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Sample records for nanoparticle pet-ct imaging

  1. PET/CT imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Waheeda; Mawlawi, Osama

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the principles of PET/CT imaging and describe the artifacts associated with it. PET/CT is a new imaging modality that integrates functional (PET) and structural (CT) information into a single scanning session, allowing excellent fusion of the PET and CT images and thus improving lesion localization and interpretation accuracy. Moreover, the CT data can also be used for attenuation correction, ultimately leading to high patient throughput. These combined advantages have rendered PET/CT a preferred imaging modality over dedicated PET. Although PET/CT imaging offers many advantages, this dual-modality imaging also poses some challenges. CT-based attenuation correction can induce artifacts and quantitative errors that can affect the PET emission images. For instance, the use of contrast medium and the presence of metallic implants can be associated with focal radiotracer uptake. Furthermore, the patient's breathing can introduce mismatches between the CT attenuation map and the PET emission data, and the discrepancy between the CT and PET fields of view can lead to truncation artifacts. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to describe the principles of PET/CT imaging, identify at least 3 types of image artifacts, and describe the differences between PET/CT artifacts of different causes: metallic implants, respiratory motion, contrast medium, and truncation. PMID:16145223

  2. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  3. PET/CT imaging in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, A; Lopci, E; Conte, M; Foppiani, L; Garaventa, A; Cabria, M; Villavecchia, G; Fanti, S; Cistaro, A

    2013-03-01

    123Iodine-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy is currently the tracer of choice for neuroblastoma (NB). It has high diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value for the assessment of patients after chemotherapy. A positive 123I-MIBG scan is also used for the basis of targeted radionuclide therapy with 131I-MIBG. I-123 MIBG scan however has some limitations which should be taken into account. Moreover the reasons for false negative MIBG results have not been entirely elucidated. Meticulous correlation with radiological examinations and recognition of the normal distribution pattern of 123I-MIBG in children is vital to obtain optimal results. With its technical superiorities, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can be successfully introduced into the diagnostic workup of NB. Different PET tracers have been offered for imaging in patients with NB, and the efficacy of this modality has been compared with that of 123I-MIBG scan. Our review aims to analyze the present role of PET/CT imaging and radiopharmaceuticals in NB. PMID:23474633

  4. Pitfalls in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondogianni, Ph; Papathanasiou, N.; Giannopoulou, Ch

    2011-09-01

    PET with 2-[fluorine 18] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG), has been a clinical tool for the evaluation of various cancers providing valuable metabolic information clinically helpful in the diagnosis, initial staging, therapy monitoring and restaging. However, FDG is not specific for neoplastic processes. Unless anatomic correlation is available to delineate normal structures, pathologic sites of FDG accumulation can easily be confused with normal physiological uptake, leading to false-positive or false-negative findings. Coregistration of PET scans (functional and morphologic information) with computed tomographic (CT) scans (anatomic information) using a combined PET-CT scanner improves the overall sensitivity and specificity of information provided by PET or CT alone. In this paper, we discuss the probable causes of false negative images and pitfalls due to technical reasons, inflammatory processes or benign lesions as well as the utility of PET-CT in differentiating malignant from inflammatory and benign processes, since in some cases such differentiation cannot be made, with certainty, using FDG PET alone.

  5. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  6. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  7. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  8. Cardiovascular PET-CT imaging: a new frontier?

    PubMed

    Adamson, P D; Williams, M C; Newby, D E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) has recently emerged as an imaging technology with the potential to simultaneously describe both anatomical structures and physiological processes in vivo. The scope for clinical application of this technique is vast, but to date this promise has not been realised. Nonetheless, significant research activity is underway to explore these possibilities and it is likely that the knowledge gained will have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications in due course. This review provides a brief overview of the current state of cardiovascular PET-CT and the likely direction of future developments. PMID:26951964

  9. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gargiulo, Sara; Greco, Adelaide; Gramanzini, Matteo; Petretta, Maria Piera; Ferro, Adele; Larobina, Michele; Panico, Mariarosaria; Brunetti, Arturo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT), high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing. PMID:22505813

  10. PET/CT imaging in mouse models of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Sara; Greco, Adelaide; Gramanzini, Matteo; Petretta, Maria Piera; Ferro, Adele; Larobina, Michele; Panico, Mariarosaria; Brunetti, Arturo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT), high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing. PMID:22505813

  11. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kipritidis, John Keall, Paul J.; Siva, Shankar; Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: CT ventilation imaging is a novel functional lung imaging modality based on deformable image registration. The authors present the first validation study of CT ventilation using positron emission tomography with{sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles (PET-Galligas). The authors quantify this agreement for different CT ventilation metrics and PET reconstruction parameters. Methods: PET-Galligas ventilation scans were acquired for 12 lung cancer patients using a four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT scanner. CT ventilation images were then produced by applying B-spline deformable image registration between the respiratory correlated phases of the 4D-CT. The authors test four ventilation metrics, two existing and two modified. The two existing metrics model mechanical ventilation (alveolar air-flow) based on Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V{sub HU}) or Jacobian determinant of deformation (V{sub Jac}). The two modified metrics incorporate a voxel-wise tissue-density scaling (ρV{sub HU} and ρV{sub Jac}) and were hypothesized to better model the physiological ventilation. In order to assess the impact of PET image quality, comparisons were performed using both standard and respiratory-gated PET images with the former exhibiting better signal. Different median filtering kernels (σ{sub m} = 0 or 3 mm) were also applied to all images. As in previous studies, similarity metrics included the Spearman correlation coefficient r within the segmented lung volumes, and Dice coefficient d{sub 20} for the (0 − 20)th functional percentile volumes. Results: The best agreement between CT and PET ventilation was obtained comparing standard PET images to the density-scaled HU metric (ρV{sub HU}) with σ{sub m} = 3 mm. This leads to correlation values in the ranges 0.22 ⩽ r ⩽ 0.76 and 0.38 ⩽ d{sub 20} ⩽ 0.68, with r{sup ¯}=0.42±0.16 and d{sup ¯}{sub 20}=0.52±0.09 averaged over the 12 patients. Compared to Jacobian-based metrics, HU-based metrics lead to statistically significant

  12. Imaging of Scrub Typhus by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Liu, Shuai; Pan, Yu; Ju, Huijun; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-10-01

    A 19-year-old man had an unexplained fever, dizziness, headache, fatigue, and pain in the scrotum. An FDG PET/CT imaging was acquired to assess fever of unknown origin. The images showed multiple foci of increased FDG activity in the enlarged lymph nodes in the body. In addition, mildly increased activity in the enlarged spleen and lung bases was also noted. The patient was eventually diagnosed with scrub typhus based on positive results of the Weil-Felix agglutination test, eschar in the scrotum, and effective therapy. PMID:26252322

  13. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  14. PET and PET/CT imaging of skeletal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone scintigraphy augmented with radiographs or cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has remained the commonest method to diagnose and follow up skeletal metastases. However, bone scintigraphy is associated with relatively poor spatial resolution, limited diagnostic specificity and reduced sensitivity for bone marrow disease. It also shows limited diagnostic accuracy in assessing response to therapy in a clinically useful time period. With the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners there has been an increasing interest in using various PET tracers to evaluate skeletal disease including [18F]fluoride (NaF) as a bone-specific tracer and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [18F]choline as tumour-specific tracers. There is also early work exploring the receptor status of skeletal metastases with somatostatin receptor analogues. This review describes the potential utility of these tracers in the assessment of skeletal metastases. PMID:20663736

  15. Comparison of PET-CT and Conventional Imaging in Staging Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Sara M.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Billups, Catherine A.; Wu, Jianrong; Shulkin, Barry; Mandell, Gerald; McCarville, M. Beth

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare PET-CT to conventional imaging (CI) in staging pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Subjects and Methods Thirty subjects with RMS, median age 7.3 years, underwent PET-CT before therapy. PET-CTs and CI were independently reviewed by two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physician to determine the presence of nodal, pulmonary, bone, bone marrow and other sites of metastasis. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT for detecting metastases was compared to CI using biopsy and clinical follow-up as reference standards. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of primary tumors, lymph nodes and pulmonary nodules were measured. Results Primary tumors had an average SUVmax of 7.2 (range, 2.5-19.2). Accuracy rates for 17 subjects with nodal disease were 95% for PET-CT and 49% for CI. PET-CT had 94% sensitivity and 100% specificity for nodal disease. Of 7 pulmonary nodules detected by CI, 3 were not identified by PET-CT, 2 were indeterminate by PET-CT, and 1 was malignant with a SUVmax (3.4) > twice that of benign nodules. Two subjects had bone disease; both were identified by PET-CT but only 1 by CI. Four subjects had bone marrow disease, 2 had positive PET-CTs but none had positive CI. Two subjects had soft tissue metastases detected by PET-CT but not CI. Conclusion PET-CT performed better than CI in identifying nodal, bone, bone marrow, and soft tissue disease in children with RMS. CI remains essential for detection of pulmonary nodules. We recommend PET-CT for routine staging of children with RMS. CI with Tc99m bone scan can be eliminated. PMID:23255260

  16. Parametric dynamic F-18-FDG PET/CT breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, Alphonso; Feiglin, David; Lipson, Edward; Mandel, James; McGraw, Wendy; Lee, Wei; Krol, Andrzej

    2008-03-01

    This study was undertaken to estimate metabolic tissue properties from dynamic breast F-18-FDG PET/CT image series and to display them as 3D parametric images. Each temporal PET series was obtained immediately after injection of 10 mCi of F-18-FDG and consisted of fifty 1- minute frames. Each consecutive frame was nonrigidly registered to the first frame using a finite element method (FEM) based model and fiducial skin markers. Nonlinear curve fitting of activity vs. time based on a realistic two-compartment model was performed for each voxel of the volume. Curve fitting was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt algorithm (LMA) that minimized X2. We evaluated which parameters are most suitable to determine the spatial extent and malignancy in suspicious lesions. In addition, Patlak modeling was applied to the data. A mixture model was constructed and provided a classification system for the breast tissue. It produced unbiased estimation of the spatial extent of the lesions. We conclude that nonrigid registration followed by voxel-by-voxel based nonlinear fitting to a realistic two-compartment model yields better quality parametric images, as compared to unprocessed dynamic breast PET time series. By comparison with the mixture model, we established that the total cumulated activity and maximum activity parametric images provide the best delineation of suspicious breast tissue lesions and hyperactive subregions within the lesion that cannot be discerned in unprocessed images.

  17. Incidental Detection of Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sager, Sait; Vatankulu, Betül; Uslu, Lebriz; Sönmezoglu, Kerim

    2016-09-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type II transmembrane protein. It has been shown to be expressed in various solid malignant neoplasms. We report a case of a prostate cancer patient who underwent (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging. There is a large thyroid nodule in the right thyroid gland, which had intense PSMA accumulation. Follicular thyroid lesions can be seen on (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging. PMID:26966127

  18. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  19. FDG PET/CT Imaging of Prostate Carcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Chin, Bennett B

    2016-08-01

    We present a case of carcinosarcoma of the prostate. Workup of urinary retention after a previously treated squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate led to a transurethral prostate resection revealing carcinosarcoma of the prostate, which on F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated moderate to high avidity of this atypical prostate cancer, with partial obstruction of the urinary system and lung metastases. While FDG PET is not avid for typical prostatic adenocarcinomas, it should be considered for evaluation of atypical prostate cancers. PMID:27187727

  20. Automated Movement Correction for Dynamic PET/CT Images: Evaluation with Phantom and Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.; Nelson, Linda D.; Small, Gary W.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (P<0.05) in the FDDNP DVR and FDG Ki values in the parietal and temporal regions after MC. In conclusion, MC applied to dynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers. PMID:25111700

  1. Hybrid CAD scheme for lung nodule detection in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yoya; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo; Hayashi, Naoki; Tamai, Shinichi; Nishio, Masami; Chen, Wei-Ping; Kobayashi, Toshiki

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among male in the world. PET/CT is useful for the detection of early lung cancer since it is an imaging technique that has functional and anatomical information. However, radiologist has to examine using the large number of images. Therefore reduction of radiologist's load is strongly desired. In this study, hybrid CAD scheme has been proposed to detect lung nodule in PET/CT images. Proposed method detects the lung nodule from both CT and PET images. As for the detection in CT images, solitary nodules are detected using Cylindrical Filter that we developed. PET images are binarized based on standard uptake value (SUV); highly uptake regions are detected. FP reduction is performed using seven characteristic features and Support Vector Machine. Finally by integrating these results, candidate regions are obtained. In the experiment, we evaluated proposed method using 50 cases of PET/CT images obtained for the cancer-screening program. We evaluated true-positive fraction (TPF) and the number of false positives / case (FPs/case). As a result, TPFs for CT and PET were 0.67 and 0.38, respectively. By integrating the both results, TPF was improved to 0.80. These results indicate that our method may be useful for the lung cancer detection using PET/CT images.

  2. Present and future roles of FDG-PET/CT imaging in the management of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Doi, Hiroshi; Kanda, Tomonori; Yamane, Tomohiko; Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Kaida, Hayato; Tamaki, Yukihisa; Kuribayashi, Kozo

    2016-06-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) has emerged as a powerful tool for combined metabolic and anatomic evaluation in clinical oncologic imaging. This review discusses the utility of (18)F-FDG PET/CT as a tool for managing patients with lung cancer. We discuss different patient management stages, including diagnosis, initial staging, therapy planning, early treatment response assessment, re-staging, and prognosis. PMID:27121156

  3. Extraosseous Osteosarcoma of the Liver Demonstrated on 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Luan, Lijuan; Yun, Hong; Hou, Yingyong; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-08-01

    A 66-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain for 1 month. Ultrasonography displayed multiple hepatic masses that were thought as metastases. FDG PET/CT was performed to assess the nature of these masses and to search primary malignancy. The images showed elevated FDG activity in the partially calcified hypodense lesions in the liver without abnormality elsewhere. The lesions were subsequently confirmed as primary extraosseous osteosarcoma in the liver. The patient received liver transplantation. Six months later, her CA-125 was significantly increased. The follow-up PET/CT scan demonstrated the widespread metastases. PMID:27055145

  4. MRI and FDG PET/CT imaging manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Sweiss, Nadera J

    2015-12-01

    A 52-year-old man had biopsy-proven sarcoidosis of mediastinal lymph nodes. Cardiac sarcoidosis was confirmed on cardiac MRI with typical imaging features as delayed gadolinium enhancement. Follow-up FDG PET/CT with a 3-day pretest diet modification showed suppression of overall myocardial uptake of FDG but with multifocal abnormal FDG uptake in the myocardium regions corresponding to the previous MRI findings. Additional noncardiac active sarcoidosis involving multiple organ and lymph nodes were also visualized on FDG PET/CT. PMID:26544904

  5. Algorithm for lung cancer detection based on PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saita, Shinsuke; Ishimatsu, Keita; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohtsuka, Hideki; Nishitani, Hiromu; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    The five year survival rate of the lung cancer is low with about twenty-five percent. In addition it is an obstinate lung cancer wherein three out of four people die within five years. Then, the early stage detection and treatment of the lung cancer are important. Recently, we can obtain CT and PET image at the same time because PET/CT device has been developed. PET/CT is possible for a highly accurate cancer diagnosis because it analyzes quantitative shape information from CT image and FDG distribution from PET image. However, neither benign-malignant classification nor staging intended for lung cancer have been established still enough by using PET/CT images. In this study, we detect lung nodules based on internal organs extracted from CT image, and we also develop algorithm which classifies benignmalignant and metastatic or non metastatic lung cancer using lung structure and FDG distribution(one and two hour after administering FDG). We apply the algorithm to 59 PET/CT images (malignant 43 cases [Ad:31, Sq:9, sm:3], benign 16 cases) and show the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  6. 11C-Choline and FDG PET/CT Imaging of Primary Cholangiocarcinoma: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chotipanich, Chanisa; Promteangtrong, Chetsadaporn; Kunawudhi, Anchisa; Chanwat, Rawisak; Sricharunrat, Thaniya; Suratako, Savitree; Wongsa, Paramest

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aimed to compare the diagnostic values of 11C-choline and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 10 patients (6 males and 4 females), aged 42-69 years, suspected of having CCA based on CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. 11C-choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT studies were performed in all patients over 1 week. PET/CT results were visually analyzed by 2 independent nuclear medicine physicians and quantitatively by calculating the tumor-to-background ratio (T/B). Results: No 11C-choline PET/CT uptake was observed in primary extrahepatic or intrahepatic CCA cases. Intense 18F-FDG avidity was detected in the tumors of 8 patients (%80). Two patients, who were 18F-FDG negative, had primary extrahepatic CCA. Ki-67 measurements were positive in all patients (range; 14.2%-39.9%). The average T/B values of 11C-choline and 18F-FDG were 0.4±0.2 and 2.0±1.0 in all cases of primary CCA, respectively; these values were significantly lower for 11C-choline (P<0.005). Both FDG and 11C-choline PET/CT detected metastatic CCA foci in all 8 patients (two patients had no metastases). Conclusion: As the results suggested, primary CCA lesions showed a poor avidity for 11C-choline, whereas 18F-FDG PET/CT was of value for the detection of most primary CCA cases. In contrast to primary lesions, metastatic CCA lesions showed 11C-choline avidity.

  7. [18F]fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT imaging for radiation treatment planning of recurrent and primary prostate cancer with dose escalation to PET/CT-positive lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background At present there is no consensus on irradiation treatment volumes for intermediate to high-risk primary cancers or recurrent disease. Conventional imaging modalities, such as CT, MRI and transrectal ultrasound, are considered suboptimal for treatment decisions. Choline-PET/CT might be considered as the imaging modality in radiooncology to select and delineate clinical target volumes extending the prostate gland or prostate fossa. In conjunction with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and imaged guided radiotherapy (IGRT), it might offer the opportunity of dose escalation to selected sites while avoiding unnecessary irradiation of healthy tissues. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary (n = 7) or recurrent (n = 19) prostate cancer received Choline-PET/CT planned 3D conformal or intensity modulated radiotherapy. The median age of the patients was 65 yrs (range 45 to 78 yrs). PET/CT-scans with F18-fluoroethylcholine (FEC) were performed on a combined PET/CT-scanner equipped for radiation therapy planning. The majority of patients had intermediate to high risk prostate cancer. All patients received 3D conformal or intensity modulated and imaged guided radiotherapy with megavoltage cone beam CT. The median dose to primary tumours was 75.6 Gy and to FEC-positive recurrent lymph nodal sites 66,6 Gy. The median follow-up time was 28.8 months. Results The mean SUVmax in primary cancer was 5,97 in the prostate gland and 3,2 in pelvic lymph nodes. Patients with recurrent cancer had a mean SUVmax of 4,38. Two patients had negative PET/CT scans. At 28 months the overall survival rate is 94%. Biochemical relapse free survival is 83% for primary cancer and 49% for recurrent tumours. Distant disease free survival is 100% and 75% for primary and recurrent cancer, respectively. Acute normal tissue toxicity was mild in 85% and moderate (grade 2) in 15%. No or mild late side effects were observed in the majority of patients (84%). One patient had a severe bladder

  8. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Mesguich, Charles; Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence; Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar; Kostakoglu, Lale

    2014-12-01

    18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie-Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUVmax and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM. PMID:25308249

  9. Evaluation of FLT-PET-CT as an imaging biomarker of proliferation in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, D K; Beresford, M; Li, S P; Dowsett, M; Sanghera, B; Wong, W L; Sonoda, L; Detre, S; Amin, V; Ah-See, M-L; Miles, D; Makris, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: [18F]fluorothymidine (FLT) has been proposed as a positron emission tomography (PET)-imaging biomarker of proliferation for breast cancer. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the feasibility of FLT-PET-CT as a technique for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in primary breast cancer and to compare baseline FLT with Ki-67. Methods: Twenty women with primary breast cancer had a baseline FLT-PET-CT scan that was repeated before the second cycle of chemotherapy. Expression of Ki-67 in the diagnostic biopsy was quantified. From the FLT-PET-CT scans lesion maximum and mean standardised uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean) were calculated. Results: Mean baseline SUVmax was 7.3, and 4.62 post one cycle of NAC, representing a drop of 2.68 (36.3%). There was no significant association between baseline, post chemotherapy, or change in SUVmax and pathological response to NAC. There was a significant correlation between pre-chemotherapy Ki-67 and SUVmax of 0.604 (P=0.006). Conclusions: Baseline SUVmax measurements of FLT-PET-CT were significantly related to Ki-67 suggesting that it is a proliferation biomarker. However, in this series neither the baseline value nor the change in SUVmax after one cycle of NAC were able to predict response as most patients had a sizeable SUVmax reduction. PMID:24832174

  10. PET/CT Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M.; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2014-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT. PMID:21237418

  11. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-06-15

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical PET/CT scanners. Therefore, visual artifacts and overestimation and/or underestimation of the tracer uptake in regions adjacent to metallic implants are likely to occur and as such, inaccurate quantification of the tracer uptake and potential erroneous clinical interpretation of PET images is expected. Accurate quantification of PET data requires metal artifact reduction (MAR) of the CT images prior to the application of the CT-based attenuation correction procedure. In this review, the origins of metallic artifacts and their impact on clinical PET/CT imaging are discussed. Moreover, a brief overview of proposed MAR methods and their advantages and drawbacks is presented. Although most of the presented MAR methods are mainly developed for diagnostic CT imaging, their potential application in PET/CT imaging is highlighted. The challenges associated with comparative evaluation of these methods in a clinical environment in the absence of a gold standard are also discussed.

  12. Adrenal tuberculosis masquerading as disseminated malignancy: A pitfall of (18)F-FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gorla, A K R; Gupta, K; Sood, A; Biswal, C K; Bhansali, A; Mittal, B R

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive characterization of adrenal lesions is a commonly encountered diagnostic challenge. Characteristic clinical and correlative imaging findings may assist in only arriving at a probable diagnosis. Currently, (18)F-FDG PET/CT is considered to provide the most comprehensive imaging information. We here present a case of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis that highlights the need for caution during the interpretation of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and also the need to suggest histopathological correlation. PMID:26853485

  13. Differentiation of cardiac thrombus from cardiac tumor combining cardiac MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rinuncini, Massimo; Zuin, Marco; Scaranello, Fiorenzo; Fejzo, Majlinda; Rampin, Lucia; Rubello, Domenico; Faggian, Giuseppe; Roncon, Loris

    2016-06-01

    Radiological differentiation of an unknown cardiac masse is often a challenging issue. 18F-FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed to evaluate a left ventricle mass visualized on transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in a patient with an history of ischemic heart disease. The metabolically inert area on the PET/CT, corresponding to the relatively homogenous hypodensity in the LV, was thought to represent an old organized LV thrombus. Histopathological examination confirmed the imaging diagnosis. PMID:27038712

  14. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand (68)Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for (18)F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for (68)Ga-Pentixafor than for (18)F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, (68)Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy. PMID:26909116

  15. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F.; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K.; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand 68Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (18F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for 18F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for 68Ga-Pentixafor than for 18F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high 68Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent 68Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, 68Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy. PMID:26909116

  16. MRI and FDG-PET/CT imaging in gynecological malignancies: the radiation oncology perspective.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Jamina; Scholber, Jutta; Grosu, Anca L; Volegova-Neher, Natalja; Henne, Karl; Langer, Mathias; Meyer, Philipp T; Gitsch, Gerald; Bartl, Nico

    2016-06-01

    MRI and FDG-PET imaging plays an important role in diagnosis, monitoring and follow-up of gynecological cancer. The goal of this paper was to summarize data of the literature about sensitivity and specificity of MRI and FDG-PET/CT for detection of primary tumor, lymph nodes invasion and metastases in cervix and endometrial cancer and to discuss their implication for radiation treatment planning and monitoring. PMID:26957003

  17. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  18. FDG-anorectic parathyroid carcinoma with FDG-avid bone metastasis on PET/CT images.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Lu, Hankui; Gao, Yunchao

    2013-11-01

    A 53-year-old man complained of aggravated left hip pain of more than 2 months. Whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed only 1 hypermetabolic lesion in the left ilium. Histopathologic examination of the lesion suggested metastatic disease. Blood tests documented mildly elevated blood calcium and parathyroid hormone. Subsequent neck ultrasonography, contrast-enhanced CT, and dual-phase scintigraphy with (99m)Tc-MIBI showed a right parathyroid tumor, which was confirmed to be a parathyroid carcinoma postoperatively. We report a case of parathyroid carcinoma rarely encountered with a FDG-negative primary but a FDG-positive metastasis on PET/CT images. PMID:24089062

  19. Multi-technique imaging of bone metastases: spotlight on PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gurdip K; Cook, Gary J

    2016-07-01

    There is growing evidence that molecular imaging of bone metastases with positron-emission tomography (PET) can improve diagnosis and treatment response assessment over current conventional standard imaging methods, although cost-effectiveness has not been assessed. In most cancer types, 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG)-PET is an accurate method for detecting bone metastases. For example, in breast cancer, combined (18)F-FDG-PET and computed tomography (CT) is more sensitive at detecting bone metastases than (99m)technetium (Tc)-labelled diphosphonate planar bone scintigraphy (BS) and there is increasing evidence to support the use of serial (18)F-FDG-PET for the assessment of osseous response to treatment. Preliminary data suggest improved diagnostic accuracy of (18)F-FDG-PET-CT in a number of other malignancies including lung, thyroid, head and neck, gastro-oesophageal cancers, and osteosarcoma. As a bone-specific tracer, there is accumulating evidence to support the use of sodium (18)F-fluoride ((18)F-NaF) PET-CT in the diagnosis of skeletal metastases in breast and prostate cancer, although relatively little data are available to support its use for assessment of treatment response. In prostate cancer, (11)C-choline and (18)F-choline PET-CT have better specificities than (18)F-NaF-PET-CT, but equivalent sensitivities in the detection of bone metastases. We review the current literature for staging and response assessment of bone metastases in different cancers. PMID:26997430

  20. Diagnostic imaging in dermatology: utility of PET-CT in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, R; Serrano-Falcón, C; Rebollo Aguirre, A C

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma accounts for 5% of all malignant skin tumors and its incidence is increasing. In the natural course of melanoma, tumors grow locally and can spread via the lymph system or the blood. Because survival is directly related to the stage of the disease at diagnosis, early detection (secondary prevention) has an impact on prognosis. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine technique that generates images using molecules labeled with positron-emitting isotopes. The most widely used molecule is fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Because of the elevated glycolytic rate in tumor cells, which results in increased FDG uptake, greater quantities of FDG become trapped in tumor cells, enabling external detection. Today, most PET scanners are multimodal PET-computed tomography (CT) scanners, which provide more detailed information by combining morphological information with functional PET findings. The possible utility of PET-CT in patients with malignant melanoma is a subject of debate. Various questions have been raised: when the scan should be performed, whether PET-CT has advantages over conventional diagnostic methods, and whether PET-CT provides a real benefit to patients. In this review of the literature, we will analyze each of these questions. PMID:24661948

  1. Imaging of prostate cancer with PET/CT using 18F-Fluorocholine

    PubMed Central

    Vali, Reza; Loidl, Wolfgang; Pirich, Christian; Langesteger, Werner; Beheshti, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    While 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) has limited value in prostate cancer (PCa), it may be useful for specific subgroups of PCa patients with hormone-resistant poorly differentiated cell types. 18F-Fluorocholine (18F-FCH) PET/CT has been increasingly used in primary and recurrent PCa and has been shown to add valuable information. Although there is a correlation between the foci of activity and the areas of malignancy in the prostate gland, the clinical value of 18F-FCH is still controversial for detection of the malignant focus in the prostate. For the T-staging of PCa at diagnosis the value of 18F-FCH is limited. This is probably due to limited resolution of PET system and positive findings in benign prostate diseases. Conversely, 18F-FCH PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the delineation of local and distant nodal recurrence and bone metastases and is poised to have an impact on therapy management. In this review, recent studies of 18F-FCH PET/CT in PCa are summarized. PMID:25973332

  2. 18F-NaF PET/CT Imaging of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Salgarello, Matteo; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Inno, Alessandro; Pasetto, Stefano; Severi, Fabrizia; Gorgoni, Giancarlo; Gori, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    F-NaF is a radiopharmaceutical widely used in PET imaging to detect bone metastases. Several cases of F-NaF uptake from brain metastases have been described, but a specific protocol for the evaluation of brain metastases with F-NaF has not been developed yet. Here we report images of F-NaF PET/CT, standard CT, and MRI of a brain metastasis in a patient with non-small lung cancer. Through a dynamic acquisition procedure, we have identified the first minutes after injection as the preferable time point of imaging acquisition for the study of brain metastases with F-NaF. PMID:27163462

  3. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT Integrated Imaging in Distinguishing Malignant from Benign Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yajuan; Yu, Hongjuan; Ma, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in differentiating malignant from benign pleural effusion. Methods A total of 176 patients with pleural effusion who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT examination to differentiate malignancy from benignancy were retrospectively researched. The images of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were visually analyzed. The suspected malignant effusion was characterized by the presence of nodular or irregular pleural thickening on CT imaging. Whereas on PET imaging, pleural 18F-FDG uptake higher than mediastinal activity was interpreted as malignant effusion. Images of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were interpreted by combining the morphologic feature of pleura on CT imaging with the degree and form of pleural 18F-FDG uptake on PET imaging. Results One hundred and eight patients had malignant effusion, including 86 with pleural metastasis and 22 with pleural mesothelioma, whereas 68 patients had benign effusion. The sensitivities of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in detecting malignant effusion were 75.0%, 91.7% and 93.5%, respectively, which were 69.8%, 91.9% and 93.0% in distinguishing metastatic effusion. The sensitivity of 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging in detecting malignant effusion was higher than that of CT imaging (p = 0.000). For metastatic effusion, 18F-FDG PET imaging had higher sensitivity (p = 0.000) and better diagnostic consistency with 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging compared with CT imaging (Kappa = 0.917 and Kappa = 0.295, respectively). The specificities of CT imaging, 18F-FDG PET imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were 94.1%, 63.2% and 92.6% in detecting benign effusion. The specificities of CT imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT integrated imaging were higher than that of 18F-FDG PET imaging (p = 0.000 and p = 0.000, respectively), and CT imaging had better diagnostic consistency with

  4. The evolution of PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bettye G

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) was the first fused or combined medical imaging technique. Although PET-CT has received widespread acclaim as a major imaging advancement, many questions have surfaced regarding its use. This article answers some of these questions and examines what PET-CT means to medicine and the medical imaging community. PMID:15835615

  5. Effect of Radionuclide Activity Concentration on PET-CT Image Uniformity

    PubMed Central

    Hasford, Francis; Wyk, Bronwin Van; Mabhengu, Thulani; Vangu, Mboyo Di Tamba; Kyere, Augustine Kwame; Amuasi, John Humphrey

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of radionuclide activity concentration on positron emission tomography-computedr tomography (PET-CT) image uniformity has been carried out quantitatively. Tomographic PET-CT images of cylindrical phantom containing F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) activity concentration was acquired and used for the assessment. Activity concentrations were varied and PET-CT images were acquired at the constant acquisition parameters of time, matrix size, and reconstruction algorithm, respectively. Using midtransaxial image slices, quantitative index of nonuniformity (NU), and coefficient of uniformity variation were estimated for the different activity concentrations. Maximum NUs of 17.6%, 26.3%, 32.7%, 36.2%, and 38.5% were estimated for activity concentrations of 16.87 kBq/mL, 14.06 kBq/mL, 11.25 kBq/mL, 8.43 kBq/mL, and 5.62 kBq/mL, respectively. The coefficient of uniformity variation established an inverse quadratic relationship with activity concentration. Activity concentrations of 16.87 kBq/mL, 14.06 kBq/mL, 11.25 kBq/mL, 8.43 kBq/mL, and 5.62 kBq/mL produced uniformity variations of 1.47%, 2.52%, 4.23%, 5.12%, and 4.98%, respectively. Increasing activity concentration resulted in decreasing coefficient of uniformity and hence, an increase in image uniformity. The uniformity estimates compared well with the standards set internationally. PMID:27134558

  6. Automatic co-segmentation of lung tumor based on random forest in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xueqing; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Weifang; Shi, Fei; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic method is proposed to segment the lung tumor in clinical 3D PET-CT images. The proposed method effectively combines PET and CT information to make full use of the high contrast of PET images and superior spatial resolution of CT images. Our approach consists of three main parts: (1) initial segmentation, in which spines are removed in CT images and initial connected regions achieved by thresholding based segmentation in PET images; (2) coarse segmentation, in which monotonic downhill function is applied to rule out structures which have similar standardized uptake values (SUV) to the lung tumor but do not satisfy a monotonic property in PET images; (3) fine segmentation, random forests method is applied to accurately segment the lung tumor by extracting effective features from PET and CT images simultaneously. We validated our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 24 3D PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The average TPVF, FPVF and accuracy rate (ACC) were 83.65%, 0.05% and 99.93%, respectively. The correlation analysis shows our segmented lung tumor volumes has strong correlation ( average 0.985) with the ground truth 1 and ground truth 2 labeled by a clinical expert.

  7. The Basic Principles of FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Hess, Søren; Nielsen Braad, Poul-Erik; Olsen, Birgitte Brinkmann; Inglev, Signe; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) forms the basis of molecular imaging. FDG-PET imaging is a multidisciplinary undertaking that requires close interdisciplinary collaboration in a broad team comprising physicians, technologists, secretaries, radio-chemists, hospital physicists, molecular biologists, engineers, and cyclotron technicians. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of important basic issues and considerations pivotal to successful patient examinations, including basic physics, instrumentation, radiochemistry, molecular and cell biology, patient preparation, normal distribution of tracer, and potential interpretive pitfalls. PMID:26050942

  8. Pulmonary nodule detection in PET/CT images: improved approach using combined nodule detection and hybrid FP reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yoya; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo

    2012-03-01

    In this study, an automated scheme for detecting pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images has been proposed using combined detection and hybrid false-positive (FP) reduction techniques. The initial nodule candidates were detected separately from CT and PET images. FPs were then eliminated in the initial candidates by using support vector machine with characteristic values obtained from CT and PET images. In the experiment, we evaluated proposed method using 105 cases of PET/CT images that were obtained in the cancer-screening program. We evaluated true positive fraction (TPF) and FP / case. As a result, TPFs of CT and PET detections were 0.76 and 0.44, respectively. However, by integrating the both results, TPF was reached to 0.82 with 5.14 FPs/case. These results indicate that our method may be of practical use for the detection of pulmonary nodules using PET/CT images.

  9. 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Gallbladder Adenocarcinoma - A Pictorial Review.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Faiq; Awan, Omer; Khan, Salman A

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder adenocarcinoma is an uncommon and serious disease. The primary disease grows rapidly with local invasion into the liver and with distant spread to lymph nodes. It is often detected late, due to which management can be challenging. Despite routine use of computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US) for detection, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often considered for a detailed assessment of the anatomic behavior of these tumors. We share three cases where 18-FDG PET/CT played a role in management thereof. PMID:26430572

  10. Primary Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma on Dual-Time Point FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Qian; He, Lirong; Zhuang, Xiaoqing; Li, Fang

    2016-08-01

    A 59-year-old man presented cough, chest pain, and shortness of breath for 2 weeks and fever for 4 days. A contrast chest CT revealed a large right pulmonary artery filling defect, suggestive of pulmonary embolism that failed to respond to anticoagulation therapy. FDG PET/CT was performed to evaluate possible malignancy, which revealed intense activity in the right main pulmonary artery without any extrathoracic abnormality. The ratio of the SUVmax of this lesion to the liver was significantly increased in the delayed PET images. The pathological examination demonstrated primary pulmonary artery sarcoma. PMID:27163460

  11. 18F-NaF PET/CT Images of Cardiac Metastasis From Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yi-Hsien; Ko, Kuan-Yin; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Chen, Wei-Wu; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Osteosarcomas are aggressive with a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis. Cardiac osteosarcoma metastasis is rare. We described a 17-year-old boy who had right distal femoral osteosarcoma with lung metastases. During follow-up, right ventricular (RV) metastasis was noted and confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgical specimen. F-NaF PET/CT was then arranged 1 month after debulking surgery for residual tumor survey. The images showed intense F-NaF uptake at RV region, suggestive of residual cardiac metastases. PMID:27405028

  12. Fireworks-induced chest wall granulomatous disease: 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Le, Stephanie T; Nguyen, Ba Duong

    2014-04-01

    The authors present a case of 18F-FDG-avid granulomatous reaction induced by fireworks injury of the chest wall in a patient with esophageal adenocarcinoma. This hypermetabolic lesion, involving the right pectoralis muscles, appeared slightly more prominent on restaging PET/CT imaging following chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Excisional biopsy of the lesion established the diagnosis of foreign-body granulomatous-type inflammation with surrounding foci of non-polarizable black foreign material and ruled out malignancy. The patient recalled accidentally shooting himself in the chest with a Roman candle at the age of 3. PMID:23877517

  13. MR imaging and PET/CT in diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Regan; Agarwal, Ankit; Martin-Macintosh, Erica L; Peller, Patrick J; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a common hematologic malignancy among the elderly population. Although there have been many advances in treatment over the past few decades, the overall prognosis for the disease remains poor. Conventional radiography has long been the standard of reference for the imaging of multiple myeloma. However, 10%-20% of patients with multiple myeloma do not have evidence of disease at conventional radiography. There is a growing body of evidence supporting use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma. MR imaging is useful in detection of bone marrow infiltration, a finding often missed at conventional radiography. FDG PET/CT is especially sensitive for the detection of extramedullary disease and can help detect the metabolically active lesions that often precede evidence of osseous destruction at conventional radiography. MR imaging and FDG PET/CT are useful tools that can provide essential information for diagnosis and management of patients with multiple myeloma. Both modalities allow accurate localization of disease after chemotherapy or autologous stem cell transplantation and can provide important prognostic information that can influence further clinical decision making regarding therapy, particularly when tumor serum markers may be a less reliable indicator of disease burden after repeated treatments. PMID:25763728

  14. [THE ROLE OF PET/CT IMAGING IN THE ASSESSMENT OF INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Keidar, Zohar

    2015-09-01

    Diagnosis (essentially early detection of infection) and also management decision-making pose clinical challenges. Many resources are invested in developing precise, non- invasive diagnostic tests and efficient therapies for infectious processes. Nuclear medicine procedures are part of the evaluation armamentarium of patients with suspected or confirmed infection. Their strength relies on the fact that they are non-invasive tests that provide both functional as well as metabolic information early during the course of disease. The most frequent nuclear medicine procedures used in the assessment of infection are bone, Gallium and labeled white blood cells scans. PET/CT, using mainly labeled glucose (FDG), is redefining the diagnostic work-up and is currently leading to changes in the management of patients with suspected or known infections. Current evidence supports the use of FDG imaging as a first-line diagnostic tool in patients with suspected or known infectious processes, with convincing data available mainly for indications such as fever of unknown origin (FUO), vertebral osteomyelitis, vasculitis and vascular graft infection. Whether FDG-PET/CT or hybrid imaging with new, more infectious-specific tracers will replace standard nuclear medicine procedures or stand-alone conventional imaging modalities, is still debatable. The future looks promising and the role of molecular hybrid imaging techniques in the assessment of inflammatory and infectious processes is undoubtedly on the rise. PMID:26665749

  15. Image reconstruction for PET/CT scanners: past achievements and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Shan; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    PET is a medical imaging modality with proven clinical value for disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The integration of PET and CT on modern scanners provides a synergy of the two imaging modalities. Through different mathematical algorithms, PET data can be reconstructed into the spatial distribution of the injected radiotracer. With dynamic imaging, kinetic parameters of specific biological processes can also be determined. Numerous efforts have been devoted to the development of PET image reconstruction methods over the last four decades, encompassing analytic and iterative reconstruction methods. This article provides an overview of the commonly used methods. Current challenges in PET image reconstruction include more accurate quantitation, TOF imaging, system modeling, motion correction and dynamic reconstruction. Advances in these aspects could enhance the use of PET/CT imaging in patient care and in clinical research studies of pathophysiology and therapeutic interventions. PMID:21339831

  16. PET-CT imaging in patients with chronic sternal wound infections prior to reconstructive surgery: A case series.

    PubMed

    Read, Charlotte; Branford, Olivier A; Verjee, Liaquat S; Wood, Simon H

    2015-08-01

    Late presenting and recurrent sternal wound infections post-sternotomy are difficult to treat, with the clinical picture not necessarily reflecting the underlying problem. As a result of our experience, we suggest that these chronic cases should be managed using a different algorithm to acute sternal wound infection. Positron emission tomography combined with computerized tomography (PET-CT) imaging may be potentially useful in enabling accurate localization of disease sites, which guides adequate debridement prior to definitive reconstruction. It may also allow for disease surveillance and monitoring of the response to antimicrobial treatment. We present three cases which support the need for pre-operative imaging using PET-CT. PMID:25986418

  17. Impact of FDG-PET/CT Imaging on Nodal Staging for Head-And-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Ryuji . E-mail: murakami@kaiju.medic.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Uozumi, Hideaki; Hirai, Toshinori; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Ota, Kazutoshi D.D.S.; Murakami, Daizo; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Oya, Natsuo; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging on nodal staging for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 23 patients with head-and-neck SCC who were evaluated with FDG-PET/CT and went on to neck dissection. Two observers consensually determined the lesion size and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and compared the results with pathologic findings on nodal-level involvement. Two different observers (A and B) independently performed three protocols for clinical nodal staging. Methods 1, 2, and 3 were based on conventional modalities, additional visual information from FDG-PET/CT images, and FDG-PET/CT imaging alone with SUV data, respectively. Results: All primary tumors were visualized with FDG-PET/CT. Pathologically, 19 positive and 93 negative nodal levels were identified. The SUV{sub max} overlapped in negative and positive nodes <15 mm in diameter. According to receiver operating characteristics analysis, the size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values were 1.9, 2.5, and 3.0 for lymph nodes <10 mm, 10-15 mm, and >15 mm, respectively. These cutoff values yielded 79% sensitivity and 99% specificity for nodal-level staging. For Observer A, the sensitivity and specificity in Methods 1, 2, and 3 were 68% and 94%, 68% and 99%, and 84% and 99%, respectively, and Method 3 yielded significantly higher accuracy than Method 1 (p = 0.0269). For Observer B, Method 3 yielded the highest sensitivity (84%) and specificity (99%); however, the difference among the three protocols was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Imaging with FDG-PET/CT with size-based SUV{sub max} cutoff values is an important modality for radiation therapy planning.

  18. In vivo verification of proton beam path by using post-treatment PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, Wen C.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Vargas, Carlos; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to establish the in vivo verification of proton beam path by using proton-activated positron emission distributions. Methods: A total of 50 PET/CT imaging studies were performed on ten prostate cancer patients immediately after daily proton therapy treatment through a single lateral portal. The PET/CT and planning CT were registered by matching the pelvic bones, and the beam path of delivered protons was defined in vivo by the positron emission distribution seen only within the pelvic bones, referred to as the PET-defined beam path. Because of the patient position correction at each fraction, the marker-defined beam path, determined by the centroid of implanted markers seen in the post-treatment (post-Tx) CT, is used for the planned beam path. The angular variation and discordance between the PET- and marker-defined paths were derived to investigate the intrafraction prostate motion. For studies with large discordance, the relative location between the centroid and pelvic bones seen in the post-Tx CT was examined. The PET/CT studies are categorized for distinguishing the prostate motion that occurred before or after beam delivery. The post-PET CT was acquired after PET imaging to investigate prostate motion due to physiological changes during the extended PET acquisition. Results: The less than 2 deg. of angular variation indicates that the patient roll was minimal within the immobilization device. Thirty of the 50 studies with small discordance, referred as good cases, show a consistent alignment between the field edges and the positron emission distributions from the entrance to the distal edge. For those good cases, average displacements are 0.6 and 1.3 mm along the anterior-posterior (D{sub AP}) and superior-inferior (D{sub SI}) directions, respectively, with 1.6 mm standard deviations in both directions. For the remaining 20 studies demonstrating a large discordance (more than 6 mm in either D{sub AP} or D{sub SI}), 13

  19. Automated detection of lung tumors in PET/CT images using active contour filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Adachi, Hayato; Tsujimoto, Masakazu; Fujita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo; Nishio, Masami; Kobayashi, Toshiki

    2015-03-01

    In a previous study, we developed a hybrid tumor detection method that used both computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) images. However, similar to existing computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes, it was difficult to detect low-contrast lesions that touch to the normal organs such as the chest wall or blood vessels in the lung. In the current study, we proposed a novel lung tumor detection method that uses active contour filters to detect the nodules deemed "difficult" in previous CAD schemes. The proposed scheme detects lung tumors using both CT and PET images. As for the detection in CT images, the massive region was first enhanced using an active contour filter (ACF), which is a type of contrast enhancement filter that has a deformable kernel shape. The kernel shape involves closed curves that are connected by several nodes that move iteratively in order to enclose the massive region. The final output of ACF is the difference between the maximum pixel value on the deformable kernel, and pixel value on the center of the filter kernel. Subsequently, the PET images were binarized to detect the regions of increased uptake. The results were integrated, followed by the false positive reduction using 21 characteristic features and three support vector machines. In the experiment, we evaluated the proposed method using 100 PET/CT images. More than half of nodules missed using previous methods were accurately detected. The results indicate that our method may be useful for the detection of lung tumors using PET/CT images.

  20. Fibrous Dysplasia Presenting as a Cold Spot in 18F-FLT PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Rehak, Zdenek; Bencsikova, Beatrix; Zambo, Iva; Kazda, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a benign bone lesion in which normal bone marrow is replaced by fibro-osseous tissue. The usual high fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) uptake in FD may lead to the misdiagnosis of bone malignancy. Herein, we describe the case of a 42-year old man with histologically verified FD of the pubic bone, which has been subsequently examined during follow-up for rectal cancer, using both F-FDG and fluorothymidine (F-FLT) PET/CT imaging. The FD lesion was characterized by a high uptake of F-FDG (hot spot) but very low uptake of F-FLT (cold spot) as compared with the contralateral unaffected pubic bone. PMID:27055128

  1. Summary of the UPICT Protocol for 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Oncology Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael M; Wahl, Richard L; Hoffman, John M; Yap, Jeffrey T; Sunderland, John J; Boellaard, Ronald; Perlman, Eric S; Kinahan, Paul E; Christian, Paul E; Hoekstra, Otto S; Dorfman, Gary S

    2015-06-01

    The Uniform Protocols for Imaging in Clinical Trials (UPICT) (18)F-FDG PET/CT protocol is intended to guide the performance of whole-body FDG PET/CT studies within the context of single- and multiple-center clinical trials of oncologic therapies by providing acceptable (minimum), target, and ideal standards for all phases of imaging. The aim is to minimize variability in intra- and intersubject, intra- and interplatform, interexamination, and interinstitutional primary or derived data. The goal of this condensed version of the much larger document is to make readers aware of the general content and subject area. The document has several main subjects: context of the imaging protocol within the clinical trial; site selection, qualification, and training; subject scheduling; subject preparation; imaging-related substance preparation and administration; imaging procedure; image postprocessing; image analysis; image interpretation; archiving and distribution of data; quality control; and imaging-associated risks and risk management. PMID:25883122

  2. Summary of the UPICT Protocol for 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Oncology Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Hoffman, John M.; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Sunderland, John J.; Boellaard, Ronald; Perlman, Eric S.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Christian, Paul E.; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Dorfman, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    The Uniform Protocols for Imaging in Clinical Trials (UPICT) 18F-FDG PET/CT protocol is intended to guide the performance of whole-body FDG PET/CT studies within the context of single- and multiple-center clinical trials of oncologic therapies by providing acceptable (minimum), target, and ideal standards for all phases of imaging. The aim is to minimize variability in intra- and intersubject, intra- and inter-platform, interexamination, and interinstitutional primary or derived data. The goal of this condensed version of the much larger document is to make readers aware of the general content and subject area. The document has several main subjects: context of the imaging protocol within the clinical trial; site selection, qualification, and training; subject scheduling; subject preparation; imaging-related substance preparation and administration; imaging procedure; image postprocessing; image analysis; image interpretation; archiving and distribution of data; quality control; and imaging-associated risks and risk management. PMID:25883122

  3. Multiple myeloma: 18F-FDG-PET/CT and diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Mihailovic, Jasna; Goldsmith, Stanley J

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a relatively rare hematologic disorder characterized by proliferation of plasma cells, primarily involving the bone marrow. Extramedullary involvement also occurs with poor prognosis. Asymptomatic plasma cell disorders, monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance, and smoldering MM, which do not require therapy, should be distinguished from symptomatic MM, which requires treatment. MM may present with CRAB, elevated Calcium levels, Renal insufficiency, Anemia, and Bone lesions (including lytic lesions and osteopenia), as well as elevated levels of serum M protein or urine M protein or both. Nonsecretory myeloma in which serum and urine M proteins are absent occurs rarely, accounting for 1%-5% of patients with myeloma, but low levels of abnormal immunoglobulins are often present. Staging of patients with MM is done according to the Durie and Salmon criteria based on laboratory testing (determination of hemoglobin, serum calcium, and serum and urine M proteins) and conventional radiography. A variety of diagnostic imaging procedures have been employed to assess the extent of disease in MM and to evaluate the response to treatment as well as provide surveillance for the detection of recurrent disease. These include whole-body x-ray, which despite its limitations is regularly used to detect lytic bone lesions; CT radiography; MRI; and a variety of radionuclide imaging procedures, with (18)F-FDG-PET/CT emerging as the radionuclide procedure of choice. Recently, the Durie-Salmon criteria have been upgrade to the Durie-Salmon PLUS system, which includes (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and MRI of the spine and pelvis. PMID:25475376

  4. Comparison of meta-analyses among elastosonography (ES) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging techniques in the application of prostate cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qiaohong; Duan, Zhongxiang; Lei, Jixiao; Jiao, Guangli

    2016-03-01

    The early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) appears to be of vital significance for the provision of appropriate treatment programs. Even though several sophisticated imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and elastosonography (ES) have already been developed for PCa diagnosis, the diagnostic accuracy of these imaging techniques is still controversial to some extent. Therefore, a comprehensive meta-analysis in this study was performed to compare the accuracy of various diagnostic imaging methods for PCa, including 11C-choline PET/CT, 11C-acetate PET/CT, 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT, 18F-fluoroglucose PET/CT, transrectal real-time elastosonography (TRTE), and shear-wave elastosonography (SWE). The eligible studies were identified through systematical searching for the literature in electronic databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Web of Science. On the basis of the fixed-effects model, the pooled sensitivity (SEN), specificity (SPE), and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) were calculated to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of 11C-choline PET/CT, 11C-acetate PET/CT, 18F-fluorocholine (FCH) PET/CT, 18F-fluoroglucose (FDG) PET/CT, TRTE, and SWE. All the statistical analyses were conducted with R language Software. The present meta-analysis incorporating a total of 82 studies demonstrated that the pooled sensitivity of the six imaging techniques were sorted as follows: SWE > 18F-FCH PET/CT > 11C-choline PET/CT > TRTE > 11C-acetate PET/CT > 18F-FDG PET/CT; the pooled specificity were also compared: SWE > 18F-FCH PET/CT > 11C-choline PET/CT > TRTE > 18F-FDG PET/CT > 11C-acetate PET/CT; finally, the pooled diagnostic accuracy of the six imaging techniques based on AUC were ranked as below: SWE > 18F-FCH PET/CT > 11C-choline PET/CT > TRTE > 11C-acetate PET/CT > 18F-FDG PET/CT. SWE and 18F-FCH PET/CT imaging could offer more assistance in the

  5. [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT in the localization of head and neck paragangliomas compared to other functional imaging modalities and CT/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Ingo; Taieb, David; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Millo, Corina M.; Adams, Karen; Nambuba, Joan; Chen, Clara C.; Herscovitch, Peter; Sadowski, Samira M.; Fojo, Antonio T.; Buchmann, Inga; Kebebew, Electron; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) overexpress somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and recent studies have already shown excellent results in the localization of sympathetic succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit B (SDHB) mutation-related metastatic PHEOs/PGLs using [(68Ga)-DOTA0,Tyr3]Octreotate ([68Ga]-DOTATATE) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Therefore, the goal of our study was to assess the clinical utility of this functional imaging modality in parasympathetic head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) compared to anatomical imaging with CT/MRI and other functional imaging modalities, including [18F]-fluorohydroyphenylalanine ([18F]-FDOPA) PET/CT, currently the gold standard in the functional imaging of HNPGLs. Methods [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT was prospectively performed in 20 patients with HNPGLs. All patients also underwent [18F]-FDOPA PET/CT, [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) PET/CT, and CT/MRI, with 18 patients also receiving [18F]-fluorodopamine ([18F]-FDA) PET/CT. [18F]-FDOPA PET/CT and CT/MRI served as the imaging comparators. Results Thirty-eight lesions in 20 patients were detected, with [18F]-FDOPA PET/CT identifying 37 of 38 (37/38) and CT/MRI identifying 22 of 38 lesions (22/38, p<0.01). All 38 and additional 7 lesions (p=0.016) were detected on [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT. Significantly fewer lesions were identified by [18F]-FDG PET/CT (24/38, p<0.01) and [18F]-FDA PET/CT (10/34, p<0.01). Conclusion [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT identified more lesions than the other imaging modalities. Due to the results of the present study, including the increasing availability and use of DOTA-analogs in the therapy of neuroendocrine tumors, we expect that [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT will become the preferred functional imaging modality for HNPGLs in the near future. PMID:26564322

  6. Intraobserver and Interobserver Variability in GTV Delineation on FDG-PET-CT Images of Head and Neck Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, Stephen L. |. E-mail: Stephen.Breen@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Publicover, Julia; De Silva, Shiroma; Pond, Greg; Brock, Kristy |; O'Sullivan, Brian |; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura; Kim, John; Ringash, Jolie; Waldron, John |; Keller, Anne |; Yu, Eugene; Hendler, Aaron |

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if the addition of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data changes primary site gross tumor volumes (GTVs) in head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography (CT), contrast-enhanced CT, and FDG-PET-CT scans were obtained in 10 patients with head and neck cancers. Eight experienced observers (6 head and neck oncologists and 2 neuro-radiologists) with access to clinical and radiologic reports outlined primary site GTVs on each modality. Three cases were recontoured twice to assess intraobserver variability. The magnitudes of the GTVs were compared. Intra- and interobserver variability was assessed by a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Inter- and intraobserver reliability were calculated. Results: There were no significant differences in the GTVs across the image modalities when compared as ensemble averages; the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test showed that CT volumes were larger than PET-CT. Observers demonstrated the greatest consistency and were most interchangeable on contrast-enhanced CT; they performed less reliably on PET-CT. Conclusions: The addition of PET-CT to primary site GTV delineation of head and neck cancers does not change the volume of the GTV defined by this group of expert observers in this patient sample. An FDG-PET may demonstrate differences in neck node delineation and in other disease sites.

  7. Accuracy assessment of an automatic image-based PET/CT registration for ultrasound-guided biopsies and ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoury, Samuel; Wood, Bradford J.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Dalal, Sandeep; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    The multimodal fusion of spatially tracked real-time ultrasound (US) with a prior CT scan has demonstrated clinical utility, accuracy, and positive impact upon clinical outcomes when used for guidance during biopsy and radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, the combination of CT-guided procedures with positron emission tomography (PET) may not only enhance navigation, but add valuable information regarding the specific location and volume of the targeted masses which may be invisible on CT and US. The accuracy of this fusion depends on reliable, reproducible registration methods between PET and CT. This can avoid extensive manual efforts to correct registration which can be long and tedious in an interventional setting. In this paper, we present a registration workflow for PET/CT/US fusion by analyzing various image metrics based on normalized mutual information and cross-correlation, using both rigid and affine transformations to automatically align PET and CT. Registration is performed between the CT component of the prior PET-CT and the intra-procedural CT scan used for navigation to maximize image congruence. We evaluate the accuracy of the PET/CT registration by computing fiducial and target registration errors using anatomical landmarks and lesion locations respectively. We also report differences to gold-standard manual alignment as well as the root mean square errors for CT/US fusion. Ten patients with prior PET/CT who underwent ablation or biopsy procedures were selected for this study. Studies show that optimal results were obtained using a crosscorrelation based rigid registration with a landmark localization error of 1.1 +/- 0.7 mm using a discrete graphminimizing scheme. We demonstrate the feasibility of automated fusion of PET/CT and its suitability for multi-modality ultrasound guided navigation procedures.

  8. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    de Galiza Barbosa, F; Delso, G; Ter Voert, E E G W; Huellner, M W; Herrmann, K; Veit-Haibach, P

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies. PMID:27108800

  9. 64Cu-Labeled LyP-1-Dendrimer for PET-CT Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to detect and quantify macrophage accumulation can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information for atherosclerotic plaque. We have previously shown that LyP-1, a cyclic 9-amino acid peptide, binds to p32 proteins on activated macrophages, facilitating the visualization of atherosclerotic plaque with PET. Yet, the in vivo plaque accumulation of monomeric [18F]FBA-LyP-1 was low (0.31 ± 0.05%ID/g). To increase the avidity of LyP-1 constructs to p32, we synthesized a dendritic form of LyP-1 on solid phase using lysine as the core structural element. Imaging probes (FAM or 6-BAT) were conjugated to a lysine or cysteine on the dendrimer for optical and PET studies. The N-terminus of the dendrimer was further modified with an aminooxy group in order to conjugate LyP-1 and ARAL peptides bearing a ketone. Oxime ligation of peptides to both dendrimers resulted in (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimers with optical (FAM) and PET probes (6-BAT). For PET-CT studies, (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimer-6-BAT were labeled with 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 h) and intravenously injected into the atherosclerotic (ApoE–/–) mice. After two hours of circulation, PET-CT coregistered images demonstrated greater uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu in the aortic root and descending aorta. Ex vivo images and the biodistribution acquired at three hours after injection also demonstrated a significantly higher uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu (1.1 ± 0.26%ID/g) than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu (0.22 ± 0.05%ID/g) in the aorta. Similarly, subcutaneous injection of the LyP-1-dendrimeric carriers resulted in preferential accumulation in plaque-containing regions over 24 h. In the same model system, ex vivo fluorescence images within aortic plaque depict an increased accumulation and penetration of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-FAM as compared to the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-FAM. Taken together, the results suggest that the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer can be applied for in

  10. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E.

    2007-06-15

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.3 mm{+-}1.0 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=3.6 mm{+-}1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar {delta}x vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.7 mm{+-}0.8 mm and vertical bar {delta}y vertical bar {+-}{sigma}=0.3 mm{+-}1.7 mm. We also noted that differences

  11. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  12. Improved correction for the tissue fraction effect in lung PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Millner, Lynn; Hutton, Brian F.; Maher, Toby M.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in imaging different pulmonary disorders using PET techniques. Previous work has shown, for static PET/CT, that air content in the lung influences reconstructed image values and that it is vital to correct for this ‘tissue fraction effect’ (TFE). In this paper, we extend this work to include the blood component and also investigate the TFE in dynamic imaging. CT imaging and PET kinetic modelling are used to determine fractional air and blood voxel volumes in six patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. These values are used to illustrate best and worst case scenarios when interpreting images without correcting for the TFE. In addition, the fractional volumes were used to determine correction factors for the SUV and the kinetic parameters. These were then applied to the patient images. The kinetic parameters K1 and Ki along with the static parameter SUV were all found to be affected by the TFE with both air and blood providing a significant contribution to the errors. Without corrections, errors range from 34-80% in the best case and 29-96% in the worst case. In the patient data, without correcting for the TFE, regions of high density (fibrosis) appeared to have a higher uptake than lower density (normal appearing tissue), however this was reversed after air and blood correction. The proposed correction methods are vital for quantitative and relative accuracy. Without these corrections, images may be misinterpreted.

  13. PET/CT in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama

    2008-11-15

    PET/CT is an effective tool for the diagnosis, staging and restaging of cancer patients. It combines the complementary information of functional PET images and anatomical CT images in one imaging session. Conventional stand-alone PET has been replaced by PET/CT for improved patient comfort, patient throughput, and most importantly the proven clinical outcome of PET/CT over that of PET and that of separate PET and CT. There are over two thousand PET/CT scanners installed worldwide since 2001. Oncology is the main application for PET/CT. Fluorine-18 deoxyglucose is the choice of radiopharmaceutical in PET for imaging the glucose uptake in tissues, correlated with an increased rate of glycolysis in many tumor cells. New molecular targeted agents are being developed to improve the accuracy of targeting different disease states and assessing therapeutic response. Over 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy (RT) in the course of their disease treatment. Clinical data have demonstrated that the information provided by PET/CT often changes patient management of the patient and/or modifies the RT plan from conventional CT simulation. The application of PET/CT in RT is growing and will become increasingly important. Continuing improvement of PET/CT instrumentation will also make it easier for radiation oncologists to integrate PET/CT in RT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the current PET/CT technology, to project the future development of PET and CT for PET/CT, and to discuss some issues in adopting PET/CT in RT and potential improvements in PET/CT simulation of the thorax in radiation therapy.

  14. 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Primary Hepatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Mitamura, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Yuka; Tanaka, Kenichi; Sanomura, Takayuki; Murota, Makiko; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors (PHNETs) are extremely rare neoplasms. Herein, we report a case of a 70- year-old man with a hepatic mass. The non-contrast computed tomography (CT) image showed a low-density mass, and dynamic CT images indicated the enhancement of the mass in the arterial phase and early washout in the late phase. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and fused PET/CT images showed increased uptake in the hepatic mass. Whole-body 18F-FDG PET images showed no abnormal activity except for the liver lesion. Presence of an extrahepatic tumor was also ruled out by performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, total colonoscopy, and chest and abdominal CT. A posterior segmentectomy was performed, and histologic examination confirmed a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 1). The patient was followed up for about 2 years after the resection, and no extrahepatic lesions were radiologically found. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with PHNET. To the best of our knowledge, no previous case of PHNET have been detected by 18F-FDG PET imaging.

