- Siegel [J.Non-Xl.-Sol. 40, 453(`80)] GENERIC many-body localization. GENERIC Hubbard-Beebe[J.Phys.C(`67)] static structure-factor S(k) modulated kinetic-energy ω(k) = ℏ ⌃(2)k⌃(2)/2mS(k) expressing G....P(``bass-ackwardly'') aka homogeneity and isotropy creates GENERIC G...P with GENERIC pseudo-isotropic pseudo-Umklapp backscattering (PIPUB) for GENERIC many-body localization of and/or by mutually interacting collective-bosons: phonons(phononics) with magnons(magnonics) with plasmons(plasmonics) with fermions (electros, holes)...etc. in nano-scale ``disorder'', metamaterials and on very-macro-scales (surprisingly) Bildsten et.al. astro-seismology(meganonics) of red-giant main-sequence stars(Mira, Betelguese)!

  9. Thermal contact conductance of pressed contacts at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil Kumar, S.; Ramamurthi, K.

    2004-10-01

    The influence of variations of interface temperature in the range 50-300 K on the thermal contact conductance between aluminium and stainless steel joints was determined. Predictions were done by modeling the deformation at the interface for different values of surface finish and contact pressure over the range of interface temperatures. Both elastic and plastic deformation was considered. Experiments were carried out in a closed loop cryostat and the results were shown to compare well with the predictions. A reduction of the interface temperature resulted in a smaller value of thermal contact conductance. Interfacial pressure variation had much lower influence at the smaller value of temperatures. The role of surface roughness at the contact was also seen to be less significant at lower interface temperatures and the zone of hysteresis was smaller. A correlation was developed for estimating thermal contact conductance at joints over this temperature range. An explicit dependence of contact conductance on temperature was not seen to be necessary as long as the changes in the hardness and thermal conductivity of the material with temperature are incorporated in the correlation.

  10. Allergic contact dermatitis from ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Warshaw, Erin M

    2014-09-01

    Ketoconazole is a widely used imidazole antifungal agent. True contact allergy to topical ketoconazole is rare, and few cases of patients with contact allergy to ketoconazole have been reported. We present the case of a patient with a history of undiagnosed recurrent dermatitis who developed acute facial swelling and pruritus after using ketoconazole cream and shampoo for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. Patch testing revealed true contact allergy to ketoconazole without cross-reactivity to 4 other imidazole antifungals. Review of the patient's medical record suggested that prior incidences of dermatitis might have been due to ketoconazole exposure. When the patient avoided this imidazole agent, the dermatitis resolved. PMID:25279470

  11. Connector contact-ring bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligon, J.

    1976-01-01

    Use of device eliminates crimp connectors and ferrules, resulting in compact termination assembly and efficient use of back-shell space. Pair of insulator rings, one at each end of assembly, provides spacing between disc caps and contact rings.

  12. Racial Disparity in Police Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Crutchfield, Robert D.; Haggerty, Kevin P.; McGlynn, Anne; Catalano, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Criminologists agree the race disparity in arrests cannot be fully explained by differences in criminal behavior. We examine social environment factors that may lead to racial differences in police contact in early adolescence, including family, peers, school, and community. Data are from 331 8th-grade students. Blacks were almost twice as likely as Whites to report a police contact. Blacks reported more property crime but not more violent crime than Whites. Police contacts were increased by having a parent who had been arrested, a sibling involved in criminal activity, higher observed reward for negative behavior, having school disciplinary actions, and knowing adults who engaged in substance abuse or criminal behavior. Race differences in police contacts were partially attributable to more school discipline. PMID:24363956

  13. Transition metal contacts to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Politou, Maria De Gendt, Stefan; Heyns, Marc; Asselberghs, Inge; Radu, Iuliana; Conard, Thierry; Richard, Olivier; Martens, Koen; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Tokei, Zsolt; Lee, Chang Seung; Sayan, Safak

    2015-10-12

    Achieving low resistance contacts to graphene is a common concern for graphene device performance and hybrid graphene/metal interconnects. In this work, we have used the circular Transfer Length Method (cTLM) to electrically characterize Ag, Au, Ni, Ti, and Pd as contact metals to graphene. The consistency of the obtained results was verified with the characterization of up to 72 cTLM structures per metal. Within our study, the noble metals Au, Ag and Pd, which form a weaker bond with graphene, are shown to result in lower contact resistance (Rc) values compared to the more reactive Ni and Ti. X-ray Photo Electron Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization for the latter have shown the formation of Ti and Ni carbides. Graphene/Pd contacts show a distinct intermediate behavior. The weak carbide formation signature and the low Rc values measured agree with theoretical predictions of an intermediate state of weak chemisorption of Pd on graphene.

  14. Pose and motion from contact

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.B.; Erdmann, M.

    1999-05-01

    In the absence of vision, grasping an object often relies on tactile feedback from the fingertips. As the finger pushes the object, the fingertip can feel the contact point move. If the object is known in advance, from this motion the finger may infer the location of the contact point on the object, and thereby, the object pose. This paper primarily investigates the problem of determining the pose (orientation and position) and motion (velocity and angular velocity) of a planar object with known geometry from such contact motion generated by pushing. A dynamic analysis of pushing yields a nonlinear system that relates through contact the object pose and motion to the finger motion. The contact motion on the fingertip thus encodes certain information about the object pose. Nonlinear observability theory is employed to show that such information is sufficient for the finger to observe not only the pose, but also the motion of the object. Therefore, a sensing strategy can be realized as an observer of the nonlinear dynamic system. Two observers are subsequently introduced. The first observer, based on the work of Gautheir, Hammouri, and Othman (1992), has its gain determined by the solution of a Lyapunov-like equation; it can be activated at any time instant during a push. The second observer, based on Newton`s method, solves for the initial (motionless) object pose from three intermediate contact points during a push. Under the Coulomb-friction model, the paper deals with support friction in the plane and/or contact friction between the finger and the object. Extensive simulations have been done to demonstrate the feasibility of the two observers. Preliminary experiments (with an Adept robot) have also been conducted. A contact sensor has been implemented using strain gauges.

  15. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Dugger, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2011-12-06

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  16. Discrete-contact nanowire photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Michelle J.; Wen, Wen; Maldonado, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    A series of finite-element simulations have been performed to assess the operational characteristics of a new semiconductor nanowire solar cell design operating under high-level injection conditions. Specifically, the steady-state current-voltage behavior of a cylindrical silicon (Si) nanowire with a series of discrete, ohmic-selective contacts under intense sunlight illumination was investigated. The scope of the analysis was limited to only the factors that impact the net internal quantum yield for solar to electricity conversion. No evaluations were performed with regards to optical light trapping in the modeled structures. Several aspects in a discrete-contact nanowire device that could impact operation were explored, including the size and density of ohmic-selective contacts, the size of the nanowire, the electronic quality and conductivity of the nanowire, the surface defect density of the nanowire, and the type of ohmic selectivity employed at each contact. The analysis showed that there were ranges of values for each parameter that supported good to excellent photoresponses, with certain combinations of experimentally attainable material properties yielding internal energy conversion efficiencies at the thermodynamic limit for a single junction cell. The merits of the discrete-contact nanowire cell were contrasted with "conventional" nanowire photovoltaic cells featuring a uniform conformal contact and also with planar point-contact solar cells. The unique capacity of the discrete-contact nanowire solar cell design to operate at useful energy conversion efficiencies with low quality semiconductor nanowires (i.e., possessing short charge-carrier lifetimes) with only light doping is discussed. This work thus defines the impetus for future experimental work aimed at developing this photovoltaic architecture.

  17. Solution-Assisted Optical Contacting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaddock, Daniel; Abramovici, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A modified version of a conventional optical-contact procedure has been found to facilitate alignment of optical components. The optical-contact procedure (called simply optical contacting in the art) is a standard means of bonding two highly polished and cleaned glass optical components without using epoxies or other adhesives. In its unmodified form, the procedure does not involve the use of any foreign substances at all: components to be optically contacted are dry. The main disadvantage of conventional optical contacting is that it is difficult or impossible to adjust the alignment of the components once they have become bonded. In the modified version of the procedure, a drop of an alcohol-based optical cleaning solution (isopropyl alcohol or similar) is placed at the interface between two components immediately before putting the components together. The solution forms a weak bond that gradually strengthens during a time interval of the order of tens of seconds as the alcohol evaporates. While the solution is present, the components can be slid, without loss of contact, to perform fine adjustments of their relative positions. After about a minute, most of the alcohol has evaporated and the optical components are rigidly attached to each other. If necessary, more solution can be added to enable resumption or repetition of the adjustment until the components are aligned to the required precision.

  18. Mechanisms of rolling contact spalling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. M.; Kulkarni, S. M.; Bhargava, V.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study aimed at analyzing the mechanical material interactions responsible for rolling contact spalling of the 440 C steel, high pressure oxygen turbopump bearings are presented. A coupled temperature displacement finite element analysis of the effects of friction heating under the contact is presented. The contact is modelled as a stationary, heat generating, 2 dimensional indent in an elastic perfectly plastic half-space with heat fluxes up to 8.6 x 10000 KW/m sq comparable to those generated in the bearing. Local temperatures in excess of 1000 C are treated. The calculations reveal high levels of residual tension after the contact is unloaded and cools. Efforts to promote Mode 2/Mode 3 fatigue crack growth under cyclic torsion in hardened 440 C steel are described. Spalls produced on 440 C steel by a 3 ball/rod rolling contact testing machine were studied with scanning microscopy. The shapes of the cyclic, stress strain hysteresis loops displayed by hardened 440 C steel in cyclic torsion at room temperature are defined for the plastic strain amplitudes encountered in rolling/sliding contact. Results of these analyses are discussed in detail.

  19. Diabetes and contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Clare; Efron, Nathan

    2012-05-01

    The literature suggests that diabetic patients may have altered tear chemistry and tear secretion as well as structural and functional changes to the corneal epithelium, endothelium and nerves. These factors, together with a reported increased incidence of corneal infection, suggest that diabetic patients may be particularly susceptible to developing ocular complications during contact lens wear. Reports of contact lens-induced complications in diabetic patients do exist, although a number of these reports concern patients with advanced diabetic eye disease using lenses on an extended wear basis. Over the past decade or so, there have been published studies documenting the response of the diabetic eye to more modern contact lens modalities. The results of these studies suggest that contact lenses can be a viable mode of refractive correction for diabetic patients. Furthermore, new research suggests that the measurement of tear glucose concentration could, in future, be used to monitor metabolic control non-invasively in diabetic patients. This could be carried out using contact lenses manufactured from hydrogel polymers embedded with glucose-sensing agents or nanoscale digital electronic technology. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the anterior ocular manifestations of diabetes, particularly that pertaining to contact lens wear. PMID:22537249

  20. Crane-Load Contact Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Mata, Carlos; Cox, Robert

    2005-01-01

    An electronic instrument has been developed as a prototype of a portable crane-load contact sensor. Such a sensor could be helpful in an application in which the load rests on a base in a horizontal position determined by vertical alignment pins (see Figure 1). If the crane is not positioned to lift the load precisely vertically, then the load can be expected to swing once it has been lifted clear of the pins. If the load is especially heavy, large, and/or fragile, it could hurt workers and/or damage itself and nearby objects. By indicating whether the load remains in contact with the pins when it has been lifted a fraction of the length of the pins, the crane-load contact sensor helps the crane operator determine whether it is safe to lift the load clear of the pins: If there is contact, then the load is resting against the sides of the pins and, hence, it may not be safe to lift; if contact is occasionally broken, then the load is probably not resting against the pins, so it should be safe to lift. It is assumed that the load and base, or at least the pins and the surfaces of the alignment holes in the load, are electrically conductive, so the instrument can use electrical contact to indicate mechanical contact. However, DC resistance cannot be used as an indicator of contact for the following reasons: The load and the base are both electrically grounded through cables (the load is grounded through the lifting cable of the crane) to prevent discharge of static electricity. In other words, the DC resistance between the load and the pins is always low, as though they were always in direct contact. Therefore, instead of DC resistance, the instrument utilizes the AC electrical impedance between the pins and the load. The signal frequency used in the measurement is high enough (.1 MHz) that the impedance contributed by the cables and the electrical ground network of the building in which the crane and the base are situated is significantly greater than the contact

  1. Ferromagnetic tunnel contacts to graphene: Contact resistance and spin signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cubukcu, M.; Laczkowski, P.; Vergnaud, C.; Marty, A.; Attané, J.-P.; Notin, L.; Vila, L. Jamet, M.; Martin, M.-B.; Seneor, P.; Anane, A.; Deranlot, C.; Fert, A.; Auffret, S.; Ducruet, C.

    2015-02-28

    We report spin transport in CVD graphene-based lateral spin valves using different magnetic contacts. We compared the spin signal amplitude measured on devices where the cobalt layer is directly in contact with the graphene to the one obtained using tunnel contacts. Although a sizeable spin signal (up to ∼2 Ω) is obtained with direct contacts, the signal is strongly enhanced (∼400 Ω) by inserting a tunnel barrier. In addition, we studied the resistance-area product (R.A) of a variety of contacts on CVD graphene. In particular, we compared the R.A products of alumina and magnesium oxide tunnel barriers grown by sputtering deposition of aluminum or magnesium and subsequent natural oxidation under pure oxygen atmosphere or by plasma. When using an alumina tunnel barrier on CVD graphene, the R.A product is high and exhibits a large dispersion. This dispersion can be highly reduced by using a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier, as for the R.A value. This study gives insight in the material quest for reproducible and efficient spin injection in CVD graphene.

  2. Measuring The Contact Resistances Of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Simple method devised to measure contact resistances of photovoltaic solar cells. Method uses readily available equipment and applicable at any time during life of cell. Enables evaluation of cell contact resistance, contact-end resistance, contact resistivity, sheet resistivity, and sheet resistivity under contact.

  3. Solar cell with back side contacts

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  4. Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections Sections Contact Lens-Related ... About Contact Lenses Proper Care of Contact Lenses Contact Lens-Related Eye Infections Written by: Kierstan Boyd ...

  5. RF Sputtering of Gold Contacts On Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable gold contacts are deposited on niobium by combination of RF sputtering and photolithography. Process results in structures having gold only where desired for electrical contact. Contacts are stable under repeated cycling from room temperature to 4.2 K and show room-temperature contact resistance as much as 40 percent below indium contacts made by thermalcompression bonding.

