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Sample records for nanoparticle pulmonary toxicity

  1. Pulmonary toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, Brian Christopher

    that carbon blacks contain free radical and other surface functionality as manufactured, and that exposure to ozone further functionalizes the surface. Samples of carbon black that have been exposed to ozone react with their ambient environment so that acid anhydride and cyclic ether functionality hydrolyze to form carboxylic acid functionality, observable by transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Persistent free radical content, but not free radical content from ozone exposure, may mediate the toxic response of cells to carbon blacks in vitro. Results showed that macrophages exposed to carbon blacks that had been exposed to ozone were not less viable in vitro than macrophages exposed to carbon blacks as manufactured because the free radical content that resulted from ozone exposure was not persistent in an aqueous medium. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to ozonated carbon blacks and ozone was less lethal to macrophages than carbon black exposure alone, possibly because the ozone oxidatively preconditioned the macrophages to resist oxidative stress. The nature of redox-active iron species on the surface of iron-loaded synthetic carbon particles was explored. The particles had been shown in previous studies to provoke an inflammatory response involving the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, which was correlated with their production of hydroxyl free radicals via the Fenton reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. It was found that the source of bioavailable Fenton-active iron on the surfaces of the particles was fluoride species that were byproducts of a step in the synthetic process. Fluoride ligated the iron already on the surface, forming a complex that resisted precipitation in the biological medium and thus made the iron more bioavailable. The results of this thesis aim to clarify whether the size and surface chemistry of nanoparticles should be considered more closely as criteria with which to develop better environmental controls

  2. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26828483

  3. Pulmonary surfactant mitigates silver nanoparticle toxicity in human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Leo, Bey Fen; Chen, Shu; Abraham-Thomas, Nisha; Thorley, Andrew J; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2016-09-01

    Accompanying increased commercial applications and production of silver nanomaterials is an increased probability of human exposure, with inhalation a key route. Nanomaterials that deposit in the pulmonary alveolar region following inhalation will interact firstly with pulmonary surfactant before they interact with the alveolar epithelium. It is therefore critical to understand the effects of human pulmonary surfactant when evaluating the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of AgNPs on human alveolar type-I-like epithelial (TT1) cells in the absence and presence of Curosurf(®) (a natural pulmonary surfactant substitute), hypothesising that the pulmonary surfactant would act to modify toxicity. We demonstrated that 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs induce toxicity in human alveolar type I-like epithelial cells and, in agreement with our hypothesis, that pulmonary surfactant acts to mitigate this toxicity, possibly through reducing AgNP dissolution into cytotoxic Ag(+) ions. For example, IL-6 and IL-8 release by TT1 cells significantly increased 10.7- and 35-fold, respectively (P<0.01), 24h after treatment with 25μg/ml AgNPs. In contrast, following pre-incubation of AgNPs with Curosurf(®), this effect was almost completely abolished. We further determined that the mechanism of this toxicity is likely associated with Ag(+) ion release and lysosomal disruption, but not with increased reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides a critical understanding of the toxicity of AgNPs in target human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells and the role of pulmonary surfactant in mitigating this toxicity. The observations reported have important implications for the manufacture and application of AgNPs, in particular for applications involving use of aerosolised AgNPs. PMID:27182651

  4. Simple in vitro models can predict pulmonary toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Giannakou, Christina; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Vermeulen, Jolanda; van Loveren, Henk; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2016-08-01

    To study the effects of nanomaterials after inhalation, a large number of in vitro lung models have been reported in literature. Although the in vitro models contribute to the reduction of animal studies, insufficient data exists to determine the predictive value of these in vitro models for the in vivo situation. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between in vitro and in vivo data by comparing the dose metrics of silver nanoparticles in an in vitro lung model of increasing complexity to our previously published in vivo inhalation study. In vivo, the previously published study showed that the alveolar dose expressed as particle surface area is the most suitable dose metric to describe the toxicity of silver nanoparticles after inhalation. The results of the present study show that particle surface area is a suitable dose metric to describe the effects of silver nanoparticles when using a simple monolayer of lung epithelial cells. The dose metric shifted from particle surface area to particle mass when adding an increasing number of macrophages. In addition, a co-culture of endothelial cells, epithelial cells and macrophages on a Transwell® insert correlated less well to the in vivo results compared to the epithelial monolayer. We conclude that for studying the acute pulmonary toxicity of nanoparticles simple in vitro models using an epithelial monolayer better predict the in vivo response compared to complex co-culture models. PMID:26809698

  5. Evaluation of Pulmonary Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Following Inhalation and Intratracheal Instillation

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We conducted inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in order to examine their pulmonary toxicity. F344 rats were received intratracheal instillation at 0.2 or 1 mg of ZnO nanoparticles with a primary diameter of 35 nm that were well-dispersed in distilled water. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed at three days, one week, one month, three months, and six months after the instillation. As the inhalation study, rats were exposed to a concentration of inhaled ZnO nanoparticles (2 and 10 mg/m3) for four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The same endpoints as in the intratracheal instillation study were analyzed at three days, one month, and three months after the end of the exposure. In the intratracheal instillation study, both the 0.2 and the 1.0 mg ZnO groups had a transient increase in the total cell and neutrophil count in the BALF and in the expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2, chemokine for neutrophil, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker, in the BALF. In the inhalation study, transient increases in total cell and neutrophil count, CINC-1,-2 and HO-1 in the BALF were observed in the high concentration groups. Neither of the studies of ZnO nanoparticles showed persistent inflammation in the rat lung, suggesting that well-dispersed ZnO nanoparticles have low toxicity. PMID:27490535

  6. Evaluation of Pulmonary Toxicity of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Following Inhalation and Intratracheal Instillation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    We conducted inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles in order to examine their pulmonary toxicity. F344 rats were received intratracheal instillation at 0.2 or 1 mg of ZnO nanoparticles with a primary diameter of 35 nm that were well-dispersed in distilled water. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed at three days, one week, one month, three months, and six months after the instillation. As the inhalation study, rats were exposed to a concentration of inhaled ZnO nanoparticles (2 and 10 mg/m³) for four weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). The same endpoints as in the intratracheal instillation study were analyzed at three days, one month, and three months after the end of the exposure. In the intratracheal instillation study, both the 0.2 and the 1.0 mg ZnO groups had a transient increase in the total cell and neutrophil count in the BALF and in the expression of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2, chemokine for neutrophil, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker, in the BALF. In the inhalation study, transient increases in total cell and neutrophil count, CINC-1,-2 and HO-1 in the BALF were observed in the high concentration groups. Neither of the studies of ZnO nanoparticles showed persistent inflammation in the rat lung, suggesting that well-dispersed ZnO nanoparticles have low toxicity. PMID:27490535

  7. Pulmonary toxicity of instilled silver nanoparticles: influence of size, coating and rat strain.

    PubMed

    Seiffert, Joanna; Hussain, Farhana; Wiegman, Coen; Li, Feng; Bey, Leo; Baker, Warren; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary P; Chang, Yan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhu, Jie; Tetley, Terry D; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Particle size and surface chemistry are potential determinants of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) respiratory toxicity that may also depend on the lung inflammatory state. We compared the effects of intratracheally-administered AgNPs (20 nm and 110 nm; polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate-capped; 0.1 mg/Kg) in Brown-Norway (BN) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In BN rats, there was both a neutrophilic and eosinophilic response, while in SD rats, there was a neutrophilic response at day 1, greatest for the 20 nm citrate-capped AgNPs. Eosinophilic cationic protein was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in BN and SD rats on day 1. BAL protein and malondialdehyde levels were increased in BN rats at 1 and 7 days, and BAL KC, CCL11 and IL-13 levels at day 1, with increased expression of CCL11 in lung tissue. Pulmonary resistance increased and compliance decreased at day 1, with persistence at day 7. The 20 nm, but not the 110 nm, AgNPs increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness on day 1, which continued at day 7 for the citrate-capped AgNPs only. The 20 nm versus the 110 nm size were more proinflammatory in terms of neutrophil influx, but there was little difference between the citrate-capped versus the PVP-capped AgNPs. AgNPs can induce pulmonary eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, features characteristic of asthma. PMID:25747867

  8. Pulmonary Toxicity of Instilled Silver Nanoparticles: Influence of Size, Coating and Rat Strain

    PubMed Central

    Seiffert, Joanna; Hussain, Farhana; Wiegman, Coen; Li, Feng; Bey, Leo; Baker, Warren; Porter, Alexandra; Ryan, Mary P.; Chang, Yan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhu, Jie; Tetley, Terry D.; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Particle size and surface chemistry are potential determinants of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) respiratory toxicity that may also depend on the lung inflammatory state. We compared the effects of intratracheally-administered AgNPs (20nm and 110nm; polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and citrate-capped; 0.1 mg/Kg) in Brown-Norway (BN) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In BN rats, there was both a neutrophilic and eosinophilic response, while in SD rats, there was a neutrophilic response at day 1, greatest for the 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs. Eosinophilic cationic protein was increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in BN and SD rats on day 1. BAL protein and malondialdehyde levels were increased in BN rats at 1 and 7 days, and BAL KC, CCL11 and IL-13 levels at day 1, with increased expression of CCL11 in lung tissue. Pulmonary resistance increased and compliance decreased at day 1, with persistence at day 7. The 20nm, but not the 110 nm, AgNPs increased bronchial hyperresponsiveness on day 1, which continued at day 7 for the citrate-capped AgNPs only. The 20nm versus the 110 nm size were more proinflammatory in terms of neutrophil influx, but there was little difference between the citrate-capped versus the PVP-capped AgNPs. AgNPs can induce pulmonary eosinophilic and neutrophilic inflammation with bronchial hyperresponsiveness, features characteristic of asthma. PMID:25747867

  9. Acute and subacute pulmonary toxicity and mortality in mice after intratracheal instillation of ZnO nanoparticles in three laboratories.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Stoeger, Tobias; van den Brule, Sybille; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Beyerle, Andrea; Vietti, Giulia; Mortensen, Alicja; Szarek, Józef; Budtz, Hans Christian; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Banerjee, Atrayee; Ercal, Nuran; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Møller, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Inhalation is the main pathway of ZnO exposure in the occupational environment but only few studies have addressed toxic effects after pulmonary exposure to ZnO nanoparticles (NP). Here we present results from three studies of pulmonary exposure and toxicity of ZnO NP in mice. The studies were prematurely terminated because interim results unexpectedly showed severe pulmonary toxicity. High bolus doses of ZnO NP (25 up to 100 μg; ≥1.4 mg/kg) were clearly associated with a dose dependent mortality in the mice. Lower doses (≥6 μg; ≥0.3 mg/kg) elicited acute toxicity in terms of reduced weight gain, desquamation of epithelial cells with concomitantly increased barrier permeability of the alveolar/blood as well as DNA damage. Oxidative stress was shown via a strong increase in lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione in the pulmonary tissue. Two months post-exposure revealed no obvious toxicity for 12.5 and 25 μg on a range of parameters. However, mice that survived a high dose (50 μg; 2.7 mg/kg) had an increased pulmonary collagen accumulation (fibrosis) at a similar level as a high bolus dose of crystalline silica. The recovery from these toxicological effects appeared dose-dependent. The results indicate that alveolar deposition of ZnO NP may cause significant adverse health effects. PMID:26260750

  10. Pulmonary toxicity and kinetic study of Cy5.5-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by optical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Park, Sue Nie; Yu, Mi Kyung; Jon, Sangyong; Jeong, Jayoung

    2009-08-15

    Recent advances in the development of nanotechnology and devices now make it possible to accurately deliver drugs or genes to the lung. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used as contrast agents, thermal therapy for cancer, and be made to concentrate to target sites through an external magnetic field. However, these advantages may also become problematic when taking into account safety and toxicological factors. This study demonstrated the pulmonary toxicity and kinetic profile of anti-biofouling polymer coated, Cy5.5-conjugated thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TCL-SPION) by optical imaging. Negatively charged, 36 nm-sized, Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was prepared for optical imaging probe. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was intratracheally instilled into the lung by a non-surgical method. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION slightly induced pulmonary inflammation. The instilled nanoparticles were distributed mainly in the lung and excreted in the urine via glomerular filtration. Urinary excretion was peaked at 3 h after instillation. No toxicity was found under the concentration of 1.8 mg/kg and the half-lives of nanoparticles in the lung and urine were estimated to be about 14.4 {+-} 0.54 h and 24.7 {+-} 1.02 h, respectively. Although further studies are required, our results showed that Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION can be a good candidate for use in pulmonary delivery vehicles and diagnostic probes.

  11. Comparative Pulmonary Toxicity of Two Ceria Nanoparticles with the Same Primary Size

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lu; He, Xiao; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Junzhe; Ma, Yuhui; Ding, Yayun; Wu, Zhenqiang; Chai, Zhifang; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Ceria nanoparticles (nano-ceria) have recently gained a wide range of applications, which might pose unwanted risks to both the environment and human health. The greatest potential for the environmental discharge of nano-ceria appears to be in their use as a diesel fuel additive. The present study was designed to explore the pulmonary toxicity of nano-ceria in mice after a single exposure via intratracheal instillation. Two types of nano-ceria with the same distribution of a primary size (3–5 nm), but different redox activity, were used: Ceria-p, synthesized by a precipitation route, and Ceria-h, synthesized by a hydrothermal route. Both Ceria-p and Ceria-h induced oxidative stress, inflammatory responses and cytotoxicity in mice, but their toxicological profiles were quite different. The mean size of Ceria-p agglomerates was much smaller compared to Ceria-h, thereby causing a more potent acute inflammation, due to their higher number concentration of agglomerates and higher deposition rate in the deep lung. Ceria-h had a higher reactivity to catalyzing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caused two waves of lung injury: bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammation and cytotoxicity in the early stage and redox-activity-evoked lipid peroxidation and pro-inflammation in the latter stage. Therefore, the size distribution of ceria-containing agglomerates in the exhaust, as well as their surface chemistry are essential characteristics to assess the potential risks of using nano-ceria as a fuel additive. PMID:24727375

  12. Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Sara A.; Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Thompson, John W.; Lin, Yu-Shen; Haynes, Christy L.

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticle toxicology, an emergent field, works toward establishing the hazard of nanoparticles, and therefore their potential risk, in light of the increased use and likelihood of exposure. Analytical chemists can provide an essential tool kit for the advancement of this field by exploiting expertise in sample complexity and preparation as well as method and technology development. Herein, we discuss experimental considerations for performing in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies, with a focus on nanoparticle characterization, relevant model cell systems, and toxicity assay choices. Additionally, we present three case studies (of silver, titanium dioxide, and carbon nanotube toxicity) to highlight the important toxicological considerations of these commonly used nanoparticles.

  13. COMPARATIVE IN VITRO PULMONARY TOXICITY OF ENGINEERED, MANUFACTURED, AND ENVIRONMENTAL NANOPARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered nanomaterials display many unique physicochemical properties for a variety of applications and due to their novel propertiesapplications may have unique routes of exposure and toxicity. This study examines the: 1) ability of the MTT assay to generate false positives or...

  14. Severe amiodarone induced pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nacca, Nicholas; Yuhico, Luke S; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Szombathy, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    A known complication of Amiodarone therapy is Amiodarone induced Pulmonary Toxicity (APT). Several features of this adverse effect make it difficult to diagnosis and treat. The case of a 63-year-old male with classic radiographic and histologic findings of APT is discussed. Clinical presentation, pathophysiology, diagnostic findings, and treatment strategies are reviewed. The patient was successfully managed with pulse high dose steroid therapy. PMID:23205299

  15. Integrative functional transcriptomic analyses implicate specific molecular pathways in pulmonary toxicity from exposure to aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Zhang, Chengcheng; Bian, Qian; Gao, Na; Zhang, Xin; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Wang, Shizhi; Xia, Yankai; Chen, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Gene expression profiling has developed rapidly in recent years and it can predict and define mechanisms underlying chemical toxicity. Here, RNA microarray and computational technology were used to show that aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) were capable of triggering up-regulation of genes related to the cell cycle and cell death in a human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Gene expression levels were validated in Al2O3 NPs exposed A549 cells and mice lung tissues, most of which showed consistent trends in regulation. Gene-transcription factor network analysis coupled with cell- and animal-based assays demonstrated that the genes encoding PTPN6, RTN4, BAX and IER play a role in the biological responses induced by the nanoparticle exposure, which caused cell death and cell cycle arrest in the G2/S phase. Further, down-regulated PTPN6 expression demonstrated a core role in the network, thus expression level of PTPN6 was rescued by plasmid transfection, which showed ameliorative effects of A549 cells against cell death and cell cycle arrest. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene expression profiling to predict cellular responses induced by nanomaterials, which could be used to develop a comprehensive knowledge of nanotoxicity. PMID:26830206

  16. Nanoparticle toxicity and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevenslik, T.

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have provided significant advancements in cancer treatment. But as in any technology, there is a darkside. Experiments have shown NPs in body fluids pose a health risk by causing DNA damage that in of itself may lead to cancer. To avoid the dilemma that NPs are toxic to both cancer cells and DNA alike, the mechanism of NP toxicity must be understood so that the safe use of NPs may go forward. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) of peroxide and hydroxyl radicals damage the DNA by chemical reaction, but require NPs provide energies of about 5 eV not possible by surface effects. Only electromagnetic (EM) radiations beyond ultraviolet (UV) levels may explain the toxicity of NPs. Indeed, experiments show DNA damage from <100 nm NPs mimic the same reaction pathways of conventional sources of ionizing radiation, Hence, it is reasonable to hypothesize that NPs produce their own source of UV radiation, albeit at low intensity. Ionizing radiation from NPs at UV levels is consistent with the theory of QED induced EM radiation. QED stands for quantum electrodynamics. By this theory, fine < 100 nm NPs absorb low frequency thermal energy in the far infrared (FIR) from collisions with the water molecules in body fluids. Since quantum mechanics (QM) precludes NPs from having specific heat, absorbed EM collision energy cannot be conserved by an increase in temperature. But total internal reflection (TIR) momentarily confines the absorbed EM energy within the NP. Conservation proceeds by the creation of QED photons by frequency up-conversion of the absorbed EM energy to the TIR confinement frequency, typically beyond the UV. Subsequently, the QED photons upon scattering from atoms within the NP avoid TIR confinement and leak UV to the surroundings, thereby explaining the remarkable toxicity of NPs. But QED radiation need not be limited to natural or man-made NPs. Extensions suggest UV radiation is produced from biological NPs within the body, e.g., enzyme induced

  17. Gallium lung scintigraphy in amiodarone pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.Y.; Botvinick, E.; Dae, M.; Golden, J.; Hattner, R.; Scheinman, M.

    1988-06-01

    We sought to assess the role of gallium-67 lung scintigrams in the evaluation of amiodarone pulmonary toxicity. Images and laboratory studies were evaluated in 54 patients who had chest radiographs and scintigraphic studies during amiodarone treatment of more than one month's duration among 561 patients receiving the medication for refractory arrhythmias. There were 22 patients with pulmonary symptoms and clinical evidence of amiodarone pulmonary toxicity (group 1); 19 patients had other causes for pulmonary symptoms (group 2); and 21 patients were without symptoms or other clinical evidence of pulmonary toxicity (group 3). There was no difference among groups in treatment duration or total amiodarone dose. Symptomatic presentation could not differentiate between group 1 and group 2 patients. However, radiographic findings of isolated pulmonary congestion or a normal radiograph in the presence of symptoms made amiodarone toxicity unlikely, while the appearance of new, dense radiographic infiltrates--often in a nodular distribution--were more frequent among group 1 patients (p less than 0.01). During symptomatic periods, 18 of 22 group 1 patients had abnormal gallium lung uptake, while four revealed more subtle serial changes but there was only one abnormal scintigram among symptomatic group 2 patients. Nonspecific radiographic abnormalities in patients with pulmonary symptoms on amiodarone therapy were rarely attributed to toxicity in the presence of a normal scintigram. One group 3 patient developed scintigraphic abnormalities early during amiodarone treatment, suggesting toxicity in the presence of a normal chest x-ray examination. Comparison of radiographic and scintigraphic studies performed during symptoms with those performed prior to symptom development best indicated the diagnosis, while comparison with later images assessed the efficacy of treatment.

  18. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity mimicking acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Iacopo; Tacconi, Danilo; Grotti, Simone; Brandini, Rossella; Salvadori, Claudia; Caremani, Marcello; Bolognese, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic drug. Its long-term use may, however, lead to several adverse effects, with pulmonary toxicity being the most serious. The article presents the case of a 78-year-old woman with a history of cardiac surgery, who after 2 years of amiodarone therapy for prophylactic treatment of atrial fibrillation developed amiodarone pneumonitis mimicking an acute pulmonary edema. The patient failed to respond to diuretic therapy and several courses of anti-infective therapy. Differential diagnosis of different causes of pulmonary infiltrates did not demonstrate any other abnormality. Lung biopsy findings were consistent with the diagnosis of amiodarone pneumonitis. Given the widespread use of amiodarone as an antiarrhythmic agent, pneumologists and cardiologists should consider this important adverse effect as a differential diagnosis of pulmonary distress refractory to therapy in all patients treated with amiodarone who present with respiratory symptoms and pneumonia-like illness. PMID:19924000

  19. Amiodarone: review of pulmonary effects and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Papiris, Spyros A; Triantafillidou, Christina; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Markoulaki, Despoina; Manali, Effrosyni D

    2010-07-01

    Amiodarone, a bi-iodinated benzofuran derivative, is, because of its high effectiveness, one of the most widely used antiarrhythmic agents. However, adverse effects, especially potentially fatal and non-reversible acute and chronic pulmonary toxicity, continue to be observed. This review provides an update of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, treatment and outcome of amiodarone pulmonary effects and toxicity. Lung adverse effects occur in approximately 5% of treated patients. The development of lung complications appears to be associated with older age, duration of treatment and cumulative dosage, high levels of its desethyl metabolite, history of cardiothoracic surgery and/or use of high oxygen mixtures, use of iodinated contrast media, and probably pre-existing lung disease as well as co-existing respiratory infections. Amiodarone-related adverse pulmonary effects may develop as early as from the first few days of treatment to several years later. The onset of pulmonary toxicity may be either insidious or rapidly progressive. Cough, new chest infiltrates in imaging studies and reduced lung diffusing capacity in the appropriate clinical setting of amiodarone use, after the meticulous exclusion of infection, malignancy and pulmonary oedema, are the cardinal clinical and laboratory elements for diagnosis. Pulmonary involvement falls into two categories of different grades of clinical significance: (i) the ubiquitous 'lipoid pneumonia', the so-called 'amiodarone effect', which is usually asymptomatic; and (ii) the more appropriately named 'amiodarone toxicity', which includes several distinct clinical entities related to the differing patterns of lung inflammatory reaction, such as eosinophilic pneumonia, chronic organizing pneumonia, acute fibrinous organizing pneumonia, nodules or mass-like lesions, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia-like and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-like interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia

  20. [Pulmonary toxicity of free radicals of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Housset, B; Junod, A

    1983-01-01

    Free oxygen radicals result from aerobic cellular metabolism; their toxicity is prevented by immediate degradation due to an endless variety of biochemical systems. The nature of these radicals, their cellular production as well as the defence mechanism which oppose their toxic effects are successively and briefly analysed. The potential role of these radicals in the genesis of different lung diseases is still poorly understood. However, certain toxic agents (oxygen, gas pollutants, ionising radiation, toxic products) can act as a whole or at least in part by their intermediaries. The experimental arguments in favour of this hypothesis are reviewed in passing. If the relative importance of the toxic mechanism is still imprecise, free radicals are certainly implicated in pulmonary disease and constitute a new aspect of respiratory patho-physiology. PMID:6189156

  1. Evaluation of the role of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the pulmonary and the hepatic toxicity induced by cerium oxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalabotu, Siva Krishna

    The field of nanotechnology is rapidly progressing with potential applications in the automobile, healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, textiles, information technology, and environmental sectors. Nanomaterials are engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nanometers or less. With increased applications of nanotechnology, there are increased chances of exposure to manufactured nanomaterials. Recent reports on the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials have given scientific and regulatory agencies concerns over the safety of nanomaterials. Specifically, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has identified fourteen high priority nanomaterials for study. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles are one among the high priority group. Recent data suggest that CeO2 nanoparticles may be toxic to lung cell lines in vitro and lung tissues in vivo. Other work has proposed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the toxicity; however, the exact mechanism of the toxicity, has to our knowledge, not been investigated. Similarly, it is not clear whether CeO2 nanoparticles exhibit systemic toxicity. Here, we investigate whether pulmonary exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles is associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the lungs and liver of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our data suggest that the intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles can cause an increased lung weight to body weight ratio. Changes in lung weights were associated with the accumulation of cerium in the lungs, elevations in serum inflammatory markers, an increased Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, elevated caspase-3 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and diminished phosphorylation of ERK1/2-MAPK. Our findings from the study evaluating the possible translocation of CeO2 nanoparticles from the lungs to the liver suggest that CeO 2 nanoparticle exposure was associated with increased liver ceria levels, elevations in serum alanine transaminase

  2. TOXICITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES TO DAPHNIA MAGNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relatively little is known regarding toxicity of nanoparticles in the environment. It is widely assumed that the toxicity of nanoparticles will be less than that of their metallic ions. Also the effect of organics on metal toxicity is well established. Presented here are the resu...