  15. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Primary Hepatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Katsuya; Yamamoto, Yuka; Tanaka, Kenichi; Sanomura, Takayuki; Murota, Makiko; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors (PHNETs) are extremely rare neoplasms. Herein, we report a case of a 70- year-old man with a hepatic mass. The non-contrast computed tomography (CT) image showed a low-density mass, and dynamic CT images indicated the enhancement of the mass in the arterial phase and early washout in the late phase. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and fused PET/CT images showed increased uptake in the hepatic mass. Whole-body (18)F-FDG PET images showed no abnormal activity except for the liver lesion. Presence of an extrahepatic tumor was also ruled out by performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, total colonoscopy, and chest and abdominal CT. A posterior segmentectomy was performed, and histologic examination confirmed a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 1). The patient was followed up for about 2 years after the resection, and no extrahepatic lesions were radiologically found. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with PHNET. To the best of our knowledge, no previous case of PHNET have been detected by (18)F-FDG PET imaging. PMID:27408882

  16. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Toriihara, Akira; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Takemoto, Akira; Kubota, Kazunori; Machida, Youichi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated 18F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated 18F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI. PMID:27408892

  17. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Toriihara, Akira; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Takemoto, Akira; Kubota, Kazunori; Machida, Youichi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dual-time-point (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI. PMID:27408892

  18. Comparison of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT imaging in metastasized Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Epstude, Maximilian; Tornquist, Katharina; Riklin, Christian; di Lenardo, Francesca; Winterhalder, Ralph; Hug, Urs; Strobel, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but very aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the skin in elderly patients with higher mortality compared with melanoma. No evidence-based standardized chemotherapy exists for metastasized patients.We report the case of an 87-year-old patient with the history of resection of a large MCC of the parietal scalp planned for radiotherapy and staged with FDG PET/CT showing disseminated distant metastases. Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT revealed more extensive tumor load compared with FDG, and due to the intensive expression of somatostatin receptors the patient qualified for Y DOTATOC therapy. PMID:23429397

  19. Graph cut based co-segmentation of lung tumor in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Wei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Xinjian

    2015-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of pulmonary tumor is important for clinicians to make appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) are two commonly used imaging technologies for image-guided radiation therapy. In this study, we present a graph-based method to integrate the two modalities to segment the tumor simultaneously on PET and CT images. The co-segmentation problem is formulated as an energy minimization problem. Two weighted sub-graphs are constructed for PET and CT. The characteristic information of the two modalities is encoded on the edges of the graph. A context cost is enforced by adding context arcs to achieve consistent results between the two modalities. An optimal solution can be achieved by solving a maximum flow problem. The proposed segmentation method was validated on 18 sets of PET-CT images from different patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The quantitative results show significant improvement of our method with a mean DSC value 0.82.

  20. Evaluation of 68Ga-labeled MG7 antibody: a targeted probe for PET/CT imaging of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Li, Xiaowei; Yin, Jipeng; Liang, Cong; Liu, Lijuan; Qiu, Zhaoyan; Yao, Liping; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Kaichun

    2015-01-01

    MG7-Ag, a specific gastric cancer-associated antigen, can be used to non-invasively monitor gastric cancer by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, we prepared and evaluated a (68)Ga-labeled MG7 antibody as a molecular probe for nanoPET/CT imaging of gastric cancer in a BGC-823 tumor xenografted mouse model. Macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N0,N00-triacetic acid (NOTA)-conjugated MG7 antibody was synthesized and radiolabeled with (68)Ga (t1/2 = 67.71 min). Then, (68)Ga-NOTA-MG7 was tested using in vitro cytological studies, in vivo nanoPET/CT and Cerenkov imaging studies as well as ex vivo biodistribution and histology studies. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that (68)Ga-NOTA-MG7 has an excellent radiolabeling efficiency of approximately 99% without purification, and it is stable in serum after 120 min of incubation. Cell uptake and retention studies confirmed that (68)Ga-NOTA-MG7 has good binding affinity and tumor cell retention. For the nanoPET imaging study, the predominant uptake of (68)Ga-NOTA-MG7 was visualized in tumor, liver and kidneys. The tumor uptake reached at its peak (2.53 ± 0.28%ID/g) at 60 min pi. Cherenkov imaging also confirmed the specificity of tumor uptake. Moreover, the biodistribution results were consistent with the quantification data of nanoPET/CT imaging. Histologic analysis also demonstrated specific staining of BGC-823 tumor cell lines. PMID:25733152

  1. Evaluation of 68Ga-Labeled MG7 Antibody: A Targeted Probe for PET/CT Imaging of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing; Li, Xiaowei; Yin, Jipeng; Liang, Cong; Liu, Lijuan; Qiu, Zhaoyan; Yao, Liping; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Kaichun

    2015-01-01

    MG7-Ag, a specific gastric cancer-associated antigen, can be used to non-invasively monitor gastric cancer by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, we prepared and evaluated a 68Ga-labeled MG7 antibody as a molecular probe for nanoPET/CT imaging of gastric cancer in a BGC-823 tumor xenografted mouse model. Macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N0,N00-triacetic acid (NOTA)-conjugated MG7 antibody was synthesized and radiolabeled with 68Ga (t1/2 = 67.71 min). Then, 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 was tested using in vitro cytological studies, in vivo nanoPET/CT and Cerenkov imaging studies as well as ex vivo biodistribution and histology studies. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 has an excellent radiolabeling efficiency of approximately 99% without purification, and it is stable in serum after 120 min of incubation. Cell uptake and retention studies confirmed that 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 has good binding affinity and tumor cell retention. For the nanoPET imaging study, the predominant uptake of 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 was visualized in tumor, liver and kidneys. The tumor uptake reached at its peak (2.53 ± 0.28%ID/g) at 60 min pi. Cherenkov imaging also confirmed the specificity of tumor uptake. Moreover, the biodistribution results were consistent with the quantification data of nanoPET/CT imaging. Histologic analysis also demonstrated specific staining of BGC-823 tumor cell lines. PMID:25733152

  2. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-12-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans.

  3. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis: Three Case Reports Imaging Using a Tri-Modality PET/CT-MR System.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT-MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine.We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT-MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway.Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis.The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD. PMID:26765477

  4. Method for transforming CT images for attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Jonathan P.J.; Townsend, David W.; Rappoport, Vitaliy; Bendriem, Bernard

    2006-04-15

    A tube-voltage-dependent scheme is presented for transforming Hounsfield units (HU) measured by different computed tomography (CT) scanners at different x-ray tube voltages (kVp) to 511 keV linear attenuation values for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) data reconstruction. A Gammex 467 electron density CT phantom was imaged using a Siemens Sensation 16-slice CT, a Siemens Emotion 6-slice CT, a GE Lightspeed 16-slice CT, a Hitachi CXR 4-slice CT, and a Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice CT at kVp ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. All of these CT scanners are also available in combination with a PET scanner as a PET/CT tomograph. HU obtained for various reference tissue substitutes in the phantom were compared with the known linear attenuation values at 511 keV. The transformation, appropriate for lung, soft tissue, and bone, yields the function 9.6x10{sup -5}{center_dot}(HU+1000) below a threshold of {approx}50 HU and a{center_dot}(HU+1000)+b above the threshold, where a and b are fixed parameters that depend on the kVp setting. The use of the kVp-dependent scaling procedure leads to a significant improvement in reconstructed PET activity levels in phantom measurements, resolving errors of almost 40% otherwise seen for the case of dense bone phantoms at 80 kVp. Results are also presented for patient studies involving multiple CT scans at different kVp settings, which should all lead to the same 511 keV linear attenuation values. A linear fit to values obtained from 140 kVp CT images using the kVp-dependent scaling plotted as a function of the corresponding values obtained from 80 kVp CT images yielded y=1.003x-0.001 with an R{sup 2} value of 0.999, indicating that the same values are obtained to a high degree of accuracy.

  5. Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Yttrium-90 PET/CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Büsing, Karen-Anett; Schönberg, Stefan O.; Bailey, Dale L.; Willowson, Kathy; Glatting, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Yttrium-90 is known to have a low positron emission decay of 32 ppm that may allow for personalized dosimetry of liver cancer therapy with 90Y labeled microspheres. The aim of this work was to image and quantify 90Y so that accurate predictions of the absorbed dose can be made. The measurements were performed within the QUEST study (University of Sydney, and Sirtex Medical, Australia). A NEMA IEC body phantom containing 6 fillable spheres (10–37 mm ∅) was used to measure the 90Y distribution with a Biograph mCT PET/CT (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) with time-of-flight (TOF) acquisition. A sphere to background ratio of 8∶1, with a total 90Y activity of 3 GBq was used. Measurements were performed for one week (0, 3, 5 and 7 d). he acquisition protocol consisted of 30 min-2 bed positions and 120 min-single bed position. mages were reconstructed with 3D ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and point spread function (PSF) for iteration numbers of 1–12 with 21 (TOF) and 24 (non-TOF) subsets and CT based attenuation and scatter correction. Convergence of algorithms and activity recovery was assessed based on regions-of-interest (ROI) analysis of the background (100 voxels), spheres (4 voxels) and the central low density insert (25 voxels). For the largest sphere, the recovery coefficient (RC) values for the 30 min –2-bed position, 30 min-single bed and 120 min-single bed were 1.12±0.20, 1.14±0.13, 0.97±0.07 respectively. For the smaller diameter spheres, the PSF algorithm with TOF and single bed acquisition provided a comparatively better activity recovery. Quantification of Y-90 using Biograph mCT PET/CT is possible with a reasonable accuracy, the limitations being the size of the lesion and the activity concentration present. At this stage, based on our study, it seems advantageous to use different protocols depending on the size of the lesion. PMID:25369020

  6. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  7. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for imaging of chemokine receptor 4 expression in small cell lung cancer - initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Rudelius, Martina; Schmid, Jan-Stefan; Schoene, Alexander; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Pelzer, Theo; Buck, Andreas K.; Kropf, Saskia; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a key factor for tumor growth and metastasis in several types of human cancer. This study investigated the feasibility of CXCR4-directed imaging of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine ligand [68Ga]Pentixafor. 10 patients with primarily diagnosed (n=3) or pre-treated (n=7) SCLC (n=9) or large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung (LCNEC, n=1) underwent [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT. 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]FDG, n=6) and/or somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-directed PET/CT with [68Ga]DOTATOC (n=5) and immunohistochemistry (n=10) served as standards of reference. CXCR4-PET was positive in 8/10 patients and revealed more lesions with significantly higher tumor-to-background ratios than SSTR-PET. Two patients who were positive on [18F]FDG-PET were missed by CXCR4-PET, in the remainder [68Ga]Pentixafor detected an equal (n=2) or higher (n=2) number of lesions. CXCR4 expression of tumor lesions could be confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Non-invasive imaging of CXCR4 expression in SCLC is feasible. [68Ga]Pentixafor as a novel PET tracer might serve as readout for confirmation of CXCR4 expression as prerequisite for potential CXCR4-directed treatment including receptor-radio(drug)peptide therapy. PMID:26843617

  8. 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting With Unusual Muscle Involvement.

    PubMed

    Dirlik Serim, Burcu; Gurleyen Eren, Tuba; Oz Puyan, Fulya; Durmus Altun, Gülay

    2016-08-01

    Extranodal involvement is more common with Burkitt lymphoma (BL) than other subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood. According to our knowledge, there are rare cases in the literature about muscle involvement of BL, and its F-FDG PET/CT findings were not well defined. We report a 6-year-old girl with a histopathologic diagnosis of BL and referred for staging with PET/CT. FDG-avid abdominal lymph nodes and diffuse involvements of right quadriceps muscle were demonstrated. PMID:27124681

  9. PET/CT Imaging Reveals Unrivaled Placental Avidity for Glucose Compared to Other Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sawatzke, Alexander B.; Norris, Andrew W.; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Walsh, Susan A.; Acevedo, Michael R.; Hu, Shanming; Yao, Jianrong; Wang, Chunlin; Sunderland, John J.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study was to define the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood to placenta to fetus using real time imaging. Methods Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the glucose tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to temporally and spatially define, in vivo, the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood into placentae and fetuses, in the late gestational gravid rat. Computed tomography (CT), with intravenous contrast, co-registered to the PET images allowed anatomic differentiation of placentae from fetal and maternal tissues. Results FDG was rapidly taken up by placentae and subsequently appeared in fetuses with minimal temporal lag. FDG standardized uptake values in placentae and fetuses approached that of maternal brain. In both anesthetized and awake dams, one quarter of the administered FDG ultimately was accrued in the collective fetuses and placentae. Accordingly, kinetic modeling demonstrated that the placentae had very high avidity for FDG, 2-fold greater than that of the fetus and maternal brain, when accounting for the fact that fetal FDG necessarily must first be taken up by placentae. Consistent with this, placental expression of glucose transporter 1 exceeded that of all other tissues. Discussion Fetal and placental tissues place a substantial glucose metabolic burden on the mother, owing to very high avidity of placentae for glucose coupled with the large relative mass of fetal and placental tissues. Conclusions The placenta has a tremendous capacity to uptake and transport glucose. PET/CT imaging is an ideal means to study metabolite transport kinetics in the fetoplacental unit. PMID:25555498

  10. The impact of reconstruction algorithms and time of flight information on PET/CT image quality

    PubMed Central

    Suljic, Alen; Tomse, Petra; Jensterle, Luka; Skrk, Damijan

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to explore the influence of various time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF reconstruction algorithms on positron emission tomography/computer tomography (PET/CT) image quality. Materials and methods. Measurements were performed with a triple line source phantom, consisting of capillaries with internal diameter of ∼ 1 mm and standard Jaszczak phantom. Each of the data sets was reconstructed using analytical filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, iterative ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm (4 iterations, 24 subsets) and iterative True-X algorithm incorporating a specific point spread function (PSF) correction (4 iterations, 21 subsets). Baseline OSEM (2 iterations, 8 subsets) was included for comparison. Procedures were undertaken following the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU-2-2001 protocol. Results Measurement of spatial resolution in full width at half maximum (FWHM) was 5.2 mm, 4.5 mm and 2.9 mm for FBP, OSEM and True-X; and 5.1 mm, 4.5 mm and 2.9 mm for FBP+TOF, OSEM+TOF and True-X+TOF respectively. Assessment of reconstructed Jaszczak images at different concentration ratios showed that incorporation of TOF information improves cold contrast, while hot contrast only slightly, however the most prominent improvement could be seen in background variability - noise reduction. Conclusions On the basis of the results of investigation we concluded, that incorporation of TOF information in reconstruction algorithm mostly affects reduction of the background variability (levels of noise in the image), while the improvement of spatial resolution due to incorporation of TOF information is negligible. Comparison of traditional and modern reconstruction algorithms showed that analytical FBP yields comparable results in some parameter measurements, such as cold contrast and relative count error. Iterative methods show highest levels of hot contrast, when TOF and PSF corrections were applied

  11. Transconvolution and the virtual positron emission tomograph-A new method for cross calibration in quantitative PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Prenosil, George A.; Weitzel, Thilo; Hentschel, Michael; Klaeser, Bernd; Krause, Thomas

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) measurements on small lesions are impaired by the partial volume effect, which is intrinsically tied to the point spread function of the actual imaging system, including the reconstruction algorithms. The variability resulting from different point spread functions hinders the assessment of quantitative measurements in clinical routine and especially degrades comparability within multicenter trials. To improve quantitative comparability there is a need for methods to match different PET/CT systems through elimination of this systemic variability. Consequently, a new method was developed and tested that transforms the image of an object as produced by one tomograph to another image of the same object as it would have been seen by a different tomograph. The proposed new method, termed Transconvolution, compensates for differing imaging properties of different tomographs and particularly aims at quantitative comparability of PET/CT in the context of multicenter trials. Methods: To solve the problem of image normalization, the theory of Transconvolution was mathematically established together with new methods to handle point spread functions of different PET/CT systems. Knowing the point spread functions of two different imaging systems allows determining a Transconvolution function to convert one image into the other. This function is calculated by convolving one point spread function with the inverse of the other point spread function which, when adhering to certain boundary conditions such as the use of linear acquisition and image reconstruction methods, is a numerically accessible operation. For reliable measurement of such point spread functions characterizing different PET/CT systems, a dedicated solid-state phantom incorporating {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga filled spheres was developed. To iteratively determine and represent such point spread functions, exponential density functions in combination

  12. A Comparison of Techniques for 90Y PET/CT Image-Based Dosimetry Following Radioembolization with Resin Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bourgeois, Austin C.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2014-01-01

    90Y PET/CT following radioembolization has recently been established as a viable diagnostic tool, capable of producing images that are both quantitative and have superior image quality than alternative 90Y imaging modalities. Because radioembolization is assumed to be a permanent implant, it is possible to convert quantitative 90Y PET image sets into data representative of spatial committed absorbed-dose. Multiple authors have performed this transformation using dose-point kernel (DPK) convolution to account for the transport of the high-energy 90Y β-particles. This article explores a technique called the Local Deposition Method (LDM), an alternative to DPK convolution for 90Y image-based dosimetry. The LDM assumes that the kinetic energy from each 90Y β-particle is deposited locally, within the voxel where the decay occurred. Using the combined analysis of phantoms scanned using 90Y PET/CT and ideal mathematical phantoms, an accuracy comparison of DPK convolution and the LDM has been performed. Based on the presented analysis, DPK convolution provides no detectible accuracy benefit over the LDM for 90Y PET-based dosimetry. For PET systems with 90Y resolution poorer than 3.25 mm at full-width and half-max using a small voxel size, the LDM may produce a dosimetric solution that is more accurate than DPK convolution under ideal conditions; however, image noise can obscure some of the perceived benefit. As voxel size increases and resolution decreases, differences between the LDM and DPK convolution are reduced. The LDM method of post-radioembolization dosimetry has the advantage of not requiring additional post-processing. The provided conversion factors can be used to determine committed absorbed-dose using conventional PET image analysis tools. The LDM is a recommended option for routine post-radioembolization 90Y dosimetry based on PET/CT imaging. PMID:24904832

  13. A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

  14. PET/CT and Bremsstrahlung Imaging After 90Y DOTANOC Therapy for Rectal Net With Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Abdülrezzak, Ümmühan; Kula, Mustafa; Tutuş, Ahmet; Buyukkaya, Fikret; Karaca, Halit

    2015-10-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu or Y is promising with successful results in somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. In all radiation therapies, knowledge of the radiation dose received by the target, and other organs in the body is essential to evaluate the risks and benefits of any procedure. We report a case of liver metastases from a rectal neuroendocrine tumor, which was treated with Y DOTANOC. Posttreatment whole-body planar images were acquired through Bremsstrahlung radiations of Y on a γ-camera, and thoracolumbar PET/CT images were acquired on PET. PMID:26204211

  15. Can technical characteristics predict clinical performance in PET/CT imaging? A correlation study for thyroid cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Pianou, Nikoletta; Metaxas, Marinos; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether image characteristics could be used to predict the outcome of ROC studies in PET/CT imaging. Patients suspected for recurrent thyroid cancer underwent a standard whole body (WB) examination and an additional high-resolution head-and-neck (HN) F18-FDG PET/CT scan. The value of the latter was determined with an ROC study, the results of which showed that the WB+HN combination was better than WB alone for thyroid cancer detection and diagnosis. Following the ROC experiment, the WB and HN images of confirmed benign or malignant thyroid disease were analyzed and first and second order textural features were determined. Features included minimum, mean, and maximum intensity, as well as contrast in regions of interest encircling the thyroid lesions. Lesion size and standard uptake values (SUV) were also determined. Bivariate analysis was applied to determine relationships between WB and HN features and between observer ROC responses and the various feature values. The two sets showed significant associations in the values of SUV, contrast, and lesion size. They were completely different when the intensities were considered; no relationship was found between the WB minimum, maximum, and mean ROI values and their HN counterparts. SUV and contrast were the strongest predictors of ROC performance on PET/CT examinations of thyroid cancer. The high resolution HN images seem to enhance these relationships but without a single dramatic effect as was projected from the ROC results. A combination of features from both WB and HN datasets may possibly be a more robust predictor of ROC performance.

  16. PET/CT imaging for treatment verification after proton therapy: a study with plastic phantoms and metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Cascio, Ethan; Flanz, Jacob B; Bonab, Ali A; Alpert, Nathaniel M; Lohmann, Kevin; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of off-line positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for routine three dimensional in-vivo treatment verification of proton radiation therapy is currently under investigation at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In preparation for clinical trials, phantom experiments were carried out to investigate the sensitivity and accuracy of the method depending on irradiation and imaging parameters. Furthermore, they addressed the feasibility of PET/CT as a robust verification tool in the presence of metallic implants. These produce x-ray CT artifacts and fluence perturbations which may compromise the accuracy of treatment planning algorithms. Spread-out Bragg peak proton fields were delivered to different phantoms consisting of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), PMMA stacked with lung and bone equivalent materials, and PMMA with titanium rods to mimic implants in patients. PET data were acquired in list mode starting within 20 min after irradiation at a commercial luthetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT scanner. The amount and spatial distribution of the measured activity could be well reproduced by calculations based on the GEANT4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes. This phantom study supports the potential of millimeter accuracy for range monitoring and lateral field position verification even after low therapeutic dose exposures of 2 Gy, despite the delay between irradiation and imaging. It also indicates the value of PET for treatment verification in the presence of metallic implants, demonstrating a higher sensitivity to fluence perturbations in comparison to a commercial analytical treatment planning system. Finally, it addresses the suitability of LSO-based PET detectors for hadron therapy monitoring. This unconventional application of PET involves countrates which are orders of magnitude lower than in diagnostic tracer imaging, i.e., the signal of interest is comparable to the noise originating from the intrinsic radioactivity of

  17. PET/CT imaging for treatment verification after proton therapy: A study with plastic phantoms and metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Cascio, Ethan; Flanz, Jacob B.; Bonab, Ali A.; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Lohmann, Kevin; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    The feasibility of off-line positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for routine three dimensional in-vivo treatment verification of proton radiation therapy is currently under investigation at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In preparation for clinical trials, phantom experiments were carried out to investigate the sensitivity and accuracy of the method depending on irradiation and imaging parameters. Furthermore, they addressed the feasibility of PET/CT as a robust verification tool in the presence of metallic implants. These produce x-ray CT artifacts and fluence perturbations which may compromise the accuracy of treatment planning algorithms. Spread-out Bragg peak proton fields were delivered to different phantoms consisting of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), PMMA stacked with lung and bone equivalent materials, and PMMA with titanium rods to mimic implants in patients. PET data were acquired in list mode starting within 20 min after irradiation at a commercial luthetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT scanner. The amount and spatial distribution of the measured activity could be well reproduced by calculations based on the GEANT4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes. This phantom study supports the potential of millimeter accuracy for range monitoring and lateral field position verification even after low therapeutic dose exposures of 2 Gy, despite the delay between irradiation and imaging. It also indicates the value of PET for treatment verification in the presence of metallic implants, demonstrating a higher sensitivity to fluence perturbations in comparison to a commercial analytical treatment planning system. Finally, it addresses the suitability of LSO-based PET detectors for hadron therapy monitoring. This unconventional application of PET involves countrates which are orders of magnitude lower than in diagnostic tracer imaging, i.e., the signal of interest is comparable to the noise originating from the intrinsic radioactivity of

  18. High-throughput multiple-mouse imaging with micro-PET/CT for whole-skeleton assessment

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Masashi; Arentsen, Luke; Shanley, Ryan M; Hui, Susanta K

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have proven that skeleton-wide functional assessment is essential to comprehensively understand physiological aspects of the skeletal system. Therefore, in contrast to regional imaging studies utilizing a multiple-animal holder (mouse hotel), we attempted to develop and characterize a multiple-mouse imaging system with micro-PET/CT for high-throughput whole-skeleton assessment. Using items found in a laboratory, a simple mouse hotel that houses four mice linked with gas anesthesia was constructed. A mouse-simulating phantom was used to measure uniformity in a cross sectional area and flatness (Amax/Amin*100) along the axial, radial and tangential directions, where Amax and Amin are maximum and minimum activity concentration in the profile, respectively. Fourteen mice were used for single- or multiple-micro-PET/CT scans. NaF uptake was measured at eight skeletal sites (skull to tibia). Skeletal 18F activities measured with mice in the mouse hotel were within 1.6±4% (mean±standard deviation) of those measured with mice in the single-mouse holder. Single-holder scanning yields slightly better uniformity and flatness over the hotel. Compared to use of the single-mouse holder, scanning with the mouse hotel reduced study time (by 65%), decreased the number of scans (four-fold), reduced cost, required less computer storage space (40%), and maximized 18F usage. The mouse hotel allows high-throughput, quantitatively equivalent scanning compared to the single-mouse holder for micro-PET/CT imaging for whole-skeleton assessment of mice. PMID:24998335

  19. Ambient radiation levels in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging center

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; de Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos; Mamede, Marcelo; Silveira, Mariana de Castro; Aguiar, Polyanna; Real, Raphaela Vila; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the level of ambient radiation in a PET/CT center. Materials and Methods Previously selected and calibrated TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters were utilized to measure room radiation levels. During 32 days, the detectors were placed in several strategically selected points inside the PET/CT center and in adjacent buildings. After the exposure period the dosimeters were collected and processed to determine the radiation level. Results In none of the points selected for measurements the values exceeded the radiation dose threshold for controlled area (5 mSv/year) or free area (0.5 mSv/year) as recommended by the Brazilian regulations. Conclusion In the present study the authors demonstrated that the whole shielding system is appropriate and, consequently, the workers are exposed to doses below the threshold established by Brazilian standards, provided the radiation protection standards are followed. PMID:25798004

  20. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Physiologic Imaging of Choroidal Melanoma: Before and After Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate changes in [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) standardized uptake values (SUV) in uveal melanoma before and after plaque brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 217 patients diagnosed with uveal melanoma and eligible for ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy underwent preoperative PET/CT to evaluate their intraocular tumor and screen for metastasis. Subsequent to undergoing plaque brachytherapy, patients' PET/CT SUV were periodically reevaluated over 42 months. Results: In this series, 37 (17%) choroidal melanoma patients were found to have an SUV of >2.0. Of these, 18 patients were able to undergo interval follow-up PET/CT scanning. There were 3 patients with T2, 11 patients with T3, and 4 patients with T4 melanomas according to 7th edition AJCC-UICC criteria. Mean apical thickness was 8.8 mm (range, 3-12.3 mm), and the largest mean tumor diameter was 15.1 mm (range, 12-19.9 mm). The mean initial SUV was 3.7 (range, 2.1-7.3). Patients were followed for a median 16 months (range, 6-42 months). The median time to a tumor SUV of 0 was 8.0 months (range, 6-18 months). There was one case of one interval increase in SUV that diminished after circumferential laser treatment. Conclusions: Intraocular PET/CT imaging provides a physiological assessment of tumor metabolism that can be used to evaluate changes after treatment. In this study, ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy was associated with extinguished tumor PET/CT SUV over time. PET/CT imaging can be used to assess choroidal melanomas for their response to treatment.

  1. Evaluation of 18F-FDG PET/CT as a diagnostic imaging and staging tool for feline oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Randall, E K; Kraft, S L; Yoshikawa, H; LaRue, S M

    2016-03-01

    18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) has been shown to be effective for staging human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) but its application for cats with oral SCC is unknown. Twelve cats with biopsy-proven oral SCC were imaged with whole body 18FDG-PET/CT to determine its value as a diagnostic imaging and staging tool and fine needle aspirates were obtained of accessible regional lymph nodes. All tumors were FDG avid and conspicuous on 18FDG-PET/CT images, with an average of the maximum standardized uptake value 9.88 ± 5.33 SD (range 2.9-24.9). Soft tissue infiltrative tumors that were subtle and ill defined on CT were highly visible and more extensive on FDG-PET/CT. Tumors invading the osseous structures were more similar in extent on 18FDG-PET/CT and CT although they were more conspicuous on PET images. Three cytologically confirmed metastases were hypermetabolic on PET, while two of those metastases were equivocal on CT. PMID:23782408

  2. Design and performance of a respiratory amplitude gating device for PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Guoping; Chang Tingting; Clark, John W. Jr.; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, the authors proposed a free-breathing amplitude gating (FBAG) technique for PET/CT scanners. The implementation of this technique required specialized hardware and software components that were specifically designed to interface with commercial respiratory gating devices to generate the necessary triggers required for the FBAG technique. The objective of this technical note is to introduce an in-house device that integrates all the necessary hardware and software components as well as tracks the patient's respiratory motion to realize amplitude gating on PET/CT scanners. Methods: The in-house device is composed of a piezoelectric transducer coupled to a data-acquisition system in order to monitor the respiratory waveform. A LABVIEW program was designed to control the data-acquisition device and inject triggers into the PET list stream whenever the detected respiratory amplitude crossed a predetermined amplitude range. A timer was also programmed to stop the scan when the accumulated time within the selected amplitude range reached a user-set interval. This device was tested using a volunteer and a phantom study. Results: The results from the volunteer and phantom studies showed that the in-house device can detect similar respiratory signals as commercially available respiratory gating systems and is able to generate the necessary triggers to suppress respiratory motion artifacts. Conclusions: The proposed in-house device can be used to implement the FBAG technique in current PET/CT scanners.

  3. Case report of PET/CT imaging of a patient with neuroblastoma using 18F-FPBG.

    PubMed

    Suh, Minseok; Park, Hyo Jin; Choi, Hyoung Soo; So, Young; Lee, Byung Chul; Lee, Won Woo

    2014-12-01

    The use of an (18)F-labeled radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of sympathetic neuronal activity has a tremendous clinical impact because it circumvents the substantial drawbacks of the prototypical imaging agent, (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). We describe a 14-year-old male patient who had neuroblastoma and underwent (18)F-fluoropropylbenzylguanidine (FPBG) PET/computed tomography (CT). We compared the findings of (18)F-FPBG PET/CT with those of (123)I-MIBG γ scintigraphy. (18)F-FPBG PET/CT readily demonstrated a focal lesion in the left tibia, but the lesion was not seen using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy. Surgical resection proved the presence of a neuroblastoma lesion in the left tibia. To the best of our knowledge, our study was the first to use an (18)F-labeled radiopharmaceutical for evaluating sympathetic neuronal activity in neuroblastoma. We suggest that (18)F-FPBG is a promising PET agent for imaging sympathetic neuronal activity in neuroblastoma. PMID:25422010

  4. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, S. R.; Nyflot, M. J.; Herrmann, C.; Groh, C. M.; Meyer, J.; Wollenweber, S. D.; Stearns, C. W.; Kinahan, P. E.; Sandison, G. A.

    2015-05-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT

  5. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by 6 different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses (EUD), and 2%-2mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, < 5% in treatment planning, and < 2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT

  6. A Comparative Study of Noninvasive Hypoxia Imaging with 18F-Fluoroerythronitroimidazole and 18F-Fluoromisonidazole PET/CT in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Yu, Qingxi; Zhu, Shouhui; Wang, Suzhen; Zhao, Shuqiang; Hu, Xudong; Yu, Jinming; Yuan, Shuanghu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This is a clinical study to compare noninvasive hypoxia imaging using 18F-fluoroerythronitroimidazole (18F-FETNIM) and 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer. Methods A total of forty-two patients with inoperable stages III–IV lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT (n = 18) and 18F-FMISO PET/CT (n = 24) before chemo/radiation therapy. The standard uptake values (SUVs) of malignant and normal tissues depict 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT uptake. Tumor-to-blood ratios (T/B) were used to quantify hypoxia. Results All patients with lung cancer underwent 18F-FETNIM PET/CT and 18F-FMISO PET/CT successfully. Compared to 18F-FMISO, 18F-FETNIM showed similar uptake in muscle, thyroid, spleen, pancreas, heart, lung and different uptake in blood, liver, and kidney. Significantly higher SUV and T/B ratio with 18F-FMISO (2.56±0.77, 1.98±0.54), as compared to 18F-FETNIM (2.12±0.56, 1.42±0.33) were seen in tumor, P = 0.022, <0.001. For the patients with different histopathological subtypes, no significant difference of SUV (or T/B ratio) was observed both in 18F-FMISO and 18F-FETNIM in tumor. A significantly different SUV (or T/B ratio) was detected between < = 2cm, 2~5cm, and >5cm groups in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.015 (or P = 0.029), whereas no difference was detected in 18F-FMISO PET/CT, P = 0.446 (or P = 0.707). Both 18F-FETNIM and 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher SUVs (or T/B ratios) in stage IV than stage III, P = 0.021, 0.013 (or P = 0.032, 0.02). Conclusion 18F-FMISO showed significantly higher uptake than 18F-FETNIM in tumor/non-tumor ratio and might be a better hypoxia tracer in lung cancer. PMID:27322586

  7. Superiority of [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT to other functional imaging modalities in the localization of SDHB-associated metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Ingo; Blanchet, Elise M.; Adams, Karen; Chen, Clara C.; Millo, Corina M.; Herscovitch, Peter; Taieb, David; Kebebew, Electron; Lehnert, Hendrik; Fojo, Antonio T.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patients with succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) mutation-related pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma (PHEO/PGL) are at a higher risk for metastatic disease than other hereditary PHEOs/PGLs. Current therapeutic approaches are limited but the best outcomes are based on the early and proper detection of as many lesions as possible. Because PHEOs/PGLs overexpress somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), the goal of our study was to assess the clinical utility of [68Ga]-DOTA(0)-Tyr(3)-octreotate ([68Ga]-DOTATATE) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and to evaluate its diagnostic utility in comparison to the currently recommended functional imaging modalities [18F]-fluorodopamine ([18F]-FDA), [18F]-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ([18F]-FDOPA), [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) PET/CT as well as CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Experimental Design [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT was prospectively performed in 17 patients with SDHB-related metastatic PHEOs/PGLs. All patients also underwent [18F]-FDG PET/CT and CT/MRI with 16 of the 17 patients also receiving [18F]-FDOPA and [18F]-FDA PET/CT scans. Detection rates of metastatic lesions were compared between all these functional imaging studies. A composite synthesis of all used functional and anatomical imaging studies served as the imaging comparator. Results [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT demonstrated a lesion-based detection rate of 98.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 96.5% to 99.5%), [18F]-FDG, [18F]-FDOPA, [18F]-FDA PET/CT, and CT/MRI showed detection rates of 85.8% (CI 81.3% to 89.4%) (p<0.01), 61.4% (CI 55.6% to 66.9%) (p<0.01), 51.9% (CI 46.1% to 57.7%) (p<0.01), and 84.8% (CI 80.0% to 88.5%) (p<0.01), respectively. Conclusions [68Ga]-DOTATATE PET/CT showed a significantly superior detection rate compared to all other functional and anatomical imaging modalities and may represent the preferred future imaging modality in the evaluation of SDHB-related metastatic PHEO/PGL. PMID:25873086

  8. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Wollenweber, Scott D.; Stearns, Charles W.; Bowen, Stephen R.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET/CT in the ground truth setting. Methods: A programmable respiratory motion phantom with a custom movable insert designed to emulate a lung lesion and lung tissue was used for this study. The insert was driven by one of five waveforms: two sinusoidal waveforms or three patient-specific respiratory waveforms. 3DPET and 4DPET images of the phantom under motion were acquired and reconstructed with six CTAC methods: helical breath-hold (3DHEL), helical free-breathing (3DMOT), 4D phase-averaged (4DAVG), 4D maximum intensity projection (4DMIP), 4D phase-matched (4DMATCH), and 4D end-exhale (4DEXH) CTAC. Recovery of SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, SUV{sub peak}, and segmented tumor volume was evaluated as RC{sub max}, RC{sub mean}, RC{sub peak}, and RC{sub vol}, representing percent difference relative to the static ground truth case. Paired Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA were used to test for significant differences. Results: For 4DPET imaging, the maximum intensity projection CTAC produced significantly more accurate recovery coefficients than all other CTAC methods (p < 0.0001 over all metrics). Over all motion waveforms, ratios of 4DMIP CTAC recovery were 0.2 ± 5.4, −1.8 ± 6.5, −3.2 ± 5.0, and 3.0 ± 5.9 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. In comparison, recovery coefficients for phase-matched CTAC were −8.4 ± 5.3, −10.5 ± 6.2, −7.6 ± 5.0, and −13.0 ± 7.7 for RC{sub max}, RC{sub peak}, RC{sub mean}, and RC{sub vol}. When testing differences between phases over all CTAC methods and waveforms, end-exhale phases were significantly more accurate (p = 0.005). However, these differences were driven by

  9. Imaging of Hepatic Ectopic Pregnancy by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jingwen; Cheng, Zhen; Hu, Na; Xiao, Lizhi; Wang, Yunhua

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic ectopic pregnancy is an uncommon form of extrauterine pregnancy. A 31-year-old woman had acute abdominal pain and distention. Laboratory examination showed significantly increased serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin level. Both ultrasound and MRI identified a lesion located at the right lobe of the liver. FDG PET/CT was performed to determine whether the other causes of elevated β-human chorionic gonadotropin level, which showed an oval mass with mid peripherally increased FDG activity. After surgery, pathological results confirmed a diagnosis of hepatic ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27454601

  10. Molecular Imaging of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT: Comparison With 18F-FDG.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Jonigk, Danny; Bauersachs, Johann; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of ST-elevation myocardial infarction who underwent 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT for characterization of postinfarct myocardial inflammation. 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT incidentally demonstrated marked CXCR4 expression in a space-occupying lesion in the right upper lobe. Corresponding 18F-FDG PET/CT showed increased metabolism, and subsequent biopsy revealed non-small cell lung cancer. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that CXCR4 was highly expressed on tumor cells. 68Ga-Pentixafor is a novel CXCR4-targeted probe for PET imaging of CXCR4-positive tumors and holds promise for tumor staging and prognostic stratification. CXCR4-targeted radionuclide therapy represents a therapy option in metastasized diseases. PMID:26756098

  11. Very low-dose adult whole-body tumor imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Naveed, Muhammad; McGrath, Mary; Lisi, Michele; Lavalley, Cathy; Feiglin, David

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if effective radiation dose due to PET component in adult whole-body tumor imaging with time-of-flight F-18 FDG PET/CT could be significantly reduced. We retrospectively analyzed data for 10 patients with the body mass index ranging from 25 to 50. We simulated F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose via reconstruction of simulated shorter acquisition time per bed position scans from the acquired list data. F-18 FDG whole-body scans were reconstructed using time-of-flight OSEM algorithm and advanced system modeling. Two groups of images were obtained: group A with a standard dose of F-18 FDG and standard reconstruction parameters and group B with simulated 25% dose and modified reconstruction parameters, respectively. Three nuclear medicine physicians blinded to the simulated activity independently reviewed the images and compared diagnostic quality of images. Based on the input from the physicians, we selected optimal modified reconstruction parameters for group B. In so obtained images, all the lesions observed in the group A were visible in the group B. The tumor SUV values were different in the group A, as compared to group B, respectively. However, no significant differences were reported in the final interpretation of the images from A and B groups. In conclusion, for a small number of patients, we have demonstrated that F-18 FDG dose reduction to 25% of the ACR recommended dose, accompanied by appropriate modification of the reconstruction parameters provided adequate diagnostic quality of PET images acquired on time-of-flight PET/CT.

  12. MO-G-17A-08: Applications of Quantitative PET/CT Imaging of Yttrium-90: A Tool for Improving Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; Bradley, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Yttrium-90 (Y90) PET/CT post-treatment imaging of radioembolization has fostered significant interest from both the interventional radiology and nuclear medicine communities over the past few years. Recent literature has demonstrated high quantitative accuracy of Y90 PET at the activity concentrations common in radioembolization. However, few have explored methods in which this information can be clinically applied toward improving patient care. Methods: IRB approval and informed consent was obtained for over 35 Y90 post-treatment imaging studies, performed under 2 distinct protocols. In protocol 1, Y90 PET/CT provided quantitative post-treatment imaging, which was then converted into 3D maps of absorbed-dose. Both images and absorbed dose maps were used to manage patient care. In protocol 2, tumor absorbed-dose measurements from Y90 PET/CT were compared to known tumoricidal thresholds. If insufficient absorbed dose was delivered to the tumor, the patient would have an additional Y90 infusion the same day, providing truly patient-specific Y90 PET/CT based treatment-planning. Results: Y90 PET/CT allowed for a superior post-radioembolization evaluation of technical success compared with conventional Y90 bremsstrahlung SPECT. Due to the exceptional resolution of PET, a direct comparison between the distribution of radioembolization and pre-treatment planning intentions can be made. Further, quantification of tumor absorbed-dose directly from PET/CT imaging allows for the prediction of treatment efficacy based on a comparison with known tumoricidal thresholds. This immediate evaluation allowed treating physicians to consider additional or alternate therapies before discovering clinical failure weeks later. One protocol 2 patient was found to have a subtumoricidal absorbed dose following radioembolization. This patient received a same-day infusion of additional Y90 with identical catheter placement to the first infusion. A robust treatment response was seen on

  13. [18F]-NaF PET/CT imaging in cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Galat, Arnault; Rosso, Jean; Guellich, Aziz; Garot, Jérôme; Bodez, Diane; Plante-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Hittinger, Luc; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Evangelista, Eva; Sasanelli, Myriam; Chalaye, Julia; Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel; Damy, Thibaud

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac amyloidosis (CA) is recognized as a common cause of restrictive cardiomyopathy and heart failure due to the deposition of insoluble proteins in the myocardial interstitium. We emphasize the role of [18F]-sodium fluoride (NaF) PET/CT as a potential noninvasive tool to identify and differentiate the transthyretin-related cardiac amyloidosis from the light-chain cardiac amyloidosis. We report cases of a 73-year-old man and a 75-year-old woman followed in our center for congestive heart failure with marked alteration of the left ventricular ejection fraction due to familial transthyretin Val122Ile cardiac amyloidosis and light-chain cardiac amyloidosis, respectively, confirmed on endomyocardial biopsy. PMID:26403145

  14. Metabolically Active Brown Fat Mimicking Pericardial Metastasis on PET/CT: The Discriminating Role of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Maude; Quarto, Cesare; Mancuso, Enrico; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2016-08-01

    Metabolically active mediastinal brown adipose tissue may be mistakenly diagnosed as a malignancy on 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)/positron emission tomography (PET). We report the case of a patient with locally recurrent breast carcinoma in which staging PET/CT revealed a suspicious pericardial lesion for which the patient was referred to our centre. The novelty of this case resides in the fact that by tissue characterization, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging allowed the determination that the lesion corresponded to brown fat, a reassuring finding with important impact on management, because the presence of pericardial metastasis would have disqualified this patient for curative resection of her cancer recurrence. PMID:26860773

  15. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  16. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy.

    PubMed

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E; Maguire, Gerald Q; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-21

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  17. Accuracy of 3D volumetric image registration based on CT, MR and PET/CT phantom experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Xie, Huchen; Ning, Holly; Citrin, Deborah; Capala, Jacek; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Guion, Peter; Arora, Barbara; Coleman, Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Registration is critical for image-based treatment planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Although automatic registration is available, manual, visual-based image fusion using three orthogonal planar views (3P) is always employed clinically to verify and adjust an automatic registration result. However, the 3P fusion can be time consuming, observer dependent, as well as prone to errors, owing to the incomplete 3-dimensional (3D) volumetric image representations. It is also limited to single-pixel precision (the screen resolution). The 3D volumetric image registration (3DVIR) technique was developed to overcome these shortcomings. This technique introduces a 4th dimension in the registration criteria beyond the image volume, offering both visual and quantitative correlation of corresponding anatomic landmarks within the two registration images, facilitating a volumetric image alignment, and minimizing potential registration errors. The 3DVIR combines image classification in real-time to select and visualize a reliable anatomic landmark, rather than using all voxels for alignment. To determine the detection limit of the visual and quantitative 3DVIR criteria, slightly misaligned images were simulated and presented to eight clinical personnel for interpretation. Both of the criteria produce a detection limit of 0.1 mm and 0.1 degree. To determine the accuracy of the 3DVIR method, three imaging modalities (CT, MR and PET/CT) were used to acquire multiple phantom images with known spatial shifts. Lateral shifts were applied to these phantoms with displacement intervals of 5.0+/-0.1 mm. The accuracy of the 3DVIR technique was determined by comparing the image shifts determined through registration to the physical shifts made experimentally. The registration accuracy, together with precision, was found to be: 0.02+/-0.09 mm for CT/CT images, 0.03+/-0.07 mm for MR/MR images, and 0.03+/-0.35 mm for PET/CT images. This accuracy is consistent with the detection limit

  18. Characterizing active and inactive brown adipose tissue in adult humans using PET-CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Aliya; Towse, Theodore F; Walker, Ronald C; Avison, Malcolm J; Welch, E Brian

    2016-07-01

    Activated brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermogenesis and whole body metabolism in mammals. Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging has identified depots of BAT in adult humans, igniting scientific interest. The purpose of this study is to characterize both active and inactive supraclavicular BAT in adults and compare the values to those of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT). We obtained [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 25 healthy adults. Unlike [(18)F]FDG PET, which can detect only active BAT, MRI is capable of detecting both active and inactive BAT. The MRI-derived fat signal fraction (FSF) of active BAT was significantly lower than that of inactive BAT (means ± SD; 60.2 ± 7.6 vs. 62.4 ± 6.8%, respectively). This change in tissue morphology was also reflected as a significant increase in Hounsfield units (HU; -69.4 ± 11.5 vs. -74.5 ± 9.7 HU, respectively). Additionally, the CT HU, MRI FSF, and MRI R2* values are significantly different between BAT and WAT, regardless of the activation status of BAT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify PET-CT and MRI FSF measurements and utilize a semiautomated algorithm to identify inactive and active BAT in the same adult subjects. Our findings support the use of these metrics to characterize and distinguish between BAT and WAT and lay the foundation for future MRI analysis with the hope that some day MRI-based delineation of BAT can stand on its own. PMID:27166284

  19. PET/CT: fundamental principles.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Marcus D

    2004-05-28

    Positron emission tomography (PET) facilitates the evaluation of metabolic and molecular characteristics of a wide variety of cancers, but is limited in its ability to visualize anatomical structures. Computed tomography (CT) facilitates the evaluation of anatomical structures of cancers, but can not visualize their metabolic and molecular aspects. Therefore, the combination of PET and CT provides the ability to accurately register metabolic and molecular aspects of disease with anatomical findings, adding further information to the diagnosis and staging of tumors. The recent generation of high performance PET/CT scanners combines a state of the art full-ring 3D PET scanner and a high-end 16-slice CT scanner. In PET/CT scanners, a CT examination is used for attenuation correction of PET images rather than standard transmission scanning using superset 68 Ge sources. This reduces the examination time, but metallic objects and contrast agents that alter the CT image quality and quantitative measurements of standardized uptake values (SUV) may lead to artifacts in the PET images. Hybrid PET/CT imaging will be very important in oncological applications in the decades to come, and possibly for use in cancer screening and cardiac imaging. PMID:15257877

  20. Is there an added clinical value of "true"whole body(18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with malignant melanoma?

    PubMed

    Tan, Julie C; Chatterton, Barry E

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and reliable staging of disease extent in patients with malignant MM is essential to ensure appropriate treatment planning. The detection of recurrent or residual malignancy after primary treatment is important to allow for early intervention and to optimise patient survival. 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET or PET computed tomography (PET/CT) is indicated for surveillance of malignant MM due to its high sensitivity and specificity for soft-tissue or nodal recurrences and metastases. It has been claimed that including lower extremities and skull in addition to 'eyes to thigh' images in PET/CT evaluation of metastatic MM routinely is warranted. We have studied retrospectively the reports of whole-body PET/CT scans in all patients with MM scanned in our Department from April 2005 to December 2010. All PET abnormalities in the brain/scalp and lower extremities were tabulated by location and whether they were 'expected' or 'unexpected'. Findings were correlated with pathology, other imaging studies, and clinical follow-up. In this study, 398 PET/CT examinations in 361 patients with MM were included. Results showed that twelve of the 398 (3%) scans had brain/scalp abnormalities, with only 4 (1.0%) showing unexpected abnormalities. Twenty nine of the 398 (7.2%) scans showed lower extremity abnormalities, with only 5 (1.2%) showing unexpected abnormalities. In no case was an isolated unexpected malignant lesion identified in the brain/scalp or lower extremities. In conclusion, whole body PET/CT scan showed about 1% unexpected primary or metastatic MM lesions involving the head or lower extremities, which seldom offered significant additional clinical benefit and were unlikely to change clinical management. No clinically significant change in staging would have occurred. Routine 'eyes to thighs' images were adequate for this subset of patients. PMID:23106051

  1. Myeloma bone and extra-medullary disease: Role of PET/CT and other whole-body imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Giuseppe; Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Ferrari, Cristina; Racanelli, Vito; Maggialetti, Nicola; Dammacco, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy. Although it can affect different organs, the bone compartment stands out both in terms of prevalence and clinical impact. Despite the striking advances in MM therapy, bone disease can remarkably affect the patient's quality of life. The occurrence and extension of bone marrow and extra-medullary involvement should be carefully assessed to confirm the diagnosis, to locate and whenever possible prevent dreadful complications such as pathological fractures and spinal cord compression, and to establish suitable therapeutic measures. Many imaging techniques have been proposed for the detection of MM skeletal involvement. With the development of more sophisticated imaging tools, it is time to use the right technique at the right time. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, this article discusses advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging methods in the work-up of MM patients, with particular emphasis on the role that PET/CT can play. It is emphasized that whole body low-dose computed tomography should be the preferred imaging technique at baseline. However, bone marrow infiltration and extra-medullary manifestations are better detected by whole body magnetic resonance imaging. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography, on the other hand, combines the benefits of the two mentioned imaging procedures and is particularly useful not only for the detection of osteolytic lesions unrevealed by conventional X-ray, but also in the assessment of prognosis and therapeutic response. PMID:26997302

  2. Combined {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT Imaging in Radiotherapy Target Delineation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Alessandra; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Rombi, Barbara; Castellucci, Paolo; Cecconi, Agnese; Bunkheila, Feisal; Fuccio, Chiara; Spezi, Emiliano; Angelini, Anna Lisa; Barbieri, Enza

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of the use of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in radiotherapy target delineation for head-and-neck cancer compared with CT alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 consecutive patients with head-and-neck cancer were included in this study. The primary tumor sites were as follow: 20 oropharyngeal tumors, 4 laryngeal tumors, 2 hypopharyngeal tumors, 2 paranasal sinuses tumors, 9 nasopharyngeal tumors, and 1 parotid gland tumor. The FDG-PET and CT scans were performed with a dedicated PET/CT scanner in one session and then fused. Subsequently, patients underwent treatment planning CT with intravenous contrast enhancement. The radiation oncologist defined all gross tumor volumes (GTVs) using both the PET/CT and CT scans. Results: In 35 (92%) of 38 cases, the CT-based GTVs were larger than the PET/CT-based GTVs. The average total GTV from the CT and PET/CT scans was 34.54 cm{sup 3} (range, 3.56-109) and 29.38 cm{sup 3} (range, 2.87-95.02), respectively (p < 0.05). Separate analyses of the difference between the CT- and PET/CT-based GTVs of the primary tumor compared with the GTVs of nodal disease were not statistically significant. The comparison between the PET/CT-based and CT-based boost planning target volumes did not show a statistically significant difference. All patients were alive at the end of the follow-up period (range, 3-38 months). Conclusion: GTVs, but not planning target volumes, were significantly changed by the implementation of combined PET/CT. Large multicenter studies are needed to ascertain whether combined PET/CT in target delineation can influence the main clinical outcomes.

  3. Topology polymorphism graph for lung tumor segmentation in PET-CT images.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hui; Wang, Xiuying; Zhou, Jianlong; Eberl, Stefan; Yin, Yong; Feng, Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2015-06-21

    Accurate lung tumor segmentation is problematic when the tumor boundary or edge, which reflects the advancing edge of the tumor, is difficult to discern on chest CT or PET. We propose a 'topo-poly' graph model to improve identification of the tumor extent. Our model incorporates an intensity graph and a topology graph. The intensity graph provides the joint PET-CT foreground similarity to differentiate the tumor from surrounding tissues. The topology graph is defined on the basis of contour tree to reflect the inclusion and exclusion relationship of regions. By taking into account different topology relations, the edges in our model exhibit topological polymorphism. These polymorphic edges in turn affect the energy cost when crossing different topology regions under a random walk framework, and hence contribute to appropriate tumor delineation. We validated our method on 40 patients with non-small cell lung cancer where the tumors were manually delineated by a clinical expert. The studies were separated into an 'isolated' group (n = 20) where the lung tumor was located in the lung parenchyma and away from associated structures / tissues in the thorax and a 'complex' group (n = 20) where the tumor abutted / involved a variety of adjacent structures and had heterogeneous FDG uptake. The methods were validated using Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap and Hausdorff distance (HD) to compare shape similarity calculated as the maximum surface distance between the segmentation results and the manual delineations. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.881 ± 0.046 and HD of 5.311 ± 3.022 mm for the isolated cases and DSC of 0.870 ± 0.038 and HD of 9.370 ± 3.169 mm for the complex cases. Student's t-test showed that our model outperformed the other methods (p-values <0.05). PMID:26056866

  4. Is There an Additional Value of {sup 11}C-Choline PET-CT to T2-weighted MRI Images in the Localization of Intraprostatic Tumor Nodules?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Laura; Koole, Michel; Isebaert, Sofie; Joniau, Steven; Deroose, Christophe M.; Oyen, Raymond; Lerut, Evelyne; Budiharto, Tom; Mottaghy, Felix; Bormans, Guy; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Haustermans, Karin

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the additional value of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) to T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for localization of intraprostatic tumor nodules. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine prostate cancer patients underwent T2w MRI and {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT before radical prostatectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Tumor regions were outlined on the whole-mount histopathology sections and on the T2w MR images. Tumor localization was recorded in the basal, middle, and apical part of the prostate by means of an octant grid. To analyze {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT images, the same grid was used to calculate the standardized uptake values (SUV) per octant, after rigid registration with the T2w MR images for anatomic reference. Results: In total, 1,176 octants were analyzed. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of T2w MRI were 33.5%, 94.6%, and 70.2%, respectively. For {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT, the mean SUV{sub max} of malignant octants was significantly higher than the mean SUV{sub max} of benign octants (3.69 {+-} 1.29 vs. 3.06 {+-} 0.97, p < 0.0001) which was also true for mean SUV{sub mean} values (2.39 {+-} 0.77 vs. 1.94 {+-} 0.61, p < 0.0001). A positive correlation was observed between SUV{sub mean} and absolute tumor volume (Spearman r = 0.3003, p = 0.0362). No correlation was found between SUVs and prostate-specific antigen, T-stage or Gleason score. The highest accuracy (61.1%) was obtained with a SUV{sub max} cutoff of 2.70, resulting in a sensitivity of 77.4% and a specificity of 44.9%. When both modalities were combined (PET-CT or MRI positive), sensitivity levels increased as a function of SUV{sub max} but at the cost of specificity. When only considering suspect octants on {sup 11}C-choline PET-CT (SUV{sub max} {>=} 2.70) and T2w MRI, 84.7% of these segments were in agreement with the gold standard, compared with 80.5% for T2w MRI alone. Conclusions: The additional value of {sup

  5. Topology polymorphism graph for lung tumor segmentation in PET-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui; Wang, Xiuying; Zhou, Jianlong; Eberl, Stefan; Yin, Yong; Feng, Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Accurate lung tumor segmentation is problematic when the tumor boundary or edge, which reflects the advancing edge of the tumor, is difficult to discern on chest CT or PET. We propose a ‘topo-poly’ graph model to improve identification of the tumor extent. Our model incorporates an intensity graph and a topology graph. The intensity graph provides the joint PET-CT foreground similarity to differentiate the tumor from surrounding tissues. The topology graph is defined on the basis of contour tree to reflect the inclusion and exclusion relationship of regions. By taking into account different topology relations, the edges in our model exhibit topological polymorphism. These polymorphic edges in turn affect the energy cost when crossing different topology regions under a random walk framework, and hence contribute to appropriate tumor delineation. We validated our method on 40 patients with non-small cell lung cancer where the tumors were manually delineated by a clinical expert. The studies were separated into an ‘isolated’ group (n = 20) where the lung tumor was located in the lung parenchyma and away from associated structures / tissues in the thorax and a ‘complex’ group (n = 20) where the tumor abutted / involved a variety of adjacent structures and had heterogeneous FDG uptake. The methods were validated using Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC) to measure the spatial volume overlap and Hausdorff distance (HD) to compare shape similarity calculated as the maximum surface distance between the segmentation results and the manual delineations. Our method achieved an average DSC of 0.881  ±  0.046 and HD of 5.311  ±  3.022 mm for the isolated cases and DSC of 0.870  ±  0.038 and HD of 9.370  ±  3.169 mm for the complex cases. Student’s t-test showed that our model outperformed the other methods (p-values <0.05).

  6. FDG-PET/CT Imaging Predicts Histopathologic Treatment Responses after Neoadjuvant Therapy in Adult Primary Bone Sarcomas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Benz, Matthias R.; Czernin, Johannes; Tap, William D.; Eckardt, Jeffrey J.; Seeger, Leanne L.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.; Dry, Sarah M.; Phelps, Michael E.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Eilber, Fritz C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose . Tmore » he aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate whether FDG-PET allows an accurate assessment of histopathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment in adult patients with primary bone sarcomas. Methods . Twelve consecutive patients with resectable, primary high grade bone sarcomas were enrolled prospectively. FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed prior to the initiation and after completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic response. Results . Histopathologic responders showed significantly more pronounced decreases in tumor FDG-SUVmax from baseline to late follow up than non-responders ( 64 ± 19 % versus 29 ± 30 %, resp.; P = .03 ). Using a 60% decrease in tumor FDG-uptake as a threshold for metabolic response correctly classified 3 of 4 histopathologic responders and 7 of 8 histopathologic non-responders as metabolic responders and non-responders, respectively (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 88%). Conclusion . These results suggest that changes in FDG-SUVmax at the end of neoadjuvant treatment can identify histopathologic responders and non-responders in adult primary bone sarcoma patients.« less

  7. Potential performance of dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT compared with single-time-point imaging for differential diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guohua; Deng, Houfu; Hu, Shuang; Jia, Zhiyun

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, dual-time-point (DTP) fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a new method for evaluating metastatic lymph nodes in cancer patients. We performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the performance of DTP PET/CT compared with single-time-point (STP) imaging for differential diagnosis of lymph nodes metastases. On the basis of data from included studies, pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were calculated. Summary receiver-operating characteristic curves were also constructed to assess the diagnostic value of DTP PET/CT and STP imaging in detecting metastatic lymph nodes. Totally, 17 articles were included in the analysis. On a per-patient basis, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.74 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68-0.79] and 0.77 (95% CI: 0.72-0.81) for DTP PET/CT and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.61-0.73) and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.78-0.85) for STP PET/CT, respectively. On a per-lesion basis, the pooled sensitivity of DTP and STP PET/CT was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.79-0.84) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.78-0.83), respectively. The pooled specificity was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.86-0.89) for DTP PET/CT and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.80-0.84) for STP PET/CT. Compared with STP imaging, DTP PET/CT has higher sensitivity but lower specificity in detecting lymph nodes metastases on a per-patient analysis, and DTP PET/CT performs only a little better than STP PET/CT on a per-lesion basis. The current results of our meta-analysis do not support the routine use of DTP imaging for the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes. Further prospective research with large samples is required to better define the potential benefits of DTP PET/CT imaging. PMID:25023998

  8. Usefulness of four dimensional (4D) PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of thoracic lesions and in radiotherapy planning: Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sindoni, Alessandro; Minutoli, Fabio; Pontoriero, Antonio; Iatì, Giuseppe; Baldari, Sergio; Pergolizzi, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has become a routinely used methodology for the assessment of solid tumors, which can detect functional abnormalities even before they become morphologically evident on conventional imaging. PET imaging has been reported to be useful in characterizing solitary pulmonary nodules, guiding biopsy, improving lung cancer staging, guiding therapy, monitoring treatment response and predicting outcome. This review focuses on the most relevant and recent literature findings, highlighting the current role of PET/CT and the evaluation of 4D-PET/CT modality for radiation therapy planning applications. Current evidence suggests that gross tumor volume delineation based on 4D-PET/CT information may be the best approach currently available for its delineation in thoracic cancers (lung and non-lung lesions). In our opinion, its use in this clinical setting is strongly encouraged, as it may improve patient treatment outcome in the setting of radiation therapy for cancers of the thoracic region, not only involving lung, but also lymph nodes and esophageal tissue. Literature results warrants further investigation in future prospective studies, especially in the setting of dose escalation. PMID:27133755

  9. Incidental Detection of Subcutaneous Myopericytoma of Trunk on FDG PET/CT and Bone Scintigraphy for Imaging of Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Demir, Selin Soyluoglu; Sarikaya, Ali; Aktas, Gul Ege; Oz Puyan, Fulya

    2016-08-01

    Myopericytoma is a rare type of unusual soft tissue tumor with perivascular myoid differentiation. A 53-year-old man with the diagnosis of colon cancer was referred to Tc-MDP bone scan and F-FDG PET/CT for staging. A subcutaneous mass located in right lower back with heterogeneous FDG uptake was detected on PET/CT. There was increased osteoblastic activity on MDP bone scan in the same region. Mass was resected and subsequently confirmed as myopericytoma by histopathology. PMID:27124684

  10. Hodgkin lymphoma post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following pediatric renal transplant: serial imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; Lisbona, Robert; Derbekyan, Vilma

    2010-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occurs in 1.2% of pediatric renal transplant patients, and is frequently Epstein-Barr Virus mediated. Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD is the rarest of the 4 types of PTLDs recognized by the World Health Organization, with an incidence of <4% of all PTLD patients. It has a distinct clinical course and treatment from all other types of PTLD. This is a case of a 16-year-old girl who had a renal transplant in 2000 due to Moya Moya disease. Her first F-18 FDG PET/CT done in 2006 showed mildly FDG-avid mediastinal adenopathy (histologically nonspecific reactive nodes), however in 2009, after presenting with fevers, a repeat PET/CT showed extensive intensely FDG-avid disease. Biopsy of a supraclavicular node identified Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and reimaged, showing excellent response to therapy. In contrast, classic PTLD is treated by withdrawal of immunosuppression and administration of Rituximab. F-18 FDG PET/CT is known to be very useful in the staging and monitoring of response to therapy in the setting of classic PTLD. In this case, serial F-18 FDG PET/CT scans proved very useful in the evaluation and follow-up of the rare and distinct Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD subtype. PMID:20706047

  11. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique. PMID:24604942

  12. Quantitative Imaging Analysis of FDG PET/CT Imaging for Detection of Central Neurolymphomatosis in a Case of Recurrent Diffuse B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Savells, Derek; Awan, Omer; Inayat, Faisal; Chaudhry, Ammar; Jerath, Nivedita; Graham, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare disease characterized by malignant lymphocytes infiltrating various structures of the nervous system. It typically manifests as a neuropathy involving the peripheral nerves, nerve roots, plexuses, or cranial nerves. It often presents as a complication of lymphoma, but it can be the presenting feature of recurrent lymphoma. It is essential to identify and initiate treatment early with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy in all cases of nodal or visceral (including neural) involvement with lymphoma. There are various diagnostic tests that can be used for its detection, such as cerebrospinal spinal fluid (CSF) cytology, electromyography (EMG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). FDG-PET/CT is the standard of care in lymphoma staging, restaging, and therapy response assessment, but has an inherent limitation in the detection of disease involvement in the central nervous system. While that is mostly true for visual assessment, there are quantitative methods to measure variation in the metabolic activity in the brain, which in turn helps detect the occurrence of neurolymphomatosis. PMID:26719822

  13. Added Value of Dual-Time-Point 18F-FDG PET/CT With Delayed Imaging for Detecting Aortic Graft Infection: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Yung; Chang, Cheng-Pei; Shih, Chun-Che; Yang, Bang-Hung; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Chang, Chi-Wei; Chu, Lee-Shing; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2015-07-01

    F-FDG PET/CT is a promising tool in detecting aortic graft infection. Present study investigated the value of dual-time-point F-FDG PET/CT imaging (DTPI) with delayed imaging in assessing aortic graft infection.Twenty-nine patients with suspected aortic graft infection were prospectively enrolled in this DTPI study. Two nuclear medicine physicians read all the images and achieved consensus about the measurement of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and grading of image quality. The percentages of SUVmax change between initial and delayed images were recorded as retention index (RI); sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated based on reference standard.All the 5 infected aortic grafts had positive RIs, which were generally higher than that of noninfected grafts. Those noninfected grafts had variable RIs. Seven patients had improved image quality in delayed imaging. DTPI with delayed image detected all the infected grafts with improved specificity (88%) and accuracy (90%), providing conspicuous delineation of the infected graft extent.In conclusion, noninfected aortic grafts had more variable RIs than infected ones. DTPI might be useful for detecting aortic graft infection, improving image quality, and enhancing delineation of the infected aortic grafts. PMID:26166113

  14. New insight of molecular imaging into the atheroma biology: (18)F-fluoride PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT of 3 carotid plaques in a symptomatic neurologic patient.