  6. On the structure of contact binaries. I - The contact discontinuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, F. H.; Lubow, S. H.; Anderson, L.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of the interior structure of contact binaries is reviewed, and a simple resolution of the difficulties which plague the theory is suggested. It is proposed that contact binaries contain a contact discontinuity between the lower surface of the common envelope and the Roche lobe of the cooler star. This discontinuity is maintained against thermal diffusion by fluid flow, and the transition layer is thin to the extent that the dynamical time scale is short in comparison with the thermal time scale. The idealization that the transition layer has infinitesimal thickness allows a simple formulation of the structure equations which are closed by appropriate jump conditions across the discontinuity. The further imposition of the standard boundary conditions suffices to define a unique model for the system once the chemical composition, the masses of the two stars, and the orbital separation are specified.

  7. Reduced contact resistance in top-contact organic field-effect transistors by interface contact doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ji-Ling; Kasemann, Daniel; Widmer, Johannes; Günther, Alrun A.; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2016-03-01

    Emerging organic integrated electronics require capability of high speed and the compatibility with high-resolution structuring processes such as photolithography. When downscaling the channel length, the contact resistance is known to limit the performance of the short channel devices. In this report, orthogonal photolithography is used for the patterning of the source/drain electrodes of the organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) as well as the interface dopant insertion layers for further modifications of the contact resistance. Bottom-gate top-contact pentacene OFETs with different thicknesses of the p-dopant 2,2'-(perfluoronaphthalene-2,6-diylidene)dimalononitrile under the Au electrodes show a significant decrease in threshold voltage from -2.2 V to -0.8 V and in contact resistance from 55 k Ω cm to 10 k Ω cm by adding a 1 nm thin dopant interlayer. The influence of doping on charge carrier injection is directly visible in the temperature-dependent output characteristics and a charge-transfer activation energy of ˜20 meV is obtained. Our results provide a systematic study of interface contact doping and also show the connection between interface contact doping and improved charge carrier injection by the activation of charge transfer process.

  8. SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheet for SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts Format: Select one PDF [256 KB] Recommend on ... that are not now known. What does "close contact" mean? In the context of SARS, close contact ...

  9. Multimodal characterization of contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Michael A.; Compertore, David; Gibson, Donald S.; Herbrand, Matthew E.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.

    2015-10-01

    A table top instrument has been designed, constructed and tested to characterize all of the primary optical and physical properties of contact lenses. Measured optical properties include base power, cylinder power, cylindrical axis, prism, refractive index and wavefront aberrations. Measured physical properties include center thickness, lens diameter and lens sagittal depth. The instrument combines a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS), a machine vision sensor, and a low coherence light interferometer (LCI) all coaxially aligned into a single tabletop unit. The unit includes a cuvette, mounted in a translatable sample chamber for holding the contact lens under test, and it can be configured to measure wet or dry contact lenses. During operation, the vision sensor measures the diameter of the lens, and locates the center of the lens. The lens is then aligned for other measurements. The vision sensor can also measure various alignment marks on the lens, as well as identify any alpha numerical features, which can be used to associate the lens orientation with the measured aberrations. The LCI measures the center thickness, sagittal depth and index of refraction of the contact lens. The base radius of curvature is then calculated using these measured parameters. The SHWS measures the lenses prescription power, including spherical, cylinder, prism, and higher order wavefront aberrations. NIST traceable calibration artifacts are used to calibrate the SHWS, machine vision and LCI modalities. Repeatability measurements on a contact lens in a saline solution are presented.

  10. Marine Bioinspired Underwater Contact Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Sean K; Sodano, Antonio; Cunningham, Dylan J; Huang, Sharon S; Zalicki, Piotr J; Shin, Seunghan; Ahn, B Kollbe

    2016-05-01

    Marine mussels and barnacles are sessile biofouling organisms that adhere to a number of surfaces in wet environments and maintain remarkably strong bonds. Previous synthetic approaches to mimic biological wet adhesive properties have focused mainly on the catechol moiety, present in mussel foot proteins (mfps), and especially rich in the interfacial mfps, for example, mfp-3 and -5, found at the interface between the mussel plaque and substrate. Barnacles, however, do not use Dopa for their wet adhesion, but are instead rich in noncatecholic aromatic residues. Due to this anomaly, we were intrigued to study the initial contact adhesion properties of copolymerized acrylate films containing the key functionalities of barnacle cement proteins and interfacial mfps, for example, aromatic (catecholic or noncatecholic), cationic, anionic, and nonpolar residues. The initial wet contact adhesion of the copolymers was measured using a probe tack testing apparatus with a flat-punch contact geometry. The wet contact adhesion of an optimized, bioinspired copolymer film was ∼15.0 N/cm(2) in deionized water and ∼9.0 N/cm(2) in artificial seawater, up to 150 times greater than commercial pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) tapes (∼0.1 N/cm(2)). Furthermore, maximum wet contact adhesion was obtained at ∼pH 7, suggesting viability for biomedical applications. PMID:27046671

  11. Contact tracing and disease control.

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Ken T D; Keeling, Matt J

    2003-01-01

    Contact tracing, followed by treatment or isolation, is a key control measure in the battle against infectious diseases. It is an extreme form of locally targeted control, and as such has the potential to be highly efficient when dealing with low numbers of cases. For this reason it is frequently used to combat sexually transmitted diseases and new invading pathogens. Accurate modelling of contact tracing requires explicit information about the disease-transmission pathways from each individual, and hence the network of contacts. Here, pairwise-approximation methods and full stochastic simulations are used to investigate the utility of contact tracing. A simple relationship is found between the efficiency of contact tracing necessary for eradication and the basic reproductive ratio of the disease. This holds for a wide variety of realistic situations including heterogeneous networks containing core-groups or super-spreaders, and asymptomatic individuals. Clustering (transitivity) within the transmission network is found to destroy the relationship, requiring lower efficiency than predicted. PMID:14728778

  12. Contact electrification of insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacks, Daniel J.; Mohan Sankaran, R.

    2011-11-01

    The electrostatic charge that is generated when two materials are contacted or rubbed and then separated is a well-known physical process that has been studied for more than 2500 years. Contact electrification occurs in many contexts, both natural and technological. For example, in dust storms the collisions between particles lead to electrostatic charging and in extreme cases, extraordinary lightning displays. In electrophotography, toner particles are intentionally charged to guide their deposition in well-defined patterns. Despite such a long history and so many important consequences, a fundamental understanding of the mechanism behind contact electrification remains elusive. An open question is what type of species are transferred between the surfaces to generate charge—experiments suggest various species ranging from electrons to ions to nanoscopic bits of material, and theoretical work suggests that non-equilibrium states may play an important role. Another open question is the contact electrification that occurs when two insulating materials with identical physical properties touch—since there is no apparent driving force, it is not clear why charge transfer occurs. A third open question involves granular systems—models and experiments have shown that a particle-size dependence for the charging often exists. In this review, we discuss the fundamental aspects of contact electrification and highlight recent research efforts aimed at understanding these open questions.

  13. 78 FR 14549 - National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey AGENCY: Contact Center Services, Federal Citizen Information Center, Office of Citizen Services... requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the...

  14. Dermatitis, contact on the cheek (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin inflammation (dermatitis) on the cheek caused by contact with a substance that produced an allergic reaction (allergen). Contact dermatitis causes redness, itching, and small blisters (vesicles).

  15. Contacts de langues et representations (Language Contacts and Representations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthey, Marinette, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Essays on language contact and the image of language, entirely in French, include: "Representations 'du' contexte et representations 'en' contexte? Eleves et enseignants face a l'apprentissage de la langue" ("Representations 'of' Context or Representations 'in' Context? Students and Teachers Facing Language Learning" (Laurent Gajo); "Le crepuscule…

  16. Nanotechnology and Food Contact Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaspyrides, Constantine (Costas) D.

    2010-06-01

    The use of nanotechnology in food contact materials is highlighted in relation to novel applications and potential implications for consumer safety and regulatory controls. Nanotechnology applications are expected to bring a range of benefits to the food sector, including improved packaging, antimicrobial properties, traceability and security of food products. The toxicological nature of hazard, likelihood of exposure and risk to consumers from nanotechnology-derived food/food packaging are largely unknown and this work highlights the benefits of nanotechnology in food contact materials but also the gaps in knowledge regarding consumers safety that require further research.

  17. Contact potential measurement: The preamplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Frank

    1992-07-01

    The factors governing the choice of preamplifier type for the vibrating capacitive probe used in contact potential measurements are examined. Two types are compared: a high input impedance voltage amplifier and a current amplifier. The latter has been increasingly used in recent years due to its great advantages in dealing with parasitic input capacitance. We extend previous analyses, elucidating other advantages of the current amplifier. Particularly important are (i) the reduction of spurious microphonic signals, implying lower systematic error, and (ii) the white noise spectrum of its equivalent contact potential noise, which allows random error to be effectively reduced by increased averaging periods.

  18. Non- contacting capacitive diagnostic device

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Timothy

    2005-07-12

    A non-contacting capacitive diagnostic device includes a pulsed light source for producing an electric field in a semiconductor or photovoltaic device or material to be evaluated and a circuit responsive to the electric field. The circuit is not in physical contact with the device or material being evaluated and produces an electrical signal characteristic of the electric field produced in the device or material. The diagnostic device permits quality control and evaluation of semiconductor or photovoltaic device properties in continuous manufacturing processes.

  19. [Tefillin-related contact dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Hashkes, Philip J; Sagi, Efraim

    2011-09-01

    We describe a 14 year-old male with a background of atopic dermatitis who developed a contact dermatitis reaction on the left arm to the leather straps of tefillin (phylacteries), a religious article worn by observant Jewish men from the age 13 years during most morning prayer services. Patch testing revealed contact allergy to potassium dichromate, a chemical involved in leather tanning. Placing the leather straps over clothing and later switching to potassium dichromate-free leather straps resolved the condition. It is important to recognize this uncommon phenomena in a population in which a large proportion regularly use this religious article. PMID:22026052

  20. Contacts of space--times

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, M.D.

    1981-03-01

    The concept of contact between manifolds is applied to space--times of general relativity. For a given background space--time a contact approximation of second order is defined and interpreted both from the point of view of a metric pertubation and of a higher order tangent manifold. In the first case, an application to the high frequency gravitational wave hypothesis is suggested. In the second case, a constant curvature tangent bundle is constructed and suggested as a means to define a ten parameter local space--time symmetry.

  1. Corneal topography and contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Szczotka, Loretta B

    2003-09-01

    Regardless of whether CVK is used qualitatively for RGP lens design selection or quantitatively in RGP parameter selection, it has a significant role in contact lens practice. Further advancements and testing on CVK-based RGP fitting modules and fluorescein simulations will make CVK an invaluable tool for the RGP lens fitter. Soft lens applications of CVK data are already being tested [42,43]. This technology will become the standard of care for all contact lens patients and will most likely replace the keratometer. PMID:14564765

  2. Nano-Scale Fabrication Using Optical-Near-Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsui, Takashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    This paper reviews the specific nature of nanophotonics, i.e., a novel optical nano-technology, utilizing dressed photon excited in the nano-material. As examples of nanophotnic fabrication, optical near-field etching and increased spatial homogeneity of contents in compound semiconductors is demonstrated with a self-organized manner.

  3. Mechanical machining and metrology at micro/nano scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Steven Y.

    2006-11-01

    Micro-scale machining performed in a mechanical manner is an ultra-precision material removal process to achieve micron form accuracy and a few nanometer finish. It has gained increasing importance in the manufacture of optical, mechanical, biomedical, and electronic components with intricate details in many industry and consumer products, both as a means to produce final products and to create dies and molds for further mass production. The backbone of science and technology for the success of machining at such fine length scales hinges on the understanding of microstructual machining mechanics, precision control of machine tool motions, miniaturization of cutters, miniaturization of machine tools, and the availability of high resolution metrology. This paper examines a number of recent research developments at Georgia Tech in these areas. On microstructual mechanics, cutting at submicron depth to control brittle-ductile transition of material will be discussed. On precision machine control, compensation of micrometer multitooth runout error through the chip load servo will be illustrated. On cutter miniaturization, the concept of magnetic single-grit abrasive as a micro cutting tool for submicron dimensional accuracy will be presented. On machine tool miniaturization, the downsizing of machining center and its associated benefits on precision will be elaborated. On metrology, a micro laser-based system and acoustic emission systems are presented for the measurement of micro cutting tool locations. The presentation of these topics will focus on the underlying fundamentals of fine scale machining and their implications toward ultra-precision engineering and micro/nano manufacturing.

  4. NANO-SCALE PALLADIUM DOPED MAGNESIUM BIMETALLICS FOR DECHLORINATING PCBS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic and recalcitrant pollutants found in rivers; coastal waters and in 500 of the nation's 1598 Superfund waste sites. According to an EPA estimate, the existing 525 million tons of PCB wastes will cost $394 billion to be incinerated, curren...

  5. Considerations for Micro- and Nano-scale Space Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altemir, David A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper collects and summarizes many of the issues associated with the design, analysis, and flight of space payloads. However, highly miniaturized experimental packages are highly susceptible to the deleterious effects of induced contamination and charged particles when they are directly exposed to the space environment. These two problem areas are addressed and a general discussion of space environments, applicable design and analysis practices (with extensive references to the open literature) and programmatic considerations are presented.

  6. Observing real time motion of nano-scale objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vondel, Joris; Timmermans, Matias; Samuely, Tomás; Raes, Bart; Serrier-Garcia, Lise; Moshchalkov, Victor

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of nanoscale objects is a very interesting field of research with a strong technological impact. Still, the combination of a technique resolving (sub)nanometer particles within a time frame relevant to observe dynamics is a very challenging task. Due to the inherent atomic-scale resolution, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is an ideal candidate to achieve this goal. Nevertheless, in most physical systems the dynamic events of the objects under investigation cannot be resolved by conventional STM image acquisition and will only reveal an average trace of the moving object. This is why a strong drive exists to develop new functionalities of STM, which allow studying dynamic events at the nanoscale. We address this issue, for vortex matter in NbSe2, by driving the vortices using an ac magnetic field and probing the induced periodic tunnel current modulations. Our results reveal different dynamical modes of the driven vortex lattice. In addition, by extending a known functionality of STM, (i.e. the `Lazy Fisherman' technique) we can use single pixel information to obtain the overall dynamics of the vortex lattice with submillisecond time resolution and subnanometer spatial resolution. This work is supported by the FWO and the Methusalem funding of the Flemish government.