  3. Right or Left: The Role of Nanoparticles in Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xuefei; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Chunying; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rapid development of the nanotechnology industry in the last decade, nanoparticles (NPs) are omnipresent in our everyday life today. Many nanomaterials have been engineered for medical purposes. These purposes include therapy for pulmonary diseases. On other hand, people are endeavoring to develop nanomaterials for improvement or replacement of traditional therapies. On the other hand, nanoparticles, as foreign material in human bodies, are reported to have potential adverse effects on the lung, including oxidase stress, inflammation, fibrosis and genotoxicity. Further, these damages could induce pulmonary diseases and even injuries in other tissues. It seems that nanoparticles may exert two-sided effects. Toxic effects of nanomaterials should be considered when their use is developed for therapies. Hence this review will attempt to summarize the two-side roles of nanoparticles in both therapies for pulmonary diseases and initiation of lung diseases and even secondary diseases caused by lung injuries. Determinants of these effects such as physicochemical properties of nanoparticles will also be discussed. PMID:25268624

  4. Novel Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Rachel Jennifer

    The lung is an important target for gene and drug therapy of many diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF), tubuerculosis (TB) and lung cancer. In fact, the pulmonary route has been employed as a means of delivering drugs for centuries, dating back 4000 years to India where inhaled vapors were used for medicinal purpose. Currently, pulmonary administration of small, hydrophobic drugs leads to rapid local and systemic absorption. However, delivery of large biomacromolecules, such as therapeutic genes, has not yet been accomplished. Here, I test the hypothesis that a rationally engineered nanoparticle (NP) vector can improve delivery of large biomacromolecules. . In this dissertation I tested this hypothesis using a hybrid NP delivery system consisting of a blend of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and a poly(beta-amino ester) (PBAE), a cationic polymer that is particularly useful for delivery of nucleic acids.. PBAE/PLGA nanoparticles (15% PBAE) loaded with plasmid DNA were surface modified with cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) via a PEGylated phospholipid linker. This optimized NP formulation was able to induce substantial intracellular uptake and transfect lung epithelial cells in vitro while imparting minimal cellular toxicity. In order to determine the most effective method to deliver these NPs to the lung I used fluorescently labeled particles to study the biodistribution of particles after administration to the lung of mice via various administration routes. I determined that the intranasal route was most effective. I further investigated this route and determined that an average of 37.1 +/- 15.1 % of lung cells had NP association after 4hrs. I also investigated the association of particles with different lung cell types like macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells and determined that our best particle formulations associated with approximately 80% of both of these cell types. To demonstrate the ability of the

  5. Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Jones, Melissa A.; Gunsolus, Ian L.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of toxicity of engineered nanoparticles to representatives of various trophic levels, including bacteria, plants, and multicellular aquatic/terrestrial organisms, to highlight important challenges within the field of econanotoxicity, challenges that analytical chemists are expertly poised to address. PMID:23427995

  6. [Acute onset pulmonary toxicity associated to amiodarone].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro Gonçalo; Saraiva, Fátima; Carreira, Cláudia

    2012-01-01

    Amiodarone is a potent anti-arrhythmic drug with a well-known potential chronic pulmonary toxicity. We describe a case of acute pulmonary toxicity (APT) induced by amiodarone in a 57 year old patient submitted to a perfusion of 900 mg in just 6 hours, to control an auricular flutter with rapid ventricular response. During the administration, the patient developed hemodynamic instability and oxygen dessaturation that led to an electrical cardioversion with return of sinus rhythm. Still, the patient continued in progressive respiratory deterioration with acute bilateral infiltrates on chest x-ray and apparent normal cardiac filling pressures confirmed by echocardiography. Anon-cardiogenic pulmonar edema progressing to clinico-physiological ARDS criteria was diagnosed. Expeditive therapeutic measures were undertaken, namely by initiation of non-invasive positive airway pressure support, that attained a good result.Albeit rare, amiodarone-induced APT might have severe consequences, namely progression to ALI/ARDS with a high mortality index.As it is a frequently prescribed drug, there should be a high clinical suspicion towards this phenomenon, allowing precocious therapeutic measures to be taken in a timely fashion to prevent the associated unfavorable outcome. PMID:23211207

  7. Acute inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jae Hyuck; Ji, Jun Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk; Lee, Ji Hyun; Choi, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Hee; Yu, Il Je

    2011-03-01

    The acute inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles was studied in Sprague-Dawley rats. Seven-week-old rats, weighing approximately 218 g (males) and 153 g (females), were divided into four groups (five rats in each group): fresh-air control, low-dose (0.94 × 10(6) particle/cm(3), 76 µg/m(3)), middle-dose (1.64 × 10(6) particle/ cm(3), 135 µg/m( 3)), and high-dose (3.08 × 10(6) particle/cm(3), 750 µg/m(3)). The animals were then exposed to silver nanoparticles (average diameter 18-20 nm) for 4 hours in a whole-body inhalation chamber. The experiment was conducted following Organization Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guideline 403 with the application of good laboratory practice (GLP). In addition to mortality and clinical observations, the body weights, food consumption, and pulmonary function tests were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, and the organ weights measured. The lung function was also measured twice per week after the initial 4-hour exposure. No significant body weight changes or clinical changes were found during the 2-week observation period. The lung function tests also indicated no significant difference between the fresh air control and the exposed groups. Thus, LC50 silver nanoparticles are suggested for higher than 3.1 × 10(6) particles/cm(3) (750 µg/m(3)). PMID:20870693

  8. Liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating iloprost exhibit enhanced vasodilation in pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pritesh P; Leber, Regina; Nagaraj, Chandran; Leitinger, Gerd; Lehofer, Bernhard; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea; Prassl, Ruth; Marsh, Leigh M

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin analogues are standard therapeutic options for vasoconstrictive diseases, including pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud’s phenomenon. Although effective, these treatment strategies are expensive and have several side effects. To improve drug efficiency, we tested liposomal nanoparticles as carrier systems. In this study, we synthesized liposomal nanoparticles tailored for the prostacyclin analogue iloprost and evaluated their pharmacologic efficacy on mouse intrapulmonary arteries, using a wire myograph. The use of cationic lipids, stearylamine, or 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) in liposomes promoted iloprost encapsulation to at least 50%. The addition of cholesterol modestly reduced iloprost encapsulation. The liposomal nanoparticle formulations were tested for toxicity and pharmacologic efficacy in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. The liposomes did not affect the viability of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Compared with an equivalent concentration of free iloprost, four out of the six polymer-coated liposomal formulations exhibited significantly enhanced vasodilation of mouse pulmonary arteries. Iloprost that was encapsulated in liposomes containing the polymer polyethylene glycol exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation of arteries. Strikingly, half the concentration of iloprost in liposomes elicited similar pharmacologic efficacy as nonencapsulated iloprost. Cationic liposomes can encapsulate iloprost with high efficacy and can serve as potential iloprost carriers to improve its therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25045260

  9. Nanoparticles, nanotechnology and pulmonary nanotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A J; Cemlyn-Jones, J; Robalo Cordeiro, C

    2013-01-01

    The recently emergent field of Nanotechnology involves the production and use of structures at the nanoscale. Research at atomic, molecular or macromolecular levels, has led to new materials, systems and structures on a scale consisting of particles less than 100 nm and showing unique and unusual physical, chemical and biological properties, which has enabled new applications in diverse fields, creating a multimillion-dollar high-tech industry. Nanotechnologies have a wide variety of uses from nanomedicine, consumer goods, electronics, communications and computing to environmental applications, efficient energy sources, agriculture, water purification, textiles, and aerospace industry, among many others. The different characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, shape, surface charge, chemical properties, solubility and degree of agglomeration will determine their effects on biological systems and human health, and the likelihood of respiratory hazards. There are a number of new studies about the potential occupational and environmental effects of nanoparticles and general precautionary measures are now fully justified. Adverse respiratory effects include multifocal granulomas, peribronchial inflammation, progressive interstitial fibrosis, chronic inflammatory responses, collagen deposition and oxidative stress. The authors present an overview of the most important studies about respiratory nanotoxicology and the effects of nanoparticles and engineered nanomaterials on the respiratory system. PMID:23265236

  10. Some inferences from in vivo experiments with metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: the pulmonary phagocytosis response, subchronic systemic toxicity and genotoxicity, regulatory proposals, searching for bioprotectors (a self-overview)

    PubMed Central

    Katsnelson, Boris A; Privalova, Larisa I; Sutunkova, Marina P; Gurvich, Vladimir B; Loginova, Nadezhda V; Minigalieva, Ilzira A; Kireyeva, Ekaterina P; Shur, Vladimir Y; Shishkina, Ekaterina V; Beikin, Ya B; Makeyev, Oleg H; Valamina, Irene E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to overview and summarize previously published results of our experiments on white rats exposed to either a single intratracheal instillation or repeated intraperitoneal injections of silver, gold, iron oxide, copper oxide, nickel oxide, and manganese oxide nanoparticles (NPs) in stable water suspensions without any chemical additives. Based on these results and some corroborating data of other researchers we maintain that these NPs are much more noxious on both cellular and systemic levels as compared with their 1 μm or even submicron counterparts. However, within the nanometer range the dependence of systemic toxicity on particle size is intricate and non-unique due to complex and often contra-directional relationships between the intrinsic biological aggressiveness of the specific NPs, on the one hand, and complex mechanisms that control their biokinetics, on the other. Our data testify to the high activity of the pulmonary phagocytosis of NPs deposited in airways. This fact suggests that safe levels of exposure to airborne NPs are possible in principle. However, there are no reliable foundations for establishing different permissible exposure levels for particles of different size within the nanometric range. For workroom air, such permissible exposure levels of metallic NP can be proposed at this stage, even if tentatively, based on a sufficiently conservative approach of decreasing approximately tenfold the exposure limits officially established for respective micro-scale industrial aerosols. It was shown that against the background of adequately composed combinations of some bioactive agents (comprising pectin, multivitamin-multimineral preparations, some amino acids, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid) the systemic toxicity and even genotoxicity of metallic NPs could be markedly attenuated. Therefore we believe that, along with decreasing NP-exposures, enhancing organisms’ resistance to their adverse action with the help

  11. Comparative toxicity of 24 manufactured nanoparticles in human alveolar epithelial and macrophage cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Lanone, Sophie; Rogerieux, Françoise; Geys, Jorina; Dupont, Aurélie; Maillot-Marechal, Emmanuelle; Boczkowski, Jorge; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Hoet, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background A critical issue with nanomaterials is the clear understanding of their potential toxicity. We evaluated the toxic effect of 24 nanoparticles of similar equivalent spherical diameter and various elemental compositions on 2 human pulmonary cell lines: A549 and THP-1. A secondary aim was to elaborate a generic experimental set-up that would allow the rapid screening of cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles. We therefore compared 2 cytotoxicity assays (MTT and Neutral Red) and analyzed 2 time points (3 and 24 hours) for each cell type and nanoparticle. When possible, TC50 (Toxic Concentration 50 i.e. nanoparticle concentration inducing 50% cell mortality) was calculated. Results The use of MTT assay on THP-1 cells exposed for 24 hours appears to be the most sensitive experimental design to assess the cytotoxic effect of one nanoparticle. With this experimental set-up, Copper- and Zinc-based nanoparticles appear to be the most toxic. Titania, Alumina, Ceria and Zirconia-based nanoparticles show moderate toxicity, and no toxicity was observed for Tungsten Carbide. No correlation between cytotoxicity and equivalent spherical diameter or specific surface area was found. Conclusion Our study clearly highlights the difference of sensitivity between cell types and cytotoxicity assays that has to be carefully taken into account when assessing nanoparticles toxicity. PMID:19405955

  12. Physiologically important metal nanoparticles and their toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Jayeeta; Ghosh, Sourav; Datta, Poulami; Gomes, Aparna; Gomes, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been setting benchmarks for the last two decades, but the origins of this technology reach back to ancient history. Today, nanoparticles of both metallic and non-metallic origin are under research and development for applications in various fields of biology/therapeutics. Physiologically important metals are of concern because they are compatible with the human system in terms of absorption, assimilation, excretion, and side effects. There are several physiologically inorganic metals that are present in the human body with a wide range of biological activities. Some of these metals are magnesium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum. These metals are synthesized in the form of nanoparticles by different physical and chemical methods. Physiologically important nanoparticles are currently under investigation for their bio-medical applications as well as for therapeutics. Along with the applicative aspects of nanoparticles, another domain that is of great concern is the risk assessment of these nanoparticles to avoid unnecessary hazards. It has been seen that these nanoparticles have been shown to possess toxicity in biological systems. Conventional physical and chemical methods of metal nanoparticle synthesis may be one possible reason for nanoparticle toxicity that can be overcome by synthesis of nanoparticles from biological sources. This review is an attempt to establish metal nanoparticles of physiological importance to be the best candidates for future nanotechnological tools and medicines, owing to the acceptability and safety in the human body. This can only be successful if these particles are synthesized with a better biocompatibility and low or no toxicity. PMID:24730316

  13. [Toxicity of nanoparticles on reproduction].

    PubMed

    Greco, F; Courbière, B; Rose, J; Orsière, T; Sari-Minodier, I; Bottero, J-Y; Auffan, M; Perrin, J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are sized between 1 and 100nm. Their size allows new nanoscale properties of particular interest for industrial and scientific purpose. Over the past twenty years, nanotechnology conquered many areas of use (electronic, cosmetic, textile…). While, human is exposed to an increasing number of nanoparticles sources, health impacts and, particularly on reproductive function, remains poorly evaluated. Indeed, traceability of nanoparticles use is lacking and nanotoxicology follows different rules than classical toxicology. This review focuses on the impact of NPs on health and particularly on fertility and addresses potential risks of chronic exposure to NPs on human fertility. PMID:25533638

  14. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  15. Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Protein and DNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Jyothi U.; Ravikumar, Priya; Pise, Amruta; Gyawali, Dipendra; Hsia, Connie C.W.; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are promising carriers of biological agents to lung due to advantages including biocompatibility, ease of surface modification, localized action and reduced systemic toxicity. However, there have been no studies extensively characterizing and comparing the behavior of polymeric NPs for pulmonary protein/DNA delivery both in vitro and in vivo. We screened six polymeric NPs: gelatin, chitosan, alginate, poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), PLGA-chitosan, and PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PEG), for inhalational protein/ DNA delivery. All NPs except PLGA-PEG and alginate were <300 nm in size with bi-phasic core compound release profile. Gelatin, PLGA NPs and PLGA-PEG NPs remained stable in deionized water, serum, saline and simulated lung fluid (Gamble’s solution) over 5 days. PLGA-based NPs and natural polymer NPs exhibited highest cytocompatibility and dose-dependent in vitro uptake respectively by human alveolar type-1 epithelial cells. Based on these profiles, gelatin and PLGA NPs were used to encapsulate a) plasmid DNA encoding yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) or b) rhodamine-conjugated erythropoietin (EPO) for inhalational delivery to rats. Following a single inhalation, widespread pulmonary EPO distribution persisted for up to 10 days while increasing YFP expression was observed for at least 7 days for both NPs. The overall results support both PLGA and gelatin NPs as promising carriers for pulmonary protein/DNA delivery. PMID:24512977

  16. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  17. Metal oxide nanoparticles with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alan Man Ching; Guo, Mu Yao; Leung, Yu Hang; Chan, Charis M N; Wong, Stella W Y; Yung, Mana M N; Ma, Angel P Y; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Leung, Frederick C C; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Chan, Wai Kin; Lee, Hung Kay

    2015-10-01

    A number of different nanomaterials produced and incorporated into various products are rising. However, their environmental hazards are frequently unknown. Here we consider three different metal oxide compounds (SnO2, In2O3, and Al2O3), which have not been extensively studied and are expected to have low toxicity. This study aimed to comprehensively characterize the physicochemical properties of these nanomaterials and investigate their toxicity on bacteria (Escherichia coli) under UV illumination and in the dark, as well as on a marine diatom (Skeletonema costatum) under ambient illumination/dark (16-8h) cycles. The material properties responsible for their low toxicity have been identified based on comprehensive experimental characterizations and comparison to a metal oxide exhibiting significant toxicity under illumination (anatase TiO2). The metal oxide materials investigated exhibited significant difference in surface properties and interaction with the living organisms. In order for a material to exhibit significant toxicity, it needs to be able to both form a stable suspension in the culture medium and to interact with the cell walls of the test organism. Our results indicated that the observed low toxicities of the three nanomaterials could be attributed to the limited interaction between the nanoparticles and cell walls of the test organisms. This could occur either due to the lack of significant attachment between nanoparticles and cell walls, or due to their tendency to aggregate in solution. PMID:26143160

  18. The significance of nanoparticles in particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, James D; Baugh, John A

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to airborne nanoparticles contributes to many chronic pulmonary diseases. Nanoparticles, classified as anthropogenic and natural particles, and fibers of diameters less than 100 nm, have unrestricted access to most areas of the lung due to their size. Size relates to the deposition efficiency of the particle, with particles in the nano-range having the highest efficiencies. The deposition of nanoparticles in the lung can lead to chronic inflammation, epithelial injury, and further to pulmonary fibrosis. Cases of particle-induced pulmonary fibrosis, namely pneumoconiosis, are mostly occupationally influenced, and continue to be documented around the world. The tremendous growth of nanotechnology, however, has spurred fears of increased rates of pulmonary diseases, especially fibrosis. The severity of toxicological consequences warrants further examination of the effects of nanoparticles in humans, possible treatments and increased regulatory measures. PMID:18523535

  19. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in zebrafish models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asharani, P. V.; Lian Wu, Yi; Gong, Zhiyuan; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to enhance our insight on the health and environmental impact of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np). Using starch and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as capping agents, silver nanoparticles were synthesized to study their deleterious effects and distribution pattern in zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio). Toxicological endpoints like mortality, hatching, pericardial edema and heart rate were recorded. A concentration-dependent increase in mortality and hatching delay was observed in Ag-np treated embryos. Additionally, nanoparticle treatments resulted in concentration-dependent toxicity, typified by phenotypes that had abnormal body axes, twisted notochord, slow blood flow, pericardial edema and cardiac arrhythmia. Ag+ ions and stabilizing agents showed no significant defects in developing embryos. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the embryos demonstrated that nanoparticles were distributed in the brain, heart, yolk and blood of embryos as evident from the electron-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS). Furthermore, the acridine orange staining showed an increased apoptosis in Ag-np treated embryos. These results suggest that silver nanoparticles induce a dose-dependent toxicity in embryos, which hinders normal development.

  20. Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: The Importance of Size, Shape, Chemical Composition, and Valence State in Determining Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnick, Katherine

    , cerium oxide nanoparticles were chemically modified using a process known as doping, to alter their valence state. The size and shape of the cerium oxide nanoparticles remained constant. Overall, results indicated that cerium oxide was not toxic in both RLE-6TN and NR8383 pulmonary rat cells, however, chemically modifying the valence state of the nanomaterial did affect the antioxidant potential. To determine if this trend was measureable in vivo, rats were exposed to various cerium oxide nanoparticles via intratracheal instillation and damage, changes in pulmonary cell differentials, and phagocytic cell activity were assessed. Results implicate that chemically modifying the nanoparticles had an effect on the overall damage induced by the material but did not dramatically affect inflammatory potential or phagocytic cell activity. Overall the data from these studies imply that size, shape, chemical composition, and valence state of nanomaterials can be manipulated to alter their toxicity.

  1. Improved antitumor activity and reduced myocardial toxicity of doxorubicin encapsulated in MPEG-PCL nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuntang; Zhou, Le; Gou, Maling; Shi, Shuai; Li, Tao; Lang, Jinyi

    2016-06-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is a broad-spectrum antitumor drug used for the treatment of many types of malignant tumors. Although it possesses powerful antitumor activity, its clinical application is seriously encumbered by its unselective distribution and systemic toxicities, particularly myocardial toxicity. Thus, it is imperative to modify Dox to decrease its systemic toxicities and improve its therapeutic index. In the present study, we adopted a novel type of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) micelles to encapsulate Dox to prepare Dox-loaded MPEG-PCL (Dox/MPEG-PCL) nanoparticles by a controllable self-assembly process. The cellular uptake efficiency and cell proliferation inhibition of the Dox/MPEG-PCL nanoparticles were examined. The antitumor activity of the Dox/MPEG-PCL nanoparticles was tested on a multiple pulmonary metastasis model of melanoma on C57BL/6 mice. Systemic toxicities and survival time were compared between the mice treated with the Dox/MPEG-PCL nanoparticles and free Dox. The potential myocardial toxicity of the Dox/MPEG-PCL nanoparticles was investigated using a prolonged observation period. Encapsulation of Dox in MPEG-PCL nanoparticles significantly improved the cellular uptake and cell proliferation inhibition of Dox in vivo. Intravenous injection of Dox/MPEG-PCL nanoparticles obtained significant inhibition of the growth and metastasis of melanoma in the lung and prolonged survival time compared with free Dox (P<0.05). The Dox/MPEG-PCL nanoparticles did not show obvious additional systemic toxicities compared with free Dox during the treatment time. During the prolonged observation period, obvious decreased cardiac toxicity was observed in the Dox/MPEG-PCL nanoparticle-treated mice compared with that observed in the free Dox-treated mice. These results indicated that encapsulating Dox with MPEG-PCL micelles could significantly promote its antitumor activity and reduce its toxicity to the myocardium. PMID

  2. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W; Scheckel, Kirk G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag(+) under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10-15nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5mgL(-1), the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100mgL(-1) as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag(+). Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100mgL(-1) as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. PMID:27016684

  3. Consideration Of The Toxicity of Manufactured Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haasch, Mary L.; McClellan-Green, Patricia; Oberdörster, Eva

    2005-09-01

    Fullerene (C60 and single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, SWCNT and MWCNT, respectively) is engineered to be redox active and it is thought that the potential toxicity of fullerene exposure is related to the formation of reactive oxygen species. During manufacture, transport or during scientific investigation, there is a potential for human or environmental exposure to nanoparticles. Several studies regarding human exposure have indicated reasons for concern. There is a lack of studies addressing the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic species but one study using the fish, largemouth bass, exposed to fullerene has shown increased (10-17-fold) lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the brain. It is likely that repair enzymes or anti-oxidants may have been induced in gill and liver tissues that had reduced LPO compared to control tissues (Oberdörster, 2004). In support of that hypothesis, suppressive subtractive hybridization was used with liver tissue and the biotransformation enzyme, cytochrome P450, specifically CYP2K4, and other oxidoreductases related to metabolism, along with repair enzymes, were increased while proteins related to normal physiological homeostasis were decreased in fullerene-exposed fish. In a new study involving the exposure of a toxicological model fish species, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to water-soluble fullerene (nC60), uptake and distribution indicated that nC60 elevated LPO in the brain and induced expression of CYP2 family isozymes in the liver. In an in vitro study, BSA-coated SWCNT interfered with biotransformation enzyme activity. These studies taken together provide support to the hypothesis that the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles is related to oxidative stress and provide insight into possible mechanisms of toxicity as well as providing information for evaluating the risk to aquatic organisms exposed to manufactured nanoparticles.

  4. Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diversity of engineered-nanomaterials and their applications as well as potential unknown health effects of these novel materials are significant challenges to assessing the health risks of nanotechnology. An integrated multi-tier testing strategy (www.epa.gov/nanoscience/) ...

  5. Biological Mechanism of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Najealicka Nicole

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), like almost all nanoparticles, are potentially toxic beyond a certain concentration because the survival of the organism is compromised due to scores of pathophysiological abnormalities above that concentration. However, the mechanism of AgNP toxicity remains undetermined. Instead of applying a toxic dose, these investigations were attempted to monitor the effects of AgNPs at a non-lethal concentration on wild type Drosophila melanogaster by exposing them to nanoparticles throughout their development. All adult flies raised in AgNP doped food indicated that of not more than 50 mg/L had no negative influence on median survival; however, these flies appeared uniformly lighter in body color due to the loss of melanin pigments in their cuticle. Additionally, fertility and vertical movement ability were compromised after AgNP feeding. The determination of the amount of free ionic silver (Ag+) indicated that the observed biological effects had resulted from the AgNPs and not from Ag+. Biochemical analysis suggests that the activity of copper dependent enzymes, namely tyrosinase and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, were decreased significantly following the consumption of AgNPs, despite the constant level of copper present in the tissue. Furthermore, copper supplementation restored the loss of AgNP induced demelanization, and the reduction of functional Ctr1 in Ctr1 heterozygous mutants caused the flies to be resistant to demelanization. Consequently, these studies proposed a mechanism whereby consumption of excess AgNPs in association with membrane bound copper transporter proteins cause sequestration of copper, thus creating a condition that resembles copper starvation. This model also explained the cuticular demelanization effect resulting from AgNP since tyrosinase activity is essential for melanin biosynthesis. Finally, these investigations demonstrated that Drosophila, an established genetic model system, can be well utilized for further

  6. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Taylor, Larry

    2008-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. NASA established the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, LADTAG has recommended investigating its toxicity in the lungs of laboratory animals. After receiving this recommendation, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in exposed rodents. The rodent pulmonary toxicity studies proposed here are the same as those proposed by the LADTAG. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal instillation (ITI). This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. We succeeded in completing an ITI study on JSC-1 lunar dust simulant in mice (Lam et al., Inhalation Toxicology 14:901-916, 2002, and Inhalation Toxicology 14: 917-928, 2002), and have conducted a pilot ITI study to examine the acute toxicity of an Apollo lunar (highland) dust sample. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies have been planned to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The ITI results will also be

  7. Toxic effects of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles on the liver and lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, L; Yousefi Babadi, V; Espanani, H R

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are magnetic nanoparticles which have widespread application in MRI and heat therapy of cancer as contrast elements. They are also used effectively for drug and gene delivery because of effective penetrating to the cells and tissues. However, these features cause Fe2O3 nanoparticles have toxic effects that are not completely understood yet. In this study, effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on lung tissue in adult male Wistar rats were studied. We used pulmonary inhalation method for nanoparticle administration and used ether as a helper. Our results showed administered nanoparticles penetrated to the circulation and rapidly reached to liver and created serious inflammation in lung and liver tissues. This study used two different nanoparticle doses (20 and 40 mg/kg) and two exposing numbers (7 and 14 times). Results showed significant enhancement of free radicals and reduction of the GSH in lung tissue. Histological studies showed nanoparticle treatment of rats caused pulmonary emphysema, interstitial hyperemia and inflammation in lungs. By increasing the administrated dose lung tissue showed all of the mentioned symptoms with increased intensity. Nanoparticle exposition causes presence of neutrophils, lymphocytes and eosinophils in the lung tissue that confirmed there is a serious pathologic condition. Hepatic cells injuries cause penetration of the hepatic enzymes in to the blood serum (Tab. 2, Fig. 4, Ref. 32). Text in PDF www.elis.sk. PMID:26084739

  8. Late pulmonary toxicity after treatment for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Villani, F; De Maria, P; Bonfante, V; Viviani, S; Laffranchi, A; Dell'oca, I; Dirusso, A; Zanini, M

    1997-01-01

    The combination of mediastinal radiotherapy (RT) with chemotherapy (CT) including bleomycin is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary toxicity. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate late pulmonary effects of RT plus CT consisting of the ABVD regimen in patients suffering from early stage Hodgkin's disease. For this purpose pulmonary function was serially evaluated before, at the end and at least 1 year after therapy in 32 patients (median age 28 years) with Hodgkin's disease stages IA,B-IIA. Treatment consisted of four cycles of ABVD chemotherapy followed by mediastinal irradiation at the median dose of 36 Gy (range 30.6-43.2). At the end of treatment, resting mean pulmonary function tests showed a significant decline of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced expiratory flow at 25-75%, (FEF25-75%), total lung capacity (TLC), vital capacity (VC) and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO). The decline of TLC, VC and DLCO, indicative of a pulmonary defect of restrictive type, persisted 1 year from the end of therapy. Only seven patients developed symptoms of cough and mild shortness of breath with effort. These data confirm that RT combined with short term ABVD result in pulmonary dysfunction that does not seem to have clinical significance. PMID:9494599

  9. Pulmonary toxicity of cytostatic drugs: cell kinetics.

    PubMed

    Witschi, H; Godfrey, G; Frome, E; Lindenschmidt, R C

    1987-02-01

    Mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of 3H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide-treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2-3 weeks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature whereas in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It is concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemicals designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid. PMID:3556836

  10. Pulmonary toxicity of cytostatic drugs: cell kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Godfrey, G.; Frome, E.; Lindenschmidt, R.C.

    1987-02-01

    Mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of /sup 3/H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide-treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2-3 weeks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature whereas in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It is concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemicals designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid.

  11. A safety and tolerability study of differently-charged nanoparticles for local pulmonary drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Harush-Frenkel, Oshrat; Bivas-Benita, Maytal; Nassar, Taher; Springer, Chaim; Sherman, Yoav; Avital, Avraham; Altschuler, Yoram; Borlak, Jurgen; Benita, Simon

    2010-07-15

    Nanoparticle (NP) based drug delivery systems provide promising opportunities in the treatment of lung diseases. Here we examined the safety and tolerability of pulmonary delivered NPs consisting of PEG-PLA as a function of particle surface charge. The rationale for such a comparison should be attributed to the differential pulmonary toxicity of positively and negatively charged PEG-PLA NP. Thus, the local and systemic effects of pulmonary administered NPs were investigated following 5 days of daily endotracheal instillation to BALB/c mice that were euthanized on the eighth or nineteenth day of the experiment. We collected bronchoalveolar lavages and studied hematological as well as histochemistry parameters. Notably, the cationic stearylamine based PEG-PLA NPs elicited increased local and systemic toxic effects both on the eighth and nineteenth day. In contrast, anionic NPs of similar size were much better tolerated with local inflammatory effects observed only on the eighth experimental day after pulmonary instillation. No systemic toxicity effect was observed although a moderate change was noted in the platelet count that was not considered to be of clinical significance. No pathological observations were detected in the internal organs following instillation of anionic NPs. Overall these observations suggest that anionic PEG-PLA NPs are useful pulmonary drug carriers that should be considered as a promising therapeutic drug delivery system.