    PubMed

    Quirce, Remedios; Banzo, Ignacio; Martínez-Rodríguez, Isabel; Jiménez-Bonilla, Julio F; Rebollo, Mariano; Rubio-Vassallo, Adriana; Carril, José M

    2013-06-01

    In a 75-year-old patient admitted with a middle cerebral artery stroke, a contrast-enhanced CT showed 3 atheroma plaques. Five days after the stroke, a F-fluoride PET/CT to evaluate calcification and, 24 hours later, a F-FDG PET/CT to evaluate inflammation were carried out. The different metabolic behavior of both radiotracers, showing different intensities and distribution in each plaque, may represent different phases of the atherogenesis and in combination could provide new information for the early identification of the carotid unstable plaque. PMID:23579977

  15. EXPLORER: Changing the molecular imaging paradigm with total-body PET/CT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Jones, Terry

    2016-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the highest sensitivity technique for human whole-body imaging studies. However, current clinical PET scanners do not make full use of the available signal, as they only permit imaging of a 15-25 cm segment of the body at one time. Given the limited sensitive region, whole-body imaging with clinical PET scanners requires relatively long scan times and subjects the patient to higher than necessary radiation doses. The EXPLORER initiative aims to build a 2-meter axial length PET scanner to allow imaging the entire subject at once, capturing nearly the entire available PET signal. EXPLORER will acquire data with ~40-fold greater sensitivity leading to a six-fold increase in reconstructed signal-to-noise ratio for imaging the total body. Alternatively, total-body images with the EXPLORER scanner will be able to be acquired in ~30 seconds or with ~0.15 mSv injected dose, while maintaining current PET image quality. The superior sensitivity will open many new avenues for biomedical research. Specifically for cancer applications, high sensitivity PET will enable detection of smaller lesions. Additionally, greater sensitivity will allow imaging out to 10 half-lives of positron emitting radiotracers. This will enable 1) metabolic ultra-staging with FDG by extending the uptake and clearance time to 3-5 hours to significantly improve contrast and 2) improved kinetic imaging with short-lived radioisotopes such as C-11, crucial for drug development studies. Frequent imaging studies of the same subject to study disease progression or to track response to therapy will be possible with the low dose capabilities of the EXPLORER scanner. The low dose capabilities will also open up new imaging possibilities in pediatrics and adolescents to better study developmental disorders. This talk will review the basis for developing total-body PET, potential applications, and review progress to date in developing EXPLORER, the first total-body PET scanner.

  16. [18F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75+-selected donor T cells (1.0–13 × 105)/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-(18F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [18F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [18F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  17. [(18)F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-06-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75(+)-selected donor T cells (1.0-13 × 10(5))/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-((18)F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([(18)F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [(18)F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [(18)F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  18. Computerized PET/CT image analysis in the evaluation of tumour response to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Zhang, H H

    2015-01-01

    Current cancer therapy strategy is mostly population based, however, there are large differences in tumour response among patients. It is therefore important for treating physicians to know individual tumour response. In recent years, many studies proposed the use of computerized positron emission tomography/CT image analysis in the evaluation of tumour response. Results showed that computerized analysis overcame some major limitations of current qualitative and semiquantitative analysis and led to improved accuracy. In this review, we summarize these studies in four steps of the analysis: image registration, tumour segmentation, image feature extraction and response evaluation. Future works are proposed and challenges described. PMID:25723599

  19. QIN. Early experiences in establishing a regional quantitative imaging network for PET/CT clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Doot, Robert K.; Thompson, Tove; Greer, Benjamin E.; Allberg, Keith C.; Linden, Hannah M.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is a Pacific Northwest regional network that enables patients from community cancer centers to participate in multicenter oncology clinical trials where patients can receive some trial-related procedures at their local center. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed at community cancer centers are not currently used in SCCA Network trials since clinical trials customarily accept results from only trial-accredited PET imaging centers located at academic and large hospitals. Oncologists would prefer the option of using standard clinical PET scans from Network sites in multicenter clinical trials to increase accrual of patients for whom additional travel requirements for imaging is a barrier to recruitment. In an effort to increase accrual of rural and other underserved populations to Network trials, researchers and clinicians at the University of Washington, SCCA and its Network are assessing feasibility of using PET scans from all Network sites in their oncology clinical trials. A feasibility study is required because the reproducibility of multicenter PET measurements ranges from approximately 3% to 40% at national academic centers. Early experiences from both national and local PET phantom imaging trials are discussed and next steps are proposed for including patient PET scans from the emerging regional quantitative imaging network in clinical trials. There are feasible methods to determine and characterize PET quantitation errors and improve data quality by either prospective scanner calibration or retrospective post hoc corrections. These methods should be developed and implemented in multicenter clinical trials employing quantitative PET imaging of patients. PMID:22795929

  20. Whole-body dynamic imaging with continuous bed motion PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Dustin R; Acuff, Shelley

    2016-04-01

    Most dynamic imaging protocols require long scan times that are beyond the range of what can be supported in a routine clinical environment and suffer from various difficulties related to step and shoot imaging techniques. In this short communication, we describe continuous bed motion (CBM) imaging techniques to create clinically relevant 15 min whole-body dynamic PET imaging protocols. We also present initial data that suggest that these CBM methods may be sufficient for quantitative analysis of uptake rates and rates of glucose metabolism. Multipass CBM PET was used in conjunction with a population-based input function to perform Patlak modeling of normal tissue. Net uptake rates were estimated and metabolic rates of glucose were calculated. Estimations of k3 (Ki/Vd) were calculated along with modeling of liver regions of interest to assess model stability. Calculated values of metabolic rates of glucose were well within normal ranges found in the previous literature. CBM techniques can potentially be used clinically to obtain reliable, quantitative multipass whole-body dynamic PET data. Values calculated for normal brain were shown to be within previously published values for normal brain glucose metabolism. PMID:26629770

  1. Whole-body dynamic imaging with continuous bed motion PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Acuff, Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Most dynamic imaging protocols require long scan times that are beyond the range of what can be supported in a routine clinical environment and suffer from various difficulties related to step and shoot imaging techniques. In this short communication, we describe continuous bed motion (CBM) imaging techniques to create clinically relevant 15 min whole-body dynamic PET imaging protocols. We also present initial data that suggest that these CBM methods may be sufficient for quantitative analysis of uptake rates and rates of glucose metabolism. Multipass CBM PET was used in conjunction with a population-based input function to perform Patlak modeling of normal tissue. Net uptake rates were estimated and metabolic rates of glucose were calculated. Estimations of k3 (Ki/Vd) were calculated along with modeling of liver regions of interest to assess model stability. Calculated values of metabolic rates of glucose were well within normal ranges found in the previous literature. CBM techniques can potentially be used clinically to obtain reliable, quantitative multipass whole-body dynamic PET data. Values calculated for normal brain were shown to be within previously published values for normal brain glucose metabolism. PMID:26629770

  2. Angiogenesis Imaging Using (68)Ga-RGD PET/CT: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Eo, Jae Seon; Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis imaging is important for diagnostic and therapeutic treatment of various malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence has been known to bind with the αvβ3 integrin that is expressed on the surface of angiogenic blood vessels or tumor cells. Thus, various radiolabeled derivatives of RGD peptides have been developed for angiogenesis imaging. Among the various radionuclides, (68)Ga was the most widely studied for RGD peptide imaging because of its excellent nuclear physical properties, easy-to-label chemical properties, and cost-effectiveness owing to the availability of a (68)Ge-(68)Ga generator. Thus, various (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives have been developed and applied for preclinical and clinical studies. Clinical trials were performed for both malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Breast cancer, glioma, and lung cancer were malignant, and myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis, and moyamoya disease were nonmalignant among the investigated diseases. Further, these (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives could be applied to assess the effects of antiangiogenic treatment or theragnosis or both, of cancers. In conclusion, the angiogenesis imaging technology using (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives might be useful for the development of new therapeutic assessments, and for diagnostic and theragnostic applications. PMID:27553467

  3. Accuracy of CT-based attenuation correction in PET/CT bone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M.; Mankoff, David A.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-05-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a 68Ga/68Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9 ± 0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers ranges from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important.

  4. Early experiences in establishing a regional quantitative imaging network for PET/CT clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Doot, Robert K; Thompson, Tove; Greer, Benjamin E; Allberg, Keith C; Linden, Hannah M; Mankoff, David A; Kinahan, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is a Pacific Northwest regional network that enables patients from community cancer centers to participate in multicenter oncology clinical trials where patients can receive some trial-related procedures at their local center. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed at community cancer centers are not currently used in SCCA Network trials since clinical trials customarily accept results from only trial-accredited PET imaging centers located at academic and large hospitals. Oncologists would prefer the option of using standard clinical PET scans from Network sites in multicenter clinical trials to increase accrual of patients for whom additional travel requirements for imaging are a barrier to recruitment. In an effort to increase accrual of rural and other underserved populations to Network trials, researchers and clinicians at the University of Washington, SCCA and its Network are assessing the feasibility of using PET scans from all Network sites in their oncology clinical trials. A feasibility study is required because the reproducibility of multicenter PET measurements ranges from approximately 3% to 40% at national academic centers. Early experiences from both national and local PET phantom imaging trials are discussed, and next steps are proposed for including patient PET scans from the emerging regional quantitative imaging network in clinical trials. There are feasible methods to determine and characterize PET quantitation errors and improve data quality by either prospective scanner calibration or retrospective post hoc corrections. These methods should be developed and implemented in multicenter clinical trials employing quantitative PET imaging of patients. PMID:22795929

  5. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D.; Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P.; Rimoldi, O. E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  6. 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging of Bilateral Renal Metastasis of Breast Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, Hani; Alabed, Yazan Z; Karls, Shawn; Probst, Stephan; Laufer, Jerome

    2016-02-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with a history of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the breast. Fifteen years after mastectomy, the patient underwent a right upper lobectomy for a lung mass, and biopsy indicated ACC metastasis. Ten years after lobectomy, an F-FDG PET/CT was performed for restaging to rule out further metastases. We observed intense FDG uptake in enlarged polylobulated kidneys, which was biopsy proven as ACC metastasis. PMID:26562575

  7. Assessment of acquisition protocols for routine imaging of Y-90 using PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the early theoretical prediction of the 0+-0+ transition of 90Zr, 90Y-PET underwent only recently a growing interest for the development of imaging radioembolization of liver tumors. The aim of this work was to determine the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 90Y by PET imaging and the impact of time-of-flight (TOF) reconstruction on detectability and quantitative accuracy according to the lesion size. Methods The study was conducted using a Siemens Biograph® mCT with a 22 cm large axial field of view. An IEC torso-shaped phantom containing five coplanar spheres was uniformly filled to achieve sphere-to-background ratios of 40:1. The phantom was imaged nine times in 14 days over 30 min. Sinograms were reconstructed with and without TOF information. A contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) index was calculated using the Rose criterion, taking partial volume effects into account. The impact of reconstruction parameters on quantification accuracy, detectability, and spatial localization of the signal was investigated. Finally, six patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and four patients included in different 90Y-based radioimmunotherapy protocols were enrolled for the evaluation of the imaging parameters in a clinical situation. Results The highest CNR was achieved with one iteration for both TOF and non-TOF reconstructions. The MDA, however, was found to be lower with TOF than with non-TOF reconstruction. There was no gain by adding TOF information in terms of CNR for concentrations higher than 2 to 3 MBq mL−1, except for infra-centimetric lesions. Recovered activity was highly underestimated when a single iteration or non-TOF reconstruction was used (10% to 150% less depending on the lesion size). The MDA was estimated at 1 MBq mL−1 for a TOF reconstruction and infra-centimetric lesions. Images from patients treated with microspheres were clinically relevant, unlike those of patients who received systemic injections of 90Y. Conclusions Only

  8. Multiparametric PET/CT in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The standardized uptake value (SUV) and other measurements of tumour uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) on positron emission tomography (PET) can potentially be supplemented by additional imaging parameters derived either from the PET images or from the computed tomography (CT) component of integrated PET/CT examinations including tumour size, CT attenuation, texture (reflecting tumour heterogeneity) and blood flow. This article illustrates the emerging benefits of such a multiparametric approach. Example benefits include greater diagnostic accuracy in characterization of adrenal masses achieved by using both the SUV and measured CT attenuation. Tumour size combined with the SUV can potentially improve the prognostic information available from PET/CT in oesophageal and lung cancer. However, greater improvements may be realized through using CT measurements of texture instead of size. Studies in breast and lung cancer suggest that combined PET/CT measurements of glucose metabolism and blood flow provide correlates for tumour proliferation and angiogenesis, respectively. These combined measurements can be utilized to determine vascular-metabolic phenotypes, which vary with tumour type. Uncoupling of blood flow and metabolism suggests a poor prognosis for larger more advanced tumours, high-grade lesions and tumours responding poorly to treatment. Vascular-metabolic imaging also has the potential to subclassify tumour response to treatment. The additional biomarkers described can be readily incorporated in existing FDG-PET examinations thereby improving the ability of PET/CT to depict tumour biology, characterize potentially malignant lesions, and assess prognosis and therapeutic response. PMID:23023069

  9. 68Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET/CT imaging of peri-implant tissue responses and staphylococcal infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    significant. The difference between the S. aureus group and group 3 was neither statistically significant. Conclusion PET/CT imaging with novel 68Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 tracer was able to detect inflammatory tissue response induced by catheter implantation and staphylococcal infections. PMID:25520903

  10. Exploring new frontiers in molecular imaging: Emergence of 68Ga PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Eik Hock; Goh, Soon Whatt

    2010-01-01

    Since US Food and Drug Administration approval of 18-fluorodeoxyglucose as a positron tracer, and the development of hybrid positron emission tomography/computed tomography machines, there has been a great increase in clinical application and progress in the field of nuclear molecular imaging. However, not underestimating the value of 18F, there are known limitations in the use of this cyclotron-produced positron tracer. We hence turn our focus to an emerging positron tracer, 68Ga, and examine the advantages, current clinical uses and potential future applications of this radioisotope. PMID:21160919

  11. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, F. Fernandez, P.; Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  12. (18)F-FLT PET/CT imaging in a Wister rabbit inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yeying; Liang, Jun; Liu, Defeng; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Guanmin; Ding, Xuemei; Han, Conghui

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the tumour specificity of the newly developed nucleoside metabolic positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT). Using (18)F-FLT PET imaging, DNA synthesis and cell proliferation were detected in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) abscess and calcium sulphate models in Wister rabbits. A total of eight rabbits were implanted with S. aureus in the left tibia to induce an inflammatory process. Calcium sulphate + gentamicin was implanted in the right tibia to induce a physical stimulus without bacterial multiplication. After four weeks, the animals underwent (18)F-FLT PET imaging, bacterial culturing and tissue pathology. The uptake of (18)F-FLT was significantly higher in the abscess site compared with that in the granuloma, with maximum standardised uptake values of 5.76±0.25 and 1.15±0.32, respectively (P<0.01). This indicates that (18)F-FLT is not a specific tumour tracer since active inflammation also results in the uptake of this compound. However, the tumour specificity of this tracer is higher compared with that of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose. Therefore, (18)F-FLT may be useful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant tumours. PMID:24944599

  13. Brown Adipose Reporting Criteria in Imaging STudies (BARCIST 1.0): Recommendations for Standardized FDG-PET/CT Experiments in Humans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kong Y; Cypess, Aaron M; Laughlin, Maren R; Haft, Carol R; Hu, Houchun Harry; Bredella, Miriam A; Enerbäck, Sven; Kinahan, Paul E; Lichtenbelt, Wouter van Marken; Lin, Frank I; Sunderland, John J; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Wahl, Richard L

    2016-08-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) presence, metabolic activity, and estimated mass are typically measured by imaging [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in response to cold exposure in regions of the body expected to contain BAT, using positron emission tomography combined with X-ray computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). Efforts to describe the epidemiology and biology of human BAT are hampered by diverse experimental practices, making it difficult to directly compare results among laboratories. An expert panel was assembled by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases on November 4, 2014 to discuss minimal requirements for conducting FDG-PET/CT experiments of human BAT, data analysis, and publication of results. This resulted in Brown Adipose Reporting Criteria in Imaging STudies (BARCIST 1.0). Since there are no fully validated best practices at this time, panel recommendations are meant to enhance comparability across experiments, but not to constrain experimental design or the questions that can be asked. PMID:27508870

  14. 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging Detects Therapy Efficacy of Anti-EMMPRIN Antibody and Gemcitabine in Orthotopic Pancreatic Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nemil; Zhai, Guihua; Knowles, Joseph A.; Stockard, Cecil R.; Grizzle, William E.; Fineberg, Naomi; Zhou, Tong; Zinn, Kurt R.; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Kim, Hyunki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate by sequential 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging the therapeutic response to a novel monoclonal antibody targeting human EMMPRIN (extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer) in combination with gemcitabine in a pancreatic-tumor xenograft murine model. Procedures Four groups of SCID mice bearing orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts were injected with PBS, gemcitabine (120mg/kg BW), anti-EMMPRIN antibody (0.2mg), or combination, respectively twice weekly for 2 weeks, while 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging was performed weekly for 3 weeks. Changes in mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) of 18F-FDG and volume of tumors were determined. Results The tumor SUVmean change in the group receiving combination therapy was significantly lower than those of the other groups. Tumor-volume changes of groups treated with anti-EMMPRIN monotherapy or combined therapy were significantly lower than that of the control group. Conclusions These data provide support for clinical studies of anti-EMMPRIN therapy with gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:21494920

  15. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Andriy; Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM(®)) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  16. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM®) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  17. The preclinical study of predicting radiosensitivity in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenografts by 18F-ML-10 animal- PET/CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Siyang; Zheng, Yujia; Wang, Mingwei; Gu, Bingxin; Zhang, Jianping; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Yingjian

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that the radiosensitivity is associated with apoptosis. Hereby, we aimed to investigate the value of 18F-ML-10 PET/CT, which selectively targeted cells undergoing apoptosis, in predicting radiosensitivity of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) xenografts. We used CNE1 (highly differentiated) and CNE2 (poorly differentiated) NPC cell lines to construct tumor models, which had very different radiosensitivities. After irradiation, the volumes of CNE2 tumors decreased significantly while those of CNE1 tumors increased. In 18F-ML-10 imaging, the values of tumor/muscle (T/M) between CNE1 and CNE2 mice were statistically different at both 24 h and 48 h after irradiation. Besides, ΔT/M1-0 and ΔT/M2-0 of CNE2 mice were higher than those of CNE1 mice, demonstrating obvious discrepancy. Furthermore, we observed obvious changes of radioactive distribution in CNE2 group. On the contrary, T/M of 18F-FDG in irradiation group revealed no obvious change in both CNE1 and CNE2 groups. In conclusion, 18F-ML-10 animal PET/CT showed its potential to predict radiosensitivity in NPC. PMID:26942701

  18. SU-D-9A-04: Brain PET/CT Imaging On a Scanner with a Large Axial Field-Of-View

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Gerbaudo, V; Hamberg, L; Seaver, K; Kijewski, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Large axial field-of-view (FOV) PET/CT scanners are valued for high sensitivity. Brain PET image quality may depend on the head position within the FOV. We investigated the precision of activity estimation for brain PET imaging when the brain was positioned at the end (END) and in the middle (CEN) of the FOV. The additional CT dose for the CEN position was recorded. Methods: An image quality (Jaszczak) phantom and a striatal phantom were filled with F-18 and positioned in END and CEN locations. For each phantom and each location, we acquired a ∼1-hr listmode PET, rebinned the data into 10 frames with equal number of coincidence events, and reconstructed each frame using an iterative algorithm. For the striatal phantom, END and CEN were compared by drawing on each image three regions of interest (ROI) in axially separated uniform areas. The standard deviation of the activity estimation within each ROI was averaged over the 10 images. The coefficient of variation (CV) for activity estimation was calculated at each position. Image quality was assessed by inspecting the resolution bar pattern in the Jaszczak phantom at two different head positions. Results: The CV was the lowest for ROIs near the center of the FOV. For slices near the end, not only was the CV highest, but also the resolution pattern was degraded. CTDIvol summarized in the dose report indicated that the CT dose was ∼ 10% higher for CEN as compared to END position. Conclusion: Positioning the brain in the middle of the FOV in a large FOV PET/CT scanner allows more precise measurement of tracer uptake and better image quality at the cost of increased CT dose. For the end location longer scan times may minimize image quality degradation without any additional CT dose.

  19. SU-E-I-100: Heterogeneity Studying for Primary and Lymphoma Tumors by Using Multi-Scale Image Texture Analysis with PET-CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dengwang; Wang, Qinfen; Li, H; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is studying tumor heterogeneity of the primary and lymphoma by using multi-scale texture analysis with PET-CT images, where the tumor heterogeneity is expressed by texture features. Methods: Datasets were collected from 12 lung cancer patients, and both of primary and lymphoma tumors were detected with all these patients. All patients underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan before treatment.The regions of interest (ROI) of primary and lymphoma tumor were contoured by experienced clinical doctors. Then the ROI of primary and lymphoma tumor is extracted automatically by using Matlab software. According to the geometry size of contour structure, the images of tumor are decomposed by multi-scale method.Wavelet transform was performed on ROI structures within images by L layers sampling, and then wavelet sub-bands which have the same size of the original image are obtained. The number of sub-bands is 3L+1.The gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated within different sub-bands, thenenergy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity were extracted from GLCM.Finally, heterogeneity statistical analysis was studied for primary and lymphoma tumor using the texture features. Results: Energy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity are calculated with our experiments for heterogeneity statistical analysis.Energy for primary and lymphomatumor is equal with the same patient, while gray in-homogeneity and inertia of primaryare 2.59595±0.00855, 0.6439±0.0007 respectively. Gray in-homogeneity and inertia of lymphoma are 2.60115±0.00635, 0.64435±0.00055 respectively. The experiments showed that the volume of lymphoma is smaller than primary tumor, but thegray in-homogeneity and inertia were higher than primary tumor with the same patient, and the correlation with lymphoma tumors is zero, while the correlation with primary tumor isslightly strong. Conclusion: This studying showed that there were effective heterogeneity

  20. [(18)]F FDG PET/CT imaging to monitor the therapeutic effect of liposome-encapsulated prednisolone in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Tessa; Metselaar, Josbert M; Gerrits, Danny; van Lent, Peter L; Storm, Gert; Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C

    2015-07-10

    Current treatment of rheumatoid arthritis includes systemic administration of glucocorticoids. To improve joint targeting and anti-inflammatory efficacy these glucocorticoids are encapsulated in long-circulating liposomes. The present study aimed to monitor therapeutic effects of prednisolone (PLP)-containing PEG-liposomes in murine antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) using [(18)F]FDG PET/CT. Mono-articular arthritis was induced in male C57Bl6/J mice. At 0, 3, 7 and 12 days after arthritis induction, inflamed joints were macroscopically scored (0 = unaffected to 4 = immobile) and [(18)F]FDG PET/CT images were acquired. In a second experiment, to study the feasibility to monitor therapeutic effects of PLP encapsulating PEG-liposomes, mice were treated with a single i.v. injection of PLP-containing PEG-liposomes (10 mg/kg) or empty PEG-liposomes 3 days after arthritis induction. Inflamed joints were macroscopically scored and images were acquired at -3, 0, 4 and 9 days after treatment. PET images were analyzed quantitatively, and mice were dissected to allow histological analysis of the joints. With progression of arthritis, [(18)F]FDG uptake in inflamed joints increased significantly (day 0: 2.5 ± 0.9%ID/ml, day 7: 4.4 ± 0.4%ID/ml, p = 0.0159), while no changes were observed in unaffected paws (day 0: 2.5 ± 1.1%ID/ml, day 7: 2.7 ± 0.8%ID/ml, p = 0.3466). In the second experiment, macroscopic scoring revealed suppression of joint swelling after treatment with PLP-containing PEG-liposomes. In line with that, [(18)F]FDG uptake did not change in the treated mice (day -3: 1.9 ± 0.3%ID/ml, day 4: 2.2 ± 0.2%ID/ml, p = 0.3466), while it increased in mice that developed arthritis (day -3: 2.0 ± 0.2%ID/ml, day 4: 3.1 ± 0.6%ID/ml, p = 0.0225). Histological analysis confirmed therapeutic efficacy, which showed less inflammation (p = 0.0354) and bone erosion (p = 0.0298) in treated mice. These data show that [(18)F]FDG PET/CT could be used to monitor the progression of AIA

  1. Site specific discrete PEGylation of (124)I-labeled mCC49 Fab' fragments improves tumor MicroPET/CT imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M; Povoski, Stephen P; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W; Tweedle, Michael F

    2013-11-20

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2-4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab' (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab' (Fab'-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG 12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 ((124)I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab' with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab'-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab' by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab'-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab'-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab'-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A. PMID:24175669

  2. Bing-Neel Syndrome Case Report: A Previously Undocumented IgG Variant with MRI, PET/CT, and PET/MRI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Daniel; Hallam, Simon; Haroon, Athar; Butler, Tom; Agrawal, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia is the most commonly reported subtype of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL); it is characterised by IgM secretion. Neurological complications are common usually as a result of hyperviscosity. In rare cases, cells can infiltrate the central nervous system; this is known as Bing-Neel syndrome. We report the case of a 57-year-old male with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma of the IgG-subtype with neurological symptoms and the consequent finding of lymphoplasmacytoid cells in his cerebrospinal fluid as well as deposits on MRI and PET-CT imaging. This is the first report of Bing-Neel syndrome in IgG-subtype LPL. We discuss the biological and radiological markers of his disease, including PET imaging, which has been minimal in this area to date. PMID:27144041

  3. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams.

    PubMed

    Bauer, J; Unholtz, D; Kurz, C; Parodi, K

    2013-08-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β(+) activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β(+) activity induced in the investigated

  4. A pilot study of the prognostic significance of metabolic tumor size measurements in PET/CT imaging of lymphomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Botsivali, Maria; Politis, Nikolaos; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2015-03-01

    This study explores changes in metabolic tumor volume, metabolic tumor diameter, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), for earlier and more accurate identification of lymphomas' response to treatment using 18F- FDG PET/CT. Pre- and post-treatment PET/CT studies of 20 patients with Hodgkin disease (HL) and 7 patients with non- Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) were retrospectively selected for this study. The diameter and volume of the metabolic tumor was determined by an in-house developed adaptive local thresholding technique based on a 50% threshold of the maximum pixel value within a region. Statistical analysis aimed at exploring associations between metabolic size measurements and SUVmax and the ability of the three biomarkers to predict the patients' response to treatment as defined by the four classes in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) guidelines. Results indicated moderate correlations between % change in metabolic tumor volume and % change in metabolic tumor maximum diameter (R=0.51) and between % change in maximum diameter and % change in SUVmax (R=0.52). The correlation between % change in tumor volume and % change in SUVmax was weak (R=0.24). The % change in metabolic tumor size, either volume or diameter, was a "very strong" predictor of response to treatment (R=0.89), stronger than SUVmax (R=0.63). In conclusion, metabolic tumor volume could have important prognostic value, possibly higher than maximum metabolic diameter or SUVmax that are currently the standard of practice. Volume measurements, however, should be based on robust and standardized segmentation methodologies to avoid variability. In addition, SUV-peak or lean body mass corrected SUV-peak may be a better PET biomarker than SUVmax when SUV-volume combinations are considered.

  5. Recommendations of the Spanish Societies of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging (SEMNiM), and Medical Physics (SEFM) on 18F-FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Caballero Perea, Begoña; Villegas, Antonio Cabrera; Rodríguez, José Miguel Delgado; Velloso, María José García; Vicente, Ana María García; Cabrerizo, Carlos Huerga; López, Rosa Morera; Romasanta, Luis Alberto Pérez; Beltrán, Moisés Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is a valuable tool for diagnosing and staging malignant lesions. The fusion of PET and computed tomography (CT) yields images that contain both metabolic and morphological information, which, taken together, have improved the diagnostic precision of PET in oncology. The main imaging modality for planning radiotherapy treatment is CT. However, PET-CT is an emerging modality for use in planning treatments because it allows for more accurate treatment volume definition. The use of PET-CT for treatment planning is highly complex, and protocols and standards for its use are still being developed. It seems probable that PET-CT will eventually replace current CT-based planning methods, but this will require a full understanding of the relevant technical aspects of PET-CT planning. The aim of the present document is to review these technical aspects and to provide recommendations for clinical use of this imaging modality in the radiotherapy planning process. PMID:24377032

  6. MicroPET/CT Imaging of an Orthotopic Model of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme and Evaluation of Pulsed Low-Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sean S.; Chunta, John L.; Robertson, John M.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Oliver Wong, Ching-Yee; Amin, Mitual; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive tumor that typically causes death due to local progression. To assess a novel low-dose radiotherapy regimen for treating GBM, we developed an orthotopic murine model of human GBM and evaluated in vivo treatment efficacy using micro-positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (microPET/CT) tumor imaging. Methods: Orthotopic GBM xenografts were established in nude mice and treated with standard 2-Gy fractionation or 10 0.2-Gy pulses with 3-min interpulse intervals, for 7 consecutive days, for a total dose of 14 Gy. Tumor growth was quantified weekly using the Flex Triumph (GE Healthcare/Gamma Medica-Ideas, Waukesha, WI) combined PET-single-photon emission CT (SPECT)-CT imaging system and necropsy histopathology. Normal tissue damage was assessed by counting dead neural cells in tissue sections from irradiated fields. Results: Tumor engraftment efficiency for U87MG cells was 86%. Implanting 0.5 x 10{sup 6} cells produced a 50- to 70-mm{sup 3} tumor in 10 to 14 days. A significant correlation was seen between CT-derived tumor volume and histopathology-measured volume (p = 0.018). The low-dose 0.2-Gy pulsed regimen produced a significantly longer tumor growth delay than standard 2-Gy fractionation (p = 0.045). Less normal neuronal cell death was observed after the pulsed delivery method (p = 0.004). Conclusion: This study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo brain tumor imaging and longitudinal assessment of tumor growth and treatment response with microPET/CT. Pulsed radiation treatment was more efficacious than the standard fractionated treatment and was associated with less normal tissue damage.

  7. Synthesis, 68Ga-Radiolabeling, and Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of a Depsipeptide-Derived Compound as a Potential PET/CT Infection Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B.; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Hazari, Puja P.; Mishra, Anil K.; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R.; Sathekge, Mike M.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as 67/68Ga-citrate or 18F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with 68Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by 68Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3–2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  8. Synthesis, 68Ga-radiolabeling, and preliminary in vivo assessment of a depsipeptide-derived compound as a potential PET/CT infection imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Mokaleng, Botshelo B; Ebenhan, Thomas; Ramesh, Suhas; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Parboosing, Raveen; Hazari, Puja P; Mishra, Anil K; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan R; Sathekge, Mike M

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as (67/68)Ga-citrate or (18)F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with (68)Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by (68)Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. (68)Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3-2.4) > noninfected thighs (P = 0.322) > forearm muscles (P = 0.092) > background (P = 0.021) in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101's capacity as targeting vector. PMID:25699267

  9. PET/CT AND RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY OF PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek; Oehr, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Traditional morphologically based imaging modalities are now being complemented by positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography (CT) in prostate cancer. Metastatic prostate cancer is an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) since no effective therapies are available. This review highlights the most important achievements within the last year in PET/CT and RIT of prostate cancer. Recent findings Conflicting results exist on the use of choline for detection of malignant disease in the prostate gland. The role of PET/CT in N-staging remains to be elucidated further. However, 18F-choline and 11C-choline PET/CT have been demonstrated to be useful for detection of recurrence. 18F-choline and 18F-fluoride PET/CT are useful for detection of bone metastases. Prostate tumor antigens may be used as targets for RIT. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is currently under focus of a number of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. J591, a monoclonal antibody, that targets the extracellular domain of PSMA, shows promising results. HER2 receptors may also have a potential as target for PET/CT imaging and RIT of advanced prostate cancer. Summary PET/CT in prostate cancer has proven to play a significant role, in particular for detection of prostate cancer recurrence and bone metastases. Radioimmunotherapy of metastatic prostate cancer warrant further investigations. PMID:19535981

  10. Comparison of Tumor Volumes as Determined by Pathologic Examination and FDG-PET/CT Images of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jinming; Li Xinke; Xing Ligang; Mu Dianbin; Fu Zheng; Sun Xiaorong; Sun Xiangyu; Yang Guoren; Zhang Baijiang; Sun Xindong; Ling, C. Clifton

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the cut-off standardized uptake value (SUV) on {sup 18}F fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) images that generates the best volumetric match to pathologic gross tumor volume (GTV{sub path}) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with NSCLC who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans followed by lobectomy were enrolled. The surgical specimen was dissected into 5-7-mum sections at approximately 4-mm intervals and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The tumor-containing area was outlined slice by slice and the GTV{sub path} determined by summing over all the slices, taking into account the interslice thickness and fixation-induced volume reduction. The gross tumor volume from the PET images, GTV{sub PET}, was determined as a function of cut-off SUV. The optimal threshold or optimal absolute SUV was defined as the value at which the GTV{sub PET} was the same as the GTV{sub path}. Results: The fixation process induced a volumetric reduction to 82% +- 10% (range, 62-100%) of the original. The maximal SUV was 10.1 +- 3.6 (range, 4.2-18.7). The optimal threshold and absolute SUV were 31% +- 11% and 3.0 +- 1.6, respectively. The optimal threshold was inversely correlated with GTV{sub path} and tumor diameter (p < 0.05), but the optimal absolute SUV had no significant correlation with GTV{sub path} or tumor diameter (p > 0.05). Conclusion: This study evaluated the use of GTV{sub path} as a criterion for determining the optimal cut-off SUV for NSCLC target volume delineation. Confirmatory studies including more cases are being performed.

  11. SU-E-T-189: First Experimental Verification of the Accuracy of Absolute Dose Reconstruction From PET-CT Imaging of Yttrium 90 Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Veltchev, I; Fourkal, E; Doss, M; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Yu, M; Horwitz, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the past few years there have been numerous proposals for 3D dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of patients undergoing radioembolization treatment of the liver with yttrium-90 microspheres. One of the most promising techniques uses convolution of the measured PET activity distribution with a pre-calculated Monte Carlo dose deposition kernel. The goal of the present study is to experimentally verify the accuracy of this method and to analyze the significance of various error sources. Methods: Optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLD) were used (NanoDot, Landauer) in this experiment. Two detectors were mounted on the central axis of a cylinder filled with water solution of yttrium-90 chloride. The total initial activity was 90mCi. The cylinder was inserted in a larger water phantom and scanned on a Siemens Biograph 16 Truepoint PET-CT scanner. Scans were performed daily over a period of 20 days to build a calibration curve for the measured absolute activity spanning 7 yttrium-90 half-lives. The OSLDs were mounted in the phantom for a predetermined period of time in order to record 2Gy dose. The measured dose was then compared to the dose reconstructed from the activity density at the location of each dosimeter. Results: Thorough error analysis of the dose reconstruction algorithm takes into account the uncertainties in the absolute PET activity, branching ratios, and nonlinearity of the calibration curve. The measured dose for 105-minute exposure on day 10 of the experiment was 219(11)cGy, while the reconstructed dose at the location of the detector was 215(47)cGy. Conclusion: We present the first experimental verification of the accuracy of the convolution algorithm for absolute dose reconstruction of yttrium-90 microspheres. The excellent agreement between the measured and calculated point doses will encourage the broad clinical adoption of the convolution-based dose reconstruction algorithm, making future quantitative dose

  12. 18F-Sodium Fluoride PET-CT Hybrid Imaging of the Lumbar Facet Joints: Tracer Uptake and Degree of Correlation to CT-graded Arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Behr, Spencer C.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Dillon, William P.; Talbott, Jason F.

    2016-01-01

    We aim to evaluate 18F-NaF uptake by facet joints with hybrid PET-CT technique. Specifically, we evaluate NaF uptake in the facet joints of the lower lumbar spine, and correlate with the morphologic grade of facet arthropathy on CT. 30 consecutive patients who underwent standard vertex to toes NaF PET-CT for re-staging of primary neoplastic disease without measurable or documented bony metastases were identified. Maximum (SUVmax) and average (SUVavg) standardized uptake values were calculated for each L3-4, L4-5, and L5-S1 facet joint (n = 180) and normalized to average uptake in the non-diseased femur. A Pathria grade (0-3) was assigned to each facet based upon the CT morphology. Spearman's rank correlation was performed for normalized SUVmax and SUVavg with Pathria grade. ANOVA was performed with Tukey-Kramer pairwise tests to evaluate differences in uptake between Pathria groups. Facet normalized SUVmax (r = 0.31, P < 0.001) and SUVavg (r = 0.28, P < 0.001) demonstrated a mild positive correlation with CT Pathria grade. There was a wide range of uptake values within each Pathria grade subgroup with statistically significant differences in uptake only between Pathria grade 3 as compared to grades 0, 1, and 2. In conclusion, NaF uptake and morphologic changes of the facet joint on CT are weakly correlated. Physiologic information provided by NaF uptake is often discrepant with structural findings on CT suggesting NaF PET may supplement conventional structural imaging for identification of pain generating facet joints. Prospective investigation into the relationship of facet joint NaF uptake with pain and response to pain interventions is warranted. PMID:27134557

  13. (18)F-Sodium Fluoride PET-CT Hybrid Imaging of the Lumbar Facet Joints: Tracer Uptake and Degree of Correlation to CT-graded Arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Mabray, Marc C; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Behr, Spencer C; Pampaloni, Miguel H; Majumdar, Sharmila; Dillon, William P; Talbott, Jason F

    2016-01-01

    We aim to evaluate (18)F-NaF uptake by facet joints with hybrid PET-CT technique. Specifically, we evaluate NaF uptake in the facet joints of the lower lumbar spine, and correlate with the morphologic grade of facet arthropathy on CT. 30 consecutive patients who underwent standard vertex to toes NaF PET-CT for re-staging of primary neoplastic disease without measurable or documented bony metastases were identified. Maximum (SUVmax) and average (SUVavg) standardized uptake values were calculated for each L3-4, L4-5, and L5-S1 facet joint (n = 180) and normalized to average uptake in the non-diseased femur. A Pathria grade (0-3) was assigned to each facet based upon the CT morphology. Spearman's rank correlation was performed for normalized SUVmax and SUVavg with Pathria grade. ANOVA was performed with Tukey-Kramer pairwise tests to evaluate differences in uptake between Pathria groups. Facet normalized SUVmax (r = 0.31, P < 0.001) and SUVavg (r = 0.28, P < 0.001) demonstrated a mild positive correlation with CT Pathria grade. There was a wide range of uptake values within each Pathria grade subgroup with statistically significant differences in uptake only between Pathria grade 3 as compared to grades 0, 1, and 2. In conclusion, NaF uptake and morphologic changes of the facet joint on CT are weakly correlated. Physiologic information provided by NaF uptake is often discrepant with structural findings on CT suggesting NaF PET may supplement conventional structural imaging for identification of pain generating facet joints. Prospective investigation into the relationship of facet joint NaF uptake with pain and response to pain interventions is warranted. PMID:27134557

  14. Effect of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging in Patients With Clinical Stage II and III Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Groheux, David Moretti, Jean-Luc; Baillet, Georges; Espie, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Hindie, Elif; Hennequin, Christophe; Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert; Cuvier, Caroline; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel; Sarandi, Farid; Misset, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential effect of using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial assessment of patients with clinical Stage II or III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: During 14 consecutive months, 39 patients (40 tumors) who presented with Stage II or III breast cancer on the basis of a routine extension assessment were prospectively included in this study. PET/CT was performed in addition to the initial assessment. Results: In 3 cases, PET/CT showed extra-axillary lymph node involvement that had not been demonstrated with conventional techniques. Two of these patients had hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the subpectoral and infraclavicular regions, and the third had a hypermetabolic internal mammary node. PET/CT showed distant uptake in 4 women. Of these 4 women, 1 had pleural involvement and 3 had bone metastasis. Overall, of the 39 women, the PET/CT results modified the initial stage in 7 (18%). The modified staging altered the treatment plan for 5 patients (13%). It led to radiotherapy in 4 patients (bone metastasis, pleural lesion, subpectoral lymph nodes, and internal mammary nodes) and excision of, and radiotherapy to, the infraclavicular lymph nodes in 1 patient. Conclusions: PET/CT can provide information on extra-axillary lymph node involvement and can uncover occult distant metastases in a significant percentage of patients. Therefore, initial PET/CT could enable better treatment planning for patients with Stage II and III breast cancer.

  15. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT imaging in an IL-6- and MYC-driven mouse model of human multiple myeloma affords objective evaluation of plasma cell tumor progression and therapeutic response to the proteasome inhibitor ixazomib.

    PubMed

    Duncan, K; Rosean, T R; Tompkins, V S; Olivier, A; Sompallae, R; Zhan, F; Tricot, G; Acevedo, M R; Ponto, L L B; Walsh, S A; Tygrett, L T; Berger, A J; Waldschmidt, T; Morse, H C; Sunderland, J J; Janz, S

    2013-01-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and computed tomography (CT) are useful imaging modalities for evaluating tumor progression and treatment responses in genetically engineered mouse models of solid human cancers, but the potential of integrated FDG-PET/CT for assessing tumor development and new interventions in transgenic mouse models of human blood cancers such as multiple myeloma (MM) has not been demonstrated. Here we use BALB/c mice that contain the newly developed iMyc(ΔEμ) gene insertion and the widely expressed H2-L(d)-IL6 transgene to demonstrate that FDG-PET/CT affords an excellent research tool for assessing interleukin-6- and MYC-driven plasma cell tumor (PCT) development in a serial, reproducible and stage- and lesion-specific manner. We also show that FDG-PET/CT permits determination of objective drug responses in PCT-bearing mice treated with the investigational proteasome inhibitor ixazomib (MLN2238), the biologically active form of ixazomib citrate (MLN9708), that is currently in phase 3 clinical trials in MM. Overall survival of 5 of 6 ixazomib-treated mice doubled compared with mice left untreated. One outlier mouse presented with primary refractory disease. Our findings demonstrate the utility of FDG-PET/CT for preclinical MM research and suggest that this method will play an important role in the design and testing of new approaches to treat myeloma. PMID:24292417

  16. PET/CT in Head-neck Malignancies: The Implications for Personalized Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Wassef, Heidi R; Hanna, Nevine; Colletti, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    PET/CT has been shown to help localize head and neck cancers and provide more accurate staging, post-treatment assessment, and restaging than standard imaging. PET/CT detects synchronous and metachronous cancers and sequelae of therapy and provides prognostic information for each patient. Information provided by PET/CT allows for more individualized therapeutic and surveillance plans for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27321027

  17. The effects of respiration motion in PET/CT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lu; Wu, Zhijian; Zhou, Fengyin; Ye, Sheng; Zeng, Shaoqun; Kao, Chien-Min; Chen, Chin-Tu; Zhang, Yongxue; Xie, Qingguo

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, the clinical status of positron emission tomography(PET)/computed tomography(CT) in achieving more accurate staging of lung cancer has been established and the technology has been enthusiastically accepted by the medical community. However, its capability in chest imaging is still limited by several physical factors. As a result of typical PET/CT imaging protocol, respiration-averaged PET data and free of respiration-averaged CT data are collected in a PET/CT scanning. In this work, we investigate the effects of respiration motion. We employ mathematical and Monte-Carlo simulations for generating PET/CT data. We scale a Zubal phantom to generate 30 phantoms having various sizes in order to represent different torso anatomic states during respiration. Images reconstructed from selected scaling PET data using the respective scaling PET attenuation maps serve as baseline results. PET/CT imaging protocol is simulated by reconstruction from respiration-averaged PET data with the selected PET attenuation maps. We also reconstruct PET images from respiratory-averaged PET data with respiration-averaged PET attenuation maps, which simulates conventional PET imaging protocol. We will compare the resulting images reconstructed from the above-mentioned approaches to evaluate the effects of respiration motion in PET/CT.

  18. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  19. Multimodality Molecular Imaging (FDG-PET/CT, US Elastography, and DWI-MRI) as Complimentary Adjunct for Enhancing Diagnostic Confidence in Reported Intermediate Risk Category Thyroid Nodules on Bethesda Thyroid Cytopathology Reporting System

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip; Mahajan, Abhishek; Arya, Supreeta

    2016-01-01

    The potential complimentary role of various molecular imaging modalities [fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT), ultrasound (US)-elastography, and diffusion weighted imaging-magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI)] in characterizing thyroid nodules, which have been designated as “intermediate risk category” on the Bethesda thyroid cytopathology reporting system (BTCRS), is illustrated in this communication. The clinical cases described (category III thyroid nodules on BTCRS) show the imaging features and the final diagnostic impressions rendered by the interpreting physicians with the modalities that have been independently compared in a tabular format at the end; of particular note is the high negative predictive value of these (specifically FDG-PET/CT), which could aid in enhancing the diagnostic confidence in the reported “intermediate risk category” thyroid nodules, a “gray zone” from the patient management viewpoint. PMID:27134564

  20. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Mairani, A.; Hobbs, R. F.; Vergara Gil, A.; Pacilio, M.; Parodi, K.; Cremonesi, M.; Coca Pérez, M. A.; Di Dia, A.; Ferrari, M.; Guerriero, F.; Battistoni, G.; Pedroli, G.; Paganelli, G.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Sgouros, G.

    2013-11-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3-4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  1. Use of the FLUKA Monte Carlo code for 3D patient-specific dosimetry on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images*

    PubMed Central

    Botta, F; Mairani, A; Hobbs, R F; Vergara Gil, A; Pacilio, M; Parodi, K; Cremonesi, M; Coca Pérez, M A; Di Dia, A; Ferrari, M; Guerriero, F; Battistoni, G; Pedroli, G; Paganelli, G; Torres Aroche, L A; Sgouros, G

    2014-01-01

    Patient-specific absorbed dose calculation for nuclear medicine therapy is a topic of increasing interest. 3D dosimetry at the voxel level is one of the major improvements for the development of more accurate calculation techniques, as compared to the standard dosimetry at the organ level. This study aims to use the FLUKA Monte Carlo code to perform patient-specific 3D dosimetry through direct Monte Carlo simulation on PET-CT and SPECT-CT images. To this aim, dedicated routines were developed in the FLUKA environment. Two sets of simulations were performed on model and phantom images. Firstly, the correct handling of PET and SPECT images was tested under the assumption of homogeneous water medium by comparing FLUKA results with those obtained with the voxel kernel convolution method and with other Monte Carlo-based tools developed to the same purpose (the EGS-based 3D-RD software and the MCNP5-based MCID). Afterwards, the correct integration of the PET/SPECT and CT information was tested, performing direct simulations on PET/CT images for both homogeneous (water) and non-homogeneous (water with air, lung and bone inserts) phantoms. Comparison was performed with the other Monte Carlo tools performing direct simulation as well. The absorbed dose maps were compared at the voxel level. In the case of homogeneous water, by simulating 108 primary particles a 2% average difference with respect to the kernel convolution method was achieved; such difference was lower than the statistical uncertainty affecting the FLUKA results. The agreement with the other tools was within 3–4%, partially ascribable to the differences among the simulation algorithms. Including the CT-based density map, the average difference was always within 4% irrespective of the medium (water, air, bone), except for a maximum 6% value when comparing FLUKA and 3D-RD in air. The results confirmed that the routines were properly developed, opening the way for the use of FLUKA for patient-specific, image

  2. Monitoring tumour response during chemo-radiotherapy: a parametric method using FDG-PET/CT images in patients with oesophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility and the additional interest of a parametric imaging (PI) method to monitor the early tumour metabolic response in a prospective series of oesophageal cancer patients who underwent positron emission tomography with fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG-PET/CT) before and during curative-intent chemo-radiotherapy. Methods Fifty-seven patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oesophagus prospectively underwent FDG-PET/CT before chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) (PET1) and at 21 ± 3 days after the beginning of CRT (PET2). The outcome was assessed at 3 months and 1 year after the completion of CRT (clinical examination, CT scan or FDG-PET/CT, biopsy). For each patient, PET1 and PET2 were registered using CT images. The 2 PET image sets were subtracted, so the voxels with significant changes in FDG uptake were identified. A model-based analysis of this graph was used to identify the tumour voxels in which significant changes occurred between the two scans and yielded indices characterising these changes (green and red clusters). Quantitative parameters were compared with clinical outcome at 3 months and at 1 year. Results The baseline tumour FDG uptake decreased significantly at PET2 (p < 0.0001). The tumour volume significantly decreased between PET1 and PET2 (p < 0.02). The initial functional volume of the lesion (TV1) was significantly lower (p < 0.02) in patients in clinical response (CR) at 3 months and 1 year. The volume of the lesion during the treatment (TV2) was significantly lower in patients identified as in CR at 3 months (p < 0.03), but did not predict the outcome at 1 year. Multivariate analyses of outcome at 3 months showed that the risk of failure/death increased with younger age (p = 0.001), larger metabolic volume on PET1 (p = 0.009) and larger volume with decreased FDG uptake (p = 0.047). As for outcome at 1 year, the risk of failure

  3. Variability of Image Features Computed from Conventional and Respiratory-Gated PET/CT Images of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jasmine A.; Budzevich, Mikalai; Zhang, Geoffrey G.; Dilling, Thomas J.; Latifi, Kujtim; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2015-01-01

    Radiomics is being explored for potential applications in radiation therapy. How various imaging protocols affect quantitative image features is currently a highly active area of research. To assess the variability of image features derived from conventional [three-dimensional (3D)] and respiratory-gated (RG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images of lung cancer patients, image features were computed from 23 lung cancer patients. Both protocols for each patient were acquired during the same imaging session. PET tumor volumes were segmented using an adaptive technique which accounted for background. CT tumor volumes were delineated with a commercial segmentation tool. Using RG PET images, the tumor center of mass motion, length, and rotation were calculated. Fifty-six image features were extracted from all images consisting of shape descriptors, first-order features, and second-order texture features. Overall, 26.6% and 26.2% of total features demonstrated less than 5% difference between 3D and RG protocols for CT and PET, respectively. Between 10 RG phases in PET, 53.4% of features demonstrated percent differences less than 5%. The features with least variability for PET were sphericity, spherical disproportion, entropy (first and second order), sum entropy, information measure of correlation 2, Short Run Emphasis (SRE), Long Run Emphasis (LRE), and Run Percentage (RPC); and those for CT were minimum intensity, mean intensity, Root Mean Square (RMS), Short Run Emphasis (SRE), and RPC. Quantitative analysis using a 3D acquisition versus RG acquisition (to reduce the effects of motion) provided notably different image feature values. This study suggests that the variability between 3D and RG features is mainly due to the impact of respiratory motion. PMID:26692535

  4. PET/CT and MR imaging biomarker of lipid-rich plaques using [64Cu]-labeled scavenger receptor (CD68-Fc).

    PubMed

    Bigalke, Boris; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Andia, Marcelo E; Cooper, Margaret S; Schuster, Andreas; Wurster, Thomas; Onthank, David; Münch, Götz; Blower, Philip; Gawaz, Meinrad; Nagel, Eike; Botnar, Rene M

    2014-11-15

    Continued uptake of modified low-density lipoproteins (LDL) by the scavenger receptor, CD68, of activated macrophages is a crucial process in the development of atherosclerotic plaques and leads to the formation of foam cells. Eight-weeks-old male Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (n = 6) were fed a high-fat diet for 12 weeks. C57BL/6J wildtype (WT) mice served as controls (n = 6). Positron emission tomography (PET) with an acquisition time of 1800 s (NanoPET/CT scanner; Mediso, Hungary & Bioscan, USA) was carried out 24h after intravenous tail vein administration of 50 µl (64)Cu-CD68-Fc (~20-30 µg labeled protein/mouse containing approximately 10-12 MBq (64)Cu-CD68-Fc per mouse). Three days after PET/CT, all mice received an intravenous administration of 0.2 mmol/kg body weight of a gadolinium-based elastin-binding contrast agent to assess plaque burden and vessel wall remodeling. Two hours after injection, mice were imaged in a 3T clinical MR scanner (Philips Healthcare, Best, NL) using a dedicated single loop surface coil (23 mm). Enhanced (64)Cu-CD68-Fc uptake was found in the aortic arches of ApoE(-/-) compared to WT mice (ApoE(-/-) mice:10.5 ± 1.5 Bq/cm(3) vs. WT mice: 2.1 ± 0.3 Bq/cm(3); P = 0.002). Higher gadolinium-based elastin-binding contrast agent uptake was also detected in the aortic arch of ApoE(-/-) compared to WT mice using R(1) maps (R(1) = 1.47 ± 0.06 s(-1) vs. 0.92 ± 0.05 s(-1); P <0.001). Radiolabeled scavenger receptor ((64)Cu-CD68-Fc) may help to target foam cell rich plaques with high content of oxidized LDL. This novel imaging biomarker tool may have potential to identify unstable plaques and for risk stratification. PMID:25499394

  5. Novel 18F labeling strategy for polyester-based NPs for in vivo PET-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, Primiano Pio; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Baz Maldonado, Zuriñe; Llop Roig, Jordi; Borrós, Salvador

    2015-03-18

    Drug-loaded nanocarriers and nanoparticulate systems used for drug release require a careful in vivo evaluation in terms of physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. Nuclear imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) are ideal and noninvasive tools to investigate the biodistribution and biological fate of the nanostructures, but the incorporation of a positron emitter is required. Here we describe a novel approach for the (18)F-radiolabeling of polyester-based nanoparticles. Our approach relies on the preparation of the radiolabeled active agent 4-[(18)F]fluorobenzyl-2-bromoacetamide ([(18)F]FBBA), which is subsequently coupled to block copolymers under mild conditions. The labeled block copolymers are ultimately incorporated as constituent elements of the NPs by using a modified nano coprecipitation method. This strategy has been applied in the current work to the preparation of peptide-functionalized NPs with potential applications in drug delivery. According to the measurements of particle size and zeta potential, the radiolabeling process did not result in a statistically significant alteration of the physicochemical properties of the NPs. Moreover, radiochemical stability studies showed no detachment of the radioactivity from NPs even at 12 h after preparation. The radiolabeled NPs enabled the in vivo quantification of the biodistribution data in rats using a combination of imaging techniques, namely, PET and computerized tomography (CT). Low accumulation of the nanoparticles in the liver and their elimination mainly via urine was found. The different biodistribution pattern obtained for the "free" radiolabeled polymer suggests chemical and radiochemical integrity of the NPs under investigation. The strategy reported here may be applied to any polymeric NPs containing polymers bearing a nucleophile, and hence our novel strategy may find application for the in vivo and noninvasive investigation of a wide range of NPs. PMID:25710619

  6. Utility of PET/CT Imaging Performed Early After Surgical Resection in the Adjuvant Treatment Planning for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, Stephanie A.; Foote, Robert L. Lowe, Val J.; Brown, Paul D.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Kasperbauer, Jan L.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) early after surgical resection and before postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We studied a prospective cohort of 91 consecutive patients referred for postoperative adjuvant radiation therapy after complete surgical resection. Tumor histologies included 62 squamous cell and 29 non-squamous cell cancers. Median time between surgery and postoperative PET/CT was 28 days (range, 13-75 days). Findings suspicious for persistent/recurrent cancer or distant metastasis were biopsied. Correlation was made with changes in patient care. Results: Based on PET/CT findings, 24 patients (26.4%) underwent biopsy of suspicious sites. Three patients with suspicious findings did not undergo biopsy because the abnormalities were not easily accessible. Eleven (45.8%) biopsies were positive for cancer. Treatment was changed for 14 (15.4%) patients (11 positive biopsy and 3 nonbiopsied patients) as a result. Treatment changes included abandonment of radiation therapy and switching to palliative chemotherapy or hospice care (4), increasing the radiation therapy dose (6), extending the radiation therapy treatment volume and increasing the dose (1), additional surgery (2), and adding palliative chemotherapy to palliative radiation therapy (1). Treatment for recurrent cancer and primary skin cancer were significant predictors of having a biopsy-proven, treatment-changing positive PET/CT (p < 0.03). Conclusions: Even with an expectedly high rate of false positive PET/CT scans in this early postoperative period, PET/CT changed patient management in a relatively large proportion of patients. PET/CT can be recommended in the postoperative, preradiation therapy setting with the understanding that treatment-altering PET/CT findings should be biopsied for confirmation.

  7. SU-E-J-250: A Methodology for Active Bone Marrow Protection for Cervical Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using 18F-FLT PET/CT Image

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a radiation therapy treatment planning that would spare active bone marrow and whole pelvic bone marrow using 18F FLT PET/CT image. Methods: We have developed an IMRT planning methodology to incorporate functional PET imaging using 18F FLT/CT scans. Plans were generated for two cervical cancer patients, where pelvicactive bone marrow region was incorporated as avoidance regions based on the range: SUV>2., another region was whole pelvic bone marrow. Dose objectives were set to reduce the volume of active bone marrow and whole bone marraw. The volumes of received 10 (V10) and 20 (V20) Gy for active bone marrow were evaluated. Results: Active bone marrow regions identified by 18F FLT with an SUV>2 represented an average of 48.0% of the total osseous pelvis for the two cases studied. Improved dose volume histograms for identified bone marrow SUV volumes and decreases in V10(average 18%), and V20(average 14%) were achieved without clinically significant changes to PTV or OAR doses. Conclusion: Incorporation of 18F FLT/CT PET in IMRT planning provides a methodology to reduce radiation dose to active bone marrow without compromising PTV or OAR dose objectives in cervical cancer.

  8. Application of 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT for αvβ3-integrin Imaging of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Zeng, Yong; Zhu, Yicheng; Feng, Feng; Xu, Weihai; Wu, Chenxi; Xing, Bing; Zhang, Weihong; Wu, Peiling; Cui, Liying; Wang, Renzhi; Li, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ischemic vascular diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, have been found to be associated with elevated expression of αvβ3-integrin, which provides a promising target for semi-quantitative monitoring of the disease. For the first time, we employed 68Ga-S-2-(isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid-PEG3-E[c(RGDyK)]2 (68Ga-PRGD2) to evaluate the αvβ3-integrin-related repair in post-MI and post-stroke patients via positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, 23 MI patients (3 days-2 years post-MI) and 16 stroke patients (3 days-13 years post-stroke) were recruited. After giving informed consent, each patient underwent a cardiac or brain PET/CT scan 30 min after the intravenous injection of 68Ga-PRGD2 in a dose of approximately 1.85 MBq (0.05 mCi) per kilogram body weight. Two stroke patients underwent repeat scans three months after the event. Results: Patchy 68Ga-PRGD2 uptake occurred in or around the ischemic regions in 20/23 MI patients and punctate multifocal uptake occurred in 8/16 stroke patients. The peak standardized uptake values (pSUVs) in MI were 1.94 ± 0.48 (mean ± SD; range, 0.62-2.69), significantly higher than those in stroke (mean ± SD, 0.46 ± 0.29; range, 0.15-0.93; P < 0.001). Higher 68Ga-PRGD2 uptake was observed in the patients 1-3 weeks after the initial onset of the MI/stroke event. The uptake levels were significantly correlated with the diameter of the diseases (r = 0.748, P = 0.001 for MI and r = 0.835, P = 0.003 for stroke). Smaller or older lesions displayed no uptake. Conclusions: 68Ga-PRGD2 uptake was observed around the ischemic region in both MI and stroke patients, which was correlated with the disease phase and severity. The different image patterns and uptake levels in MI and stroke patients warrant further investigations. PMID:24955139

  9. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of {sup 90}Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: Feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Fourkal, E.; Veltchev, I.; Lin, M.; Meyer, J.; Koren, S.; Doss, M.; Yu, J. Q.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for {sup 90}Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58–3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71–311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25–155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target

  10. Brain (18)F-FDG, (18)F-Florbetaben PET/CT, (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT and Cardiac (123)I-MIBG Imaging for Diagnosis of a "Cerebral Type" of Lewy Body Disease.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Bélissant, Ophélie; Rabu, Corentin; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Bonnot-Lours, Sophie; Fénelon, Gilles; Itti, Emmanuel

    2016-09-01

    A 67-year-old man was referred for fluctuating neuropsychiatric symptoms, featuring depression, delirious episodes, recurrent visual hallucinations and catatonic syndrome associated with cognitive decline. No parkinsonism was found clinically even under neuroleptic treatment. (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed hypometabolism in the posterior associative cortex including the occipital cortex, suggesting Lewy body dementia, but (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT was normal and cardiac (123)I-MIBG imaging showed no signs of sympathetic denervation. Alzheimer's disease was excluded by a normal (18)F-florbetaben PET/CT. This report suggests a rare case of α-synucleinopathy without brainstem involvement, referred to as "cerebral type" of Lewy body disease. PMID:27540431

  11. PET/CT in renal, bladder and testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Physician, Chief; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of cancer patients. Hybrid imaging with PET/CT is having a broad impact in oncology, and in recent years PET/CT is beginning to have an impact in uro-oncology as well. In both bladder and renal cancer there is a need to study the efficacy of other tracers than F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), particularly tracers with only limited renal excretion. Thus, new tracers are being introduced in these malignancies. This review focuses on the clinical role of FDG and other PET agents in renal, bladder and testicular cancer. PMID:26099672

  12. Estimation of patient radiation dose from whole body 18F- FDG PET/CT examination in cancer imaging: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, M. H.; Nordin, A. J.; Saad, F. F. Ahmad; Fattah Azman, A. Z.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to estimate the radiation effective dose resulting from whole body fluorine-18 flourodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18F-FDG PET) scanning as compared to conservative Computed Tomography (CT) techniques in evaluating oncology patients. We reviewed 19 oncology patients who underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT at our centre for cancer staging. Internal and external doses were estimated using radioactivity of injected FDG and volume CT Dose Index (CTDIvol), respectively with employment of the published and modified dose coefficients. The median differences of dose among the conservative CT and PET protocols were determined using Kruskal Wallis test with p < 0.05 considered as significant. The median (interquartile range, IQR) effective doses of non-contrasted CT, contrasted CT and PET scanning protocols were 7.50 (9.35) mSv, 9.76 (3.67) mSv and 6.30 (1.20) mSv, respectively, resulting in the total dose of 21.46 (8.58) mSv. Statistically significant difference was observed in the median effective dose between the three protocols (p < 0.01). The effective doses of whole body 18F-FDG PET technique may be effective the lowest amongst the conventional CT imaging techniques.