  7. Active osmotic exchanger for advanced filtration at the nano scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-11-01

    One of the main functions of the kidney is to remove the waste products of an organism, mostly by excreting concentrated urea while reabsorbing water and other molecules. The human kidney is capable of recycling about 200 liters of water per day, at the relatively low cost of 0.5 kJ/L (standard dialysis requiring at least 150 kJ/L). Kidneys are constituted of millions of parallel filtration networks called nephrons. The nephrons of all mammalian kidneys present a specific loop geometry, the Loop of Henle, that is believed to play a key role in the urinary concentrating mechanism. One limb of the loop is permeable to water and the other contains sodium pumps that exchange with a common interstitium. In this work, we take inspiration from this osmotic exchanger design to propose new nanofiltration principles. We first establish simple analytical results to derive general operating principles, based on coupled water permeable pores and osmotic pumps. The best filtration geometry, in terms of power required for a given water recycling ratio, is comparable in many ways to the mammalian nephron. It is not only more efficient than traditional reverse osmosis systems, but can also work at much smaller pressures (of the order of the blood pressure, 0.13 bar, as compared to more than 30 bars for pressure-retarded osmosis systems). We anticipate that our proof of principle will be a starting point for the development of new filtration systems relying on the active osmotic exchanger principle.

  8. Nano Scale Mechanical Analysis of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Diganta

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a probe-based microscope that uses nanoscale and structural imaging where high resolution is desired. AFM has also been used in mechanical, electrical, and thermal engineering applications. This unique technique provides vital local material properties like the modulus of elasticity, hardness, surface potential, Hamaker constant, and the surface charge density from force versus displacement curve. Therefore, AFM was used to measure both the diameter and mechanical properties of the collagen nanostraws in human costal cartilage. Human costal cartilage forms a bridge between the sternum and bony ribs. The chest wall of some humans is deformed due to defective costal cartilage. However, costal cartilage is less studied compared to load bearing cartilage. Results show that there is a difference between chemical fixation and non-chemical fixation treatments. Our findings imply that the patients' chest wall is mechanically weak and protein deposition is abnormal. This may impact the nanostraws' ability to facilitate fluid flow between the ribs and the sternum. At present, AFM is the only tool for imaging cells' ultra-structure at the nanometer scale because cells are not homogeneous. The first layer of the cell is called the cell membrane, and the layer under it is made of the cytoskeleton. Cancerous cells are different from normal cells in term of cell growth, mechanical properties, and ultra-structure. Here, force is measured with very high sensitivity and this is accomplished with highly sensitive probes such as a nano-probe. We performed experiments to determine ultra-structural differences that emerge when such cancerous cells are subject to treatments such as with drugs and electric pulses. Jurkat cells are cancerous cells. These cells were pulsed at different conditions. Pulsed and non-pulsed Jurkat cell ultra-structures were investigated at the nano meter scale using AFM. Jurkat cell mechanical properties were measured under different conditions. In addition, AFM was used to measure the charge density of cell surface in physiological conditions. We found that the treatments changed the cancer cells' ultra-structural and mechanical properties at the nanometer scale. Finally, we used AFM to characterize many non-biological materials with relevance to biomedical science. Various metals, polymers, and semi-conducting materials were characterized in air and multiple liquid media through AFM - techniques from which a plethora of industries can benefit. This applies especially to the fledging solar industry which has found much promise in nanoscopic insights. Independent of the material being examined, a reliable method to measure the surface force between a nano probe and a sample surface in a variety of ionic concentrations was also found in the process of procuring these measurements. The key findings were that the charge density increases with the increase of the medium's ionic concentration.

  9. Nano-scale twinning associated with columnar defects in YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Kirk, M. A.

    1998-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy study reveals that high energy ( GeV) heavy ion (U+, Xe+, and Au+) irradiation in high-Tc superconductors leads to the formation of aligned columnar defects which are usually amorphous. The associated volume expansion causes strain in surrounding matrix. Our study shows that the stress field induced by ion irradiation along the c axis direction of YBa2Cu3O7-d can be relaxed by local oxygen re-ordering in the ab planes which gives a 90o reorientation of the orthorhombic unit cell in the affected area. As the ion dose increases (>1011/cm2), a characteristic microstructure, the joining of oxygen re-ordering regions, has been observed. Thus a number of local ``twin'' boundaries are formed between two or more amorphous cores. The local a/b interfaces between the matrix and the oxygen re-ordering regions tend to either 110 plane of YBa2Cu3O7-d. These interfaces are similar to the pre-existing twin boundaries formed during the tetragonal to orthorhombic transformation, but they are more diffuse. Cross-sectional TEM study shows that the diameter of aligned amorphous columns is far from uniform along the ion path. Three typical morphologies: discontinuous, modulated, and uniform columns were observed in our study, which certainly must affect the degree of local twinning associated with the columnar defect.

  10. High-precision micro/nano-scale machining system

    DOEpatents

    Kapoor, Shiv G.; Bourne, Keith Allen; DeVor, Richard E.

    2014-08-19

    A high precision micro/nanoscale machining system. A multi-axis movement machine provides relative movement along multiple axes between a workpiece and a tool holder. A cutting tool is disposed on a flexible cantilever held by the tool holder, the tool holder being movable to provide at least two of the axes to set the angle and distance of the cutting tool relative to the workpiece. A feedback control system uses measurement of deflection of the cantilever during cutting to maintain a desired cantilever deflection and hence a desired load on the cutting tool.

  11. Neural assembly models derived through nano-scale measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Hongyou; Branda, Catherine; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Forsythe, James Chris

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments of a three-year project focused on developing technical capabilities for measuring and modeling neuronal processes at the nanoscale. It was successfully demonstrated that nanoprobes could be engineered that were biocompatible, and could be biofunctionalized, that responded within the range of voltages typically associated with a neuronal action potential. Furthermore, the Xyce parallel circuit simulator was employed and models incorporated for simulating the ion channel and cable properties of neuronal membranes. The ultimate objective of the project had been to employ nanoprobes in vivo, with the nematode C elegans, and derive a simulation based on the resulting data. Techniques were developed allowing the nanoprobes to be injected into the nematode and the neuronal response recorded. To the authors's knowledge, this is the first occasion in which nanoparticles have been successfully employed as probes for recording neuronal response in an in vivo animal experimental protocol.

  12. Nano-scale orientation mapping of graphite in cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Theuwissen, Koenraad; Lacaze, Jacques; Véron, Muriel; Laffont, Lydia

    2014-09-15

    A diametrical section of a graphite spheroid from a ductile iron sample was prepared using the focused ion beam-lift out technique. Characterization of this section was carried out through automated crystal orientation mapping in a transmission electron microscope. This new technique automatically collects electron diffraction patterns and matches them with precalculated templates. The results of this investigation are crystal orientation and phase maps of the specimen, which bring new light to the understanding of growth mechanisms of this peculiar graphite morphology. This article shows that mapping the orientation of carbon-based materials such as graphite, which is difficult to achieve with conventional techniques, can be performed automatically and at high spatial resolution using automated crystal orientation mapping in a transmission electron microscope. - Highlights: • ACOM/TEM can be used to study the crystal orientation of carbon-based materials. • A spheroid is formed by conical sectors radiating from a central nuclei. • Misorientations exist within the conical sectors, defining various orientation domains.

  13. Engineered nano-scale ceramic supports for PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L; Blackmore, Karen J; Burrell, Anthony K; Henson, Neil J; Phillips, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Catalyst support durability is currently a technical barrier for commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, especially for transportation applications. Degradation and corrosion of the conventional carbon supports leads to losses in active catalyst surface area and, consequently, reduced performance. As a result, the major aim of this work is to develop support materials that interact strongly with Pt, yet sustain bulk-like catalytic activities with very highly dispersed particles. This latter aspect is key to attaining the 2015 DOE technical targets for platinum group metal (PGM) loadings (0.20 mg/cm{sup 2}). The benefits of the use of carbon-supported catalysts to drastically reduce Pt loadings from the early, conventional Pt-black technology are well known. The supported platinum catalyzed membrane approach widely used today for fabrication of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) was developed shortly thereafter these early reports. Of direct relevance to this present work, are the investigations into Pt particle growth in PEM fuel cells, and subsequent follow-on work showing evidence of Pt particles suspended free of the support within the catalyst layer. Further, durability work has demonstrated the detrimental effects of potential cycling on carbon corrosion and the link between electrochemical surface area and particle growth. To avoid the issues with carbon degradation altogether, it has been proposed by numerous fuel cell research groups to replace carbon supports with conductive materials that are ceramic in nature. Intrinsically, these many conductive oxides, carbides, and nitrides possess the prerequisite electronic conductivity required, and offer corrosion resistance in PEMFC environments; however, most reports indicate that obtaining sufficient surface area remains a significant barrier to obtaining desirable fuel ceU performance. Ceramic materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity and necessary stability under fuel cell conditions must also exhibit high surface area as a necessary adjunct to obtaining high Pt dispersions and Pt utilization targets. Our goal in this work is to identify new synthesis approaches together with materials that will lead to ceramic supports with high surface areas and high Pt dispersions. Several strong candidates for use as PEMFC catalyst supports include: transition metal nitrides and substoichiometric titanium oxides, which hither to now have been prepared by other researcher groups with relatively low surface areas (ca. 1-50 m{sup 2}/g typical). To achieve our goals of engineering high surface area, conductive ceramic support for utilization in PEMFCs, a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with experience synthesizing and investigating these materials has been assembled. This team is headed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and includes Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of New Mexico. This report describes our fiscal year 2010 technical progress related to applying advanced synthetiC methods towards the development of new ceramic supports for Pt catalysts for PEM fuel cells.

  14. Development and characterization of a nano-scale contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Oeffinger, Brian E; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2004-04-01

    Agents injected parenterally must be less than approximately 8 microm diameter in order to traverse the capillaries in the pulmonary bed, but these agents remain in the vasculature until they are eliminated from the body by a variety of mechanisms. Targeting of cells outside the capillaries requires agent diameters of less than approximately 700 nm to enable escape through the larger-than-usual pores that have been noted in the leaky vasculature of a tumor. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of creating a surfactant-stabilized nano-bubble with favorable acoustic properties, and identify the key parameters that influence size, yield and stability. Size distribution was characterized using laser light scattering. In vitro acoustic enhancement was assessed by generation of dose and time response curves. We previously developed a successful protocol to generate gas-filled microbubbles (containing perfluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride or air) with mean diameter of 1.5 microm, using sonication of carefully selected surfactant mixtures. This presentation describes generation of nano-bubbles with mean diameters ranging from 700 to 450 nm, depending on process variables. In all cases a centrifugation step was employed to separate the nano-sized particles. The in vitro dose response curves gave a maximum of 23-27 dB enhancement compared to buffer in the absence of agent, with the maximum enhancement and presence of shadowing at higher doses being dependent on the fabrication protocol. The effect of sonication time for solutions containing a mixture of the surfactants (Span 60 and Tween 80) was also tested, but was determined not to be an influencing factor. Future studies will involve development of a mathematical model characterizing the mean size as a function of centrifugal force, spin time and initial size distribution. Future work will also include imaging of tumor-bearing mice and measuring imaging potential in vivo in New Zealand white rabbits using power Doppler. PMID:15047309

  15. Industrial characterization of nano-scale roughness on polished surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj A.; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Pilný, Lukáš; Madsen, Morten H.; Bissacco, Giuliano; Petersen, Jan C.; Taboryski, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    We report a correlation between the scattering value "Aq" and the ISO standardized roughness parameter Rq. The Aq value is a measure for surface smoothness, and can easily be determined from an optical scattering measurement. The correlation equation extrapolates the Aq value from a narrow measurement range of +/-16° from specular to a broader range of +/-80°, corresponding to spatial surface wavelengths of 0.8 μm to 25 μm, and converts the Aq value to the Rq value for the surface. Furthermore, we present an investigation of the changes in scattering intensities, when a surface is covered with a thin liquid film. It is shown that the changes in the angular scattering intensities can be compensated for the liquid film, using empirically determined relations. This allows a restoration of the "true" scattering intensities which would be measured from a corresponding clean surface. The compensated scattering intensities provide Aq values within 5.7 % +/- 6.1 % compared to the measurements on clean surfaces.

  16. Thermal and electrical contact conductance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, S. W.; Nilles, M.

    1985-01-01

    Prediction of electrical and thermal contact resistance for pressed, nominally flat contacts is complicated by the large number of variables which influence contact formation. This is reflected in experimental results as a wide variation in contact resistances, spanning up to six orders of magnitude. A series of experiments were performed to observe the effects of oxidation and surface roughness on contact resistance. Electrical contact resistance and thermal contact conductance from 4 to 290 K on OFHC Cu contacts are reported. Electrical contact resistance was measured with a 4-wire DC technique. Thermal contact conductance was determined by steady-state longitudinal heat flow. Corrections for the bulk contribution ot the overall measured resistance were made, with the remaining resistance due solely to the presence of the contact.

  17. Imaging surface contacts: Power law contact distributions and contact stresses in quartz, calcite, glass and acrylic plastic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Kilgore, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to obtain microscope images of regions of contact between roughened surfaces of transparent materials, while the surfaces are subjected to static loads or undergoing frictional slip. Static loading experiments with quartz, calcite, soda-lime glass and acrylic plastic at normal stresses to 30 MPa yield power law distributions of contact areas from the smallest contacts that can be resolved (3.5 ??m2) up to a limiting size that correlates with the grain size of the abrasive grit used to roughen the surfaces. In each material, increasing normal stress results in a roughly linear increase of the real area of contact. Mechanisms of contact area increase are by growth of existing contacts, coalescence of contacts and appearance of new contacts. Mean contacts stresses are consistent with the indentation strength of each material. Contact size distributions are insensitive to normal stress indicating that the increase of contact area is approximately self-similar. The contact images and contact distributions are modeled using simulations of surfaces with random fractal topographies. The contact process for model fractal surfaces is represented by the simple expedient of removing material at regions where surface irregularities overlap. Synthetic contact images created by this approach reproduce observed characteristics of the contacts and demonstrate that the exponent in the power law distributions depends on the scaling exponent used to generate the surface topography.

  18. DISEASES CAUSED BY WATER CONTACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diseases associated with water contact are reviewed with respect to the sources of etiological agents, the types of diseases and the conditions under which they occur. The sources of disease agents fall into three general groups; point sources such as sewage treatment plants; dis...

  19. Contact symmetries and Hamiltonian thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bravetti, A.; Lopez-Monsalvo, C.S.; Nettel, F.

    2015-10-15

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher’s Information Matrix. In this work we analyse several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production.

  20. Non-contact ECG monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alexey S.; Erlikh, Vadim V.; Kodkin, Vladimir L.; Keller, Andrei V.; Epishev, Vitaly V.