  12. Gemcitabine-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity: A Case Report of Pulmonary Veno-Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Célia; Jary, Marine; Kim, Stefano; Moltenis, Mélanie; Degano, Bruno; Manzoni, Philippe; Nguyen, Thierry; Genet, Bruno; Rabier, Marie-Blanche Valnet; Heyd, Bruno; Borg, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gemcitabine is a chemotherapeutic agent frequently used by for the treatment of several malignancies both in the adjuvant and metastatic setting. Although myelosuppression is the most adverse event of this therapy, gemcitabine might induce severe pulmonary toxicities. We describe a case of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) related to gemcitabine. CASE PRESENTATION The patient was an 83-year-old man with a metastatic pancreatic cancer who was treated by gemcitabine as first-line therapy. He was in good health and received no other chemotherapy. A dose of 1000 mg/m2 of gemcitabine was administered over a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28-day cycle. After a period of 6 months, a complete response was observed. Nevertheless, the patient developed a severe dyspnea, with arterial hypoxemia and very low lung diffusion for carbon monoxide. A CT scan showed diffuse ground glass opacities with septal lines, bilateral pleural effusion, and lymph node enlargement. On echocardiography, there was a suspicion of pulmonary hypertension with elevated systolic pulmonary artery pressure and normal left ventricular pressures. Right heart catheterization confirmed pulmonary hypertension and normal pulmonary artery occlusion pressure. Diagnosis of PVOD was made, and a gemcitabine-induced toxicity was suspected. A symptomatic treatment was started. At last follow-up, patient was in functional class I with near-normal of CT scan, arterial blood gases, and echocardiography. A gemcitabine-induced PVOD is the more likely diagnosis. PMID:26380562

  13. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  14. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  15. Subchronic inhalation toxicity of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gold nanoparticles are widely used in consumer products, including cosmetics, food packaging, beverages, toothpaste, automobiles, and lubricants. With this increase in consumer products containing gold nanoparticles, the potential for worker exposure to gold nanoparticles will also increase. Only a few studies have produced data on the in vivo toxicology of gold nanoparticles, meaning that the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of gold nanoparticles remain unclear. Results The toxicity of gold nanoparticles was studied in Sprague Dawley rats by inhalation. Seven-week-old rats, weighing approximately 200 g (males) and 145 g (females), were divided into 4 groups (10 rats in each group): fresh-air control, low-dose (2.36 × 104 particle/cm3, 0.04 μg/m3), middle-dose (2.36 × 105 particle/cm3, 0.38 μg/m3), and high-dose (1.85 × 106 particle/cm3, 20.02 μg/m3). The animals were exposed to gold nanoparticles (average diameter 4-5 nm) for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 90-days in a whole-body inhalation chamber. In addition to mortality and clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, and lung function were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, blood samples were collected for hematology and clinical chemistry tests, and organ weights were measured. Cellular differential counts and cytotoxicity measurements, such as albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and total protein were also monitored in a cellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Among lung function test measurements, tidal volume and minute volume showed a tendency to decrease comparing control and dose groups during the 90-days of exposure. Although no statistically significant differences were found in cellular differential counts, histopathologic examination showed minimal alveoli, an inflammatory infiltrate with a mixed cell type, and increased macrophages in the high-dose rats. Tissue distribution of gold

  16. Cationic Surface Modification of PLG Nanoparticles Offers Sustained Gene Delivery to Pulmonary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    BAOUM, ABDULGADER; DHILLON, NAVNEET; BUCH, SHILPA; BERKLAND, CORY

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles are currently being explored as a nonviral gene delivery system; however, many obstacles impede the translation of these nanomaterials. For example, nanoparticles delivered systemically are inherently prone to adsorbing serum proteins and agglomerating as a result of their large surface/volume ratio. What is desired is a simple procedure to prepare nanoparticles that may be delivered locally and exhibit minimal toxicity while improving entry into cells for effectively delivering DNA. The objective of this study was to optimize the formulation of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles for gene delivery performance to a model of the pulmonary epithelium. Using a simple solvent diffusion technique, the chemistry of the particle surface was varied by using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (~200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80–90%) and slowly released the same for 2 weeks. In A549 alveolar lung epithelial cells, high levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least 2 weeks. In contrast, PEI gene expression ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. PMID:19911425

  17. Pulmonary toxicity of Expancel microspheres in the rat.

    PubMed

    Porter, Dale W; Hubbs, Ann F; Baron, Paul A; Millecchia, Lyndell L; Wolfarth, Michael G; Battelli, Lori A; Schwegler-Berry, Diane E; Beighley, Christopher M; Andrew, Michael E; Castranova, Vincent

    2007-08-01

    Expancel microspheres are thermoplastic microspheres enclosing hydrocarbon. These microspheres expand when heated, producing many applications. Because they have unknown biological persistence and toxicity, we investigated the toxicity of two unexpanded (11.1 and 15.4 micro m mean diameter) and two expanded (3.1 and 5.5 micro m mass median aerodynamic diameter) Expancel microspheres in intratracheally-instilled, male, Sprague-Dawley rats. Pulmonary histopathology was evaluated at 28 days postexposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was evaluated at days 1, 7, 14, and 28 days postexposure. Crystalline silica was the positive control. By histopathology, both unexpanded and expanded microspheres caused granulomatous bronchopneumonia characterized by macrophages and giants cells, suggesting a persistent foreign body response. Expanded, but not unexpanded microspheres, also caused eosinophilic bronchitis and bronchiolitis, mucous metaplasia of airways and organized granulomatous inflammation with associated fibrosis and frequent airway obstruction. In contrast, alveolar macrophage activation, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, LDH and albumin in bronchoalveolar laveage fluid were initially elevated but returned to near control levels at 28 days, and did not reflect the persistent granulomatous bronchopneumonia caused by Expancel microspheres. These findings emphasize the importance of histopathology for evaluating pulmonary toxicity, suggest that Expancel microspheres are a potential occupational hazard, and indicate a need for additional studies on their potential pulmonary toxicity. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Toxicology Pathology for the following free supplemental resources: motion within unexpected microspheres in H&E-stained lung (supplementary Figure 1); broncholar epithelium 28 days following exposure to 551 DE 20 microspheres (supplementary Figure 2); membrane ruffling and some instances of

  18. Pulmonary toxicity and fibrogenic response of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Manke, Amruta; Wang, Liying; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been a subject of intensive research for a wide range of applications. However, because of their extremely small size and light weight, CNTs are readily inhaled into human lungs resulting in increased rates of pulmonary disorders, most notably fibrosis. Several studies have demonstrated the fibrogenic effects of CNTs given their ability to translocate into the surrounding areas in the lung causing granulomatous lesions and interstitial and sub-pleural fibrosis. However, the mechanisms underlying the disease process remain obscure due to the lack of understanding of the cellular interactions and molecular targets involved. Interestingly, certain physicochemical properties of CNTs have been shown to affect their respiratory toxicity, thereby becoming significant determinants of fibrogenesis. CNT-induced fibrosis involves a multitude of cell types and is characterized by the early onset of inflammation, oxidative stress and accumulation of extracellular matrix. Increased reactive oxygen species activate various cytokine/growth factor signaling cascades resulting in increased expression of inflammatory and fibrotic genes. Profibrotic growth factors and cytokines contribute directly to fibroblast proliferation and collagen production. Given the role of multiple players during the pathogenesis of CNT-induced fibrosis, the objective of this review is to summarize the key findings and discuss major cellular and molecular events governing pulmonary fibrosis. We also discuss the physicochemical properties of CNTs and their effects on pulmonary toxicities as well as various biological factors contributing to the development of fibrosis. PMID:23194015

  19. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Elshama, Said Said; El-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  20. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  1. Zebrafish: A complete animal model to enumerate the nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Presently, nanotechnology is a multi-trillion dollar business sector that covers a wide range of industries, such as medicine, electronics and chemistry. In the current era, the commercial transition of nanotechnology from research level to industrial level is stimulating the world's total economic growth. However, commercialization of nanoparticles might offer possible risks once they are liberated in the environment. In recent years, the use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an established animal model system for nanoparticle toxicity assay is growing exponentially. In the current in-depth review, we discuss the recent research approaches employing adult zebrafish and their embryos for nanoparticle toxicity assessment. Different types of parameters are being discussed here which are used to evaluate nanoparticle toxicity such as hatching achievement rate, developmental malformation of organs, damage in gill and skin, abnormal behavior (movement impairment), immunotoxicity, genotoxicity or gene expression, neurotoxicity, endocrine system disruption, reproduction toxicity and finally mortality. Furthermore, we have also highlighted the toxic effect of different nanoparticles such as silver nanoparticle, gold nanoparticle, and metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, Al2O3, CuO, NiO and ZnO). At the end, future directions of zebrafish model and relevant assays to study nanoparticle toxicity have also been argued. PMID:27544212

  2. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Glass-Mattie, Dana F; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Saxton, Arnold; Donnel, Robert L.; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  3. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  4. Release, transport and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soni, Deepika; Naoghare, Pravin K; Saravanadevi, Sivanesan; Pandey, Ram Avatar

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology have facilitated the synthesis of novel engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) that possess new and different physicochemical properties. These ENPs have been ex tensive ly used in various commercial sectors to achieve both social and economic benefits. However. the increasing production and consumption of ENPs by many different industries has raised concerns about their possible release and accumulation in the environment. Released EN Ps may either remain suspended in the atmosphere for several years or may accumulate and eventually be modified int o other substances. Settled nanoparticles can he easily washed away during ra in s. and therefore may easily enter the food chain via water and so il. Thus. EN Ps can contaminate air. water and soil and can subsequently pose adverse risks to the health of different organisms. Studies to date indicate that ENP transport to and within the ecosystem depend on their chemical and physical properties (viz .. size. shape and solubility) . Therefore. the EN Ps display variable behavior in the environment because of their individual properties th at affect their tendency for adsorption, absorption, diffusional and colloidal interaction. The transport of EN Ps also influences their fate and chemical transformation in ecosystems. The adsorption, absorption and colloidal interaction of ENPs affect their capacity to be degraded or transformed, whereas the tendency of ENPs to agglomerate fosters their sedimentation. How widely ENPs are transported and their environmental fate influence how tox ic they may become to environmental organisms. One barrier to fully understanding how EN Ps are transformed in the environment and how best to characterize their toxicity, is related to the nature of their ultrafine structure. Experiments with different animals, pl ants, and cell lines have revealed that ENPs induce toxicity via several cellular pathways that is linked to the size. shape. surface area

  5. Toxicity of food-relevant nanoparticles in intestinal epithelial models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, Christie

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being incorporated into common consumer products, including in foods and food packaging, for their unique properties at the nanoscale. Food-grade silica and titania are used as anti-caking and whitening agents, respectively, and these particle size distributions are composed of approximately one-third nanoparticles. Zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles can be used for their antimicrobial properties. However, little is known about the interactions of nanoparticles in the body upon ingestion. This study was performed to investigate the role of nanoparticle characteristics including surface chemistry, dissolution, and material type on toxicity to the intestinal epithelium. Only mild acute toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was observed after 24-hour treatment of intestinal epithelial C2BBe1 cells based on the results of toxicity assays measuring necrosis, apoptosis, membrane damage, and mitochondrial activity. Silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were not observed to be toxic although all nanoparticles were internalized by cells. In vitro digestion of nanoparticles in solutions representing the stomach and intestines prior to treatment of cells did not alter nanoparticle toxicity. Long-term repeated treatment of cells weekly for 24 hours with nanoparticles did not change nanoparticle cytotoxicity or the growth rate of the treated cell populations. Thus, silica, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles were found to induce little toxicity in intestinal epithelial cells. Fluorescent silica nanoparticles were synthesized as a model for silica used in foods that could be tracked in vitro and in vivo. To maintain an exterior of pure silica, a silica shell was hydrolyzed around a core particle of quantum dots or a fluorescent dye electrostatically associated with a commercial silica particle. The quantum dots used were optimized from a previously reported microwave quantum dot synthesis to a quantum yield of 40%. Characterization

  6. Acute toxicity of nickel nanoparticles in rats after intravenous injection

    PubMed Central

    Magaye, Ruth R; Yue, Xia; Zou, Baobo; Shi, Hongbo; Yu, Hongsheng; Liu, Kui; Lin, Xialu; Xu, Jin; Yang, Cui; Wu, Aiguo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to add scientific data in regard to the use of metallic nanoparticles in nanomedicine. The acute toxicity of nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (50 nm), intravenously injected through the dorsal penile vein of Sprague Dawley rats was evaluated in this study. Fourteen days after injection, Ni nanoparticles induced liver and spleen injury, lung inflammation, and caused cardiac toxicity. These results indicate that precautionary measures should be taken with regard to the use of Ni nanoparticles or Ni compounds in nanomedicine. PMID:24648736

  7. Severe Pulmonary Toxicity After Myeloablative Conditioning Using Total Body Irradiation: An Assessment of Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Chris R.; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Chino, Junzo P.; Craciunescu, Oana; Steffey, Beverly; Folz, Rodney J.; Chao, Nelson J.; Rizzieri, David A.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess factors associated with severe pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using total body irradiation (TBI) followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 101 adult patients who underwent TBI-based myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies at Duke University between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed. TBI was combined with high-dose cyclophosphamide, melphalan, fludarabine, or etoposide, depending on the underlying disease. Acute pulmonary toxicity, occurring within 90 days of transplantation, was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Actuarial overall survival and the cumulative incidence of acute pulmonary toxicity were calculated via the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using a log-rank test. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to assess factors independently associated with acute severe pulmonary toxicity. Results: The 90-day actuarial risk of developing severe (Grade 3-5) pulmonary toxicity was 33%. Actuarial survival at 90 days was 49% in patients with severe pulmonary toxicity vs. 94% in patients without (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of prior chemotherapy regimens was the only factor independently associated with development of severe pulmonary toxicity (odds ratio, 2.7 per regimen). Conclusions: Severe acute pulmonary toxicity is prevalent after TBI-based myeloablative conditioning regimens, occurring in approximately 33% of patients. The number of prior chemotherapy regimens appears to be an important risk factor.

  8. Comparison of pulmonary inflammatory responses following intratracheal instillation and inhalation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Okada, Takami; Oyabu, Takako; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kawai, Kazuaki; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Manabu; Kubo, Masaru; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitajima, Shinichi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Horie, Masanori; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    In order to examine whether intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for determining the harmful effect of nanoparticles, we performed inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies using samples of the same nanoparticles. Nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2) were used as chemicals with high and low toxicities, respectively. In the intratracheal instillation study, rats were exposed to 0.2 or 1 mg of NiO or TiO2. Cell analysis and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were analyzed from 3 days to 6 months following the single intratracheal instillation. In the inhalation study, rats were exposed to inhaled NiO or TiO2 (1.65, 1.84 mg/m(3), respectively) for 4 weeks. The same endpoints were examined from 3 days to 3 months after the end of exposure. Inhalation of NiO induced an increase in the number of neutrophils in BALF and concentrations of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, CINC-2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Intratracheal instillation of NiO induced persistent inflammation and upregulation of these cytokines was observed in the rats. However, inhalation of TiO2 did not induce pulmonary inflammation, and intratracheal instillation of TiO2 transiently induced an increase in the number of neutrophils in BALF and the concentrations of CINC-1, CINC-2 and HO-1. Taken together, a difference in pulmonary inflammation was observed between the high and low toxicity nanomaterials in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies, suggesting that intratracheal instillation studies may be useful for ranking the harmful effects of nanoparticles. PMID:26558952

  9. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Taylor, L.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Astronauts on the Moon will go in and out of the base for various activities, and will inevitably bring some dust into the living quarters. Depressurizing the airlock so that astronauts can exit for outdoor activities could also bring dust inside the airlock to the habitable area. Concerned about the potential health effects on astronauts exposed to airborne lunar dust, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust. The toxicity data also will be needed by toxicologists to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts residing in the lunar habitat and by environmental engineers to design an appropriate dust mitigation strategy. We conducted a study to examine biomarkers of toxicity (inflammation and cytotoxicity) in lung lavage fluids from mice intrapharyngeally instilled with lunar dust samples; we also collected lung tissue from the mice for histopathological examination 3 months after the dust instillation. Reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) having known toxicities and industrial exposure limits were studied in parallel with lunar dust so that the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. A 6-month histopathology study has been planned. These instillation experiments will be followed by inhalation studies, which are more labor intensive and technologically difficult. The animal inhalation studies will be conducted first with an appropriate lunar dust simulant to ensure that the exposure techniques to be used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of these studies collectively will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and enable us to establish exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  10. Sulfidation of Silver Nanoparticles: Natural antidote to their toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Levard, Clément; Hotze, Ernest M.; Colman, Benjamin P.; Truong, Lisa; Yang, X. Y.; Bone, Audrey; Brown, Gordon E.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Di Giulio, Richard T.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Meyer, Joel N.; Wiesner, Mark R.; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are highly dynamic in biological and environmental media. A critical need for advancing environmental health and safety research for nanomaterials is to identify commonly occurring physical and chemical transformations affecting nanomaterial properties and toxicity. Silver nanoparticles, one of the most ecotoxic and well-studied nanomaterials, readily sulfidize in the environment. Here, we show that very low degrees of sulfidation (0.019 S/Ag mass ratio) universally and significantly decreases the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to four diverse types of aquatic and terrestrial eukaryotic organisms. Toxicity reduction is primarily associated with a decrease in Ag+ availability after sulfidation due to the lower solubility of Ag2S relative to elemental Ag (Ag(0)). We also show that chloride in exposure media determines silver nanoparticle toxicity by controlling the speciation of Ag. These results highlight the need to consider environmental transformation of NPs in assessing their toxicity to accurately portray their potential environmental risks. PMID:24180218

  11. Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Amara L.; Marr, Linsey C.

    2013-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials in consumer products. Some of these products are likely to be aerosolized, making silver nanoparticles a high priority for inhalation toxicity assessment. To study the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles, we have exposed cultured lung cells to them at the air-liquid interface. Cells were exposed to suspensions of silver or nickel oxide (positive control) nanoparticles at concentrations of 2.6, 6.6, and 13.2 μg cm−2 (volume concentrations of 10, 25, and 50 μg ml−1) and to 0.7 μg cm−2 silver or 2.1 μg cm−2 nickel oxide aerosol at the air-liquid interface. Unlike a number of in vitro studies employing suspensions of silver nanoparticles, which have shown strong toxic effects, both suspensions and aerosolized nanoparticles caused negligible cytotoxicity and only a mild inflammatory response, in agreement with animal exposures. Additionally, we have developed a novel method using a differential mobility analyzer to select aerosolized nanoparticles of a single diameter to assess the size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:23484109

  12. Structure-pulmonary toxicity/retention relationships of inhaled fluorocyclobutenes.

    PubMed

    Maidment, M P; Patel, S K; Upshall, D G; Timperley, C M

    1999-01-01

    Hexafluorocyclobutene (HFCB) and derivatives have been used as fumigants, refrigerants and polymerization monomers. When inhaled they produce a potentially fatal pulmonary oedema similar to that induced by perfluoroisobutene (PFIB), a by-product of Teflon manufacture. This study determined the relationship between the chemical structure, respiratory retention and toxicity of HFCB and five analogues in rats and mice. Retention in the rat was determined using a flow-through system combining nose-only exposure and plethysmography. Structural changes to HFCB modified retention. At concentrations of ca. 1 ppm, where uptake was independent of exposure time, the rate of uptake was increased by halogen substitution in the order 3-Br = 1-Br = 1-Cl > 3-Cl = 1-H > HFCB, and was a function of volatility. At concentrations of 6 or 30 ppm, the percentage retained and rate of uptake decreased with time. The total mass retained (micromol kg(-1)) was not proportional to inhaled concentration and was best described by the calculated partition coefficient (octane-water). No clear relationship between retention and reactivity was apparent. The contribution of volatility, partition coefficient and reactivity to the uptake process depended on inhaled concentration. The toxicity of the fluorocyclobutenes agreed with reactivity relationships based on electrophilicity (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), carbanion stability and leaving-group mobility. Toxicity is based principally on the number of successive alkylations (1, 2 or 3) that can occur with tissue nucleophiles. PMID:10215183

  13. Dry Powder form of Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Shiehzadeh, Farideh; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Delivery to the lungs is an efficient way to deliver drugs directly to the site of action or to the blood circulation. Because of limitations of direct administration of free drugs, particulate drug delivery systems such as DPI formulations based on nanoparticles (NPs) have been of interest for pulmonary drug delivery. The prolonged residence of NPs in the lungs due to ability to escape from the clearance mechanisms such as mucociliary escalator, macrophage uptake (a size of 1-2 µm is ideal for macrophage phagocytosis), and translocation to the systemic circulation is amongst the key advantages of NPs. By this approach, the controlled pulmonary delivery of drugs, peptides, proteins, genes, siRNA, and vaccines is possible. Both natural (albumin, gelatin, alginate, collagen, cyclodextrin, and chitosan) and synthetic (poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), polyacrylates and polyanhydrides) polymers have been used in formulation of pulmonary nanovectors. As direct pulmonary administration of NPs is not feasible, by using the safe excipients, NPs could be converted to dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. These can provide a promising deposition and stability of NPs. In this article, the DPI formulations based on polymeric nanoparticles have been reviewed and categorized based on the polymer type used for preparation of NPs. PMID:26818872

  14. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure was investigated. Results from 7-d sediment toxicity tests indicate that Ag...

  15. Potential Occupational Risks Associated with Pulmonary Toxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Manke, Amruta; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2014-01-01

    Given their remarkable properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have made their way through various industrial and medicinal applications and the overall production of CNTs is expected to grow rapidly in the next few years, thus requiring an additional recruitment of workers. However, their unique applications and desirable properties are fraught with concerns regarding occupational exposure. The concern about worker exposure to CNTs arises from the results of recent animal studies. Short-term and sub-chronic exposure studies in rodents have shown consistent adverse health effects such as pulmonary inflammation, granulomas, fibrosis, genotoxicity and mesothelioma after inhalation or instillation of several types of CNTs. Furthermore, physicochemical properties of CNTs such as dispersion, functionalization and particle size can significantly affect their pulmonary toxicity. Risk estimates from animal studies necessitate implementation of protective measures to limit worker exposure to CNTs. Information on workplace exposure is very limited, however, studies have reported that CNTs can be aerosolized and attain respirable airborne levels during synthesis and processing activities in the workplace. Quantitative risk assessments from sub-chronic animal studies recommend the health-based need to reduce exposures below the recommended exposure limit of 1 µg/m3. Practice of prevention measures including the use of engineering controls, personal protective equipment, health surveillance program, safe handling and use, as well as worker training can significantly minimize worker exposure and improve worker health and safety. PMID:25621290

  16. Mucoadhesive controlled release ciprofloxacin nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudumba, Sujata S.

    Controlled release of drugs to the lungs is an interesting and evolving field of research. The influence of physicochemical properties of nanoparticles on the controlled release of ciprofloxacin and in-vivo pharmacokinetics following pulmonary administration was evaluated. The physicochemical properties had an effect on encapsulation efficiency and surface charge, but no significant effect on particle size. The in-vitro release profiles of ciprofloxacin in phosphate buffered saline showed small differences over the range of physicochemical properties evaluated. The physicochemical properties of ciprofloxacin nanoparticles resulted in variable and unreliable nebulizer output using a vibrating mesh nebulizer whereas the impact on the aerosol properties of a jet nebulizer was negligible. Addition of mucoadhesive polymers in the nanoparticles had a three-fold increase in apparent half-life in rats by releasing ciprofloxacin over an extended release period on the surfaces of the lungs.