  13. Investigating the limits of PET/CT imaging at very low true count rates and high random fractions in ion-beam therapy monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, Christopher Bauer, Julia; Conti, Maurizio; Guérin, Laura; Eriksson, Lars; Parodi, Katia

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a tighter conformation of the applied dose to arbitrarily shaped tumor volumes with respect to photons, but is more sensitive to uncertainties in the radiotherapeutic treatment chain. Consequently, an independent verification of the applied treatment is highly desirable. For this purpose, the irradiation-induced β{sup +}-emitter distribution within the patient is detected shortly after irradiation by a commercial full-ring positron emission tomography/x-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner installed next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). A major challenge to this approach is posed by the small number of detected coincidences. This contribution aims at characterizing the performance of the used PET/CT device and identifying the best-performing reconstruction algorithm under the particular statistical conditions of PET-based treatment monitoring. Moreover, this study addresses the impact of radiation background from the intrinsically radioactive lutetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based detectors at low counts. Methods: The authors have acquired 30 subsequent PET scans of a cylindrical phantom emulating a patientlike activity pattern and spanning the entire patient counting regime in terms of true coincidences and random fractions (RFs). Accuracy and precision of activity quantification, image noise, and geometrical fidelity of the scanner have been investigated for various reconstruction algorithms and settings in order to identify a practical, well-suited reconstruction scheme for PET-based treatment verification. Truncated listmode data have been utilized for separating the effects of small true count numbers and high RFs on the reconstructed images. A corresponding simulation study enabled extending the results to an even wider range of counting statistics and to additionally investigate the impact of scatter coincidences. Eventually, the recommended

  14. ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT in malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Chiara; Spinapolice, Elena Giulia; Ferretti, Alice; Castellucci, Paolo; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Trifirò, Giuseppe; Rubello, Domenico

    2013-07-01

    It is well known the useful role of ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT for differential diagnosis between benign and malignant disease, for staging, for monitoring response and for prognosis regarding mesothelioma. Recently, literature was enriched with new interesting studies regarding the potential applications of ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT in this field. The purpose of this review is to evaluate articles published on line (PubMed) from January 2011 until October 2012 in order to obtain an overview of recent progress of molecular imaging in malignant mesothelioma. The main topics concern the use of ¹⁸F-FDG-PET/CT in radiation therapy planning, monitoring of treatment (surgery/chemotherapy) response and prognosis assessment. PMID:23583476

  15. FDG PET/CT in Hepatoid Adenocarcinoma of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouyang; Li, Mengxi; Chen, Huai; Li, Jianyu; Zeng, Qingsi

    2016-07-01

    A right upper lung mass was incidentally found on a chest radiograph in a routine health examination in a 56-year-old man. The mass showed mild heterogeneous enhancement on contrast chest CT images and intense FDG uptake on PET/CT images. Pathological examination demonstrated hepatoid adenocarcinoma in the lung. PMID:27124679

  16. Allergic Reaction to Ginkgo Nut on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Ji; Park, Hye Lim; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who previously underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma. F FDG PET/CT images demonstrated multiple lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake in the neck, chest, and abdomen and diffusely increased FDG uptake in the spleen, which were highly suspicious findings for malignant lymphoma. However, subsequent biopsy of axillary lymph node presented reactive hyperplasia. Detailed history revealed that the patient had a history of generalized edema and severe arthralgia after contact with ginkgo nut one week ago. This case highlights allergic reaction mimicking lymphoma on FDG PET/CT. PMID:27276210

  17. Recent experiences with shielding a PET/CT facility.

    PubMed

    Erdman, Mike; King, Steve; Miller, Ken

    2004-08-01

    Since the photon energy of positron emitting radionuclides is significantly higher than the maximum kVp of diagnostic x rays, designing a shielding plan for a PET/CT imaging facility requires careful consideration of future workloads and potential occupancy of surrounding spaces. The shielding calculations can be done by hand or with the aid of available software. In calculating the shielding, specific considerations arise. Some of these are presented as a checklist of things to consider when preparing to calculate the shielding required for a PET/CT facility. PMID:15220722

  18. Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detection of primary site in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making: experience from a tertiary care centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous group of tumours which usually originate from small, occult primary sites and are characterized by over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Ga-68-labeled-somatostatin-analogues have shown superiority over other modalities for imaging of NETs. The objective of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detecting the primary site in patients with metastatic NETs of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making in such patients. Methods Between December 2011 and September 2014, a total of 263 patients underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT study in our department for various indications. Out of them, 68 patients (45 males, 23 females; mean age, 54.9±10.7 years; range, 31–78 years) with histopathologically proven metastatic NETs and unknown primary site (CUP-NET) on conventional imaging, who underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan as part of their clinical work-up were included for analyses. Histopathology (wherever available) and/or follow-up imaging were taken as reference standard. Quantitative estimation of SSTR expression in the form of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of detected primary and metastatic sites was calculated. Follow-up data of individual patients was collected through careful survey of hospital medical records and telephonic interviews. Results Maximum patients presented to our department with hepatic metastasis (50 out of 68 patients) and grade I NETs (>50%). Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan identified primary sites in 40 out of these 68 patients i.e., in approximately 59% patients. Identified primary sites were: small intestine [19], rectum [8], pancreas [7], stomach [4], lung [1] and one each in rare sites in kidney and prostate. In one patient, 2 primary sites were identified (one each in stomach and duodenum). Mean SUVmax of the detected primary sites was

  19. Localized Airspace Consolidation of Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis Mimicking Malignant Lesions in 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging: One Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Li; Fang, Na; Zeng, Lei; Wu, Zeng-jie; Cui, Xin-Jian

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a rare lung disease caused by diffuse, abnormal intra-alveolar surfactant accumulation. Here, we report a case of autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis with heterogeneous accumulation of F-FDG in both lungs shown on the combined F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:26252337

  20. Staging of Primary Abdominal Lymphomas: Comparison of Whole-Body MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Alessandro; Buemi, Francesco; Quagliozzi, Martina; Lombardi, Mariangela; Santagostino, Alberto; Sacchetti, Gian Mauro; Carriero, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences (WB-DW-MRI) with that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the staging of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Methods. This retrospective study involved 17 untreated patients with primary abdominal gastrointestinal lymphoma. All patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and WB-DW-MRI. Histopathology findings or at least 6 months of clinical and radiological follow-up was the gold standard. The Musshoff-modified Ann Arbor system was used for staging, and diagnostic accuracy was evaluated on a per-node basis. Results. WB-DW-MRI exhibited 100% sensitivity, 96.3% specificity, and 96.1% and 100% positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and PPV and NPV of PET/CT were 95.9%, 100%, and 100% and 96.4%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques (p = 0.05). The weighted kappa agreement statistics with a 95% confidence interval were 0.97 (0.95–0.99) between the two MRI readers and 0.87 (0.82–0.92) between the two methods. Conclusions. WB-DW-MRI appears to have a comparable diagnostic value to 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging patients with gastrointestinal lymphoma. PMID:26798331

  1. Segmental "misty mesentery" on FDG PET/CT: an uncommon manifestation of mesenteric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Ameya D; Purandare, Nilendu C; Agrawal, Archi; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Mesenteric lymphomas are commonly seen as bulky hypermetabolic nodal masses on F-FDG PET/CT. Very rarely, these are seen as mesenteric haziness due to localized hyperattenuation of fat, known as "misty mesentery", which morphological imaging-wise has other differentials as well. We report a unique imaging finding of segmental misty mesentery with hypermetabolic mesenteric nodes on FDG PET/CT in a patient who was kept on observation due to inconclusive biopsy, which on follow-up imaging progressed to extensive lymphomatous involvement. Thus, in retrospect, this imaging feature on baseline PET/CT was diagnostic for mesenteric lymphoma. PMID:23797224

  2. Single scan parameterization of space-variant point spread functions in image space via a printed array: the impact for two PET/CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotasidis, F. A.; Matthews, J. C.; Angelis, G. I.; Noonan, P. J.; Jackson, A.; Price, P.; Lionheart, W. R.; Reader, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    Incorporation of a resolution model during statistical image reconstruction often produces images of improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. A novel and practical methodology to rapidly and accurately determine the overall emission and detection blurring component of the system matrix using a printed point source array within a custom-made Perspex phantom is presented. The array was scanned at different positions and orientations within the field of view (FOV) to examine the feasibility of extrapolating the measured point source blurring to other locations in the FOV and the robustness of measurements from a single point source array scan. We measured the spatially-variant image-based blurring on two PET/CT scanners, the B-Hi-Rez and the TruePoint TrueV. These measured spatially-variant kernels and the spatially-invariant kernel at the FOV centre were then incorporated within an ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) algorithm and compared to the manufacturer's implementation using projection space resolution modelling (RM). Comparisons were based on a point source array, the NEMA IEC image quality phantom, the Cologne resolution phantom and two clinical studies (carbon-11 labelled anti-sense oligonucleotide [11C]-ASO and fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-l-thymidine [18F]-FLT). Robust and accurate measurements of spatially-variant image blurring were successfully obtained from a single scan. Spatially-variant resolution modelling resulted in notable resolution improvements away from the centre of the FOV. Comparison between spatially-variant image-space methods and the projection-space approach (the first such report, using a range of studies) demonstrated very similar performance with our image-based implementation producing slightly better contrast recovery (CR) for the same level of image roughness (IR). These results demonstrate that image-based resolution modelling within reconstruction is a valid alternative to projection

  3. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Sergio L. Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible.

  4. Restaging of colorectal cancer and PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Alev; Gençoğlu, Esra Arzu; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography/Computerized Tomography (PET/CT) is an important assessment method in restaging of oncology patients. Its ability to detect the metabolic/functional changes in patients with colorectal cancer during the early stages, in which morphological changes cannot be documented, is significantly superior to other imaging modalities. PMID:25931851

  5. 18F-DOPA PET/CT but not 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the underlying cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Ahonen, Aapo; Seppänen, Marko

    2012-09-01

    F-DOPA PET/CT but not Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome in a 61-year-old man. The patient presented with rapid weight gain, swollen legs, and sleep disturbances. Plasma potassium level was 2.7 mM (reference range, 3.3-4.9 mM), 24-hour urinary cortisol level was 13,124 nmol (reference range, 30-144 nmol), and plasma adrenocorticotropin level was 61 ng/L (reference range, <48 g/L). CT demonstrated prominent lymph nodes in the left lung hilus and hyperplastic adrenals but no primary tumor. Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, which is recommended as the first-line PET imaging, was performed, but it was not diagnostic. Imaging with F-DOPA PET/CT revealed the underlying cause. PMID:22889786

  6. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Jackson, Price; Siva, Shankar

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  7. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Imaging and 153Sm-EDTMP Bone Pain Palliation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Nanabala, Raviteja; Pillai, M R A; Thomas, Boben

    2016-07-01

    Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a potential tool in the imaging of recurrent prostate cancer. Ga-PSMA imaging is also useful for radiotherapy planning and in targeted therapy with Lu-PSMA. A few case reports regarding the use of Ga-PSMA in nonprostate cancer malignancies are also reported. We describe the use of Ga-PSMA imaging before Sm-EDTMP bone pain palliation therapy in a 58-year-old hormone refractory prostate cancer patient with extensive bone metastases. PMID:27055142

  8. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. In order to better understand and treat them, an accurate evaluation using multi-modal imaging techniques for anatomical and functional characterizations is needed. For non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), there have been many engineering improvements that have significantly enhanced the resolution and contrast of the images, but there are still insufficient computational algorithms available for researchers to use when accurately quantifying imaging data from anatomical structures and functional biological processes. Since the development of such tools may potentially translate basic research into the clinic, this study focuses on the development of a quantitative and qualitative image analysis platform that provides a computational radiology perspective for pulmonary infections in small animal models. Specifically, we designed (a) a fast and robust automated and semi-automated image analysis platform and a quantification tool that can facilitate accurate diagnostic measurements of pulmonary lesions as well as volumetric measurements of anatomical structures, and incorporated (b) an image registration pipeline to our proposed framework for volumetric comparison of serial scans. This is an important investigational tool for small animal infectious disease models that can help advance researchers’ understanding of infectious diseases. Methods We tested the utility of our proposed methodology by using sequentially acquired CT and PET images of rabbit, ferret, and mouse models with respiratory infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), H1N1 flu virus, and an aerosolized respiratory pathogen (necrotic TB) for a total of 92, 44, and 24 scans for the respective studies with half of the scans from CT and the other half from PET. Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal

  9. Desmoid Tumor Showing Intense Uptake on 68Ga PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Hsiao, Edward; Kneebone, Andrew; Eade, Thomas; Schembri, Geoffrey Paul

    2016-06-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a new imaging technique that is highly sensitive to metastatic prostate cancer lesions compared with other conventional imaging modalities. We report a case of a 77-year-old man with newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma who had a PSMA PET/CT scan for staging of his disease. An intensely PSMA-avid right pelvic mass was identified abutting the cecum and terminal ileum. Surgical removal and histopathologic examination of this lesion revealed the diagnosis of a desmoid tumor. It is important to be aware that many tumors other than prostate carcinoma may also show avid uptake on PSMA PET/CT scan. PMID:26909712

  10. Patient-Specific Dosimetry Using Pretherapy [124I]m-iodobenzylguanidine ([124I]mIBG) Dynamic PET/CT Imaging Before [131I]mIBG Targeted Radionuclide Therapy for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-ying; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Van Brocklin, Henry F.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Sznewajs, Aimee; DuBois, Steven G.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Iodine-131-m-iodobenzylguanidine ([131I]mIBG) targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is a standard treatment for recurrent or refractory neuroblastoma with response rates of 30–40%. The aim of this study is to demonstrate patient-specific dosimetry using quantitative [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging with a Geant4-based Monte Carlo method for better treatment planning. Procedures A Monte Carlo dosimetry method was developed using the Geant4 toolkit with voxelized anatomical geometry and source distribution as input. The pre-segmented hybrid computational human phantoms developed by the University of Florida and the National Cancer Institute (UF/NCI) were used as a surrogate to characterize the anatomy of a given patient. S-values for I-131 were estimated by the phantoms coupled with Geant4 and compared with those estimated by OLINDA|EXM and MCNPX for the newborn model. To obtain patient-specific biodistribution of [131I]mIBG, a 10-year-old girl with relapsed neuroblastoma was imaged with [124I]mIBG PET/CT at four time points prior to the planned [131I]mIBG TRT. The organ and tumor absorbed dose of the clinical case were estimated with the Geant4 method using the modified UF/NCI 10-year-old phantom with tumors and the patient-specific residence time. Results For the newborn model, the Geant4 S-values were consistent with the MCNPX S- values. The S-value ratio of the Geant4 method to OLINDA|EXM ranged from 0.08 to 6.5 of all major organs. The [131I]mIBG residence time quantified from the pretherapy [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging of the 10-year-old patient was mostly comparable to those previously reported. Organ absorbed dose for the salivary glands were 98.0 Gy, heart wall, 36.5 Gy, and liver, 34.3 Gy; while tumor absorbed dose ranged from 143.9 Gy to 1641.3 Gy in different sites. Conclusions Patient-specific dosimetry for [131I]mIBG targeted radionuclide therapy was accomplished using pretherapy [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging and a Geant4-based Monte Carlo dosimetry method

  11. The effect of activity outside the field of view on image quality for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Della Monica, P; Leva, L; Sacchetti, G; Inglese, E; Brambilla, M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of outside field of view (FOV) activity concentration (A(c)(,out)) on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR), scatter fraction (SF) and image quality of a 3D LSO whole-body PET/CT scanner. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was the figure of merit used to characterize the image quality of PET scans. A modified International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) phantom was used to obtain SF and counting rates similar to those found in average patients. A scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the modified IEC phantom to simulate an activity that extends beyond the scanner. The modified IEC phantom was filled with (18)F (11 kBq mL(-1)) and the spherical targets, with internal diameter (ID) ranging from 10 to 37 mm, had a target-to-background ratio of 10. PET images were acquired with background activity concentrations into the FOV (A(c)(,bkg)) about 11, 9.2, 6.6, 5.2 and 3.5 kBq mL(-1). The emission scan duration (ESD) was set to 1, 2, 3 and 4 min. The tube inside the scatter phantom was filled with activities to provide A(c)(,out) in the whole scatter phantom of zero, half, unity, twofold and fourfold the one of the modified IEC phantom. Plots of CNR versus the various parameters are provided. Multiple linear regression was employed to study the effects of A(c)(,out) on CNR, adjusted for the presence of variables (sphere ID, A(c)(,bkg) and ESD) related to CNR. The presence of outside FOV activity at the same concentration as the one inside the FOV reduces peak NECR of 30%. The increase in SF is marginal (1.2%). CNR diminishes significantly with increasing outside FOV activity, in the range explored. ESD and A(c)(,out) have a similar weight in accounting for CNR variance. Thus, an experimental law that adjusts the scan duration to the outside FOV activity can be devised. Recovery of CNR loss due to an elevated A(c)(,out) activity seems feasible by modulating the ESD in individual bed positions according to A

  12. A comparative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging of experimental Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis and Staphylococcus epidermidis foreign-body-associated infection in the rabbit tibia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background 18F-FDG-PET imaging has emerged as a promising method in the diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis commonly due to Staphylococcus aureus. The inaccuracy of 18 F-FDG-PET in the detection of periprosthetic joint infections may be related to the predominance of low-virulent S. epidermidis strains as the causative pathogen. We have compared the18F-FDG-PET characteristics of S. aureus osteomyelitis and foreign-body-associated S. epidermidis infections under standardized laboratory conditions. Methods Twenty-two rabbits were randomized into three groups. In group 1, a localized osteomyelitis model induced with a clinical strain of S. aureus was applied. In groups 2 and 3, a foreign-body-associated infection model induced with a clinical or laboratory strain of S. epidermidis was applied. A small block of bone cement was surgically introduced into the medullary cavity of the proximal tibia followed by peri-implant injection of S. aureus (1 × 105 CFU/mL) or one of the two S. epidermidis (1 × 109 CFU/mL) strains with an adjunct injection of aqueous sodium morrhuate. In group 1, the cement block was surgically removed at 2 weeks but left in place in groups 2 and 3 in order to mimic foreign-body-associated S. epidermidis infections. At 8 weeks, the animals were imaged using 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The presence of bacterial infection was confirmed by cultures, and the severity of bone infections was graded by means of radiography, peripheral quantitative CT, and semi-quantitative histology. Results The S. aureus strain caused constantly culture-positive osteomyelitis. The clinical S. epidermidis strain resulted in foreign-body-associated infections, while the laboratory S. epidermidis strain (ATCC 35983) induced only occasionally culture-positive infections. There was a correlation (r = 0.645; P = 0.013) between semi-quantitative score of leukocyte infiltration and the 18 F-FDG uptake in animals with positive cultures. Standardized uptake value

  13. PET/CT imaging evidence of FUS-mediated (18)F-FDG uptake changes in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungmin; Park, Mi-Ae; Wang, Shuyan; Chiu, Alan; Fischer, Krisztina; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) delivers highly focused acoustic energy to a small region of the brain in a noninvasive manner. Recent studies have revealed that FUS, which is administered either in pulsed or continuous waves, can elicit or suppress neural tissue excitability. This neuromodulatory property of FUS has been demonstrated via direct motion detection, electrophysiological recordings, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), confocal imaging, and microdialysis sampling of neurotransmitters. This study presents new evidence of local increase in glucose metabolism induced by FUS to the rat brain using FDG (18-fludeoxyglucose) positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Sprague–Dawley rats underwent sonication to a unilateral hemispheric area of the brain prior to PET scan. The pulsed sonication (350 kHz, tone burst duration of 0.5 ms, pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz, and duration of 300 ms) was applied in 2 s intervals for 40 min immediately after the FDG injection via tail vein. Subsequently, the PET was acquired in dynamic list-mode to image FDG activity for an hour, and reconstructed into a single volume representing standardized uptake value (SUV). The raw SUV as well as its asymmetry index (AI) were measured from five different volume-of-interests (VOIs) of the brain for both hemispheres, and compared between sonicated and unsonicated groups. Results: Statistically significant hemispheric changes in SUV were observed only at the center of sonication focus within the FUS group [paired t-test; t(7) = 3.57, p < 0.05]. There were no significant hemispheric differences in SUV within the control group in any of the VOIs. A statistically significant elevation in AI (t-test; t(7) = 3.40, p < 0.05) was observed at the center of sonication focus (7.9 ± 2.5%, the deviations are in standard error) among the FUS group when compared to the control group (−0.8 ± 1.2%). Conclusions: Spatially distinct increases in the glucose metabolic

  14. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part II. In Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Swine with PET/CT and MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ziv, Keren; Ito, Ken; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Swanson, Julia C; Merk, Denis R; Lyons, Jennifer K; Yerushalmi, David; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Kosuge, Hisanori; Dao, Catherine N; Ray, Pritha; Patel, Manishkumar; Chang, Ya-Fang; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Cohen, Jeff Eric; Goldstone, Andrew Brooks; Habte, Frezghi; Bhaumik, Srabani; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Robbins, Robert C; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; McConnell, Michael V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To quantitatively determine the limit of detection of marrow stromal cells (MSC) after cardiac cell therapy (CCT) in swine by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with cell prelabeling. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the institutional administrative panel on laboratory animal care. Seven swine received 23 intracardiac cell injections that contained control MSC and cell mixtures of MSC expressing a multimodality triple fusion (TF) reporter gene (MSC-TF) and bearing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) (MSC-TF-NP) or NP alone. Clinical MR imaging and PET reporter gene molecular imaging were performed after intravenous injection of the radiotracer fluorine 18-radiolabeled 9-[4-fluoro-3-(hydroxyl methyl) butyl] guanine ((18)F-FHBG). Linear regression analysis of both MR imaging and PET data and nonlinear regression analysis of PET data were performed, accounting for multiple injections per animal. Results MR imaging showed a positive correlation between MSC-TF-NP cell number and dephasing (dark) signal (R(2) = 0.72, P = .0001) and a lower detection limit of at least approximately 1.5 × 10(7) cells. PET reporter gene imaging demonstrated a significant positive correlation between MSC-TF and target-to-background ratio with the linear model (R(2) = 0.88, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.523) and the nonlinear model (R(2) = 0.99, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.273) and a lower detection limit of 2.5 × 10(8) cells. Conclusion The authors quantitatively determined the limit of detection of MSC after CCT in swine by using clinical PET reporter gene imaging and clinical MR imaging with cell prelabeling. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:27332865

  15. Pearls and pitfalls in interpretation of abdominal and pelvic PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Blake, Michael A; Singh, Ajay; Setty, Bindu N; Slattery, James; Kalra, Mannudeep; Maher, Michael M; Sahani, Dushyant V; Fischman, Alan J; Mueller, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    The interpretation of images obtained in the abdomen and pelvis can be challenging, and the coregistration of positron emission tomographic (PET) and computed tomographic (CT) scans may be especially valuable in the evaluation of these anatomic areas. PET-CT represents a major technologic advance, consisting of generally complementary modalities whose combined strength tends to overcome their respective weaknesses. However, this combined functional-structural imaging approach raises a number of controversial questions and presents some unique interpretative challenges. Accurate PET-CT scan interpretation requires awareness of the various pitfalls associated with the imaging components, both individually and in combination. The results of recent PET-CT studies have been very encouraging, but larger prospective studies will be needed to establish optimal hybrid scanning protocols. Applying sound imaging principles, paying attention to detail, and staying abreast of advances in this exciting new modality are necessary for harnessing the full diagnostic power of abdominopelvic PET-CT. PMID:16973768

  16. Schwannoma Showing Avid Uptake on 68Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Izard, Michael A; Emmett, Louise; Hsiao, Edward; Schembri, Geoffrey Paul

    2016-09-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT is a relatively new and highly sensitive imaging modality used in staging metastatic prostate cancer. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma who had a PSMA PET/CT scan for staging of his disease. A PSMA-avid right pelvic mass was identified anterior to the sacrum. Surgical removal and histopathological examination of this lesion revealed the diagnosis of schwannoma. It is important to be aware that schwannoma may also show avid uptake on PSMA PET/CT scan and may potentially lead to an incorrect diagnosis of metastatic prostate carcinoma. PMID:27405039

  17. Widespread Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma Shown by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Soydal, Cigdem; Ozkan, Elgin; Yerlikaya, Halis; Utkan, Gungor; Kucuk, Ozlem Nuriye

    2016-06-01

    We present the F-FDG and Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT images of a 61-year-old patient with a newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma (4 + 4 Gleason score) and high serum prostate-specific antigen levels (460 ng/mL). In F-FDG PET/CT, minimal uptake was demonstrated in the prostatic mass without any accompanying pathological uptake. However, Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT revealed multiple pathological uptake in the lung nodules, mediastinal nodes, abdominal-pelvic lymph nodes, bone lesions, and prostatic mass. PMID:26909710

  18. Use of PET/CT scanning in cancer patients: technical and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This overview of the oncologic applications of positron emission tomography (PET) focuses on the technical aspects and clinical applications of a newer technique: the combination of a PET scanner and a computed tomography (CT) scanner in a single (PET/CT) device. Examples illustrate how PET/CT contributes to patient care and improves upon the previous state-of-the-art method of comparing a PET scan with a separate CT scan. Finally, the author presents some of the results from studies of PET/CT imaging that are beginning to appear in the literature. PMID:16252023

  19. PET/MRI and PET/CT in Lung Lesions and Thoracic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Flechsig, Paul; Mehndiratta, Amit; Haberkorn, Uwe; Kratochwil, Clemens; Giesel, Frederik L

    2015-07-01

    More than one decade ago, introduction of integrated PET/CT scanners changed oncologic imaging and oncologic patient management profoundly. With these systems, the metabolic information acquired by PET can be anatomically localized even to small structures such as small primary tumors, lymph nodes, and soft tissue masses owing to the high-resolution multidetector CT scanners. This has made PET/CT a most reliable method for tumor detection, characterization, staging, and response monitoring. The importance of an integrated functional and morphologic approach to better understand the biology of oncologic disease and to improve therapy planning is underlined by the increasing number of PET/CT systems worldwide, leading to an increasing number of scientific publications in the field. The paradigmatic indication of integrated PET/CT is staging of patients with lung cancer, as PET/CT allows for precise pretherapeutic staging and also posttreatment restaging according to the TNM criteria. The growing numbers of targeted therapy strategies in the fields of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, which are adapted to dedicated tumor stages, require the exact classifications of each patient's tumor stage. In this context, whole-body examinations using integrated (18)F-FDG-PET/CT have been shown to reduce the side effects of futile invasive procedures and reduce additional costly staging procedures. In this review article, the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of PET/CT examinations are highlighted and compared with some competitive techniques such as scintigraphy, MRI, and, where possible, integrated PET/MRI. PMID:26050655

  20. The role of 18F–NaF PET/CT in metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Aras, Gülseren; Küçük, Özlem N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the role of 18F–NaF PET/CT and compare it with 99m Tc-MDP whole body bone scintigraphy and 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting the extent of metastatic bone disease and to present our first experience with 18F–NaF PET/CT in our country. Materials and methods A total of 37 histopathologically proven cancer patients (22 male, 15 female) with bone metastasis detected on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan were prospectively enrolled Cebeci, following ethics committee approval. 18F–NaF PET/CT was performed to the participants in Ankara University Medical Faculty Nuclear Medicine Department for evaluation of symptomatic skeletal sites which were negative on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan. A lesion based comparison was made between 18F–NaF PET/CT and Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan for each patient and between 18F–NaF PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT in 12/37 patients. Results The number of lesions demonstrated by 99m Tc-MDP bone scan and 18F–NaF PET/CT was equal in 4/37 (%11) of the cases. 18F–NaF PET/CT showed a greater number of pathological foci in 89% of participants. 18F–NaF PET/CT was able to show both lytic and blastic lesions and small lesions were better visualized due to the advantage of sectional imaging with much better resolution and higher target/background ratio. 18F–NaF PET/CT demonstrated a greater number of metastases in 10/12 (83%) of the patients when compared to 18F-FDG PET/CT. In the other two patients, bone metastasis could be demonstrated only by 18F–NaF PET/CT. The uptake of 18F-FDG was variable in blastic lesions and cranial bone involvement was missed by 18F-FDG PET/CT in some cases due to physiological brain metabolism. Conclusion Although further prospective clinical studies in specific cancer populations are indicated to set the place of 18F–NaF PET/CT in diagnostic scheme, the results of this pilot study from our country support the superiority of 18F–NaF PET/CT in investigation of bone metastasis over 99m

  1. FDG PET-CT of gynecologic cancers: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Hima B; Kraeft, Jessica J; Schorge, John O; Scott, James A; Lee, Susanna I

    2015-10-01

    FDG PET-CT plays an important role in treatment planning and in prognosis assessment of gynecologic cancer patients. Detection of hypermetabolic tissue with FDG PET, when combined with the high spatial resolution of CT, results in improved cancer detection and localization not afforded by either modality independently. This article is a primer for a radiologist performing PET-CT on gynecologic cancer patients and includes the imaging protocol, normal pattern of FDG distribution in the female pelvis and the lymph node drainage pathways from the gynecologic organs. Clinically relevant imaging findings that should be included in the report are discussed. Case examples illustrate how potential errors in exam interpretation can be avoided by concurrently performing a high-quality diagnostic CT with the FDG PET scan and by analyzing both the stand-alone and the fusion images. PMID:25680500

  2. Reproducibility of 'Intelligent' Contouring of Gross Tumor Volume in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer on PET/CT Images Using a Standardized Visual Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, Michael; Hicks, Rodney J.; Everitt, Sarah; Fimmell, Natalie

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly used for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The methodology for contouring tumor margins remains controversial. We developed a rigorous visual protocol for contouring GTV that uses all available clinical information and studied its reproducibility in patients from a prospective PET/CT planning trial. Methods and Materials: Planning PET/CT scans from 6 consecutive patients were selected. Six 'observers' (two radiation oncologists, two nuclear medicine physicians, and two radiologists) contoured GTVs for each patient using a predefined protocol and subsequently recontoured 2 patients. For the estimated GTVs and axial distances, least-squares means for each observer and for each case were calculated and compared, using the F test and pairwise t-tests. In five cases, tumor margins were also autocontoured using standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoffs of 2.5 and 3.5 and 40% SUV{sub max}. Results: The magnitude of variation between observers was small relative to the mean (coefficient of variation [CV] = 3%), and the total variation (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 3%). For estimation of superior/inferior (SI), left/right (LR), and anterior/posterior (AP) borders of the GTV, differences between observers were also small (AP, CV = 2%, ICC = 0.4%; LR, CV = 6%, ICC = 2%; SI, CV 4%, ICC = 2%). GTVs autocontoured generated using SUV 2.5, 3.5, and 40% SUV{sub max} differed widely in each case. An SUV contour of 2.5 was most closely correlated with the mean GTV defined by the human observers. Conclusions: Observer variation contributed little to total variation in the GTV and axial distances. A visual contouring protocol gave reproducible results for contouring GTV in NSCLC.

  3. Assessment of the usefulness of the standardized uptake values and the radioactivity levels for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer measured by using 18F-FDG PET/CT dual-time-point imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeon-Guck; Hong, Seong-Jong; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Han, Man-Seok; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Ik-Han

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the changes in the SUV (standardized uptake value), the 18F-FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) uptake pattern, and the radioactivity level for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer via dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT (positron emission tomographycomputed tomography) imaging. Moreover, the study aimed to verify the usefulness and significance of SUV values and radioactivity levels to discriminate tumor malignancy. A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients who received 18F-FDG PET/CT for thyroid cancer as a primary tumor. To set the background, we compared changes in values by calculating the dispersion of scattered rays in the neck area and the lung apex, and by comparing the mean and SD (standard deviation) values of the maxSUV and the radioactivity levels. According to the statistical analysis of the changes in 18F-FDG uptake for the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, a high similarity was observed with the coefficient of determination being R2 = 0.939, in the SUVs and the radioactivity levels. Moreover, similar results were observed in the assessment of tumor malignancy using dual-time-point. The quantitative analysis method for assessing tumor malignancy using radioactivity levels was neither specific nor discriminative compared to the semi-quantitative analysis method.

  4. PET/CT and MRI in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    Bladder Cancer (BCa) is the most common malignancy arising from the urinary tract. One of the mainstays of diagnosis, staging, and therapeutic decision-making for BCa is accurate and appropriate imaging. The ability to identify metastatic disease preoperatively is of utmost importance in determining treatment. Advances in standard cross sectional imaging techniques like Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have improved imaging of bladder cancer. Over the last decade, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in combination with CT (18F-FDG PET/CT) has become an important non-invasive imaging modality for the preoperative staging of various malignancies. 18F-FDG PET/CT is useful for detection of metastatic disease in BCa, but the ability to detect primary bladder wall lesions remains to be elucidated. To overcome the problem with urinary excretion of 18F-FDG, new PET tracers are being tested. MRI is an accurate technique for the local staging of BCa due to its superior spatial and contrast resolution. Anatomical MRI has a modest utility in NM-staging of BCa. However, incorporation of functional MR techniques, such as diffusion weighted MRI can improve the results for lesion detection and staging and multi-parametric MRI`s role is yet to be explored widely. The aim of this review is to present the recent advances in PET/CT and MRI in BCa, with particular focus on improvements in staging. PMID:23471167

  5. ¹⁸F-fluoride PET and PET/CT in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Grant, Frederick D

    2014-07-01

    18F-fluoride PET/CT has been used for a wide variety of indications in children and young adults. Nearly all pediatric 18F-fluoride PET/CTs are performed to evaluate benign conditions. The most common indication is the evaluation of back pain in a wide variety of circumstances, including patients with sports injuries, scoliosis, trauma, and back pain after surgery. The high image quality of 18F-fluoride PET/CT can make it particularly useful for evaluating benign skeletal lesions such as osteoid osteoma and Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Quantitative assessment of bone turnover with 18F-fluoride PET/CT may make it useful for assessing the skeleton in patients with metabolic bone diseases, eating disorders, and avascular necrosis. There is little pediatric experience using 18F-fluoride PET/CT for evaluation of skeletal or soft tissue disease in childhood cancers. PMID:25030392

  6. Spectrum of the Breast Lesions With Increased 18F-FDG Uptake on PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jianping; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Interpretation of 18F-FDG PET/CT studies in breast is challenging owing to nonspecific FDG uptake in various benign and malignant conditions. Benign conditions include breast changes in pregnancy and lactation, gynecomastia, mastitis, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Among malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma are common histological types of breast carcinoma. Rarely, other unusual histological types of breast carcinomas (eg, intraductal papillary carcinoma, invasive micropapillary carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma), lymphoma, and metastasis can be the causes. Knowledge of a wide spectrum of hypermetabolic breast lesions on FDG PET/CT is essential in accurate reading of FDG PET/CT. The purpose of this atlas article is to demonstrate features of various breast lesions encountered at our institution, both benign and malignant, which can result in hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT imaging. PMID:26975010

  7. Spectrum of the Breast Lesions With Increased 18F-FDG Uptake on PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jianping; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-07-01

    Interpretation of F-FDG PET/CT studies in breast is challenging owing to nonspecific FDG uptake in various benign and malignant conditions. Benign conditions include breast changes in pregnancy and lactation, gynecomastia, mastitis, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Among malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma are common histological types of breast carcinoma. Rarely, other unusual histological types of breast carcinomas (eg, intraductal papillary carcinoma, invasive micropapillary carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, and metaplastic carcinoma), lymphoma, and metastasis can be the causes. Knowledge of a wide spectrum of hypermetabolic breast lesions on FDG PET/CT is essential in accurate reading of FDG PET/CT. The purpose of this atlas article is to demonstrate features of various breast lesions encountered at our institution, both benign and malignant, which can result in hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT imaging. PMID:26975010

  8. The role of PET/CT as a prognosticator and outcome predictor in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Khiewvan, Benjapa; Ziai, Pouya; Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Ziai, Peyman; Alavi, Abass

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important imaging tool for management of lung cancer and can be utilized in diagnosis, staging, restaging, treatment planning and evaluating treatment response. In the past decade PET/CT has proven to be beneficial for the prediction of prognosis and outcome. PET findings before and after treatment, the quantitative PET parameters such as standardized uptake value (SUV), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as well as delayed PET/CT imaging can be used to determine patient prognosis and outcome. Other tracers such as hypoxia and proliferation marker tracers may be used for prognostication. The prognostic factors derived from PET/CT imaging help early development of risk-adapted treatment strategies, which provides cost-effective treatment and leads to improved patient management. Here, we discuss findings of studies related to application of PET/CT in lung cancer as well as some technical updates on quantitative PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26822467

  9. The role of PET/CT scanning in radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Jarritt, P H; Carson, K J; Hounsell, A R; Visvikis, D

    2006-09-01

    The introduction of functional data into the radiotherapy treatment planning process is currently the focus of significant commercial, technical, scientific and clinical development. The potential of such data from positron emission tomography (PET) was recognized at an early stage and was integrated into the radiotherapy treatment planning process through the use of image fusion software. The combination of PET and CT in a single system (PET/CT) to form an inherently fused anatomical and functional dataset has provided an imaging modality which could be used as the prime tool in the delineation of tumour volumes and the preparation of patient treatment plans, especially when integrated with virtual simulation. PET imaging typically using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) can provide data on metabolically active tumour volumes. These functional data have the potential to modify treatment volumes and to guide treatment delivery to cells with particular metabolic characteristics. This paper reviews the current status of the integration of PET and PET/CT data into the radiotherapy treatment process. Consideration is given to the requirements of PET/CT data acquisition with reference to patient positioning aids and the limitations imposed by the PET/CT system. It also reviews the approaches being taken to the definition of functional/tumour volumes and the mechanisms available to measure and include physiological motion into the imaging process. The use of PET data must be based upon a clear understanding of the interpretation and limitations of the functional signal. Protocols for the implementation of this development remain to be defined, and outcomes data based upon clinical trials are still awaited. PMID:16980683

  10. First-In-Human Study Demonstrating Tumor-Angiogenesis by PET/CT Imaging with 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST, a High-Affinity Peptidomimetic for αvβ3 Integrin Receptor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Richard P.; Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Müller, Dirk; Danthi, Narasimhan; Kim, Young-Seung; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST™ is an αvβ3 integrin antagonist and the first radiolabeled peptidomimetic to reach clinical development for targeting integrin receptors. In this first-in-human study, the feasibility of integrin receptor peptidomimetic positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was confirmed in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and breast cancer. Methods: Patients underwent PET/CT imaging with 68Ga NODAGA-THERANOST. PET images were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively and compared to 2-deoxy-2-(18F) fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) findings. Images were obtained 60 minutes postinjection of 300–500 MBq of 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST. Results: 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST revealed high tumor-to-background ratios (SUVmax=4.8) and uptake at neoangiogenesis sites. Reconstructed fused images distinguished cancers with high malignancy potential and enabled enhanced bone metastasis detection. 18F-FDG-positive lung and lymph node metastases did not show uptake, indicating the absence of neovascularization. Conclusions: 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST was found to be safe and effective, exhibiting in this study rapid blood clearance, stability, rapid renal excretion, favorable biodistribution and PK/PD, low irradiation burden (μSv/MBq/μg), and convenient radiolabeling. This radioligand might enable theranostics, that is, a combination of diagnostics followed by the appropriate therapeutics, namely antiangiogenic therapy, image-guided presurgical assessment, treatment response evaluation, prediction of pathologic response, neoadjuvant-peptidomimetic-radiochemotherapy, and personalized medicine strategies. Further clinical trials evaluating 68Ga-NODAGA-THERANOST are warranted. PMID:25945808

  11. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. Ronan Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  12. (18) F-FDG PET-CT and trephine biopsy assessment of bone marrow involvement in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ujjani, Chaitra S; Hill, Elizabeth M; Wang, Hongkun; Nassif, Samer; Esposito, Giuseppe; Ozdemirli, Metin; Cordova, Christine; Cheson, Bruce D

    2016-08-01

    The ability of positron emission tomography-computerized tomography (PET-CT) to accurately detect bone marrow involvement (BMI) has been suggested in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but its abilities in other histologies is less established. The aim of this retrospective study was to confirm the role of PET-CT in detecting BMI in DLBCL and HL, and to explore its usefulness in other subtypes. Of the 149 newly diagnosed patients, common subtypes included DLBCL, follicular lymphoma (FL) and HL. In DLBCL, the sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT at diagnosis were 75% and 92%. In FL, the sensitivity and specificity of PET-CT were 67% and 85% at diagnosis, and 73% and 89% at relapse. In HL, the sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 74%. PET-CT was able to detect BMI in patients with negative biopsies. Most of the patients in which PET-CT failed to identify BMI were already advanced stage by imaging. In this analysis, PET-CT was highly accurate for detecting BMI at diagnosis in DLBCL and HL and highly specific in FL at diagnosis and relapse. Results also suggested the diagnostic advantage of PET-CT over bone marrow biopsy in detecting BMI. Prospective evaluation is necessary and may eliminate biopsies in future patients. PMID:27098364

  13. Role of FDG PET/CT in Baastrup's disease.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Padma; Palaniswamy, Shanmuga Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is a benign condition, which presents as chronic low back pain. It is also known as "kissing spine syndrome" and refers to close approximation of adjacent spinous processes producing inflammation and back pain. This condition is often misdiagnosed, resulting in incorrect treatment and persistence of symptoms. Diagnosis of Baastrup's disease is verified with clinical examination and imaging studies. Conventionally, clinicians resort to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spine rather than X-ray or computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of back pain. MRI can additionally identify flattening, sclerosis, enlargement, cystic lesions, and bone edema at the articulating surfaces of the two affected spinous processes. Studies have reported that (18)Fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) can detect a bursitis or an inflammation as a form of stress reaction despite a negative MRI and (99m)Tc Methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scan. PET/CT is usually not a recommended investigation for this condition. However, this case report highlights the benefit of FDG-PET/CT in identifying the site of inflammatory pathology. It is also known to identify the exact site of inflammation where steroid or local anesthetic injection can be administered to alleviate pain, especially in patients with multilevel vertebral involvement. PMID:27385901

  14. Role of FDG PET/CT in Baastrup's disease

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyam, Padma; Palaniswamy, Shanmuga Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is a benign condition, which presents as chronic low back pain. It is also known as “kissing spine syndrome” and refers to close approximation of adjacent spinous processes producing inflammation and back pain. This condition is often misdiagnosed, resulting in incorrect treatment and persistence of symptoms. Diagnosis of Baastrup's disease is verified with clinical examination and imaging studies. Conventionally, clinicians resort to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spine rather than X-ray or computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of back pain. MRI can additionally identify flattening, sclerosis, enlargement, cystic lesions, and bone edema at the articulating surfaces of the two affected spinous processes. Studies have reported that 18Fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) can detect a bursitis or an inflammation as a form of stress reaction despite a negative MRI and 99mTc Methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scan. PET/CT is usually not a recommended investigation for this condition. However, this case report highlights the benefit of FDG-PET/CT in identifying the site of inflammatory pathology. It is also known to identify the exact site of inflammation where steroid or local anesthetic injection can be administered to alleviate pain, especially in patients with multilevel vertebral involvement. PMID:27385901

  15. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Prospective Multicenter Comparison of Early Interim FLT PET/CT versus FDG PET/CT with IHP, EORTC, Deauville, and PERCIST Criteria for Early Therapeutic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Fayad, Luis; Advani, Ranjana; Vose, Julie; Macapinlac, Homer; Meza, Jane; Hankins, Jordan; Mottaghy, Felix; Juweid, Malik; Quon, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To compare the performance characteristics of interim fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (after two cycles of chemotherapy) by using the most prominent standardized interpretive criteria (including International Harmonization Project [IHP] criteria, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] criteria, and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) versus those of interim (18)F fluorothymidine (FLT) PET/CT and simple visual interpretation. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant prospective study was approved by the institutional review boards, and written informed consent was obtained. Patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) underwent both FLT and FDG PET/CT 18-24 days after two cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone or rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin. For FDG PET/CT interpretation, IHP criteria, EORTC criteria, PERCIST, Deauville criteria, standardized uptake value, total lesion glycolysis, and metabolic tumor volume were used. FLT PET/CT images were interpreted with visual assessment by two reviewers in consensus. The interim (after cycle 2) FDG and FLT PET/CT studies were then compared with the end-of-treatment FDG PET/CT studies to determine which interim examination and/or criteria best predicted the result after six cycles of chemotherapy. Results From November 2011 to May 2014, there were 60 potential patients for inclusion, of whom 46 patients (24 men [mean age, 60.9 years ± 13.7; range, 28-78 years] and 22 women [mean age, 57.2 years ± 13.4; range, 25-76 years]) fulfilled the criteria. Thirty-four patients had complete response, and 12 had residual disease at the end of treatment. FLT PET/CT had a significantly higher positive predictive value (PPV) (91%) in predicting residual disease than did any FDG PET/CT interpretation method

  16. The role of PET-CT in radiotherapy planning of solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jelercic, Stasa; Rajer, Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Background PET-CT is becoming more and more important in various aspects of oncology. Until recently it was used mainly as part of diagnostic procedures and for evaluation of treatment results. With development of personalized radiotherapy, volumetric and radiobiological characteristics of individual tumour have become integrated in the multistep radiotherapy (RT) planning process. Standard anatomical imaging used to select and delineate RT target volumes can be enriched by the information on tumour biology gained by PET-CT. In this review we explore the current and possible future role of PET-CT in radiotherapy treatment planning. After general explanation, we assess its role in radiotherapy of those solid tumours for which PET-CT is being used most. Conclusions In the nearby future PET-CT will be an integral part of the most radiotherapy treatment planning procedures in an every-day clinical practice. Apart from a clear role in radiation planning of lung cancer, with forthcoming clinical trials, we will get more evidence of the optimal use of PET-CT in radiotherapy planning of other solid tumours. PMID:25810695

  17. 18F-FDG PET/CT oncologic imaging at extended injection-to-scan acquisition time intervals derived from a single-institution 18F-FDG-directed surgery experience: feasibility and quantification of 18F-FDG accumulation within 18F-FDG-avid lesions and background tissues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a well-established imaging modality for a wide variety of solid malignancies. Currently, only limited data exists regarding the utility of PET/CT imaging at very extended injection-to-scan acquisition times. The current retrospective data analysis assessed the feasibility and quantification of diagnostic 18F-FDG PET/CT oncologic imaging at extended injection-to-scan acquisition time intervals. Methods 18F-FDG-avid lesions (not surgically manipulated or altered during 18F-FDG-directed surgery, and visualized both on preoperative and postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging) and corresponding background tissues were assessed for 18F-FDG accumulation on same-day preoperative and postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Multiple patient variables and 18F-FDG-avid lesion variables were examined. Results For the 32 18F-FDG-avid lesions making up the final 18F-FDG-avid lesion data set (from among 7 patients), the mean injection-to-scan times of the preoperative and postoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were 73 (±3, 70-78) and 530 (±79, 413-739) minutes, respectively (P < 0.001). The preoperative and postoperative mean 18F-FDG-avid lesion SUVmax values were 7.7 (±4.0, 3.6-19.5) and 11.3 (±6.0, 4.1-29.2), respectively (P < 0.001). The preoperative and postoperative mean background SUVmax values were 2.3 (±0.6, 1.0-3.2) and 2.1 (±0.6, 1.0-3.3), respectively (P = 0.017). The preoperative and postoperative mean lesion-to-background SUVmax ratios were 3.7 (±2.3, 1.5-9.8) and 5.8 (±3.6, 1.6-16.2), respectively, (P < 0.001). Conclusions 18F-FDG PET/CT oncologic imaging can be successfully performed at extended injection-to-scan acquisition time intervals of up to approximately 5 half-lives for 18F-FDG while maintaining good/adequate diagnostic image quality. The resultant increase in the 18F-FDG-avid lesion SUVmax values, decreased background SUVmax values, and

  18. Volume-Based F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging Markers Provide Supplemental Prognostic Information to Histologic Grading in Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid; Petersen, Michael Mork; Loft, Annika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to assess the prognostic value of different volume-based calculations of tumor metabolic activity in the initial assessment of patients with high-grade bone sarcomas (BS) and soft tissue sarcomas (STS) using F-18 FDG PET/CT. A single-site, retrospective study from 2002 to 2012 including 92 patients with histologically verified high-grade BS (N = 37) or STS (N = 55). All patients underwent a pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan. Clinical data were registered. Measurements of the accuracy of metabolic tumor volume with a preset threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized uptake value of primary tumor (MTV40%) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as prognostic variables and identification of optimal discriminating cut-off values were performed through ROC curve analysis. Patients were grouped according to the cut-off values. All deaths were considered an event in survival analysis. Kaplan–Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare the degree of equality of survival distributions. Prognostic variables with related hazard ratios (HR) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%; 12 BS and 29 STS). Average survival for included patients was 6.5 years (95% CI 5.8–7.3 years) and probability of 5-year survival was 52%. There was a high-significant accuracy of TLG and MTV40% as prognostic variables when looking on all patients and during subgroup analysis. AUCs were higher for TLG than for MTV40%. TLG above optimal cut-off value was the only variable which was independently prognostic for survival throughout multivariate regression analysis of all included patients (P = 0.01, HR 4.78 [95% CI 1.45–15.87]) and subgroup analysis (BS: P = 0.04, HR 11.11 [95% CI 1.09–111.11]; STS: P < 0.05, HR 3.37 [95% CI 1.02–11.11]). No significant results were demonstrated for MTV40%. Volume-based F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging markers in terms of

  19. Volume-Based F-18 FDG PET/CT Imaging Markers Provide Supplemental Prognostic Information to Histologic Grading in Patients With High-Grade Bone or Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kim Francis; Fuglo, Hanna Maria; Rasmussen, Sine Hvid; Petersen, Michael Mork; Loft, Annika

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the prognostic value of different volume-based calculations of tumor metabolic activity in the initial assessment of patients with high-grade bone sarcomas (BS) and soft tissue sarcomas (STS) using F-18 FDG PET/CT.A single-site, retrospective study from 2002 to 2012 including 92 patients with histologically verified high-grade BS (N = 37) or STS (N = 55). All patients underwent a pretreatment F-18 FDG PET/CT scan. Clinical data were registered. Measurements of the accuracy of metabolic tumor volume with a preset threshold of 40% of the maximum standardized uptake value of primary tumor (MTV40%) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) as prognostic variables and identification of optimal discriminating cut-off values were performed through ROC curve analysis. Patients were grouped according to the cut-off values. All deaths were considered an event in survival analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank test were used to compare the degree of equality of survival distributions. Prognostic variables with related hazard ratios (HR) were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.Forty-one of 92 patients died during follow-up (45%; 12 BS and 29 STS). Average survival for included patients was 6.5 years (95% CI 5.8-7.3 years) and probability of 5-year survival was 52%. There was a high-significant accuracy of TLG and MTV40% as prognostic variables when looking on all patients and during subgroup analysis. AUCs were higher for TLG than for MTV40%. TLG above optimal cut-off value was the only variable which was independently prognostic for survival throughout multivariate regression analysis of all included patients (P = 0.01, HR 4.78 [95% CI 1.45-15.87]) and subgroup analysis (BS: P = 0.04, HR 11.11 [95% CI 1.09-111.11]; STS: P < 0.05, HR 3.37 [95% CI 1.02-11.11]). No significant results were demonstrated for MTV40%.Volume-based F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging markers in terms of pretreatment estimation

  20. Prognostic Value of Quantitative Metabolic Metrics on Baseline Pre-Sunitinib FDG PET/CT in Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Minamimoto, Ryogo; Barkhodari, Amir; Harshman, Lauren; Srinivas, Sandy; Quon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate various quantitative metrics on FDG PET/CT for monitoring sunitinib therapy and predicting prognosis in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). Methods Seventeen patients (mean age: 59.0 ± 11.6) prospectively underwent a baseline FDG PET/CT and interim PET/CT after 2 cycles (12 weeks) of sunitinib therapy. We measured the highest maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of all identified lesions (highest SUVmax), sum of SUVmax with maximum six lesions (sum of SUVmax), total lesion glycolysis (TLG) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) from baseline PET/CT and interim PET/CT, and the % decrease in highest SUVmax of lesion (%Δ highest SUVmax), the % decrease in sum of SUVmax, the % decrease in TLG (%ΔTLG) and the % decrease in MTV (%ΔMTV) between baseline and interim PET/CT, and the imaging results were validated by clinical follow-up at 12 months after completion of therapy for progression free survival (PFS). Results At 12 month follow-up, 6/17 (35.3%) patients achieved PFS, while 11/17 (64.7%) patients were deemed to have progression of disease or recurrence within the previous 12 months. At baseline, PET/CT demonstrated metabolically active cancer in all cases. Using baseline PET/CT alone, all of the quantitative imaging metrics were predictive of PFS. Using interim PET/CT, the %Δ highest SUVmax, %Δ sum of SUVmax, and %ΔTLG were also predictive of PFS. Otherwise, interim PET/CT showed no significant difference between the two survival groups regardless of the quantitative metric utilized including MTV and TLG. Conclusions Quantitative metabolic measurements on baseline PET/CT appears to be predictive of PFS at 12 months post-therapy in patients scheduled to undergo sunitinib therapy for mRCC. Change between baseline and interim PET/CT also appeared to have prognostic value but otherwise interim PET/CT after 12 weeks of sunitinib did not appear to be predictive of PFS. PMID:27123976

  1. Hybrid registration of PET/CT in thoracic region with pre-filtering PET sinogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokri, S. S.; Saripan, M. I.; Marhaban, M. H.; Nordin, A. J.; Hashim, S.

    2015-11-01

    The integration of physiological (PET) and anatomical (CT) images in cancer delineation requires an accurate spatial registration technique. Although hybrid PET/CT scanner is used to co-register these images, significant misregistrations exist due to patient and respiratory/cardiac motions. This paper proposes a hybrid feature-intensity based registration technique for hybrid PET/CT scanner. First, simulated PET sinogram was filtered with a 3D hybrid mean-median before reconstructing the image. The features were then derived from the segmented structures (lung, heart and tumor) from both images. The registration was performed based on modified multi-modality demon registration with multiresolution scheme. Apart from visual observations improvements, the proposed registration technique increased the normalized mutual information index (NMI) between the PET/CT images after registration. All nine tested datasets show marked improvements in mutual information (MI) index than free form deformation (FFD) registration technique with the highest MI increase is 25%.

  2. 18F-FDG PET/CT in Neurolymphomatosis: Report of 3 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Canh, Nguyen Xuan; Tan, Ngo Van; Tung, Tran Thanh; Son, Nguyen Truong; Maurea, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis is a rare manifestation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by infiltration of peripheral nerves, nerve roots, plexus and cranial nerves by malignant lymphocytes. This report presents positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)imaging with 2-deoxy-2-18F-fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) in 3 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with nerve infiltration, including one newly diagnosed lymphoma, one recurrent lymphoma in previous nerve lesions and one newly recurrent lymphoma. PET/CT could reveal the affected neural structures including cranial nerves, spinal nerve roots, brachial plexus, cervicothoracic ganglion, intercostal nerves, branches of the vagus nerve, lumbosacral plexus and sciatic nerves. There was relative concordance between PET/CT and MRI in detection of affected cranial nerves. PET/CT seemed to be better than MRI in detection of affected peripheral nerves. 18F-FDG PET/CT was a whole-body imaging technique with the ability to reveal the affected cranial nerves, peripheral nerves, nerve roots and plexus in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A thorough understanding of disease and use of advanced imaging modalities will increasingly detect neurolymphomatosis.

  3. A case of pathologic fracture of femur whose primary tumor and occult metastases were ascertained by PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Ho; Yang, Bo Kyu; Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Soyon; Kim, Eun Sil

    2009-02-01

    We report a case of metastatic pathologic fracture of femoral shaft, whose primary cancer was ascertained by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). The abnormally increased biological activity of the space-occupying lesion of the lung was clearly demonstrated by PET-CT. Moreover, the occult bony metastatic lesions were confirmed with evidence of altered biologic activity. The PET-CT should be regarded as a valuable work-up tool for the orthopaedic management of metastatic pathologic fracture of a skeleton, all-the-more as a functional metabolic imaging tool. PMID:18183409

  4. 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ørbæk, Mathilde; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena; Kronborg, Gitte; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the clinical picture and imaging on 18F-FDG PET/CT mimicked malignant lymphoma. Follow-up 18F-FDG PET/CT scan in the patient performed 7 weeks after the abnormal scan revealed complete resolution of the metabolically active disease in the neck, axillas, lung hili, and spleen. This case highlights inflammation as one of the most well established false positives when interpreting 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. PMID:27187482

  5. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ørbæk, Mathilde; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena; Kronborg, Gitte; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the clinical picture and imaging on (18)F-FDG PET/CT mimicked malignant lymphoma. Follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan in the patient performed 7 weeks after the abnormal scan revealed complete resolution of the metabolically active disease in the neck, axillas, lung hili, and spleen. This case highlights inflammation as one of the most well established false positives when interpreting (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans. PMID:27187482

  6. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Thyroid Gland and Pancreas Showing Uptake on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT Scan.

    PubMed

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Schembri, Geoffrey Paul; Samra, Jaswinder; Roach, Paul; Hsiao, Edward

    2016-07-01

    Ga DOTATATE PET/CT is an imaging technique used in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors. We report a case of 66-year-old woman with a history of surgically removed renal cell carcinoma who presented for a DOTATATE PET/CT scan to characterize a newly diagnosed pancreatic lesion. DOTATATE-avid lesions were identified in the thyroid gland and pancreas. Subsequent biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma at both sites. It is important to be aware that tumors other than neuroendocrine tumors may also show uptake on DOTATATE PET/CT scan. A biopsy may be required if lesions are identified at atypical sites. PMID:27055137

  7. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component of PET/CT and PET/MRI in MM patients. The study includes 30 MM patients. All patients initially underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT (60 min p.i.), followed by PET/MRI (120 min p.i.). PET/CT and PET/MRI data were assessed and compared based on qualitative (lesion detection) and quantitative (SUV) evaluation. The hybrid PET/MRI system provided good image quality in all cases without artefacts. PET/MRI identified 65 of the 69 lesions, which were detectable with PET/CT (94.2%). Quantitative PET evaluations showed the following mean values in MM lesions: SUVaverage=5.5 and SUVmax=7.9 for PET/CT; SUVaverage=3.9 and SUVmax=5.8 for PET/MRI. Both SUVaverage and SUVmax were significantly higher on PET/CT than on PET/MRI. Spearman correlation analysis demonstrated a strong correlation between both lesional SUVaverage (r=0.744) and lesional SUVmax (r=0.855) values derived from PET/CT and PET/MRI. Regarding detection of myeloma skeletal lesions, PET/MRI exhibited equivalent performance to PET/CT. In terms of tracer uptake quantitation, a significant correlation between the two techniques was demonstrated, despite the statistically significant differences in lesional SUVs between PET/CT and PET/MRI. PMID:26550538

  8. FDG PET/CT of Intercostal Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si-Yun; Luo, Dong-Lan; Chen, Gang; Liu, En-Tao; Wang, Shu-Xia

    2016-06-01

    Intercostal schwannoma is rare. We report FDG PET/CT findings of intercostal schwannoma in a 66-year-old woman. The tumor contains both solid and cystic components with intense FDG activity in the solid component. Postsurgical pathology diagnosis revealed schwannoma. PMID:26859215

  9. Clinical Utility of Multimodality Imaging with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the Prediction of Neck Control in Oropharyngeal or Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated with Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wang, Hung- Ming; Chang, Chee-Jen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of pretreatment imaging techniques for predicting neck control in patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) treated with chemoradiation remains unclear. In this prospective study, we investigated the role of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DCE-PWI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET)/CT derived imaging markers for the prediction of neck control in OHSCC patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with untreated OHSCC scheduled for chemoradiation between August, 2010 and July, 2012 were eligible for the study. Clinical variables and the following imaging parameters of metastatic neck lymph nodes were examined in relation to neck control: transfer constant, volume of blood plasma, and volume of extracellular extravascular space (Ve) on DCE-PWI; apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI; maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis on 18F-FDG PET/CT. There were 69 patients (37 with oropharynx SCC and 32 with hypopharynx SCC) with successful pretreatment DCE-PWI and DWI available for analysis. After a median follow-up of 31 months, 25 (36.2%) participants had neck failure. Multivariate analysis identified hemoglobin level <14.3 g/dL (P = 0.019), Ve <0.23 (P = 0.040), and ADC >1.14×10−3 mm2/s (P = 0.003) as independent prognostic factors for 3-year neck control. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the three significant predictors of neck control. Patients with scores of 2–3 had significantly poorer neck control and overall survival rates than patients with scores of 0–1. We conclude that hemoglobin levels, Ve, and ADC are independent pretreatment prognostic factors for neck control in OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination may identify a subgroup of patients at high risk of developing neck failure. PMID:25531391

  10. Sodium 18F-Fluoride PET/CT of Bone, Joint and Other Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein; Desai, Bhushan; Conti, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of 18F-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) with positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasing. This resurgence of an old tracer has been fueled by several factors including superior diagnostic performance over standard 99mTc-based bone scintigraphy, growth in the availability of PET/CT imaging systems, increase in the number of regional commercial distribution centers for PET radiotracers, the recent concerns about potential chronic shortages with 99mTc based radiotracers, and the recent decision by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to reimburse for 18F-NaF PET/CT for evaluation of patients with known or suspected bone metastases through the National Oncologic PET Registry. The major goal of this article is to review the current evidence on the diagnostic utility of 18F-NaF in the imaging assessment of bone and joint in a variety of clinical conditions. PMID:25475379

  11. Follicular Lymphoma Showing Avid Uptake on 68Ga PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Coyle, Luke; Kneebone, Andrew; Schembri, Geoffrey Paul; Hsiao, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT is a new imaging technique that is significantly more sensitive to prostate cancer lesions than other conventional imaging modalities. Various other benign and malignant neoplasms may also express PSMA and show uptake on PSMA PET/CT scan. We report a case of 66-year-old man who had a PSMA PET/CT scan for restaging of prostate carcinoma. A PSMA-avid left femoral lymph node was identified. Subsequent biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of follicular lymphoma. It is important to be aware of this possibility to avoid scan misinterpretation. Biopsy of any atypical or clinically unexpected lesions should be considered. PMID:26914565

  12. Serendipitous Detection of Hodgkin Lymphoma by 18F-NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fuqiang; Wu, Jingbo; Huang, Zhanwen; Zhou, Fan; Chen, Yue

    2016-10-01

    A 17-year-old girl underwent F-NaF PET/CT to evaluate bone pain after an accident. The images did not identify any osseous lesion. However, there was a focally increased activity in the left upper chest, which corresponded to a partially calcified soft tissue mass in the mediastinum, suggestive of malignancy. The result led to subsequent F-FDG PET/CT imaging, which demonstrated intense activity in the mediastinal mass and in multiple cervical, supraclavicular, and mediastinal lymph nodes. Hodgkin lymphoma was diagnosed histopathologically following the biopsy. PMID:27556800

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT Demonstrating Malignant Degeneration of a Uterine Fibroid.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Punit

    2016-10-01

    Whereas benign leiomyoma of the uterus (fibroid) is very common, malignant degeneration of such fibroids to leiomyosarcoma is rare. Anatomical imaging with CT or MRI cannot differentiate between larger leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma. Imaging with F-FDG PET/CT can be helpful in differentiating the two. High-grade F-FDG uptake in uterine fibroids is suspected and warrants surgical excision for further evaluation. We present such as case of a 42-year-old premenopausal woman where F-FDG PET/CT helped in making the diagnosis of malignant degeneration of uterine fibroid. PMID:27556790

  14. 18F-FDG PET-CT in soft tissue sarcomas: staging, restaging, and prognostic value?