    2016-03-01

    The research is dedicated to non-contact methods of electrocardiography. The authors describe the routine of experimental procedure and suggest the approach to solving the problems which arise at indirect signal recording. The paper presents the results of experiments conducted by the authors, covers the flow charts of ECG recorders and reviews the drawbacks of filtering methods used in foreign equivalents.

  1. Barrier/Cu contact resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.S.; Nicolet, M.A.; Angyal, M.S.; Lilienfeld, D.; Shacham-Diamand, Y.; Smith, P.M.

    1995-10-17

    The specific contact resistivity of Cu with ({alpha} + {beta})-Ta, TiN, {alpha}-W, and amorphous-Ta{sub 36}Si{sub 14}N{sub 50} barrier films is measured using a novel four-point-probe approach. Geometrically, the test structures consist of colinear sets of W-plugs to act as current and voltage probes that contact the bottom of a planar Cu/barrier/Cu stack. Underlying Al interconnects link the plugs to the current source and voltmeter. The center-to-center distance of the probes ranges from 3 to 200 {micro}m. Using a relation developed by Vu et al., a contact resistivity of roughly 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} is obtained for all tested barrier/Cu combinations. By reflective-mode small-angle X-ray scattering, the similarity in contact resistivity among the barrier films may be related to interfacial impurities absorbed from the deposition process.

  2. Cultural Contacts, Attitudes and Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Carol; Purbhoo, Mary

    To investigate the effects of contacts with people from other cultures, students in nine Canadian secondary schools with differing ethnic population densities were compared. The first focus of the study was the development of cross-cultural understanding. Three measurement instruments were administered to eleventh grade English and history classes…

  3. Patterns of Nonresident Father Contact

    PubMed Central

    CHEADLE, JACOB E.; AMATO, PAUL R.; KING, VALARIE

    2010-01-01

    We used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort (NLSY79) from 1979 to 2002 and the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (CNLSY) from 1986 to 2002 to describe the number, shape, and population frequencies of U.S. nonresident father contact trajectories over a 14-year period using growth mixture models. The resulting four-category classification indicated that nonresident father involvement is not adequately characterized by a single population with a monotonic pattern of declining contact over time. Contrary to expectations, about two-thirds of fathers were consistently either highly involved or rarely involved in their children’s lives. Only one group, constituting approximately 23% of fathers, exhibited a clear pattern of declining contact. In addition, a small group of fathers (8%) displayed a pattern of increasing contact. A variety of variables differentiated between these groups, including the child’s age at father-child separation, whether the child was born within marriage, the mother’s education, the mother’s age at birth, whether the father pays child support regularly, and the geographical distance between fathers and children. PMID:20355691

  4. Electrical contact tool set station

    DOEpatents

    Byers, M.E.

    1988-02-22

    An apparatus is provided for the precise setting to zero of electrically conductive cutting tools used in the machining of work pieces. An electrically conductive cylindrical pin, tapered at one end to a small flat, rests in a vee-shaped channel in a base so that its longitudinal axis is parallel to the longitudinal axis of the machine's spindle. Electronic apparatus is connected between the cylindrical pin and the electrically conductive cutting tool to produce a detectable signal when contact between tool and pin is made. The axes of the machine are set to zero by contact between the cutting tool and the sides, end or top of the cylindrical pin. Upon contact, an electrical circuit is completed, and the detectable signal is produced. The tool can then be set to zero for that axis. Should the tool contact the cylindrical pin with too much force, the cylindrical pin would be harmlessly dislodged from the vee-shaped channel, preventing damage either to the cutting tool or the cylindrical pin. 5 figs.

  5. Contact lens related corneal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ky; Agarwal, P

    2010-01-01

    A corneal ulcer caused by infection is one of the major causes of blindness worldwide. One of the recent health concerns is the increasing incidence of corneal ulcers associated with contact lens user especially if the users fail to follow specific instruction in using their contact lenses. Risk factors associated with increased risk of contact lens related corneal ulcers are: overnight wear, long duration of continuous wear, lower socio-economic classes, smoking, dry eye and poor hygiene. The presenting symptoms of contact lens related corneal ulcers include eye discomfort, foreign body sensation and lacrimation. More serious symptoms are redness (especially circum-corneal injection), severe pain, photophobia, eye discharge and blurring of vision. The diagnosis is established by a thorough slit lamp microscopic examination with fluorescein staining and corneal scraping for Gram stain and culture of the infective organism. Delay in diagnosing and treatment can cause permanent blindness, therefore an early referral to ophthalmologist and commencing of antimicrobial therapy can prevent visual loss. PMID:25606178

  6. Assessing Measures of Contact Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William R.; Patchen, Martin

    This paper consolidates findings from two related studies: William Brown's research on the predictive ability of measures of early and non-high school interracial contact/opportunities that appear to affect interracial attitudes and behaviors in high school; and Martin Patchen's investigation in Indianapolis, Indiana high schools analyzing the…

  7. Computing Contact Stresses In Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Somprakit, Paisan; Huston, Ronald L.

    1995-01-01

    Improved method of computing contact stresses in gear teeth accounts for complicating effects like those of static and sliding friction. Provides iterative procedure for determination of contact region and nodal contact forces along with contact stresses. Method based on equations and computational procedure incorporating these effects routinely.

  8. Contact discontinuity as a stabilizing factor in contact binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarna, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed, which can stabilize oscillation cycles, in the sense of the thermal relaxation oscillation theory, during the first phase of the contact configuration evolution. It is argued that a special structure of the secondary component (the inversion layer) acts as a stabilizing factor that is complementary to another stabilizing factor (evolved primary component) proposed by Rahunen (1981). The proposition explains quite well the fact that not many systems with EB and EW light curves are observed.

  9. Spin analysis of concentrated traction contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    Spin, the result of a mismatch in contact radii on either side of the point of rolling, has a detrimental effect on traction contact performance. It occurs in concentrated contacts having conical or contoured rolling elements, such as those in traction drives or angular contact bearings, and is responsible for an increase in contact heating and power loss. The kinematics of spin producing contact geometries and the subsequent effect on traction and power loss are investigated. The influence of lubricant traction characteristics and contact geometries that minimize spin are also addressed.

  10. Phenomena resulting from hypergolic contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forness, Jordan M.

    Understanding hypergolic ignition is critical for the safe and successful operation of hypergolic engines. The complex coupling of physical and chemical processes during hypergolic ignition complicates analysis of the event. Presently, hypergolic ignition models cannot simulate liquid contact and mixing or liquid-phase chemical reactions, and rely on experimental results for validation. In some cases, chemical kinetics of hypergolic propellants and fluid dynamics of droplet collisions couple to produce unexpected phenomena. This research investigates contact between droplets and pools of liquid hypergolic propellants under various conditions in order to investigate these liquid-phase reactions and categorize the resulting interaction. During this experiment, 142 drop tests were performed to investigate phenomena associated with hypergolic contact of various propellants. A drop of fuel impacted a semi-ellipsoidal pool of oxidizer at varying impact velocities and impact geometries. The temperature, pressure, ambient atmosphere, and propellant quality were all controlled during the experiment, as these factors have been shown to influence hypergolic ignition delay. Three distinct types of impacts were identified: explosions, bounces, and splashes. The impact type was found to depend on the impact Weber number and impact angle. Splashes occurred above a critical Weber number of 250, regardless of impact angle. Explosions occurred for Weber numbers less than 250, and for impact angles less than seven degrees. If the impact angle was greater than seven degrees then the test resulted in a bounce. Literature related to explosions induced by hypergolic contact was reviewed. Explosions were observed to occur inconsistently, a feature that has never been addressed. Literature related to non-reactive splashing, bouncing, and coalescence was reviewed for insight into the explosion phenomenon. I propose that the dependence of impact angle on the transition between explosion and

  11. Improved Electrical Contact For Dowhhole Drilling Networks

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2005-08-16

    An electrical contact system for transmitting information across tool joints while minimizing signal reflections that occur at the tool joints includes a first electrical contact comprising an annular resilient material. An annular conductor is embedded within the annular resilient material and has a surface exposed from the annular resilient material. A second electrical contact is provided that is substantially equal to the first electrical contact. Likewise, the second electrical contact has an annular resilient material and an annular conductor. The two electrical contacts configured to contact one another such that the annular conductors of each come into physical contact. The annular resilient materials of each electrical contact each have dielectric characteristics and dimensions that are adjusted to provide desired impedance to the electrical contacts.

  12. Thermal Contact Resistance: Experiment Versus Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, L.; Moyne, C.; Degiovanni, A.

    1998-11-01

    With a knowledge of the thermal resistance value associated with an asperity, a model for the thermal contact resistance of a given interface is obtained by considering that each asperity of surfaces in contact is a flux tube. Calculation of any of the thermal conductances depends on the contact radius of each asperity. This radius increases with load, as asperities are compressed. Contact area is calculated for a plastic load. Values of thermal contact conductance (or resistance) are compared with experimental results.

  13. Pseudoelastic deformation during nanoscale adhesive contact formation.

    PubMed

    Mordehai, Dan; Rabkin, Eugen; Srolovitz, David J

    2011-08-26

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to demonstrate that adhesive contact formation through classical jump to contact is mediated by extensive dislocation activity in metallic nanoparticles. The dislocations generated during jump to contact are completely annihilated by the completion of the adhesive contact, leaving the nanoparticles dislocation-free. This rapid and efficient jump to contact process is pseudoelastic, rather than purely elastic or plastic. PMID:21929255

  14. Chain Of Test Contacts For Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieneweg, Udo

    1989-01-01

    Test structure forms chain of "cross" contacts fabricated together with large-scale integrated circuits. If necessary, number of such chains incorporated at suitable locations in integrated-circuit wafer for determination of fabrication yield of contacts. In new structure, resistances of individual contacts determined: In addition to making it possible to identify local defects, enables generation of statistical distributions of contact resistances for prediction of "parametric" contact yield of fabrication process.

  15. PREFACE: Non-contact AFM Non-contact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.; Morita, Seizo

    2012-02-01

    This special issue is focussed on high resolution non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM). Non-contact atomic force microscopy was established approximately 15 years ago as a tool to image conducting and insulating surfaces with atomic resolution. Since 1998, an annual international conference has taken place, and although the proceedings of these conferences are a useful source of information, several key developments warrant devoting a special issue to this subject. In the theoretic field, the possibility of supplementing established techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Kelvin probe microscopy with atomically resolved force micrsoscopy poses many challenges in the calculation of contrast and contrast reversal. The surface science of insulators, self-assembled monolayers and adsorbates on insulators is a fruitful field for the application of non-contact AFM: several articles in this issue are devoted to these subjects. Atomic imaging and manipulation have been pioneered using STM, but because AFM allows the measurement of forces, AFM has had a profound impact in this field as well. Three-dimensional force spectroscopy has allowed many important insights into surface science. In this issue a combined 3D tunneling and force microscopy is introduced. Non-contact AFM typically uses frequency modulation to measure force gradients and was initially used mainly in a vacuum. As can be seen in this issue, frequency modulation is now also used in ambient conditions, allowing better spatial and force resolution. We thank all of the contributors for their time and efforts in making this special issue possible. We are also very grateful to the staff of IOP Publishing for handling the administrative aspects and for steering the refereeing process. Non-contact AFM contents Relation between the chemical force and the tunnelling current in atomic point contacts: a simple model Pavel Jelínek, Martin Ondrácek and Fernando Flores Theoretical simulation of

  16. Sensing with Superconducting Point Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting point contacts have been used for measuring magnetic polarizations, identifying magnetic impurities, electronic structures, and even the vibrational modes of small molecules. Due to intrinsically small energy scale in the subgap structures of the supercurrent determined by the size of the superconducting energy gap, superconductors provide ultrahigh sensitivities for high resolution spectroscopies. The so-called Andreev reflection process between normal metal and superconductor carries complex and rich information which can be utilized as powerful sensor when fully exploited. In this review, we would discuss recent experimental and theoretical developments in the supercurrent transport through superconducting point contacts and their relevance to sensing applications, and we would highlight their current issues and potentials. A true utilization of the method based on Andreev reflection analysis opens up possibilities for a new class of ultrasensitive sensors. PMID:22778630

  17. Contact charge-transfer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dharamsi, A.N.; Tulip, J.

    1981-07-01

    A mechanism for sustaining population inversions in contact charge-transfer complexes in which the ground electronic state is not bound is described. The mechanism relies on picosecond radiationless depletion of the lower laser state. This generates an inversion even when the ground-state potential curve, as plotted against the donor-acceptor distance, is not repulsive vertically below the excited state minimum. Contact charge-transfer lasers would offer high gain, high-energy density, and tunable sources of coherent radiation in the uv and visible. A method for pumping such a laser is examined and applied to the pyrrole-oxygen complex. A rate equation analysis is done and estimates for gain and energy density are presented.

  18. Remedial Action Contacts Directory - 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This document, which was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), is a directory of 2628 individuals interested or involved in environmental restoration and/or remedial actions at radioactively contaminated sites. This directory contains a list of mailing addresses and phone numbers of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor offices; an index of DOE operations, area, site, project, and contractor office sorted by state; a list of individuals, presented by last name, facsimile number, and e-mail address; an index of affiliations presented alphabetically, with individual contacts appearing below each affiliation name; and an index of foreign contacta sorted by country and affiliation. This document was generated from the Remedial Action Contacts Database, which is maintained by the Remedial Action Program Information Center (RAPIC).

  19. Contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panessa-Warren, B.J.

    1985-10-01

    Soft x-ray contact microscopy with synchrotron radiation offers the biologist and especially the microscopist, a way to morphologically study specimens that could not be imaged by conventional TEM, STEM or SEM methods (i.e. hydrated samples, samples easily damaged by an electron beam, electron dense samples, thick specimens, unstained low contrast specimens) at spatial resolutions approaching those of the TEM, with the additional possibility to obtain compositional (elemental) information about the sample as well. Although flash x-ray sources offer faster exposure times, synchrotron radiation provides a highly collimated, intense radiation that can be tuned to select specific discrete ranges of x-ray wavelengths or specific individual wavelengths which optimize imaging or microanalysis of a specific sample. This paper presents an overview of the applications of x-ray contact microscopy to biological research and some current research results using monochromatic synchrotron radiation to image biological samples. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Contact dermatitis caused by preservatives.