  17. A Mechanistic Study on the Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shammari, Bader; Khalifa, Mohamed; Bakheet, Saleh A.; Yasser, Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone- (AM-) induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT) is still a matter of research and is poorly understood. In attempting to resolve this issue, we treated Sprague-Dawley rats with AM doses of 80 mg/kg/day/i.p. for one, two, three, and four weeks. The rats were weighed at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 and bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained to determine total leukocyte count (TLC). For each group, lung weighing, histopathology, and homogenization were performed. Fresh homogenates were used for determination of ATP content, lipid peroxides, GSH, catalase, SOD, GPx, GR activities, NO, and hydroxyproline levels. The results showed a significant decrease in body weight and GSH depletion together with an increase in both lung weight and lung/body weight coefficient in the first week. Considerable increases in lung hydroxyproline level with some histopathological alterations were apparent. Treatment for two weeks produced a significant increase in BAL fluid, TLC, GR activity, and NO level in lung homogenate. The loss of cellular ATP and inhibition of most antioxidative protective enzymatic system appeared along with alteration in SOD activity following daily treatment for three weeks, while, in rats treated with AM for four weeks, more severe toxicity was apparent. Histopathological diagnosis was mostly granulomatous inflammation and interstitial pneumonitis in rats treated for three and four weeks, respectively. As shown, it is obvious that slow oedema formation is the only initiating factor of AIPT; all other mechanisms may occur as a consequence. PMID:26933474

  18. Assessing toxicity of copper nanoparticles across five cladoceran species.

    PubMed

    Song, Lan; Vijver, Martina G; de Snoo, Geert R; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-08-01

    As a result of ever increasing applications, nanoparticles will eventually end up in the environment. However, currently no common principle has been established to help understand the toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) across species. Therefore, it is difficult to estimate the potential risks of nanoparticles to untested species in the environment. The authors exposed 4 different sizes of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) and 1 submicron-sized copper particle to 5 cladoceran species (Daphnia magna, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia galeata, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Chydorus sphaericus) to investigate whether morphological attributes of species can help to assess the acute toxicity of CuNPs across species. The results showed that rod-shaped CuNPs caused much lower toxicity to all species than spherical CuNPs. Both the particles and ions contributed to the total toxicity of the CuNP suspensions. Moreover, the toxicity caused by particles in 5 different copper suspensions increases with decreasing body length, surface area, and body volume of neonates of 5 cladoceran species. Especially the correlations between body volume of the 5 cladoceran species tested and the corresponding toxicity caused by 5 different CuNPs were statistically significant, and in all cases radj (2) was higher than 0.51 (p < 0.001). The highest correlation was found between body volume and the toxicity of the 78-nm CuNPs (radj (2)  = 0.95, p < 0.001). To conclude, the correlations between attributes of cladoceran species and the toxicity of CuNPs reported in the present study evoke the possibility to assess and extrapolate the toxicity of nanoparticles across species with similar attributes. PMID:25826796

  19. Severe Acute Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Brentuximab in a Patient with Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Yasmin; Ramirez, Saul; Rosell Cespedes, Elizabeth; Rensoli Velasquez, Marimer; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Gaur, Sumit; Figueroa-Casas, Juan B.; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary toxicity associated with brentuximab appears to be a rare but serious adverse effect that can be potentially fatal. We report the case of a twenty-nine-year-old female with Hodgkin's lymphoma who was treated with brentuximab and later presented with severe acute pulmonary toxicity; she improved after the discontinuation of brentuximab and administration of antibiotics and glucocorticoid therapy. Currently there is very little data in the literature in regard to the clinical manifestations and characteristics of patients taking brentuximab and the potential development of acute severe pulmonary toxicity, as well as the appropriate therapeutic approach, making this particular case of successful treatment and resolution unique. PMID:27190667

  20. Minimal toxicity of stabilized compacted DNA nanoparticles in the murine lung.

    PubMed

    Ziady, Assem-Galal; Gedeon, Christopher R; Muhammad, Osman; Stillwell, Virginia; Oette, Sharon M; Fink, Tamara L; Quan, Will; Kowalczyk, Tomasz H; Hyatt, Susannah L; Payne, Jennifer; Peischl, Angela; Seng, J E; Moen, Robert C; Cooper, Mark J; Davis, Pamela B

    2003-12-01

    Nanoparticles containing DNA compacted with poly-l-lysine modified on an N-terminal cysteine with polyethylene glycol can effectively transfect cells of the airway epithelium when applied by the luminal route. To evaluate the toxicity of these nanoparticles, we administered 10 and 100 microg DNA compacted into nanoparticles suspended in normal saline by the intranasal route to mice and determined the pulmonary and systemic responses to this challenge, compared to administration of saline alone, and in some experiments, compared to administration of naked DNA, Escherichia coli genomic DNA, or lipofectin-complexed naked DNA. There was no systemic response to either dose of nanoparticles in serum chemistries, hematologic parameters, serum complement, IL-6, or MIP-2 levels or in the activity, growth, and grooming of the mice. Nanoparticles containing 10 microg DNA induced responses comparable to saline in all measures, including BAL cell counts and differentials and cytokine levels and histology. However, mice dosed with 100 microg DNA in nanoparticles had modest increases in BAL neutrophils 48 and 72 h after dosing, modest increases in BAL IL-6 and KC beginning 24 and 48 h, respectively, after dosing, and, on histology of the lung, a trace to 1+ mononuclear cell infiltrates about the pulmonary veins at 48 h, which were markedly reduced by 10 days and gone by 28 days after dosing. BAL neutrophil and cytokine responses were no greater than those entrained by naked DNA for up to 24 h. However, compared to administration of only 10 microg E. coli genomic DNA, the response to compacted DNA was much less. A low dose of lipofectin-complexed DNA (5 microg DNA) induced the same response as 20-fold higher doses of DNA nanoparticles. These data indicate that DNA nanoparticles have no measurable toxic effect at a dose of 10 microg and a very modest effect, which is not limiting, at a dose of 100 microg, which gives maximal gene expression. This favorable toxicity profile

  1. Toxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles - the effect of nanoparticle properties.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yu Hang; Yung, Mana M N; Ng, Alan M C; Ma, Angel P Y; Wong, Stella W Y; Chan, Charis M N; Ng, Yip Hang; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Guo, Muyao; Wong, Mabel Ting; Leung, Frederick C C; Chan, Wai Kin; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Lee, Hung Kay

    2015-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the toxicity of CeO2 nanomaterials have been published in recent years, with some studies finding CeO2 nanoparticles to be toxic, while others found it to have protective effects against oxidative stress. To investigate the possible reasons for this, we have performed a comprehensive study on the physical and chemical properties of nanosized CeO2 from three different suppliers as well as CeO2 synthesized by us, and tested their toxicity. For toxicity tests, we have studied the effects of CeO2 nanoparticles on a Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli in the dark, under ambient and UV illuminations. We have also performed toxicity tests on the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum under ambient and UV illuminations. We found that the CeO2 nanoparticle samples exhibited significantly different toxicity, which could likely be attributed to the differences in interactions with cells, and possibly to differences in nanoparticle compositions. Our results also suggest that toxicity tests on bacteria may not be suitable for predicting the ecotoxicity of nanomaterials. The relationship between the toxicity and physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles is explicitly discussed in the light of the current results. PMID:25768267

  2. Lipid nanoparticle delivery of a microRNA-145 inhibitor improves experimental pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McLendon, Jared M; Joshi, Sachindra R; Sparks, Jeff; Matar, Majed; Fewell, Jason G; Abe, Kohtaro; Oka, Masahiko; McMurtry, Ivan F; Gerthoffer, William T

    2015-07-28

    pathology, and histopathology and did not detect significant off-target effects. AntimiR-145 reduced the degree of pulmonary arteriopathy, reduced the severity of pulmonary hypertension, and reduced the degree of cardiac dysfunction. The results establish effective and low toxicity of lung delivery of a miRNA-145 inhibitor using functionalized cationic lipopolyamine nanoparticles to repair pulmonary arteriopathy and improve cardiac function in rats with severe PAH. PMID:25979327

  3. Computational nanotoxicology: Predicting toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burello, Enrico; Worth, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    A statistical model based on a quantitative structure-activity relationship accurately predicts the cytotoxicity of various metal oxide nanoparticles, thus offering a way to rapidly screen nanomaterials and prioritize testing.

  4. Relationship between chemical composition and pulmonary toxicity of source-specific ambient particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have reported incidence of cardio-pulmonary disease associated with increase in particulate matter (PM) exposure. In this study, the pulmonary toxicity potential of combustion and ambient PM were investigated using data from animal studies at the US EPA....

  5. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological

  6. Resistance of the hamster to amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity following repeated intraperitoneal administration.

    PubMed

    Leeder, R G; Evans, C D; Brien, J F; Massey, T E

    1994-10-01

    Amiodarone is an effective antidysrhythmic agent, restricted in use by the development of pulmonary toxicity. Several in vivo animal models have been used to study amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. Intratracheal administration of amiodarone to the hamster has been used as a model for the critical amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis (AIPF). In order to investigate the cellular mechanism of human AIPF, which occurs following oral or intravenous administration, an animal model of AIPF resulting from systemic administration of the drug would appear to be preferable. We have evaluated pulmonary toxicity following repeated intraperitoneal amiodarone administration to the hamster. Intraperitoneal treatment of hamsters for 1, 4, or 7 weeks with amiodarone (100 mg/kg/day) did not lead to pulmonary toxicity based on wet lung weight, hydroxyproline content, or histological examination. Furthermore, when comparing 1- and 7-week treatment groups, there was no pulmonary accumulation of either amiodarone or desethylamiodarone beyond levels found at 1 week. Therefore, failure to develop pulmonary toxicity may be due to an inability to accumulate sufficient amiodarone and/or desethylamiodarone. Intratracheal administration of amiodarone to rodents remains the only in vivo animal model for studying the mechanism(s) of AIPF. PMID:8085270

  7. Metal Nanoparticle Pollutants Interfere with Pulmonary Surfactant Function In Vitro☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Mandeep Singh; Zhao, Lin; Smith, Ronald; Possmayer, Fred; Petersen, Nils O.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reported associations between air pollution and pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases prompted studies on the effects of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) on pulmonary surfactant function. Low levels (3.7 mol % Au/lipid, 0.98% wt/wt) markedly inhibited adsorption of a semisynthetic pulmonary surfactant (dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol/surfactant protein B (SP-B); 70:30:1 wt %). Au NP also impeded the surfactant's ability to reduce surface tension (γ) to low levels during film compression and to respread during film expansion. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Au NP generated by a seed-growth method were spherical with diameters of ∼15 nm. Including palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol appeared to coat the NP with at least one lipid bilayer but did not affect NP shape or size. Similar overall observations occurred with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol was less effective in NP capping, although similar sized NP were formed. Including SP-B (1% wt/wt) appears to induce the formation of elongated strands of interacting threads with the fluid phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Including DPPC resulted in formation of aggregated, less spherical NP with a larger size distribution. With DPPC, strand formation due to SP-B was not observed. Agarose gel electrophoresis studies demonstrated that the aggregation induced by SP-B blocked migration of PG-coated NP. Migration was also influenced by the fluidity of the PGs. It is concluded that Au NP can interact with and sequester pulmonary surfactant phospholipids and, if inhaled from the atmosphere, could impede pulmonary surfactant function in the lung. PMID:17890383

  8. TOXICITY OF AMORPHOUS SILICA NANOPARTICLES IN MOUSE KERATINOCYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kyung; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Hussain, Saber

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the uptake, localization and the cytotoxic effects of well-dispersed amorphous silica nanoparticles in mouse keratinocytes (HEL-30). Mouse keratinocytes were exposed for 24h to various concentrations of amorphous silica nanoparticles in homogeneous suspensions of average size distribution (30, 48, 118 and 535 nm SiO2) then assessed for uptake and biochemical changes. Results of transmission electron microscopy revealed all sizes of silica were taken up into the cells and localized into the cytoplasm. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay shows LDH leakage was dose- and size-dependent with exposure to 30 and 48 nm nanoparticles. However, no LDH leakage was observed for either 118 or 535 nm nanoparticles. The mitochondrial viability assay (MTT) showed significant toxicity for 30 and 48 nm at high concentrations (100 g/mL) compare to the 118 and 535 nm particles. Further studies were carried out to investigate if cellular reduced GSH and mitochondria membrane potential are involved in the mechanism of SiO2 toxicity. The redox potential of cells (GSH) was reduced significantly at concentrations of 50, 100 and 200 g/mL at 30 nm nanoparticle exposures. However, silica nanoparticles larger than 30 nm showed no changes in GSH levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation did not show any significant change between controls and the exposed cells. In summary, amorphous silica nanoparticles below 100 nm induced cytotoxicity suggest size-of the particles is critical to produce biological effects.

  9. Reducing Environmental Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles through Shape Control.

    PubMed

    Gorka, Danielle E; Osterberg, Joshua S; Gwin, Carley A; Colman, Benjamin P; Meyer, Joel N; Bernhardt, Emily S; Gunsch, Claudia K; DiGulio, Richard T; Liu, Jie

    2015-08-18

    The use of antibacterial silver nanomaterials in consumer products ranging from textiles to toys has given rise to concerns over their environmental toxicity. These materials, primarily nanoparticles, have been shown to be toxic to a wide range of organisms; thus methods and materials that reduce their environmental toxicity while retaining their useful antibacterial properties can potentially solve this problem. Here we demonstrate that silver nanocubes display a lower toxicity toward the model plant species Lolium multiflorum while showing similar toxicity toward other environmentally relevant and model organisms (Danio rerio and Caenorhabditis elegans) and bacterial species (Esherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) compared to quasi-spherical silver nanoparticles and silver nanowires. More specifically, in the L. multiflorum experiments, the roots of silver nanocube treated plants were 5.3% shorter than the control, while silver nanoparticle treated plant roots were 39.6% shorter than the control. The findings here could assist in the future development of new antibacterial products that cause less environmental toxicity after their intended use. PMID:26146787

  10. Nanoparticle-Mediated Pulmonary Drug Delivery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Paranjpe, Mukta; Müller-Goymann, Christel C.

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated as drug carriers for the application of different drugs via different routes of administration. Systems, such as solid lipid nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, have been investigated for a long time for the treatment of various lung diseases. The pulmonary route, owing to a noninvasive method of drug administration, for both local and systemic delivery of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) forms an ideal environment for APIs acting on pulmonary diseases and disorders. Additionally, this route offers many advantages, such as a high surface area with rapid absorption due to high vascularization and circumvention of the first pass effect. Aerosolization or inhalation of colloidal systems is currently being extensively studied and has huge potential for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of various diseases. Furthermore, the surfactant-associated proteins present at the interface enhance the effect of these formulations by decreasing the surface tension and allowing the maximum effect. The most challenging part of developing a colloidal system for nebulization is to maintain the critical physicochemical parameters for successful inhalation. The following review focuses on the current status of different colloidal systems available for the treatment of various lung disorders along with their characterization. Additionally, different in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo cell models developed for the testing of these systems with studies involving cell culture analysis are also discussed. PMID:24717409

  11. Pulmonary toxicity and environmental contamination: radicals, electron transfer, and protection by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    The atmosphere is replete with a mixture of toxic substances, both natural and man-made. Inhalation of toxic substances produces a variety of insults to the pulmonary system. Lung poisons include industrial materials, particulates from mining and combustion, agricultural chemicals, cigarette smoke, ozone, and nitrogen oxides, among a large number of other chemicals and environmental contaminants. Many proposals have been advanced to explain the mode of action of pulmonary toxicants. In this review we focus on mechanisms of pulmonary toxicity that involve ET, ROS, and OS. The vast majority of toxicants or their metabolites possess chemical ET functionalities that can undergo redox cycling. Such recycling may generate ROS that can injure various cellular constituents in the lung and in other tissues. ET agents include quinones, metal complexes, aromatic nitro compounds, and conjugated iminium ions. Often, these agents are formed metabolically from parent toxicants. Such metabolic reactions are often catalytic and require only small amounts of the offending material. Oxidative attack is commonly associated with lipid peroxidation and oxidation of DNA, and it may result in strand cleavage and 8-OH-DG production. Toxicity is often accompanied by depletion of natural AOs, which further exacerbates the toxic effect. It is not surprising that the use of AOs, both natural in fruits and vegetables, as well as synthetic, may provide protection from the adverse effects of toxicant exposure. The mechanistic framework described earlier is also applicable to some of the more prominent pulmonary illnesses, such as asthma, COPD, and cancer. PMID:19484588

  12. Pulmonary administration of integrin-nanoparticles regenerates collapsed alveoli.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Michiko; Kojima, Hisako; Sakai, Hitomi; Kubo, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Chikamasa

    2014-08-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an intractable pulmonary disease, causes widespread and irreversible alveoli collapse. In search of a treatment target molecule, which is able to regenerate collapsed alveoli, we sought to identify a factor that induces differentiation in human alveolar epithelial stem cells using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), whose alveolar repair capacity has been reported in animal experiments. When human alveolar epithelial stem cells were exposed to ATRA at a concentration of 10μM for over seven days, approximately 20% of the cells differentiated into each of the type-I and type-II alveolar epithelial cells that constitute the alveoli. In a microarray analysis, integrin-α1 and integrin-β3 showed the largest variation in the ATRA-treated group compared with the controls. Furthermore, the effect of the induction of differentiation in human alveolar epithelial stem cells using ATRA was suppressed by approximately one-fourth by siRNA treatments with integrin α1 and integrin β3. These results suggested that integrin α1 and β3 are factors responsible for the induction of differentiation in human alveolar epithelial stem cells. We accordingly investigated whether integrin nanoparticles also had a regenerative effect in vivo. Elastase-induced COPD model mouse was produced, and the alveolar repair effect of pulmonary administration using nanoparticles of integrin protein was evaluated by X-ray CT scanning. Improvement in the CT value in comparison with an untreated group indicated that there was an alveolar repair effect. In this study, it was shown that the differentiation-inducing effect on human alveolar epithelial stem cells by ATRA was induced by increased expression of integrin, and that the induced integrin enhanced phosphorylation signaling of AKT, resulting in inducing differentiations. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that lung administration of nanoparticles with increased solubility and stability of integrin

  13. A Review of Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Toxicity of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khalili Fard, Javad; Jafari, Samira; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the use of nanomaterials has received much attention in industrial and medical fields. However, some reports have mentioned adverse effects of these materials on the biological systems and cellular components. There are several major mechanisms for cytotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) such as physicochemical properties, contamination with toxic element, fibrous structure, high surface charge and radical species generation. In this review, a brief key mechanisms involved in toxic effect of NPs are given, followed by the in vitro toxicity assays of NPs and prooxidant effects of several NPs such as carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide NPs, quantum dots, gold NPs and silver NPs. PMID:26819915

  14. Toxicity, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Silver Nanoparticles in Marine Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) capped silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure were investigated. Results from 7-d sedimen...

  15. Nickel Nanoparticles Exposure and Reproductive Toxicity in Healthy Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lu; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Dayong; Hu, Ke; Lu, Weiqi; Wei, Chao; Liang, Geyu; Pu, Yuepu

    2014-01-01

    Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), and lowered etradiol (E2) serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T) diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions. PMID:25407529

  16. Biphasic release of gentamicin from chitosan/fucoidan nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Cheng; Li, Rou-Ying; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Chen, Jen-Kun

    2016-03-15

    Gentamicin (GM), one of the most commonly used aminoglycoside antibiotics, has been used for treating pneumonia; however, the applicability of GM is limited by its bioavailability and toxic side effects. This study used chitosan (CS)/fucoidan (F) nanoparticles (NPs) to develop a nanoformulation for pulmonary delivery of GM, presenting a biphasic release feature. The NPs exhibited a zero-order release of GM for the first 10h, followed by a sustained release of up to 72h, attaining a value of 99%. The GM-loaded CS/F NPs provide multiple antimicrobial capabilities against Klebsiella pneumoniae, including the CS and biphasic release of GM. Compared with the intravenous administration of free GM (0.5mg/kg), the intratracheal administration of GM-loaded CS/F NP (0.27mg/kg) presented a superior area under the concentration-time curve/minimum inhibitory concentration ratio, indicating the simultaneous improvement of antimicrobial efficacy and elimination of systemic toxicity. These results suggested that CS/F NPs are potential carriers in pulmonary delivery of GM for pneumonia treatment. PMID:26794744

  17. Comparative Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Toxicity Using Embryonic Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Wehmas, Leah C.; Anders, Catherine; Chess, Jordan; Punnoose, Alex; Pereira, Cliff B.; Greenwood, Juliet A.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered metal oxide nanoparticles (MO NPs) are finding increasing utility in the medical field as anticancer agents. Before validation of in vivo anticancer efficacy can occur, a better understanding of whole-animal toxicity is required. We compared the toxicity of seven widely used semiconductor MO NPs made from zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide and tin dioxide prepared in pure water and in synthetic seawater using a five-day embryonic zebrafish assay. We hypothesized that the toxicity of these engineered MO NPs would depend on physicochemical properties. Significant agglomeration of MO NPs in aqueous solutions is common making it challenging to associate NP characteristics such as size and charge with toxicity. However, data from our agglomerated MO NPs suggests that the elemental composition and dissolution potential are major drivers of toxicity. Only ZnO caused significant adverse effects of all MO particles tested, and only when prepared in pure water (point estimate median lethal concentration = 3.5–9.1 mg/L). This toxicity was life stage dependent. The 24 h toxicity increased greatly (~22.7 fold) when zebrafish exposures started at the larval life stage compared to the 24 hour toxicity following embryonic exposure. Investigation into whether dissolution could account for ZnO toxicity revealed high levels of zinc ion (40–89% of total sample) were generated. Exposure to zinc ion equivalents revealed dissolved Zn2+ may be a major contributor to ZnO toxicity. PMID:26029632

  18. Pulmonary vascular lesions in the toxic oil syndrome in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Segoviano, P; Esteban, A; Martínez-Cabruja, R

    1983-01-01

    A histological study was made of pulmonary arteries at the necropsies of nine patients who died after the ingestion of denatured rapeseed oil during the epidemic which occurred in Spain in May 1981. Lesions found in the elastic pulmonary arteries were characterised by pronounced intimal proliferation of an oedematous nature, accumulation of large vacuolated cells within the media, and loss of vascular smooth muscle. In muscular pulmonary arteries there was pronounced medial hypertrophy and intimal proliferation, which was so severe in one case that it completely occluded the arterial lumen. Foamy cells were found in the intima. Muscularisation was seen in the walls of pulmonary arterioles. Images PMID:6648850

  19. Applications and toxicity of silver nanoparticles: a recent review.

    PubMed

    Marin, Stefania; Vlasceanu, George Mihail; Tiplea, Roxana Elena; Bucur, Ioana Raluca; Lemnaru, Madalina; Marin, Maria Minodora; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) exhibit a consistent amount of flexible properties which endorse them for a larger spectrum of applications in biomedicine and related fields. Over the years, silver nanoparticles have been subjected to numerous in vitro and in vivo tests to provide information about their toxic behavior towards living tissues and organisms. Researchers showed that AgNPs have high antimicrobial efficacy against many bacteria species including Escherichia coli, Neisseria gonorrhea, Chlamydia trachomatis and also viruses. Due to their novel properties, the incorporation of silver nanoparticles into different materials like textile fibers and wound dressings can extend their utility on the biomedical field while inhibiting infections and biofilm development. Among the noble metal nanoparticles, AgNPs present a series of features like simple synthesis routes, adequate and tunable morphology, and high surface to volume ratio, intracellular delivery system, a large plasmon field area recommending them as ideal biosensors, catalysts or photo-controlled delivery systems. In bioengineering, silver nanoparticles are considered potentially ideal gene delivery systems for tissue regeneration. The remote triggered detection and release of bioactive compounds of silver nanoparticles has proved their relevance also in forensic sciences. The authors report an up to date review related to the toxicity of AgNPs and their applications in antimicrobial activity and biosensors for gene therapy. PMID:25877089

  20. Nanoparticle Toxicity Mechanisms: Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Azou, Béatrice; Marano, Francelyne

    Toxicology plays a key role in understanding the potentially harmful biological effects of nanoparticles, since epidemiological studies are still difficult to implement given the lack of data concerning exposure. For this reason, in 2005, Günter Oberdörster coined the term `nanotoxicology' to specify the emerging discipline that dealt with ultrafine particles (UFP). It involves in vivo or in vitro studies under controlled conditions to establish the dose-response relationship, so difficult to expose by epidemiological studies. It also aims to determine the thresholds below which biological effects are no longer observed. It is concerned with the role played by properties specific to nanoparticles in the biological response: size, surface reactivity, chemical composition, solubility, etc.

  1. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Samantha J.; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B.; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Thomas, Ronald F.; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P.; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P.; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E.; Elmore, Susan A.; Morrison, James P.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2014-01-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  2. Inhaled diesel emissions generated with cerium oxide nanoparticle fuel additive induce adverse pulmonary and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Snow, Samantha J; McGee, John; Miller, Desinia B; Bass, Virginia; Schladweiler, Mette C; Thomas, Ronald F; Krantz, Todd; King, Charly; Ledbetter, Allen D; Richards, Judy; Weinstein, Jason P; Conner, Teri; Willis, Robert; Linak, William P; Nash, David; Wood, Charles E; Elmore, Susan A; Morrison, James P; Johnson, Crystal L; Gilmour, Matthew Ian; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2014-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe results in greater adverse pulmonary effects compared with DE. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to filtered air, DE, or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days. N-acetyl glucosaminidase activity was increased in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of rats exposed to DECe but not DE. There were also marginal but insignificant increases in several other lung injury biomarkers in both exposure groups (DECe > DE for all). To further characterize DECe toxicity, rats in a second study were exposed to filtered air or DECe for 5 h/day for 2 days or 4 weeks. Tissue analysis indicated a concentration- and time-dependent accumulation of lung and liver cerium followed by a delayed clearance. The gas-phase and high concentration of DECe increased lung inflammation at the 2-day time point, indicating that gas-phase components, in addition to particles, contribute to pulmonary toxicity. This effect was reduced at 4 weeks except for a sustained increase in BALF γ-glutamyl transferase activity. Histopathology and transmission electron microscopy revealed increased alveolar septa thickness due to edema and increased numbers of pigmented macrophages after DECe exposure. Collectively, these findings indicate that DECe induces more adverse pulmonary effects on a mass basis than DE. In addition, lung accumulation of cerium, systemic translocation to the liver, and delayed clearance are added concerns to existing health effects of DECe. PMID:25239632

  3. Engineered nanoparticle respiratory exposure and potential risks for cardiovascular toxicity: predictive tests and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Simeonova, Petia P; Erdely, Aaron

    2009-07-01

    The most attractive properties of engineered nanomaterials for technological applications, including their small size, large surface area, and high reactivity, are also the main factors for their potential toxicity. Based on ambient ultrafine particle research, it is predicted that nanosized particles may have deeper pulmonary deposition, higher biological activity, and a tendency for extrapulmonary translocation compared to larger particles. In this regard, nanoparticle exposure, by direct or indirect mechanisms, may lead to unexpected distant responses, involving the immune system, cardiovascular system, liver, kidney, and brain. The systemic effects may induce or modify the progression of existing diseases such as cardiovascular disease. Current experimental toxicity evaluation of engineered nanomaterials, specifically carbon nanotubes, demonstrated that deposition of these materials in the lung leads to inflammation and fibrosis. The local toxicity is associated with cardiovascular effects related to atherosclerosis. Although translocation of carbon nanotubes into the systemic circulation is hypothetically possible, there is no current evidence to support this hypothesis. However, studies pointed out that carbon nanotube-induced lung inflammation results in a release of inflammatory mediators and activation of blood cells which can contribute to cardiovascular adverse effects. Furthermore, complex protein and gene expression blood analysis can help in development of biomarkers for application in human screening of nanoparticle exposure. Future studies to evaluate the systemic effects of carbon nanotube exposure under workplace or environmental exposure paradigms should be conducted. PMID:19558236

  4. ECMO for pulmonary rescue in an adult with amiodarone-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Benassi, Filippo; Molardi, Alberto; Righi, Elena; Santangelo, Rosaria; Meli, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic agent. Unfortunately amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity is described for medium-long term therapy. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man admitted to our department for breathlessness and with a history of recurrent episodes of atrial fibrillation for which he had been receiving amiodarone (200 mg/day) since 2008. Despite diuretic therapy, along with aspirin, statins and antibiotics the patient continued to complain of severe dyspnea and had a moderate fever. Thus, diagnostic hypotheses different from acute cardiac failure were considered, in particular non-cardiogenic causes of pulmonary infiltrates. Following suspicion of amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity, the drug was discontinued and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Due to the deterioration of the clinical picture, we proceeded to intubation. After few hours from intubation we were forced to institute a veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation due to the worsening of pulmonary function. The patient's clinical condition improved which allowed us to remove the ECMO after 15 days of treatment. Indications for use of ECMO have expanded considerably. To our knowledge this is the first successful, reported article of a veno-venous ECMO used to treat amiodarone-induced toxicity in an adult. In patients with severe but potentially reversible pulmonary toxicity caused by amiodarone, extracorporeal life support can maintain pulmonary function and vital organ perfusion at the expense of low morbidity, while allowing time for drug clearance. PMID:24604330

  5. Antimicrobial efficacy and ocular cell toxicity from silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Colleen M.; Duchsherer, Nicole L.

    2009-01-01

    Silver in various forms has long been recognized for antimicrobial properties, both in biomedical devices and in eyes. However, soluble drugs used on the ocular surface are rapidly cleared through tear ducts and eventually ingested, resulting in decreased efficacy of the drug on its target tissue and potential concern for systemic side effects. Silver nanoparticles were studied as a source of anti-microbial silver for possible controlled-release contact lens controlled delivery formulations. Silver ion release over a period of several weeks from nanoparticle sources of various sizes and doses in vitro was evaluated in vitro against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA01. Mammalian cell viability and cytokine expression in response to silver nanoparticle exposure is evaluated using corneal epithelial cells and eye-associated macrophages cultured in vitro in serum-free media. Minimal microcidal and cell toxic effects were observed for several silver nanoparticle suspensions and aqueous extraction times for bulk total silver concentrations commensurate with comparative silver ion (e.g., Ag+(aq)) toxicity. This indicates that (1) silver particles themselves are not microcidal under conditions tested, and (2) insufficient silver ion is generated from these particles at these loadings to produce observable biological effects in these in vitro assays. If dosing allows substantially increased silver particle loading in the lens, the bactericidal efficacy of silver nanoparticles in vitro is one possible approach to limiting bacterial colonization problems associated with extended-wear contact lenses. PMID:19865601

  6. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheng, Lin; Huang, Yue-wern; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Ma, Yinfa

    2006-12-31

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

  7. [Toxic and drug-induced lesions of the pulmonary parenchyma].