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Michael; Rubello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the current role of PET/computed tomography (CT) in soft tissue sarcomas with respect to staging, restaging, and prognostic value. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, for instance, can be very useful in differentiating recurrent disease from scar tissue during follow-up. Other indications of PET-CT are still evolving, especially in the light of new molecular drugs. Different aspects of PET/CT imaging in soft tissue sarcomas are overviewed including organ-specific merits, limitations, and potential pitfalls. Finally, methodological considerations on PET/MRI are also briefly discussed. PMID:26457597

  15. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT in Langerhans cell histiocytosis: spectrum of manifestations.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Seth, Rachna; Behra, Abhishek; Jana, Manisha; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this article is to provide an illustrative tutorial highlighting the utility of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging to detect the spectrum of manifestations in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis. FDG PET/CT is a powerful tool for making an early diagnosis; it allows higher diagnostic confidence with regard to lesions, measuring the extent of disease (staging) and assessing disease activity, and is consequently useful for evaluating the response to therapy in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PMID:26759026

  16. Value of FDG PET/CT in staging of oral cancer: four simultaneous primary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Linz, Christian; Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Kircher, Stefan; Lapa, Constantin; Bluemel, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the head and neck are at increased risk for second primary malignancies (SPMs). We report on a 53-year-old patient with primary diagnosis of SCC in the anterior floor of the mouth. Panendoscopy suspected an SPM of the right vocal cord. FDG PET/CT, as a whole-body imaging method, confirmed this suspicion and raised concern for further SPM of both esophagus and colon. All malignancies were confirmed by biopsy. Subsequently, the patient underwent radiochemotherapy. In summary, FDG PET/CT revealed unexpected multiple SPMs, prevented unnecessary resection of the oral SCC, and enabled individualized therapeutic management. PMID:25742223

  17. Is There a Role for PET/CT Parameters to Characterize Benign, Malignant, and Metastatic Parotid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karagulle; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Corey, Amanda; Galt, James R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Wadsworth, J. Trad; El-Deiry, Mark W.; Schuster, David M.; Saba, Nabil F.; Hudgins, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of benign and malignant lesions of the parotid gland, including metastatic lesions, is challenging with current imaging methods. Fluorine-18 FDG PET/CT is a noninvasive imaging modality that provides both anatomic and metabolic information. Semiquantitative data obtained from PET/CT, also known as PET/CT parameters, are maximum, mean, or peak standardized uptake values (SUVs); metabolic tumor volume; total lesion glycolysis; standardized added metabolic activity; and normalized standardized added metabolic activity. Our aim was to determine whether FDG PET/CT parameters can differentiate benign, malignant, and metastatic parotid tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-four patients with parotid neoplasms underwent PET/CT before parotidectomy; maximum SUV, mean SUV, peak SUV, total lesion glycolysis, metabolic tumor volume, standardized added metabolic activity, and normalized standardized added metabolic activity were calculated on a dedicated workstation. Univariate analyses were performed. A ROC analysis was used to determine the ability of PET/CT parameters to predict pathologically proven benign, malignant, and metastatic parotid gland neoplasms. RESULTS Fourteen patients had a benign or malignant primary parotid tumor. Twenty had metastases to the parotid gland. When the specificity was set to at least 85% for each parameter to identify cut points, the corresponding sensitivities ranged from 15% to 40%. Assessment of benign versus malignant lesions of parotid tumors, as well as metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma versus other metastatic causes, revealed that none of the PET/CT parameters has enough power to differentiate among these groups. CONCLUSION PET/CT parameters, including total lesion glycolysis, metabolic tumor volume, standardized added metabolic activity, and normalized standardized added metabolic activity, are not able to differentiate benign from malignant parotid tumors, primary parotid tumors from metastasis, or metastasis

  18. Post-radioembolization yttrium-90 PET/CT - part 1: diagnostic reporting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Yttrium-90 (90Y) positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) represents a technological leap from 90Y bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography with integrated computed tomography (SPECT/CT) by coincidence imaging of low abundance internal pair production. Encouraged by favorable early experiences, we implemented post-radioembolization 90Y PET/CT as an adjunct to 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT in diagnostic reporting. Methods This is a retrospective review of all paired 90Y PET/CT and 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT scans over a 1-year period. We compared image resolution, ability to confirm technical success, detection of non-target activity, and providing conclusive information about 90Y activity within targeted tumor vascular thrombosis. 90Y resin microspheres were used. 90Y PET/CT was performed on a conventional time-of-flight lutetium-yttrium-oxyorthosilicate scanner with minor modifications to acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Specific findings on 90Y PET/CT were corroborated by 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT, 99mTc macroaggregated albumin SPECT/CT, follow-up diagnostic imaging or review of clinical records. Results Diagnostic reporting recommendations were developed from our collective experience across 44 paired scans. Emphasis on the continuity of care improved overall diagnostic accuracy and reporting confidence of the operator. With proper technique, the presence of background noise did not pose a problem for diagnostic reporting. A counter-intuitive but effective technique of detecting non-target activity is proposed, based on the pattern of activity and its relation to underlying anatomy, instead of its visual intensity. In a sub-analysis of 23 patients with a median follow-up of 5.4 months, 90Y PET/CT consistently outperformed 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT in all aspects of qualitative analysis, including assessment for non-target activity and tumor vascular thrombosis. Parts of viscera closely

  19. An old enemy not to be forgotten during PET CT scanning of cancer patients: tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Ahmet; Abali, Hüseyin; Gültepe, Bilge; Koçer, Emrah; Reyhan, Mehmet; Tonyalı, Önder; Özyilkan, Özgür

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study Positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET CT) scan is commonly used in current medical oncology practice as an imaging method. In this study we present data from cancer patients who were followed at our clinic and suspected of having tuberculosis during PET CT scanning. After the biopsy, they were diagnosed with concomitant tuberculosis. Material and methods In this study, 14 patients who applied to our clinic and followed up due to cancer, and had PET CT scanning for the preliminary staging or further evaluation, were included. The patients were diagnosed with metastatic or recurrent disease, and their biopsy results revealed tuberculosis. Results The mean age was 57.8 years with SD (standard deviation) 13.1 years and gender distribution of 78.6% (n = 11) females and 21.4% (n = 3) males. None of the patients had tuberculosis in their personal history (0%). Among the patients, 5 (35.7%) were diagnosed with tuberculosis during the preliminary staging, whereas 9 (64.3%) were diagnosed during the follow-up after the treatment. The median time to tuberculosis diagnosis was 11 months (min–max: 3–24 months) after the treatment. The most commonly involved lymph nodes during PET CT scanning were mediastinal in 8 (64.3%), axillary in 3 (21.4%) and para-aortic in 3 (21.4%) patients. The mean SUVmax (maximum standardised uptake value) of lymph node involved by PET CT scanning was defined as 8.5 (SD 2.6). Conclusions Despite all improvements in modern medicine, tuberculosis is still a serious public health problem. It should always be considered in differential diagnosis while evaluating PET CT scanning results of cancer patients, because it may cause false positive results. PMID:27358601

  20. PET/CT-Based Dosimetry in 90Y-Microsphere Selective Internal Radiation Therapy: Single Cohort Comparison With Pretreatment Planning on 99mTc-MAA Imaging and Correlation With Treatment Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yoo Sung; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Chung, Jin Wook; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 90Y PET/CT can be acquired after 90Y-microsphere selective radiation internal therapy (SIRT) to describe radioactivity distribution. We performed dosimetry using 90Y-microsphere PET/CT data to evaluate treatment efficacy and appropriateness of activity planning from 99mTc-MAA scan and SPECT/CT. Twenty-three patients with liver malignancy were included in the study. 99mTc-MAA was injected during planning angiography and whole body 99mTc-MAA scan and liver SPECT/CT were acquired. After SIRT using 90Y-resin microsphere, 90Y-microsphere PET/CT was acquired. A partition model (PM) using 4 compartments (tumor, intarget normal liver, out-target normal liver, and lung) was adopted, and absorbed dose to each compartment was calculated based on measurements from 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT and 90Y-microsphere PET/CT, respectively, to be compared with each other. Progression-free survival (PFS) was evaluated in terms of tumor absorbed doses calculated by 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT and 90Y-microsphere PET/CT results. Lung shunt fraction was overestimated on 99mTc-MAA scan compared with 90Y-microsphere PET/CT (0.060 ± 0.037 vs. 0.018 ± 0.026, P < 0.01). Tumor absorbed dose exhibited a close correlation between the results from 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT and 90Y-microsphere PET/CT (r = 0.64, P < 0.01), although the result from 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT was significantly lower than that from 90Y-microsphere PET/CT (135.4 ± 64.2 Gy vs. 185.0 ± 87.8 Gy, P < 0.01). Absorbed dose to in-target normal liver was overestimated on 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT compared with PET/CT (62.6 ± 38.2 Gy vs. 45.2 ± 32.0 Gy, P = 0.02). Absorbed dose to out-target normal liver did not differ between 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT and 90Y-microsphere PET/CT (P = 0.49). Patients with tumor absorbed dose >200 Gy on 90Y-microsphere PET/CT had longer PFS than those with tumor absorbed dose ≤200 Gy (286 ± 56 days vs. 92 ± 20 days, P = 0.046). Tumor absorbed dose calculated by 99m

  1. Hepatosplenic Candidiasis Detected by 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Bertoli, Mattia; Petrilli, Giulia; Bertagna, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosplenic candidiasis is a fungal infection, which mostly affects patients with hematologic malignancies such as leukemia. The pathogenesis of this infection is not clear yet, and the liver is the most commonly affected organ. Diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis can be only established via biopsy, since computed tomography (CT) scan, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yield non-specific results. The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography /computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis remains undetermined, considering a few evidences in the literature. In this case report, we present the case of a 47-year-old patient, affected by acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy, resulting in the development of neutropenia and fever following the last cycle. The 18F-FDG PET/CT scan showed some foci of intense FDG uptake in the liver and spleen. The subsequent diagnostic investigations (i.e., abdominal CT scan and biopsy) were suggestive of hepatosplenic candidiasis. The patient was started on antifungal treatment with fluconazole. After one month, the clinical conditions were resolved, and the subsequent abdominal CT scan was negative.

  2. Hepatosplenic Candidiasis Detected by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Bertoli, Mattia; Petrilli, Giulia; Bertagna, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosplenic candidiasis is a fungal infection, which mostly affects patients with hematologic malignancies such as leukemia. The pathogenesis of this infection is not clear yet, and the liver is the most commonly affected organ. Diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis can be only established via biopsy, since computed tomography (CT) scan, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yield non-specific results. The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography /computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis remains undetermined, considering a few evidences in the literature. In this case report, we present the case of a 47-year-old patient, affected by acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy, resulting in the development of neutropenia and fever following the last cycle. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan showed some foci of intense FDG uptake in the liver and spleen. The subsequent diagnostic investigations (i.e., abdominal CT scan and biopsy) were suggestive of hepatosplenic candidiasis. The patient was started on antifungal treatment with fluconazole. After one month, the clinical conditions were resolved, and the subsequent abdominal CT scan was negative. PMID:27408899

  3. Unexpected Pregnancy Revealed on 18F-NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fuqiang; Chen, Yue; Huang, Zhanwen; Cai, Liang; Zhang, Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 48-year-old illiterate woman who is congenitally deaf and mute underwent F-NaF PET/CT study to evaluate bone metastases from newly diagnosed breast cancer. Unexpectedly, a fetus in early second trimester was noted on CT images. In addition, subtle F-NaF uptake by the fetus could also be observed. PMID:26359575

  4. Primary Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Kidney on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ximin; Li, Fang; Luo, Yaping; Huo, Li

    2016-09-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented gradually worsening intermittent right groin pain for 10 months. FDG PET/CT was performed to evaluate the suspected renal malignancy. The images demonstrated a large hypermetabolic tumor occupying the entire right kidney. Pathological examination demonstrated a primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the kidney. PMID:27504808

  5. Value of PET/CT and MR Lymphography in Treatment of Prostate Cancer Patients With Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuin, Ansje S.; Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G.; Meijer, Hanneke J.M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Takahashi, Satoru; Debats, Oscar A.; Reske, Sven N.; Schick, Christian; Krause, Bernd J.; Oort, Inge van; Witjes, Alfred J.; Hoogeveen, Yvonne L.; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical value of two novel molecular imaging techniques: {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and ferumoxtran-10 enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic resonance lymphography [MRL]) for lymph node (LN) treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of PET/CT and MRL to assess the number, size, and location of LN metastases in patients with primary or recurrent PCa. Methods and Materials: A total of 29 patients underwent MRL and PET/CT for LN evaluation. The MRL and PET/CT data were analyzed independently. The number, size, and location of the LN metastases were determined. The location was described as within or outside the standard clinical target volume for elective pelvic irradiation as defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Subsequently, the results from MRL and PET/CT were compared. Results: Of the 738 LNs visible on MRL, 151 were positive in 23 of 29 patients. Of the 132 LNs visible on PET/CT, 34 were positive in 13 of 29 patients. MRL detected significantly more positive LNs (p < 0.001) in more patients than PET/CT (p = 0.002). The mean diameter of the detected suspicious LNs on MRL was significantly smaller than those detected by PET/CT, 4.9 mm and 8.4 mm, respectively (p < 0.0001). In 14 (61%) of 23 patients, suspicious LNs were found outside the clinical target volume with MRL and in 4 (31%) of 13 patients with PET/CT. Conclusion: In patients with PCa, both molecular imaging techniques, MRL and {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, can detect LNs suspicious for metastasis, irrespective of the existing size and shape criteria for CT and conventional magnetic resonance imaging. On MRL and PET/CT, 61% and 31% of the suspicious LNs were located outside the conventional clinical target volume. Therefore, these techniques could help to individualize treatment selection and enable image-guided radiotherapy for patients with PCa LN metastases.

  6. Applications of PET CT in clinical practice: Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Durval Campos

    2007-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging and specially positron emission tomography (PET) has already demonstrated its benefits in three major medical subjects, i.e. neurology, cardiology and particularly clinical oncology. More recently the combination of PET and X-ray computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT led to a significant increment of the already large number of clinical applications of this imaging modality. This "anatomy-metabolic fusion" also known as Metabolic Imaging has its future assured if we can: (1) improve resolution reducing partial volume effect, (2) achieve very fast whole body imaging, (3) obtain accurate quantification of specific functions with higher contrast resolution and, if possible, (4) reduce exposure rates due to the unavoidable use of ionizing radiation.

  7. Nanoparticles in Higher-Order Multimodal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieffel, James Ki

    Imaging procedures are a cornerstone in our current medical infrastructure. In everything from screening, diagnostics, and treatment, medical imaging is perhaps our greatest tool in evaluating individual health. Recently, there has been tremendous increase in the development of multimodal systems that combine the strengths of complimentary imaging technologies to overcome their independent weaknesses. Clinically, this has manifested in the virtually universal manufacture of combined PET-CT scanners. With this push toward more integrated imaging, new contrast agents with multimodal functionality are needed. Nanoparticle-based systems are ideal candidates based on their unique size, properties, and diversity. In chapter 1, an extensive background on recent multimodal imaging agents capable of enhancing signal or contrast in three or more modalities is presented. Chapter 2 discusses the development and characterization of a nanoparticulate probe with hexamodal imaging functionality. It is my hope that the information contained in this thesis will demonstrate the many benefits of nanoparticles in multimodal imaging, and provide insight into the potential of fully integrated imaging.

  8. Clinical impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on initial staging and therapy planning for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    GUNALP, BENGUL; INCE, SEMRA; KARACALIOGLU, ALPER OZGUR; AYAN, ASLI; EMER, OZDES; ALAGOZ, ENGIN

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical significance of 18F-FDG PET/CT on initial staging and therapy planning in patients with invasive breast cancer. One hundred and forty-one consecutive, biopsy proven preoperative and 195 postoperative high-risk breast cancer patients who were referred for PET/CT for initial staging were included in this retrospective study. The clinical stage had been determined by conventional imaging modalities prior to the PET/CT scan. Of the 141 examined preoperative patients, 19 had clinical stage I (T1N0), 51 had stage IIA (12 T2N0 and 39 T1N1), 49 had stage IIB (2 T3N0 and 47 T2N1), 12 had stage IIIA (11 T3N1, 1 T2N2), 2 had stage IIIB (2 T4N1) and 8 had stage IV. PET/CT modified the staging for 26% of stage I patients, 29% of stage IIA patients, 46% of stage IIB patients, 58% of stage IIIA patients and 100% of stage IIIB patients. PET/CT scans detected extra-axillary regional lymph nodes in 14 (9.9%) patients and distant metastasis in 41 (29%) patients. PET/CT scans detected multifocal lesions in 30 (21%) patients, multicentric lesions in 21 (14%) patients and malign foci in the contralateral breast (bilateral breast cancer) confirmed by biopsy in 5 (3.5%) patients. Of the examined 195 postoperative patients PET/CT detected axillary lymph nodes in 22 (11%) patients, extra-axillary regional lymph nodes in 21 (10%) patients and distant metastasis in 24 (12%) patients. PET/CT findings altered plans for radiotherapy in 22 (11%) patients and chemotherapy was adapted to the meta-static diseases in 24 (12%) patients. PET/CT was revealed to be superior to conventional imaging modalities for the detection of extra-axillary regional metastatic lymph nodes and distant metastases. These features make PET/CT an essential imaging modality for the primary staging of invasive breast cancer, particularly in patients with clinical stages II and III. PMID:23170128

  9. Clinical impact of (18)F-FDG PET/CT on initial staging and therapy planning for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gunalp, Bengul; Ince, Semra; Karacalioglu, Alper Ozgur; Ayan, Asli; Emer, Ozdes; Alagoz, Engin

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical significance of (18)F-FDG PET/CT on initial staging and therapy planning in patients with invasive breast cancer. One hundred and forty-one consecutive, biopsy proven preoperative and 195 postoperative high-risk breast cancer patients who were referred for PET/CT for initial staging were included in this retrospective study. The clinical stage had been determined by conventional imaging modalities prior to the PET/CT scan. Of the 141 examined preoperative patients, 19 had clinical stage I (T1N0), 51 had stage IIA (12 T2N0 and 39 T1N1), 49 had stage IIB (2 T3N0 and 47 T2N1), 12 had stage IIIA (11 T3N1, 1 T2N2), 2 had stage IIIB (2 T4N1) and 8 had stage IV. PET/CT modified the staging for 26% of stage I patients, 29% of stage IIA patients, 46% of stage IIB patients, 58% of stage IIIA patients and 100% of stage IIIB patients. PET/CT scans detected extra-axillary regional lymph nodes in 14 (9.9%) patients and distant metastasis in 41 (29%) patients. PET/CT scans detected multifocal lesions in 30 (21%) patients, multicentric lesions in 21 (14%) patients and malign foci in the contralateral breast (bilateral breast cancer) confirmed by biopsy in 5 (3.5%) patients. Of the examined 195 postoperative patients PET/CT detected axillary lymph nodes in 22 (11%) patients, extra-axillary regional lymph nodes in 21 (10%) patients and distant metastasis in 24 (12%) patients. PET/CT findings altered plans for radiotherapy in 22 (11%) patients and chemotherapy was adapted to the meta-static diseases in 24 (12%) patients. PET/CT was revealed to be superior to conventional imaging modalities for the detection of extra-axillary regional metastatic lymph nodes and distant metastases. These features make PET/CT an essential imaging modality for the primary staging of invasive breast cancer, particularly in patients with clinical stages II and III. PMID:23170128

  10. 3D intrathoracic region definition and its application to PET-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Higgins, William E.

    2014-03-01

    Recently developed integrated PET-CT scanners give co-registered multimodal data sets that offer complementary three-dimensional (3D) digital images of the chest. PET (positron emission tomography) imaging gives highly specific functional information of suspect cancer sites, while CT (X-ray computed tomography) gives associated anatomical detail. Because the 3D CT and PET scans generally span the body from the eyes to the knees, accurate definition of the intrathoracic region is vital for focusing attention to the central-chest region. In this way, diagnostically important regions of interest (ROIs), such as central-chest lymph nodes and cancer nodules, can be more efficiently isolated. We propose a method for automatic segmentation of the intrathoracic region from a given co-registered 3D PET-CT study. Using the 3D CT scan as input, the method begins by finding an initial intrathoracic region boundary for a given 2D CT section. Next, active contour analysis, driven by a cost function depending on local image gradient, gradient-direction, and contour shape features, iteratively estimates the contours spanning the intrathoracic region on neighboring 2D CT sections. This process continues until the complete region is defined. We next present an interactive system that employs the segmentation method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis. A validation study over a series of PET-CT studies reveals that the segmentation method gives a Dice index accuracy of less than 98%. In addition, further results demonstrate the utility of the method for focused 3D PET-CT chest image analysis, ROI definition, and visualization.

  11. Role of PET/CT in Workup of Fever without a Source.

    PubMed

    Dibble, Elizabeth H; Yoo, Don C; Noto, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Fever without source is a febrile illness without localizing signs or initial obvious cause. Early workup will often include chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis, with or without CT of the chest. To evaluate localizing signs or symptoms or to further evaluate findings from initial studies, targeted imaging according to body part can be performed by using radiography, ultrasonography, CT, or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Nuclear medicine studies can provide imaging of the whole body and may be helpful when the clinical and conventional imaging workup findings are negative or equivocal in identifying a source of fever. Nuclear medicine studies can be used to detect pathologic changes early in a disease course, even in the absence of an anatomic abnormality. Gallium 67 scintigraphy, indium 111- and technetium 99m-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy, and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET)/CT studies are all useful in the evaluation of fever, but the radiopharmaceutical cost for PET/CT is much lower than that for radiolabeled leukocyte studies. The increased use of bundled payments for inpatient admissions requires updated cost evaluations for the preferred nuclear medicine study. For inpatients in whom the findings from the initial clinical workup and imaging studies are nondiagnostic, PET/CT examination may be preferable to radiolabeled leukocyte studies because of its high sensitivity and lower cost. Negative findings at PET/CT can be helpful in excluding a suspected site of infection, and positive findings at PET/CT can be helpful in confirming a suspected site of infection or in identifying an unexpected cause of fever. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27399241

  12. 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT in the Evaluation of Glioma: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 is overexpressed in both neovasculature and glioma cells. We aimed to evaluate 68gallium-BNOTA-PRGD2 (68Ga-PRGD2) as a new reagent for noninvasive integrin αvβ3 imaging in glioma patients. With informed consent, 12 patients with suspicious brain glioma, as diagnosed by enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, were enrolled to undergo 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans before surgery. The preoperative images were compared and correlated with the pathologically determined WHO grade. Next, the expression of integrin αvβ3, CD34, and Ki-67 were determined by immunohistochemical staining of the resected brain tumor tissue. Our findings demonstrated that 68Ga-PRGD2 specifically accumulated in the brain tumors that were rich of integrin αvβ3 and other neovasculature markers, but not in the brain parenchyma other than the choroid plexus. Therefore, 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT was able to evaluate the glioma demarcation more specifically than 18F-FDG PET/CT. The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of 68Ga-PRGD2, rather than those of 18F-FDG, were significantly correlated with the glioma grading. The maximum tumor-to-brain ratios (TBRmax) of both tracers were significantly correlated with glioma grading, whereas 68Ga-PRGD2 seemed to be more superior to 18F-FDG in differentiating high-grade glioma (HGG) from low-grade glioma (LGG). Moreover, 68Ga-PRGD2 PET/CT showed different accumulation patterns for HGG of WHO grades III and IV. This is the first noninvasive integrin imaging study, to the best of our knowledge, conducted in preoperative patients with different grades of glioma, and it preliminarily indicated the effectiveness of this novel method for evaluating glioma grading and demarcation. PMID:25093246

  13. MRI and PET/CT of patients with bone metastases from breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Grankvist, J; Fisker, R; Iyer, V; Fründ, E T; Simonsen, C; Christensen, T; Stenbygaard, L; Ewertz, M; Larsson, E-M

    2012-01-01

    3.0Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was compared with combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with suspected bone metastases from breast cancer. A prospective clinical study was performed in 13 female breast cancer patients (mean age 61years; range 45-85 years). The spine was imaged in the sagittal plane with T1-weighted (T1), short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and T2-weighted fat-saturated (T2) sequences. The pelvis was imaged similarly in the coronal plane. Axial DWI was performed from the skull base to the mid-thigh. MRI and PET/CT were performed in all patients at a maximum interval of 10 working days and at least 14 days after chemotherapy. MRI was reviewed by two radiologists, and their consensus on potential metastases in 27 predefined locations was recorded. The predefined locations were the vertebral bodies (24), the left (1) and right (1) pelvic bones, and the sacral bone (1). The PET/CT was reviewed by a radiologists and a nuclear medicine physician. MRI detected 59 of the 60 active metastases found with our gold standard modality PET/CT. T1 had the highest sensitivity (98%) but rather low specificity (77%), but with the addition of STIR and DWI, the specificity increased to 95%. The additional metastases detected with MRI most likely represented postherapeutic residual scars without active tumour. In conclusion, 3.0Tesla MRI with T1, STIR, and DWI is useful for the clinical evaluation of bone metastases from breast cancer and compares well to PET/CT. PMID:21227614

  14. IV Leiomyomatosis on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaona; Li, Fang; Lu, Zhaohui; Cheng, Wuying

    2016-07-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of right lower extremity edema. Clinical examination only showed right lower limb swelling. Routine laboratory examination revealed no abnormal results. Abdominal ultrasonography identified uterine leiomyoma and soft tissue masses. An abdominal CT demonstrated a continuous mass extending from the right internal and external iliac vein into the common iliac vein and inferior vena cava. To distinguish the mass from malignancy, the patient underwent PET/CT scan which showed increased FDG activity in the mass. However, histopathological examination proved the mass to be IV leiomyomatosis. PMID:26914578

  15. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and (18)F-NaF-PET/CT in men with castrate-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Kim, Chun K; Gerbaudo, Victor H; Hainer, Jon; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Kantoff, Philip; den Abbeele, Annick D Van; Seltzer, Steven; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate (18)F-labeled-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG-) and (18)F-labeled-sodium fluoride ((18)F-NaF-) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) as biomarkers in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Nine men (53-75 years) in a phase 1 trial of abiraterone and cabozantinib had (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, (18)F-NaF-PET/CT and standard imaging ((99m)Tc-labeled-methylene-diphosphonate ((99m)Tc-MDP) bone scan and abdominal/pelvic CT) at baseline and after 8 weeks of therapy. Baseline disease was classified as widespread (18)F-FDG-avid, oligometastatic (18)F-FDG-avid (1 site), or non-(18)F-FDG-avid. Metabolic response was classified using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. Treatment response using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 (PCWG2) guidelines and days on trial (DOT) were recorded. All men were followed for 1 year or until progression. Four men had (18)F-FDG-avid disease: two with widespread (DOT 53 and 76) and two with oligometastatic disease (DOT 231 and still on trial after 742+ days). Five men had non-(18)F-FDG-avid disease; three remained stable or improved (2 still on trial while one discontinued for non-oncologic reasons; DOT 225-563+), and 2 progressed (DOT 285 and 532). Despite the small sample size, Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant difference in progression free survival (PFS) between men with widespread (18)F-FDG-avid, oligometastatic (18)F-FDG-avid and non-(18)F-FDG-avid disease (p < 0.01). All men had (18)F-NaF-avid disease. Neither (18)F-NaF-avid disease extent nor intensity was predictive of treatment response. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT may be superior to (18)F-NaF-PET/CT and standard imaging in men with mCRPC on abiraterone and cabozantinib. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT may have potential to stratify men into 3 groups (widespread vs. oligometastatic (18)F-FDG-avid vs. non-(18)F-FDG-avid mCRPC) to tailor therapy. Further evaluation is

  16. 18F-FDG PET/CT Role in Staging of Gastric Carcinomas: Comparison with Conventional Contrast Enhancement Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Altini, Corinna; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Di Palo, Alessandra; Fanelli, Margherita; Ferrari, Cristina; Moschetta, Marco; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of the report was to evaluate the role of fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in staging gastric cancer comparing it with contrast enhancement computed tomography (CECT). This retrospective study included 45 patients who underwent performed whole body CECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT before any treatment. We calculated CECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) for gastric, lymphnode, and distant localizations; furthermore, we compared the 2 techniques by McNemar test. The role of 18F-FDG PET/CT semiquantitative parameters in relation to histotype, grading, and site of gastric lesions were evaluated by ANOVA test. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of CECT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT for gastric lesion were, respectively, 92.11%, 57.14%, 86.66%, 92.11%, 57.14% and 81.58%, 85.71%, 82.22%, 96.88%, 46.15%. No differences were identified between the 2 techniques about sensitivity and specificity. No statistical differences were observed between PET parameters and histotype, grading, and site of gastric lesion. The results of CECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT about lymphnode involvement were 70.83%, 61.90%, 66.66%, 68%, 65% and 58.33%, 95.24%, 75.55%, 93.33%, 66.67%. The results of CECT and 18F-FDG PET/CT about distant metastases were 80%, 62.86%, 66.66%, 38.10%, 91.67% and 60%, 88.57%, 82.22%, 60%, 88.57%. 18FDG PET/CT specificity was significantly higher both for lymphnode and distant metastases. The 18F-FDG PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of gastric carcinoma to detect primary lesion, lymphnode, and distant metastases using 1 single image whole-body technique. Integration of CECT with 18F-FDG PET/CT permits a more valid staging in these patients. PMID:25997066

  17. A Pilot Study of 18F-FLT PET/CT in Pediatric Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Danny L.; Vali, Reza; McQuattie, Susan; Chan, Jeffrey; Punnett, Angela; Weitzman, Shiela; Shammas, Amer; Charron, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We performed an observational pilot study of 18F-FLT PET/CT in pediatric lymphoma. Eight patients with equivocal 18F-FDG PET/CT underwent imaging with 18F-FLT PET/CT. No immediate adverse reactions to 18F-FLT were observed. Compared to 18F-FDG, 18F-FLT uptake was significantly higher in bone marrow and liver (18F-FLT SUV 8.6 ± 0.6 and 5.0 ± 0.3, versus 18F-FDG SUV 1.9 ± 0.1 and 3.4 ± 0.7, resp., p < 0.05). In total, 15 lesions were evaluated with average 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT SUVs of 2.6 ± 0.1 and 2.0 ± 0.4, respectively. Nonspecific uptake in reactive lymph nodes and thymus was observed. Future studies to assess the clinical utility of 18F-FLT PET/CT in pediatric lymphoma are planned. PMID:27313888

  18. PET/CT in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients: a review

    PubMed Central

    Malham, Mikkel; Hess, Søren; Nielsen, Rasmus G; Husby, Steffen; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2014-01-01

    The literature on positron emission tomography and computed tomography using 18fluoro-deoxyglusose (FDG-PET/CT) in the diagnosis of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presented. Only five papers representing independent studies were identified and included in this review. Of these, two studies dealt with both stand-alone FDG-PET and FDG-PET/CT, while three were about stand-alone FDG-PET only. No studies could be found that focused on FDG-PET/CT only. The five studies comprised analysis of a total 181 pediatric patients (0-18 years of age). They unanimously indicated that FDG-PET/CT is a versatile method with a diagnostic high sensitivity ranging from 70% to 97%. In conclusion, the pediatric literature on FGD-PET/CT’s role in the diagnosis of IBD is very limited. Prospective studies of well characterized populations are needed in order to validate this novel imaging modality in pediatric IBD. PMID:24795836

  19. FDG-PET/CT in staging of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, R; Ravi Kumar, A S; Batstone, M

    2014-11-01

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma (CCOC) is a rare neoplasm; only 75 cases have been reported in the English language literature. They have a tendency for recurrence and a capacity to metastasize. There is very little known regarding the metabolic features of this tumour or the utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scans in the staging and follow-up of these tumours. We present two cases of CCOC with their relevant FDG-PET/CT scan findings. The first patient had primary CCOC of the mandible that was FDG-avid, and the other had recurrence of CCOC of the anterior mandible and superomedial orbit that was not FDG-avid. FDG uptake in CCOC appears to be variable. Although FDG-PET/CT is useful in other head and neck cancers and has benefits compared to other imaging modalities, further studies are needed to investigate the sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT in CCOC. PMID:25015905

  20. Interobserver and Intraobserver Variability among Measurements of FDG PET/CT Parameters in Pulmonary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Büyükdereli, Gülgün; Güler, Mehtap; şeydaoğlu, Gülşah

    2016-01-01

    Background: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT) provides information about metabolic and morphologic status of malignancies. Tumor size and standardized uptake value (SUV) measurements are crucial for cancer treatment monitoring. Aims: The purpose of our study was to assess the variability of these measurements performed by observers evaluating lung tumors. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: FDG PET/CT images of 97 patients with pulmonary tumors were independently evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Primary tumor size (UDCT), maximum SUV (SUVmax), mean SUV (SUVmean) and maximum SUV normalized to liver mean SUV (SUVnliv max) were measured by each observer at two different times with an interval of at least 2 weeks. Interobserver and intraobserver variabilities of measurements were evaluated through statistical methods. Results: Size of the lesions varied from 0.81 to 13.6 cm (mean 4.29±2.24 cm). Very good agreement was shown with correlation, Bland-Altman and regression analysis for all measured PET/CT parameters. In the interobserver and intraobserver variability analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.96 and 0.98, respectively. Conclusion: Semi-quantitative measurements of pulmonary tumors were highly reproducible when determined by experienced physicians with clinically available software for routine FDG PET/CT evaluation. Consistency may be improved if the same observer performs serial measurements for any one patient. PMID:27308075

  1. A Pilot Study of 18F-FLT PET/CT in Pediatric Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Danny L; Vali, Reza; McQuattie, Susan; Chan, Jeffrey; Punnett, Angela; Weitzman, Shiela; Shammas, Amer; Charron, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We performed an observational pilot study of 18F-FLT PET/CT in pediatric lymphoma. Eight patients with equivocal 18F-FDG PET/CT underwent imaging with 18F-FLT PET/CT. No immediate adverse reactions to 18F-FLT were observed. Compared to 18F-FDG, 18F-FLT uptake was significantly higher in bone marrow and liver (18F-FLT SUV 8.6 ± 0.6 and 5.0 ± 0.3, versus 18F-FDG SUV 1.9 ± 0.1 and 3.4 ± 0.7, resp., p < 0.05). In total, 15 lesions were evaluated with average 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT SUVs of 2.6 ± 0.1 and 2.0 ± 0.4, respectively. Nonspecific uptake in reactive lymph nodes and thymus was observed. Future studies to assess the clinical utility of 18F-FLT PET/CT in pediatric lymphoma are planned. PMID:27313888

  2. Role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1).

    PubMed

    Lastoria, Secondo; Marciello, Francesca; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Aloj, Luigi; Caracò, Corradina; Aurilio, Michela; D'Ambrosio, Laura; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Ramundo, Valeria; Camera, Luigi; De Luca, Leonardo; Fonti, Rosa; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary syndrome predisposing to many endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Conventional imaging (CI) cannot provide satisfactory results for all the different types of MEN1-related tumors. Objective of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in MEN1 compared to CI. Diagnostic performance of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET was evaluated as well as the prognostic role of SUVmax. Eighteen patients with genetically confirmed MEN1 were evaluated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, endoscopic ultrasounds, multidetector-row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and hormone/markers serum measurements. Four MEN1-related tumor sites (pancreas, pituitary, parathyroids, adrenals) were considered. Sensitivity and specificity of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET were calculated. There was (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT uptake in 11/11 patients with pancreatic lesions, in 9/12 with pituitary adenoma, in 5/15 with parathyroid enlargements, and in 5/7 with adrenal lesions. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 100 % in pancreas, 75 and 83 % in pituitary, 28 and 100 % in parathyroids, and 62.5 and 100 % in adrenals, respectively. Compared with CI, no significant difference in sensitivity for pancreas, pituitary, and adrenals was found, while CI had a better sensitivity for parathyroids (p = 0.002). On the ROC analysis, progression of pancreatic lesions was significantly associated to SUVmax <12.3 (p < 0.05). (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is greatly helpful in the work-up of MEN1 providing a panoramic view of MEN1-related lesions. There is also a prognostic role of (68)Ga-PET in patients with MEN1-pancreatic lesions. PMID:26242621

  3. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT for Systemic Staging of Newly Diagnosed Invasive Lobular Carcinoma Versus Invasive Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Molly P.; Goldman, Debra A.; Dashevsky, Brittany; Riedl, Christopher C.; Gönen, Mithat; Osborne, Joseph R.; Jochelson, Maxine; Hudis, Clifford; Morrow, Monica; Ulaner, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    -FDG PET/CT was more likely to reveal unsuspected distant metastases in stage III IDC patients than in stage III ILC patients. In addition, some ILC patients were upstaged by non–18F-FDG-avid lesions visible only on the CT images. Overall, the impact of PET/CT on systemic staging may be lower for ILC patients than for IDC patients. PMID:26294295

  4. Clinical significance of incidental FDG uptake in the prostate gland detected by PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ertan; Elboga, Umut; Kalender, Ebuzer; Basıbuyuk, Mustafa; Demir, Hasan Deniz; Celen, Yusuf Zeki

    2015-01-01

    The value of FDG-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting prostate cancer is unknown. We aimed to investigate the clinical value of incidental prostate FDG uptake on PET/CT scans. We reviewed 6128 male patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT scans and selected cases that reported hypermetabolic lesion in the prostate. The patients who have prior history of prostate carcinoma or prostate surgery were excluded from the study. We have analyzed the correlation between PET/CT findings and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, imaging (USG), urological examinations and biopsy. Incidental 18F-FDG uptake of the prostate gland was observed in 79 patients (1.3%). While sixteen of them were excluded due to inadequate clinical data, the remaining 63 patients were included for further analysis. The patients were divided into two groups; 8 patients (12.7%) in the malignant group and 55 patients (87.3%) in the benign group. The SUVmax values were not significantly different between the two groups. In 6 (75%) patients with prostate cancer, FDG uptake was observed focally in the peripheral zone of the prostate glands. There was no significant correlation between the SUVmax and the PSA levels. Incidental 18F-FDG uptake in the prostate gland is a rare condition, but a substantial portion of it is associated with the cancer. Benign and malignant lesions of the prostate gland in FDG-PET/CT imaging could not be reliably distinguished. The peripheral focally FDG uptake of prostate glands should be further examined with the clinical and labaratory evaluations. PMID:26379847

  5. Comparison of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen–Based 18F-DCFBC PET/CT to Conventional Imaging Modalities for Detection of Hormone-Naïve and Castration-Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Ciarallo, Anthony; Mena, Esther; Blackford, Amanda; Nadal, Rosa; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Carducci, Michael A.; Ross, Ashley E.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Holt, Daniel P.; Dannals, Robert F.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.; Cho, Steve Y.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities (CIMs) have limited sensitivity and specificity for detection of metastatic prostate cancer. We examined the potential of a first-in-class radiofluorinated small-molecule inhibitor of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-18F-fluorobenzyl-l-cysteine (18F-DCFBC), to detect metastatic hormone-naïve (HNPC) and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods Seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled (9 HNPC and 8 CRPC); 16 had CIM evidence of new or progressive metastatic prostate cancer and 1 had high clinical suspicion of metastatic disease. 18F-DCFBC PET/CT imaging was obtained with 2 successive PET scans starting at 2 h after injection. Patients were imaged with CIM at approximately the time of PET. A lesion-by-lesion analysis of PET to CIM was performed in the context of either HNPC or CRPC. The patients were followed with available clinical imaging as a reference standard to determine the true nature of identified lesions on PET and CIM. Results On the lesion-by-lesion analysis, 18F-DCFBC PET was able to detect a larger number of lesions (592 positive with 63 equivocal) than CIM (520 positive with 61 equivocal) overall, in both HNPC and CRPC patients. 18F-DCFBC PET detection of lymph nodes, bone lesions, and visceral lesions was superior to CIM. When intrapatient clustering effects were considered, 18F-DCFBC PET was estimated to be positive in a large proportion of lesions that would be negative or equivocal on CIM (0.45). On follow-up, the sensitivity of 18F-DCFBC PET (0.92) was superior to CIM (0.71). 18F-DCFBC tumor uptake was increased at the later PET time point (∼2.5 h after injection), with background uptake showing a decreasing trend on later PET. Conclusion PET imaging with 18F-DCFBC, a small-molecule PSMA-targeted radiotracer, detected more lesions than CIM and promises to diagnose and stage patients with metastatic prostate cancer more accurately than current

  6. Influence of 11C-choline PET/CT on radiotherapy planning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    López, Escarlata; Lazo, Antonio; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Arregui, Gregorio; Núñez, Isabel; Sacchetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the influence of 11C-choline PET/CT on radiotherapy planning in prostate cancer patients. Background Precise information on the extension of prostate cancer is crucial for the choice of an appropriate therapeutic strategy. 11C-choline positron emission tomography (11C-choline PET/CT) has two roles in radiation oncology (RT): (1) patient selection for treatment and (2) target volume selection and delineation. In conjunction with high-accuracy techniques, it might offer an opportunity of dose escalation and better tumour control while sparing healthy tissues. Materials and methods We carried out a retrospective study in order to analyse RT planning modification based on 11C-choline PET/CT in 16 prostate cancer patients. Patients were treated with hypofractionated step-and-shoot Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), or Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT), and a daily cone-beam CT for Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT). All patients underwent a 11C-choline-PET/CT scan prior to radiotherapy. Results In 37.5% of cases, a re-delineation and new dose prescription occurred. Data show good preliminary clinical results in terms of biochemical control and toxicity. No gastrointestinal (GI)/genitourinary (GU) grade III toxicities were observed after a median follow-up of 9.5 months. Conclusions In our experience, concerning the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa), 11C-choline PET/CT may be helpful in radiotherapy planning, either for dose escalation or exclusion of selected sites. PMID:25859399

  7. Clinical Utility of 18F-FDG PET/CT in brachial plexopathy secondary to metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Agrawal, Archi; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Role of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in breast cancer is rapidly evolving. Brachial plexopathy is a rare clinical entity in follow-up of operated breast cancer patients, who presents with disease recurrence in the axilla. Conventionally, magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation in these cases and only few case reports/short studies have explored the utility of PET/CT in this clinical indication. We present here a short case series to demonstrate the utility of PET/CT as an important adjunctive imaging modality to magnetic resonance to supplement diagnosis of brachial plexopathy, differentiate radiation-induced brachial plexopathy from neoplastic plexopathy, accurately restage the disease and to monitor response to chemotherapy. PMID:27095861

  8. Potential Applications of Using 68Ga–Evans Blue PET/CT in the Evaluation of Lymphatic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Peilin; Li, Fang; Tong, Guansheng; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Potentials of 68Ga-NEB as a PET tracer in the evaluation of a variety of lymphatic drainage disorders were analyzed. Methods 68Ga-NEB was injected subcutaneously, and the PET/CT images were acquired in 13 patients with different suspected lymphatic drainage abnormality. The 68Ga-NEB PET/CT findings were compared with 99mTc-SC lymphoscintigraphy. Results 68Ga-NEB activity could be clearly observed in the lymphatic route on the PET/CT images from all the patients. In 5 (38.5%) of 13 patients tested, 68Ga-NEB PET/CT provided more information than the 99mTc-SC lymphoscintigraphy. Conclusions 68Ga-NEB PET/CT can be used as an alternative of 99mTc-SC lymphoscintigraphy in the evaluation of lymphatic disorders, which enables fast results and might be more accurate than the conventional 99mTc-SC lymphoscintigraphy. PMID:26859218

  9. Preliminary results on the role of PET/CT in initial staging, restaging, and management of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamitsi, J.; Valotassiou, B.; Iliadis, K.; Kosmidis, P.; Laspas, F.; Vasilaki, M.; Pipini, E.; Petounis, A.; Gogou, L.; Pagou, M.; Dalianis, K.; Efthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.

    2006-12-01

    AimTo determine true-positive and true-negative rates of PET/CT studies in the staging of lung cancer as compared with conventional imaging (CT and bone scan and occasionally MRI) and the impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy in patients with lung cancer. Materials and methodTwenty patients (21 studies) with known or suspected lung cancer (14 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), three patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), three patients with solitary pulmonary nodule underwent initial staging (seven studies) or restaging (14 studies) with combined FDG PET and CT scans on a PET/CT tomograph. PET/CT images were evaluated separately by two nuclear medicine physicians and two radiologists specialized on PET, CT, and MRI. Histology results and a more than 6 months follow-up served as the reference standards. ResultsAccurate diagnosis was achieved on 16 studies. Site-by-site analysis gave the following results: 16 true-positive sites (seven on histology, nine on >6 months follow-up), six true-negative sites (two on histology, four on >6 months follow-up). On PET/CT, six patients were correctly down-staged, three patients were correctly upstaged and seven patients were diagnosed correctly as being on the same stage (2/7 with increase of extent of disease, 5/7 with the same extent of disease). One patient was falsely upstaged and three patients were falsely down-staged. On the basis of PET/CT results, change of management was induced in six patients, while in 14 patients there was no change induced. In five cases PET/CT was partially accurate: on site-by-site analysis, four sites proved true positive (on histology), one site false positive (on histology), and four sites false negative (one on histology, three on >6 months follow-up). ConclusionIn our early experience, PET/CT contributed significantly to correct staging and management of patients with lung cancer.

  10. TU-F-12A-05: Sensitivity of Textural Features to 3D Vs. 4D FDG-PET/CT Imaging in NSCLC Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F; Nyflot, M; Bowen, S; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Neighborhood Gray-level difference matrices (NGLDM) based texture parameters extracted from conventional (3D) 18F-FDG PET scans in patients with NSCLC have been previously shown to associate with response to chemoradiation and poorer patient outcome. However, the change in these parameters when utilizing respiratory-correlated (4D) FDG-PET scans has not yet been characterized for NSCLC. The Objectives: of this study was to assess the extent to which NGLDM-based texture parameters on 4D PET images vary with reference to values derived from 3D scans in NSCLC. Methods: Eight patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. 4D PET scans were reconstructed with OSEM-IR in 5 respiratory phase-binned images and corresponding CT data of each phase were employed for attenuation correction. NGLDM-based texture features, consisting of coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity and strength, were evaluated for gross tumor volumes defined on 3D/4D PET scans by radiation oncologists. Variation of the obtained texture parameters over the respiratory cycle were examined with respect to values extracted from 3D scans. Results: Differences between texture parameters derived from 4D scans at different respiratory phases and those extracted from 3D scans ranged from −30% to 13% for coarseness, −12% to 40% for contrast, −5% to 50% for busyness, −7% to 38% for complexity, and −43% to 20% for strength. Furthermore, no evident correlations were observed between respiratory phase and 4D scan texture parameters. Conclusion: Results of the current study showed that NGLDM-based texture parameters varied considerably based on choice of 3D PET and 4D PET reconstruction of NSCLC patient images, indicating that standardized image acquisition and analysis protocols need to be established for clinical studies, especially multicenter clinical trials, intending to validate prognostic values of texture features for NSCLC.

  11. PET/CT Imaging of c-Myc Transgenic Mice Identifies the Genotoxic N-Nitroso-Diethylamine as Carcinogen in a Short-Term Cancer Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Laenger, Florian; Halter, Roman; Rodt, Thomas; Galanski, Michael; Borlak, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Background More than 100,000 chemicals are in use but have not been tested for their safety. To overcome limitations in the cancer bioassay several alternative testing strategies are explored. The inability to monitor non-invasively onset and progression of disease limits, however, the value of current testing strategies. Here, we report the application of in vivo imaging to a c-Myc transgenic mouse model of liver cancer for the development of a short-term cancer bioassay. Methodology/Principal Findings μCT and 18F-FDG μPET were used to detect and quantify tumor lesions after treatment with the genotoxic carcinogen NDEA, the tumor promoting agent BHT or the hepatotoxin paracetamol. Tumor growth was investigated between the ages of 4 to 8.5 months and contrast-enhanced μCT imaging detected liver lesions as well as metastatic spread with high sensitivity and accuracy as confirmed by histopathology. Significant differences in the onset of tumor growth, tumor load and glucose metabolism were observed when the NDEA treatment group was compared with any of the other treatment groups. NDEA treatment of c-Myc transgenic mice significantly accelerated tumor growth and caused metastatic spread of HCC in to lung but this treatment also induced primary lung cancer growth. In contrast, BHT and paracetamol did not promote hepatocarcinogenesis. Conclusions/Significance The present study evidences the accuracy of in vivo imaging in defining tumor growth, tumor load, lesion number and metastatic spread. Consequently, the application of in vivo imaging techniques to transgenic animal models may possibly enable short-term cancer bioassays to significantly improve hazard identification and follow-up examinations of different organs by non-invasive methods. PMID:22319569

  12. 18F-FDG PET/CT Prediction of an Aggressive Clinical Course for Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sandip; Goliwale, Fahim

    2016-06-01

    The ability to assess tumor biology is a benefit of molecular imaging with (18)F-FDG PET/CT, which performs better than anatomic imaging in evaluating malignancies. We present an unusual case of fatal dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, a usually indolent entity for which high-grade (18)F-FDG uptake was predictive of an aggressive clinical course unabated by tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate, to which the patient showed a poor response. PMID:26338485

  13. Incidental Detection of Femoral Pseudoaneurysm at 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Nougaret, Stephanie; Ragucci, Monica; Bach, Ariadne M; Carollo, Gabriella; Mannelli, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with history of lung cancer and melanoma was referred for routine follow-up with 18F-FDG PET/CT. CT images showed a new mass in the right groin associated with mild FDG activity on 18F-FDG PET images. Subsequent ultrasound obtained the same day demonstrated flow within the lesion to be a pseudoaneurysm of the right femoral artery. PMID:26462043

  14. (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings in a case with HIV (-) Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, E; Poyraz, N Y; Keskin, M; Kandemir, Z; Turkolmez, S

    2014-01-01

    Although mucocutaneous sites are the most frequently encountered sites of involvement, Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) may also occasionally involve the breast and the skeletal, endocrine, urinary and nervous systems.. Various imaging modalities may be used to delineate the extent of the disease by detecting unexpected sites of involvement. Herein, we report a case of classical type KS, in whom staging with (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging disclosed widespread disease and unexpected findings of bone and salivary gland involvement. PMID:24119549

  15. Isolated cholangiolitis revealed by 18F-FDG-PET/CT in a patient with fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Codreanu, Ion; Zhuang, Hongming

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiolitis, inflammation of the cholangioles, is difficult to diagnose by conventional imaging modalities. We report a case of cholangiolitis revealed by fluorine-18 fluoro desoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computerized tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) after about 9 months of recurrent fevers. A 20 years old girl with a history of recurrent fevers and repeated workups at different hospitals, which didn't diagnosed the source of fever, was admitted with a recent episode of fever. An (18)F-FDG-PET/CT was requested, which demonstrated focal hypermetabolic activity in the lateral segment of the left lobe of the liver. A liver biopsy showed inflammation of small biliary ducts consistent of cholangiolitis. Enterococcus casseliflavus was found on performed cultures. This represents the first case of cholangiolitis revealed by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT imaging. PMID:21512668

  16. (68)Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT in patients with prostate cancer: How we review and report.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Isabel; Maurer, Tobias; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Sommer, Wieland H; Schwaiger, Markus; Eiber, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recently, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using PSMA-ligands has gained high attention as a promising new radiotracer in patients with prostate cancer (PC). Several studies promise accurate staging of primary prostate cancer and restaging after biochemical recurrence with (68)Ga-PSMA ligand Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). However, prospective trials and clinical guidelines for this new technique are still missing. Therefore, we summarized our experience with (68)Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT examinations in patients with primary PC and biochemical recurrence. It focuses on the technical and logistical aspects of (68)Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT examination as well as on the specific background for image reading discussing also potential pitfalls. Further, it includes relevant issues on free-text as well as structured reporting used in daily clinical routine. PMID:27277843

  17. The retrospective binning method improves the consistency of phase binning in respiratory-gated PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didierlaurent, D.; Ribes, S.; Batatia, H.; Jaudet, C.; Dierickx, L. O.; Zerdoud, S.; Brillouet, S.; Caselles, O.; Courbon, F.

    2012-12-01

    This study assesses the accuracy of prospective phase-gated PET/CT data binning and presents a retrospective data binning method that improves image quality and consistency. Respiratory signals from 17 patients who underwent 4D PET/CT were analysed to evaluate the reproducibility of temporal triggers used for the standard phase-based gating method. Breathing signals were reprocessed to implement retrospective PET data binning. The mean and standard deviation of time lags between automatic triggers provided by the Real-time Position Management (RPM, Varian) gating device and inhalation peaks derived from respiratory curves were computed for each patient. The total number of respiratory cycles available for 4D PET/CT according to the binning mode (prospective versus retrospective) was compared. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), biological tumour volume (BTV) and tumour trajectory measures were determined from the PET/CT images of five patients. Compared to retrospective binning (RB), prospective gating approach led to (i) a significant loss in breathing cycles (15%) and (ii) the inconsistency of data binning due to temporal dispersion of triggers (average 396 ms). Consequently, tumour characterization could be impacted. In retrospective mode, SUVmax was up to 27% higher, where no significant difference appeared in BTV. In addition, prospective mode gave an inconsistent spatial location of the tumour throughout the bins. Improved consistency with breathing patterns and greater motion amplitude of the tumour centroid were observed with retrospective mode. The detection of the tumour motion and trajectory was improved also for small temporal dispersion of triggers. This study shows that the binning mode could have a significant impact on 4D PET images. The consistency of triggers with breathing signals should be checked before clinical use of gated PET/CT images, and our RB method improves 4D PET/CT image quantification.

  18. Pilot Preclinical and Clinical Evaluation of (4S)-4-(3-[18F]Fluoropropyl)-L-Glutamate (18F-FSPG) for PET/CT Imaging of Intracranial Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Mittra, Erik S.; Koglin, Norman; Mosci, Camila; Kumar, Meena; Hoehne, Aileen; Keu, Khun Visith; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Mueller, Andre; Berndt, Mathias; Bullich, Santiago; Friebe, Matthias; Schmitt-Willich, Heribert; Gekeler, Volker; Fels, Lüder M.; Bacher-Stier, Claudia; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Chin, Frederick T.; Stephens, Andrew W.; Dinkelborg, Ludger M.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose (S)-4-(3-[18F]Fluoropropyl)-L-glutamic acid (18F-FSPG) is a novel radiopharmaceutical for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging. It is a glutamate analogue that can be used to measure xC- transporter activity. This study was performed to assess the feasibility of 18F-FSPG for imaging orthotopic brain tumors in small animals and the translation of this approach in human subjects with intracranial malignancies. Experimental Design For the small animal study, GS9L glioblastoma cells were implanted into brains of Fischer rats and studied with 18F-FSPG, the 18F-labeled glucose derivative 18F-FDG and with the 18F-labeled amino acid derivative 18F-FET. For the human study, five subjects with either primary or metastatic brain cancer were recruited (mean age 50.4 years). After injection of 300 MBq of 18F-FSPG, 3 whole-body PET/Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained and safety parameters were measured. The three subjects with brain metastases also had an 18F-FDG PET/CT scan. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of the scans was performed to assess kinetics, biodistribution, and relative efficacy of the tracers. Results In the small animals, the orthotopic brain tumors were visualized well with 18F-FSPG. The high tumor uptake of 18F-FSPG in the GS9L model and the absence of background signal led to good tumor visualization with high contrast (tumor/brain ratio: 32.7). 18F-FDG and 18F-FET showed T/B ratios of 1.7 and 2.8, respectively. In the human pilot study, 18F-FSPG was well tolerated and there was similar distribution in all patients. All malignant lesions were positive with 18F-FSPG except for one low-grade primary brain tumor. In the 18F-FSPG-PET-positive tumors a similar T/B ratio was observed as in the animal model. Conclusions 18F-FSPG is a novel PET radiopharmaceutical that demonstrates good uptake in both small animal and human studies of intracranial malignancies. Future studies on larger numbers of subjects and a wider array of brain tumors

  19. Distribution Atlas of Proliferating Bone Marrow in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Measured by FLT-PET/CT Imaging, With Potential Applicability in Radiation Therapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Belinda A.; Callahan, Jason; Bressel, Mathias; Simoens, Nathalie; Everitt, Sarah; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Burbury, Kate; MacManus, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Proliferating bone marrow is exquisitely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Knowledge of its distribution could improve radiation therapy planning to minimize unnecessary marrow exposure and avoid consequential prolonged myelosuppression. [18F]-Fluoro-3-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT)–positron emission tomography (PET) is a novel imaging modality that provides detailed quantitative images of proliferating tissues, including bone marrow. We used FLT-PET imaging in cancer patients to produce an atlas of marrow distribution with potential clinical utility. Methods and Materials: The FLT-PET and fused CT scans of eligible patients with non-small cell lung cancer (no distant metastases, no prior cytotoxic exposure, no hematologic disorders) were reviewed. The proportions of skeletal FLT activity in 10 predefined bony regions were determined and compared according to age, sex, and recent smoking status. Results: Fifty-one patients were studied: 67% male; median age 68 (range, 31-87) years; 8% never smokers; 70% no smoking in the preceding 3 months. Significant differences in marrow distribution occurred between sex and age groups. No effect was detected from smoking in the preceding 3 months. Using the mean percentages of FLT uptake per body region, we created an atlas of the distribution of functional bone marrow in 4 subgroups defined by sex and age. Conclusions: This atlas has potential utility for estimating the distribution of active marrow in adult cancer patients to guide radiation therapy planning. However, because of interindividual variation it should be used with caution when radiation therapy risks ablating large proportions of active marrow; in such cases, individual FLT-PET scans may be required.

  20. Unusual widespread metastatic subcutaneous lesions in a patient with ileal carcinoid evidenced by 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Caobelli, Federico; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Quartuccio, Natale; Guerra, Ugo Paolo

    2014-04-01

    68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT has been widely validated in diagnosis and follow-up of carcinoid. A 47-year-old woman with ileal carcinoid underwent a 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for restaging purposes. Images showed extensive liver involvement and also a widespread metastatic subcutaneous metastases in the right chest wall and in the right laterocervical region. The presence of multiple soft-tissue metastases, as described in our case and imaged with 68Ga-DOTATOC, represents a very rare clinical entity. PMID:24561684

  1. Quantification of Local Tumor Response to Fractionated Radiation Therapy for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Using Weekly {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Harald; Goda, Jayant Sastri; Vines, Douglass C.; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Tsang, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify, in a feasibility study, metabolic and volumetric response to fractionated radiation therapy (RT) using weekly {sup 18}F fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for 10 non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients, and to correlate them to clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with chemotherapy-refractory NHL planned for radical RT were prospectively entered into a research study. PET/computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired before RT, and repeated weekly during the 3- to 4-week course of RT, and at 1 and 3 months after therapy. Gross tumor volumes were contoured on CT scans and the corresponding maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) determined in the coregistered PET images. The clinical outcomes of interest were local tumor response at 3 months post-RT and local tumor status at last follow-up or time of death. Results: {sup 18}F fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake from inflammation was rarely observed. The responses showed a large variability between patients. SUV{sub max} decreased consistently with a median of -2.1% per Gy (range, -3.3 to -0.7) and the median of the volumetric response was -2.2% per Gy (range, -2.8 to +0.5). Initial SUV{sub max} was not correlated with local control, whereas smaller initial tumor volume was, with smaller tumors more likely to achieve local control. The responses after treatment were also correlated to local control, but not the responses during treatment. Conclusions: Radiation does not confound the FDG uptake in the NHL tumor and normal tissues. Only smaller initial tumor volume and metabolic and volumetric response after completion of radiation therapy significantly correlated with eventual local control.