    PubMed

    Yim, Elizabeth; Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Preservatives are biocidal chemicals added to food, cosmetics, and industrial products to prevent the growth of microorganisms. They are usually nontoxic and inexpensive and have a long shelf life. Unfortunately, they commonly cause contact dermatitis. This article reviews the most important classes of preservatives physicians are most likely to encounter in their daily practice, specifically isothiazolinones, formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, methyldibromoglutaronitrile, and parabens. For each preservative mentioned, the prevalence of sensitization, clinical presentation of contact dermatitis, patch testing concentrations, cross reactions, and related legislation will be discussed. Mandatory labeling of preservatives is required in some countries, but not required in others. Until policies are made, physicians and patients must be proactive in identifying potential sensitizers and removing their use. We hope that this article will serve as a guide for policy makers in creating legislation and future regulations on the use and concentration of certain preservatives in cosmetics and industrial products. PMID:25207684

  1. Freely suspended quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, C.; Herz, M.; Bichler, M.; Ludwig, S.

    2010-05-01

    We present a versatile design of freely suspended quantum point contacts with particular large one-dimensional subband quantization energies of up to Δɛ≈10 meV. The nanoscale bridges embedding a two-dimensional electron system are fabricated from AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures by electron-beam lithography and etching techniques. Narrow constrictions define quantum point contacts that are capacitively controlled via local in-plane side gates. Employing transport spectroscopy, we investigate the transition from electrostatic subbands to Landau quantization in a perpendicular magnetic field. The large subband quantization energies allow us to utilize a wide magnetic field range and thereby observe a large exchange split spin-gap of the two lowest Landau-levels.

  2. On the role of RhoA/ROCK signaling in contact guidance of bone-forming cells on anisotropic Ti6Al4V surfaces.

    PubMed

    Calzado-Martín, A; Méndez-Vilas, A; Multigner, M; Saldaña, L; González-Carrasco, J L; González-Martín, M L; Vilaboa, N

    2011-04-01

    Patterned surfaces direct cell spatial dynamics, yielding cells oriented along the surface geometry, in a process known as contact guidance. The Rho family of GTPases controls the assembly of focal adhesions and cytoskeleton dynamics, but its role in modulating bone-cell alignment on patterned surfaces remains unknown. This article describes the interactions of two human cell types involved in osseointegration, specifically mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts, with submicron- or nano-scale Ti6Al4V grooved surfaces generated by mechanical abrasion. The surface chemistry of the alloy was not affected by grinding, ensuring that the differences found in cellular responses were exclusively due to changes in topography. Patterned surfaces supported cell growth and stimulated mesenchymal stem cell viability. Anisotropic surfaces promoted cell orientation and elongation along the grates. Both cell types oriented on nanometric surfaces with grooves of 150 nm depth and 2 μm width. The number of aligned cells increased by approximately 30% on submicrometric grooves with sizes of about 1 μm depth and 10 μm width. Cells were treated with drugs that attenuate the activities of the GTPase RhoA and one of its downstream effectors, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), and contact guidance of treated cells on the grooved surfaces was investigated. The data indicate that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is a key modulator of both mesenchymal stem cell and osteoblast orientation on nanometric surface features. RhoA and its effector participate in the alignment of mesenchymal stem cells on submicrometric grooves, but not of osteoblasts. These findings show that RhoA/ROCK signaling is involved in contact guidance of bone-related cells on metallic substrates, although to a varying extent depending on the specific cell type and the dimensions of the pattern. PMID:21115140

  3. Allergic contact dermatitis to Alstroemeria.

    PubMed

    Marks, J G

    1988-06-01

    Two female florists developed dermatitis of the fingertips. Patch testing revealed allergic contact dermatitis to the flower, Alstroemeria, used in floral arrangements. They had positive patch tests to portions of Alstroemeria, and to tuliposide A, the allergen in this plant. Vinyl gloves were not helpful since tuliposide A readily penetrates through these gloves. Nitrile gloves may be protective since they prevented positive patch test to tuliposide A. PMID:2967676

  4. [Contact allergies in medical occupations].

    PubMed

    Rustemeyer, T; Pilz, B; Frosch, P J

    1994-12-01

    Based on reports in the literature, data from the information network of German dermatology centres (Informationsverbund Dermatologischer Kliniken) and the authors own findings, a review is presented on prevalence, clinical picture and causative agents of contact allergic dermatoses in health care professions. In 1991 the proportion of suspected occupational diseases in the health care professions (including hairdressers) represented by cases of dermatitis, as reported to the responsible insurance institution, reached 72% of the total for the year (7287 out of 10127). Every 20th to 40th case was recognized as an occupational dermatosis according to German law. Accurate figures on incidence are scarce; for dentists an incidence of 0.11% has been calculated. The risk of developing occupational hand eczema has been shown to be at least three times higher for nurses than for other so-called dry professions. For persons engaged in the personal care of the ill and the elderly, relevant occupational allergens were found to be benzalkonium chloride and aldehydes in disinfectants, as well as rubber accelerators such as thiuram mix. Latex contact urticaria has increasing significance for medical personnel, with prevalence rates of sensitization between 4.5% and 10.7%. Among physicians, contact allergies to thiuram mix were found to be dominant (12.9%). For surgeons and orthopaedic surgeons, methyl methacrylate as a constituent of bone cement is of great importance. Various esters of acrylic acid and methacrylic acid are important sensitizers in the dental professions, particularly in heavily exposed dental laboratory technicians. Only a few gloves protect against these types of sensitizers. Sensitizations by medicaments can be avoided in most cases by reducing direct skin contact, as practiced with penicillin or ispaghula powder. Strategies of prevention include information of atopics regarding the increase in occupational dermatitis, the regular use of barrier creams

  5. [Contact allergy to essential oils].

    PubMed

    Selvåg, E; Holm, J O; Thune, P

    1995-11-10

    Ethereal oils are widely used, in food, toothpaste, as flavouring agents in perfumes and cosmetics, and in dermatological treatment, as antiseptics, adstringenta, antipruritic tinctures, lotions and pomades. The use of ethereal oils seems to have increased in recent years, probably due to a growing interest in alternative medicine, and especially aromatherapy. By describing the cases of three patients with allergic contact dermatitis, we wish to point out possible unwanted side effects of using ethereal oils. PMID:7491578

  6. Contact | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    For more information about the Office of Cancer Genomics, please contact: Office of Cancer Genomics National Cancer Institute 31 Center Drive, 10A07 Bethesda, Maryland 20892-2580 Phone: (301) 451-8027 Fax: (301) 480-4368 Email: ocg@mail.nih.gov *Please note that this site will not function properly in Internet Explorer unless you completely turn off the Compatibility View*

  7. Contact processes in crowded environments.

    PubMed

    Xu, S-L-Y; Schwarz, J M

    2013-11-01

    Periodically sheared colloids at low densities demonstrate a dynamical phase transition from an inactive to active phase as the strain amplitude is increased. The inactive phase consists of no collisions (contacts) between particles in the steady state limit, while in the active phase collisions persist. To investigate this system at higher densities, we construct and study a conserved-particle-number contact process with three-body interactions, which are potentially more likely than two-body interactions at higher densities. For example, consider one active (diffusing) particle colliding with two inactive (nondiffusing) particles such that they become active and consider spontaneous inactivation. In mean field, this system exhibits a continuous dynamical phase transition. Simulations on square lattices also indicate a continuous transition with exponents similar to those measured for the conserved lattice gas (CLG) model. In contrast, the three-body interaction requiring two active particles to activate one inactive particle exhibits a discontinuous transition. Finally, inspired by kinetically constrained models of the glass transition, we investigate the "caging effect" at even higher particle densities to look for a second dynamical phase transition back to an inactive phase. Square lattice simulations suggest a continuous transition with a new set of exponents differing from both the CLG model and what is known as directed percolation, indicating a potentially new universality class for a contact process with a conserved particle number. PMID:24329237

  8. Implicit Multibody Penalty-BasedDistributed Contact.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyi; Zhao, Yili; Barbic, Jernej

    2014-09-01

    The penalty method is a simple and popular approach to resolving contact in computer graphics and robotics. Penalty-based contact, however, suffers from stability problems due to the highly variable and unpredictable net stiffness, and this is particularly pronounced in simulations with time-varying distributed geometrically complex contact. We employ semi-implicit integration, exact analytical contact gradients, symbolic Gaussian elimination and a SVD solver to simulate stable penalty-based frictional contact with large, time-varying contact areas, involving many rigid objects and articulated rigid objects in complex conforming contact and self-contact. We also derive implicit proportional-derivative control forces for real-time control of articulated structures with loops. We present challenging contact scenarios such as screwing a hexbolt into a hole, bowls stacked in perfectly conforming configurations, and manipulating many objects using actively controlled articulated mechanisms in real time. PMID:26357376

  9. Direct-Write Contacts: Metallization and Contact Formation; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Curtis, C. J.; Miedaner, A.; Pasquarelli, R. M.; Kaydonova, T.; Hersh, P.; Ginley, D. S.

    2008-05-01

    Using direct-write approaches in photovoltaics for metallization and contact formation can significantly reduce the cost per watt of producing photovoltaic devices. Inks have been developed for various materials, such as Ag, Cu, Ni and Al, which can be used to inkjet print metallizations for various kinds of photovoltaic devices. Use of these inks results in metallization with resistivities close to those of bulk materials. By means of inkjet printing a metallization grid can be printed with better resolution, i.e. smaller lines, than screen-printing. Also inks have been developed to deposit transparent conductive oxide films by means of ultrasonic spraying.

  10. Contact Dermatitis, Patch Testing, and Allergen Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Burkemper, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    In patients presenting with a complaint of rash, contact dermatitis is often the underlying diagnosis making it an entity with which health care providers should be familiar. Contact dermatitis can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. In a patient suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis, patch testing can be done to identify specific allergens. Education focused on allergen avoidance and safe products is an integral part of treatment for the contact dermatitis patient. Knowledge of the most common allergens is helpful for clinicians to be able to provide this education. PMID:26455061

  11. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  12. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  13. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  14. Low resistance contacts for shallow junction semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S. (Inventor); Weizer, Victor G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method of enhancing the specific contact resistivity in InP semiconductor devices and improved devices produced thereby are disclosed. Low resistivity values are obtained by using gold ohmic contacts that contain small amounts of gallium or indium and by depositing a thin gold phosphide interlayer between the surface of the InP device and the ohmic contact. When both the thin interlayer and the gold-gallium or gold-indium contact metallizations are used, ultra low specific contact resistivities are achieved. Thermal stability with good contact resistivity is achieved by depositing a layer of refractory metal over the gold phosphide interlayer.

  15. Towards an optimal contact metal for CNTFETs.

    PubMed

    Fediai, Artem; Ryndyk, Dmitry A; Seifert, Gotthard; Mothes, Sven; Claus, Martin; Schröter, Michael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-05-21

    Downscaling of the contact length Lc of a side-contacted carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) is challenging because of the rapidly increasing contact resistance as Lc falls below 20-50 nm. If in agreement with existing experimental results, theoretical work might answer the question, which metals yield the lowest CNT-metal contact resistance and what physical mechanisms govern the geometry dependence of the contact resistance. However, at the scale of 10 nm, parameter-free models of electron transport become computationally prohibitively expensive. In our work we used a dedicated combination of the Green function formalism and density functional theory to perform an overall ab initio simulation of extended CNT-metal contacts of an arbitrary length (including infinite), a previously not achievable level of simulations. We provide a systematic and comprehensive discussion of metal-CNT contact properties as a function of the metal type and the contact length. We have found and been able to explain very uncommon relations between chemical, physical and electrical properties observed in CNT-metal contacts. The calculated electrical characteristics are in reasonable quantitative agreement and exhibit similar trends as the latest experimental data in terms of: (i) contact resistance for Lc = ∞, (ii) scaling of contact resistance Rc(Lc); (iii) metal-defined polarity of a CNTFET. Our results can guide technology development and contact material selection for downscaling the length of side-contacts below 10 nm. PMID:27124382

  16. Seeking Contact: Issues to Consider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, M.

    Seeking contact with extraterrestrial intelligence is a species enterprise that should be conducted with our shared interests in mind. We must reflect on the full range of possible outcomes; we cannot opt out of the potential consequences of actions taken by small numbers of our fellow humans. Until we have empirical evidence about alien technological civilizations, we can reason about them only by analogy with our own history and behaviour. Given that record, some degree of prudence is in order. To conduct this debate more rationally, we must free our thinking of excessively binary stereotypes.

  17. Thermal Conductances Of Metal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Scherkenbach, F. E.; Spivak, A. L.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents results of measurements of thermal conductances of aluminum and stainless-steel contacts at temperatures from 1.6 to 6.0 K. Measurement apparatus includes gearmotor assembly connected to rocker arm by music wire to load sample pair with forces up to 670 N. Heater placed above upper sample. Germanium resistance thermometers in upper and lower samples measured temperature difference across interface over range of heater powers from 0.1 to 10.0 mW. The thermal conductance calculated from temperature difference. Measurements provide data for prediction of thermal conductances of bolted joints in cryogenic infrared instruments.

  18. Smart contact oscillations by IPMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Asaka, K.; Su, J.; Poubel, L.; Shahinpoor, M.

    2016-02-01

    An ion migration-induced self-oscillation phenomenon observed in ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) is reported. These oscillations are generated from a purely static equilibrium configuration of IPMCs in loose contact with a stationary electrode, and in particular the anode of an imposed DC voltage source. Many interesting possibilities emerge, which are described in this paper. Of particular importance is the emergence of the possibility of creating tailor-made electric signals or pulse-width modulation-type signals from a DC source.

  19. Frictionless contact of aircraft tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyun O.; Tanner, John A.; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1989-01-01

    A computational procedure for the solution of frictionless contact problems of spacecraft tires was developed using a two-dimensional laminated anisotropic shell theory incorporating the effects of variations in material and geometric parameters, transverse shear deformation, and geometric nonlinearities to model the nose-gear tire of a space shuttle. Numerical results are presented for the case when the nose-gear tire is subjected to inflation pressure and pressed against a rigid pavement. The results are compared with experimental results obtained at NASA Langley, demonstrating a high accuracy of the model and the effectiveness of the computational procedure.