    PubMed

    Russi, E

    1992-05-01

    Pulmonary tissue may be damaged by certain toxins or drugs in a dose-dependent way or by a hypersensitivity reaction. Pathological changes consist of a permeability pulmonary edema, an alveolar hemorrhage, an alveolitis and finally the formation of pulmonary fibrosis. Ingestion of the weed killer paraquat may induce a rapidly progressive and lethal form of fibrosing alveolitis, the inhalation of nitrous oxides may elicit lung edema. The most common drugs causing lung damage are cytotoxic agents, often used in combination, and the noncytotoxic drugs amiodarone and nitrofurantoin. PMID:1589677

  8. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Liau, Ian; Huang, G. Steve

    2009-08-01

    The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  9. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Shiun; Hung, Yao-Ching; Liau, Ian; Huang, G Steve

    2009-01-01

    The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:20596373

  10. Comparative toxicity of copper nanoparticles across three Lemnaceae species.

    PubMed

    Song, Lan; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-06-15

    Metallic nanoparticles can end up in aquatic ecosystems due to their widespread application. Even though the toxicological effects of metallic nanoparticles to a diversity of species have been reported extensively, the toxicological data achieved in different studies are not always comparable and little is known regarding the comparative toxicity of nanoparticles across species, as different test strategies and endpoints were applied. To attempt to fill this knowledge gap, Spirodela polyrhiza, Lemna minor and Wolffia arrhiza were exposed to 25 nm spherical copper nanoparticles to investigate the inhibiting effect of copper nanoparticle suspensions across species at three endpoints: total frond area, frond number and dry weight based relative growth rate. The total frond area based relative growth rate was found to be the most sensitive endpoint, with an EC50 of 1.15±0.09 mg/L for S. polyrhiza, 0.84±0.12 mg/L for L. minor and 0.64±0.05 mg/L for W. arrhiza. Both the particles and the copper ions contributed to the inhibiting effects of copper nanoparticle suspensions at all endpoints studied. Dose-response related inhibiting effects caused by the copper ions were found at all endpoints studied, whereas the particles only showed dose-response related inhibiting effects on the total frond area based relative growth rate. This suggests that different physiological processes are involved in case of exposure to particles and copper ions. W. arrhiza was found to be the most sensitive species tested and S. polyrhiza was the least sensitive species tested, when the inhibiting effect was evaluated based on the relative growth rate calculated from total frond area. These findings exemplify the importance of identifying the suitable endpoints of toxicity assessment and considering the intrinsic differences between species when evaluating the toxicological profile of metallic nanoparticles across species. PMID:25765374

  11. Alteration of biophysical activity of pulmonary surfactant by aluminosilicate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kondej, Dorota; Sosnowski, Tomasz R

    2013-02-01

    The influence of five different types of aluminosilicate nanoparticles (NPs) on the dynamic surface activity of model pulmonary surfactant (PS) (Survanta) was studied experimentally using oscillating bubble tensiometry. Bentonite, halloysite and montmorillonite (MM) NPs, which are used as fillers of polymer composites, were characterized regarding the size distribution, morphology and surface area. Particle doses applied in the studies were estimated based on the inhalation rate and duration, taking into account the expected aerosol concentration and deposition efficiency after penetration of NPs into the alveolar region. The results indicate that aluminosilicate NPs at concentrations in the pulmonary liquid above 0.1 mg cm(-3) are capable of promoting alterations of the original dynamic biophysical activity of the PS. This effect is indicated by deviation of the minimum surface tension, stability index and the size of surface tension hysteresis. Such response is dependent on the type of NPs present in the system and is stronger when particle concentration increases. It is suggested that interactions between NPs and the PS must be related to the surfactant adsorption on the suspended particles, while in the case of surface-modified clay NPs the additional washout of surface-active components may be expected. It is speculated that observed changes in surface properties of the surfactant may be associated with undesired health effects following extensive inhalation of aluminosilicate NPs in the workplace. PMID:23363039

  12. Toxicity of silver and gold nanoparticles on marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Pérez, Sara; Blasco, Julián

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of nanomaterials in several novel industrial applications during the last decade has led to a rise in concerns about the potential toxic effects of released engineered nanoparticles (NPs) into the environment, as their potential toxicity to aquatic organisms is just beginning to be recognised. Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles to aquatic organisms, including microalgae, seems to be related to their physical and chemical properties, as well as their behaviour in the aquatic media where processes of dissolution, aggregation and agglomeration can occur. Although the production of these particles has increased considerably in recent years, data on their toxicity on microalgae, especially those belonging to marine or estuarine environments remain scarce and scattered. The literature shows a wide variation of results on toxicity, mainly due to the different methodology used in bioassays involving microalgae. These can range for up to EC50 data, in the case of AgNPs, representing five orders of magnitude. The importance of initial cellular density is also addressed in the text, as well as the need for keeping test conditions as close as possible to environmental conditions, in order to increase their environmental relevance. This review focuses on the fate and toxicity of silver, gold, and gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on microalgae, as key organisms in aquatic ecosystems. It is prompted by their increased production and use, and taking into account that oceans and estuaries are the final sink for those NPs. The design of bioassays and further research in the field of microalgae nanoecotoxicology is discussed, with a brief survey on newly developed technology of green (algae mediated) production of Ag, Au and Ag-Au bimetallic NPs, as well as some final considerations about future research on this field. PMID:26002248

  13. Dasatinib induces lung vascular toxicity and predisposes to pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guignabert, Christophe; Phan, Carole; Seferian, Andrei; Huertas, Alice; Tu, Ly; Thuillet, Raphaël; Sattler, Caroline; Le Hiress, Morane; Tamura, Yuichi; Jutant, Etienne-Marie; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Bouchet, Stéphane; Manéglier, Benjamin; Molimard, Mathieu; Rousselot, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Montani, David; Humbert, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that can be induced by dasatinib, a dual Src and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Today, key questions remain regarding the mechanisms involved in the long-term development of dasatinib-induced PAH. Here, we demonstrated that chronic dasatinib therapy causes pulmonary endothelial damage in humans and rodents. We found that dasatinib treatment attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction responses and increased susceptibility to experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) in rats, but these effects were absent in rats treated with imatinib, another BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment induced pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, while imatinib did not. Dasatinib treatment mediated endothelial cell dysfunction via increased production of ROS that was independent of Src family kinases. Consistent with these findings, we observed elevations in markers of endothelial dysfunction and vascular damage in the serum of CML patients who were treated with dasatinib, compared with CML patients treated with imatinib. Taken together, our findings indicate that dasatinib causes pulmonary vascular damage, induction of ER stress, and mitochondrial ROS production, which leads to increased susceptibility to PH development. PMID:27482885

  14. Size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Glyptotendipes tokunagai

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seona; Kim, Soyoun; Bae, Yeon-Jae; Park, June-Woo; Jung, Jinho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to evaluate the size-dependent toxicity of spherical silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) to an endemic benthic organism, Glyptotendipes tokunagai. Methods Ag nanoparticles of three nominal sizes (50, 100, and 150 nm) capped with polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP-Ag NPs) were used. Their physicochemical properties, acute toxicity (48 hours), and bioaccumulation were measured using third instar larvae of G. tokunagai. Results The aggregation and dissolution of PVP-Ag NPs increased with exposure time and concentration, respectively, particularly for 50 nm PVP-Ag NPs. However, the dissolved concentration of Ag ions was not significant compared with the median lethal concentration value for AgNO3 (3.51 mg/L). The acute toxicity of PVP-Ag NPs was highest for the smallest particles (50 nm), whereas bioaccumulation was greatest for the largest particles (150 nm). However, larger PVP-Ag NPs were absorbed and excreted rapidly, resulting in shorter stays in G. tokunagai than the smaller ones. Conclusions The size of PVP-Ag NPs significantly affects their acute toxicity to G. tokunagai. In particular, smaller PVP-Ag NPs have a higher solubility and stay longer in the body of G. tokunagai, resulting in higher toxicity than larger PVP-Ag NPs. PMID:26184045

  15. Central nervous system toxicity of metallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Jianfeng; Shao, Longquan; Wei, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are increasingly used for the therapy, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease- or drug-induced mechanisms in the human biological system. In view of their small size, after certain modifications, NMs have the capacity to bypass or cross the blood–brain barrier. Nanotechnology is particularly advantageous in the field of neurology. Examples may include the utilization of nanoparticle (NP)-based drug carriers to readily cross the blood–brain barrier to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases, nanoscaffolds for axonal regeneration, nanoelectromechanical systems in neurological operations, and NPs in molecular imaging and CNS imaging. However, NPs can also be potentially hazardous to the CNS in terms of nano-neurotoxicity via several possible mechanisms, such as oxidative stress, autophagy, and lysosome dysfunction, and the activation of certain signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the dual effect of NMs on the CNS and the mechanisms involved. The limitations of the current research are also discussed. PMID:26170667

  16. Silver nanoparticle toxicity in Drosophila: size does matter

    PubMed Central

    Gorth, Deborah J; Rand, David M; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Consumer nanotechnology is a growing industry. Silver nanoparticles are the most common nanomaterial added to commercially available products, so understanding the influence that size has on toxicity is integral to the safe use of these new products. This study examined the influence of silver particle size on Drosophila egg development by comparing the toxicity of both nanoscale and conventional-sized silver particles. Methods: The toxicity assays were conducted by exposing Drosophila eggs to particle concentrations ranging from 10 ppm to 100 ppm of silver. Size, chemistry, and agglomeration of the silver particles were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Results: This analysis confirmed individual silver particle sizes in the ranges of 20–30 nm, 100 nm, and 500–1200 nm, with similar chemistry. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope data also indicated agglomeration in water, with the transmission electron microscopic images showing individual particles in the correct size range, but the dynamic light scattering z-average sizes of the silver nanoparticles were 782 ± 379 nm for the 20–30 nm silver nanoparticles, 693 ± 114 nm for the 100 nm silver nanoparticles, and 508 ± 32 nm for the 500–1200 nm silver particles. Most importantly, here we show significantly more Drosophila egg toxicity when exposed to larger, nonnanometer silver particles. Upon exposure to silver nanoparticles sized 20–30 nm, Drosophila eggs did not exhibit a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease in their likelihood to pupate, but eggs exposed to larger silver particles (500–1200 nm) were 91% ± 18% less likely to pupate. Exposure to silver nanoparticles reduced the percentage of pupae able to emerge as adults. At 10 ppm of silver particle exposure, only 57% ± 48% of the pupae exposed to 20–30 nm silver particles became adults, whereas 89% ± 25% of the control

  17. Nanoparticles: Their potential toxicity, waste and environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrzejewska-Piotrowska, Grazyna Golimowski, Jerzy; Urban, Pawel L.

    2009-09-15

    This literature review discusses specific issues related to handling of waste containing nanomaterials. The aims are (1) to highlight problems related to uncontrolled release of nanoparticles to the environment through waste disposal, and (2) to introduce the topics of nanowaste and nanotoxicology to the waste management community. Many nanoparticles used by industry contain heavy metals, thus toxicity and bioaccumulation of heavy metals contained in nanoparticles may become important environmental issues. Although bioavailability of heavy metals contained in nanoparticles can be lower than those present in soluble form, the toxicity resulting from their intrinsic nature (e.g. their size, shape or density) may be significant. An approach to the treatment of nanowaste requires understanding of all its properties - not only chemical, but also physical and biological. Progress in nanowaste management also requires studies of the environmental impact of the new materials. The authors believe Amara's law is applicable to the impact of nanotechnologies, and society might overestimate the short-term effects of these technologies, while underestimating the long-term effects. It is necessary to have basic information from companies about the level and nature of nanomaterials produced or emitted and about the expectation of the life cycle time of nanoproducts as a basis to estimate the level of nanowaste in the future. Without knowing how companies plan to use and store recycled and nonrecycled nanomaterials, development of regulations is difficult. Tagging of nanoproducts is proposed as a means to facilitate separation and recovery of nanomaterials.

  18. Analytical methods to assess nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Bryce J; Love, Sara A; Braun, Katherine L; Haynes, Christy L

    2009-03-01

    During the past 20 years, improvements in nanoscale materials synthesis and characterization have given scientists great control over the fabrication of materials with features between 1 and 100 nm, unlocking many unique size-dependent properties and, thus, promising many new and/or improved technologies. Recent years have found the integration of such materials into commercial goods; a current estimate suggests there are over 800 nanoparticle-containing consumer products (The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies Consumer Products Inventory, , accessed Oct. 2008), accounting for 147 billion USD in products in 2007 (Nanomaterials state of the market Q3 2008: stealth success, broad impact, Lux Research Inc., New York, NY, 2008). Despite this increase in the prevalence of engineered nanomaterials, there is little known about their potential impacts on environmental health and safety. The field of nanotoxicology has formed in response to this lack of information and resulted in a flurry of research studies. Nanotoxicology relies on many analytical methods for the characterization of nanomaterials as well as their impacts on in vitro and in vivo function. This review provides a critical overview of these techniques from the perspective of an analytical chemist, and is intended to be used as a reference for scientists interested in conducting nanotoxicological research as well as those interested in nanotoxicological assay development. PMID:19238274

  19. Prolonged Hypocalcemic Effect by Pulmonary Delivery of Calcitonin Loaded Poly(Methyl Vinyl Ether Maleic Acid) Bioadhesive Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, J.; Minaiyan, M.; Forghanian, M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design a pulmonary controlled release system of salmon calcitonin (sCT). Therefore, poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) [P(MVEMA)] nanoparticles were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Fe2+ and Zn2+ ions. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The stability of sCT in the optimized nanoparticles was studied by electrophoretic gel method. Plasma calcium levels until 48 h were determined in rats as pulmonary-free sCT solution or nanoparticles (25 μg·kg−1), iv solution of sCT (5 μg·kg−1), and pulmonary blank nanoparticles. The drug remained stable during fabrication and tests on nanoparticles. The optimized nanoparticles showed proper physicochemical properties. Normalized reduction of plasma calcium levels was at least 2.76 times higher in pulmonary sCT nanoparticles compared to free solution. The duration of hypocalcemic effect of pulmonary sCT nanoparticles was 24 h, while it was just 1 h for the iv solution. There was not any significant difference between normalized blood calcium levels reduction in pulmonary drug solution and iv injection. Pharmacological activity of nanoparticles after pulmonary delivery was 65% of the iv route. Pulmonary delivery of P(MVEMA) nanoparticles of sCT enhanced and prolonged the hypocalcemic effect of the drug significantly. PMID:24701588

  20. A case of pulmonary toxicity associated with G-CSF and doxorubicin administration.

    PubMed

    Eisenbeis, C F; Winn, D; Poelman, S; Polsky, C V; Rubenstein, J H; Olopade, O I

    2001-02-01

    The cytokine growth factor, G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), is commonly used in oncologic practice and is generally believed to be a safe agent to administer. We describe here a case of pulmonary toxicity associated with the concurrent administration of G-CSF and doxorubicin. We contend that G-CSF contributed to the life-threatening lung injury in our patient, and discuss additional reports in the literature of pulmonary toxicity associated with the use of this agent. PMID:11261324

  1. Deglycosylated bleomycin has the antitumor activity of bleomycin without pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Burgy, Olivier; Wettstein, Guillaume; Bellaye, Pierre S; Decologne, Nathalie; Racoeur, Cindy; Goirand, Françoise; Beltramo, Guillaume; Hernandez, Jean-François; Kenani, Abderraouf; Camus, Philippe; Bettaieb, Ali; Garrido, Carmen; Bonniaud, Philippe

    2016-02-17

    Bleomycin (BLM) is a potent anticancer drug used to treat different malignancies, mainly lymphomas, germ cell tumors, and melanomas. Unfortunately, BLM has major, dose-dependent, pulmonary toxicity that affects 20% of treated individuals. The most severe form of BLM-induced pulmonary toxicity is lung fibrosis. Deglyco-BLM is a molecule derived from BLM in which the sugar residue d-mannosyl-l-glucose disaccharide has been deleted. The objective of this study was to assess the anticancer activity and lung toxicity of deglyco-BLM. We compared the antitumor activity and pulmonary toxicity of intraperitoneally administrated deglyco-BLM and BLM in three rodent models. Pulmonary toxicity was examined in depth after intratracheal administration of both chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of both drugs was further studied in epithelial alveolar cells in vitro. We demonstrated in rodent cancer models, including a human Hodgkin's lymphoma xenograft and a syngeneic melanoma model, that intraperitoneal deglyco-BLM is as effective as BLM in inducing tumor regression. Whereas the antitumor effect of BLM was accompanied by a loss of body weight and the development of pulmonary toxicity, deglyco-BLM did not affect body weight and did not engender lung injury. Both molecules induced lung epithelial cell apoptosis after intratracheal administration, but deglyco-BLM lost the ability to induce caspase-1 activation and the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species), transforming growth factor-β1, and other profibrotic and inflammatory cytokines in the lungs of mice and in vitro. Deglyco-BLM should be considered for clinical testing as a less toxic alternative to BLM in cancer therapy. PMID:26888428

  2. Interaction of engineered nanoparticles with toxic and essential elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumakova, A. A.; Gmoshinski, I. V.; Khotimchenko, S. A.; Trushina, E. N.

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of engineered nanoparticles with toxic and essential trace elements must be taken into consideration when estimating risks of NPs presented in the natural environment. The purpose of this work was to study the possible influence of silica, titanium dioxide (rutile) and fullerenol NPs on the toxicity of cadmium and to research the status of some trace elements and related indices of immune function in experiments on laboratory animals. Young male Wistar rats received cadmium salt (1 mg/kg b.w. Cd) orally for 28 days separately or in conjunction with the said kinds of NPs in different doses. A number of effects was observed as a result of combined action of Cd together with NPs, increase in bioaccumulation of this toxic trace element in the liver was most evident. The observed effects didn't show simple dose- dependence in respect to nanomaterials that should be taken into consideration when assessing the possible risks of joint action of nanoparticles and toxic elements existing in the environment in extremely low doses. Violation of microelement homeostasis caused by the combined action of Cd and NPs can have various adverse effects, such as inhibition of T-cell immunity induced by co-administration of Cd with rutile NPs.

  3. Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps

    PubMed Central

    Bergin, Ingrid L.; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures. PMID:24228068

  4. Toxicological Considerations, Toxicity Assessment, and Risk Management of Inhaled Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bakand, Shahnaz; Hayes, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Novel engineered nanoparticles (NPs), nanomaterial (NM) products and composites, are continually emerging worldwide. Many potential benefits are expected from their commercial applications; however, these benefits should always be balanced against risks. Potential toxic effects of NM exposure have been highlighted, but, as there is a lack of understanding about potential interactions of nanomaterials (NMs) with biological systems, these side effects are often ignored. NPs are able to translocate to the bloodstream, cross body membrane barriers effectively, and affect organs and tissues at cellular and molecular levels. NPs may pass the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and gain access to the brain. The interactions of NPs with biological milieu and resulted toxic effects are significantly associated with their small size distribution, large surface area to mass ratio (SA/MR), and surface characteristics. NMs are able to cross tissue and cell membranes, enter into cellular compartments, and cause cellular injury as well as toxicity. The extremely large SA/MR of NPs is also available to undergo reactions. An increased surface area of the identical chemical will increase surface reactivity, adsorption properties, and potential toxicity. This review explores biological pathways of NPs, their toxic potential, and underlying mechanisms responsible for such toxic effects. The necessity of toxicological risk assessment to human health should be emphasised as an integral part of NM design and manufacture. PMID:27314324

  5. Toxicological Considerations, Toxicity Assessment, and Risk Management of Inhaled Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bakand, Shahnaz; Hayes, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Novel engineered nanoparticles (NPs), nanomaterial (NM) products and composites, are continually emerging worldwide. Many potential benefits are expected from their commercial applications; however, these benefits should always be balanced against risks. Potential toxic effects of NM exposure have been highlighted, but, as there is a lack of understanding about potential interactions of nanomaterials (NMs) with biological systems, these side effects are often ignored. NPs are able to translocate to the bloodstream, cross body membrane barriers effectively, and affect organs and tissues at cellular and molecular levels. NPs may pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and gain access to the brain. The interactions of NPs with biological milieu and resulted toxic effects are significantly associated with their small size distribution, large surface area to mass ratio (SA/MR), and surface characteristics. NMs are able to cross tissue and cell membranes, enter into cellular compartments, and cause cellular injury as well as toxicity. The extremely large SA/MR of NPs is also available to undergo reactions. An increased surface area of the identical chemical will increase surface reactivity, adsorption properties, and potential toxicity. This review explores biological pathways of NPs, their toxic potential, and underlying mechanisms responsible for such toxic effects. The necessity of toxicological risk assessment to human health should be emphasised as an integral part of NM design and manufacture. PMID:27314324

  6. Biodistribution and toxicity of spherical aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Lee, Gwang-Hee; Yoon, Cheolho; Jeong, Uiseok; Kim, Younghun; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Dong-Wan

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of the nano-industry, concerns about their potential adverse health effects have been raised. Thus, ranking accurately their toxicity and prioritizing for in vivo testing through in vitro toxicity test is needed. In this study, we used three types of synthesized aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlONPs): γ-aluminum oxide hydroxide nanoparticles (γ-AlOHNPs), γ- and α-AlONPs. All three AlONPs were spherical, and the surface area was the greatest for γ-AlONPs, followed by the α-AlONPs and γ-AlOHNPs. In mice, γ-AlOHNPs accumulated the most 24 h after a single oral dose. Additionally, the decreased number of white blood cells (WBC), the increased ratio of neutrophils and the enhanced secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 were observed in the blood of mice dosed with γ-AlOHNPs (10 mg kg(-1)). We also compared their toxicity using four different in vitro test methods using six cell lines, which were derived from their potential target organs, BEAS-2B (lung), Chang (liver), HACAT (skin), H9C2 (heart), T98G (brain) and HEK-293 (kidney). The results showed γ-AlOHNPs induced the greatest toxicity. Moreover, separation of particles was observed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of cells treated with γ-AlOHNPs, but not γ-AlONPs or α-AlONPs. In conclusion, our results suggest that the accumulation and toxicity of AlONPs are stronger in γ-AlOHNPs compared with γ-AlONPs and α-AlONPs owing their low stability within biological system, and the presence of hydroxyl group may be an important factor in determining the distribution and toxicity of spherical AlONPs. PMID:26437923

  7. Sirolimus-related pulmonary toxicity mimicking 'asthma like' symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, GL; Mahadevan, S; Clarke, JR; Alton, H; Beath, SV

    2007-01-01

    Sirolimus is an immunosuppressant with expanding use in pediatric organ transplantation, dermatology and rheumatology. We report two cases of children who developed asthma like symptoms and were diagnosed with interstitial lung disease, which responded to discontinuation of sirolimus. Pediatricians should be aware about the pulmonary side effects of sirolimus. PMID:17876884

  8. Molecular insights into the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Umbright, Christina; Roberts, Jenny R.; Cumpston, Amy; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T.; Frazer, David; Li, Shengqiao; Kashon, Michael; Joseph, Pius

    2015-01-01

    Identification of molecular target(s) and mechanism(s) of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity is important for the intervention and/or prevention of diseases associated with exposure to silica. Rats were exposed to crystalline silica by inhalation (15 mg m−3, 6 h per day, 5 days) and global gene expression profile was determined in the lungs by microarray analysis at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 weeks following termination of silica exposure. The number of significantly differentially expressed genes (>1.5-fold change and <0.01 false discovery rate P-value) detected in the lungs during the post-exposure time intervals analyzed exhibited a steady increase in parallel with the progression of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity noticed in the rats. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of a representative set of 10 genes confirmed the microarray findings. The number of biological functions, canonical pathways and molecular networks significantly affected by silica exposure, as identified by the bioinformatics analysis of the significantly differentially expressed genes detected during the post-exposure time intervals, also exhibited a steady increase similar to the silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, respiratory diseases, cancer, and tissue remodeling and fibrosis were significantly differentially expressed in the rat lungs; however, unresolved inflammation was the single most significant biological response to pulmonary exposure to silica. Excessive mucus production, as implicated by significant overexpression of the pendrin coding gene, SLC26A4, was identified as a potential novel mechanism for silica-induced pulmonary toxicity. Collectively, the findings of our study provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of crystalline silica-induced pulmonary toxicity in the rat. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:22431001

  9. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO2-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO2 in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO2 exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO2 induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO2 and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO2 induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. PMID:22613087

  10. Airway irritation, inflammation, and toxicity in mice following inhalation of metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Søren T; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Steen S; Levin, Marcus; Jensen, Keld A; Wallin, Håkan; Nielsen, Gunnar D; Koponen, Ismo K

    2016-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are used in a broad range of industrial processes and workers may be exposed to aerosols of the particles both during production and handling. Despite the widespread use of these particles, relatively few studies have been performed to investigate the toxicological effects in the airways following inhalation. In the present study, the acute (24 h) and persistent (13 weeks) effects in the airways after a single exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles were studied using a murine inhalation model. Mice were exposed 60 min to aerosols of either ZnO, TiO2, Al2O3 or CeO2 and the deposited doses in the upper and lower respiratory tracts were calculated. Endpoints were acute airway irritation, pulmonary inflammation based on analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell composition, DNA damage assessed by the comet assay and pulmonary toxicity assessed by protein level in BAL fluid and histology. All studied particles reduced the tidal volume in a concentration-dependent manner accompanied with an increase in the respiratory rate. In addition, ZnO and TiO2 induced nasal irritation. BAL cell analyses revealed both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation 24-h post-exposure to all particles except TiO2. The ranking of potency regarding induction of acute lung inflammation was Al2O3 = TiO2 < CeO2 ≪ ZnO. Exposure to CeO2 gave rise to a more persistent inflammation; both neutrophilic and lymphocytic inflammation was seen 13 weeks after exposure. As the only particles, ZnO caused a significant toxic effect in the airways while TiO2 gave rise to DNA-strand break as shown by the comet assay. PMID:27323801

  11. Natural inorganic nanoparticles – formation, fate, and toxicity in the environment.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis, stability, and toxicity of engineered metal nanoparticles (ENPs) have been extensively studied during the past two decades. In contrast, research on the formation, fate and ecological effects of naturally occurring nanoparticles (NNPs) has become a focus of attent...