  2. The Value of 18F-FDG PET/CT Imaging Combined With Pretherapeutic Ki67 for Early Prediction of Pathologic Response After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jurui; Zhou, Zhirui; Yang, Zhaozhi; Chen, Xingxing; Cheng, Jinyi; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Xiaomao; Tuan, Jeffrey; Fu, Xiaolong; Yu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) and pretherapeutic Ki67 in predicting pathologic response in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). As a training set, total 301 LABC patients treated with NAC were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate the potential predictive value of pretherapeutic Ki67 for pathologic complete response (pCR) after NAC. Another 60 LABC patients were prospectively included as a validation set to evaluate the value of Ki67 combined PET/CT as pCR predictors. Ki67 was assessed in pretherapy core needle biopsy specimens and PET/CT scans were performed at baseline (before initiating NAC), after the 2nd, and 4th cycle of NAC. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and its changes relative to baseline (ΔSUVmax%) were used as parameters of PEC/CT. In the training set, Ki67 was a predictor of pCR to NAC, with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.624 (P = 0.003) in receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. In the validation set, Ki67 alone did not show significant value in predicting pCR in the validation set. ΔSUVmax% after then 2nd or 4th course are predictors of pCR to NAC with the AUC of 0.774 (P = 0.002) and 0.791 (P = 0.002), respectively. When combined with ΔSUVmax% after the 2nd and 4th course NAC, Ki67 increased the value of ΔSUVmax% in predicting pCR with the AUC of 0.824 (P = 0.001). Baseline SUVmax and after 2nd, 4th course NAC had no predictive value for pCR, but SUVmax after the 2nd and 4th course showed remarkable predictive value for nonpathologic response (Grade 1 in Miller-Payne Grading System) with the AUC of 0.898 (P = 0.0001) and 0.801 (P = 0.003). Both PET/CT and Ki67 can predict pCR to NAC in LABC patients in the early phases of treatment. PET/CT combined Ki67 is a better pCR predictor for response to NAC. This helps the physician to predict the probability of pCR, and

  3. Correlating tumor metabolic progression index measured by serial FDG PET-CT, apparent diffusion coefficient measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and blood genomics to patient’s outcome in advanced colorectal cancer: the CORIOLAN study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) may present various behaviours that define different courses of tumor evolution. There is presently no available tool designed to assess tumor aggressiveness, despite the fact that this is considered to have a major impact on patient outcome. Methods/Design CORIOLAN is a single-arm prospective interventional non-therapeutic study aiming mainly to assess the natural tumor metabolic progression index (TMPI) measured by serial FDG PET-CT without any intercurrent antitumor therapy as a prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) in patients with mCRC. Secondary objectives of the study aim to test the TMPI as a prognostic marker for progression-free survival (PFS), to assess the prognostic value of baseline tumor FDG uptake on PFS and OS, to compare TMPI to classical clinico-biological assessment of prognosis, and to test the prognostic value on OS and PFS of MRI-based apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and variation of vADC using voxel-based diffusion maps. Additionally, this study intends to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that correlate with progression of tumors and the OS of patients with mCRC. Consequently, this analysis will provide information about the signaling pathways that determine the natural and therapy-free course of the disease. Finally, it would be of great interest to investigate whether in a population of patients with mCRC, for which at present no known effective therapy is available, tumor aggressiveness is related to elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and to patient outcome. Discussion Tumor aggressiveness is one of the major determinants of patient outcome in advanced disease. Despite its importance, supported by findings reported in the literature of extreme outcomes for patients with mCRC treated with chemotherapy, no objective tool allows clinicians to base treatment decisions on this factor. The CORIOLAN study will characterize TMPI using FDG-PET-based metabolic imaging

  4. Dosimetry of patients submitted to cerebral PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo; Mourão, Arnaldo Prata; de Oliveira, Paulo Márcio Campos; Bernardes, Felipe Dias; Mamede, Marcelo; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at evaluating the effective radiation dose in patients submitted to PET/CT for the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. Materials and Methods TLD-100 detectors inserted into an Alderson Rando® anthropomorphic phantom were utilized to measure the absorbed dose coming from the CT imaging modality. The anthropomorphic phantoms (male and female adult versions) were submitted to the same technical protocols for patients’ images acquisition. The absorbed dose resulting from the radiopharmaceutical injection was estimated by means of the model proposed by the ICRP publication 106. Results The effective dose in patients submitted to this diagnostic technique was approximately (5.34 ± 1.99) mSv. Conclusion Optimized protocols for calculation of radioactive activity injected into patients submitted to this diagnostic technique might contribute to reduce the effective radiation dose resulting from PET/CT in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. PMID:25741117

  5. Detection of Diffuse Infiltrative Primary Hepatic Lymphoma on FDG PET-CT: Hallmarks of Hepatic Superscan.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Sonia; Kalra, Shefali; Chawla, Madhavi; Dougall, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is an extremely rare entity with scarce information in evidence-based literature. Few case reports have described the role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET-CT) in the diagnosing and staging of PHL. We report the case of a 78-year-old man with PHL who initially presented with weight loss and nonspecific fatigue. FDG PET-CT proved to be a beneficial tool in arriving at the diagnosis of this patient with nonspecific clinical presentation and also in the staging of PHL. Physiological uptake of FDG in the liver can be a potential cause of misinterpretation in such cases. Hence, knowing the imaging hallmarks can increase the accuracy in PET image interpretation. PMID:27134567

  6. Detection of Diffuse Infiltrative Primary Hepatic Lymphoma on FDG PET-CT: Hallmarks of Hepatic Superscan

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Sonia; Kalra, Shefali; Chawla, Madhavi; Dougall, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is an extremely rare entity with scarce information in evidence-based literature. Few case reports have described the role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET-CT) in the diagnosing and staging of PHL. We report the case of a 78-year-old man with PHL who initially presented with weight loss and nonspecific fatigue. FDG PET-CT proved to be a beneficial tool in arriving at the diagnosis of this patient with nonspecific clinical presentation and also in the staging of PHL. Physiological uptake of FDG in the liver can be a potential cause of misinterpretation in such cases. Hence, knowing the imaging hallmarks can increase the accuracy in PET image interpretation. PMID:27134567

  7. Distant metastases in a young woman with Stewart-Treves syndrome demonstrated by an FDG-PET/CT scan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Ren; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2014-11-01

    This 17-year-old woman had chronic congenital lymphedema in the left lower extremity since childhood. She underwent surgeries to remove excessive lymphedematous tissues more than 15 times previously. Histopathology of the specimen from the recent surgery revealed angiosarcoma; therefore, FDG-PET/CT scan was arranged to determine the extent of tumor spread, and distant metastases were discovered. Stewart-Treves syndrome is angiosarcomas that arise secondary to chronic lymphedema. Because of the high lethality of this condition, the FDG-PET/CT scan may be a clinically useful imaging modality to detect the possible malignant transformation earlier for patients with chronic lymphedema. PMID:24561687

  8. [Rectal mucosa metastasis in recurrent prostate cancer : (68)Ga-PSMA-PET/CT allows targeted salvage radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Düwel, C; Blümel, C; Westenfelder, K; Wagner-Thiessen, E; Becker, A; Gschwend, J E; Eiber, M; Maurer, T

    2016-08-01

    This article presents for the first time a case of rectal mucosa metastasis of recurrent prostate cancer that was diagnosed with (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT. After histological confirmation, the patient was treated with salvage radiotherapy. This case report underlines the specificity and efficacy of PSMA-based PET imaging. In case of biochemical relapse, it can be used even at low PSA levels to detect prostate cancer metastases that might also be in atypical locations. Thus, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT may allow new options for salvage therapy. PMID:27385310

  9. Ultra-low dose CT attenuation correction for PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; De Man, Bruno; Manjeshwar, Ravindra; Asma, Evren; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    A challenge for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) quantitation is patient respiratory motion, which can cause an underestimation of lesion activity uptake and an overestimation of lesion volume. Several respiratory motion correction methods benefit from longer duration CT scans that are phase matched with PET scans. However, even with the currently available, lowest dose CT techniques, extended duration cine CT scans impart a substantially high radiation dose. This study evaluates methods designed to reduce CT radiation dose in PET/CT scanning. We investigated selected combinations of dose reduced acquisition and noise suppression methods that take advantage of the reduced requirement of CT for PET attenuation correction (AC). These include reducing CT tube current, optimizing CT tube voltage, adding filtration, CT sinogram smoothing and clipping. We explored the impact of these methods on PET quantitation via simulations on different digital phantoms. CT tube current can be reduced much lower for AC than that in low dose CT protocols. Spectra that are higher energy and narrower are generally more dose efficient with respect to PET image quality. Sinogram smoothing could be used to compensate for the increased noise and artifacts at radiation dose reduced CT images, which allows for a further reduction of CT dose with no penalty for PET image quantitation. When CT is not used for diagnostic and anatomical localization purposes, we showed that ultra-low dose CT for PET/CT is feasible. The significant dose reduction strategies proposed here could enable respiratory motion compensation methods that require extended duration CT scans and reduce radiation exposure in general for all PET/CT imaging.

  10. PET/CT in nononcological lung diseases: current applications and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, Selene; Nordin, Abdul Jalil; Noraini, Abdul Rahim; Rossetti, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT) is an established diagnostic modality that has become an essential imaging tool in oncological practice. However, thanks to its noninvasive nature and its capability to provide physiological information, the main applications of this technique have significantly expanded.(18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for PET scanning and demonstrates metabolic activity in various tissues. Since activated inflammatory cells, like malignant cells, predominantly metabolise glucose as a source of energy and increase expression of glucose transporters when activated, FDG-PET/CT can be successfully used to detect and monitor a variety of lung diseases, such as infections and several inflammatory conditions.The added value of FDG-PET/CT as a molecular imaging technique relies on its capability to identify disease in very early stages, long before the appearance of structural changes detectable by conventional imaging. Furthermore, by detecting the active phase of infectious or inflammatory processes, disease progression and treatment efficacy can be monitored.This review will focus on the clinical use of FDG-PET/CT in nonmalignant pulmonary diseases. PMID:27581824

  11. FDG-PET/CT Brain Findings in a Patient With Macrophagic Myofasciitis.

    PubMed

    Van Der Gucht, Axel; Aoun-Sebaiti, Mehdi; Kauv, Paul; Guedj, Eric; Aouizerate, Jessie; Verger, Antoine; Gherardi, Romain K; Bachoud-Levi, Anne-Catherine; Authier, François-Jérôme; Itti, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    Brain Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET/CT) was performed in a 44-year-old woman with marked cognitive impairment, diffuse myalgias, sensory, memory and visual disorders, and chronic fatigue, presenting with histopathological features of macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) at deltoid muscle biopsy. Cerebromedullary Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), electromyography, ophthalmic examination, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were normal. Visual analysis of FDG PET/CT images showed an atypical pattern of hypometabolism, involving symmetrically the occipital cortex, temporal lobes, and limbic system (including in particular amygdalo-hippocampal complexes), and the cerebellum. Posterior cingulate cortex and parietal areas were preserved. This pattern was confirmed by a voxel-based procedure using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM12) that compared a patient's images to normal reference samples from six healthy subjects with adjustment to age obtained using the same PET/CT camera. These results provide a glucose metabolism substrate for cognitive complaints in patients with long-lasting aluminium hydroxide-induced MMF. PMID:26941864

  12. Initial prostate cancer diagnosis and disease staging--the role of choline-PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Paola; Picchio, Maria

    2015-09-01

    An early and correct diagnosis together with accurate staging of prostate cancer is necessary in order to plan the most appropriate treatment strategy. Morphological imaging modalities such as transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS), CT, and MRI can have some limitations regarding their accuracy for primary diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer; for instance, they have limited specificity in differentiating cancer from benign prostatic conditions and, by using size as the only criterion to characterize lymph node metastases, they might not be accurate enough for tumour characterization. In this scenario, PET-CT with (11)C-labelled or (18)F-labelled choline derivatives provides morphological and functional characterization and could overcome the limitations of the conventional imaging techniques. PET-CT is one of the most investigated molecular imaging modalities for prostate cancer diagnosis and staging. Currently, the main investigations on the role of PET-CT in the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer have been performed on a retrospective basis and this type of analysis might be one of the main reasons why different results regarding its diagnostic accuracy have been reported. PMID:26260884

  13. Does the Novel Integrated PET/MRI Offer the Same Diagnostic Performance as PET/CT for Oncological Indications?

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Dayi; Zhang, Jinming; Chen, Yingmao; An, Ningyu; Xu, Baixuan

    2014-01-01

    Background We compared PET/MRI with PET/CT in terms of lesion detection and quantitative measurement to verify the feasibility of the novel integrated imaging modality for oncological applications. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 285 patients referred to our PET/CT center for oncological indications voluntarily participated in this same-day PET/CT and PET/MRI comparative study. PET/CT images were acquired and reconstructed following routine protocols, and then PET/MRI was performed at a mean time interval of 28±11 min (range 15–45 min). PET/MRI covered the body trunk with a sequence combination of transverse T1WI 3D-volumetric interpolated breath-hold, T2WI turbo spin echo with fat saturation, diffusion-weighted imaging with double b values (50 and 800 s/mm2), and simultaneous PET acquisition over 45 min/5 bed positions. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was assessed by manually drawn regions of interest over fluorodeoxyglucose-positive lesions. Among 285 cases, 57 showed no abnormalities, and 368 lesions (278 malignant, 68 benign and 22 undetermined) were detected in 228 patients. When stand-alone modalities were evaluated, PET revealed 31 and 12 lesions missed by CT and MRI, respectively, and CT and MRI revealed 38 and 61 more lesions, respectively, than PET. Compared to CT, MRI detected 40 more lesions and missed 8. In the integrated mode, PET/CT correctly detected 6 lesions misdiagnosed by PET/MRI, but was false-negative in 30 cases that were detected by PET/MRI. The overall diagnosis did not differ between integrated PET/MRI and PET/CT. SUVmax for lesions were slightly higher from PET/MRI than PET/CT but correlated well (ρ = 0.85–0.91). Conclusions/Significance The novel integrated PET/MRI performed comparatively to PET/CT in lesion detection and quantitative measurements. PET from either scanner modality offered almost the same information despite differences in hardware. Further study is needed to explore features of

  14. Comparison of CE-FDG-PET/CT with CE-FDG-PET/MR in the evaluation of osseous metastases in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, O A; Nicolai, E; Rosen, B R; Luongo, A; Catalano, M; Iannace, C; Guimaraes, A; Vangel, M G; Mahmood, U; Soricelli, A; Salvatore, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite improvements in treatments, metastatic breast cancer remains difficult to cure. Bones constitute the most common site of first-time recurrence, occurring in 40–75% of cases. Therefore, evaluation for possible osseous metastases is crucial. Technetium 99 (99Tc) bone scintigraphy and fluorodexossyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (PET-CT) are the most commonly used techniques to assess osseous metastasis. PET magnetic resonance (PET-MR) imaging is an innovative technique still under investigation. We compared the capability of PET-MR to that of same-day PET-CT to assess osseous metastases in patients with breast cancer. Methods: One hundred and nine patients with breast cancer, who underwent same-day contrast enhanced (CE)-PET-CT and CE-PET-MR, were evaluated. CE-PET-CT and CE-PET-MR studies were interpreted by consensus by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician. Correlations with prior imaging and follow-up studies were used as the reference standard. Binomial confidence intervals and a χ2 test were used for categorical data, and paired t-test was used for the SUVmax data; a non-informative prior Bayesian approach was used to estimate and compare the specificities. Results: Osseous metastases affected 25 out 109 patients. Metastases were demonstrated by CE-PET-CT in 22 out of 25 patients (88%±7%), and by CE-PET-MR in 25 out of 25 patients (100%). CE-PET-CT revealed 90 osseous metastases and CE-PET-MR revealed 141 osseous metastases (P<0.001). The estimated sensitivity of CE-PET-CT and CE-PET-MR were 0.8519 and 0.9630, respectively. The estimated specificity for CE-FDG-PET-MR was 0.9884. The specificity of CE-PET-CT cannot be determined from patient-level data, because CE-PET-CT yielded a false-positive lesion in a patient who also had other, true metastases. Conclusions: CE-PET-MR detected a higher number of osseous metastases than did same-day CE-PET-CT, and was positive for 12% of the patients

  15. 11C-choline vs. 18F-FDG PET/CT in assessing bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Cristina; Zamagni, Elena; Cavo, Michele; Rubello, Domenico; Tacchetti, Paola; Pettinato, Cinzia; Farsad, Mohsen; Castellucci, Paolo; Ambrosini, Valentina; Montini, Gian Carlo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Franchi, Roberto; Fanti, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    Background Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a B cell neoplasm causing lytic or osteopenic bone abnormalities. Whole body skeletal survey (WBSS), Magnetic resonance (MR) and 18F-FDG PET/CT are imaging techniques routinely used for the evaluation of bone involvement in MM patients. Aim As MM bone lesions may present low 18F-FDG uptake; the aim of this study was to assess the possible added value and limitations of 11C-Choline to that of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients affected with MM. Methods Ten patients affected with MM underwent a standard 11C-Choline PET/CT and an 18F-FDG PET/CT within one week. The results of the two scans were compared in terms of number, sites and SUVmax of lesions. Results Four patients (40%) had a negative concordant 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two patients (20%) had a positive 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans that identified the same number and sites of bone lesions. The remaining four patients (40%) had a positive 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT scan, but the two exams identified different number of lesions. Choline showed a mean SUVmax of 5 while FDG showed a mean SUVmax of 3.8 (P = 0.042). Overall, 11C-Choline PET/CT scans detected 37 bone lesions and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans detected 22 bone lesions but the difference was not significant (P = 0.8). Conclusion According to these preliminary data, 11C-Choline PET/CT appears to be more sensitive than 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of bony myelomatous lesions. If these data are confirmed in larger series of patients, 11C-Choline may be considered a more appropriate functional imaging in association with MRI for MM bone staging. PMID:17584499

  16. Prevalence of exclusive lower extremity metastases at 18F-NaF PET/CT*

    PubMed Central

    Ordones, Monique Beraldo; Valadares, Agnes Araujo; Duarte, Paulo Schiavom; Sado, Heitor Naoki; Lima, Marcos Santos; Carvalho, Giovanna; Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of exclusive lower extremity metastases, specifically in the femur and below the knee, observed at 18F-NaF PET/CT. Materials and Methods One thousand consecutive PET/CT studies were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of exclusive uptake in lower extremities suggesting metastatic involvement. The presumptive diagnoses based on such uptakes were subsequently obtained by evaluation of other imaging studies. Results No exclusive uptake suggestive of metastasis below the femur was observed in the present series. Exclusive uptake was observed in the proximal femur with a presumptive diagnosis of metastasis in two patients. Conclusion The prevalence of exclusive metastasis below the femur is low and scanning from head to knees is appropriate in most cases. PMID:26185339

  17. Newer PET application with an old tracer: role of 18F-NaF skeletal PET/CT in oncologic practice.

    PubMed

    Bastawrous, Sarah; Bhargava, Puneet; Behnia, Fatemeh; Djang, David S W; Haseley, David R

    2014-01-01

    The skeleton is one of the most common sites for metastatic disease, particularly from breast and prostate cancer. Bone metastases are associated with considerable morbidity, and accurate imaging of the skeleton is important in determining the appropriate therapeutic plan. Sodium fluoride labeled with fluorine 18 (sodium fluoride F 18 [(18)F-NaF]) is a positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical first introduced several decades ago for skeletal imaging. (18)F-NaF was approved for clinical use as a positron emission tomographic (PET) agent by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1972. The early use of this agent was limited, given the difficulties of imaging its high-energy photons on the available gamma cameras. For skeletal imaging, it was eventually replaced by technetium 99m ((99m)Tc)-labeled agents because of the technical limitations of (18)F-NaF. During the past several years, the widespread availability and implementation of hybrid PET and computed tomographic (CT) dual-modality systems (PET/CT) have encouraged a renewed interest in (18)F-NaF PET/CT for routine clinical use in bone imaging. Because current PET/CT systems offer high sensitivity and spatial resolution, the use of (18)F-NaF has been reevaluated for the detection of malignant and nonmalignant osseous disease. Growing evidence suggests that (18)F-NaF PET/CT provides increased sensitivity and specificity in the detection of bone metastases. Furthermore, the favorable pharmacokinetics of (18)F-NaF, combined with the superior imaging characteristics of PET/CT, supports the routine clinical use of (18)F-NaF PET/CT for oncologic imaging for skeletal metastases. In this article, a review of the indications, imaging appearances, and utility of (18)F-NaF PET/CT in the evaluation of skeletal disease is provided, with an emphasis on oncologic imaging. PMID:25208282

  18. Feasibility of quantitative PET/CT dosimetry for proton therapy using polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidan, O. A.; Hsi, W. C.; Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Sriprisan, S. I.; Meeks, S. L.; Kupelian, P. A.; Li, Z.; Palta, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    A feasibility study of proton beam PET/CT off-line quantitative dosimetry using polymer gels is presented. A newly developed proton-sensitive polymer gel dosimeter (BANG(®)3-Pro2) is used as a dosimeter and a tissue-equivalent phantom medium for this study. We explore a new approach to correlating measured proton 3-dimensional (3D) dose distributions directly to measured positron emission from in the gel medium using PET/CT imaging. A large cylindrical volume (2.2 Litres) of the gel was irradiated with a clinical modulated proton beam using irregular-shaped aperture geometry. The gel was imaged in a nearby PET/CT unit immediately (<3 min) after irradiation. Dose distribution in the gel was generated using an optical tomography scanning system. Direct 3D spatial comparison of dose and positron emission distributions was then performed. Profiles along the beam path show that the distal fall-off of the dose is nearly 2 cm deeper than the activity profile which is comparable to previous studies with plastic phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations of activity distributions. Planar PET and dose distributions at depth and perpendicular to beam axis show a strong one-to-one spatial correlation. This phantom study demonstrates that the gel medium could be potentially useful for quantifying various physical factors that can influence the PET activity range verification method in patients.

  19. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Moreno, Elena; Jimenez de la Peña, Mar; Cano Alonso, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI) including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as biomarkers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume. PMID:22315683

  20. Radionecrosis versus disease progression in brain metastasis. Value of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT/MRI.

    PubMed

    Hernández Pinzón, J; Mena, D; Aguilar, M; Biafore, F; Recondo, G; Bastianello, M

    2016-01-01

    The use of (18)F-DOPA PET/CT with magnetic resonance imaging fusion and the use of visual methods and quantitative analysis helps to differentiate between changes post-radiosurgery vs. suspicion of disease progression in a patient with brain metastases from melanoma, thus facilitating taking early surgical action. PMID:27117985

  1. Diagnostic Accuracy of PET/CT-Guided Percutaneous Biopsies for Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brahmi, Mehdi; Combemale, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are one of the most frequent causes of death in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Early detection is crucial because complete surgical resection is the only curative treatment. It has been previously reported that an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) image with a T/L (Tumor/Liver) SUVmax ratio > 1.5 provides a high negative predictive value; however, it is not specific enough to make a NF1-related MPNST diagnosis. A formal proof of malignant transformation from a histological analysis is necessary before surgical excision because the procedure can cause mutilation. The objective of the present work was to investigate the effectiveness of and complications associated with PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies for an NF1-related MPNST diagnosis. Methods PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsy procedures performed on 26 NF1 patients with a clinical suspicion of MPNST and a suspect lesion from a PET/CT scan (T/L SUVmax ratio > 1.5) were retrospectively evaluated. The localization of the suspected malignant site was determined using PET/CT. A stereotactic (ultrasonic and CT control) core biopsy technique was used with a local anesthesia. Results The first PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies enabled a pathological diagnosis for all of the patients (no "inconclusive " results were obtained), and no secondary procedures were needed. Among the 26 patients, the histopathological results from the biopsy were malignant in 17 cases and benign (BPNST with atypical cells) in nine cases. No complications from the diagnostic procedure were observed. A surgical resection was performed in 18 patients (seven benign and 11 malignant biopsies), removing the fine needle biopsy scar. In addition, six locally advanced/metastatic MPNST were treated with chemo/radiotherapy, and two BPNST had no progression after a follow-up of 14 and 39 months, respectively. The PET/CT

  2. Optimal scan time for evaluation of parathyroid adenoma with [18F]-fluorocholine PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Rep, Sebastijan; Lezaic, Luka; Kocjan, Tomaz; Pfeifer, Marija; Sever, Mojca Jensterle; Simoncic, Urban; Tomse, Petra; Hocevar, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Background Parathyroid adenomas, the most common cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, are benign tumours which autonomously produce and secrete parathyroid hormone. [18F]-fluorocholine (FCH), PET marker of cellular proliferation, was recently demonstrated to accumulate in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue; however, the optimal time to perform FCH PET/CT after FCH administration is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal scan time of FCH PET/CT in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. Patients and methods. 43 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were enrolled in this study. A triple-phase PET/CT imaging was performed five minutes, one and two hours after the administration of FCH. Regions of interest (ROI) were placed in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and thyroid tissue. Standardized uptake value (SUVmean), retention index and lesion contrast for parathyroid and thyroid tissue were calculated. Results Accumulation of FCH was higher in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue in comparison to the thyroid tissue with significantly higher SUVmean in the second and in the third phase (p < 0.0001). Average retention index decreased significantly between the first and the second phase and increased significantly between the second and the third phase in lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and decreased significantly over all three phases in thyroid tissue (p< 0.0001). The lesion contrast of lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue and thyroid tissue was significantly better in the second and the third phase compared to the first phase (p < 0.05). Conclusions According to the results the optimal scan time of FCH PET/CT for localization of lesions representing enlarged parathyroid tissue is one hour after administration of the FCH. PMID:26834518

  3. Validation of CT doses of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid devices: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Sera, Terez; Porubszky, Tamas; Papos, Miklos; Elek, Richard; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Gion, Katalin; Bartha, Andras; Pellet, Sandor; Pavics, Laszlo

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to check the validity of computed tomographic (CT) doses exhibited by SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid devices. Dose measurements were taken from four SPECT/CT and four PET/CT cameras commercially available from different manufacturers. A calibrated ionization chamber was placed in whole-body or head phantoms for the acquisition of CT images with clinically used parameters. Computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) values were calculated according to the IEC 60601-2-44:1999 formula. The measured CTDIvol doses were compared with those preprogrammed by the manufacturer. In the case of the whole-body phantom, the differences between the measured and displayed values varied between -31 and +24% [European document RP162 (2012) sets up the limit for acceptance criterion as ±20%]. The head phantom data showed either an agreement between -10 and +24%, or an underestimation by two-fold. The latter seemed to be because, while preprogramming the doses, the manufacturer had used the whole-body phantom instead of a proper head phantom. The results of the work demonstrate the need for individual dosimetric calibration of every single X-ray tube. Dosimetric checks should be included in the regular quality control programmes of the SPECT/CT and PET/CT devices. Special attention should be paid to head-and-neck and paediatric protocols, in which the use of a head phantom is recommended for dose calibration. PMID:24499726

  4. A rib-specific multimodal registration algorithm for fused unfolded rib visualization using PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaftan, Jens N.; Kopaczka, Marcin; Wimmer, Andreas; Platsch, Günther; Declerck, Jérôme

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory motion affects the alignment of PET and CT volumes from PET/CT examinations in a non-rigid manner. This becomes particularly apparent if reviewing fine anatomical structures such as ribs when assessing bone metastases, which frequently occur in many advanced cancers. To make this routine diagnostic task more efficient, a fused unfolded rib visualization for 18F-NaF PET/CT is presented. It allows to review the whole rib cage in a single image. This advanced visualization is enabled by a novel rib-specific registration algorithm that rigidly optimizes the local alignment of each individual rib in both modalities based on a matched filter response function. More specifically, rib centerlines are automatically extracted from CT and subsequently individually aligned to the corresponding bone-specific PET rib uptake pattern. The proposed method has been validated on 20 PET/CT scans acquired at different clinical sites. It has been demonstrated that the presented rib- specific registration method significantly improves the rib alignment without having to run complex deformable registration algorithms. At the same time, it guarantees that rib lesions are not further deformed, which may otherwise affect quantitative measurements such as SUVs. Considering clinically relevant distance thresholds, the centerline portion with good alignment compared to the ground truth improved from 60:6% to 86:7% after registration while approximately 98% can be still considered as acceptably aligned.

  5. TU-A-18A-01: Basic Principles of PET/CT, Calibration Methods and Contrast Recovery Across Multiple Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Kappadath, S; Nye, J

    2014-06-15

    This continuing education session will discuss the physical principles of PET/CT imaging and characterization of contrast recovery using accreditation phantoms. A detailed overview will be given on the physical principles of PET including positron decay physics, 2D and 3D data acquisition, time-of-flight, scatter correction, CT attenuation correction, and image reconstruction. Instrument quality control and calibration procedures will be discussed. Technical challenges, common image artifacts and strategies to mitigate these issues will also be discussed. Data will be presented on acquisition techniques and reconstruction parameters affecting contrast recovery. The discussion will emphasize the minimization of reconstruction differences in quantification metrics such as SUV and contrast recovery coefficients for the NEMA and ACR clinical trial phantoms. Data from new and older generation scanners will be shown including comparison of contrast recovery measurements to their analytical solutions. The goal of this session is to update attendees on the quality control and calibration of PET/CT scanners, on methods to establish a common calibration for PET/CT scanners to control for instrument variance across multiple sites. Learning Objectives: Review the physical principles of PET/CT, quality control and calibration Gain further understanding on how to apply techniques for improving quantitative agreement across multiple cameras Describe the differences between measured and expected contrast recovery for the NEMA and ACR PET phantoms.

  6. Virtual hybrid bronchoscopy using PET/CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Seemann, Marcus D.

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the possibilities, advantages and limitations of virtual bronchoscopy using data sets from positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). Eight consecutive patients with lung cancer underwent PET/CT. PET was performed with F-18-labelled 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ((18)F-FDG). The tracheobronchial system was segmented with a volume-growing algorithm, using the CT data sets, and visualized with a shaded-surface rendering method. The primary tumours and the lymph node metastases were segmented for virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the CT data set and for virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy using the PET/CT data set. Virtual CT-bronchoscopy using the low-dose or diagnostic CT facilitates the detection of anatomical/morphological structure changes of the tracheobronchial system. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy was superior to virtual CT-bronchoscopy in the detection of lymph node metastases (P=0.001), because it uses the CT information and the molecular/metabolic information from PET. Virtual PET/CT-bronchoscopy with a transparent colour-coded shaded-surface rendering model is expected to improve the diagnostic accuracy of identification and characterization of malignancies, assessment of tumour staging, differentiation of viable tumour tissue from atelectases and scars, verification of infections, evaluation of therapeutic response and detection of an early stage of recurrence that is not detectable or is misjudged in comparison with virtual CT-bronchoscopy.

  7. Granuloma Mimicking Local Recurrence on PET/CT after Liver Resection of Colorectal Liver Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kontis, Elissaios A; Michalaki, Vasiliki; Primetis, Elias; Vezakis, Antonios; Polydorou, Andreas; Fragulidis, Georgios P

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT) improves the diagnostic interpretation of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG ) PET and CT in oncologic patients and has an impact on both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of patient management. However, false positive findings from the PET/CT imaging should be taken into consideration as they mislead physicians into improper therapeutic actions. We present a 48-year-old female patient with a history of left colectomy for colorectal cancer and subsequent liver metastasectomy. After one year of follow-up, she presented with a highly suspicious lesion in the liver, which was confirmed on PET/CT as a metastatic liver tumor. Consequently, the patient underwent surgical excision of the tumor, and the definitive histological diagnosis showed a granulomatous tissue with giant cells and foreign body tissue reaction. Based on this report, we briefly review the dangerous pitfalls from radiological and PET/CT imaging concerning the preoperative diagnostic workup examination, as they may significantly alter the treatment plan in oncologic patients.

  8. The role of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of residual disease in paediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bhojwani, Deepa; McCarville, Mary B; Choi, John K; Sawyer, Jennifer; Metzger, Monika L; Inaba, Hiroto; Davidoff, Andrew M; Gold, Robert; Shulkin, Barry L; Sandlund, John T

    2015-03-01

    (18) F-labelled-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) findings are challenging to interpret for residual disease versus complete response in paediatric patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). A biopsy is often warranted to confirm the presence or absence of viable tumour if there is clinical or radiographic evidence of residual disease. In this study, we compared conventional imaging and FDG-PET/computerized tomography (CT) findings with biopsy results in 18 children with NHL. Our goal was to provide additional data to establish more reliable criteria for response evaluation. Residual disease was suspected after conventional imaging alone in eight patients, after FDG-PET/CT alone in three and after both modalities in seven patients. Biopsy confirmed the presence of viable tumour in two patients. Two additional patients experienced progressive disease or relapse. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of FDG-PET/CT using the London criteria to indicate residual tumour detectable by biopsy were 100%, but specificity was low (60%), as was the positive predictive value (25%). Thus, in this study, a negative FDG-PET/CT finding was a good indicator of complete remission. However, because false-positive FDG-PET/CT findings are common, biopsy and close monitoring are required for accurate determination of residual disease in individual patients. PMID:25382494

  9. MR-driven metal artifact reduction in PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Delso, G; Wollenweber, S; Lonn, A; Wiesinger, F; Veit-Haibach, P

    2013-04-01

    Among the proposed system architectures capable of delivering positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) datasets, tri-modality systems open an interesting field in which the synergies between these modalities can be exploited to address some of the problems encountered in standalone systems. In this paper we present a feasibility study of the correction of dental streak artifacts in computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction images using complementary MR data. The frequency and severity of metal artifacts in oncology patients was studied by inspecting the CT scans of 152 patients examined at our hospital. A prospective correction algorithm using CT and MR information to automatically locate and edit the region affected by metal artifacts was developed and tested retrospectively on data from 15 oncology patients referred for a PET/CT scan. In datasets without malignancies, the activity in Waldeyer's ring was used to measure the maximum uptake variation when the proposed correction was applied. The measured bias ranged from 10% to 30%. In datasets with malignancies on the slices affected by artifacts, the correction led to lesion uptake variations of 6.1% for a lesion 3 cm away from the implant, 1.5% for a lesion 7 cm away and <1% for a lesion 8 cm away. PMID:23478566

  10. MR-driven metal artifact reduction in PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delso, G.; Wollenweber, S.; Lonn, A.; Wiesinger, F.; Veit-Haibach, P.

    2013-04-01

    Among the proposed system architectures capable of delivering positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) datasets, tri-modality systems open an interesting field in which the synergies between these modalities can be exploited to address some of the problems encountered in standalone systems. In this paper we present a feasibility study of the correction of dental streak artifacts in computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction images using complementary MR data. The frequency and severity of metal artifacts in oncology patients was studied by inspecting the CT scans of 152 patients examined at our hospital. A prospective correction algorithm using CT and MR information to automatically locate and edit the region affected by metal artifacts was developed and tested retrospectively on data from 15 oncology patients referred for a PET/CT scan. In datasets without malignancies, the activity in Waldeyer's ring was used to measure the maximum uptake variation when the proposed correction was applied. The measured bias ranged from 10% to 30%. In datasets with malignancies on the slices affected by artifacts, the correction led to lesion uptake variations of 6.1% for a lesion 3 cm away from the implant, 1.5% for a lesion 7 cm away and <1% for a lesion 8 cm away.

  11. Natural history of atherosclerotic disease progression as assessed by (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Hetterich, Holger; Rominger, Axel; Walter, Lisa; Habs, Maximilian; Volpers, Sarah; Hacker, Marcus; Reiser, Maximilian F; Bartenstein, Peter; Saam, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of cardiovascular risk factors and plaque inflammation on the progression of atherosclerosis as assessed by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging with (18)F-radiolabled fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study. Patients who received a (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan and follow-up scan 9-24 months later without systemic inflammation or steroid medication were eligible for the study. (18)F-FDG PET/CT included a full diagnostic contrast enhanced CT scan. Cardiovascular risk factors and medication were documented. Calcified plaque volume, lumen area and (18)F-FDG uptake, quantified by the target-to-background ratio (TBR), were measured in the carotid arteries, aorta and iliac arteries. Influence of cardiovascular risk factors and vessel wall inflammation on atherosclerotic disease progression was analyzed. Ninety-four patients underwent baseline and follow-up whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT (mean follow-up time 14.5 ± 3.5 months). Annualized calcified plaque volume increased by 15.4 % (p < 0.0001), carotid and aortic lumen area decreased by 10.5 % (p < 0.0001) and 1.7 % (p = 0.045). There was no significant difference in (18)F-FDG uptake at baseline and follow-up (mean TBR 1.44 ± 0.18 vs. 1.42 ± 0.19, p = 0.18). Multiple linear regression analysis identified hypertension as an independent predictor for total, aortic and iliac calcified plaque volume progression (all p < 0.04). Carotid lumen reduction was predicted by hypercholesterolemia (p = 0.008) while aortic lumen reduction was associated with BMI and mean (18)F-FDG uptake (p ≤ 0.005). Furthermore we observed a dose response relationship between the number of cardiovascular risk factors and calcified plaque volume progression in the aorta (p = 0.03). Findings from this study provide data on the natural history of atherosclerotic disease burden in multiple vascular beds and emphasize the value of

  12. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumors: CT and FDG-PET/CT findings with histopathological association

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JINGJING; WU, ZENGJIE; SUN, BINBIN; LI, DACHENG; WANG, ZHENGUANG; LIU, FANGJUN; HUA, HUI

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) are rare and aggressive malignant tumors. The aim of the present study was to analyze computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of intra-abdominal desmoplastic DSRCT, and investigate the association of these features with histopathological results. The present study was a retrospective investigation of 4 patients with DSRCT. All patients underwent CT and dynamic CT, and 1 additionally underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning. Following a tumor resection, routine hematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunostaining, were performed and evaluated. Multiple large abdominopelvic masses were identified in all 4 patients; however, no indications of their site of origin were demonstrated. CT revealed soft-tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense lesions. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed slightly or moderately heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other observations from these patients included calcification (n=2), peritoneal seeding (n=3), hepatic metastasis (n=3), retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n=3) and ascites (n=2). FDG-PET/CT revealed multiple nodular increased FDG uptake in the abdominopelvic masses, and in the liver and peritoneum in 1 case. Intra-abdominal DSRCT demonstrated significant diagnostic characteristics on plain and contrast-enhanced CT. Multiple, bulky soft-tissue masses inside the peritoneal cavity, particularly in male adolescents and young adults, should be considered as potential cases of DSRCT. FDG-PET/CT techniques may be utilized to aid the staging of tumors. PMID:27123106

  13. Focal Inflammatory Myositis on 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Olivia; Ravi Kumar, Aravind S; Agnew, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Focal myositis is a rare benign inflammatory pseudotumor that can mimic malignancy, clinically and on imaging. A 34-year-old man presented with a 3-week history of sudden-onset, nontender, left upper neck mass that was nonresolving with antibiotics. Anatomical imaging was concerning for a sarcoma of the sternocleidomastoid muscle with possible regional nodal metastases and surrounding inflammatory change. F-FDG PET/CT showed marked FDG uptake extending around the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle with no FDG-avid local nodal disease. Core biopsy of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and adjacent node revealed inflammatory changes. A diagnosis of focal inflammatory myositis was made. PMID:27055132

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for detecting synchronous advanced colorectal neoplasia in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Wook; Kim, Hae Won; Won, Kyoung Sook; Song, Bong-Il; Cho, Kwang Bum; Bae, Sung Uk

    2016-09-01

    Preoperative screening for synchronous colorectal neoplasia (CRN) has been recommended in patients with gastric cancer because patients with gastric cancer are at increased risk for synchronous CRN. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer.A total of 256 patients who underwent colonoscopy and F-FDG PET/CT for preoperative staging were enrolled in this study. The diagnosis of focal colonic F-FDG uptake on F-FDG PET/CT image was made based on histopathologic results from the colonoscopic biopsy. The F-FDG PET/CT result was considered as true positive for advanced CRN when focal F-FDG uptake matched colorectal carcinoma or adenoma with high-grade dysplasia in the same location on colonoscopy.Synchronous advanced CRN was detected in 21 of the 256 patients (4.7%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of F-FDG PET/CT were 76.2%, 96.2%, and 94.5%. The size of CRN with a true positive result was significantly larger than that with a false negative result.F-FDG PET/CT demonstrated high diagnostic accuracy for detecting synchronous advanced CRN in patients with gastric cancer. Colonoscopy is recommended as the next diagnostic step for further evaluation of a positive F-FDG PET/CT result in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:27603371

  15. Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staffs during 18F-FDG PET/CT procedures at Ramathibodi Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmoon, T.; Chamroonrat, W.; Tuntawiroon, M.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the whole body and finger radiation doses per study received by nuclear medicine staff involved in dispensing, administration of 18F-FDG and interacting with radioactive patients during PET/CT imaging procedures in a PET/CT facility. The whole-body doses received by radiopharmacists, technologists and nurses were measured by electronic dosimeter and the finger doses by ring dosimeter during a period of 4 months. In 70 PET/CT studies, the mean whole-body dose per study to radiopharmacist, technologist, and nurse were 1.07±0.09, 1.77±0.46, μSv, and not detectable respectively. The mean finger doses per study received by radiopharmacist, technologist, and nurse were 265.65±107.55, 4.84±1.08 and 19.22±2.59 μSv, respectively. The average time in contact with 18F-FDG was 5.88±0.03, 39.06±1.89 and 1.21±0.02 minutes per study for radiopharmacist, technologist and nurse respectively. Technologists received highest mean effective whole- body dose per study and radiopharmacist received the highest finger dose per study. When compared with the ICRP dose limit, each individual worker can work with many more 18F- FDG PET/CT studies for a whole year without exceeding the occupational dose limits. This study confirmed that low levels of radiation does are received by our medical personnel involved in 18F-FDG PET/CT procedures.

  16. Prognostic value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhitao; Wang, Xuejuan; Song, Yuqin; Zheng, Wen; Wang, Xiaopei; Xie, Yan; Lin, Ningjing; Tu, Meifeng; Ping, Lingyan; Liu, Weiping; Deng, Lijuan; Zhang, Chen; Yang, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a heterogeneous disease. The prognostic factor currently used is not accurate enough to predict the outcomes of patients with DLBCL. The prognostic significance of interim PET/CT in DLBCL remains controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the predictive value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT after first-line treatment in patients with DLBCL. Methods Thirty-two patients with DLBCL underwent baseline, interim and post-treatment 18F-FDG PET/CT scans. Imaging results were analyzed for the survival of patients via software SPSS 13.0, retrospectively. Results Thirty-one of the 32 patients were treated with R-CHOP regimen, and interim 18F-FDG PET/CT of 24 patients was performed after 2 cycles of treatment. After a median follow-up period of 16.7 months, the 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were significantly different between the groups above and below SUVmax cut-off value of 2.5 (P=0.039). No significant differences were found in the 2-year PFS rates if SUVmax cut-off values were set as 2.0 and 3.0, respectively (P=0.360; P=0.113). Conclusions Interim PET/CT could predict the prognosis of DLBCL patients with the SUVmax cut-off value of 2.5, but more clinical data should be concluded to confirm this conclusion. Key Words Fludeoxyglucose F18; lymphoma; large cell; diffuse; prognosis; standard utility value PMID:23372347

  17. Clinical applications of choline PET/CT in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Milano, Amalia; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas and metastatic tumors are the most common forms of brain tumors. From a clinical perspective, neuroimaging plays a significant role, in diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. To date MRI is considered the current clinical gold standard for imaging, however, despite providing superior structural detail it features poor specificity in identifying viable tumors in brain treated with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. In the last years functional neuroimaging has become largely widespread thanks to the use of molecular tracers employed in cellular metabolism which has significantly improved the management of patients with brain tumors, especially in the post-treatment phase. Despite the considerable progress of molecular imaging in oncology its use in the diagnosis of brain tumors is still limited by a few wellknown technical problems. Because 18F-FDG, the most common radiotracer used in oncology, is avidly accumulated by normal cortex, the low tumor/background signal ratio makes it difficult to distinguish the tumor from normal surrounding tissues. By contrast, radiotracers with higher specificity for the tumor are labeled with a short half-life isotopes which restricts their use to those centers equipped with a cyclotron and radiopharmacy facility. 11C-choline has been reported as a suitable tracer for neuroimaging application. The recent availability of choline labeled with a long half-life radioisotope as 18F increases the possibility of studying this tracer's potential role in the staging of brain tumors. The present review focuses on the possible clinical applications of PET/CT with choline tracers in malignant brain tumors and brain metastases, with a special focus on malignant gliomas. PMID:25225894

  18. FDG-PET/CT of Vulvar Adenocarcinoma With Diffuse Metastases.

    PubMed

    Patel, Darshan; Anderson, Thomas M; Lu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    A 52 year-old woman presented to her gynecologist with a 1-year history of a 1.5-cm left labial mass. Punch biopsy of the vulvar lesion revealed primary infiltrating adenocarcinoma. Staging FDG-PET/CT demonstrated multiorgan diffuse metastases. PMID:27187733

  19. PET-CT: reliable cornerstone for Hodgkin lymphoma treatment?

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Josée M

    2016-03-24

    In this issue of Blood, Barrington et al present the analyses of centrally reviewed positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) used for staging and response monitoring after 2 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) to guide treatment modification in a large prospective clinical trial in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) (Response-Adapted Therapy in Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma [RATHL]). PMID:27013209

  20. Low-Dose PET/CT and Full-Dose Contrast-Enhanced CT at the Initial Staging of Localized Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Sabaté-Llobera, Aida; Cortés-Romera, Montserrat; Mercadal, Santiago; Hernández-Gañán, Javier; Pomares, Helena; González-Barca, Eva; Gámez-Cenzano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been used as the reference imaging technique for the initial staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma until recent days, when the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging as a hybrid technique has become of routine use. However, the performance of both examinations is still common. The aim of this work was to compare the findings between low-dose 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT and full-dose contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) in 28 patients with localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma according to PET/CT findings, in order to avoid the performance of ceCT. For each technique, a comparison in the number of nodal and extranodal involved regions was performed. PET/CT showed more lesions than ceCT in both nodal (41 vs. 36) and extranodal localizations (16 vs. 15). Disease staging according to both techniques was concordant in 22 patients (79%) and discordant in 6 patients (21%), changing treatment management in 3 patients (11%). PET/CT determined a better staging and therapeutic approach, making the performance of an additional ceCT unnecessary. PMID:27559300

  1. Experimental Evaluation of a Deformable Registration Algorithm for Motion Correction in PET-CT Guided Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Rahul; Sala, Guillaume; Kinahan, Paul; Esposito, Giuseppe; Banovac, Filip; Cleary, Kevin; Enquobahrie, Andinet

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) images are increasingly being used for guidance during percutaneous biopsy. However, due to the physics of image acquisition, PET-CT images are susceptible to problems due to respiratory and cardiac motion, leading to inaccurate tumor localization, shape distortion, and attenuation correction. To address these problems, we present a method for motion correction that relies on respiratory gated CT images aligned using a deformable registration algorithm. In this work, we use two deformable registration algorithms and two optimization approaches for registering the CT images obtained over the respiratory cycle. The two algorithms are the BSpline and the symmetric forces Demons registration. In the first optmization approach, CT images at each time point are registered to a single reference time point. In the second approach, deformation maps are obtained to align each CT time point with its adjacent time point. These deformations are then composed to find the deformation with respect to a reference time point. We evaluate these two algorithms and optimization approaches using respiratory gated CT images obtained from 7 patients. Our results show that overall the BSpline registration algorithm with the reference optimization approach gives the best results. PMID:25717283

  2. Imaging Intratumoral Nanoparticle Uptake After Combining Nanoembolization with Various Ablative Therapies in Hepatic VX2 Rabbit Tumors.

    PubMed

    Tam, Alda L; Melancon, Marites P; Abdelsalam, Mohamed; Figueira, Tomas Appleton; Dixon, Katherine; McWatters, Amanda; Zhou, Min; Huang, Qian; Mawlawi, Osama; Dunner, Kenneth; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Combining image-guided therapy techniques for the treatment of liver cancers is a strategy that is being used to improve local tumor control rates. Here, we evaluate the intratumoral uptake of nanoparticles used in combination with radiofrequency ablation (RFA), irreversible electroporation (IRE), or laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). Eight rabbits with VX2 tumor in the liver underwent one of four treatments: (i) nanoembolization (NE) with radiolabeled, hollow gold nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin (⁶⁴Cu-PEG-HAuNS-DOX); (ii) NE + RFA; (iii) NE + IRE; (iv) NE +LITT. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging was obtained 1-hr or 18-hrs after intervention. Tissue samples were collected for autoradiography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. PET/CT imaging at 1-hr showed focal deposition of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor only after NE+ RFA but at 18-hrs, all animals had focal accumulation of oil and nanoparticles in the tumor region. Autoradiograph analysis demonstrated nanoparticle deposition in the tumor and in the ablated tissues adjacent to the tumor when NE was combined with ablation. TEM results showed the intracellular uptake of nanoparticles in tumor only after NE + IRE. Nanoparticles demonstrated a structural change, suggesting direct interaction, potentially leading to drug release, only after NE + LITT. The findings demonstrate that a combined NE and ablation treatment technique for liver tumors is feasible, resulting in deposition of nanoparticles in and around the tumor. Depending on the ablative energy applied, different effects are seen on nanoparticle localization and structure. These effects should be considered when designing nanoparticles for use in combination with ablation technologies. PMID:27305763

  3. PET/CT for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, Irene; Devic, Slobodan; Hickeson, Marc; Roberge, David; Turcotte, Robert E.; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To study the possibility of incorporating positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) information into radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We studied 17 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy at our institution from 2005 to 2007. All patients had a high-grade STS and had had a staging PET/CT scan. For each patient, an MRI-based gross tumor volume (GTV), considered to be the contemporary standard for radiotherapy treatment planning, was outlined on a T1-gadolinium enhanced axial MRI (GTV{sub MRI}), and a second set of GTVs were outlined using different threshold values on PET images (GTV{sub PET}). PET-based target volumes were compared with the MRI-based GTV. Threshold values for target contouring were determined as a multiple (from 2 to 10 times) of the background soft tissue uptake values (B) sampled over healthy tissue. Results: PET-based GTVs contoured using a threshold value of 2 or 2.5 most closely resembled the GTV{sub MRI} volumes. Higher threshold values lead to PET volumes much smaller than the GTV{sub MRI}. The standard deviations between the average volumes of GTV{sub PET} and GTV{sub MRI} ratios for all thresholds were large, ranging from 36% for 2 xB up to 93% for 10 xB. Maximum uptake-to-background ratio correlated poorly with the maximum standardized uptake values. Conclusions: It is unlikely that PET/CT will make a significant contribution in GTV definition for radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with STS using threshold methods on PET images. Future studies will focus on molecular imaging and tumor physiology.

  4. The usefulness of F-18 FDG PET/CT-mammography for preoperative staging of breast cancer: comparison with conventional PET/CT and MR-mammography

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Ha; Lim, Seok Tae; Han, Yeon-Hee; Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Yun-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Sohn, Myung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy of an integrated Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) PET/CT-mammography (mammo-PET/CT) with conventional torso PET/CT (supine-PET/CT) and MR-mammography for initial assessment of breast cancer patients. Patients and methods Forty women (52.0 ± 12.0 years) with breast cancer who underwent supine-PET/CT, mammo-PET/CT, and MR-mammography from April 2009 to August 2009 were enrolled in the study. We compared the size of the tumour, tumour to chest wall distance, tumour to skin distance, volume of axillary fossa, and number of meta-static axillary lymph nodes between supine-PET/CT and mammo-PET/CT. Next, we assessed the difference of focality of primary breast tumour and tumour size in mammo-PET/CT and MR-mammography. Histopathologic findings served as the standard of reference. Results In the comparison between supine-PET/CT and mammo-PET/CT, significant differences were found in the tumour size (supine-PET/CT: 1.3 ± 0.6 cm, mammo-PET/CT: 1.5 ± 0.6 cm, p < 0.001), tumour to thoracic wall distance (1.8 ± 0.9 cm, 2.2 ± 2.1 cm, p < 0.001), and tumour to skin distance (1.5 ± 0.8 cm, 2.1 ± 1.4 cm, p < 0.001). The volume of axillary fossa was significantly wider in mammo-PET/CT than supine-PET/CT (21.7 ± 8.7 cm3 vs. 23.4 ± 10.4 cm3, p = 0.03). Mammo-PET/CT provided more correct definition of the T-stage of the primary tumour than did supine-PET/CT (72.5% vs. 67.5%). No significant difference was found in the number of metastatic axillary lymph nodes. Compared with MR-mammography, mammo-PET/CT provided more correct classification of the focality of lesion than did MR-mammography (95% vs. 90%). In the T-stage, 72.5% of cases with mammo-PET/CT and 70% of cases with MR-mammography showed correspondence with pathologic results. Conclusions Mammo-PET/CT provided more correct definition of the T-stage and evaluation of axillary fossa may also be delineated more clearly than with supine-PET/CT

  5. Burkitt Lymphoma Presented as Acute Lower Back Pain and Revealed by 18F-NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenlu; Chen, Yue; Huang, Zhanwen; Cai, Liang

    2016-05-01

    A 15-year-old man with acute lower back pain for 7 days underwent F-NaF PET/CT to determine the cause of his symptoms. The PET images revealed irregularly increased F activity in the L1 vertebral body without definite sclerotic changes on CT. However, the corresponding CT images revealed an adjacent paravertebral mass extending into the vertebral foramen without elevated activity on PET. A diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma was made after pathological examination. PMID:26825214

  6. Intense uptake evidenced by 18F-FDG PET/CT without a corresponding CT finding--dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Caobelli, Federico; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Guerra, Ugo Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Although 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been widely validated and extensively used in the latest years in clinical practice, interpretation of PET/CT images can be affected by several pitfalls. We here present a case of intense lung uptake in a patient without a corresponding finding on CT images, probably due to a microembolism produced during the injection process and located in small vascular structures of the lung parenchyma. PMID:24610649

  7. PET-CT with MR Fusion: Single Comprehensive Preoperative Metastatic Workup in Head and Neck Malignancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mandlik, Dushyant; Patel, Purvi; Desai, Tushar; Patel, Kaustubh D.

    2015-01-01

    Head neck cancers (HNC) are the sixth most common cancer worldwide. In presence of the complex anatomy of this region, early diagnosis can sometimes be a challenge. At present for the TNM staging, contrast enhanced CT and MRI are the primary imaging modalities for evaluating T stage of HNSCC. Multiple studies suggest that PET/CT might be superior to conventional imaging (CT or MRI) in initial staging and may alter management and treatment especially when distant metastases are discovered. We present a case of a 35-year-old patient who presented to us with an ulcerative lesion on the left buccal mucosa, which was staged as cT2N0M0, using the conventional radiology. But on subsequent imaging by PET-CT with MR-fusion was upstaged to cT4bN0M0, thus completely changing the management of the patient. With the recent advances in technology leading to fusion of MRI images with PET-CT images have combined the benefits of all three imaging modalities and has led to increased sensitivity towards soft tissue and peri-neural invasion of tumours leading to upstaging of primary oral cavity malignancies, altering their management. Accuracy is increased when the information of multiple imaging modalities are analysed together and has the potential of changing the management plan of patients. PMID:26814666

  8. 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Two Cases With Myelodysplastic Syndrome Accompanied by Behçet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kimiteru; Kubota, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, the co-occurrence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and Behçet's disease (BD) has been reported in association with trisomy 8 and HLA 51, with the pathology varying from vasculitis to acute neutrophilic inflammation. We report for the first time about imaging findings of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) in 2 cases having MDS accompanied by BD. In these cases, 18 F-FDG PET/CT images clearly revealed high uptake by bone marrow in MDS and by genital aphthous or ileocecal ulcers in BD. F-FDG PET/CT may be the ideal modality for the detection of comorbidity of MDS and BD. PMID:26909715

  9. Chronic Esophageal Perforation With Periesophageal Abscess Mimicking Malignancy on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-06-01

    A 53-year-old man was admitted because of progressive dysphagia and retrosternal pain for 20 days. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed an irregular submucosal bulge on the distal esophageal wall. A barium swallow showed a triangular-shaped outpouching of contrast material with minimal contained extravasation into the periesophageal area. Enhanced CT showed thickening of the distal esophagus with an area containing air and septa. FDG PET/CT showed intense FDG uptake of the thickened esophageal wall mimicking malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biopsy of the submucosal mass revealed granulation tissue. The imaging and pathologic findings were consistent with chronic esophageal perforation with periesophageal abscess. PMID:26914572

  10. Hepatoblastoma evaluated by 18F-fluoromethyl choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bieze, Matthanja; van Gulik, Thomas M; Bennink, Roelof J

    2013-02-01

    Hepatoblastoma is a rare carcinoma mostly seen in children. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection and adjuvant chemotherapy is the optimal treatment. We present the case of an 18-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, and fatigue. MRI showed 3 hepatic lesions with high signal intensity on arterial phase T1-weighted images and slight washout on the late phase, suggestive for hepatocellular carcinoma. Laboratory examinations revealed plasma α-feto-protein of 114,245 μg/L. Subsequent baseline and posttreatment F-fluoromethyl choline PET/CT were performed to possibly evaluate extent of the disease and assess disease response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23334143

  11. 18F-FDG PET/CT in multicentric Castleman disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiexin; Yang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by unexplained enlarged lymph nodes. According to lymph nodes distribution it contains two types of single-centric and multicentric (more than one site) disease. Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is rare, and shows unspecific manifestation with high misdiagnosis rate. Here we reported a case of MCD in a 43-year-old male. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging demonstrated higher FDG uptake in multiple lymph nodes and slightly FDG uptake in spleen and bone marrow. Right inguinal Lymph node biopsy was taken and the results confirmed CD. PMID:26904580

  12. Grover disease (transient acantholytic dermatosis) in acute myeloid leukemia on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongyun June; Clark, Lindsey N; Deloney, Linda A; McDonald, James E

    2014-02-01

    A 48-year-old man with a newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia developed purpuric rash on day 6 after chemotherapy. Skin biopsy on day 8 demonstrated Grover disease. Triamcinolone treatment started on day 10 with subjective improvement on day 15. Initial FDG PET/CT on day 12 demonstrated rarely seen diffuse skin uptake that was interpreted as technical artifact and repeated on day 16. Accurately reviewing both PET and CT imaging would prevent confusion between diffuse cutaneous hypermetabolic activity and a technical artifact. Grover disease usually affects the trunk and may be related to the elimination of chemotherapy agents by sweating. PMID:24152615

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT Osteometabolic Activity in Metastatic Parathyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    do Vale, Rômulo Hermeto Bueno; Queiroz, Marcelo Araújo; Coutinho, Artur Martins Novaes; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; de Menezes, Marcos Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Parathyroid cancer is an uncommon type of malignancy, which is frequently associated with poor prognosis. Clinical manifestations are caused by elevated serum calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Diagnostic imaging studies as neck ultrasonography, technetium Tc Tc-sestamibi whole body scintigraphy, CT, and MR are already established tools for this malignancy. Nevertheless, the role of F-FDG PET/CT remains unknown in this scenario, with few published studies in literature. Hence, in this article, we aimed to report an illustrative case of increased skeletal FDG uptake associated with high calcium and PTH levels. PMID:27276208

  14. Renal Cell Carcinoma Arising From Renal Allograft Detected by 18F-FDG PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuehong; Wang, Tie

    2016-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma arising from renal allograft is a rare condition. A 56-year-old man with a history of 3 renal transplantation due to renal failure presented poor appetite and weight loss for 3 months. Possibility of tumor of unknown origin was suspected. For this reason, an FDG PET/CT was performed, and the images showed a hypermetabolic focus in the lower pole of the left renal transplant, suggestive of a malignant lesion. Subsequent pathological examination following allograft nephrectomy confirmed grade 4 renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26825198

  15. Polysplenia Syndrome With Splenic and Skeletal Muscle Metastases From Thyroid Carcinoma Evaluated by FDG PET/CT: Case Report and Literature Review: A Care-Compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Li, Zu-Gui; Lin, Zhi-Chun; Mu, Hai-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome (PSS) is a rare congenital abnormality. Metastases to spleen and skeletal muscle from differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) are also extremely rare. Our case report aims to present an interesting case of PSS associated with splenic metastasis (SM) and skeletal muscle metastasis (SMM) from advanced papillary thyroid carcinoma which was evaluated on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). An 84-year-old Chinese man was admitted with the history of multiple enlarged masses in bilateral neck, right axillary, and inguinal areas for >2 months. The results of ultrasonography examination were highly suggestive of malignancy. The histological results of the following biopsy were consistent with papillary thyroid carcinoma with involvement of multiple regional lymph nodes. He was referred for an FDG PET/CT imaging to evaluate the situation. FDG PET/CT showed that an intense FDG-avid thyroid mass with widespread regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases in the body. Unexpected sites of metastases were detected in the spleens and skeletal muscles. Most interestingly, FDG PET/CT imaging also described the typical imaging findings of PSS including the 2 right-sided spleens, azygos and hemiazygos continuation of inferior vena cava (IVC), right-sided stomach, middle line liver, a short pancreas, preduodenal portal vein (PPV), and malrotation of gut. Whole body FDG PET/CT imaging can accurately evaluate the situation of DTC by detecting regional lymph node involvement, common and rare sites of distant metastases which are closely related to staging, management, and prognosis of this disease. Whole-body FDG PET/CT is also valuable in demonstrating the typical imaging features of PSS. PMID:26825891

  16. (18)F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Manca, Gianpiero; Vanzi, Eleonora; Rubello, Domenico; Giammarile, Francesco; Grassetto, Gaia; Wong, Ka Kit; Perkins, Alan C; Colletti, Patrick M; Volterrani, Duccio

    2016-07-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. (18)F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of (18)F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited "quantification" to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of "true" quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical (18)F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and "personalized" quantification techniques. PMID:26780912

  17. Potential impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on surgical approach for operable squamous cell cancer of middle-to-lower esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sujing; Zhu, Hui; Li, Wanghu; Zhang, Baijiang; Ma, Li; Guo, Zhijun; Huang, Yong; Song, Pingping; Yu, Jinming; Guo, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is reported to have a significant advantage over CT for staging esophageal cancer (EC). However, whether PET/CT may play a useful role in guiding surgical approach remains undetermined. Methods Patients with potentially resectable squamous cell EC were randomized into either PET/CT group or CT group. The surgical data and survival outcomes were compared. Results Compared to the CT group, the right-sided approach was more frequently used (42.6% versus 25.5%, P=0.065) in the PET/CT group in order to allow surgical access to radiographically suspicious lymph nodes inaccessible from the left, thus enabling the removal of more involved lymph nodes (2.83 versus 1.76; P=0.039) as well as their stations (1.65 versus 1.08; P=0.042). Although the overall survival between the two groups was similar, the PET/CT group had a longer disease-free survival (DFS) than the CT group (27.1 months versus 18.9 months; P=0.019), especially in the subgroup of node-positive patients (22.5 months versus 13.5 months; P=0.02). Preoperative imaging arm was the only prognostic factor found to independently influence DFS. Conclusion For patients with middle-to-lower EC, surgical approaches directed by PET/CT may increase the likelihood of complete resection and affect DFS. PMID:26955283

  18. PET CT Identifies Reactivation Risk in Cynomolgus Macaques with Latent M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Maiello, Pauline; Gideon, Hannah P.; Cadena, Anthony M.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Gregg, Robert; O’Malley, Melanie; Fillmore, Daniel; Frye, L. James; Rutledge, Tara; DiFazio, Robert M.; Janssen, Christopher; Klein, Edwin; Andersen, Peter L.; Fortune, Sarah M.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection presents across a spectrum in humans, from latent infection to active tuberculosis. Among those with latent tuberculosis, it is now recognized that there is also a spectrum of infection and this likely contributes to the variable risk of reactivation tuberculosis. Here, functional imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxygluose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET CT) of cynomolgus macaques with latent M. tuberculosis infection was used to characterize the features of reactivation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF) neutralization and determine which imaging characteristics before TNF neutralization distinguish reactivation risk. PET CT was performed on latently infected macaques (n = 26) before and during the course of TNF neutralization and a separate set of latently infected controls (n = 25). Reactivation occurred in 50% of the latently infected animals receiving TNF neutralizing antibody defined as development of at least one new granuloma in adjacent or distant locations including extrapulmonary sites. Increased lung inflammation measured by PET and the presence of extrapulmonary involvement before TNF neutralization predicted reactivation with 92% sensitivity and specificity. To define the biologic features associated with risk of reactivation, we used these PET CT parameters to identify latently infected animals at high risk for reactivation. High risk animals had higher cumulative lung bacterial burden and higher maximum lesional bacterial burdens, and more T cells producing IL-2, IL-10 and IL-17 in lung granulomas as compared to low risk macaques. In total, these data support that risk of reactivation is associated with lung inflammation and higher bacterial burden in macaques with latent Mtb infection. PMID:27379816

  19. MicroPET/CT Colonoscopy in long-lived Min mouse using NM404

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Matthew B.; Halberg, Richard B.; Schutten, Melissa M.; Weichert, Jamey P.