  20. Contact dermatitis: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ronni; Orion, Edith; Ruocco, Eleonora; Baroni, Adone; Ruocco, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The history of contact dermatitis (CD) is inseparable from the history of the patch test, and the patch test is inseparable from the pioneer in the field, Josef Jadassohn (1860-1936). Despite the fact that we have been diagnosing, treating, and investigating the condition for more than 100 years, there are still many unsolved questions and controversies, which show no signs of coming to an end in the foreseeable future. This contribution reviews and highlights some of the disagreements and discrepancies associated with CD. For example: • What is the real sensitizer in balsam of Peru, one of the most common allergens, and what, if any, is the value of a low-balsam diet? • Is benzalkonium chloride, which has well-known and undisputed irritant properties, a contact allergen as well? • Is cocamidopropyl betaine (CABP) a common contact allergen and what is the actual sensitizer in CABP allergy the molecule itself, or impurities, or intermediaries in its synthesis? • How can the significant differences in the prevalence of sensitization of formaldehyde (FA, a common cause of contact allergy) between the United States (8%-9%) and Europe (2%-3%) be explained? • What is the relationship between formaldehyde releasers (FRs) allergy and an FA allergy? Should we recommend that FA-allergic patients also avoid FRs, and, if so, to what extent? • What is the true frequency of lanolin allergy? This issue remains enigmatic despite the expenditure of thousands of dollars and the innumerable hours spent investigating this subject. • What is the basis behind the so-called "lanolin paradox"? This label was coined in 1996 and is still a matter of controversy. • Is there such a thing as systemic CD from nickel, and, if so, to what extent? Is there a cross-reactivity or concomitant sensitization between nickel and cobalt?These are some of the controversial problems discussed. We have selected the ones that we consider to be of special interest and importance to the

  1. Protein Residue Contacts and Prediction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Badri

    2016-01-01

    In the field of computational structural proteomics, contact predictions have shown new prospects of solving the longstanding problem of ab initio protein structure prediction. In the last few years, application of deep learning algorithms and availability of large protein sequence databases, combined with improvement in methods that derive contacts from multiple sequence alignments, have shown a huge increase in the precision of contact prediction. In addition, these predicted contacts have also been used to build three-dimensional models from scratch. In this chapter, we briefly discuss many elements of protein residue–residue contacts and the methods available for prediction, focusing on a state-of-the-art contact prediction tool, DNcon. Illustrating with a case study, we describe how DNcon can be used to make ab initio contact predictions for a given protein sequence and discuss how the predicted contacts may be analyzed and evaluated. PMID:27115648

  2. Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates Ensuring Safe Use of Contact Lens Solution Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... back to top Dos and Don'ts for Contact Lens Wearers DO: Always wash your hands before ...

  3. Protein Residue Contacts and Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Badri; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of computational structural proteomics, contact predictions have shown new prospects of solving the longstanding problem of ab initio protein structure prediction. In the last few years, application of deep learning algorithms and availability of large protein sequence databases, combined with improvement in methods that derive contacts from multiple sequence alignments, have shown a huge increase in the precision of contact prediction. In addition, these predicted contacts have also been used to build three-dimensional models from scratch.In this chapter, we briefly discuss many elements of protein residue-residue contacts and the methods available for prediction, focusing on a state-of-the-art contact prediction tool, DNcon. Illustrating with a case study, we describe how DNcon can be used to make ab initio contact predictions for a given protein sequence and discuss how the predicted contacts may be analyzed and evaluated. PMID:27115648

  4. Rolling-Contact Spalling In Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A. M.; Kulkarni, S. M.; Bhargava, B.; Hahn, G. T.; Rubin, C. A.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental and theoretical studies of effects of thermal and mechanical contact stresses and attendant plastic deformations responsible for rolling-contact spalling of the 440C-steel bearings in high-pressure-oxygen turbopump.

  5. Inferring Epidemic Contact Structure from Phylogenetic Trees

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Gabriel E.; Kouyos, Roger; Stadler, Tanja; von Wyl, Viktor; Yerly, Sabine; Böni, Jürg; Cellerai, Cristina; Klimkait, Thomas; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Contact structure is believed to have a large impact on epidemic spreading and consequently using networks to model such contact structure continues to gain interest in epidemiology. However, detailed knowledge of the exact contact structure underlying real epidemics is limited. Here we address the question whether the structure of the contact network leaves a detectable genetic fingerprint in the pathogen population. To this end we compare phylogenies generated by disease outbreaks in simulated populations with different types of contact networks. We find that the shape of these phylogenies strongly depends on contact structure. In particular, measures of tree imbalance allow us to quantify to what extent the contact structure underlying an epidemic deviates from a null model contact network and illustrate this in the case of random mixing. Using a phylogeny from the Swiss HIV epidemic, we show that this epidemic has a significantly more unbalanced tree than would be expected from random mixing. PMID:22412361

  6. On the ohmicity of Schottky contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E.; Konakova, R. V.

    2016-06-01

    An analysis is made of the conditions for ohmic contacts realization in the case of Schottky contacts. Based on the classical notions about the mechanisms of current flow, we consider the generalized model of Schottky contact that takes into account the thermionic current of majority charge carriers and recombination current of minority charge carriers in Schottky contacts with a dielectric gap. An analysis of the results given by that model made it possible to obtain ohmicity criteria for Schottky contacts and compare the conditions for low injection level and ohmicity of Schottky contacts in the case of silicon-based contacts. It is shown that conditions for Schottky contact ohmicity do not coincide with those for p-n junctions.

  7. Clean Cities Program Contacts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides contact information for program staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program, as well as contact information for the nearly 100 local Clean Cities coalitions across the country.

  8. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Contact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Kundan; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Frank, Juhan; Marcello, Dominic; Motl, Patrick M.; Staff, Jan E.

    2015-01-01

    The motivation for our project is the peculiar case of the 'red nova" V1309 Sco which erupted in September 2008. The progenitor was, in fact, a contact binary system. We are developing a simulation of contact binaries, so that their formation, structural, and merger properties could be studied using hydrodynamics codes. The observed transient event was the disruption of the secondary star by the primary, and their subsequent merger into one star; hence to replicate this behavior, we need a core-envelope structure for both the stars. We achieve this using a combination of Self Consistant Field (SCF) technique and composite polytropes, also known as bipolytropes. So far we have been able to generate close binaries with various mass ratios. Another consequence of using bipolytropes is that according to theoretical calculations, the radius of a star should expand when the core mass fraction exceeds a critical value, resulting in interesting consequences in a binary system. We present some initial results of these simulations.

  9. [Contact allergies in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Mahler, V

    2015-09-01

    The percentage of seniors (> 65 years of age) in the general population continues to rise. Their sensitization profile may be influenced by lifelong work-related and nonwork-related exposures and comorbidities requiring local or systemic treatment. Recent analysis of the IVDK (Information Network of Departments of Dermatology) cohort concerning the most frequently recognized contact allergens in the age group above 65 (2009-2013: N = 14,841) revealed significant differences compared to the age group up to 65 years of age. The top 10 contact allergens recognized in individuals older than 65 years were the following: fragrance mix, Myroxylon pereirae (Balsam of Peru), nickel (II) sulfate, fragrance mix II, colophony, propolis, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone (MCI/MI), lanolin alcohol, Amerchol L 101, tert-butylhydroquinone. Sensitization to nickel was significantly less frequent, while sensitizations to fragrance mix and Balsam of Peru were significantly more frequent than in the age group up to 65 years of age. The percentage of patients with leg dermatitis was 25.9 % in the age group above 65 (versus 5.8 % in the age group up to 65 years of age). The analysis of the subgroup over 65 years of age with and without ulcer/stasis dermatitis/chronic venous insufficiency displayed remarkable differences in sensitization frequencies against ingredients of topical ointments (lanolin alcohol, Amerchol L 101, and tert-butylhydroquinone). If these comorbidities exist, patch testing of the topical ointment series parallel to the standard series is worthwhile. PMID:26285897

  10. Lubricant Rheology in Concentrated Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.

    1984-01-01

    Lubricant behavior in highly stressed situtations shows that a Newtonian model for lubricant rheology is insufficient for explanation of traction behavior. The oil film build up is predicted by using a Newtonian lubricant model except at high slide to roll ratios and at very high loads, where the nonNewtonian behavior starts to be important already outside the Hertzian contact area. Static and dynamic experiments are reported. In static experiments the pressure is applied to the lubricant more than a million times longer than in an EHD contact. Depending on the pressure-temperature history of the experiment the lubricant will become a crystallized or amorphous solid at high pressures. In dynamic experiments, the oil is in an amorphous solid state. Depending on the viscosity, time scale, elasticity of the oil and the bearing surfaces, the oil film pressure, shear strain rate and the type of lubricant, different properties of the oil are important for prediction of shear stresses in the oil. The different proposed models for the lubricant, which describe it to a Newtonian liquid, an elastic liquid, a plastic liquid and an elastic-plastic solid.

  11. Rolling Contact Fatigue of Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Wang, W.; Wang, Y.; Hadfield, M.; Kanematsu, W.; Kirkland, Timothy Philip; Jadaan, Osama M.

    2006-09-01

    High hardness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high temperature capability are properties also suited to rolling element materials. Silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) has been found to have a good combination of properties suitable for these applications. However, much is still not known about rolling contact fatigue (RCF) behavior, which is fundamental information to assess the lifetime of the material. Additionally, there are several test techniques that are employed internationally whose measured RCF performances are often irreconcilable. Due to the lack of such information, some concern for the reliability of ceramic bearings still remains. This report surveys a variety of topics pertaining to RCF. Surface defects (cracks) in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and their propagation during RCF are discussed. Five methods to measure RCF are then briefly overviewed. Spalling, delamination, and rolling contact wear are discussed. Lastly, methods to destructively (e.g., C-sphere flexure strength testing) and non-destructively identify potential RCF-limiting flaws in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls are described.

  12. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  13. Contact dermatitis from a prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Carla A; Gaspari, Anthony; Goldner, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Patients wearing a prosthesis face a wide variety of medical problems. Skin complications have long been recognized, but their prevalence is still unknown. The most frequently reported disorders are allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), acroangiodermatitis, epidermoid cysts, epidermal hyperplasia, follicular hyperkeratosis, verrucous hyperplasia, bullous diseases, hyperhidrosis, infections, malignancies, and ulcerations. Contact dermatitis represents one-third of the dermatoses in amputees wearing prostheses. All patients who are suspected of having ACD should be patch tested with standard allergen series as well as materials from the patient's own prosthesis, topical medicaments, moisturizers, and cosmetics. We report a patient with an ACD to mixed dialkyl thiourea present in the rubber parts of his below-the-knee prosthesis. Thiourea derivates are used as accelerators in the manufacture of chloroprene rubber and as fixatives in photography and photocopy paper. Allergy to thiourea is relatively uncommon; different studies have shown a prevalence of 0.7% up to 2.4% in patch-tested patients. Thiourea derivates are often the allergic sources in ACD involving high-grade rubber products made of neoprene such as diving suits, protective goggles, knee braces, and continuous positive airway pressure masks. They are also present in the rubber material of prostheses, as in the case of our patient. PMID:18413115

  14. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, M.; Popov, V. L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-11-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed.

  15. Microscale hydrodynamics near moving contact lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garoff, Stephen; Chen, Q.; Rame, Enrique; Willson, K. R.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrodynamics governing the fluid motions on a microscopic scale near moving contact lines are different from those governing motion far from the contact line. We explore these unique hydrodynamics by detailed measurement of the shape of a fluid meniscus very close to a moving contact line. The validity of present models of the hydrodynamics near moving contact lines as well as the dynamic wetting characteristics of a family of polymer liquids are discussed.

  16. Substantially oxygen-free contact tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, James F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for arc welding is provided in which a continuously-fed electrode wire is in electrical contact with a contact tube. The contact tube is improved by using a substantially oxygen-free conductive alloy in order to reduce the amount of electrical erosion.

  17. AIDS, Contact Notification, and Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dejowski, Edmund F.

    The concept of contact tracing and notification once used for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is being mentioned for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Some professional organizations have supported contact notification; others have opposed it. Initially, states were free to establish their own contact notification programs. More…

  18. Substantially Oxygen-Free Contact Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, James F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A device for arc welding is provided in which a continuously-fed electrode wire is in electrical contact with a contact tube. The contact tube is improved by using a substantially oxygen-free conductive alloy in order to reduce the amount of electrical erosion.

  19. Techniques for Solution- Assisted Optical Contacting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVine, Glenn; Ware, Brent; Wuchenich, Danielle M.; Spero, Robert E.; Klipstein, William M.; McKenzie, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a solution-assisted contacting technique for optical contacting. An optic of surface flatness Lambda/20 was successfully contacted with one of moderate surface quality, or Lambda/4. Optics used were both ultra-low expansion (ULE) glass (Lambda/4 and Lambda/20) and fused silica (Lambda/20). A stainless steel template of the intended interferometer layout was designed and constructed with three contact points per optic. The contact points were all on a common side of the template. The entire contacting jig was tilted at about 30 . Thus, when the isopropanol was applied, each optic slid due to gravity, resting on the contact points. All of the contacting was performed in a relatively dusty laboratory. A number of successful contacts were achieved where up to two or three visible pieces of dust could be seen. These were clearly visible due to refraction patterns between the optic and bench. On a number of optics, the final step of dropping isopropyl between the surfaces was repeated until a successful contact was achieved. The new procedures realized in this work represent a simplification for optical contacting in the laboratory. They will both save time and money spent during the contacting process, and research and development phases. The techniques outlined are suitable for laboratory experiments, research, and initial development stages.

  20. 7 CFR 1737.10 - Initial contact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Initial contact. 1737.10 Section 1737.10 Agriculture... Preapplication Stage § 1737.10 Initial contact. Initial loan applicants seeking assistance should write the Rural.... Existing borrowers initiate the contact directly with their assigned field representative....

  1. Sinterless Formation Of Contacts On Indium Phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1995-01-01

    Improved technique makes it possible to form low-resistivity {nearly equal to 10(Sup-6) ohm cm(Sup2)} electrical contacts on indium phosphide semiconductor devices without damaging devices. Layer of AgP2 40 Angstrom thick deposited on InP before depositing metal contact. AgP2 interlayer sharply reduces contact resistance, without need for sintering.

  2. Spectral flow dissipation in superconducting point contacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, N. B.; Vinokur, V. M.; Materials Science Division; Helsinki Univ. of Technology; L. D. Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2003-03-15

    We find that multiple Andreev reflections mediating the transport in superconducting point contacts are strongly affected by a small amount of impurities in the area of the contact. We also argue that the model based on Zener transitions within independent conducting channels is not suitable for kinetic processes in multichannel contacts.