  12. Toxicity Effect of Silver Nanoparticles in Brine Shrimp Artemia

    PubMed Central

    Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Jennifer, Samou Michael; Prabhu, Durai; Chandhirasekar, Devakumar

    2014-01-01

    The present study revealed the toxic effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in Artemia nauplii and evaluated the mortality rate, hatching percentage, and genotoxic effect in Artemia nauplii/cysts. The AgNPs were commercially purchased and characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were spherical in nature and with size range of 30–40 nm. Artemia cysts were collected from salt pan, processed, and hatched in sea water. Artemia nauplii (II instar) were treated using silver nanoparticles of various nanomolar concentrations and LC50 value (10 nM) and mortality rate (24 and 48 hours) was evaluated. Hatching percentage of decapsulated cysts treated with AgNPs was examined. Aggregation of AgNPs in the gut region of nauplii was studied using phase contrast microscope and apoptotic cells in nauplii stained with acridine orange were observed using fluorescence microscope. DNA damage of single cell of nauplii was determined by comet assay. This study showed that as the concentration of AgNPs increased, the mortality rate, aggregation in gut region, apoptotic cells, and DNA damage increased in nauplii, whereas the percentage of hatching in Artemia cysts decreased. Thus this study revealed that the nanomolar concentrations of AgNPs have toxic effect on both Artemia nauplii and cysts. PMID:24516361

  13. Encapsulation of Alpha-1 antitrypsin in PLGA nanoparticles: In Vitro characterization as an effective aerosol formulation in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    , but the polymer with a ratio of 75:25 had a continuous and longer release profile. Cytotoxicity studies showed that nanoparticles do not affect cell growth and were not toxic to cells. Conclusion In summary, α1AT-loaded nanoparticles may be considered as a novel formulation for efficient treatment of many pulmonary diseases. PMID:22607686

  14. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  15. Species-specific toxicity of ceria nanoparticles to Lactuca plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, Yuhui; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Xiao; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-02-01

    Species-specific differences in the toxicity of manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) have been reported, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We previously found that CeO2 NPs inhibited root elongation of head lettuce, whereas no toxic effect was observed on other plants (such as wheat, cucumber and radish). In this study, interactions between Lactuca plants and three types of CeO2 NPs (lab-synthesized 7 and 25 nm CeO2 NPs, and a commercial CeO2 NPs) were investigated. It was found that CeO2 NPs were toxic to three kinds of Lactuca genus plants and different CeO2 NPs showed different degrees of toxicity. The results of X-ray absorption near edge fine structure indicate that small parts of CeO2 NPs were transformed from Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in roots of the plants that were treated with CeO2 NPs during the seed germination stage. But the high sensitivity of Lactuca plants to the released Ce(3+) ions caused the species-specific phytotoxicity of CeO2 NPs. Differences in sizes and zeta potentials among three types of CeO2 NPs resulted in their different degrees of biotransformation which accounted for the discrepancy in the toxicity to Lactuca plants. This study is among the few, and may indeed the first, that addresses the relation between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles and its species-specific phytotoxicity. PMID:24256192

  16. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies. PMID:26286636

  17. Toxicity of Nanoparticles and an Overview of Current Experimental Models.

    PubMed

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field having potential applications in many areas. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been studied for cell toxicity, immunotoxicity, and genotoxicity. Tetrazolium-based assays such as MTT, MTS, and WST-1 are used to determine cell viability. Cell inflammatory response induced by NPs is checked by measuring inflammatory biomarkers, such as IL-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor, using ELISA. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay is used for cell membrane integrity. Different types of cell cultures, including cancer cell lines have been employed as in vitro toxicity models. It has been generally agreed that NPs interfere with either assay materials or with detection systems. So far, toxicity data generated by employing such models are conflicting and inconsistent. Therefore, on the basis of available experimental models, it may be difficult to judge and list some of the more valuable NPs as more toxic to biological systems and vice versa. Considering the potential applications of NPs in many fields and the growing apprehensions of FDA about the toxic potential of nanoproducts, it is the need of the hour to look for new internationally agreed free of bias toxicological models by focusing more on in vivo studies. PMID:26286636

  18. Inhalation of Carbon Black Nanoparticles Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saputra, Devina; Yoon, Jin-ha; Park, Hyunju; Heo, Yongju; Yang, Hyoseon; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sangjin; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of recent studies have focused on the impact of particulate matter on human health. As a model for atmospheric particulate inhalation, we investigated the effects of inhaled carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) on mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The CNBPs were generated by a novel aerosolization process, and the mice were exposed to the aerosol for 4 hours. We found that CBNP inhalation exacerbated lung inflammation, as evidenced by histopathology analysis and by the expression levels of interleukin-6 protein, fibronectin, and interferon-γ mRNAs in lung tissues. Notably, fibronectin mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase in expression after CBNP exposure. These data suggest that the concentration of CBNPs delivered (calculated to be 12.5 μg/m3) can aggravate lung inflammation in mice. Our results also suggest that the inhalation of ultrafine particles like PM 2.5 is an impactful environmental risk factor for humans, particularly in susceptible populations with predisposing lung conditions. PMID:25071917

  19. Toxicity of Calcium Hydroxide Nanoparticles on Murine Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Azadnia, Sina; Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major contributing factors, which may cause failure of endodontic treatment, is the presence of residual microorganisms in the root canal system. For years, most dentists have been using calcium hydroxide (CH) as the intracanal medicament between treatment sessions to eliminate remnant microorganisms. Reducing the size of CH particles into nanoparticles enhances the penetration of this medicament into dentinal tubules and increases their antimicrobial efficacy. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles and conventional CH on fibroblast cell line using the Mosmann’s Tetrazolium Toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on L929 murine fibroblast cell line by cell culture and evaluation of the direct effect of materials on the cultured cells. Materials were evaluated in two groups of 10 samples each at 24, 48 and 72 h. At each time point, 10 samples along with 5 positive and 5 negative controls were evaluated. The samples were transferred into tubes and exposed to fibroblast cells. The viability of cells was then evaluated. The Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Cytotoxicity of both materials decreased over time and for conventional CH was lower than that of nanoparticles. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles was similar to that of conventional CH. PMID:25598810

  20. Toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Combarros, R G; Collado, S; Díaz, M

    2016-03-01

    The increasing use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) in industrial and household applications will very likely lead to the release of such materials into the environment. As wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are usually the last barrier before the water is discharged into the environment, it is important to understand the effects of these materials in the biotreatment processes, since the results in the literature are usually contradictory. We proposed the use of flow cytometry (FC) technology to obtain conclusive results. Aqueous solutions of TiO2 nanoparticles (0-2 mg mL(-1)) were used to check its toxicity effect using Pseudomonas putida as simplified model of real sludge over room light. Physiological changes in P. putida from viable to viable but non-culturable cells were observed by flow cytometry in presence of TiO2. The damaged and dead cell concentrations were below 5% in all cases under study. Both FSC and SSC parameter increased with TiO2 dose dependent manner, indicating nanoparticles uptake by the bacteria. The biological removal of salicylic acid (SA) was also significantly impacted by the presence of TiO2 in the medium reducing the efficiency. The use of FC allows also to develop and fit segregated kinetic models, giving the impact of TiO2 nanoparticles in the physiological subpopulations growth and implications for SA removal. PMID:26771160

  1. Environmental Feedbacks and Engineered Nanoparticles: Mitigation of Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Algal-Produced Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Louise M.; Dickson, Helen; Klanjscek, Tin; Keller, Arturo A.; McCauley, Edward; Nisbet, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of nanotoxicity studies measures the effect of exposure to a toxicant on an organism and ignores the potentially important effects of the organism on the toxicant. We investigated the effect of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on populations of the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at different phases of batch culture growth and show that the AgNPs are most toxic to cultures in the early phases of growth. We offer strong evidence that reduced toxicity occurs because extracellular dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds produced by the algal cells themselves mitigate the toxicity of AgNPs. We analyzed this feedback with a dynamic model incorporating algal growth, nanoparticle dissolution, bioaccumulation of silver, DOC production and DOC-mediated inactivation of nanoparticles and ionic silver. Our findings demonstrate how the feedback between aquatic organisms and their environment may impact the toxicity and ecological effects of engineered nanoparticles. PMID:24086348

  2. Death by bleomycin pulmonary toxicity in ovarian dysgerminoma with pathologic complete response to chemotherapy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Calzas Rodríguez, Julia; Carmen Juarez Morales, María Del; Casero, Miguel Angel Racionero

    2016-01-01

    With cisplatin-based chemotherapy, most patients with ovarian dysgerminoma will survive long-term. Bleomycin is an important part of ovarian germ cell tumors (OGCT) treatment, and its dose-limiting toxicity is the development of pulmonary toxicity and it is increased in patients older than 40 years. We report the case of an elderly patient with an unresectable ovarian dysgerminoma who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and who developed fatal bleomycin pulmonary toxicity (BPT) after surgery. A monitoring of pulmonary function is not routinely recommended for detecting BPT, although together with carefully assessment for symptoms or signs suggestive of pulmonary toxicity is the best way to reduce the risk of BPT. The frequency of pulmonary events in older patients makes us to think about the possibility of either reduce the dose of bleomycin or removing it from the BEP in ovarian GCT. PMID:27330950

  3. Methods for nanoparticle labeling of ricin and effect on toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Alastair W.; Yu, Jun; Lindsay, Christopher D.; Nativo, Paola; Graham, Duncan

    2009-09-01

    The unique optical properties associated with nanostructured materials that support the excitation of surface plasmons offer many new opportunities for the enhanced optical investigation of biological materials that pose a security threat. In particular, ricin is considered a significant bioterrorism risk due to its high toxicity combined with its ready availability as a byproduct in castor oil production. Therefore, the development of optical techniques capable of rapid on-site toxin detection with high molecular specificity and sensitivity continues to be of significant importance. Furthermore, understanding of the ricin cell entry and intracellular pathways remains poor due to a lack of suitable bioanalytical techniques. Initial work aimed at simultaneously tackling both these issues is described where different approaches for the nanoparticle labeling of ricin are investigated along with changes in ricin toxicity associated with the labeling process.

  4. Toxic effect of silver and platinum nanoparticles toward the freshwater microalga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Książyk, Małgorzata; Asztemborska, Monika; Stęborowski, Romuald; Bystrzejewska-Piotrowska, Grażyna

    2015-05-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in a wide range of products has resulted in their release into the aquatic environment; therefore, an understanding of the toxic effects of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms is of permanent importance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of silver and platinum nanoparticles toward the freshwater microalga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. Algal growth and photosynthetic pigments were determined to quantitate the effects of varying concentrations of Ag and Pt nanoparticles. The silver nanoparticles were much more toxic than the platinum ones. The concentrations causing total inhibition of algal growth were 5.0 and 22.2 mg L(-1), respectively. Similar results were obtained by analyzing the concentration of photosynthetic pigments in P. subcapitata exposed to nanoparticles. Thus, simple spectrophotometric determination of chlorophyll is a convenient tool for the analysis of nanoparticle toxicity to algae. PMID:25742926

  5. Surface area of particle administered versus mass in determining the pulmonary toxicity of ultrafine and fine carbon black: comparison to ultrafine titanium dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Tina M; Castranova, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles are characterized by having a high surface area per mass. Particulate surface area has been reported to play an important role in determining the biological activity of nanoparticles. However, recent reports have questioned this relationship. This study was conducted to determine whether mass of particles or surface area of particles is the more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In this study, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to various doses of ultrafine and fine carbon black. At 1, 7, or 42 days post-exposure, inflammatory and cytotoxic potential of each particle type was compared on both a mass dosage (mg/rat) as well as an equal surface area dosage (cm2 of particles per cm2 of alveolar epithelium). In an additional study, the pulmonary responses to instillation of ultrafine carbon black were compared to equivalent particle surface area doses of ultrafine titanium dioxide. Results Ultrafine carbon black particles caused a dose dependent but transient inflammatory and cytotoxic response. On a mass basis, these responses were significantly (65 fold) greater than those for fine sized carbon black. However, when doses were equalized based on surface area of particles given, the ultrafine carbon black particles were only slightly (non-significantly) more inflammogenic and cytotoxic compared to the fine sized carbon black. At one day post-exposure, inflammatory potencies of the ultrafine carbon black and ultrafine titanium dioxide particles were similar. However, while the pulmonary reaction to ultrafine carbon black resolved with time, the inflammatory effects of ultrafine titanium dioxide were more persistent over a 42 day post-exposure period. Conclusion These results indicate that for low toxicity low solubility materials, surface area of particles administered rather than mass burden of particles may be a more appropriate dose metric for pulmonary toxicity studies. In addition, ultrafine titanium

  6. Role of oxidative stress in thuringiensin-induced pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.-F. . E-mail: sftsai@tactri.gov.tw; Yang Chi; Liu, B.-L.; Hwang, J.-S.; Ho, S.-P. . E-mail: spho@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2006-10-15

    To understand the effect of thuringiensin on the lungs tissues, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administrated with thuringiensin by intratracheal instillation at doses 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. The rats were sacrificed 4 h after treatment, and lungs were isolated and examined. Subsequently, an effective dose of 1.6 mg/kg was selected for the time course study (4, 8, 12, and 24 h). Intratracheal instillation of thuringiensin resulted in lung damage, as evidenced by increase in lung weight and decrease in alkaline phosphatase (10-54%), an enzyme localized primarily in pulmonary alveolar type II epithelial cells. Furthermore, the administration of thuringiensin caused increases in lipid peroxidation (21-105%), the indices of lung injury. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) activities of lung tissue extracts were measured to evaluate the effect of thuringiensin on antioxidant defense system. The SOD activity and GSH content in lung showed significant decreases in a dose-related manner with 11-21% and 15-37%, respectively. Those were further supported by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, as indicated by increases in IL-1{beta} (229-1017%) and TNF-{alpha} (234%) levels. Therefore, the results demonstrated that changes in the pulmonary oxidative-antioxidative status might play an important role in the thuringiensin-induced lung injury.

  7. Compared in vivo toxicity in mice of lung delivered biodegradable and non-biodegradable nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aragao-Santiago, Letícia; Hillaireau, Hervé; Grabowski, Nadège; Mura, Simona; Nascimento, Thais L; Dufort, Sandrine; Coll, Jean-Luc; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2016-04-01

    To design nanoparticle (NP)-based drug delivery systems for pulmonary administration, biodegradable materials are considered safe, but their potential toxicity is poorly explored. We here explore the lung toxicity in mice of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) and compare it to the toxicity of non-biodegradable ones. NP formulations of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) coated with chitosan (CS), poloxamer 188 (PF68) or poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), which renders 200 nm NPs of positive, negative or neutral surface charge respectively, were analyzed for their biodistribution by in vivo fluorescence imaging and their inflammatory potential after single lung nebulization in mice. After exposure, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell population, protein secretion and cytokine release as well as lung histology were carried out. The inflammatory response was compared to the one induced by non-biodegradable counterparts, namely, TiO2 of rutile and anatase crystal form and polystyrene (PS). PLGA NPs were mostly present in mice lungs, with little passage to other organs. An increase in neutrophil recruitment was observed in mice exposed to PS NPs 24 h after nebulization, which declined at 48 h. This result was supported by an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) in BAL supernatant at 24 h. TiO2 anatase NPs were still present in lung cells 48 h after nebulization and induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells to BAL. In contrast, regardless of their surface charge, PLGA NPs did not induce significant changes in the inflammation markers analyzed. In conclusion, these results point out to a safe use of PLGA NPs regardless of their surface coating compared to non-biodegradable ones. PMID:26573338

  8. Early Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Uzung; Marinelli, Laura; Ali, Sayed; Huberfeld, Seymour; Barrera, Rafael; Chang, John B

    2016-09-01

    Amiodarone is an antiarrhythmic drug that has been commonly used to treat supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. This drug is an iodine-containing compound that tends to accumulate in several organs, including the lungs. Especially, its main metabolically active metabolite desethylamiodarone can adversely affect many organs. A very well-known severe complication of amiodarone therapy is the amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. This article presents the case study of an 82-year-old male patient with acute amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity. The patient underwent endovascular aneurysm repair for rapidly increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm. During the postoperative period the patient developed rapid atrial fibrillation and amiodarone therapy was initiated. Subsequently, the patient went into acute respiratory failure and was requiring high supplemental oxygen support and a chest X-ray revealed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. During the hospital course the patient required mechanical ventilator support. With discontinuation of amiodarone, supportive therapy and steroid treatment patient symptoms significantly improved. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity must be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients on the medication with progressive or acute respiratory symptoms. Early discontinuation of amiodarone and aggressive corticosteroid therapy should be considered as a viable treatment strategy. PMID:27574388

  9. Pulmonary extraction of propranolol in normal and oxygen-toxic sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.E.; Lanken, P.N.; Hansen-Flaschen, J.H.; Haselton, F.R.; Albelda, S.M.; Fishman, A.P.

    1989-07-01

    To help define the mechanisms involved in the handling of propranolol by normal and injured lungs, we studied the pulmonary extraction of (/sup 3/H)propranolol in 23 unanesthetized sheep. Extraction of propranolol by normal lungs during a single circulation was characterized by (1) subsequent back-diffusion and pulmonary retention of the drug, (2) no evidence of saturable uptake or binding, (3) no effect of isoproterenol or imipramine, and (4) no effect of increasing cardiac output by treadmill exercise. In lungs damaged by oxygen toxicity, (/sup 3/H)propranolol extraction decreased progressively to 63% of base line, paralleling progressive arterial hypoxemia and hypercapnia. In contrast, (/sup 14/C)serotonin extraction remained unchanged from base line. Our results suggest that in normal unanesthetized sheep, pulmonary extraction of propranolol occurs primarily by passive diffusion that is flow-limited. Also, lung injury induced by oxygen toxicity in sheep reduces the pulmonary extraction of propranolol. Indeed, in oxygen toxicity, the depressed extraction of propranolol is a more sensitive marker of lung injury than is serotonin extraction.

  10. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO{sub 2}-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO{sub 2} in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO{sub 2} exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO{sub 2} induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO{sub 2} and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO{sub 2} induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. -- Highlights: ► Cerium oxide exposure significantly affected the following parameters in the lung. ► Induced fibrotic cytokine OPN and TGF-β1 production and phospholipidosis. ► Caused imbalance of the MMP-9/ TIMP-1 ratio that favors fibrosis

  11. Corticosteroid therapy against treatment-related pulmonary toxicities in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun; Park, Seo-Yeon; Song, Jang-Hyeon; Seon, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yun-Hyeon; Yoon, Seong-Hoon; Yu, Jin-Yeong; Lee, Bo-Ram; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Young-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background With the recent increased use of new anti-neoplastic agents, molecular-targeted drugs and radiation in patients with lung cancer, there has been an increase in the occurrence drug-induced or radiation-induced pulmonary toxicities. We conducted this study to evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with lung cancer who presented with treatment-related pulmonary toxicities and to analyze the dosage pattern of corticosteroid therapy against them. Methods To collect the baseline data from the patients with lung cancer who developed treatment-related pulmonary toxicities, we initially selected those who were prescribed corticosteroids between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Depending on clinical and radiological diagnoses, we classified pulmonary toxicities into drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD), radiation pneumonitis, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE COPD) and others. Results We divided total patients (n=398) into four groups, and these include 88 cases (22%) of DILD, 189 cases (47%) of radiation pneumonitis, 47 cases (12%) of AE COPD and 74 cases (19%) of others. The prescribed rate of pulse or high-dose steroid was measured as 73%, 20%, 40% and 38%, respectively (P<0.001). In DILD radiologic findings, the 2-month mortality was significantly higher in the patients with the diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) pattern (100%) as compared with those with the non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) or bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP) one (62% or 42%, respectively) (P=0.032). Conclusions This study showed that the natural course of DILD had more unfavorable outcome requiring higher dose steroid therapy as compared with those with radiation pneumonitis or AE COPD. According to a subgroup analysis of the patients with DILD, BOOP and NSIP radiographic patterns showed more favorable outcomes. PMID:25276362

  12. Acute fibrinous organising pneumonia: a manifestation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jamous, Fady; Ayaz, Syed Zain; Choate, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    A 50-year-old man was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for acute arthritis of his right big toe. Within a few days, he developed dyspnoea, hypoxaemia and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. Symptoms improved with discontinuation of the antibiotic but worsened again with its reintroduction. An open lung biopsy was performed. We describe the workup performed and the factors that pointed to a final diagnosis of TMP-SMX-related pulmonary toxicity in the form of acute fibrinous organising pneumonia. PMID:25355746

  13. Comparison of the Pulmonary Oxidative Stress Caused by Intratracheal Instillation and Inhalation of NiO Nanoparticles when Equivalent Amounts of NiO Are Retained in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Masanori; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Izumi, Hiroto; Oyabu, Takako; Tomonaga, Taisuke; Okada, Takami; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Myojo, Toshihiko; Kubo, Masaru; Shimada, Manabu; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    NiO nanoparticles were administered to rat lungs via intratracheal instillation or inhalation. During pulmonary toxicity caused by NiO nanoparticles, the induction of oxidative stress is a major factor. Both intratracheal instillation and inhalation of NiO nanoparticles induced pulmonary oxidative stress. The oxidative stress response protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), was induced by the administration of NiO nanoparticles at both the protein and gene expression level. Additionally, certain oxidative-stress markers in the lung, such as 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, thioredoxin, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were increased. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the lung was also increased by the administration of NiO nanoparticles. When the amount of NiO in the lung is similar, the responses against pulmonary oxidative stress of intratracheal instillation and inhalation are also similar. However, the state of pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase was different between intratracheal instillation and inhalation, even if the amount of NiO in the lung was similar. Inhalation causes milder oxidative stress than that caused by intratracheal instillation. On evaluation of the nanoparticle-induced pulmonary oxidative stress in the early phase, we should understand the different states of oxidative stress induced by intratracheal instillation and inhalation. PMID:26797643

  14. In Vitro Pulmonary Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanomaterials (NMs) encompass a diversity of materials with unique physicochemical characteristics which raise concerns about their potential risk to human health. Rapid predictive testing methods are needed to characterize NMs health effects as well as to screen and prioritize N...

  15. Toxicity of mycotoxins for the rat pulmonary macrophage in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, W G; Gerberick, G F; Lewis, D M; Castranova, V

    1986-01-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in grains is well documented. Workers in grain handling occupations are commonly exposed to grain dust aerosols. Work in our laboratory has shown that T-2 toxin is highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro, causing loss of viability, release of radiolabeled chromium, inhibition of macromolecular synthesis, inhibition of phagocytosis, and inhibition of macrophage activation. Similarly, patulin caused a significant release of radiolabeled chromium, decrease in ATP levels, significant inhibition of protein and RNA synthesis, and inhibition of phagocytosis. The data show that both T-2 toxin and patulin are highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The data further suggest that the presence of these mycotoxins in airborne respirable dust might present a hazard to exposed workers. PMID:2423320

  16. Toxicity of mycotoxins for the rat pulmonary macrophage in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, W.G.; Gerberick, G.F.; Lewis, D.M.; Castranova, V.

    1986-04-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in grains is well documented. Workers in grain handling occupations are commonly exposed to grain dust aerosols. Work in our laboratory has shown that T-2 toxin is highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro, causing loss of viability, release of radiolabeled chromium, inhibition of macromolecular synthesis, inhibition of phagocytosis, and inhibition of macrophage activation. Similarly, patulin caused a significant release of radiolabeled chromium, decrease in ATP levels, significant inhibition of protein and RNA synthesis, and inhibition of phagocytosis. The data show that both T-2 toxin and patulin are highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The data further suggest that the presence of these mycotoxins in airborne respirable dust might present a hazard to exposed workers.

  17. Toxicity of mycotoxins for the rat pulmonary macrophage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, W G; Gerberick, G F; Lewis, D M; Castranova, V

    1986-04-01

    The presence of mycotoxins in grains is well documented. Workers in grain handling occupations are commonly exposed to grain dust aerosols. Work in our laboratory has shown that T-2 toxin is highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro, causing loss of viability, release of radiolabeled chromium, inhibition of macromolecular synthesis, inhibition of phagocytosis, and inhibition of macrophage activation. Similarly, patulin caused a significant release of radiolabeled chromium, decrease in ATP levels, significant inhibition of protein and RNA synthesis, and inhibition of phagocytosis. The data show that both T-2 toxin and patulin are highly toxic to rat alveolar macrophages in vitro. The data further suggest that the presence of these mycotoxins in airborne respirable dust might present a hazard to exposed workers. PMID:2423320

  18. Toxicity of metallic oxides nanoparticle suspensions to a freshwater sludge worm Tubifex tubifex Müller.

    PubMed

    Verma, Surabhi; Das, Sangita; Khangarot, B S

    2011-02-01

    Toxic effects of selected metallic oxides nanoparticles were studied using the short-term static bioassays. Nanoparticles were more toxic than comparable bulk metallic oxides. Freshwater sludge worm Tubifex tubifex can be used as suitable test model for nanoecotoxicological studies in future studies. PMID:21485877

  19. Pulmonary toxicity of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C.L.; Conklin, A.W.; Gelman, R.A.; Adee, R.R.; Rhoads, K.

    1982-02-01

    The effects of Mount St. Helens volcanic ash, a sandy loam soil, and quartz particles on the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes of Fischer rats were studied at time intervals of up to 109 days after in tratracheal instillation of 40 mg ash, soil, or quartz in a single dose or after multiple doses of ash instilled in seven consecutive weekly doses for a total deposition of 77 mg. Quartz caused early granuloma formation, later fibrosis was also seen in lymph nodes. Volcanic ash caused an ill-defined inflammatory reaction with a few rats showing granuloma formulation, a very limited linear fibrosis, and a moderate lipoproteinosis, and lymph nodes were enlarged with numerous microgranulomas but without reticulin and collagen formation. Pulmonary reactions to soil particles were less intense but similar to those in ash- exposed animals; lymph nodes were not enlarged. No significant clearance of ash was found at 3 months after instillation. Volcanic ash produced a simple pneumoconiosis similar to what has been described for animals and humans living for prolonged periods of time in dusty desert areas of the United States.

  20. Gene Expression and Pulmonary Toxicity of Chitosan-graft- Polyethylenimine as Aerosol Gene Carrier.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Taek; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Gyu Woo, Chang; Choi, Mansoo; Cho, Chong-Su; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-01-01

    Chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (CHI-g-PEI) copolymer has been used for the improvement of low transfection efficiency of chitosan. The present study aims to test the pulmonary toxicity and efficiency of CHI-g-PEI as an aerosol gene carrier. Mice were exposed to aerosol containing green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-polyethylenimine (PEI) or GFP-CHI-g-PEI complexes for 30 min during the development of our nose-only exposure chamber (NOEC) system. CHI-g-PEI-mediated aerosol delivery demonstrated 15.65% enhancement of the fluorescence intensity. Compared to PEI, CHI-g-PEI showed no significant pulmonary toxicity. In summary, using CHI-g-PEI is safe and shows high transfection in aerosol gene delivery to animals, and enhanced efficiency was achieved through our aerosol gene delivery system. Therefore, CHI-g-PEI and this system would be applicable to future study for aerosol gene therapy. PMID:24250601

  1. Corticosteroid-Responsive Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Fludarabine Monophosphate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rudzianskiene, Milda; Griniute, Rasa; Juozaityte, Elona; Inciura, Arturas; Rudzianskas, Viktoras; Emilia Kiavialaitis, Greta

    2012-01-01

    Fludarabine monophosphate is an effective drug for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. Myelosuppression, opportunistic infections, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia are the most common side effects of fludarabine. Herein we report a 55-year-old female that presented with fever and dyspnea after completing her third cycle of FMD (fludarabine, mitoxantrone, and dexamethasone) chemotherapy for stage IV non-Hodgkin follicular lymphoma. Chest X-ray revealed bilateral pneumofibrotic changes and chest CT showed bilateral diffuse interstitial changes with fibrotic alterations. No evidence of infectious agents was noted. The patient had a reduced carbon monoxide transfer factor (45%). Her symptoms and radiographic findings resolved following treatment with prednisolone. The literature contains several cases of fludarabine-associated interstitial pulmonary toxicity that responded to steroid therapy. Fludarabine-induced pulmonary toxicity is reversible with cessation of the drug and administration of glucocorticosteroids. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385727

  2. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  3. Pulmonary toxicity of components of textile paint linked to the Ardystil syndrome: intratracheal administration in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Clottens, F L; Verbeken, E K; Demedts, M; Nemery, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It was hypothesised from an epidemiological investigation that a formula change from Acramin FWR (a polyurea) to Acramin FWN (a polyamide-amine) had led to severe pulmonary disease in textile printing sprayers in SPAIN AND ALGERIA. To verify this, the pulmonary toxicity of the components of the paint systems involved was assessed in experimental animals. METHODS: Individual components and relevant mixtures, diluted in phosphate buttered saline, were given by intratracheal instillation of 2 ml/kg to hamsters. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed on days 3, 7, 14, 28, and 92 after a single intratracheal instillation, by histology and by measuring wet and dry lung weight, protein concentration, the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase, inflammatory cell number and distribution in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and hydroxyproline content in dried lung tissue. RESULTS: Based on the doses that killed 50% of the animals (LD50s), the various components were found to be 10 to 1250 times more toxic when given intratracheally than when given orally (according to reported oral LD50s in rats). Acramin FWN, Acramin FWR, Acrafix FHN, or their mixtures caused lung damage. Protein concentration, enzyme activities, total cell number, and percentage of polymorphonuclear neutrophils were increased in BALF during the first week after intratracheal instillation. Lung weights remained high for at least a month. Histology showed inflammatory cell infiltration and subsequent fibrosis with collagen deposition. This finding was confirmed by an increased hydroxyproline content in dried lung tissue. Acramoll W did not show toxic effects. CONCLUSIONS: The study suggests that there is no major difference, in hamsters, between the acute intratracheal toxicity of Acramin FWR and that of Acramin FWN. Consequently, there is no simple toxicological explanation for the epidemiological hypothesis. However

  4. ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF RESPIRABLE TIRE PARTICLES AND ASSESSMENT OF CARDIO-PULMONARY TOXICITY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elemental Analysis of Respirable Tire Particles and Assessment of Cardio-pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    R.R. Gottipolu, PhD1, E. Landa, PhD2, J.K. McGee, MS1, M.C. Schladweiler, BS1, J.G. Wallenborn, MS3, A.D. Ledbetter, BS1, J.E. Richards, MS1 and U.P. Kodavanti, PhD1. 1NHEER...