    2009-02-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of death in the US, even though many cases are preventable if tumors are detected early. One technique to promote screening is Computed Tomography Colonography (CTC). NM404 is a second generation phospholipid ether analogue which has demonstrated selective uptake and prolonged retention in 43/43 types of malignant tumors but not inflammatory sites or premalignant lesions. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate (SWR x B6 )F1.Min mice as a preclinical model to test MicroPET/CT dual modality virtual colonoscopy. Each animal was given an IV injection of 124I-NM404 (100 uCi) 24, 48 and 96 hours prior to scanning on a dedicated microPET/CT system. Forty million counts were histogrammed in 3D and reconstructed using an OSEM 2D algorithm. Immediately after PET acquisition, a 93 m volumetric CT was acquired at 80 kVp, 800 uA and 350 ms exposures. Following CT, the mouse was sacrificed. The entire intestinal tract was excised, washed, insufflated, and scanned ex vivo A total of eight tissue samples from the small intestine were harvested: 5 were benign adenomas, 2 were malignant adenocarcinomas, and 1 was a Peyer's patch (lymph tissue) . The sites of these samples were positioned on CT and PET images based on morphological cues and the distance from the anus. Only 1/8 samples showed tracer uptake. several hot spots in the microPET image were not chosen for histology. (SWR x B6)F1.Min mice develop benign and malignant tumors, making this animal model a strong candidate for future dual modality microPET/CT virtual colonography studies.

  20. SU-E-J-254: Evaluating the Role of Mid-Treatment and Post-Treatment FDG-PET/CT in Predicting Progression-Free Survival and Distant Metastasis of Anal Cancer Patients Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Wang, J; Chuong, M; D’Souza, W; Choi, W; Lu, W; Latifi, K; Hoffe, S; Moros, E; Saeed, Nadia; Tan, S; Shridhar, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of mid-treatment and post-treatment FDG-PET/CT in predicting progression-free survival (PFS) and distant metastasis (DM) of anal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 17 anal cancer patients treated with CRT were retrospectively studied. The median prescription dose was 56 Gy (range, 50–62.5 Gy). All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans before and after CRT. 16 of the 17 patients had an additional FDG-PET/CT image at 3–5 weeks into the treatment (denoted as mid-treatment FDG-PET/CT). 750 features were extracted from these three sets of scans, which included both traditional PET/CT measures (SUVmax, SUVpeak, tumor diameters, etc.) and spatialtemporal PET/CT features (comprehensively quantify a tumor’s FDG uptake intensity and distribution, spatial variation (texture), geometric property and their temporal changes relative to baseline). 26 clinical parameters (age, gender, TNM stage, histology, GTV dose, etc.) were also analyzed. Advanced analytics including methods to select an optimal set of predictors and a model selection engine, which identifies the most accurate machine learning algorithm for predictive analysis was developed. Results: Comparing baseline + mid-treatment PET/CT set to baseline + posttreatment PET/CT set, 14 predictors were selected from each feature group. Same three clinical parameters (tumor size, T stage and whether 5-FU was held during any cycle of chemotherapy) and two traditional measures (pre- CRT SUVmin and SUVmedian) were selected by both predictor groups. Different mix of spatial-temporal PET/CT features was selected. Using the 14 predictors and Naive Bayes, mid-treatment PET/CT set achieved 87.5% accuracy (2 PFS patients misclassified, all local recurrence and DM patients correctly classified). Post-treatment PET/CT set achieved 94.0% accuracy (all PFS and DM patients correctly predicted, 1 local recurrence patient misclassified) with logistic regression, neural network or

  1. Effectiveness of Breast MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the Preoperative Staging of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma versus Ductal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Na Young; Kim, Sung Hun; Seo, Ye Young; Oh, Jin Kyoung; Choi, Hyun Su; You, Won Jong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) for the preoperative staging of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast and compared the results with those of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Methods The study included pathologically proven 32 ILCs and 73 IDCs. We compared clinical and histopathological characteristics and the diagnostic performances of MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the primary mass, additional ipsilateral and/or contralateral lesion(s), and axillary lymph node metastasis between the ILC and IDC groups. Results Primary ILCs were greater in size, but demonstrated lower maximum standardized uptake values than IDCs. All primary masses were detected on MRI. The detection rate for ILCs (75.0%) was lower than that for IDCs (83.6%) on 18F-FDG PET/CT, but the difference was not significant. For additional ipsilateral lesion(s), the sensitivities and specificities of MRI were 87.5% and 58.3% for ILC and 100.0% and 66.7% for IDC, respectively; whereas the sensitivities and specificities of 18F-FDG PET/CT were 0% and 91.7% for ILC and 37.5% and 94.7% for IDC, respectively. The sensitivity of 18F-FDG PET/CT for ipsilateral lesion(s) was significantly lower in the ILC group than the IDC group. The sensitivity for ipsilateral lesion(s) was significantly higher with MRI; however, specificity was higher with 18F-FDG PET/CT in both tumor groups. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic performance for additional contralateral lesion(s) or axillary lymph node metastasis on MRI or 18F-FDG PET/CT for ILC versus IDC. Conclusion The MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT detection rates for the primary cancer do not differ between the ILC and IDC groups. Although 18F-FDG PET/CT demonstrates lower sensitivity for primary and additional ipsilateral lesions, it shows higher specificity for additional ipsilateral lesions, and could play a complementary role in

  2. The role of early 18F-FDG PET/CT in therapeutic management and ongoing risk stratification of high/intermediate-risk thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Triviño Ibáñez, E M; Muros, M A; Torres Vela, E; Llamas Elvira, J M

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the role in ongoing risk stratification of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) performed early after radioactive iodine (RAI) ablation in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). The aim of the study is to investigate whether 18F-FDG PET/CT performed early after RAI ablation is useful to detect disease and to influence therapy and ongoing risk stratification. Patients with high/intermediate risk of recurrent DTC were included. 18F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed within 6 months after RAI ablation. We confirmed results with other imaging techniques, pathology reports, or follow-up. We classified the patient response as excellent, acceptable, or incomplete. Modified Hicks criteria were used to evaluate clinical impact. We included 81 patients with high/intermediate risk of recurrent DTC. Forty-one (50.6 %) had positive uptake in 18F-FDG PET/CT, with negative (131)I whole-body scan ((131)I WBS). Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT were 92.5, 90.2, and 91.4 %, respectively. 18F-FDG PET/CT results had an impact on therapy in 38.3 % of patients. One year after initial therapy, 45.7 % showed excellent response, 8.6 % acceptable response, and 45.7 % incomplete response. A statistically significant relationship was found between negative 18F-FDG PET/CT and excellent response (80 vs. 12.2 %, p < 0.001; OR 52.8). 18F-FDG PET/CT scan performed early in surveillance of patients with high/intermediate-risk thyroid carcinoma provides important additional information not available with conventional follow-up methods and had a high impact on therapy. A negative 18F-FDG PET/CT predicts an excellent response to therapy in the new ongoing risk stratification. PMID:26224589

  3. Is [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose FDG-PET/CT better than ct alone for the preoperative lymph node staging of muscle invasive bladder cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, Mete; Pravin, Nayak; Anish, Bhattacharya; Nandita, Kakkar; Arup, Mandal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate whether the use of [F-18]-FDG-PET/CT can accurately predict pelvic lymph node metastasis in patients with muscle invasive TCC of the bladder undergoing radical cystectomy. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer had undergone FDG-PET/CT scan from the skull base to the mid-thighs after IV injection of 6.5MBq (Mega-Becquerel)/Kg of FDG. After intravenous hydration IV furosemide was given to overcome the difficulties posed by urinary excretion of 18F-FDG. PET/CT data were analyzed as PET and CT images studied separately as well as fused PET/CT images. The imaging findings were correlated with the histopathology of the nodes (gold standard). Results: CT and FDG-PET had demonstrated positive lymph nodes in 9 & 8 patients respectively. Among the 15 patients 3 had documented metastasis on histopathology. Both CT and PET could detect the nodes in all these 3 patients (100% sensitivity). Nodes were histologically negative amongst 6&5 patients who had node involvement by CT and PET respectively. Therefore, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) & negative predictive value (NPV) for CT and PET/CT were 50%, 33.3%, 100% and 58.3%, 37.5%, 100% respectively. Conclusion: The theoretical advantage of this cutting edge technology for whole body imaging has not been translated into clinical practice as we found minimal advantage of combined FDG-PET/CT over CT alone for nodal staging of muscle invasive bladder cancer. This may be due to substantial overlap between standardized uptake values (SUVs) from active inflammatory processes with those of malignant lesion. PMID:27256176

  4. [Neurolymphomatosis: diagnosis of extension and assessment of response to treatment with PET-CT].

    PubMed

    Durán, C; Infante, J R; Serrano, J; Rayo, J I; García, L; Domínguez, M L; Sánchez, R

    2009-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis is a rare neurological manifestation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and it may be its first and sole manifestation. Diagnosis is often difficult and nerve biopsy is generally required. However, this it is not always possible to perform or is not conclusive. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman diagnosed with giant B-cell NHL. After 6 cycles of chemotherapy, imaging and molecular biology techniques showed complete remission. At four months after treatment, the patient complained of low back pain of radicular distribution. CT and MRI imaging showed signs of lymphoproliferative activity of L5 and also lesions to thoracic nerve roots. A PET-CT was requested in order to complete the diagnosis and plan the treatment. Imaging confirmed the presence of tumor recurrence with neurolymphomatosis and also indicated lesions on the chest and abdominal level. Thus, it was decided to start a new line of chemotherapy, without performing the histological study through biopsy. This case illustrates the important role played by PET-CT imaging in neurolymphomatosis diagnosis. This technique can help the patient avoid more aggressive procedures, such as a biopsy, and can also be useful in the follow-up and assessment of the treatment response to NHL-diagnosed patients. PMID:19864049

  5. A New Method of Detecting Pulmonary Nodules with PET/CT Based on an Improved Watershed Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Ji, Guohua; Qiang, Yan; Han, Xiaohong; Pei, Bo; Shi, Zhenghao

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is widely performed for staging solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). However, the diagnostic efficacy of SPNs based on PET/CT is not optimal. Here, we propose a method of detection based on PET/CT that can differentiate malignant and benign SPNs with few false-positives. Method Our proposed method combines the features of positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). A dynamic threshold segmentation method was used to identify lung parenchyma in CT images and suspicious areas in PET images. Then, an improved watershed method was used to mark suspicious areas on the CT image. Next, the support vector machine (SVM) method was used to classify SPNs based on textural features of CT images and metabolic features of PET images to validate the proposed method. Results Our proposed method was more efficient than traditional methods and methods based on the CT or PET features alone (sensitivity 95.6%; average of 2.9 false positives per scan). PMID:25853496

  6. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Integrated PET/CT-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, Matthew R.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Schultz, Christopher J.; Michel, Michelle A.; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang Dian

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: We previously reported the advantages of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) fused with CT for radiotherapy planning over CT alone in head and neck carcinoma (HNC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the predictive value of PET for patients receiving PET/CT-guided definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From December 2002 to August 2006, 42 patients received PET/CT imaging as part of staging and radiotherapy planning. Clinical outcomes including locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, death, and treatment-related toxicities were collected retrospectively and analyzed for disease-free and overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence. Results: Median follow-up from initiation of treatment was 32 months. Overall survival and disease-free survival were 82.8% and 71.0%, respectively, at 2 years, and 74.1% and 66.9% at 3 years. Of the 42 patients, seven recurrences were identified (three LR, one DM, three both LR and DM). Mean time to recurrence was 9.4 months. Cumulative risk of recurrence was 18.7%. The maximum standard uptake volume (SUV) of primary tumor, adenopathy, or both on PET did not correlate with recurrence, with mean values of 12.0 for treatment failures vs. 11.7 for all patients. Toxicities identified in those patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were also evaluated. Conclusions: A high level of disease control combined with favorable toxicity profiles was achieved in a cohort of HNC patients receiving PET/CT fusion guided radiotherapy plus/minus chemotherapy. Maximum SUV of primary tumor and/or adenopathy was not predictive of risk of disease recurrence.

  8. Utility of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hulikal, Narendra; Gajjala, Sivanath Reddy; Kalawat, Teck Chand; Kottu, Radhika; Amancharla Yadagiri, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    In India up to 50 % of breast cancer patients still present as locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The conventional methods of metastatic work up include physical examination, bone scan, chest & abdominal imaging, and biochemical tests. It is likely that the conventional staging underestimates the extent of initial spread and there is a need for more sophisticated staging procedure. The PET/CT can detect extra-axillary and occult distant metastases and also aid in predicting response to chemotherapy at an early point in time. To evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT in initial staging and response assessment of patients with LABC receiving NACT. A prospective study of all biopsy confirmed female patients diagnosed with LABC receiving NACT from April 2013 to May 2014. The conventional work up included serum chemistry, CECT chest and abdomen and bone scan. A baseline whole body PET/CT was done in all patients. A repeat staging evaluation and a whole body PET/CT was done after 2/3rd cycle of NACT in non-responders and after 3/4 cycles in clinical responders. The histopathology report of the operative specimen was used to document the pathological response. The FDG PET/CT reported distant metastases in 11 of 38 patients, where as conventional imaging revealed metastases in only 6. Almost all the distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were detected with PET/CT, which showed additional sites of metastasis in 3 patients. In 2 patients, PET/CT detected osteolytic bone metastasis which were not detected by bone scan. In 5 patients PET CT detected N3 disease which were missed on conventional imaging. A total of 14 patients had second PET/CT done to assess the response to NACT and 11 patients underwent surgery. Two patients had complete pathological response. Of these 1 patient had complete metabolic and morphologic response and other had complete metabolic and partial morphologic response on second PET/CT scan. The 18 FDG PET/CT can detect more number of

  9. Uterine Intravenous Leiomyomatosis with Intracardiac Extension and Pulmonary Benign Metastases on FDG PET/CT: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Chun; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Cui, Lan-Lan

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 50-day history of irregular vaginal bleeding and lower abdominal pain. Ultrasound indicated an extremely large occupying lesion in the pelvic cavity that was highly suggestive of malignancy. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was performed to further assess the nature of pelvic abnormality. PET/CT images demonstrated a diffusely lobulated mass ranging from cervix up to the inferior pole of kidneys with mild FDG uptake. Simultaneously, multiple nodules in bilateral lungs and a hypodense lesion in the right ventricle were shown without FDG-avidity. Based on the imaging results, the presumptive diagnosis was uterine intravenous leiomyomatosis with intracardiac extension and pulmonary benign metastases, which was subsequently confirmed by MRI and the lesion biopsy. PMID:26957916

  10. Hybrid PET/CT for noninvasive pharmacokinetic evaluation of dynamic PolyConjugates, a synthetic siRNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mudd, Sarah R; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Blokhin, Andrei V; Weichert, Jamey P; Wolff, Jon A

    2010-07-21

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging can be used to gain insights into a synthetic siRNA delivery system targeted to the liver. Either siRNA or the delivery vehicle was labeled with (64)Cu via 1, 4, 7, 10- tetraazacyclododecane- 1, 4, 7, 10- tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelation. This study confirmed that the siRNA delivery system was successfully targeted to the liver. Incorporation of the siRNA into the delivery system protected the siRNA from renal filtration long enough so that the siRNA could be delivered to the liver. PET/CT imaging was important for confirming biodistribution and for determining differences in the distribution of labeled siRNA, siRNA incorporated into the delivery system, and the delivery system without siRNA. PMID:20552976

  11. Malignant extrarenal rhabdoid tumor of the spine: staging and evaluation of response to therapy with F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; Ciarallo, Anthony; Hickeson, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Malignant extrarenal rhabdoid tumor (ERRT) is a very rare type of soft-tissue sarcoma with a reported incidence of 0.3% of all soft-tissue sarcomas. Only 7 cases of spinal malignant ERRT have been reported in the literature, and to our knowledge, F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging for staging and evaluation of response to therapy for these tumors has not been previously described. This is a case of an 8-month-old boy with malignant ERRT of the spine, who was staged with F-18 FDG PET/CT, and had his tumor burden assessed with PET/CT after chemotherapy, which altered the subsequent chemotherapy regimen. PMID:21637073

  12. (18)F-DOPA PET/CT for assessment of response to induction chemotherapy in a child with high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Arnoldo; Lopci, Egesta; Foppiani, Luca; Morana, Giovanni; Conte, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    Functional imaging plays a crucial role in the assessment of neuroblastoma. The evaluation of response to induction chemotherapy is a cornerstone in scheduling proper treatment management in patients affected by high-risk neuroblastoma. (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine has been recognized as the radiopharmaceutical of choice in neuroblastoma assessment. To date, the clinical role of PET/CT in pediatric malignancy is not well established.(18)F-DOPA-PET/CT has been recently used in neuroblastoma, and compared with (123)I-MIBG-scan. Scant new data are available about the role of this tool in the evaluation of treatment response after induction chemotherapy. We investigate the role of (18)F-DOPA-PET/CT in characterizing the response to induction chemotherapy in a child affected by high-risk-neuroblastoma, in whom the rare association of (123)I-MIBG-negative primary tumor and MIBG-positive bone marrow metastases was observed. PMID:24247818

  13. [18F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of liver cyst infection in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and fever of unknown origin].

    PubMed

    Banzo, J; Ubieto, M A; Gil, D; Prats, E; Razola, P; Tardín, L; Andrés, A; Rambalde, E F; Ayala, S M; Cáncer, L; Velilla, J

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis, localization and treatment of infected cysts in the kidney or liver of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) remain a clinical challenge. We report the findings of (18)F-FDG PET-CT in an ADPKD diagnosed patient who required renal transplantation five years before and in his follow up presented repeated episodes of bacteriemia without known focus on radiological tests performed. The (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan showed numerous hypermetabolic images with focal or ring-shaped morphology related to the content and the wall of some hepatic cysts. The increased metabolic activity was localized on segments VI and VII. We proceeded to drainage of one cyst in segment VI, removing 110 cc of purulent fluid which grew E. Coli BLEE. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan should be included in the diagnostic algorithm for detecting infected liver cysts in patients with ADPKD and fever of unknown origin. PMID:23153986

  14. Inflammation, Atherosclerosis, and Coronary Artery Disease: PET/CT for the Evaluation of Atherosclerosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Alie, Nadia; Eldib, Mootaz; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a prevalent cardiovascular disease marked by inflammation and the formation of plaque within arterial walls. As the disease progresses, there is an increased risk of major cardiovascular events. Owing to the nature of atherosclerosis, it is imperative to develop methods to further understand the physiological implications and progression of the disease. The combination of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has proven to be promising for the evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques and inflammation within the vessel walls. The utilization of the radiopharmaceutical tracer, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG), with PET/CT is invaluable in understanding the pathophysiological state involved in atherosclerosis. In this review, we will discuss the use of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT imaging for the evaluation of atherosclerosis and inflammation both in preclinical and clinical studies. The potential of more specific novel tracers will be discussed. Finally, we will touch on the potential benefits of using the newly introduced combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for non-invasive imaging of atherosclerosis. PMID:25674025

  15. Inflammation, Atherosclerosis, and Coronary Artery Disease: PET/CT for the Evaluation of Atherosclerosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Alie, Nadia; Eldib, Mootaz; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a prevalent cardiovascular disease marked by inflammation and the formation of plaque within arterial walls. As the disease progresses, there is an increased risk of major cardiovascular events. Owing to the nature of atherosclerosis, it is imperative to develop methods to further understand the physiological implications and progression of the disease. The combination of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has proven to be promising for the evaluation of atherosclerotic plaques and inflammation within the vessel walls. The utilization of the radiopharmaceutical tracer, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), with PET/CT is invaluable in understanding the pathophysiological state involved in atherosclerosis. In this review, we will discuss the use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT imaging for the evaluation of atherosclerosis and inflammation both in preclinical and clinical studies. The potential of more specific novel tracers will be discussed. Finally, we will touch on the potential benefits of using the newly introduced combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for non-invasive imaging of atherosclerosis. PMID:25674025

  16. Evaluation of lymph node status after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: comparison of diagnostic performance of ultrasound, MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    You, S; Kang, D K; Jung, Y S; An, Y-S; Jeon, G S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of ultrasound, MRI and fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET)/CT for the diagnosis of metastatic axillary lymph node (ALN) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and to find out histopathological factors affecting the diagnostic performance of these imaging modalities. Methods: From January 2012 to November 2014, 191 consecutive patients with breast cancer who underwent NAC before surgery were retrospectively reviewed. We included 139 patients with ALN metastasis that was confirmed on fine needle aspiration or core needle biopsy at initial diagnosis. Results: After NAC, 39 (28%) patients showed negative conversion of ALN on surgical specimens of sentinel lymph node (LN) or ALN. The sensitivity of ultrasound, MRI and PET/CT was 50% (48/96), 72% (70/97) and 22% (16/73), respectively. The specificity of ultrasound, MRI and PET/CT was 77% (30/39), 54% (21/39) and 85% (22/26), respectively. The Az value of combination of ultrasound and PET/CT was the highest (0.634) followed by ultrasound (0.626) and combination of ultrasound, MRI and PET/CT (0.617). The size of tumour deposit in LN and oestrogen receptor was significantly associated with the diagnostic performance of ultrasound (p < 0.001 and p = 0.009, respectively) and MRI (p = 0.045 and p = 0.036, respectively). The percentage diameter decrease, size of tumour deposit in LN, progesterone receptor, HER2 and histological grade were significantly associated with the diagnostic performance of PET/CT (p = 0.023, p = 0.002, p = 0.036, p = 0.044 and p = 0.008, respectively). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, size of tumour deposit within LN was identified as being independently associated with diagnostic performance of ultrasound [odds ratio, 13.07; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.95–57.96] and PET/CT (odds ratio, 6.47; 95% CI, 1.407–29.737). Conclusion: Combination of three imaging modalities

  17. Tumor heterogeneity on 18F-FDG-PET/CT for response monitoring in non-small cell lung cancer treated with erlotinib

    PubMed Central

    van Gool, Matthijs H.; Aukema, Tjeerd S.; Sinaasappel, Michiel; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.

    2016-01-01

    Response monitoring using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography acquired together with low dose computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) textural features has potential in targeted treatment with erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Patients with substantial decrease of metabolic activity during erlotinib treatment will probably benefit from continued treatment. However, various aspects of the method (quantification tools, cut-off values, etc.) need to be standardized before the software becomes widely available in a similar manner as standardized uptake value (SUV) measurements. Heterogeneity on FDG-PET/CT opened an additional window for innovation but simultaneously a new challenge for molecular hybrid imaging. PMID:27076970

  18. [Findings of the (18)F-FDG PET-CT in a cardiac angiosarcoma complicated by a cardiac rupture].

    PubMed

    Santiago-Chinchilla, Alicia; Ruiz-Carazo, Eduardo; Moral-Ruiz, Antonio; Testart Dardel, Nathalie; Martínez-Martínez, Alberto; López-Fernández, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the heart are a rare condition. The most common type is the cardiac angiosarcoma. The symptoms of this disease are very nonspecific and can be very difficult to diagnose by conventional imaging techniques. We report the case of a male patient with cardiac angiosarcoma who also had a rare complication, this being cardiac rupture, which required the use of (18)F-FDG PET-CT to demonstrate the mass malignancy and to reach a definitive diagnosis. PMID:23810660

  19. Metabolic characteristics distinguishing intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: a negative pilot study of 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT clarified by transcriptomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Sandi A; Okimoto, Gordon S; Chan, Owen TM; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Wong, Linda L

    2016-01-01

    PET using fluorine-18 fluorocholine (18F-fluorocholine) may detect malignancies that involve altered choline metabolism. While 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT has shown greater sensitivity for detecting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) than 18F-fluoro-D-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT, it is not known whether it can also detect intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), a less common form of primary liver cancer. Clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic data from 5 patients with ICC and 23 patients with HCC from a diagnostic trial of liver 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT imaging were analyzed to preliminarily evaluate 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT for ICC. Imaging was correlated with whole-genome expression profiling to identify molecular pathways associated with tumor phenotypes. On PET/CT, all ICC tumors demonstrated low 18F-fluorocholine uptake with a significantly lower tumor to mean background uptake ratio than HCC tumors (0.69 vs. 1.64, p < 0.0001), but no corresponding significant difference in liver parenchyma uptake of 18F-fluorocholine between ICC and HCC patients (8.0 vs. 7.7, p = 0.74). Two ICC patients demonstrated increased tumor metabolism on FDG PET/CT, while immunohistochemical analysis of ICC tumors revealed overexpression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) and hexokinase indicating a hyper-glycolytic phenotype. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulation of farnesoid-X-receptor and other lipid pathways in ICC relative to HCC, and up-regulation of glycolytic pathways and GLUT-1 by HIF1α. These results imply limited utility of 18F-fluorocholine in ICC, however, significant metabolic differences between ICC, HCC, and parenchymal liver tissue may still provide clues about the underlying liver pathology. Gene and protein expression analysis support hyperglycolysis as a more dominant metabolic trait of ICC. PMID:27069767

  20. Metabolic characteristics distinguishing intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: a negative pilot study of (18)F-fluorocholine PET/CT clarified by transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwee, Sandi A; Okimoto, Gordon S; Chan, Owen Tm; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Wong, Linda L

    2016-01-01

    PET using fluorine-18 fluorocholine ((18)F-fluorocholine) may detect malignancies that involve altered choline metabolism. While (18)F-fluorocholine PET/CT has shown greater sensitivity for detecting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) than (18)F-fluoro-D-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT, it is not known whether it can also detect intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), a less common form of primary liver cancer. Clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic data from 5 patients with ICC and 23 patients with HCC from a diagnostic trial of liver (18)F-fluorocholine PET/CT imaging were analyzed to preliminarily evaluate (18)F-fluorocholine PET/CT for ICC. Imaging was correlated with whole-genome expression profiling to identify molecular pathways associated with tumor phenotypes. On PET/CT, all ICC tumors demonstrated low (18)F-fluorocholine uptake with a significantly lower tumor to mean background uptake ratio than HCC tumors (0.69 vs. 1.64, p < 0.0001), but no corresponding significant difference in liver parenchyma uptake of (18)F-fluorocholine between ICC and HCC patients (8.0 vs. 7.7, p = 0.74). Two ICC patients demonstrated increased tumor metabolism on FDG PET/CT, while immunohistochemical analysis of ICC tumors revealed overexpression of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) and hexokinase indicating a hyper-glycolytic phenotype. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulation of farnesoid-X-receptor and other lipid pathways in ICC relative to HCC, and up-regulation of glycolytic pathways and GLUT-1 by HIF1α. These results imply limited utility of (18)F-fluorocholine in ICC, however, significant metabolic differences between ICC, HCC, and parenchymal liver tissue may still provide clues about the underlying liver pathology. Gene and protein expression analysis support hyperglycolysis as a more dominant metabolic trait of ICC. PMID:27069767

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of the staff working in a PET/CT department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalianis, K.; Malamitsi, J.; Gogou, L.; Pagou, M.; Efthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.; Louizï, A.; Georgiou, E.

    2006-12-01

    The dosimetric literature data concerning the medical personnel working in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) departments are limited. Therefore, we measured the radiation dose of the staff working in the first PET/CT department in Greece at the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens HYGEIA—Harvard Medical International. As, for the time being, only 2-deoxy-2-[ 18F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) PET studies are performed, radiation dose measurements concern those derived from dispensing of the radiopharmaceutical as well as from the patients undergoing FDG-PET imaging. Our aim is to develop more effective protective measures against radionuclide exposure. To estimate the effective dose from external exposure, all seven members of the staff (two nurses, two medical physicists, two technologists, one secretary) had TLD badges worn at the upper pocket of their overall, TLD rings on the right hand and digital dosimeters at their upper side pocket. In addition, isodose curves were measured with thermoluminescence detectors for distances of 20, 50, 70 and 100 cm away from patients who had been injected with 18F-FDG. Dose values of the PET/CT staff were measured with digital detectors, TLD badges and TLD rings over the first 8 months for a total of 160 working days of the department's operation, consisting of a workload of about 10-15 patients/week who received 250-420 MBq of 18F-FDG each. Whole - body collective doses and hand doses for the staff were the following: Nurse #1 received 1.6 mSv as a whole body dose and 2,1 as a hand dose, Nurse #2 received 1.9 and 2.4 mSv respectively. For medical physicist #1 the dose values were 1.45 mSv whole body and 1.7 mSv hand dose, for medical physicist #2 1.67 mSv wholebody dose and 1.55 mSv hand dose and for technologists #1 & #2 the whole body doses were 0.7 and 0.64 mSv respectively. Lastly, the secretary received 0.1 mSv whole body dose. These preliminary data have shown that the dose levels of our PET/CT

  2. PET/CT with Fluorodeoxyglucose During Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Travaini, Laura L; Zampino, Maria G; Colandrea, Marzia; Ferrari, Mahila E; Gilardi, Laura; Leonardi, Maria C; Santoro, Luigi; Orecchia, Roberto; Grana, Chiara M

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study is to evaluate the accuracy of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) with Fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) to predict treatment response in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Patients and methods Forty-one LARC patients performed [18F]FDG-PET/CT at baseline (PET0). All patients received continuous capecitabine concomitant to radiotherapy on the pelvis, followed by intermittent capecitabine until two weeks before curative surgery. [18F]FDG-PET/CT was also carried out at 40 Gy-time (PET1) and at the end of neoadjuvant therapy (PET2). PET imaging was analysed semi-quantitatively through the measurement of maximal standardised uptake value (SUVmax) and the tumour volume (TV). Histology was expressed through pTNM and Dworak tumor regression grading. Patients were categorised into responder (downstaging or downsizing) and non-responder (stable or progressive disease by comparison pretreatment parameters with clinical/pathological characteristics posttreatment/after surgery). Logistic regression was used to evaluate SUVmax and TV absolute and percent reduction as predictors of response rate using gender, age, and CEA as covariates. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Survivals were compared by the Log-Rank test. Results Twenty-three responders (9 ypCR, 14 with downstaged disease) and 18 non-responders showed differences in terms of both early and posttreatment SUVmax percent reduction (median comparison: responder = 63.2%, non-responder = 44.2%, p = 0.04 and responder = 76.9%, non-responder = 61.6%, p = 0.06 respectively). The best predictive cut-offs of treatment response for early and posttreatment SUVmax percent reduction were ≥57% and ≥66% from baseline (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01 respectively). Conclusions [18F]FDG-PET/CT is a reliable technique for evaluating therapy response during neoadjuvant

  3. FDG PET/CT in Peritoneal Metastasis From Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Serkan; Asa, Sertac; Kupik, Osman

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men. The prognosis in prostate cancer is greatly worsened by the presence of metastases, which are most commonly found in bone, lung, liver, and brain. The peritoneum is an extremely uncommon metastatic site for prostate cancer, even in autopsy series. We present a case of FDG PET/CT demonstration of peritoneal metastasis from prostate cancer. PMID:27187732

  4. Quantitative evaluation of the memory bias effect in ROC studies with PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Pianou, Nicoletta; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Kafiri, Georgia; Pavlou, Spiros; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the memory bias effect in ROC experiments with tomographic data and, specifically, in the evaluation of two different PET/CT protocols for the detection and diagnosis of recurrent thyroid cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Two readers participated in an ROC experiment that evaluated tomographic images from 43 patients followed up for thyroid cancer recurrence. Readers evaluated first whole body PET/CT scans of the patients and then a combination of whole body and high-resolution head and neck scans of the same patients. The second set was read twice. Once within 48 hours of the first set and the second time at least a month later. The detection and diagnostic performances of the readers in the three reading sessions were assessed with the DBMMRMC and LABMRMC software using the area under the ROC curve as a performance index. Performances were also evaluated by comparing the number and the size of the detected abnormal foci among the three readings. RESULTS. There was no performance difference between first and second treatments. There were statistically significant differences between first and third, and second and third treatments showing that memory can seriously affect the outcome of ROC studies. CONCLUSION. Despite the fact that tomographic data involve numerous image slices per patient, the memory bias effect is present and substantial and should be carefully eliminated from analogous ROC experiments.

  5. Clinical Impact of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in a Patient With Biochemical Recurrence of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Marcelo A; Viana, Publio; Santos, Allan; Bastos, Diogo; Etchebehere, Elba; Cerri, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    A 64-year-old man with history of prostate adenocarcinoma underwent radical prostatectomy in 2003. He remained with undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels until 2014, when he then presented rising serum PSA levels and performed a Tc-MDP bone scan that was negative for metastases. In August 2015, his PSA was 4.89 ng/dL, and restaging images with pelvic MR and F-FDG PET/CT were both negative. Therefore, the patient underwent a Ga-PSMA PET/CT that showed marked tracer uptake in a single mediastinal lymph node. Histopathology demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma secondary to prostate cancer, altering patient management to hormone therapy instead of pelvic radiotherapy. PMID:27276202

  6. Unusual Presentation of Bladder Paraganglioma: Comparison of 131I MIBG SPECT/CT and 68Ga DOTANOC PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Shukla, Jaya; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Extraadrenal chromaffin cell-related tumors or paragangliomas are rare, especially in the bladder, accounting for less than 1% of cases. We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and paroxysmal headache and was found to have a prostatic growth infiltrating the urinary bladder on anatomical imaging. Iodine-131 (131I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) whole-body scanning and subsequently gallium-68 (68Ga) DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The MIBG scan revealed a non-tracer-avid soft-tissue mass, while DOTANOC PET/CT revealed a tracer-avid primary soft-tissue mass involving the urinary bladder and prostate with metastasis to the iliac lymph nodes. He underwent surgical management; histopathology of the surgical specimen revealed a bladder paraganglioma, whereas the prostate was found to be free of tumor. PMID:26912984

  7. Ga-68-DOTATOC: Feasibility of high throughput screening by small animal PET using a clinical high-resolution PET/CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Michael; Weitzel, Thilo; Krause, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    As radio peptide tracers have been developed in recent years for the high sensitive detection of neuroendocrine tumors, still the broad application of other peptides to breast and prostate cancer is missing. A rapid screening of new peptides can, in theory, be based on in vivo screening in animals by PET/CT. To test this hypothesis and to asses the minimum screening time needed per animal, we used the application of Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT in rats as test system. The Ga-68-DOTATOC yields in a hot spot imaging with minimal background. To delineate liver and spleen, we performed PET/CT of 10 animals on a SIEMENS Biograph 16 LSO HIGHREZ after intravenous injection of 1.5 MBq Ga-68-DOTATOC per animal. Animals were mounted in an '18 slot' holding device and scanned for a single-bed position. The emission times for the PET scan was varied from 1 to 20 min. The images were assessed first for "PET only" and afterwards in PET/CT fusion mode. The detection of the two organs was good at emission times down to 1 min in PET/CT fusion mode. In the "PET only" scans, the liver was clearly to be identified down to 1 min emission in all animals. But the spleen could only be delineated only by 1 min of emission in the PET/CT-fusion mode. In conclusion the screening of "hot spot" enriching peptides is feasible. "PET only" is in terms of delineation of small organs by far inferior to PET/CT fusion. If animal tumors are above a diameter of 10 mm small, animal PET/CT using clinical high resolution scanners will enable rapid screening. Even the determination of bio-distributions becomes feasible by using list mode tools. The time for the whole survey of 18 animals including anesthesia, preparation and mounting was approximately 20 min. By use of several holding devices mounted simultaneously, a survey time of less than 1 h for 180 animals can be expected.

  8. Nanoparticles for biomedical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nune, Satish K; Gunda, Padmaja; Thallapally, Praveen K; Lin, Ying-Ying; Forrest, M Laird; Berkland, Cory J

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic nanoparticles are emerging as versatile tools in biomedical applications, particularly in the area of biomedical imaging. Nanoparticles 1 – 100 nm in diameter have dimensions comparable to biological functional units. Diverse surface chemistries, unique magnetic properties, tunable absorption and emission properties, and recent advances in the synthesis and engineering of various nanoparticles suggest their potential as probes for early detection of diseases such as cancer. Surface functionalization has expanded further the potential of nanoparticles as probes for molecular imaging. Objective To summarize emerging research of nanoparticles for biomedical imaging with increased selectivity and reduced nonspecific uptake with increased spatial resolution containing stabilizers conjugated with targeting ligands. Methods This review summarizes recent technological advances in the synthesis of various nanoparticle probes, and surveys methods to improve the targeting of nanoparticles for their application in biomedical imaging. Conclusion Structural design of nanomaterials for biomedical imaging continues to expand and diversify. Synthetic methods have aimed to control the size and surface characteristics of nanoparticles to control distribution, half-life and elimination. Although molecular imaging applications using nanoparticles are advancing into clinical applications, challenges such as storage stability and long-term toxicology should continue to be addressed. PMID:19743894

  9. Diagnostic value of SPECT, PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Al Moudi, M; Sun, Z; Lenzo, N

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to investigate the diagnostic value of SPECT, PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, based on a systematic review. Material and Methods: A search of PubMed/Medline and Sciencedirect databases in the English-language literature published over the last 24 years was performed. Only studies with at least 10 patients comparing SPECT, PET or combined PET/CT with invasive coronary angiography in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (50% stenosis) were included for analysis. Sensitivities and specificities estimates pooled across studies were analysed using a Chi-square test. Results: Twenty-five studies met the selection criteria and were included for the analysis. Ten studies were performed with SPECT alone; while another six studies were performed with PET alone. Five studies were carried out with both PET and SPECT modalities, and the remaining four studies were investigated with integrated PET-CT. The mean value of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of these imaging modalities for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was 82% (95%CI: 76 to 88), 76% (95%CI: 70 to 82) and 83% (95%CI: 77 to 89) for SPECT; 91% (95%CI: 85 to 97), 89% (95%CI: 83 to 95) and 89% (95%CI: 83 to 95) for PET; and 85% (95%CI: 79 to 90), 83% (95%CI: 77 to 89) and 88% (95%CI: 82 to 94) for PET/CT, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of these imaging modalities was dependent on the radiotracers used in these studies, with ammonia resulting in the highest diagnostic value. Conclusion: Our review shows that PET has high diagnostic value for diagnosing coronary artery disease, and this indicates that it is a valuable technique for both detection and prediction of coronary artery disease. PMID:22287989

  10. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range

  11. Diagnostic Utility of PET CT in Thymic Tumours with Emphasis on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET CT in Thymic Neuroendocrine Tumour - Experience at a Tertiary Level Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Shanthly, Nylla; Oommen, Regi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:18 Fluorine-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emis–sion tomography/computed tomography (18F- FDG-PET/CT) is of importance in assessing high-risk thymoma and thymic carcinomas. Detection of advanced thymoma versus thymic carcinoma by routine cross sectional anatomical imaging such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often poses a diagnostic dilemma. In this case series we observed the utility of FDG uptake to predict advanced thymoma and distinguish thymoma from thymic cancer. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 18F- FDG-PET/CT scans of 12 patients (8 males, 4 females); age 24-60yrs with thymic epithelial malignancy from January 2011 to May 2013. FDG activity in lesions was quantified using maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) and correlated with Masaoka staging and WHO classification. All patients fasted 4 hr prior to 18F-FDG PET/CT. Images from vertex to mid-thigh were acquired 60min post injection of 3.7 -4.7 MBq/kg (Mega Becquerel)/kilogram of18F-FDG and SUV max of each tumour was measured. One patient underwent DOTATATE scan, received 138MBq of 68Gallium (68Ga)-DOTATATE injection IV and imaging was done after 60 min. Results: Higher FDG uptake of SUVmax 7.35 was seen in type B3 thymoma. FDG uptake was higher in thymic carcinoma (20.45 in primary and 17.46 in the node) or neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) than in patients with thymomas (ranged 7.35 - 3.02). No significant association was observed between higher focal FDG uptake and advanced-stage disease in thymoma. In NED 68Ga - DOTATATE imaging identified more lesions than in FDG. Conclusion: PET CT is a valuable diagnostic tool in evaluation of thymic tumours, to assess in initial workup, for treatment response and for prognostication. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is beneficial in assessing neuroendocrine thymic tumours. Focal FDG uptake cannot predict advanced thymoma but is helpful in distinguishing thymoma from thymic carcinoma, or the more aggressive thymoma B3. PMID

  12. Diagnostic Ability of FDG-PET/CT in the Detection of Malignant Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the role of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for the differential diagnosis of malignant and benign pleural effusion. We studied 36 consecutive patients with histologically proven cancer (excluding malignant mesothelioma) who underwent FDG-PET/CT for suspected malignant pleural effusion. Fourteen patients had cytologically proven malignant pleural effusion and the other 22 patients had either negative cytology or clinical follow-up, which confirmed the benign etiology. We examined the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of pleural effusion and the target-to-normal tissue ratio (TNR), calculated as the ratio of the pleural effusion SUVmax to the SUVmean of the normal tissues (liver, spleen, 12th thoracic vertebrae [Th12], thoracic aorta, and spinalis muscle). We also examined the size and density (in Hounsfield units) of the pleural effusion and pleural abnormalities on CT images. TNR (Th12) and increased pleural FDG uptake compared to background blood pool were significantly more frequent in cases with malignant pleural effusion (P < 0.05 for both). The cutoff TNR (Th12) value of >0.95 was the most accurate; the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for this value were 93%, 68%, and 75%, respectively. FDG-PET/CT can be a useful method for the differential diagnosis of malignant and benign pleural effusion. PMID:26200610

  13. AAPM Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT Shielding Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Mark T.; Anderson, Jon A.; Halama, James R.

    2006-01-15

    The shielding of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) facilities presents special challenges. The 0.511 MeV annihilation photons associated with positron decay are much higher energy than other diagnostic radiations. As a result, barrier shielding may be required in floors and ceilings as well as adjacent walls. Since the patient becomes the radioactive source after the radiopharmaceutical has been administered, one has to consider the entire time that the subject remains in the clinic. In this report we present methods for estimating the shielding requirements for PET and PET/CT facilities. Information about the physical properties of the most commonly used clinical PET radionuclides is summarized, although the report primarily refers to fluorine-18. Typical PET imaging protocols are reviewed and exposure rates from patients are estimated including self-attenuation by body tissues and physical decay of the radionuclide. Examples of barrier calculations are presented for controlled and noncontrolled areas. Shielding for adjacent rooms with scintillation cameras is also discussed. Tables and graphs of estimated transmission factors for lead, steel, and concrete at 0.511 MeV are also included. Meeting the regulatory limits for uncontrolled areas can be an expensive proposition. Careful planning with the equipment vendor, facility architect, and a qualified medical physicist is necessary to produce a cost effective design while maintaining radiation safety standards.

  14. AAPM Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT shielding requirements.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mark T; Anderson, Jon A; Halama, James R; Kleck, Jeff; Simpkin, Douglas J; Votaw, John R; Wendt, Richard E; Williams, Lawrence E; Yester, Michael V

    2006-01-01

    The shielding of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT (computed tomography) facilities presents special challenges. The 0.511 MeV annihilation photons associated with positron decay are much higher energy than other diagnostic radiations. As a result, barrier shielding may be required in floors and ceilings as well as adjacent walls. Since the patient becomes the radioactive source after the radiopharmaceutical has been administered, one has to consider the entire time that the subject remains in the clinic. In this report we present methods for estimating the shielding requirements for PET and PET/CT facilities. Information about the physical properties of the most commonly used clinical PET radionuclides is summarized, although the report primarily refers to fluorine-18. Typical PET imaging protocols are reviewed and exposure rates from patients are estimated including self-attenuation by body tissues and physical decay of the radionuclide. Examples of barrier calculations are presented for controlled and noncontrolled areas. Shielding for adjacent rooms with scintillation cameras is also discussed. Tables and graphs of estimated transmission factors for lead, steel, and concrete at 0.511 MeV are also included. Meeting the regulatory limits for uncontrolled areas can be an expensive proposition. Careful planning with the equipment vendor, facility architect, and a qualified medical physicist is necessary to produce a cost effective design while maintaining radiation safety standards. PMID:16485403

  15. Multimodal 3D PET/CT system for bronchoscopic procedure planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Higgins, William E.

    2013-02-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET) / computed-tomography (CT) scanners give 3D multimodal data sets of the chest. Such data sets offer the potential for more complete and specific identification of suspect lesions and lymph nodes for lung-cancer assessment. This in turn enables better planning of staging bronchoscopies. The richness of the data, however, makes the visualization and planning process difficult. We present an integrated multimodal 3D PET/CT system that enables efficient region identification and bronchoscopic procedure planning. The system first invokes a series of automated 3D image-processing methods that construct a 3D chest model. Next, the user interacts with a set of interactive multimodal graphical tools that facilitate procedure planning for specific regions of interest (ROIs): 1) an interactive region candidate list that enables efficient ROI viewing in all tools; 2) a virtual PET-CT bronchoscopy rendering with SUV quantitative visualization to give a "fly through" endoluminal view of prospective ROIs; 3) transverse, sagittal, coronal multi-planar reformatted (MPR) views of the raw CT, PET, and fused CT-PET data; and 4) interactive multimodal volume/surface rendering to give a 3D perspective of the anatomy and candidate ROIs. In addition the ROI selection process is driven by a semi-automatic multimodal method for region identification. In this way, the system provides both global and local information to facilitate more specific ROI identification and procedure planning. We present results to illustrate the system's function and performance.

  16. Performance tests for ray-scan 64 PET/CT based on NEMA NU-2 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suying; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Qiushi; Zhang, Jinming; Yang, Kun; Xu, Baixuan; Ren, Qiushi

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on evaluating the performance of the Ray-Scan 64 PET/CT system, a newly developed PET/CT in China. It combines a 64 slice helical CT scanner with a high resolution PET scanner based on BGO crystals assembled in 36 rings. The energy window is 350~ 650 keV, and the coincidence window is set at 12 ns in both 2D and 3D mode. The transaxial field of view (FOV) is 600 mm in diameter, and the axial FOV is 163 mm. Method: Performance measurements were conducted focusing on PET scanners based on NEMA NU-2 2007 standard. We reported the full characterization (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, scatter fraction, accuracy of correction, and image quality) in both 2D and 3D mode. In addition, the clinical images from two patients of different types of tumor were presented to further demonstrate this PET/CT system performance in clinical application. Results: using the NEMA NU-2 2007 standard, the main results: (1) the transaxial resolution at 1cm from the gantry center for 2D and 3D was both 4.5mm (FWHM), and at 10cm from the gantry center, the radial (tangential) resolution were 5.6mm (5.3mm) and 5.4mm (5.2mm) in 2D and 3D mode respectively. The axial resolution at 1cm and 10cm off axis was 3.4mm (4.8mm) and 5.5mm (5.8mm) in 2D (3D) mode respectively; (2) the sensitivity for the radial position R0(r=0mm) and R100(r=100mm) were 1.741 kcps/MBq and 1.767 kcps/MBq respectively in 2D mode and 7.157 kcps/MBq and 7.513 kcps/MBq in 3D mode; (3) the scatter fraction was calculated as 18.36% and 42.92% in 2D and 3D mode, respectively; (4) contrast of hot spheres in the image quality phantom in 2D mode was 50.33% (52.87%), 33.34% (40.86%), 20.64% (26.36%), and 10.99% (15.82%), respectively, in N=4 (N=8). Besides, in clinical study, the diameter of lymph tumor was about 2.4 cm, and the diameter of lung cancer was 4.2 cm. This PET/CT system can distinguish the position of cancer easily. Conclusion: The results show that the performance of the newly

  17. 18F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Mhlanga, Joyce C.; Carrino, John A.; Lodge, Martin; Wang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with 18F-FDG. Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological 18F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Results Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73±7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7±9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r=0.86. p =0.007; r=0.94, p=0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7±6.6 vs. 32.2±0.4, p=0.02; 37.5±5.4 vs. 32.2±0.4, p=0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8±4.2 vs. 18±1.8, p= 0.13; 22.8±5.38 vs. 20.1±1.54, p=0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9±31.3 vs. 0, p=0.03). Conclusion Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted. PMID:25134669

  18. From PET/CT to PET/MRI: advances in instrumentation and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenhua; Yang, Weidong; Liu, Haixiao; Wang, Kun; Bao, Chengpeng; Song, Tianming; Wang, Jing; Tian, Jie

    2014-11-01

    Multimodality imaging of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) provides both metabolic information and the anatomic structure, which is significantly superior to either PET or CT alone and has greatly improved its clinical applications. Because of the higher soft-tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and no extra ionizing radiation, PET/MRI imaging is the hottest topic currently. PET/MRI is swiftly making its way into clinical practice. However, it has many technical difficulties to overcome, such as photomultiplier tubes, which cannot work properly in a magnetic field, and the inability to provide density information on the object for attenuation correction. This paper introduces the technique process of PET/MRI and summarizes its clinical applications, including imaging in oncology, neurology, and cardiology. PMID:25058336

  19. MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT in primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhai, Zhijun; Wang, Yang; Zuo, Changjing

    2015-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (PRMC) is an extremely rare neoplasm. We present a case of PRMC with MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT findings. Abdominal MRI showed a cystic lesion in the retroperitoneum with a mural nodule. The mural nodule showed progressive enhancement on enhanced CT and intense FDG uptake on early PET/CT with increased SUVmax on delayed PET/CT. Laparoscopy was performed. Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was confirmed histopathologically. Metastasis from gastrointestinal tract or ovary was excluded. This case indicates, although rare, PRMC should be considered when a hypermetabolic retroperitoneal cystic lesion with bilateral normal ovaries is found on FDG PET/CT. PMID:24445275

  20. FDG-PET/CT Limited to the Thorax and Upper Abdomen for Staging and Management of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Postema, Jan W. A.; Schreurs, Wendy M. J.; Lafeber, Albert; Hendrickx, Baudewijn W.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Vogel, Wouter V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) of the chest/upper abdomen compared to the generally performed scan from head to upper thighs, for staging and management of (suspected) lung cancer in patients with no history of malignancy or complaints outside the thorax. Methods FDG-PET/CT scans of 1059 patients with suspected or recently proven lung cancer, with no history of malignancy or complaints outside the thorax, were analysed in a retrospective multi-centre trial. Suspect FDG-avid lesions in the chest and upper abdomen, the head and neck area above the shoulder line and in the abdomen and pelvis below the caudal tip of the liver were noted. The impact of lesions detected in the head and neck area and abdomen and pelvis on additional diagnostic procedures, staging and treatment decisions was evaluated. Results The head and neck area revealed additional suspect lesions in 7.2%, and the abdomen and pelvis in 15.8% of patients. Imaging of the head and neck area and the abdomen and pelvic area showed additional lesions in 19.5%, inducing additional diagnostic procedures in 7.8%. This resulted in discovery of additional lesions considered malignant in 10.7%, changing patient management for lung cancer in 1.2%. In (suspected) lung cancer, PET/CT limited to the chest and upper abdomen resulted in correct staging in 98.7% of patients, which led to the identical management as full field of view PET in 98.8% of patients. Conclusion High value of FDG-PET/CT for staging and correct patient management is already achieved with chest and upper abdomen. Findings in head and neck area and abdomen and pelvis generally induce investigations with limited or no impact on staging and treatment of NSCLC, and can be interpreted accordingly. PMID:27556809

  1. Tubercular Meningitis and Lymphadenitis Mimicking a Relapse of Burkitt's Lymphoma on 18F-FDG-PET/CT: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Omri, Halima El; Hascsi, Zsolt; Taha, Ruba; Szabados, Lajos; Sabah, Hesham El; Gamiel, Amna; Hijji, Ibrahim Al

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) can present with various forms and can occasionally be mistaken for malignancy. Hereby, we report a 53-year-old man diagnosed and treated for Burkitt's lymphoma in 2009 who achieved a complete remission confirmed by a computed tomography (CT) scan. During the follow-up 2 years later, he complained of left hip pain that warranted investigation with magnetic resonance imaging and whole-body 18F-fludeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT which showed a benign lesion in the left hip associated with multiple lymph nodes in the chest and abdomen not amenable for biopsy. A follow-up PET/CT scan a few months later showed intense tracer uptake in the lymph nodes with size progression and appearance of new lymph nodes suspicious of lymphoma relapse. The patient was asymptomatic, and all investigations including viral and connective tissue disease studies were negative. Also the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON were negative. Lymph node biopsy was planned; however, the patient presented a few days earlier with fever, headache and photophobia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination confirmed meningitis with lymphocytic pleocytosis and elevated protein. The CSF Gram stain, culture, viral and acid-fast bacilli were negative. CSF flow cytometry and cytopathology confirmed polyclonal lymphocytosis and suggested reactive causes. CSF TB culture grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mediastinal lymph node biopsy also confirmed TB lymphadenitis. Four antituberculosis drugs were started. One year later, a PET/CT scan showed regression of all the involved lymph nodes. This case highlights the importance of excluding TB in patients with suspected malignancy, especially if they belong to endemic regions, and the increasing role of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the early detection of extrapulmonary TB. PMID:26078742

  2. Usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in recurrent basal cell carcinoma: Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ayala, S; Perlaza, P; Puig, S; Prats, E; Vidal-Sicart, S

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the case of a patient with left periorbital infiltrating basal cell carcinoma treated with surgical excision in October 2010. Surgery included orbital exenteration and reconstruction using skin graft and radiotherapy. In May 2013 a MR imaging showed a mass in the left orbital fossa, suggesting a recurrence in the graft. A basal cell carcinoma recurrence with perineural invasion was confirmed in the biopsy. On (18)F-FDG PET/CT performed, a hypermetabolic activity was observed in the left periorbital area with extension to surrounding sinus and bones. The use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma has not been fully explored due to the rarity of this entity. This case demonstrates the usefulness of this technique to determine the extent of non-melanocytic recurrent skin tumors, and its value in the staging and treatment control, supporting the incorporation of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the management of advanced basal cell carcinoma. PMID:26522004

  3. Comparison of CT and PET-CT based planning of radiation therapy in locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Topkan, Erkan; Yavuz, Ali A; Aydin, Mehmet; Onal, Cem; Yapar, Fuat; Yavuz, Melek N

    2008-01-01

    Background To compare computed tomography (CT) with co-registered positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) as the basis for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). Methods Fourteen patients with unresectable LAPC had both CT and PET images acquired. For each patient, two three-dimensional conformal plans were made using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. We analyzed differences in treatment plans and doses of radiation to primary tumors and critical organs. Results Changes in GTV delineation were necessary in 5 patients based on PET-CT information. In these patients, the average increase in GTV was 29.7%, due to the incorporation of additional lymph node metastases and extension of the primary tumor beyond that defined by CT. For all patients, the GTVCT versus GTVPET-CT was 92.5 ± 32.3 cm3 versus 104.5 ± 32.6 cm3 (p = 0.009). Toxicity analysis revealed no clinically significant differences between two plans with regard to doses to critical organs. Conclusion Co-registration of PET and CT information in unresectable LAPC may improve the delineation of GTV and theoretically reduce the likelihood of geographic misses. PMID:18808725

  4. 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI Perform Equally Well in Cancer: Evidence from Studies on More Than 2,300 Patients.

    PubMed

    Spick, Claudio; Herrmann, Ken; Czernin, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT has become the reference standard in oncologic imaging against which the performance of other imaging modalities is measured. The promise of PET/MRI includes multiparametric imaging to further improve diagnosis and phenotyping of cancer. Rather than focusing on these capabilities, many investigators have examined whether (18)F-FDG PET combined with mostly anatomic MRI improves cancer staging and restaging. After a description of PET/MRI scanner designs and a discussion of technical and operational issues, we review the available literature to determine whether cancer assessments are improved with PET/MRI. The available data show that PET/MRI is feasible and performs as well as PET/CT in most types of cancer. Diagnostic advantages may be achievable in prostate cancer and in bone metastases, whereas disadvantages exist in lung nodule assessments. We conclude that (18)F-FDG PET/MRI and PET/CT provide comparable diagnostic information when MRI is used simply to provide the anatomic framework. Thus, PET/MRI could be used in lieu of PET/CT if this approach becomes economically viable and if reasonable workflows can be established. Future studies should explore the multiparametric potential of MRI. PMID:26742709

  5. FDG-Avid Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis from Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Contrast-Enhanced FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan Canh; Nguyen, Dinh Song Huy; Ngo, Van Tan; Maurea, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): In this study, we aimed to describe the characteristics of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT), complicating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT scan. Methods: In this retrospective study, 9 HCC patients with FDG-avid PVTT were diagnosed by contrast-enhanced fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT), which is a combination of dynamic liver CT scan, multiphase imaging, and whole-body PET scan. PET and CT DICOM images of patients were imported into the PET/CT imaging system for the re-analysis of contrast enhancement and FDG uptake in thrombus, the diameter of the involved portal vein, and characteristics of liver tumors and metastasis. Results: Two patients with previously untreated HCC and 7 cases with previously treated HCC had FDG-avid PVTT in contrast-enhanced FDG PET/CT scan. During the arterial phase of CT scan, portal vein thrombus showed contrast enhancement in 8 out of 9 patients (88.9%). PET scan showed an increased linear FDG uptake along the thrombosed portal vein in all patients. The mean greatest diameter of thrombosed portal veins was 1.8 ± 0.2 cm, which was significantly greater than that observed in normal portal veins (P<0.001). FDG uptake level in portal vein thrombus was significantly higher than that of blood pool in the reference normal portal vein (P=0.001). PVTT was caused by the direct extension of liver tumors. All patients had visible FDG-avid liver tumors in contrast-enhanced images. Five out of 9 patients (55.6%) had no extrahepatic metastasis, 3 cases (33.3%) had metastasis of regional lymph nodes, and 1 case (11.1%) presented with distant metastasis. The median estimated survival time of patients was 5 months. Conclusion: The intraluminal filling defect consistent with thrombous within the portal vein, expansion of the involved portal vein, contrast enhancement, and linear increased FDG uptake of the thrombus extended from liver tumor are findings of FDG

  6. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-06: Y90 PET/CT for the Instantaneous Determination of Both Target and Non-Target Absorbed Doses Following Hepatic Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; Kao, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose The process of converting Yttrium-90 (Y90) PET/CT images into 3D absorbed dose maps will be explained. The simple methods presented will allow the medical physicst to analyze Y90 PET images following radioembolization and determine the absorbed dose to tumor, normal liver parenchyma and other areas of interest, without application of Monte-Carlo radiation transport or dose-point-kernel (DPK) convolution. Methods Absorbed dose can be computed from Y90 PET/CT images based on the premise that radioembolization is a permanent implant with a constant relative activity distribution after infusion. Many Y90 PET/CT publications have used DPK convolution to obtain 3D absorbed dose maps. However, this method requires specialized software limiting clinical utility. The Local Deposition method, an alternative to DPK convolution, can be used to obtain absorbed dose and requires no additional computer processing. Pixel values from regions of interest drawn on Y90 PET/CT images can be converted to absorbed dose (Gy) by multiplication with a scalar constant. Results There is evidence that suggests the Local Deposition method may actually be more accurate than DPK convolution and it has been successfully used in a recent Y90 PET/CT publication. We have analytically compared dose-volume-histograms (DVH) for phantom hot-spheres to determine the difference between the DPK and Local Deposition methods, as a function of PET scanner point-spread-function for Y90. We have found that for PET/CT systems with a FWHM greater than 3.0 mm when imaging Y90, the Local Deposition Method provides a more accurate representation of DVH, regardless of target size than DPK convolution. Conclusion Using the Local Deposition Method, post-radioembolization Y90 PET/CT images can be transformed into 3D absorbed dose maps of the liver. An interventional radiologist or a Medical Physicist can perform this transformation in a clinical setting, allowing for rapid prediction of treatment efficacy by

  7. Ultralow dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric PET CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Samuel L.; Shulkin, Barry L.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To develop ultralow dose computed tomography (CT) attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisition protocols for pediatric positron emission tomography CT (PET CT). Methods: A GE Discovery 690 PET CT hybrid scanner was used to investigate the change to quantitative PET and CT measurements when operated at ultralow doses (10–35 mA s). CT quantitation: noise, low-contrast resolution, and CT numbers for 11 tissue substitutes were analyzed in-phantom. CT quantitation was analyzed to a reduction of 90% volume computed tomography dose index (0.39/3.64; mGy) from baseline. To minimize noise infiltration, 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) was used for CT reconstruction. PET images were reconstructed with the lower-dose CTAC iterations and analyzed for: maximum body weight standardized uptake value (SUV{sub bw}) of various diameter targets (range 8–37 mm), background uniformity, and spatial resolution. Radiation dose and CTAC noise magnitude were compared for 140 patient examinations (76 post-ASiR implementation) to determine relative dose reduction and noise control. Results: CT numbers were constant to within 10% from the nondose reduced CTAC image for 90% dose reduction. No change in SUV{sub bw}, background percent uniformity, or spatial resolution for PET images reconstructed with CTAC protocols was found down to 90% dose reduction. Patient population effective dose analysis demonstrated relative CTAC dose reductions between 62% and 86% (3.2/8.3–0.9/6.2). Noise magnitude in dose-reduced patient images increased but was not statistically different from predose-reduced patient images. Conclusions: Using ASiR allowed for aggressive reduction in CT dose with no change in PET reconstructed images while maintaining sufficient image quality for colocalization of hybrid CT anatomy and PET radioisotope uptake.