  3. A record system for contact tracing.

    PubMed Central

    Satin, A

    1977-01-01

    A system for recording information on patients and contacts was developed during a research project designed to measure the effectiveness of contact tracing. The record system has proved valuable in contact tracing, cross-referencing patients and their contacts, defining the characteristics of the patient and contact populations, and providing information for research and management. The value of a standardised system has been accepted by health workers who appreciate that its purpose is to increase efficiency and improve the care of infected persons. By October 1976 health workers in 16 clinics in the United Kingdom had started to use the system. PMID:576849

  4. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-12-08

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  5. Contact kinematics of biomimetic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Ranajay; Ebrahimi, Hamid; Vaziri, Ashkan

    2014-12-01

    Dermal scales, prevalent across biological groups, considerably boost survival by providing multifunctional advantages. Here, we investigate the nonlinear mechanical effects of biomimetic scale like attachments on the behavior of an elastic substrate brought about by the contact interaction of scales in pure bending using qualitative experiments, analytical models, and detailed finite element (FE) analysis. Our results reveal the existence of three distinct kinematic phases of operation spanning linear, nonlinear, and rigid behavior driven by kinematic interactions of scales. The response of the modified elastic beam strongly depends on the size and spatial overlap of rigid scales. The nonlinearity is perceptible even in relatively small strain regime and without invoking material level complexities of either the scales or the substrate.

  6. Contact lenses, migraine, and allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Timucin, Ozgur Bulent; Karadag, Mehmet Fatih; Mehmet, Baykara

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials and electrophysiologic studies demonstrated increased perceptual sensitivity in patients suffering from migraines. At least, one triggering factor is described in 85% of migraine patients. The aim of this report was to investigate the relationship between contact lens (CL) usage and migraine attacks in two cases. Two patients who were diagnosed with migraine reported that the frequency of migraine attacks increased after they switched to using CL with different base curves (BCs). These two patients, who began using CL with different BCs experienced discomfort and dryness of the eye. The ocular complaints were followed by migraine attacks. CL intolerance was also developed during migraine attack in one of the cases. The frequency of migraine attacks decreased and allodynia relieved significantly when flatter BCs were selected. CL related stimulus could have triggered the migraine attack. CLs should be well fitted in migraine patients with allodynia. PMID:27433037

  7. Contact dermatitis in Alstroemeria workers.

    PubMed

    van der Mei, I A; de Boer, E M; Bruynzeel, D P

    1998-09-01

    Hand dermatitis is common in workers in the horticultural industry. This study determined the prevalence of hand dermatitis in workers of Alstroemeria cultivation, investigated how many workers had been sensitized by tulipalin A (the allergen in Alstroemeria) and took stock of a wide range of determinants of hand dermatitis. The 12-month period prevalence of major hand dermatitis amounted to 29.5% whereas 7.4% had minor dermatitis. Of these workers, 52.1% were sensitized for tulipalin A. Several personal and work-related determinants played a role in the multifactorial aetiology of hand dermatitis. Factors which showed a significant relationship with major hand dermatitis were: female sex, atopic dermatitis, chapped hands and the frequency of washing hands. It may be concluded that the Alstroemeria workers are a population at risk of developing contact dermatitis and it might be useful to carry out an educational campaign to lower the high prevalence. PMID:10024736

  8. Contact process with temporal disorder.

    PubMed

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of time-varying environmental noise, i.e., temporal disorder, on the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process. Combining a real-time renormalization group, scaling theory, and large scale Monte-Carlo simulations in one and two dimensions, we show that the temporal disorder gives rise to an exotic critical point. At criticality, the effective noise amplitude diverges with increasing time scale, and the probability distribution of the density becomes infinitely broad, even on a logarithmic scale. Moreover, the average density and survival probability decay only logarithmically with time. This infinite-noise critical behavior can be understood as the temporal counterpart of infinite-randomness critical behavior in spatially disordered systems, but with exchanged roles of space and time. We also analyze the generality of our results, and we discuss potential experiments. PMID:27627250

  9. Making eye contact without awareness.

    PubMed

    Rothkirch, Marcus; Madipakkam, Apoorva Rajiv; Rehn, Erik; Sterzer, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    Direct gaze is a potent non-verbal signal that establishes a communicative connection between two individuals, setting the course for further interactions. Although consciously perceived faces with direct gaze have been shown to capture attention, it is unknown whether an attentional preference for these socially meaningful stimuli exists even in the absence of awareness. In two experiments, we recorded participants' eye movements while they were exposed to faces with direct and averted gaze rendered invisible by interocular suppression. Participants' inability to correctly guess the occurrence of the faces in a manual forced-choice task demonstrated complete unawareness of the faces. However, eye movements were preferentially directed towards faces with direct compared to averted gaze, indicating a specific sensitivity to others' gaze directions even without awareness. This oculomotor preference suggests that a rapid and automatic establishment of mutual eye contact constitutes a biological advantage, which could be mediated by fast subcortical pathways in the human brain. PMID:26133642

  10. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  11. Screening for corticosteroid contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Boffa, M J; Wilkinson, S M; Beck, M H

    1995-09-01

    To evaluate which corticosteroids are most useful for the detection of corticosteroid contact allergy in our population, 2123 patients were patch tested with a series of 6 corticosteroids, in parallel with a standard series, and other relevant investigations. 127 patients (5.98%) were allergic to one or more corticosteroids; 96 to tixocortol pivalate, 51 to hydrocortisone butyrate, 47 to budesonide, 11 to betamethasone valerate, 11 to clobetasone butyrate and 8 to clobetasol propionate. 511 patients with negative patch tests to the limited corticosteroid series were in addition tested to a further 12 corticosteroids; only 1 of these patients reacted to a corticosteroid. A combination of tixocortol pivalate and budesonide thus detected 91.3% of corticosteroid-allergic subjects. We believe that both these allergens should be included in the standard series and that there may be a case for extending this further. PMID:8565453

  12. Contact process with temporal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barghathi, Hatem; Vojta, Thomas; Hoyos, José A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of time-varying environmental noise, i.e., temporal disorder, on the nonequilibrium phase transition of the contact process. Combining a real-time renormalization group, scaling theory, and large scale Monte-Carlo simulations in one and two dimensions, we show that the temporal disorder gives rise to an exotic critical point. At criticality, the effective noise amplitude diverges with increasing time scale, and the probability distribution of the density becomes infinitely broad, even on a logarithmic scale. Moreover, the average density and survival probability decay only logarithmically with time. This infinite-noise critical behavior can be understood as the temporal counterpart of infinite-randomness critical behavior in spatially disordered systems, but with exchanged roles of space and time. We also analyze the generality of our results, and we discuss potential experiments.

  13. Fingertip contact influences human postural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeka, J. J.; Lackner, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Touch and pressure stimulation of the body surface can strongly influence apparent body orientation, as well as the maintenance of upright posture during quiet stance. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between postural sway and contact forces at the fingertip while subjects touched a rigid metal bar. Subjects were tested in the tandem Romberg stance with eyes open or closed under three conditions of fingertip contact: no contact, touch contact (< 0.98 N of force), and force contact (as much force as desired). Touch contact was as effective as force contact or sight of the surroundings in reducing postural sway when compared to the no contact, eyes closed condition. Body sway and fingertip forces were essentially in phase with force contact, suggesting that fingertip contact forces are physically counteracting body sway. Time delays between body sway and fingertip forces were much larger with light touch contact, suggesting that the fingertip is providing information that allows anticipatory innervation of musculature to reduce body sway. The results are related to observations on precision grip as well as the somatosensory, proprioceptive, and motor mechanisms involved in the reduction of body sway.

  14. Salt deposition at particle contact points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xiaodong; Evitts, Richard W.; Besant, Robert W.; Kennell, Glyn F.

    2015-09-01

    Caking may occur when granular potash fertilizer with a moisture content greater than 0.25 % (w/w) undergoes drying. Since cake strength is proportional to the mass of crystal deposited per unit volume near contact points (and other factors) the modelling of mass deposition near contact points is important. The Young-Laplace equation for the air-salt-solution interface is used to determine the geometry of a 2-D planar saline film between two cubic potash particles. A 2-D theoretical model is developed and applied for ion diffusion and deposition near the contact point during drying. The numerical predictions of ion diffusion in an initially saturated salt illustrate the transient spatial distribution of new KCl deposits along the solid surfaces near the contact line. These results indicate the average salt deposition commences at the air-liquid-solid intersection, where the liquid film is thinnest, and moves toward the particle contact point with increasing area averaged KCl deposits, causing the formation of crystal deposits and bridges near contact points. It is concluded that the average salt deposit height increases inversely with distance from the contact point and decreases with initial contact angle of the contact region, but the deposition is nearly independent of the evaporation or drying rate near each contact region. Caking strength depends on, among other parameters, the amount of salt deposition near contact points.

  15. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) Contact Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the CBIRD detector is enhanced by using new device contacting methods that have been developed. The detector structure features a narrow gap adsorber sandwiched between a pair of complementary, unipolar barriers that are, in turn, surrounded by contact layers. In this innovation, the contact adjacent to the hole barrier is doped n-type, while the contact adjacent to the electron barrier is doped p-type. The contact layers can have wider bandgaps than the adsorber layer, so long as good electrical contacts are made to them. If good electrical contacts are made to either (or both) of the barriers, then one could contact the barrier(s) directly, obviating the need for additional contact layers. Both the left and right contacts can be doped either n-type or ptype. Having an n-type contact layer next to the electron barrier creates a second p-n junction (the first being the one between the hole barrier and the adsorber) over which applied bias could drop. This reduces the voltage drop over the adsorber, thereby reducing dark current generation in the adsorber region.

  16. Towards an optimal contact metal for CNTFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediai, Artem; Ryndyk, Dmitry A.; Seifert, Gotthard; Mothes, Sven; Claus, Martin; Schröter, Michael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-05-01

    Downscaling of the contact length Lc of a side-contacted carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) is challenging because of the rapidly increasing contact resistance as Lc falls below 20-50 nm. If in agreement with existing experimental results, theoretical work might answer the question, which metals yield the lowest CNT-metal contact resistance and what physical mechanisms govern the geometry dependence of the contact resistance. However, at the scale of 10 nm, parameter-free models of electron transport become computationally prohibitively expensive. In our work we used a dedicated combination of the Green function formalism and density functional theory to perform an overall ab initio simulation of extended CNT-metal contacts of an arbitrary length (including infinite), a previously not achievable level of simulations. We provide a systematic and comprehensive discussion of metal-CNT contact properties as a function of the metal type and the contact length. We have found and been able to explain very uncommon relations between chemical, physical and electrical properties observed in CNT-metal contacts. The calculated electrical characteristics are in reasonable quantitative agreement and exhibit similar trends as the latest experimental data in terms of: (i) contact resistance for Lc = ∞, (ii) scaling of contact resistance Rc(Lc); (iii) metal-defined polarity of a CNTFET. Our results can guide technology development and contact material selection for downscaling the length of side-contacts below 10 nm.Downscaling of the contact length Lc of a side-contacted carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) is challenging because of the rapidly increasing contact resistance as Lc falls below 20-50 nm. If in agreement with existing experimental results, theoretical work might answer the question, which metals yield the lowest CNT-metal contact resistance and what physical mechanisms govern the geometry dependence of the contact resistance. However, at

  17. Contact lens sensors in ocular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Farandos, Nicholas M; Yetisen, Ali K; Monteiro, Michael J; Lowe, Christopher R; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-04-22

    Contact lenses as a minimally invasive platform for diagnostics and drug delivery have emerged in recent years. Contact lens sensors have been developed for analyzing the glucose composition of tears as a surrogate for blood glucose monitoring and for the diagnosis of glaucoma by measuring intraocular pressure. However, the eye offers a wider diagnostic potential as a sensing site and therefore contact lens sensors have the potential to improve the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases and conditions. With advances in polymer synthesis, electronics and micro/nanofabrication, contact lens sensors can be produced to quantify the concentrations of many biomolecules in ocular fluids. Non- or minimally invasive contact lens sensors can be used directly in a clinical or point-of-care setting to monitor a disease state continuously. This article reviews the state-of-the-art in contact lens sensor fabrication, their detection, wireless powering, and readout mechanisms, and integration with mobile devices and smartphones. High-volume manufacturing considerations of contact lenses are also covered and a case study of an intraocular pressure contact lens sensor is provided as an example of a successful product. This Review further analyzes the contact lens market and the FDA regulatory requirements for commercialization of contact lens sensors. PMID:25400274

  18. Tear analysis in contact lens wearers.

    PubMed Central

    Farris, R L

    1985-01-01

    Tear analysis in contact lens wearers was compared with tear analysis in aphakics without contact lens wear and normal phakic patients. Subjects were divided into five groups: group 1, aphakic without contact lens; group 2, phakic with daily-wear hard contact lens; group 3, phakic with daily-wear soft contact lens; group 4, phakic with extended-wear soft contact lens; and group 5, aphakic with extended-wear soft contact lens. The experimental groups were compared with age- and sex-matched control groups for statistical analysis of tear variables by means of the Student's t-test. The variables measured were tear osmolarity, tear albumin, and lysozyme and lactoferrin concentrations in basal and reflex tears. Highly significant elevations of tear osmolarity were found in aphakic subjects without contact lenses. Less significant differences in tear osmolarity were found in phakic subjects with hard daily-wear lenses or with extended-wear soft lenses. Tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin in basal and reflex tears were not significantly different in the different groups of contact lens wearers or in the group of aphakic subjects without contact lenses compared with their control groups. Individual variations in tear albumin, lysozyme, and lactoferrin appeared to be responsible for the inability to demonstrate significant differences in tear composition in association with the wearing of different types of contact lenses. Older and aphakic patients demonstrated a tendency to have increased concentrations of proteins in the tears compared with younger, phakic contact lens wearers and normal controls without contact lenses. PMID:3914131

  19. SIPOS heterojunction contacts to silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwark, Y. H.; Swanson, R. M.

    1986-02-01

    Deliberate introduction of controlled amounts of an oxygen-bearing species such as nitrous oxide into the deposition ambient normally used for chemical vapor deposition of polysilicon produces SIPOS, a class of silicon oxides that exhibits a wide range of physical properties is discussed. It is possible to tailor SIPOS film characteristics such as refractive index by altering the oxygen partial pressure in the deposition ambient. The addition of a dopant species converts these films from semi-insulating to a form that can be made sufficiently conductive after annealing to make them interesting for electronic applications. The potential for conveniently altering the effective mobility gap in this material suggests its use in heterojunction contact structures to silicon. Incorporation of these films into the emitter structure of an NPN bipolar transistor has been found to reduce the emitter saturation current fifty fold. This suppression of reverse injected hole transport has often been assumed to be the result of a wider gap in the SIPOS due to the presence of incorporated oxygen. However, this seems to be an oversimplification in view of microstructural studies that revealed a multi-phase structure consisting of a fine dispersion of silicon microcrystals embedded in an oxide-like matrix.