  5. Pulmonary toxicity of indium-tin oxide production facility particles in rats.

    PubMed

    Badding, Melissa A; Fix, Natalie R; Orandle, Marlene S; Barger, Mark W; Dunnick, Katherine M; Cummings, Kristin J; Leonard, Stephen S

    2016-04-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. Occupational exposures to potentially toxic particles generated during ITO production have increased in recent years as the demand for consumer electronics continues to rise. Previous studies have demonstrated cytotoxicity in vitro and animal models have shown pulmonary inflammation and injury in response to various indium-containing particles. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which indium materials or specific processes in the workplace may be the most toxic to workers is unknown. Here we examined the pulmonary toxicity of three different particle samples that represent real-life worker exposures, as they were collected at various production stages throughout an ITO facility. Indium oxide (In2O3), sintered ITO (SITO) and ventilation dust (VD) particles each caused pulmonary inflammation and damage in rats over a time course (1, 7 and 90 days post-intratracheal instillation), but SITO and VD appeared to induce greater toxicity in rat lungs than In2O3 at a dose of 1 mg per rat. Downstream pathological changes such as PAP and fibrosis were observed in response to all three particles 90 days after treatment, with a trend towards greatest severity in animals exposed to VD when comparing animals that received the same dose. These findings may inform workplace exposure reduction efforts and provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of an emerging occupational health issue. PMID:26472246

  6. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity--a fatal case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Range, Felix T; Hilker, Ekkehard; Breithardt, Günter; Buerke, Boris; Lebiedz, Pia

    2013-06-01

    Amiodarone is a widely used and very potent antiarrhythmic substance. Among its adverse effects, pulmonary toxicity is the most dangerous without a causal treatment option. Due to a very long half-life, accumulation can only be prevented by strict adherence to certain dosage patterns. In this review, we outline different safe and proven dosing schemes of amiodarone and compare the incidence and description of pulmonary toxicity. Reason for this is a case of fatal pulmonary toxicity due to a subacute iatrogenic overdosing of amiodarone in a 74-year-old male patient with known severe coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and ectopic atrial tachycardia with reduced function of kidneys and liver but without preexisting lung disease. Within 30 days, the patient received 32.2 g of amiodarone instead of 15.6 g as planned. Despite early corticosteroid treatment after fast exclusion of all other differential diagnoses, the patient died another month later in our intensive care unit from respiratory failure due to bipulmonal pneumonitis. PMID:23397327

  7. Toxicity assessment of zinc oxide nanoparticles using sub-acute and sub-chronic murine inhalation models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many commercial products and the potential for human exposure is increasing, few in vivo studies have addressed their possible toxic effects after inhalation. We sought to determine whether ZnO NPs induce pulmonary toxicity in mice following sub-acute or sub-chronic inhalation exposure to realistic exposure doses. Methods Mice (C57Bl/6) were exposed to well-characterized ZnO NPs (3.5 mg/m3, 4 hr/day) for 2 (sub-acute) or 13 (sub-chronic) weeks and necropsied immediately (0 wk) or 3 weeks (3 wks) post exposure. Toxicity was assessed by enumeration of total and differential cells, determination of total protein, lactate dehydrogenase activity and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid as well as measurements of pulmonary mechanics. Generation of reactive oxygen species was assessed in the lungs. Lungs were evaluated for histopathologic changes and Zn content. Zn concentration in blood, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, brain and BAL fluid was measured. Results An elevated concentration of Zn2+ was detected in BAL fluid immediately after exposures, but returned to baseline levels 3 wks post exposure. Dissolution studies showed that ZnO NPs readily dissolved in artificial lysosomal fluid (pH 4.5), but formed aggregates and precipitates in artificial interstitial fluid (pH 7.4). Sub-acute exposure to ZnO NPs caused an increase of macrophages in BAL fluid and a moderate increase in IL-12(p40) and MIP-1α, but no other inflammatory or toxic responses were observed. Following both sub-acute and sub-chronic exposures, pulmonary mechanics were no different than sham-exposed animals. Conclusions Our ZnO NP inhalation studies showed minimal pulmonary inflammation, cytotoxicity or lung histopathologic changes. An elevated concentration of Zn in the lung and BAL fluid indicates dissolution of ZnO NPs in the respiratory system after inhalation. Exposure concentration, exposure mode and time post

  8. Pulmonary toxicity following exposure to a tile coating product containing alkylsiloxanes. A clinical and toxicological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nørgaard, A. W.; Hansen, J. S.; Sørli, J. B.; Jacobsen, P.; Lynggard, F.; Levin, M.; Nielsen, G. D.; Wolkoff, P.; Ebbehøj, N. E.; Larsen, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    Context Coating products are widely used for making surfaces water and dirt repellent. However, on several occasions the use of these products has been associated with lung toxicity. Objective In the present study, we evaluated the toxic effects of an aerosolized tile-coating product. Methods Thirty-nine persons, who reported respiratory and systemic symptoms following exposure to the tile-coating product, were clinically examined. The product was analysed chemically and furthermore, the exposure scenario was reconstructed using a climate chamber and the toxicological properties of the product were studied using in vivo and by in vitro surfactometry. Results The symptoms developed within few hours and included coughing, tachypnoea, chest pain, general malaise and fever. The physical examination revealed perihilar lung infiltrates on chest radiograph and reduced blood oxygen saturation. The acute symptoms resolved gradually within 1–3 days and no delayed symptoms were observed. By means of mass spectrometry and X-ray spectroscopy, it was shown that the product contained non-fluorinated alkylsiloxanes. The exposure conditions in the supermarket were reconstructed under controlled conditions in a climate chamber and particle and gas exposure levels were monitored over time allowing estimation of human exposure levels. Mice exposed to the product developed symptoms of acute pulmonary toxicity in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The symptoms of acute pulmonary toxicity likely resulted from inhibition of the pulmonary surfactant function as demonstrated by in vitro surfactometry. Among these patients only a partial association between the level of exposure and the degree of respiratory symptoms was observed, which could be because of a high inter-individual difference in sensitivity and time-dependent changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol. Conclusion Workers need to cautiously apply surface coating products because the contents can be highly

  9. A Review on the Respiratory System Toxicity of Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Lowe, Kristine; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Kafoury, Ramzi

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory system represents the main gateway for nanoparticles’ entry into the human body. Although there is a myriad of engineered nanoparticles, carbon nanoparticles/nanotubes (CNPs/CNTs) have received much attention mainly due to their light weight, very high surface area, durability, and their diverse applications. Since their discovery and manufacture over two decades ago, much has been learned about nanoparticles’ interactions with diverse biological system models. In particular, the respiratory system has been of great interest because various natural and man-made fibrous particles are known to be responsible for chronic and debilitating lung diseases. In this review, we present up-to-date the literature regarding the effects of CNTs or carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the human respiratory system with respect to respiratory toxicity pathways and associated pathologies. This article is intended to emphasize the potentially dangerous effects to the human respiratory system if inadequate measures are used in the manufacture, handling, and preparation and applications of CNP or CNP-based products. PMID:26999172

  10. Aquatic Toxicity Comparison of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Ellen; Lee, Ji Hyun; Chung, Young Shin

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impact of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) released into freshwater environments, the toxicities of these nanomaterials were assessed and compared using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) test guidelines, including a “Daphnia sp., acute immobilization test,” “Fish, acute toxicity test,” and “freshwater alga and cyanobacteria, growth inhibition test.” Based on the estimated median lethal/effective concentrations of AgNPs and AgNWs, the susceptibility to the nanomaterials was different among test organisms (daphnia > algae > fish), suggesting that the AgNPs are classified as “category acute 1” for Daphnia magna, “category acute 2” for Oryzias latipes, and “category acute 1” for Raphidocelis subcapitata, while the AgNWs are classified as “category acute 1” for Daphnia magna, “category acute 2” for Oryzias latipes, and “category acute 2” for Raphidocelis subcapitata, according to the GHS (Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals). In conclusion, the present results suggest that more attention should be paid to prevent the accidental or intentional release of silver nanomaterials into freshwater aquatic environments. PMID:26125025

  11. Research of nickel nanoparticles toxicity with use of Aquatic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgaleva, T.; Morgalev, Yu; Gosteva, I.; Morgalev, S.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of nanoparticles with the particle size Δ50=5 nm on the test function of aquatic organisms was analyzed by means of biotesting methods with the use of a complex of test-organisms representing general trophic levels. The dependence of an infusoria Paramecium caudatum chemoattractant-elicited response, unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris Beijer growth rate, Daphnia magna Straus mortality and trophic activity and Danio rerio fish kill due to nNi disperse system concentration, is estimated. It is determined that the release of chlorella into cultivated environment including nNi as a feed for daphnias raises the death rate of entomostracans. The minimal concentration, whereby an organism response to the effect of nNi is registered, depends on the type of test organism and the analysed test function. L(E)C20 is determined for all the organisms used in bioassays. L(E)C50 is estimated for Paramecium caudatum (L(E)C50 = 0.0049 mg/l), for Chlorella vulgaris Beijer (L(E)C50 = 0.529 mg/l), for Daphnia m. S (L(E)C50 > 100 mg/l) and for fish Danio rerio (L(E)C50 > 100 mg/l). According to the Globally Harmonized System hazard substance evaluation criteria and Commission Directive 93/67/EEC, nNi belongs to the “acute toxicity 1” category of toxic substances.

  12. Mechanisms of Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liying

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has offered innovative discoveries in the medical, industrial, and consumer sectors. The unique physicochemical and electrical properties of engineered nanoparticles (NP) make them highly desirable in a variety of applications. However, these novel properties of NP are fraught with concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in structural and physicochemical properties of NP can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS generation, one of the most frequently reported NP-associated toxicities. Oxidative stress induced by engineered NP is due to acellular factors such as particle surface, size, composition, and presence of metals, while cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, NP-cell interaction, and immune cell activation are responsible for ROS-mediated damage. NP-induced oxidative stress responses are torch bearers for further pathophysiological effects including genotoxicity, inflammation, and fibrosis as demonstrated by activation of associated cell signaling pathways. Since oxidative stress is a key determinant of NP-induced injury, it is necessary to characterize the ROS response resulting from NP. Through physicochemical characterization and understanding of the multiple signaling cascades activated by NP-induced ROS, a systemic toxicity screen with oxidative stress as a predictive model for NP-induced injury can be developed. PMID:24027766

  13. Validation of an LDH Assay for Assessing Nanoparticle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xianglu; Gelein, Robert; Corson, Nancy; Wade-Mercer, Pamela; Jiang, Jingkun; Biswas, Pratim; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Elder, Alison; Oberdörster, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Studies showed that certain cytotoxicity assays were not suitable for assessing nanoparticle (NP) toxicity. We evaluated a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for assessing copper (Cu-40, 40 nm), silver (Ag-35, 35 nm; Ag-40, 40 nm), and titanium dioxide (TiO2-25, 25 nm) NPs by examining their potential to inactivate LDH and interference with β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), a substrate for the assay. We also performed a dissolution assay for some of the NPs. We found that the copper NPs, because of their high dissolution rate, could interfere with the LDH assay by inactivating LDH. Ag-35 could also inactivate LDH probably because of the carbon matrix used to cage the particles during synthesis. TiO2-25 NPs were found to adsorb LDH molecules. In conclusion, NP interference with the LDH assay depends on the type of NPs and the suitability of the assay for assessing NP toxicity should be examined case by case. PMID:21722700

  14. Toxicity, bioaccumulation, and biotransformation of silver nanoparticles in marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanhua; Ho, Kay T; Scheckel, Kirk G; Wu, Fengchang; Cantwell, Mark G; Katz, David R; Horowitz, Doranne Borsay; Boothman, Warren S; Burgess, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    The toxicity, bioaccumulation, and biotransformation of citrate and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated silver nanoparticles (NPs) (AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP) in marine organisms via marine sediment exposure was investigated. Results from 7-d sediment toxicity tests indicate that AgNP-citrate and AgNP-PVP did not exhibit toxicity to the amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia) at ≤75 mg/kg dry wt. A 28-d bioaccumulation study showed that Ag was significantly accumulated in the marine polychaete Nereis virens (N. virens) in the AgNP-citrate, AgNP-PVP and a conventional salt (AgNO3) treatments. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) results showed the distribution of Ag species in marine sediments amended with AgNP-citrate, AgNP-PVP, and AgNO3 was AgCl (50–65%) > Ag2S (32–42%) > Ag metal (Ag0) (3–11%). In N virens, AgCl (25–59%) and Ag2S (10–31%) generally decreased and, Ag metal (32–44%) increased, relative to the sediments. The patterns of speciation in the worm were different depending upon the coating of the AgNP and both types of AgNPs were different than the AgNO3 salt. These results show that the AgNP surface capping agents influenced Ag uptake, biotransformation, and/or excretion. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the bioaccumulation and speciation of AgNPs in a marine organism (N. virens). PMID:25369427

  15. Dose-Dependent Pulmonary Toxicity After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, David C. Smythe, W. Roy; Liao Zhongxing; Guerrero, Thomas; Chang, Joe Y.; McAleer, Mary F.; Jeter, Melenda D.; Correa, Arlene Ph.D.; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Liu, H. Helen; Komaki, Ritsuko; Forster, Kenneth M.; Stevens, Craig W.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of fatal pulmonary events after extrapleural pneumonectomy and hemithoracic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 63 consecutive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who underwent extrapleural pneumonectomy and IMRT at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The endpoints studied were pulmonary-related death (PRD) and non-cancer-related death within 6 months of IMRT. Results: Of the 63 patients, 23 (37%) had died within 6 months of IMRT (10 of recurrent cancer, 6 of pulmonary causes [pneumonia in 4 and pneumonitis in 2], and 7 of other noncancer causes [pulmonary embolus in 2, sepsis after bronchopleural fistula in 1, and cause unknown but without pulmonary symptoms or recurrent disease in 4]). On univariate analysis, the factors that predicted for PRD were a lower preoperative ejection fraction (p = 0.021), absolute volume of lung spared at 10 Gy (p = 0.025), percentage of lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}; p 0.002), and mean lung dose (p = 0.013). On multivariate analysis, only V{sub 20} was predictive of PRD (p = 0.017; odds ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.08) or non-cancer-related death (p = 0.033; odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.45). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that fatal pulmonary toxicities were associated with radiation to the contralateral lung. V{sub 20} was the only independent determinant for risk of PRD or non-cancer-related death. The mean V{sub 20} of the non-PRD patients was considerably lower than that accepted during standard thoracic radiotherapy, implying that the V{sub 20} should be kept as low as possible after extrapleural pneumonectomy.

  16. Thioridazine in PLGA nanoparticles reduces toxicity and improves rifampicin therapy against mycobacterial infection in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Vibe, Carina Beatrice; Fenaroli, Federico; Pires, David; Wilson, Steven Ray; Bogoeva, Vanya; Kalluru, Raja; Speth, Martin; Anes, Elsa; Griffiths, Gareth; Hildahl, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Encapsulating antibiotics such as rifampicin in biodegradable nanoparticles provides several advantages compared to free drug administration, including reduced dosing due to localized targeting and sustained release. Consequently, these characteristics reduce systemic drug toxicity. However, new nanoformulations need to be tested in complex biological systems to fully characterize their potential for improved drug therapy. Tuberculosis, caused by infection with the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, requires lengthy and expensive treatment, and incomplete therapy contributes to an increasing incidence of drug resistance. Recent evidence suggests that standard therapy may be improved by combining antibiotics with bacterial efflux pump inhibitors, such as thioridazine. However, this drug is difficult to use clinically due to its toxicity. Here, we encapsulated thioridazine in poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles and tested them alone and in combination with rifampicin nanoparticles, or free rifampicin in macrophages and in a zebrafish model of tuberculosis. Whereas free thioridazine was highly toxic in both cells and zebrafish embryos, after encapsulation in nanoparticles no toxicity was detected. When combined with rifampicin nanoparticles, the nanoparticles loaded with thioridazine gave a modest increase in killing of both Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis in macrophages. In the zebrafish, the thioridazine nanoparticles showed a significant therapeutic effect in combination with rifampicin by enhancing embryo survival and reducing mycobacterial infection. Our results show that the zebrafish embryo is a highly sensitive indicator of drug toxicity and that thioridazine nanoparticle therapy can improve the antibacterial effect of rifampicin in vivo. PMID:26573343

  17. Comparison of toxicity of uncoated and coated silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, K. C.; Seligy, V. L.; Massarsky, A.; Moon, T. W.; Rippstein, P.; Tan, J.; Tayabali, A. F.

    2013-04-01

    This study compares toxic effects of uncoated (20, 40, 60 and 80 nm) and OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) standard citrate- and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated (10, 50, and 75 nm) silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) in J774A. 1 macrophage and HT29 epithelial cells. The cells were exposed to different concentrations (silver content) of Ag-NPs for 24 h. Analysis showed that uncoated Ag-NPs, at a concentration of 1 μg/ml, decreased cell viability by 20-40% and that 20 and 40 nm particles were 10% more cytotoxic than the 60 and 80 nm particles. In exposures to coated Ag-NPs, cell viability dropped at 25 μg/ml or higher concentrations, and the effects were also size-dependent. PVP-coated particles induced greater cytotoxicity than citrate-coated particles. Changes in sub-cellular architecture were observed in J774A. 1 cells upon exposure to test Ag-NPs. Furthermore, uncoated Ag-NPs (1 μg/mL) decreased the expression of selected cytokines including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-12 (p70) in J774A. 1 and IL-8 in HT29 cells. In contrast, both citrate- and PVP-coated Ag-NPs increased the expression of these cytokines at higher concentrations (25 μg/ml), and PVP-coated particles elevated cytokine levels the most. Moreover, while uncoated Ag-NPs resulted in decreased glutathione (GSH) content and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in test cells in a size-dependent manner at 1 μg/ml, coated Ag-NPs caused non-significant changes in GSH and SOD, even at the highest test concentrations. Lastly, uncoated (20 and 40 nm) at 1 μg/ml and coated Ag-NPs (10 nm PVP) at 50 μg/ml slightly increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our data showed that uncoated Ag-NPs are more toxic than coated Ag-NPs. While uncoated Ag-NPs appear to suppress inflammatory responses and enhance oxidative stress in the test cells, coated Ag-NPs induce toxic effects through up-regulation of cytokines. Our findings support the toxicity of Ag-NPs as being size

  18. Toxicity of various silver nanoparticles compared to silver ions in Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To better understand the potential ecotoxicological impacts of silver nanoparticles released into freshwater environments, the Daphnia magna 48-hour immobilization test was used. Methods The toxicities of silver nitrate, two types of colloidal silver nanoparticles, and a suspension of silver nanoparticles were assessed and compared using standard OECD guidelines. Also, the swimming behavior and visible uptake of the nanoparticles by Daphnia were investigated and compared. The particle suspension and colloids used in the toxicity tests were well-characterized. Results The results obtained from the exposure studies showed that the toxicity of all the silver species tested was dose and composition dependent. Plus, the silver nanoparticle powders subsequently suspended in the exposure water were much less toxic than the previously prepared silver nanoparticle colloids, whereas the colloidal silver nanoparticles and AgNO3 were almost similar in terms of mortality. The silver nanoparticles were ingested by the Daphnia and accumulated under the carapace, on the external body surface, and connected to the appendages. All the silver species in this study caused abnormal swimming by the D. magna. Conclusion According to the present results, silver nanoparticles should be classified according to GHS (Globally Harmonized System of classification and labeling of chemicals) as "category acute 1" to Daphnia neonates, suggesting that the release of nanosilver into the environment should be carefully considered. PMID:22472056

  19. Toxicity of nanoparticles embedded in paints compared to pristine nanoparticles, in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Stijn; Luyts, Katrien; Brabants, Gert; Golanski, Luana; Martens, Johan; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter H M

    2015-01-22

    The unique physicochemical properties of nanomaterials has led to an increased use in the paint and coating industry. In this study, the in vitro toxicity of three pristine ENPs (TiO2, Ag and SiO₂), three aged paints containing ENPs (TiO₂, Ag and SiO₂) and control paints without ENPs were compared. In a first experiment, cytotoxicity was assessed using a biculture consisting of human bronchial epithelial (16HBE14o-) cells and human monocytic cells (THP-1) to determine subtoxic concentrations. In a second experiment, a new coculture model of the lung-blood barrier consisting of 16HBE14o- cells, THP-1 and human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) was used to study pulmonary and extrapulmonary toxicity. The results show that the pristine TiO₂ and Ag ENPs have some cytotoxic effects at relative high dose, while pristine SiO₂ ENPs and all aged paints with ENPs and control paints do not. In the complex triculture model of the lung-blood barrier, no considerable changes were observed after exposure to subtoxic concentration of the different pristine ENPs and paint particles. In conclusion, we demonstrated that although pristine ENPs show some toxic effects, no significant toxicological effects were observed when they were embedded in a complex paint matrix. PMID:25436935

  20. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Gil-Jong; Maeng, Eun-Ho; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm) on pregnant dams and embryo-fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5-19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%); resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. Morphological examinations of the fetuses demonstrated significant differences in incidences of abnormalities in the group administered 400mg/kg/day. Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Zn content of fetal tissue between the control and high-dose groups. These results showed that oral doses for the study with 15-days repeated of ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs were maternotoxic in the 200 mg/kg/day group, and embryotoxic in the 400 mg/kg/day group. PMID:25565834

  1. Vascular toxicity of silver nanoparticles to developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiejun; Mahapatra, Cecon T; Mapes, Christopher D; Khlebnikova, Maria; Wei, Alexander; Sepúlveda, Marisol S

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs, 1-100 nm) can enter the environment and result in exposure to humans and other organisms leading to potential adverse health effects. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of early life exposure to polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs, 50 nm), particularly with respect to vascular toxicity on zebrafish embryos and larvae (Danio rerio). Previously published data has suggested that PVP-AgNP exposure can inhibit the expression of genes within the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway, leading to delayed and abnormal vascular development. Here, we show that early acute exposure (0-12 h post-fertilization, hpf) of embryos to PVP-AgNPs at 1 mg/L or higher results in a transient, dose-dependent induction in VEGF-related gene expression that returns to baseline levels at hatching (72 hpf). Hatching results in normoxia, negating the effects of AgNPs on vascular development. Interestingly, increased gene transcription was not followed by the production of associated proteins within the VEGF pathway, which we attribute to NP-induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The impaired translation may be responsible for the observed delays in vascular development at later stages, and for smaller larvae size at hatching. Silver ion (Ag(+)) concentrations were < 0.001 mg/L at all times, with no significant effects on the VEGF pathway. We propose that PVP-AgNPs temporarily delay embryonic vascular development by interfering with oxygen diffusion into the egg, leading to hypoxic conditions and ER stress. PMID:27499207

  2. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Gil-Jong; Maeng, Eun-Ho; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnOSM20(+) NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm) on pregnant dams and embryo–fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5–19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnOSM20(+) NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%); resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. Morphological examinations of the fetuses demonstrated significant differences in incidences of abnormalities in the group administered 400mg/kg/day. Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Zn content of fetal tissue between the control and high-dose groups. These results showed that oral doses for the study with 15-days repeated of ZnOSM20(+) NPs were maternotoxic in the 200 mg/kg/day group, and embryotoxic in the 400 mg/kg/day group. PMID:25565834

  3. Size effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on in vivo and in vitro pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Katsuhide; Fukuda, Makiko; Endoh, Shigehisa; Maru, Junko; Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Shinohara, Naohide; Uchino, Kanako; Honda, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To elucidate the effect of size on the pulmonary toxicity of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we prepared two types of dispersed SWCNTs, namely relatively thin bundles with short linear shapes (CNT-1) and thick bundles with long linear shapes (CNT-2), and conducted rat intratracheal instillation tests and in vitro cell-based assays using NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages. Total protein levels, MIP-1α expression, cell counts in BALF, and histopathological examinations revealed that CNT-1 caused pulmonary inflammation and slower recovery and that CNT-2 elicited acute lung inflammation shortly after their instillation. Comprehensive gene expression analysis confirmed that CNT-1-induced genes were strongly associated with inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, and immune system processes at 7 or 30 d post-instillation. Numerous genes were significantly upregulated or downregulated by CNT-2 at 1 d post-instillation. In vitro assays demonstrated that CNT-1 and CNT-2 SWCNTs were phagocytized by NR8383 cells. CNT-2 treatment induced cell growth inhibition, reactive oxygen species production, MIP-1α expression, and several genes involved in response to stimulus, whereas CNT-1 treatment did not exert a significant impact in these regards. These results suggest that SWCNTs formed as relatively thin bundles with short linear shapes elicited delayed pulmonary inflammation with slower recovery. In contrast, SWCNTs with a relatively thick bundle and long linear shapes sensitively induced cellular responses in alveolar macrophages and elicited acute lung inflammation shortly after inhalation. We conclude that the pulmonary toxicity of SWCNTs is closely associated with the size of the bundles. These physical parameters are useful for risk assessment and management of SWCNTs. PMID:25865113

  4. EVALUATION OF THE PULMONARY TOXICITY OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER FROM CAMP VICTORY, IRAQ

    PubMed Central

    Porter, K. L.; Green, F. H. Y.; Harley, R. A.; Vallyathan, V.; Castranova, V.; Waldron, N. R.; Leonard, S. S.; Nelson, D. E.; Lewis, J. A.; Jackson, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal reports in the press and epidemiological studies suggest that deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan may be associated with respiratory diseases and symptoms in U.S. military personnel and veterans. Exposures during military operations were complex, but virtually all service members were exposed to high levels of respirable, geogenic dust. Inhalation of other dusts has been shown to be associated with adverse health effects, but the pulmonary toxicity of ambient dust from Iraq has not been previously studied. The relative toxicity of Camp Victory dust was evaluated by comparing it to particulate matter from northern Kuwait, a standard U.S. urban dust, and crystalline silica using a single intratracheal instillation in rats. Lung histology, protein levels, and cell counts were evaluated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 1–150 d later. The Iraq dust provoked an early significant, acute inflammatory response. However, the level of inflammation in response to the Iraq dust, U.S. urban dust, and Kuwait dust rapidly declined and was nearly at control levels by the end of the study At later times, animals exposed to the Iraq, U.S. urban, or Kuwait dusts showed increased small airway remodeling and emphysema compared to silica-exposed and control animals without evidence of fibrosis or premalignant changes. The severity and persistence of pulmonary toxicity of these three dusts from the Middle East resemble those of a U.S. urban dust and are less than those of silica. Therefore, Iraq dust exposure is not highly toxic, but similar to other poorly soluble low-toxicity dusts. PMID:26594896

  5. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Erik Q.; Cafasso, Danielle E.; Lee, Karen W.M.; Pierce, Lisa M.