  8. The role of PET/CT in the management of patients affected by head and neck tumors: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cammaroto, Giovanni; Quartuccio, Natale; Sindoni, Alessandro; Di Mauro, Francesca; Caobelli, Federico

    2016-08-01

    The management of head and neck tumor (HNSCC) has been changing over the years, especially due to the aid of imaging techniques that help physicians to attain a correct diagnosis. These techniques represent a valuable tool to help tailor treatment and during follow-up of patients affected by malignancies. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of the most recent and relevant studies about the use of PET imaging in HNSCCs. This review is divided into six chapters: (1) The role of PET/CT in the pre-treatment phase; (2) PET/CT and radiotherapy planning; (3) PET/CT in the post-treatment setting; (4) PET/CT and SUVmax for prediction of prognosis; (5) miscellanea on the utility of PET in specific HNSCCs; (6) non-FDG PET tracers used in HNSCC. Promising results have been obtained so far. Despite the encouraging outcomes, more investigations are needed to warrant the value of this technique, especially in the pre-treatment setting. PMID:25971995

  9. Eye dose monitoring of PET/CT workers

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, U; O'Reilly, G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to measure eye dose [Hp(3)] to workers in a busy positron emission tomography (PET)/CT centre. Doses were compared with the proposed new annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Methods: We used a newly designed dosemeter to measure eye dose [Hp(3)]. Eye dosemeters were worn with an adjustable headband, with the dosemeter positioned adjacent to the left eye. The whole-body dose was also recorded using electronic personal dosemeter (EPD® Mk2; Thermo Electron Corporation, Waltham, MA). Exposed staff included radiographers, nurses and healthcare assistants. Results: The radiographers received the highest exposure of the staff groups studied, with one radiographer receiving an exposure of 0.5 mSv over the 3-month survey period. The estimated maximum eye dose for 1 year is approximately 2 mSv. The numeric value for eye dose was compared with the numeric value for personal dose equivalent to see if one could be used as an indicator for the other. From our data, a conservative estimate of eye dose Hp(3) (mSv) can be made as being up to approximately twice the numeric value for whole-body dose [Hp(10)] (mSv). Conclusion: Eye dose was found to be well within the new proposed annual limit at our PET/CT centre. Routine whole-body dose measurements may be a useful starting point for assessing whether eye dose monitoring should be prioritized in a PET facility. Advances in knowledge: Following the proposal of a reduced eye dose limit, this article provides new measurement data on staff eye doses for PET/CT workers. PMID:25109711

  10. FLT PET/CT in a Case of Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, Alexandra; Prassopoulos, Vasilios; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Tsougos, Ioannis; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    A 32-year-old woman, with spare previous medical history, presented with neurological symptoms of numbness and diplopia. The patient underwent brain MRI, which revealed a lesion of abnormal signal in the midbrain that could be attributed to subacute stroke; however, consecutive MRIs revealed multiple lesions of abnormal signal pointing to demyelinating disease. During symptoms investigation and MRI findings assessment, the patient underwent a FLT PET/CT examination, which revealed lesions of increased FLT uptake, probably indicating active disease and blood-brain barrier disruption. PMID:27088385

  11. Comparison of an alternative and existing binning methods to reduce the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Didierlaurent, David Ribes, Sophie; Caselles, Olivier; Jaudet, Cyril; Dierickx, Lawrence O.; Zerdoud, Slimane; Brillouet, Severine; Weits, Kathleen; Batatia, Hadj; Courbon, Frédéric

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion is a source of artifacts that reduce image quality in PET. Four dimensional (4D) PET/CT is one approach to overcome this problem. Existing techniques to limiting the effects of respiratory motions are based on prospective phase binning which requires a long acquisition duration (15–25 min). This time is uncomfortable for the patients and limits the clinical exploitation of 4D PET/CT. In this work, the authors evaluated an existing method and an alternative retrospective binning method to reduce the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT. Methods: The authors studied an existing mixed-amplitude binning (MAB) method and an alternative binning method by mixed-phases (MPhB). Before implementing MPhB, they analyzed the regularity of the breathing patterns in patients. They studied the breathing signal drift and missing CT slices that could be challenging for implementing MAB. They compared the performance of MAB and MPhB with current binning methods to measure the maximum uptake, internal volume, and maximal range of tumor motion. Results: MPhB can be implemented depending on an optimal phase (in average, the exhalation peak phase −4.1% of the entire breathing cycle duration). Signal drift of patients was in average 35% relative to the breathing amplitude. Even after correcting this drift, MAB was feasible in 4D CT for only 64% of patients. No significant differences appeared between the different binning methods to measure the maximum uptake, internal volume, and maximal range of tumor motion. The authors also determined the inaccuracies of MAB and MPhB to measure the maximum amplitude of tumor motion with three bins (less than 3 mm for movement inferior to 12 mm, up to 6.4 mm for a 21 mm movement). Conclusions: The authors proposed an alternative binning method by mixed-phase binning that halves the acquisition duration of 4D PET/CT. Mixed-amplitude binning was challenging because of signal drift and missing CT slices. They showed that more

  12. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT: a review of diagnostic and prognostic features in multiple myeloma and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Dammacco, Franco; Rubini, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Cristina; Vacca, Angelo; Racanelli, Vito

    2015-02-01

    Conventional radiographic skeletal survey has been for many years the gold standard to detect the occurrence of osteolytic lesions in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). However, the introduction of more sensitive imaging procedures has resulted in an updated anatomic and functional Durie and Salmon "plus" staging system and has remarkably changed the diagnostic and prognostic approach to this tumor. It is now established that (18)fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) combined with low-dose computed tomography (CT), shortly designated PET/CT, exhibits a higher screening and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity over the skeleton X-ray. In patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and in those with smoldering MM, PET/CT is consistently unable to detect focal and/or diffuse marrow abnormalities. Conversely, based on a systematic review of 18 studies comprising almost 800 MM patients, PET/CT was able to detect MM osteolytic lesions with a sensitivity of approximately 80-90% and a specificity of 80-100%. Importantly, a poor degree of concordance has also been emphasized between PET/CT and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) in that when both techniques were applied to the same patients, double-positive results were recorded in approximately 30% of the cases, but in the majority of them, a higher number of lesions were revealed with PET/CT than with MRI. Double-negative results, on the other hand, were found in about 22% of the patients. Because PET/CT is able to identify tumor foci throughout the body, it can be usefully applied to the study of solitary bone plasmacytoma and extra-medullary plasmacytoma: In both conditions, the detection of additional, previously overlooked sites of skeletal involvement would falsify the diagnosis of single-district disease, upstage the tumor, and therefore require a different therapeutic approach. In addition, although PET/CT is poorly sensitive to diffuse bone

  13. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems. PMID:27140618

  14. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J

    2016-05-17

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems. PMID:27140618

  15. Imaging through plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanzid, Mehbuba; Sobhani, Ali; DeSantis, Christopher J.; Cui, Yao; Hogan, Nathaniel J.; Samaniego, Adam; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Halas, Naomi J.

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles with plasmon resonances have been studied extensively, typically by measuring the transmission of light, as a function of wavelength, through a nanoparticle suspension. One question that has not yet been addressed, however, is how an image is transmitted through such a suspension of absorber-scatterers, in other words, how the various spatial frequencies are attenuated as they pass through the nanoparticle host medium. Here, we examine how the optical properties of a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles affect the transmitted image. We use two distinct ways to assess transmitted image quality: the structural similarity index (SSIM), a perceptual distortion metric based on the human visual system, and the modulation transfer function (MTF), which assesses the resolvable spatial frequencies. We show that perceived image quality, as well as spatial resolution, are both dependent on the scattering and absorption cross-sections of the constituent nanoparticles. Surprisingly, we observe a nonlinear dependence of image quality on optical density by varying optical path length and nanoparticle concentration. This work is a first step toward understanding the requirements for visualizing and resolving objects through media consisting of subwavelength absorber-scatterer structures, an approach that should also prove useful in the assessment of metamaterial or metasurface-based optical imaging systems.

  16. Lymph Node Metastasis from Tall-Cell Thyroid Cancer Negative on 18F-FDG PET/CT and Detected by 18F-Choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Arnoldo; Massollo, Michela; Bandelloni, Roberto; Arlandini, Anselmo; Foppiani, Luca

    2015-08-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent thyroidectomy and (131)I remnant ablation for tall-cell differentiated cancer (DTC) of the left lobe. Detectable Tg levels (4.1 μg/L) under TSH suppression, with undetectable serum Tg-antibody levels, prompted neck ultrasonography, which revealed a lymph node in the left laterocervical region and in the right retroclavicular region. (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed uptake by the left lymph node. (18)F-choline PET/CT showed increased uptake by both lymph nodes. Histopathology revealed DTC solid metastasis in the left lymph node and solid and cystic metastasis in the right one. (18)F-choline PET/CT can locate virulent DTC recurrence, thereby increasing (18)F-FDG PET/CT information. PMID:26053727

  17. Standardized Uptake Values from PET/MRI in Metastatic Breast Cancer: An Organ-based Comparison With PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Pujara, Akshat C.; Raad, Roy A.; Ponzo, Fabio; Wassong, Carolyn; Babb, James S.; Moy, Linda; Melsaether, Amy N.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative standardized uptake values (SUVs) from fluorine-18 (18F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) are commonly used to evaluate the extent of disease and response to treatment in breast cancer patients. Recently, PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to qualitatively detect metastases from various primary cancers with similar sensitivity to PET/CT. However, quantitative validation of PET/ MRI requires assessing the reliability of SUVs from MR attenuation correction (MRAC) relative to CT attenuation correction (CTAC). The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the utility of PET/MRI-derived SUVs in breast cancer patients by testing the hypothesis that SUVs derived from MRAC correlate well with those from CTAC. Between August 2012 and May 2013, 35 breast cancer patients (age 37–78 years, 1 man) underwent clinical 18F-FDG PET/CT followed by PET/MRI. One hundred seventy metastases were seen in 21 of 35 patients; metastases to bone in 16 patients, to liver in seven patients, and to nonaxillary lymph nodes in eight patients were sufficient for statistical analysis on an organ-specific per patient basis. SUVs in the most FDG-avid metastasis per organ per patient from PET/CT and PET/MRI were measured and compared using Pearson’s correlations. Correlations between CTAC- and MRAC-derived SUVmax and SUVmean in 31 metastases to bone, liver, and nonaxillary lymph nodes were strong overall (ρ= 0.80, 0.81). SUVmax and SUVmean correlations were also strong on an organ-specific basis in 16 bone metastases (ρ= 0.76, 0.74), seven liver metastases (ρ= 0.85, 0.83), and eight nonaxillary lymph node metastases (ρ= 0.95, 0.91). These strong organ-specific correlations between SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MRI in breast cancer metastases support the use of SUVs from PET/MRI for quantitation of 18F-FDG activity. PMID:26843433

  18. Effectiveness of 18F-FDG-PET/CT vs Bone Scintigraphy in Treatment Response Assessment of Bone Metastases in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Muqbel, Kusai M.; Yaghan, Rami J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) versus bone scintigraphy (BS) in treatment response assessment of bone metastases in breast cancer. The medical records of breast cancer patients with metastatic bone disease were reviewed retrospectively in our hospital from the period of January 2003 until April 2014. We included in our study patients evaluated by BS and/or 18F-FDG-PET/CT. Group 1 included patients who underwent pre- and post-treatment BS. Group 2 included patients who underwent pre- and post-treatment 18F-FDG-PET/CT scans. Group 3 included patients who underwent pretreatment BS and post-treatment both modalities. Functional and structural bone changes were monitored on pre- and post-treatment scans. Group 1 included 71 patients, average age of 49.5 y (range 28–73 y). Post-treatment results were as follows: 34% stable disease, 43% progressed disease, 19% improved disease, 3% resolved disease, and 2% relapsed disease. Group 2 included 32 patients, average age 53.2 y (ranges between 37 and 78 y). Post-treatment results were as follows: 3% stable disease, 15% progressed disease, 15% improved disease, 53% resolved disease, and 14% relapsed disease. After treatment, the total symptomatic/imaging concordance rate was 51% in BS and 83% in 18F-FDG-PET/CT. Structurally, most patients with newly diagnosed metastatic bone disease had predominantly osteolytic lesions, which became mixed or osteoblastic after treatment as noted on CT images of responders. Group 3 included 8 patients, average age 48.9 y (ranges 32–64 y). Five patients had stable disease according to BS. 18F-FDG-PET/CT was concordant in 3/5 patients and discordant in 2/5 patients. Three patients had progressed disease on BS with concordant findings on 18F-FDG-PET/CT. 18F-FDG-PET/CT was found a powerful tool in treatment response assessment of bone metastases in breast cancer

  19. Chinese Erdheim-Chester disease: clinical-pathology-PET/CT updates

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanyu; Li, Yang; Ruan, Caishun; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Hehua; Zhang, Xiangsong

    2015-01-01

    Summary Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD), one type of systemic non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, has been rarely seen and is characterized by the accumulation of foamy CD68+CD1a- histiocytes. We reported a case of ECD and reviewed the clinical features of 13 cases of ECD reported so far in China. A 53-year-old male was diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus in March 2014, followed by fever, splenomegaly and anemia in July 2014. His initial pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the absence of high signal at T1-weighted image in posterior pituitary without any lesion. A further positron emission tomography/computer tomography (PET/CT) images showed elevated metabolic activity of 18F-2-fluro-D-deoxy-glucose (FDG) and low 13N-NH3 uptake in the posterior pituitary, and multi-organ involvement. Biopsy at right femur lesion revealed that granulomatous infiltration of foamy histiocytes and Touton giant cells surrounded by fibrosis tissues. Immunohistochemistry stain was positive for CD68, negative for CD207/Langerin and S-100. The diagnosis of ECD was confirmed and the treatment with pegylated interferon was effective. ECD was a possible immune-related disorder concluding from the IgG4 immunohistochemistry results. We summarized the pathological manifestations for ECD and its differential diagnosis from Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD). ECD should be considered by both pathologists and clinicians in the differential diagnosis when central diabetes insipidus is accompanied with multi-organ involvement, especially skeletal system involvement, or recurrent fever. Learning points ECD should be considered when central diabetes insipidus is accompanied with multisystem involvement, especially symmetric/asymmetric bone lesions, or recurrent fever. PET/CT scanning was helpful for locating pituitary lesion, discovering multiple system involvement and indicating the biopsy sites. Conducting proper immunohistochemistry stains was

  20. Management of Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Palate Utilizing 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sudhakar, Sankaran; Velugubantla, Raga Geethika; Erva, Swathi; Chennoju, Sai kiran

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland carcinomas are a clinically diverse group of neoplasms with histological patterns overlapping other tumors, thus complicating their diagnosis. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), first described by Masson and Berger in 1924, is a well-recognized salivary gland neoplasm, accounting for 5–10% of all salivary gland tumors. MEC frequently involves the major salivary glands and is rarely seen involving the jaws. The biological behavior of MEC is usually more aggressive with higher nodal and metastatic status at the time of presentation, which notably reduces the survival rate. Hence, early and accurate diagnosis utilizing advanced imaging modalities can reduce its morbidity. The present case is a rare presentation of MEC involving the palate, where (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) was utilized for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25558436

  1. Cholecystokinin-Assisted Hydrodissection of the Gallbladder Fossa during FDG PET/CT-guided Liver Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, Sanjit O.; Petre, Elena N.; Osborne, Joseph; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.

    2013-12-15

    A 68-year-old female with colorectal cancer developed a metachronous isolated fluorodeoxyglucose-avid (FDG-avid) segment 5/6 gallbladder fossa hepatic lesion and was referred for percutaneous ablation. Pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated a distended gallbladder abutting the segment 5/6 hepatic metastasis. In order to perform ablation with clear margins and avoid direct puncture and aspiration of the gallbladder, cholecystokinin was administered intravenously to stimulate gallbladder contraction before hydrodissection. Subsequently, the lesion was ablated successfully with sufficient margins, of greater than 1.0 cm, using microwave with ultrasound and FDG PET/CT guidance. The patient tolerated the procedure very well and was discharged home the next day.

  2. 18F-Choline PET/CT-Positive Lytic Bone Lesions in Prostate Cancer and Accidental Myeloma Detection.

    PubMed

    Florimonte, Luigia; Orunesu, Eva; Castellani, Massimo; Longari, Virgilio; Cortelezzi, Agostino

    2016-05-01

    F-choline PET/CT was performed for suspected prostate cancer relapse in a 67-year-old man with hip pain and a rapid rise in prostate-specific antigen values (1.1 ng/mL). PET imaging showed an area of increased F-choline bone uptake in the right ischium. Coregistered CT images showed a lytic bone lesion. The infrequent CT appearance of a possible prostate carcinoma metastasis led to additional laboratory testing that showed a monoclonal γ-peak and to subsequent biopsy, which revealed a solitary plasmocytoma. PMID:26825195

  3. [Extension study and evaluation of the therapeutic response in a patient with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma using sequential study with ¹⁸F-FDG PET-CT and ¹⁸F-fluoride PET-CT].

    PubMed

    Moragas, M; Soler, M; Riera, E; García, J R

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with lung adenocarcinoma and bone and extraosseus metastases studied with (18)F-FDG PET-CT, (99m)Tc-HMDP and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT. It assesses the usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET-CT for initial staging of the disease and monitoring response to therapy. For the study of the sclerotic bone metastases it shows the superiority of 99mTc-HMDP bone scintigraphy and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT over (18)F-FDG PET-CT, and (18)F-fluoride PET-CT over bone scintigraphy. It also shows the usefulness of (18)F-fluoride PET-CT for monitoring the bone metastases. PMID:24690280

  4. Two-Time-Point FDG PET/CT: Liver SULmean Repeatability

    PubMed Central

    Tahari, Abdel K.; Paidpally, Vasavi; Chirindel, Alin; Wahl, Richard L.; Subramaniam, Rathan M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of liver mean standardized uptake value normalized to lean body mass (SULmean) in the same patients at different time points within the right lobe of the liver at 18F-FDG PET/CT, in a clinical setting. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two PET/CT studies performed on two different dates from each of 130 patients who had normal livers according to structural imaging were included in this reader study. The mean (± SD) length of time between the studies was 235 ± 192 days. SULmean was measured with a 30-mm diameter spherical volume of interest (VOI) placed within the right lobe of the liver (above, below, and at the level of the main portal vein) by two expert readers. ANOVA, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman analysis were performed. RESULTS The ICC for the first and second set of studies varied between 0.487 and 0.535 for reader 1 and between 0.472 and 0.545 for reader 2. The mean percentage variation for SULmean between the two time scans for the VOIs placed above, below, and at the level of the main portal vein were 3.55% ± 23.19%, 4.65% ± 23.87%, and 4.30% ± 23.03%, respectively, for reader 1 and 4.49% ± 23.23%, 4.33% ± 23.74%, and 4.48% ± 23.01%, respectively, for reader 2. Using 95% CI, the reference range for intrapatient variations between the studies in liver SULmean was −0.5 to 0.60. CONCLUSION There is only fair repeatability of liver SULmean measured between two time points in the same patient in a clinical setting. Scan-to-scan intrapatient variation in absolute liver SULmean was −0.5 to 0.60. PMID:25615764

  5. MO-G-17A-09: Quantitative Autoradiography of Biopsy Specimens Extracted Under PET/CT Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Fanchon, L; Carlin, S; Schmidtlein, C; Humm, J; Yorke, E; Solomon, S; Deasy, J; Kirov, A; Burger, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a procedure for accurate determination of PET tracer concentration with high spatial accuracy in situ by performing Quantitative Autoradiography of Biopsy Specimens (QABS) extracted under PET/CT guidance. Methods: Autoradiography (ARG) standards were produced from a gel loaded with a known concentration of FDG biopsied with 18G and 20G biopsy needles. Specimens obtained with these needles are generally cylindrical: up to 18 mm in length and about 0.8 and 0.6 mm in diameter respectively. These standards, with similar shape and density as biopsy specimens were used to generate ARG calibration curves.Quantitative ARG was performed to measure the activity concentration in biopsy specimens extracted from ten patients. The biopsy sites were determined according to PET/CT's obtained in the operating room. Additional CT scans were acquired with the needles in place to confirm correct needle placements. The ARG images were aligned with the needle tip in the PET/CT images using the open source CERR software. The mean SUV calculated from the specimen activities (SUVarg) were compared to that from PET (SUVpet) at the needle locations. Results: Calibration curves show that the relation between ARG signal and activity concentration in those standards is linear for the investigated range (up to 150 kBq/ml). The correlation coefficient of SUVarg with SUVpet is 0.74. Discrepancies between SUVarg and SUVpet can be attributed to the small size of the biopsy specimens compared to PET resolution. Conclusion: The calibration procedure using surrogate biopsy specimens provided a method for quantifying the activity within the biopsy cores obtained under FDG-PET guidance. QABS allows mapping the activity concentration in such biopsy specimens with a resolution of about 1mm. QABS is a promising tool for verification of biopsy adequacy by comparing specimen activity to that expected from the PET image. A portion of this research was funded by a research grant from

  6. [Usefulness of Determining Acquisition Time by True Count Rate Measurement Method for Delivery 18F-FDG PET/CT].

    PubMed

    Miura, Shota; Odashima, Satoshi

    2016-03-01

    A stable quality of delivery 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires suitable acquisition time, which can be obtained from an accurate true count of 18F-FDG. However, the true count is influenced by body mass index (BMI) and attenuation of 18F-FDG. In order to remove these influences, we have developed a new method (actual measurement method) to measure the actual true count rate based on sub-pubic thigh, which allows us to calculate a suitable acquisition time. In this study, we aimed to verify the acquisition count through our new method in terms of two categories: (1) the accuracy of acquisition count and (2) evaluation of clinical images using physical index. Our actual measurement method was designed to obtain suitable acquisition time through the following procedure. A true count rate of sub-pubic thigh was measured through detector of PET, and used as a standard true count rate. Finally, the obtained standard count rate was processed to acquisition time. This method was retrospectively applied to 150 patients, receiving 18F-FDG administration from 109.7 to 336.8 MBq, and whose body weight ranged from 37 to 95.4 kg. The accuracy of true count was evaluated by comparing relationships of true count, relative to BMI or to administered dose of 18F-FDG. The PET/CT images obtained by our actual measurement method were assessed using physical index. Our new method resulted in accurate true count, which was not influenced by either BMI or administered dose of 18F-FDG, as well as satisfied PET/CT images with recommended criteria of physical index in all patients. PMID:27000670

  7. [The role of PET/CT in decision-making during cancer treatment. Clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Landherr, László

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays PET/CT examinations have got more and more important role during cancer treatment. It has importance not only in diagnostic examination and staging but also in the radiation planning process and measuring the therapeutic effect. From November 2006 to November 2010 there were 153 PET/CT examinations requested by the Oncology Outpatient Clinic, Uzsoki Hospital. Nine patients were excluded from the examination. In the clinical trial we have aimed to measure what the correlation between the oncologists' questions and the PET/CT results was, in how many cases the PET/CT had influence on therapeutic decision-making. In the case of the patients waiting for the operation we compared the results of the pathological examinations to the results of the PET/CT. The oncologists got the expected answers in 79 cases, while in 45 cases the answers were negative. In 10 cases there were no definite answers. Ten cases proved to be false negative or false positive based on the later pathological examination. As a result of the PET/CT findings the originally planned therapeutic decisions or the therapies in process have been modified in 77 cases. To sum up, the PET/CT gave the expected answers to the oncologists' questions in more than half of the cases (54.9%) and modified the originally prescribed therapy in 53.5% of the cases. PMID:23236592

  8. PET-CT in the UK: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Scarsbrook, A F; Barrington, S F

    2016-07-01

    Combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) has taken the oncological world by storm since being introduced into the clinical domain in the early 21(st) century and is firmly established in the management pathway of many different tumour types. Non-oncological applications of PET-CT represent a smaller but steadily growing area of interest. PET-CT continues to be the focus of a large number of research studies and keeping up-to-date with the literature is important but represents a challenge. Consequently guidelines recommending PET-CT usage need to be revised regularly to encompass new developments. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, it provides a detailed review of the evidence-base underpinning the major uses of PET-CT in clinical practice, which may be of value to a wide-range of individuals, including those directly involved with PET-CT and to a much larger group with limited exposure, but for whom a précis of the current state-of-play may help inform other radiology and multidisciplinary team (MDT) work; the second purpose is as a companion to revised guidelines on evidence-based indications for PET-CT in the UK (being published concurrently) providing a detailed commentary on new indications with a summary of emerging data supporting these additional clinical uses of the technique. PMID:27044903

  9. Breast Sparganosis Incidentally Detected by FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seunggyun; Oh, So Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Yi, Ann; Ahn, Young Joon

    2013-06-01

    Sparganosis is a rare, parasitic infection that is caused by the plercercoid tapeworm larvae of the genus Spirometra. Sparganosis is transmitted by ingestion of larvae-containing water or intermediate hosts, such as raw amphibians, and usually presented with a subcutaneous nodule in the abdominal wall, extremities, and genital organs. Among the various involved organs, the breast is a seldom encountered site for sparganosis. However, breast sparganosis has clinical importance, since it is generally presented with an indolent palpable mass that mimics malignancy, even without evidence of inflammation. Herein, we report a case of breast sparganosis that was detected incidentally by FDG PET/CT during staging work ups in a patient with gall bladder cancer. PMID:24900094

  10. Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor of Diffuse Type Mimicking Bony Metastasis Detected on F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyoung Jin; Byun, Byung Hyun; Moon, Han Sol; Park, Jihyun; Koh, Jae Soo; Kim, Byung Il; Lim, Sang Moo

    2014-09-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor of diffuse type (TGCT-D) is a locally aggressive neoplasm that arises in the tendon sheath, bursa, or synovium. It typically involves the appendicular skeleton and rarely involves the axial skeleton. Because there are no specific findings of TGCT-D based on imaging studies or clinical symptoms, TGCT-D can be confused with other primary or metastatic bone tumors. We report findings of TGCT-D involving the T9 vertebra incidentally detected on F-18 FDG PET/CT in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer. PMID:25177381

  11. 18F-FDG PET/CT Metabolic Activity in a Patient With Solitary Extramedullary Plasmacytoma of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linqi; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Rusen; Fan, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytoma is a rare variant of plasmacytoma that is frequently observed in the head and neck. Primary plasmacytoma of the lung is quite rare. A 92-year-old woman presented with chest distress for 6 months with a mass detected in the right posterior thoracic cavity. Enhanced T1-weighted image showed marked enhancement of the mass. F-FDG PET/CT showed strong FDG uptake of the lesion with SUVmax of 21.9. Thoracentesis of the tumor was subsequently performed, and pathologic analysis confirmed the diagnosis of primary pulmonary plasmacytoma. PMID:26462042

  12. Extramedullary Involvement of Mast Cell Leukemia Detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhanli; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Meng; Li, Ziao; Li, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare subtype of systemic mastocytosis, characterized by the leukemic expansion of immature mast cells. We present a case of MCL with extramedullary involvement of cervical lymph node and lung demonstrated by the initial F-FDG PET/CT scan. After a transient complete remission by induction chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the follow-up PET/CT showed extensive extramedullary relapse involving multiple lymph nodes and small bowel. F-FDG PET/CT may be a useful tool to comprehensively stage and follow-up MCL. PMID:26975014

  13. FDG PET/CT Findings in Abdominal Fat Necrosis After Treatment for Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, Julien; Moreau, Aurélie; Sarkozy, Clémentine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Skanjeti, Andrea; Salles, Gilles; Giammarile, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    FDG PET/CT is now validated in non-Hodgkin lymphoma for response assessment in interim and posttreatment lymphoma. We report the case of a 62-year-old man followed by FDG PET/CT for a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, with initial stage III. The interim FDG PET/CT examination concluded in complete metabolic and morphological response of subdiaphragmatic lymphadenopathy but a persistent abnormal subdiaphragmatic uptake (SUVmax at 9 and Deauville 5-point scale at 5). Therefore, an abdominal biopsy of the corresponding nodules was conducted with a final diagnosis of diffuse fat necrosis. PMID:26825213

  14. 18F-Fluorocholine PET/CT Finding of a Vertebral Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Savelli, Giordano; Perotti, Valentina; Rosso, Edoardo; Pizzocaro, Claudio; Magnaldi, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    The uptake of F-fluorocholine (FCH), a radiopharmaceutical used to study patients with prostate cancer, follow both the phosphorylcholine and acetylcholine synthesis. FCH uptake is not specific of neoplastic cells because phospholipids are a structural constituent of the membrane of all cells. Thus, PET/CT with FCH show several areas of physiologic uptake. The skeleton concentrates only mild amounts of FCH, thus a diffuse faint uptake of the radiopharmaceutical is present at a PET/CT study. Herein we present the case of a patient in which PET/CT evidenced a sharply defined vertebral "cold" area of reduced FCH uptake corresponding to a vertebral hemangioma. PMID:27124683

  15. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis: PET/CT for initial workup and treatment response evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Neil J; Hankins, Jordan H

    2015-02-01

    A 40-year-old man underwent pan-endoscopy owing to abdominal pain. Biopsies of the gastrointestinal tract demonstrated diffuse Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PET/CT was done, with CT demonstrating classic pulmonary manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis that had association with intense FDG uptake on PET. Bowel appeared normal. Treatment was initiated with smoking cessation and 6 cycles of cytarabine. Follow-up PET/CT after initial treatment demonstrated improvement of parenchymal abnormalities seen on CT, with resolution of hypermetabolic activity. Maintenance chemotherapy was initiated. PET/CT is increasingly being used for initial staging and treatment response assessment in this rare disorder. PMID:24999688

  16. Primary Liver Carcinosarcoma and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Li, Beilei; Zhang, Yiqiu; Hou, Jun; Yu, Haojun; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-08-01

    Primary liver carcinosarcoma is a very rare, malignant neoplasm that is concomitantly composed of a mixture of sarcomatous and carcinomatous elements. In the present study, an initial staging FDG PET/CT showed intense FDG uptake in a patient with liver carcinosarcoma composed of hepatocellular carcinoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Two months after surgical resection, a restaging PET/CT showed rapid progression of the disease with abdominal and lung metastases, indicating aggressive feature of the disease. The case shows the importance to repeat a restaging PET/CT at early time after surgery for a patient with liver carcinosarcoma to monitor disease progression. PMID:27280902

  17. MicroPET/CT assessment of FDG uptake in brain after long-term methylphenidate treatment in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Newport, G D; Callicott, R; Liu, S; Thompson, J; Berridge, M S; Apana, S M; Slikker, W; Wang, C; Paule, M G

    2016-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is a psychostimulant commonly used for the treatment of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Since the long-term effects of this drug on the central nervous system (CNS) are not well understood, we conducted microPET/CT scans on young adult male rhesus monkeys (n=4/group) to gather information on brain metabolism using the uptake of [(18)F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-2-d-glucose (FDG) as a marker. Approximately two-year old, male rhesus monkeys were treated orally with MPH twice per day, five days per week (M-F) over a 6-year period. Subjects received MPH at either 2.5 or 12.5mg/kg/dose or vehicle (Prang). To minimize the acute effects of MPH on FDG uptake, microPET/CT scans were scheduled on Mondays before their first daily dosing of the week (approximately 68h since their last treatment). FDG (370±8.88MBq) was injected intravenously and 30min later microPET/CT images were obtained over 60min. Radiolabeled tracer accumulation in regions of interest (ROIs) in the prefrontal cortex, temporal cortex, striatum and cerebellum were converted into Standard Uptake Values (SUVs). Compared to the control group, the uptake of FDG in the cerebellum was significantly decreased in both the low and high dose groups. These preliminary data demonstrate that microPET imaging is capable of distinguishing differences in retention of FDG in the brains of NHPs treated chronically with MPH and suggests that this approach may provide a minimally invasive biomarker for exploring the effects of chronic MPH treatment on aspects of brain function. PMID:27307090

  18. Relationship between Tumor Heterogeneity Measured on FDG-PET/CT and Pathological Prognostic Factors in Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soussan, Michael; Orlhac, Fanny; Boubaya, Marouane; Zelek, Laurent; Ziol, Marianne; Eder, Véronique; Buvat, Irène

    2014-01-01

    Background There is currently little support to understand which pathological factors led to differences in tumor texture as measured from FDG PET/CT images. We studied whether tumor heterogeneity measured using texture analysis in FDG-PET/CT images is correlated with pathological prognostic factors in invasive breast cancer. Methods Fifty-four patients with locally advanced breast cancer who had an initial FDG-PET/CT were retrospectively included. In addition to SUVmax, three robust textural indices extracted from 3D matrices: High-Gray-level Run Emphasis (HGRE), Entropy and Homogeneity were studied. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify PET parameters associated with poor prognosis pathological factors: hormone receptor negativity, presence of HER-2 and triple negative phenotype. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and the (AUC) analysis, and reclassification measures, were performed in order to evaluate the performance of combining texture analysis and SUVmax for characterizing breast tumors. Results Tumor heterogeneity, measured with HGRE, was higher in negative estrogen receptor (p = 0.039) and negative progesterone receptor tumors (p = 0.036), and in Scarff-Bloom-Richardson grade 3 tumors (p = 0.047). None of the PET indices could identify HER-2 positive tumors. Only SUVmax was positively correlated with Ki-67 (p<0.0004). Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) exhibited higher SUVmax (Odd Ratio = 1.22, 95%CI [1.06–1.39],p = 0.004), lower Homogeneity (OR = 3.57[0.98–12.5],p = 0.05) and higher HGRE (OR = 8.06[1.88–34.51],p = 0.005) than non-TNBC. Multivariate analysis showed that HGRE remained associated with TNBC (OR = 5.27[1.12–1.38],p = 0.03) after adjustment for SUVmax. Combining SUVmax and HGRE yielded in higher area under the ROC curves (AUC) than SUVmax for identifying TNBC: AUC =  0.83 and 0.77, respectively. Probability of correct classification also

  19. High bone turnover assessed by 18F-fluoride PET/CT in the spine and sacroiliac joints of patients with ankylosing spondylitis: comparison with inflammatory lesions detected by whole body MRI

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study compares the frequency and distribution of increased activity on 18 F-fluoride PET/CT with the presence of bone marrow edema on whole-body MR imaging in the spine and sacroiliac joints (SIJ) of patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods Ten patients (6 men and 4 women), between 30 and 58 years old (median 44) with active AS, were prospectively examined with both whole-body MRI and 18 F-fluoride PET/CT. Patients fulfilled modified NY criteria and had a Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) of at least 4. Increased radiotracer uptake in PET/CT and bone marrow edema in whole-body MRI of spine and SIJ was evaluated independently by two blinded observers for each modality. Kappa statistics were used to compare interobserver agreement as well as scores of consensus reading of the two imaging modalities. Results Analysis of interobserver agreement for PET/CT yielded a kappa value of 0.68 for spinal lesions and of 0.88 for SIJ lesions. The corresponding kappa values for the MRI modality were 0.64 and 0.93, respectively. More spinal lesions were detected by MRI in comparison to PET/CT (68 vs. 38), whereas a similar number of SIJ quadrants scored positive in both modalities (19 vs. 17). Analysis of agreement of lesion detection between both imaging modalities yielded a kappa value of only 0.25 for spinal lesions and of 0.64 for SIJ lesions. Conclusion Increased 18 F-fluoride uptake in PET/CT is only modestly associated with bone marrow edema on MRI in the spine and SIJ of patients with AS, suggesting different aspects of bone involvement in AS. PMID:22788874

  20. Semiautomatic method to identify the best phase for gated RT in lung region by 4D-PET/CT acquisitions

    SciTech Connect

    Mancosu, Pietro; Danna, Massimo; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Lobefalo, Francesca; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Delineating tumor motion by four-dimensional positron emission tomography/computed tomography (4D-PET/CT) is a crucial step for gated radiotherapy (RT). This article quantitatively evaluates semiautomatic algorithms for tumor shift estimation in the lung region due to patient respiration by 4D-PET/CT, in order to support the selection of the best phases for gated RT, by considering the most stable phases of the breathing cycle. Methods: Three mobile spheres and ten selected lesions were included in this study. 4D-PET/CT data were reconstructed and classified into six/ten phases. The semiautomatic algorithms required the generation of single sets of images representative of the full target motion, used as masks for segmenting the phases. For 4D-CT, a pre-established HU range was used, whereas three thresholds (100%, 80%, and 40%) were evaluated for 4D-PET. By using these segmentations, the authors estimated the lesion motion from the shifting centroids, and the phases with the least motion were also deduced including the phases with a curve slope less than 2 mm/{Delta}phase. The proposed algorithms were validated by comparing the results to those generated entirely by manual contouring. Results: In the phantom study, the mean difference between the manual contour and the semiautomatic technique was 0.1{+-}0.1 mm for 4D-CT and 0.2{+-}0.1 mm for the 4D-PET based on 40% threshold. In the patients' series, the mean difference was 0.9{+-}0.6 mm for 4D-CT and 0.8{+-}0.2 mm for the 4D-PET based on 40% threshold. Conclusions: Estimation of lesion motion by the proposed semiautomatic algorithm can be used to evaluate tumor motion due to breathing.

  1. NEMA and clinical evaluation of a novel brain PET-CT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, Kira S.; Toole, Terrence; Ouyang, Jinsong; Zhu, Xuping; Normandin, Marc; Johnson, Keith; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Fakhri, Georges El

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of a novel mobile human brain/small animal PET-CT system, developed by Photo Diagnostic Systems Inc. The scanner has a 35.7-cm diameter bore and a 22-cm axial extent. The detector ring has 7 modules each with 3×4 cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate crystal blocks, each consisting of 22×22 outer layer and 21×21 inner layer crystals, each layer 1 cm thick. Light is collected by 12×12 SiPMs. The integrated CT can be used for attenuation correction and anatomical localization. The scanner was designed as a low-cost device that nevertheless produces high-quality PET images with the unique capability of battery-powered propulsion, enabling use in many settings. Methods Spatial resolution, sensitivity and noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) were measured based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-2012 procedures. Reconstruction was done with tight energy and timing cuts: 400-650 keV and 7ns, and loose cuts: 350-700 keV and 10ns. Additional image quality measurements were made from phantoms, human, and animal studies. Performance was compared to a reference scanner (ECAT Exact HR+) with comparable imaging properties. Results The full-width half-max transverse resolution at 1 cm (10 cm) radius is 3.2 mm (5.2 mm radial, 3.1 mm tangential) and the axial resolution is 3.5 mm (4.0 mm). For tight (loose) cuts, a sensitivity of 7.5 (11.7) kcps/MBq at the center increases to 8.8 (13.9) kcps/MBq at a 10 cm radial offset. The maximum NECR of 19.5 (22.7) kcps was achieved for an activity concentration of 2.9 kBq/ml. Contrast recovery for 4:1 hot cylinder to warm background was 76% for the 25 mm diameter cylinder, but decreased with decreasing cylinder size. The quantitation agrees within 2% of the known activity distribution and concentration. Brain phantom and human scans have shown agreement in SUV values and image quality with the HR+. Conclusion We have characterized the performance of the NeuroPET/CT

  2. Performance comparison of two commercial BGO-based PET/CT scanners using NEMA NU 2-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bolard, Gregory; Prior, John O.; Modolo, Luca; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Kosinski, Marek; Wastiel, Claude; Malterre, Jerome; Bulling, Shelley; Bochud, Francois; Verdun, Francis R.

    2007-07-15

    Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) scanners play a major role in medicine for in vivo imaging in an increasing number of diseases in oncology, cardiology, neurology, and psychiatry. With the advent of short-lived radioisotopes other than {sup 18}F and newer scanners, there is a need to optimize radioisotope activity and acquisition protocols, as well as to compare scanner performances on an objective basis. The Discovery-LS (D-LS) was among the first clinical PET/CT scanners to be developed and has been extensively characterized with older National Electrical Manufacturer Association (NEMA) NU 2-1994 standards. At the time of publication of the latest version of the standards (NU 2-2001) that have been adapted for whole-body imaging under clinical conditions, more recent models from the same manufacturer, i.e., Discovery-ST (D-ST) and Discovery-STE (D-STE), were commercially available. We report on the full characterization both in the two- and three-dimensional acquisition mode of the D-LS according to latest NEMA NU 2-2001 standards (spatial resolution, sensitivity, count rate performance, accuracy of count losses, and random coincidence correction and image quality), as well as a detailed comparison with the newer D-ST widely used and whose characteristics are already published.

  3. Multiparametric PET/CT-perfusion does not add significant additional information for initial staging in lung cancer compared with standard PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of CT-perfusion (CTP), 18F-FDG-PET/CT and histological parameters, and the possible added value of CTP to FDG-PET/CT in the initial staging of lung cancer. Methods Fifty-four consecutive patients (median age 65 years, 15 females, 39 males) with suspected lung cancer were evaluated prospectively by CT-perfusion scan and 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan. Overall, 46 tumors were identified. CTP parameters blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), and mean transit time (MTT) of the tumor tissue were calculated. Intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was assessed quantitatively. Differences in CTP parameters concerning tumor type, location, PET positivity of lymph nodes, TNM status, and UICC stage were analyzed. Spearman correlation analyses between CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters (SUVmax, SUVmean, PETvol, and TLG), MVD, tumor size, and tumor stage were performed. Results The mean BF (mL/100 mL min-1), BV (mL/100 mL), and MTT (s) was 35.5, 8.4, and 14.2, respectively. The BF and BV were lower in tumors with PET-positive lymph nodes (p = 0.02). However, the CTP values were not significantly different among the N stages. The CTP values were not different, depending on tumor size and location. No significant correlation was found between CTP parameters and MVD. Conclusions Overall, the CTP information showed only little additional information for the initial staging compared with standard FDG-PET/CT. Low perfusion in lung tumors might possibly be associated with metabolically active regional lymph nodes. Apart from that, both CTP and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameter sets may reflect different pathophysiological mechanisms in lung cancer. PMID:24450990

  4. Comparative Oncology: Evaluation of 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) for the Staging of Dogs with Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Ambros J.; Brühschwein, Andreas; Kreutzmann, Nina; Laberke, Silja; Wergin, Melanie C.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andrea; Brandl, Johanna; von Thaden, Anne-Kathrin; Farrell, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET/CT is a well-established imaging method for staging, restaging and therapy-control in human medicine. In veterinary medicine, this imaging method could prove to be an attractive and innovative alternative to conventional imaging in order to improve staging and restaging. The aim of this study was both to evaluate the effectiveness of this image-guided method in canine patients with spontaneously occurring cancer as well as to illustrate the dog as a well-suited animal model for comparative oncology. Methods Ten dogs with various malignant tumors were included in the study and underwent a whole body FDG PET/CT. One patient has a second PET-CT 5 months after the first study. Patients were diagnosed with histiocytic sarcoma (n = 1), malignant lymphoma (n = 2), mammary carcinoma (n = 4), sertoli cell tumor (n = 1), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) (n = 1) and lung tumor (n = 1). PET/CT data were analyzed with the help of a 5-point scale in consideration of the patients’ medical histories. Results In seven of the ten dogs, the treatment protocol and prognosis were significantly changed due to the results of FDG PET/CT. In the patients with lymphoma (n = 2) tumor extent could be defined on PET/CT because of increased FDG uptake in multiple lymph nodes. This led to the recommendation for a therapeutic polychemotherapy as a treatment. In one of the dogs with mammary carcinoma (n = 4) and in the patient with the lung tumor (n = 1), surgery was cancelled due to the discovery of multiple metastasis. Consequently no treatment was recommended. Conclusion FDG PET/CT offers additional information in canine patients with malignant disease with a potential improvement of staging and restaging. The encouraging data of this clinical study highlights the possibility to further improve innovative diagnostic and staging methods with regard to comparative oncology. In the future, performing PET/CT not only for staging but also in

  5. Paget sarcoma of the pelvic bone with widespread metastatic disease on radiography, CT, MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael A; Scalcione, Luke R; Gimber, Lana H; Thompson, Rebecca B; Avery, Ryan J; Taljanovic, Mihra S

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of Paget sarcoma of the left superior pubic ramus and disseminated metastatic disease in a 70-year-old man. Paget disease of the left hemipelvis with malignant degeneration in the region of the left superior pubic ramus was initially diagnosed on radiographs. Subsequent CT, MRI, PET/CT imaging, and CT-guided biopsy confirmed the diagnosis and showed extensive left-sided pelvic and abdominal lymphadenopathy with widespread metastatic disease to liver, spleen, and lungs. PMID:24566398

  6. Primary central nervous system lymphoma with lymphomatosis cerebri in an immunocompetent child: MRI and 18F-FDG PET-CT findings.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tarun K; Sharma, Punit; Suman, Sudhir K C; Faizi, Nauroze A; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is extremely rare in immunocompetent children. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) findings of such a case in a 14-year old immunocompetent boy. In this patient, PCNSL was associated with lymphomatosis cerebri. Familiarity with the findings of this rare condition will improve the diagnostic confidence of the nuclear radiologist and avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:23743243

  7. A Case of Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Duodenal Metastasis on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tends to have distant metastasis. However, metastasis from NSCLC to the small bowel is uncommon, and duodenal metastasis from NSCLC is extremely rare. FDG PET/CT findings of duodenal metastasis from NSCLC have not been reported in the literature. In this case, we report FDG PET/CT findings in a 61-year-old NSCLC patient with biopsy-proven metastasis in the transverse duodenum. PMID:27055139

  8. FDG PET/CT Evidence of Effective Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis With Adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christina T; Sweiss, Nadera J; Lu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A 53-year-old man with mediastinal lymph node biopsy and cardiac MRI-proven cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) received treatment with pacemaker and steroids. FDG PET/CT showed active CS despite treatment with prednisone and methotrexate. Addition of weekly adalimumab (Humira) injections was introduced for 3 months. Follow-up FDG PET/CT showed complete resolution of CS as well as improvement of other sarcoid lesions in the thoracic lymph nodes. PMID:26828145

  9. Attenuation correction of PET cardiac data with low-dose average CT in PET/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Tinsu; Mawlawi, Osama; Luo, Dershan; Liu, Hui H.; Chi Paichun, M.; Mar, Martha V.; Gladish, Gregory; Truong, Mylene; Erasmus, Jeremy Jr.; Liao Zhongxing; Macapinlac, H. A.

    2006-10-15

    We proposed a low-dose average computer tomography (ACT) for attenuation correction (AC) of the PET cardiac data in PET/CT. The ACT was obtained from a cine CT scan of over one breath cycle per couch position while the patient was free breathing. We applied this technique on four patients who underwent tumor imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG in PET/CT, whose PET data showed high uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the heart and whose CT and PET data had misregistration. All four patients did not have known myocardiac infarction or ischemia. The patients were injected with 555-740 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG and scanned 1 h after injection. The helical CT (HCT) data were acquired in 16 s for the coverage of 100 cm. The PET acquisition was 3 min per bed of 15 cm. The duration of cine CT acquisition per 2 cm was 5.9 s. We used a fast gantry rotation cycle time of 0.5 s to minimize motion induced reconstruction artifacts in the cine CT images, which were averaged to become the ACT images for AC of the PET data. The radiation dose was about 5 mGy for 5.9 s cine duration. The selection of 5.9 s was based on our analysis of the respiratory signals of 600 patients; 87% of the patients had average breath cycles of less than 6 s and 90% had standard deviations of less than 1 s in the period of breath cycle. In all four patient studies, registrations between the CT and the PET data were improved. An increase of average uptake in the anterior and the lateral walls up to 48% and a decrease of average uptake in the septal and the inferior walls up to 16% with ACT were observed. We also compared ACT and conventional slow scan CT (SSCT) of 4 s duration in one patient study and found ACT was better than SSCT in depicting average respiratory motion and the SSCT images showed motion-induced reconstruction artifacts. In conclusion, low-dose ACT improved registration of the CT and the PET data in the heart region in our study of four patients. ACT was superior than SSCT for depicting average respiration

  10. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Wu, Hubing; Huang, Meiyan; Wu, Yao; Wang, Quanshi; Zhao, Jianqi; Yang, Wei; Chen, Wufan; Feng, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the variability of gross tumor volume (GTV) using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT images for nasopharyngeal carcinomas boundary definition. Assessment consisted of inter-observer and inter-modality variation analysis. Four radiation oncologists were invited to manually contour GTV by using PET/CT fusion obtained from a cohort of 12 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and who underwent both 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG scans. Student's paired-sample t-test was performed for analyzing inter-observer and inter-modality variability. Semi-automatic segmentation methods, including thresholding and region growing, were also validated against the manual contouring of the two types of PET images. We observed no significant variation in the results obtained by different oncologists in terms of the same type of PET/CT volumes. Choline fusion volumes were significantly larger than the FDG volumes (p < 0.0001, mean ± SD = 18.21 ± 8.19). While significantly consistent results were obtained between the oncologists and the standard references in Choline volumes compared with those in FDG volumes (p = 0.0025). Simple semi-automatic delineation methods indicated that 11C-Choline PET images could provide better results than FDG volumes (p = 0.076, CI = [-0.29, 0.025]). 11C-Choline PET/CT may be more advantageous in GTV delineation for the radiotherapy of NPC than 18F-FDG. Phantom simulations and clinical trials should be conducted to prove the possible improvement of the treatment outcome. PMID:26161910

  11. Inflammatory Pseudotumor in the Epidural Space of Lumbosacral Spine on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Suk; Park, Shin Young

    2014-01-01

    An inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare benign lesion, characterized by non-neoplastic proliferation of inflammatory cells and presence of intermingling collagen fibers. IPT commonly occurs in the lungs and orbita, while an intraspinal IPT is extremely rare. IPT can mimic both clinically and radiologically malignant processes, and making a definitive preoperative diagnosis is often difficult. Recently, 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been reported to accumulate in IPT in the lung, spleen, liver, pancreas, colon, orbit, mediastinum, and mesentery. However, to the best of our knowledge, accumulation of 18F-FDG has not been reported in lumbosacral intraspinal IPT. Herein, we report a case of IPT in the epidural space of the lumbar spine, using the imaging findings of 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This is the first case of IPT in the epidural space, depicted by 18F-FDG PET/CT, which revealed a homogeneous, intense 18F-FDG uptake.

  12. Clinical count rate performance of an LSO PET/CT scanner utilizing a new front-end electronics architecture with sub-nanosecond intrinsic timing resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carney, J. P. J.; Townsend, D. W.

    2006-12-01

    A new front-end electronics architecture with sub-nanosecond intrinsic timing resolution has recently been incorporated into a 16 slice LSO PET/CT scanner for imaging applications in oncology. The new electronics are designed to work optimally with the lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillator. Clinical performance of the LSO PET/CT is examined before and after upgrading to the new PICO 3D electronics, and compared with results using the NEMA NU 2 standard for evaluating scanner performance. Improved noise-equivalent count rates are seen in clinical studies, and reduced scatter fractions are observed, consistent with the increased lower-level energy threshold used to reject scatter events in the upgraded configuration.

  13. Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT-Guided Biopsy and Cryoablation with Autoradiography of Biopsy Specimen for Treatment of Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Maybody, Majid; Grewal, Ravinder K; Healey, John H; Antonescu, Cristina R; Fanchon, Louise; Hwang, Sinchun; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Kirov, Assen; Farooki, Azeez

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused by small benign tumors of mesenchymal origin also known as phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors mixed connective tissue variant. Excellent prognosis is expected with eradication of the culprit tumor. These small tumors are notoriously difficult to localize with conventional imaging studies; this often leads to an extensive work up and prolonged morbidity. We report a patient with clinical diagnosis of TIO whose culprit tumor was localized with Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT and MRI. Biopsy and cryoablation were performed under Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT guidance. Autoradiography of the biopsy specimen was performed and showed in situ correlation between Ga-68 DOTATOC uptake and histopathology with millimeter resolution. PMID:27150801

  14. Neurolymphomatosis as a late relapse of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kajáry, K; Molnár, Z; Mikó, I; Barsi, P; Lengyel, Z; Szakáll, S

    2014-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis is a rare condition defined as an infiltration of nerves, nerve roots or nervous plexuses by haematological malignancy. Its diagnosis may sometimes be difficult with conventional imaging techniques. This paper aims to emphasize the importance of this entity and the role of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in this indication. We present the case of a 53-year-old male who complained of sharp pain in his right hip and right leg paresthesia after 2 years of complete remission from Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Physical examination and CT scan were negative and the lumbar MRI showed protrusion of L5-S1 disc. Physiotherapy, nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs and steroids were inefficient. PET/CT was performed four months after the onset of the symptoms, revealing focal FDG uptake in the right S1 nerve root and linear FDG uptake along the right sacral plexus suggesting relapse. This was confirmed by histology. PMID:23683830

  15. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C. M. Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  16. Cytotoxicity, tumor targeting and PET imaging of sub-5 nm KGdF4 multifunctional rare earth nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinmin; Cao, Fengwen; Xiong, Liqin; Yang, Yang; Cao, Tianye; Cai, Xi; Hai, Wangxi; Li, Biao; Guo, Yixiao; Zhang, Yimin; Li, Fuyou

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasmall sub-5 nm KGdF4 rare earth nanoparticles were synthesized as multifunctional probes for fluorescent, magnetic, and radionuclide imaging. The cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles in human glioblastoma U87MG and human non-small cell lung carcinoma H1299 cells was evaluated, and their application for in vitro and in vivo tumor targeted imaging has also been demonstrated.Ultrasmall sub-5 nm KGdF4 rare earth nanoparticles were synthesized as multifunctional probes for fluorescent, magnetic, and radionuclide imaging. The cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles in human glioblastoma U87MG and human non-small cell lung carcinoma H1299 cells was evaluated, and their application for in vitro and in vivo tumor targeted imaging has also been demonstrated. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental section as well as EDXA, XRD, zeta potential, FTIR, TGA, stability, TEM, Z scanning, ICP-MS, and MicroPET/CT images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03374h

  17. Is non-attenuation-corrected PET inferior to body attenuation-corrected PET or PET/CT in lung cancer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maintas, Dimitris; Houzard, Claire; Ksyar, Rachid; Mognetti, Thomas; Maintas, Catherine; Scheiber, Christian; Itti, Roland

    2006-12-01

    It is considered that one of the great strengths of PET imaging is the ability to correct for body attenuation. This enables better lesion uptake quantification and quality of PET images. The aim of this work is to compare the sensitivity of non-attenuation-corrected (NAC) PET images, the gamma photons (GPAC) and CT attenuation-corrected (CTAC) images in detecting and staging of lung cancer. We have studied 66 patients undergoing PET/CT examinations for detecting and staging NSC lung cancer. The patients were injected with 18-FDG; 5 MBq/kg under fasting conditions and examination was started 60 min later. Transmission data were acquired by a spiral CT X-ray tube and by gamma photons emitting Cs-137l source and were used for the patient body attenuation correction without correction for respiratory motion. In 55 of 66 patients we performed both attenuation correction procedures and in 11 patients only CT attenuation correction. In seven patients with solitary nodules PET was negative and in 59 patients with lung cancer PET/CT was positive for pulmonary or other localization. In the group of 55 patients we found 165 areas of focal increased 18-FDG uptake in NAC, 165 in CTAC and 164 in GPAC PET images.In the patients with only CTAC we found 58 areas of increased 18-FDG uptake on NAC and 58 areas lesions on CTAC. In the patients with positive PET we found 223 areas of focal increased uptake in NAC and 223 areas in CTAC images. The sensitivity of NAC was equal to the sensitivity of CTAC and GPAC images. The visualization of peripheral lesions was better in NAC images and the lesions were better localized in attenuation-corrected images. In three lesions of the thorax the localization was better in GPAC and fused images than in CTAC images.

  18. (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT for the in vivo visualization of Mönckeberg's sclerosis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Quirce, R; Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Banzo, I; de Arcocha-Torres, M; Jiménez-Bonilla, J F; Martínez-Amador, N; Ibáñez-Bravo, S; Ramos, L; Amado, J A; Carril, J M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a major frequent cause of atherosclerosis vascular disease. Arterial calcification in diabetic patients is responsible for peripheral vascular involvement. Molecular imaging using (18)F-sodium fluoride ((18)F-NaF) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) has been recently proposed as a marker to study the in vivo mineralization process in the atheroma plaque. A 69-year-old man with a history of type 2 diabetes and no clinical evidence of peripheral arterial disease underwent an (18)F-NaF PET/CT scan. A linear, well-defined (18)F-NaF uptake was detected along the femoral arteries. In addition, the CT component of the PET/CT identified an unsuspected "tram-track" calcification in his femoral arteries, suggestive of medial calcification (Mönckeberg's sclerosis). In other vascular territories, focal (18)F-NaF uptake was also detected in carotid and aorta atheroma plaques. Molecular imaging with (18)F-NaF PET/CT might provide new functional information about the in vivo vascular calcification process in diabetic patients. PMID:26032617

  19. Will 3-dimensional PET-CT enable the routine quantification of myocardial blood flow?

    PubMed

    deKemp, Robert A; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2007-01-01

    Quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and flow reserve has been used extensively with positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate the functional significance of coronary artery disease. Increasingly, flow quantification is being applied to investigations of microvascular dysfunction in early atherosclerosis and in nonatherosclerotic microvascular disease associated with primary and secondary cardiomyopathies. Fully three-dimensional (3D) acquisition is becoming the standard imaging mode on new equipment, bringing with it certain challenges for cardiac PET, but also the potential for MBF to be measured simultaneously with routine electrocardiography (ECG)-gated perfusion imaging. Existing 3D versus 2D comparative studies support the use of 3D cardiac PET for flow quantification, and these protocols can be translated to PET-CT, which offers a virtually noise-free attenuation correction. This technology combines the strengths of cardiac CT for evaluation of anatomy with cardiac PET for quantification of the hemodynamic impact on the myocardium. High throughput clinical imaging protocols are needed to evaluate the incremental diagnostic and prognostic value of this technology. PMID:17556173

  20. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  1. Bilateral symmetrical adrenal hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT due to Cushing syndrome in well differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aktas, G E; Soyluoglu Demir, S; Sarikaya, A

    2016-01-01

    The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan has been suggested for whole-body imaging to identify ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting tumours, but there are some challenges involved. The case of a patient is presented, who was admitted with the pre-diagnosis of ectopic ACTH syndrome. On the CT, a nodular lesion was detected in the medial segment of the right lung. The FDG uptake of the lesion seemed to be increased visually, but was not pathological quantitatively (SUVmax: 1.8) on the PET/CT. There was also diffuse increased uptake (SUVmax: 14.2) in the enlarged adrenal glands. The lesion was reported as a possible malignant lesion with low FDG affinity, such as a low grade neuroendocrine tumour, while the diffuse enlarged adrenal glands with high uptake were interpreted as diffusely hyperplasic, due to Cushing's syndrome. The patient was treated with a surgical wedge resection. The histopathological diagnosis confirmed that the tumour was a grade 1 well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:26522002

  2. Acquisition with (11)C-choline and (18)F-fluorocholine PET/CT for patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    von Eyben, Finn E; Kairemo, Kalevi

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate whether the choice between two radiotracers, (11)C-choline ((11)C-cho) and (18)F-fluorocholine ((18)F-FCH) for PET/CT, and different acquisition protocols contributed to detect metastases for patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy. We searched in January 2016 in Pubmed and Embase for articles that had used radiolabeled choline PET/CT in restaging. The meta-analysis evaluated technical and clinical aspects. Across 18 articles 1 219 of 2 213 patients (54.9 %) had a positive radiolabeled PET/CT image. Mean of the mean/median restaging PSA levels was 3.6 ± 2.7 ng/mL (range 0.5-10.7 ng/mL). Six articles with (11)C-cho PET/CT had a radiation activity of 561 ± 122 MBq and it was 293 ± 47 MBq in 12 articles with (18)F-FCH PET/CT. The difference was significant (P = 0.007, t test). Uptake time was 5 min in articles with (11)C-cho PET/CT and it was 29 ± 24 min in articles with (18)F-FCH PET/CT. The difference was significant (P = 0.02, t test). Thereby the detection rates of metastatic sites in articles with (11)C-cho (30 ± 5 %) and (18)F-FCH (39 ± 5 %) did not differ significantly (P = 0.26, t test). In linear regression analyses of the articles, the radiation activity of (11)C-cho and (18)F-FCH was not significantly associated with the detection rate of metastatic sites (P = 0.75 and P = 0.60). Restaging with radiolabeled choline PET/CT detected metastatic sites for patients with biochemical recurrence and PSA levels of 1-10 ng/mL at clinically relevant level. The choice between the two choline radiotracers and different acquisition protocols had no significant impact on detection. PMID:27173771

  3. Coregistration of Prechemotherapy PET-CT for Planning Pediatric Hodgkin's Disease Radiotherapy Significantly Diminishes Interobserver Variability of Clinical Target Volume Definition

    SciTech Connect

    Metwally, Hussein; Courbon, Frederic; David, Isabelle; Filleron, Thomas; Blouet, Aurelien; Rives, Michel; Izar, Francoise; Zerdoud, Slimane; Plat, Genevieve; Vial, Julie; Robert, Alain; Laprie, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) definitions when using registered {sup 18}F-labeled deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET-CT) versus side-by-side image sets in pediatric Hodgkin's disease (HD). Methods and Materials: Prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scans performed in the treatment position were acquired from 20 children (median age, 14 years old) with HD (stages 2A to 4B) and registered with postchemotherapy planning CT scans. The patients had a median age of 14 years and stages of disease ranging between 2A and 4B. Image sets were coregistered using a semiautomatic coregistration system. The biological target volume was defined on all the coregistered images as a guide to defining the initial site of involvement and to avoid false-positive or negative results. Five radiation oncologists independently defined the CTV for all 20 patients: once using separate FDG-PET-CT images as a guide (not registered) to define CTVa and once using the registered FDG-PET-CT data to define CTVb. The total volumes were compared, as well as their coefficients of variation (COV). To assess the interobserver variability, the percentages of intersection between contours drawn by all observers for each patient were calculated for CTVa and for CTVb. Results: The registration of a prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan caused a change in the CTV for all patients. Comparing CTVa with CTVb showed that the mean CTVb increased in 14 patients (range, 0.61%-101.96%) and decreased in 6 patients (range, 2.97%-37.26%). The COV for CTVb significantly decreased for each patient; the mean COVs for CTVa and CTVb were 45% (21%-65%) and 32% (13%-57%), respectively (p = 0.0004). The percentage of intersection among all CTVbs for the five observers increased significantly by 89.77% (1.99%-256.41%) compared to that of CTVa (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: High observer variability can occur during CT-based definition of CTVs for children diagnosed with HD

  4. Comparison of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT in localisation of tumours in ectopic ACTH syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Swati S; Lila, Anurag R; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Khare, Shruti; Yerawar, Chaitanya G; Hira, Priya; Phadke, Uday; Shah, Hina; Lele, Vikram R; Malhotra, Gaurav; Bandgar, Tushar; Shah, Nalini S

    2016-01-01

    Background Localising ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) syndrome (EAS) tumour source is challenging. Somatostatin receptor-based PET imaging has shown promising results, but the data is limited to case reports and small case series. We reviewed here the performance of 68Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) in our cohort of 12 consecutive EAS patients. Materials and methods Retrospective data analysis of 12 consecutive patients of EAS presenting to a single tertiary care centre in a period between January 2013 and December 2014 was done. CECT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT were reported (blinded) by an experienced radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician, respectively. The performance of CECT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was compared. Results Tumours could be localised in 11 out of 12 patients at initial presentation (overt cases), whereas in one patient, tumour remained occult. Thirteen lesions were identified in 11 patients as EAS source (true positives). CECT localised 12 out of these 13 lesions (sensitivity 92.3%) and identified five false-positive lesions (positive predictive value (PPV) 70.5%). Compared with false-positive lesions, true-positive lesions had greater mean contrast