  20. Occupational contact dermatitis from propacetamol.

    PubMed

    Szczurko, C; Dompmartin, A; Michel, M; Castel, B; Leroy, D

    1996-11-01

    We report 4 cases of contact sensitization to propacetamol. They presented with lesions on the hands, forearms, crease of the elbows, and neck. They were all sensitized to multiple allergens and 2 of them were atopic. Patch tests to Pro-Dafalgan and propacetamol were positive; sodium citrate and paracetamol were negative. Our cases were similar to those published for the first time by Barbaud in 1995. The only allergen was propacetamol; patch tests with diethyglycine and paracetamol were negative. Propacetamol chlorhydrate is composed of a complex paracetamol-diethylglycine, which probably acts like a hapten capable of inducing cutaneous allergy. It is an occupational allergy affecting nurses who work in surgery departments or post-anesthesia recovery rooms, where high doses of analgesics are widely used. The patients were not allergic to oral paracetamol. Despite the usual precautions, the mixture of propacetamol chlorhydrate and solvent leaks onto the nurses' hands, suggesting that health care workers handling propacetamol chlorhydrate should wear gloves. PMID:9007376

  1. Technology Transfer: A Contact Sport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paynter, Nina P.

    1995-01-01

    Technology transfer is a dynamic process, involving dynamic people as the bridge between NASA Langley Research Center and the outside world. This bridge, for nonaerospace applications, is known as the Technology Applications Group. The introduction of new innovations and expertise where they are needed occurs through a 'push' and 'pull' process. A 'push' occurs when a new technology is first developed with high commercial potential and then a company is found to licence or further develop the technology. The 'pull' process occurs through problem statements. A company or group will submit a written statement of what they need and the shortcomings of commercially available technology. The Technology Transfer Team (T3) reviews these problem statements and decides where NASA LaRC can offer assistance. A researcher or group of researchers are then identified who can help solve the problem and they are put in contact with the company. Depending upon the situation in either method, a Space Act Agreement (SAA), or outline of the responsibilities for each party, is developed.

  2. Advancing contact angles on large structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Yumiko; Itakura, Yoshinori; Gobo, Junichi; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    To understand wetting phenomena on complex surfaces, simple modeling experiments in two-dimension system would be one of the most efficient approaches. We develop a new experimental method for wetting dynamics using a large pseudo two- dimensional droplet. This method is useful to examine theoretical studies developed in two dimensional systems. In this study, we examine a pinning and depinning phenomena on millimeter-size structured surface to explain the origin of contact angle hysteresis. Contact lines of the droplet are pinned and deppined at the edge of surface texture. The contact lines can move when the contact angle is equal to the Young's contact angle which are determined by the balance of the surface and interfacial tension immediate vicinity of the contact lines, which is different from the Wenzel's low. Our approach enables to realize a macroscopic modelling experiment of wetting on complex surfaces, which opens a path to design functional surfaces with chemical and physical structure.

  3. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by dorzolamide eyedrops.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2015-01-01

    The side effects of topical dorzolamide hydrochloride, such as conjunctivitis, eyelid edema, and eye lid irritation, are well known. However, allergic contact dermatitis due to dorzolamide is rare, although the product has been commonly used worldwide in patients with glaucoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of allergic contact dermatitis caused by topical dorzolamide hydrochloride in Korea. Herein we report a case of allergic contact dermatitis due to topical dorzolamide eyedrops. PMID:25897195

  4. Driven drops with contact line damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Chang, Chun-Ti; Steen, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A water droplet placed on a hydrophobic plate is driven by plate-normal oscillations. Resulting droplet motions are largely inviscid, having Reynolds number >100 (Ohnesorge 0.002). We are interested in isolating the effective damping, sometimes called Davis dissipation, owing to a moving contact line that is not completely mobile. In this talk, we report energy budgets as influenced by contact angle - contact line speed relationships for variously prepared surfaces.

  5. Process design for Al backside contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chalfoun, L.L.; Kimerling, L.C.

    1995-08-01

    It is known that properly alloyed aluminum backside contacts can improve silicon solar cell efficiency. To use this knowledge to fullest advantage, we have studied the gettering process that occurs during contact formation and the microstructure of the contact and backside junction region. With an understanding of the alloying step, optimized fabrication processes can be designed. To study gettering, single crystal silicon wafers were coated with aluminim on both sides and subjected to heat treatments. Results are described.

  6. Optical contacting for gravity probe star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. J.; Zissa, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A star-tracker telescope, constructed entirely of fused silica elements optically contacted together, has been proposed to provide submilliarc-second pointing accuracy for Gravity Probe. A bibliography and discussion on optical contacting (the bonding of very flat, highly polished surfaces without the use of adhesives) are presented. Then results from preliminary experiments on the strength of optical contacts including a tensile strength test in liquid helium are discussed. Suggestions are made for further study to verify an optical contacting method for the Gravity Probe star-tracker telescope.

  7. Charge Redistribution and Transport in Molecular Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corso, Martina; Ondráček, Martin; Lotze, Christian; Hapala, Prokop; Franke, Katharina J.; Jelínek, Pavel; Pascual, J. Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    The forces between two single molecules brought into contact, and their connection with charge transport through the molecular junction, are studied here using non contact AFM, STM, and density functional theory simulations. A carbon monoxide molecule approaching an acetylene molecule (C2 H2 ) initially feels weak attractive electrostatic forces, partly arising from charge reorganization in the presence of molecular . We find that the molecular contact is chemically passive, and protects the electron tunneling barrier from collapsing, even in the limit of repulsive forces. However, we find subtle conductance and force variations at different contacting sites along the C2 H2 molecule attributed to a weak overlap of their respective frontier orbitals.

  8. Electrical contacts to individual SWCNTs: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hierold, Christofer; Haluska, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Summary Owing to their superior electrical characteristics, nanometer dimensions and definable lengths, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are considered as one of the most promising materials for various types of nanodevices. Additionally, they can be used as either passive or active elements. To be integrated into circuitry or devices, they are typically connected with metal leads to provide electrical contacts. The properties and quality of these electrical contacts are important for the function and performance of SWCNT-based devices. Since carbon nanotubes are quasi-one-dimensional structures, contacts to them are different from those for bulk semiconductors. Additionally, some techniques used in Si-based technology are not compatible with SWCNT-based device fabrication, such as the contact area cleaning technique. In this review, an overview of the investigations of metal–SWCNT contacts is presented, including the principle of charge carrier injection through the metal–SWCNT contacts and experimental achievements. The methods for characterizing the electrical contacts are discussed as well. The parameters which influence the contact properties are summarized, mainly focusing on the contact geometry, metal type and the cleanliness of the SWCNT surface affected by the fabrication processes. Moreover, the challenges for widespread application of CNFETs are additionally discussed. PMID:25551048

  9. BISON Contact Improvements CASL FY14 Report

    SciTech Connect

    B. W. Spencer; J. D. Hales; D. R. Gaston; D. A. Karpeev; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; D. M. Perez; R. J. Gardner; K. A. Gamble

    2014-09-01

    The BISON code is the foundation for multiple fuel performance modeling efforts, and is cur- rently under heavy development. For a variety of fuel forms, the effects of heat conduction across a gap and mechanical contact between components of a fuel system are very significant. It is thus critical that BISON have robust capabilities for enforcement of thermal and mechanical contact. BISON’s solver robustness has generally been quite good before mechanical contact between the fuel and cladding occurs, but there have been significant challenges obtaining converged so- lutions once that contact occurs and the solver begins to enforce mechanical contact constraints. During the current year, significant development effort has been focused on the enforcement of mechanical contact to provide improved solution robustness. In addition to this work to improve mechanical contact robustness, an investigation into ques- tionable results attributable to thermal contact has been performed. This investigation found that the order of integration typically used on the surfaces involved in thermal contact was not suffi- ciently high. To address this problem, a new option was provided to permit the use of a different integration order for surfaces, and new usage recommendations were provided.

  10. Mathematical model of electrical contact bouncing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Stanislav

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical model of a contact bouncing takes into account elastic-plastic and electrodynamic forces, phase transformations during interaction of electrical arc with the contact surface as a result of increasing temperature. It is based on the integro-differential equations for the contact motion and Stefan problem for the temperature field. These equations describe four consecutive stages of the contact vibration from the impact at contact closing up to opening after bouncing including effects of penetration and restitution. The new method for the solution of the Stefan problem is elaborated, which enables us to get the information about dynamics of zones of elasticity, plasticity and phase transformations during contact vibration. It is shown that the decrement of damping depends on the coefficient of plasticity and the moment of inertia only, while the frequency of vibration depends also on the hardness of contact, its temperature, properties of contact spring, and geometry of rotational mechanism. It is found also from the solution of Stefan problem that the relationship between dynamical zones of plasticity and melting explains the decrease of current density and contact welding. The results of calculations are compared with the experimental data.

  11. Star product and contact Weyl manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Contact algebra is introduced, which is a Lie algebra given as a one-dimesional exrention of a Weyl algebra. A contact Lie algebra bundle called a contact Weyl manifold is considered over a symplectic manifold which contains a Weyl manifold as a subbundle. A relationship is discussed between deformation quantization on s symplectic manifold and a Weyl manifold over the symplectic manifold. The contact Weyl manifold has a canonical connection which gives rise the relation, and is regarded as an extension of Fedosov connection.

  12. What To Know If Your Child Wants Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... For More Information Decorative Contact Lenses Contact Lenses Hydrogen Peroxide Solution Consumer Updates Focusing on Contact Lens ... Prescription Is A Must Contact Lens Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide: To Avoid Injury, Follow All Instructions Five ...

  13. Metal contact reliability of RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qing; Tran, Quan; Chou, Tsung-Kuan A.; Heck, John; Bar, Hanan; Kant, Rishi; Rao, Valluri

    2007-01-01

    It is well-recognized that MEMS switches, compared to their more traditional solid state counterparts, have several important advantages for wireless communications. These include superior linearity, low insertion loss and high isolation. Indeed, many potential applications have been investigated such as Tx/Rx antenna switching, frequency band selection, tunable matching networks for PA and antenna, tunable filters, and antenna reconfiguration. However, none of these applications have been materialized in high volume products to a large extent because of reliability concerns, particularly those related to the metal contacts. The subject of the metal contact in a switch was studied extensively in the history of developing miniaturized switches, such as the reed switches for telecommunication applications. While such studies are highly relevant, they do not address the issues encountered in the sub 100μN, low contact force regime in which most MEMS switches operate. At such low forces, the contact resistance is extremely sensitive to even a trace amount of contamination on the contact surfaces. Significant work was done to develop wafer cleaning processes and storage techniques for maintaining the cleanliness. To preserve contact cleanliness over the switch service lifetime, several hermetic packaging technologies were developed and their effectiveness in protecting the contacts from contamination was examined. The contact reliability is also very much influenced by the contact metal selection. When pure Au, a relatively soft metal, was used as the contact material, significant stiction problems occurred when clean switches were cycled in an N II environment. In addition, various mechanical damages occurred after extended switching cycling tests. Harder metals, while more resistant to deformation and stiction, are more sensitive to chemical reactions, particularly oxidation. They also lead to higher contact resistance because of their lower electrical conductivity

  14. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multi-body knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer’s CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously. PMID:15564115

  15. Evaluation of Contact Separation Force Testing as a Screening Methodology for Electrical Socket Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Chris; Greenwell, Chris; Brusse, jay; Krus, Dennis; Leidecker, Henning

    2009-01-01

    During system level testing intermittent and permanent open circuit failures of mated, crimp removable, electrical contact pairs were experienced. The root cause of the failures was determined to be low (but not zero) contact forces applied by the socket contact tines against the engaging pin. The low contact force reduces the effectiveness of the wiping action of the socket tines against the pin. The observed failure mode may be produced when insufficient wiping during mate, demate and small relative movement in use allows for the accumulation of debris or insulating films that electrically separate the contact pair. The investigation identified at least three manufacturing process control problems associated with the socket contacts that enabled shipment of contacts susceptible to developing low contact forces: (1) Improper heat treatment of the socket tines resulting in plastic rather than elastic behavior; (2) Overly thinned socket tines at their base resulting in reduced pin retention forces; (3) insufficient screening tests to identify parts susceptible to the aforementioned failure mechanisms. The results from an extensive screening program of socket contacts utilizing the industry standard contact separation force test procedures are described herein. The investigation shows this method to be capable of identifying initially weak sockets. However, sockets whose contact retention forces may degrade during use may not be screened out by pin retention testing alone. Further investigations are required to correlate low contact retention forces with increased electrical contact resistance in the presence of insulating films that may accumulate in the use environment.

  16. 5 CFR 2600.102 - Contact information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contact information. 2600.102 Section... AND FUNCTIONS OF THE OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS § 2600.102 Contact information. (a) Address. The.... OGE does not have any regional offices. (b) Web site. Information about OGE and its role in...

  17. [Allergic contact dermatitis caused by etofenamate].

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, A; Zick, C; Hausen, B M

    1988-06-15

    We report on 3 cases of contact dermatitis following topical application of etofenamat. Each patient developed positive reactions in patch tests with etofenamat in concentrations of both 10% and 1%. After testing, one patient showed secondary inflammatory reactions at the original site of application. Considering the frequent administration of etofenamat, contact sensitization seems to be relatively rare. PMID:2970161

  18. Screen printed interdigitated back contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Mazaris, G. A.; Chai, A. T. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Interdigitated back contact solar cells are made by screen printing dopant materials onto the back surface of a semiconductor substrate in a pair of interdigitated patterns. These dopant materials are then diffused into the substrate to form junctions having configurations corresponding to these patterns. Contacts having configurations which match the patterns are then applied over the junctions.

  19. Effects of insoles contact on static balance

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ju Yong; Ryu, Young Uk; Yi, Chae Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effect of the degree of the contact area between the insoles and soles on static balance. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male and female adults voluntarily participated. All of the subjects wore three different types of insoles (no orthotic insole, partial contact, full contact) in the present experiment. The subjects were instructed to place both feet parallel to each other and maintain static balance for 30 seconds. Center of pressure parameters (range, total distance, and mean velocity) were analyzed. [Results] The results show that the anteroposterior range and mediolateral (ML) total distance and velocity decreased when orthotic insoles with partial contact or full contact were used in comparison to when a flat insole (no orthotic insole) was used. Also, the ML range and total distance were lower with full contact than in the other two conditions. These results indicate that static balance improves as the degree of contact between the soles and insoles increases. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggests that using insoles with increased sole contact area would improve static balance ability. PMID:27190460

  20. 3-2-1 Contact Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Television Workshop, New York, NY.

    This guide to the television program 3-2-1 Contact covers 20 theme weeks. The program is designed to bring students into closer contact with the science and technology in their everyday lives. This guide includes: (1) a brief introduction to the contents of each week's shows; (2) a detailed discussion of each week's primary concepts as well as…