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ► Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ► W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ► W

  6. Evaluation of the Pulmonary Toxicity of Ambient Particulate Matter From Camp Victory, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Porter, K L; Green, F H Y; Harley, R A; Vallyathan, V; Castranova, V; Waldron, N R; Leonard, S S; Nelson, D E; Lewis, J A; Jackson, D A

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal reports in the press and epidemiological studies suggest that deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan may be associated with respiratory diseases and symptoms in U.S. military personnel and veterans. Exposures during military operations were complex, but virtually all service members were exposed to high levels of respirable, geogenic dust. Inhalation of other dusts has been shown to be associated with adverse health effects, but the pulmonary toxicity of ambient dust from Iraq has not been previously studied. The relative toxicity of Camp Victory dust was evaluated by comparing it to particulate matter from northern Kuwait, a standard U.S. urban dust, and crystalline silica using a single intratracheal instillation in rats. Lung histology, protein levels, and cell counts were evaluated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 1-150 d later. The Iraq dust provoked an early significant, acute inflammatory response. However, the level of inflammation in response to the Iraq dust, U.S. urban dust, and Kuwait dust rapidly declined and was nearly at control levels by the end of the study At later times, animals exposed to the Iraq, U.S. urban, or Kuwait dusts showed increased small airway remodeling and emphysema compared to silica-exposed and control animals without evidence of fibrosis or premalignant changes. The severity and persistence of pulmonary toxicity of these three dusts from the Middle East resemble those of a U.S. urban dust and are less than those of silica. Therefore, Iraq dust exposure is not highly toxic, but similar to other poorly soluble low-toxicity dusts. PMID:26594896

  7. Surface charge of gold nanoparticles mediates mechanism of toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeublin, Nicole M.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Schrand, Amanda M.; Miller, John M.; Hutchison, Jim; Schlager, John J.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-02-01

    Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the event that they come into contact with a biological system. In the present study, we have investigated whether modulating the surface charge of 1.5 nm Au NPs induced changes in cellular morphology, mitochondrial function, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular calcium levels, DNA damage-related gene expression, and of p53 and caspase-3 expression levels after exposure in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The evaluation of three different Au NPs (positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged) showed that cell morphology was disrupted by all three NPs and that they demonstrated a dose-dependent toxicity; the charged Au NPs displayed toxicity as low as 10 µg ml-1 and the neutral at 25 µg ml-1. Furthermore, there was significant mitochondrial stress (decreases in MMP and intracellular Ca2+ levels) following exposure to the charged Au NPs, but not the neutral Au NPs. In addition to the differences observed in the MMP and Ca2+ levels, up or down regulation of DNA damage related gene expression suggested a differential cell death mechanism based on whether or not the Au NPs were charged or neutral. Additionally, increased nuclear localization of p53 and caspase-3 expression was observed in cells exposed to the charged Au NPs, while the neutral Au NPs caused an increase in both nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 expression. In conclusion, these results indicate that surface charge is a major determinant of how Au NPs impact cellular processes, with the charged NPs inducing cell death through apoptosis and neutral NPs leading to necrosis.Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the

  8. Sample characterization of automobile and forklift diesel exhaust particles and comparative pulmonary toxicity in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pramila; DeMarini, David M; Dick, Colin A J; Tabor, Dennis G; Ryan, Jeff V; Linak, William P; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Gilmour, M Ian

    2004-01-01

    Two samples of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) predominate in health effects research: an automobile-derived DEP (A-DEP) sample and the National Institute of Standards Technology standard reference material (SRM 2975) generated from a forklift engine. A-DEPs have been tested extensively for their effects on pulmonary inflammation and exacerbation of allergic asthmalike responses. In contrast, SRM 2975 has been tested thoroughly for its genotoxicity. In the present study, we combined physical and chemical analyses of both DEP samples with pulmonary toxicity testing in CD-1 mice to compare the two materials and to make associations between their physicochemical properties and their biologic effects. A-DEPs had more than 10 times the amount of extractable organic material and less than one-sixth the amount of elemental carbon compared with SRM 2975. Aspiration of 100 micro g of either DEP sample in saline produced mild acute lung injury; however, A-DEPs induced macrophage influx and activation, whereas SRM 2975 enhanced polymorphonuclear cell inflammation. A-DEPs stimulated an increase in interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inhibitory protein-2, and the TH2 cytokine IL-5, whereas SRM 2975 only induced significant levels of IL-6. Fractionated organic extracts of the same quantity of DEPs (100 micro g) did not have a discernable effect on lung responses and will require further study. The disparate results obtained highlight the need for chemical, physical, and source characterization of particle samples under investigation. Multidisciplinary toxicity testing of diesel emissions derived from a variety of generation and collection conditions is required to meaningfully assess the health hazards associated with exposures to DEPs. Key words: automobile, diesel exhaust particles, forklift, mice, pulmonary toxicity, SRM 2975. PMID:15175167

  9. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of naked gold nanoparticles in a rabbit hepatic tumor model

    PubMed Central

    GLAZER, EVAN S; ZHU, CIHUI; HAMIR, AMIR N.; BORNE, AGATHA; THOMPSON, C. SHEA; CURLEY, STEVEN A.

    2012-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the safety of administering solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in large animal tumor models. We assessed the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 5 nm and 25 nm solid AuNPs in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 6 in each) with implanted liver Vx2 tumors 24 hours after intravenous injection. Gold concentration was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP) and imaged with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). There was no clinico-pathologic evidence of renal, hepatic, pulmonary, or other organ dysfunction. After 25 nm AuNP administration, the concentration of white blood cells increased after treatment (p = 0.001). Most other blood studies were unchanged. AuNPs were distributed to the spleen, liver, and Vx2 tumors, but not to other tissues. The urinary excretion of AuNPs was bimodal as measured by ICP. 25 nm AuNPs were more evenly distributed throughout tissues and may be better tools for medical therapy. PMID:20854190

  10. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sabella, Stefania; Carney, Randy P; Brunetti, Virgilio; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Al-Juffali, Noura; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Janes, Sam M; Bakr, Osman M; Cingolani, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-06-21

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment--where particles are abundantly internalized--is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a "lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect" since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments. PMID:24842463

  11. Synthesis of fluorapatite–hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and toxicity investigations

    PubMed Central

    Montazeri, N; Jahandideh, R; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    In this study, calcium phosphate nanoparticles with two phases, fluorapatite (FA; Ca10(PO4)6F2) and hydroxyapatite (HA; Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), were prepared using the solgel method. Ethyl phosphate, hydrated calcium nitrate, and ammonium fluoride were used, respectively, as P, Ca, and F precursors with a Ca:P ratio of 1:72. Powders obtained from the sol-gel process were studied after they were dried at 80°C and heat treated at 550°C. The degree of crystallinity, particle and crystallite size, powder morphology, chemical structure, and phase analysis were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Zetasizer experiments. The results of XRD analysis and FTIR showed the presence of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite phases. The sizes of the crystallites estimated from XRD patterns using the Scherrer equation and the crystallinity of the hydroxyapatite phase were about 20 nm and 70%, respectively. Transmission electron microscope and SEM images and Zetasizer experiments showed an average size of 100 nm. The in vitro behavior of powder was investigated with mouse fibroblast cells. The results of these experiments indicated that the powders were biocompatibile and would not cause toxic reactions. These compounds could be applied for hard-tissue engineering. PMID:21499417

  12. Synthesis of fluorapatite-hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and toxicity investigations.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, N; Jahandideh, R; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    In this study, calcium phosphate nanoparticles with two phases, fluorapatite (FA; Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)F(2)) and hydroxyapatite (HA; Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2)), were prepared using the solgel method. Ethyl phosphate, hydrated calcium nitrate, and ammonium fluoride were used, respectively, as P, Ca, and F precursors with a Ca:P ratio of 1:72. Powders obtained from the sol-gel process were studied after they were dried at 80°C and heat treated at 550°C. The degree of crystallinity, particle and crystallite size, powder morphology, chemical structure, and phase analysis were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Zetasizer experiments. The results of XRD analysis and FTIR showed the presence of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite phases. The sizes of the crystallites estimated from XRD patterns using the Scherrer equation and the crystallinity of the hydroxyapatite phase were about 20 nm and 70%, respectively. Transmission electron microscope and SEM images and Zetasizer experiments showed an average size of 100 nm. The in vitro behavior of powder was investigated with mouse fibroblast cells. The results of these experiments indicated that the powders were biocompatible and would not cause toxic reactions. These compounds could be applied for hard-tissue engineering. PMID:21499417

  13. Ultrastructural hepatocytic alterations induced by silver nanoparticle toxicity.

    PubMed

    Almansour, Mansour; Sajti, Laszlo; Melhim, Walid; Jarrar, Bashir M

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are widely used in nanomedicine and consuming products with potential risk to human health. While considerable work was carried out on the molecular, biochemical, and physiological alterations induced by these particles, little is known of the ultrastructural pathological alterations that might be induced by nanosilver materials. The aim of the present work is to investigate the hepatocyte ultrastructural alterations that might be induced by SNP exposure. Male rats were subjected to a daily single dose (2 mg/kg) of SNPs (15-35 nm diameter) for 21 days. Liver biopsies from all rats under study were processed for transmission electron microscopy examination. The following hepatic ultrastructural alterations were demonstrated: mitochondria swelling and crystolysis, endoplasmic reticulum disruption, cytoplasmic vacuolization, lipid droplets accumulation, glycogen depletion, karyopyknosis, apoptosis, sinusoidal dilatation, Kupffer cells activation, and myelin figures formation. The current findings may indicate that SNPs can induce hepatocyte organelles alteration, leading to cellular damage that may affect the function of the liver. These findings might indicate that SNPs potentially trigger heptocyte ultrastructural alterations that may affect the function of the liver with potential risk on human health in relation to numerous applications of these particles. More work is needed to elucidate probable ultrastructural alterations in the vital organs that might result from nanosilver toxicity. PMID:26934218

  14. Anisotropic gold nanoparticles: synthesis, properties, applications, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhao, Pengxiang; Astruc, Didier

    2014-02-10

    Anisotropic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have attracted the interest of scientists for over a century, but research in this field has considerably accelerated since 2000 with the synthesis of numerous 1D, 2D, and 3D shapes as well as hollow AuNP structures. The anisotropy of these nonspherical, hollow, and nanoshell AuNP structures is the source of the plasmon absorption in the visible region as well as in the near-infrared (NIR) region. This NIR absorption is especially sensitive to the AuNP shape and medium and can be shifted towards the part of the NIR region in which living tissue shows minimum absorption. This has led to crucial applications in medical diagnostics and therapy ("theranostics"), especially with Au nanoshells, nanorods, hollow nanospheres, and nanocubes. In addition, Au nanowires (AuNWs) can be synthesized with longitudinal dimensions of several tens of micrometers and can serve as plasmon waveguides for sophisticated optical devices. The application of anisotropic AuNPs has rapidly spread to optical, biomedical, and catalytic areas. In this Review, a brief historical survey is given, followed by a summary of the synthetic modes, variety of shapes, applications, and toxicity issues of this fast-growing class of nanomaterials. PMID:24421264

  15. Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity Assessment of Six Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes Nanoparticle uptake in cells may be an important determinant of their potential cytotoxic and inflammatory effects. Six commercial TiO2 NP (A=Alfa Aesar,10nm, A*=Alfa Aesar 32nm, B=P25 27...

  16. The Stability of Silver Nanoparticles in a Model of Pulmonary Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Fen, Leo Bey; Chen, Shu; Kyo, Yoshihiko; Herpoldt, Karla-Luise; Terrill, Nicholas J.; Dunlop, Iain E.; McPhail, David S.; Shaffer, Milo S.; Schwander, Stephan; Gow, Andrew; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Ryan, Mary P.

    2013-01-01

    The growing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in consumer products has raised concerns about their potential impact on the environment and human health. Whether AgNPs dissolve and release Ag+ ions, or coarsen to form large aggregates, is critical in determining their potential toxicity. In this work, the stability of AgNPs in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major component of pulmonary surfactant, was investigated as a function of pH. Spherical, citrate-capped AgNPs with average diameters of 14 ± 1.6 nm (n=200) were prepared by a chemical bath reduction. The kinetics of Ag+ ion release was strongly pH-dependent. After 14 days of incubation in sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) or perchloric acid (HClO4) solutions, the total fraction of AgNPs dissolved varied from ~10 % at pH 3, to ~2 % at pH 5, with negligible dissolution at pH 7. A decrease in pH from 7 to 3 also promoted particle aggregation and coarsening. DPPC (100 mg.L−1) delayed the release of Ag+ ions, but did not significantly alter the total amount of Ag+ released after two weeks. In addition, DPPC improved the dispersion of the AgNPs and inhibited aggregation and coarsening. TEM images revealed that the AgNPs were coated with a DPPC layer serving as a semi-permeable layer. Hence, lung lining fluid, particularly DPPC, can modify the aggregation state and kinetics of Ag+ ion release of inhaled AgNPs in the lung. These observations have important implications for predicting the potential reactivity of AgNPs in the lung and the environment. PMID:23988335

  17. Use of Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Band Gap to Develop a Predictive Paradigm for Oxidative Stress and Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (Ec) levels with the cellular redox potential (−4.12 to −4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co3O4, Cr2O3, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of CB57 Bl/6 mice. Co3O4, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by Ec levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22502734

  18. Pulmonary Toxicity, Distribution, and Clearance of Intratracheally Instilled Silicon Nanowires in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jenny R.; Mercer, Robert R.; Chapman, Rebecca S.; Cohen, Guy M.; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James F.; Castranova, Vincent; Antonini, James M.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (Si NWs) are being manufactured for use as sensors and transistors for circuit applications. The goal was to assess pulmonary toxicity and fate of Si NW using an in vivo experimental model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with 10, 25, 50, 100, or 250 μg of Si NW (~20–30 nm diameter; ~2–15 μm length). Lung damage and the pulmonary distribution and clearance of Si NW were assessed at 1, 3, 7, 28, and 91 days after-treatment. Si NW treatment resulted in dose-dependent increases in lung injury and inflammation that resolved over time. At day 91 after treatment with the highest doses, lung collagen was increased. Approximately 70% of deposited Si NW was cleared by 28 days with most of the Si NW localized exclusively in macrophages. In conclusion, Si NW induced transient lung toxicity which may be associated with an early rapid particle clearance; however, persistence of Si NW over time related to dose or wire length may lead to increased collagen deposition in the lung. PMID:26640479

  19. Pulmonary oxygen toxicity in rats treated with cytochrome P-450 inducers

    SciTech Connect

    Ebel, R.E.; Barlow, R.L.; Gregory, E.M.

    1987-05-01

    Pulmonary oxygen toxicity is assumed to result from damage caused by superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) and/or hydroxyl radical (OH) produced by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen (O/sub 2/). The microsomal cytochrome P-450 (P-450) monooxygenase system is known to produce O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. They have studied the influence of monooxygenase induction using phenobarbital (PB) and ..beta..-naphthoflavone (..beta..-NF) on O/sub 2/ toxicity in the rat. PB- or ..beta..-NF induce hepatic P-450 but only ..beta..-NF induces pulmonary P-450. Pulmonary microsomes produced O/sub 2//sup -/ and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ at rates (expressed per mg microsomal protein) which did not vary as a function of pretreatment. Rats were exposed to 100% O/sub 2/ for up to 3 days. After 3 days of O/sub 2/, lung weights were about 50% above controls regardless of pretreatment. The microsomal monooxygenase enzymes (P-450, b/sub 5/ and NADPH P-450 reductase) were quantified in liver and lung. Lung microsomal P-450 was reduced after 3 days of O/sub 2/ exposure regardless of pretreatment. The protective enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) peroxidase) and non-protein sulfhydryl groups (NPSH) were also quantified in lung and liver samples. Lung NPSH and GSH peroxidase were increased after 3 days of O/sub 2/ exposure regardless of pretreatment while SOD was increased in controls and PB- but not ..beta..-NF-treated rats. Three of 14 ..beta..-NF-treated rats died during O/sub 2/ exposure while no animals in the control or PB-treated groups died.

  20. Ultrafast laser based ``green'' synthesis of non-toxic nanoparticles in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besner, S.; Kabashin, A. V.; Winnik, F. M.; Meunier, M.

    2008-12-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles offer novel promising properties for biological sensing and imaging, as well as in therapeutics. However, these applications are often complicated by the possible toxicity of conventional nanomaterials, arising as a result of inadequate purification procedures of nanoparticles obtained via synthetic pathways using toxic or non-biocompatible substances. We review novel femtosecond laser-assisted methods, which enable the preparation of metal nanomaterials in clean, biologically friendly aqueous environment (“green” synthesis) and thus completely solve the toxicity problem. The proposed methods, including laser ablation and fragmentation, make possible the production of stable metal colloids of extremely small size (˜2 nm) with a low coefficient of variation (15-25%). Those nanoparticles exhibit unique surface chemistry and can be used for bio-imaging, cancer treatment and nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Development of screening assays for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in human blood: preliminary studies with charged Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Love, Sara A; Thompson, John W; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-09-01

    As nanoparticles have found increased use in both consumer and medical applications, corresponding increases in possible exposure to humans necessitate studies examining the impacts of these nanomaterials in biological systems. This article examines the effects of approximately 30-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles, with positively and negatively charged surface coatings in human blood. Here, we study the exposure effects, with up to 72 h of exposure to 5, 15, 25 and 50 µg/ml nanoparticles on hemolysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and platelet aggregation in subsets of cells from human blood. Assessing viability with hemolysis, results show significant changes in a concentration-dependent fashion. Rates of ROS generation were investigated using the dichlorofluorscein diacetate-based assay as ROS generation is a commonly suspected mechanism of nanoparticle toxicity; herein, ROS was not a significant factor. Optical monitoring of platelet aggregation revealed that none of the examined nanoparticles induced aggregation upon short-term exposure. PMID:22583573

  2. Nitric oxide-mediated central sympathetic excitation promotes CNS and pulmonary O₂ toxicity.

    PubMed

    Demchenko, Ivan T; Moskvin, Alexander N; Krivchenko, Alexander I; Piantadosi, Claude A; Allen, Barry W

    2012-06-01

    In hyperbaric oxygen (HBO(2)) at or above 3 atmospheres absolute (ATA), autonomic pathways link central nervous system (CNS) oxygen toxicity to pulmonary damage, possibly through a paradoxical and poorly characterized relationship between central nitric oxide production and sympathetic outflow. To investigate this possibility, we assessed sympathetic discharges, catecholamine release, cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, and lung damage in rats exposed to oxygen at 5 or 6 ATA. Before HBO(2) exposure, either a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) or a nonselective NOS inhibitor was injected directly into the cerebral ventricles to minimize effects on the lung, heart, and peripheral circulation. Experiments were performed on both anesthetized and conscious rats to differentiate responses to HBO(2) from the effects of anesthesia. EEG spikes, markers of CNS toxicity in anesthetized animals, were approximately four times as likely to develop in control rats than in animals with central NOS inhibition. In inhibitor-treated animals, autonomic discharges, cardiovascular pressures, catecholamine release, and cerebral blood flow all remained below baseline throughout exposure to HBO(2). In control animals, however, initial declines in these parameters were followed by significant increases above their baselines. In awake animals, central NOS inhibition significantly decreased the incidence of clonic-tonic convulsions or delayed their onset, compared with controls. The novel findings of this study are that NO produced by nNOS in the periventricular regions of the brain plays a critical role in the events leading to both CNS toxicity in HBO(2) and to the associated sympathetic hyperactivation involved in pulmonary injury. PMID:22442027

  3. Pulmonary toxicity screening studies in male rats with M5 respirable fibers and particulates.

    PubMed

    Warheit, David B; Webb, Thomas R; Reed, Kenneth L

    2007-09-01

    M5 fiber is a high-strength, high-performance organic fiber type that is a rigid rod material and composed of heterocyclic polymer fibers of type PIPD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute lung toxicity of intratracheally instilled M5 respirable fibers and particulates in rats. Using a pulmonary bioassay and bridging methodology, the acute lung toxicity of intratracheally instilled M5 particulates and that of its fibers were compared with a positive control particle type, quartz, as well as a negative control particle type, carbonyl iron particles. Moreover, the results of these instillation studies were bridged with data previously generated from inhalation studies with quartz and carbonyl iron particles, using the quartz and iron particles as the inhalation/instillation bridge material. For the bioassay experimental design, in the bronchoalveolar lavage studies, the lungs of rats were intratracheally instilled with 0.5 or 0.75 mg/kg of M5 particulate or 1 or 5 mg/kg of the following control or particle types: (1) M5 long fiber preparation, (2) silica-quartz particles, and (3) carbonyl iron particles. Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-instilled rats served as additional controls. Following exposures, the lungs of PBS and particle-exposed rats were assessed using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid biomarkers, cell proliferation methods, and histopathological evaluation of lung tissue at 24 h, 1 wk, 1 mo and 3 mo post instillation exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage results demonstrated that lung exposures to quartz particles, at both concentrations but particularly at the higher dose, produced significant increases vs. controls in pulmonary inflammation and cytotoxicity indices. Exposures to M5 particulate and M5 long fiber preparation produced transient inflammatory and cell injury effects at 24 h postexposure (pe) as well as at 24 h and 1 wk pe, respectively, but these effects were not sustained when compared to quartz-silica effects. Exposures to

  4. Silver nanoparticles: mechanism of antimicrobial action, synthesis, medical applications, and toxicity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Sukumaran; Poulose, Eldho K.

    2012-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles are nanoparticles of silver which are in the range of 1 and 100 nm in size. Silver nanoparticles have unique properties which help in molecular diagnostics, in therapies, as well as in devices that are used in several medical procedures. The major methods used for silver nanoparticle synthesis are the physical and chemical methods. The problem with the chemical and physical methods is that the synthesis is expensive and can also have toxic substances absorbed onto them. To overcome this, the biological method provides a feasible alternative. The major biological systems involved in this are bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts. The major applications of silver nanoparticles in the medical field include diagnostic applications and therapeutic applications. In most of the therapeutic applications, it is the antimicrobial property that is being majorly explored, though the anti-inflammatory property has its fair share of applications. Though silver nanoparticles are rampantly used in many medical procedures and devices as well as in various biological fields, they have their drawbacks due to nanotoxicity. This review provides a comprehensive view on the mechanism of action, production, applications in the medical field, and the health and environmental concerns that are allegedly caused due to these nanoparticles. The focus is on effective and efficient synthesis of silver nanoparticles while exploring their various prospective applications besides trying to understand the current scenario in the debates on the toxicity concerns these nanoparticles pose.

  5. Toxicity of Nanoparticles Embedded in Paints Compared with Pristine Nanoparticles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smulders, Stijn; Luyts, Katrien; Brabants, Gert; Landuyt, Kirsten Van; Kirschhock, Christine; Smolders, Erik; Golanski, Luana; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter HM

    2014-01-01

    The unique physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials have led to their increased use in many industrial applications, including as a paint additive. For example, titanium dioxide (TiO2) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have well-established anti-UV, self-cleaning, and air purification effects. Silver (Ag) ENPs are renowned for their anti-microbial capabilities and silicon dioxide (SiO2) ENPs are used as fire retardants and anti-scratch coatings. In this study, the toxic effects and biodistribution of three pristine ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2), three aged paints containing ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2) along with control paints without ENPs were compared. BALB/c mice were oropharyngeally aspirated with ENPs or paint particles (20 μg/aspiration) once a week for 5 weeks and sacrificed either 2 or 28 days post final aspiration treatment. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and systemic blood toxicity was evaluated to ascertain cell counts, induction of inflammatory cytokines, and key blood parameters. In addition, the lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and heart were harvested and metal concentrations were determined. Exposure to pristine ENPs caused subtle effects in the lungs and negligible alterations in the blood. The most pronounced toxic effects were observed after Ag ENPs exposure; an increased neutrophil count and a twofold increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß)) were identified. The paint containing TiO2 ENPs did not modify macrophage and neutrophil counts, but mildly induced KC and IL-1ß. The paints containing Ag or SiO2 did not show significant toxicity. Biodistribution experiments showed distribution of Ag and Si outside the lung after aspiration to respectively pristine Ag or SiO2 ENPs. In conclusion, we demonstrated that even though direct exposure to ENPs induced some toxic effects, once they were embedded in a complex paint matrix little to no adverse toxicological effects were

  6. Toxicity of nanoparticles embedded in paints compared with pristine nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Smulders, Stijn; Luyts, Katrien; Brabants, Gert; Landuyt, Kirsten Van; Kirschhock, Christine; Smolders, Erik; Golanski, Luana; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Hoet, Peter H M

    2014-09-01

    The unique physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials have led to their increased use in many industrial applications, including as a paint additive. For example, titanium dioxide (TiO2) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have well-established anti-UV, self-cleaning, and air purification effects. Silver (Ag) ENPs are renowned for their anti-microbial capabilities and silicon dioxide (SiO2) ENPs are used as fire retardants and anti-scratch coatings. In this study, the toxic effects and biodistribution of three pristine ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2), three aged paints containing ENPs (TiO2, Ag, and SiO2) along with control paints without ENPs were compared. BALB/c mice were oropharyngeally aspirated with ENPs or paint particles (20 μg/aspiration) once a week for 5 weeks and sacrificed either 2 or 28 days post final aspiration treatment. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and systemic blood toxicity was evaluated to ascertain cell counts, induction of inflammatory cytokines, and key blood parameters. In addition, the lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and heart were harvested and metal concentrations were determined. Exposure to pristine ENPs caused subtle effects in the lungs and negligible alterations in the blood. The most pronounced toxic effects were observed after Ag ENPs exposure; an increased neutrophil count and a twofold increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß)) were identified. The paint containing TiO2 ENPs did not modify macrophage and neutrophil counts, but mildly induced KC and IL-1ß. The paints containing Ag or SiO2 did not show significant toxicity. Biodistribution experiments showed distribution of Ag and Si outside the lung after aspiration to respectively pristine Ag or SiO2 ENPs. In conclusion, we demonstrated that even though direct exposure to ENPs induced some toxic effects, once they were embedded in a complex paint matrix little to no adverse toxicological effects were

  7. Toxicity of lanthanum oxide (La2O3) nanoparticles in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Balusamy, Brabu; Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Ergen, Seyda Fikirdesici; Uyar, Tamer; Tekinay, Turgay

    2015-07-01

    This study demonstrates the acute toxicity of lanthanum oxide nanoparticles (La2O3 NP) on two sentinel aquatic species, fresh-water microalgae Chlorella sp. and the crustacean Daphnia magna. The morphology, size and charge of the nanoparticles were systematically studied. The algal growth inhibition assay confirmed absence of toxic effects of La2O3 NP on Chlorella sp., even at higher concentration (1000 mg L(-1)) after 72 h exposure. Similarly, no significant toxic effects were observed on D. magna at concentrations of 250 mg L(-1) or less, and considerable toxic effects were noted in higher concentrations (effective concentration [EC50] 500 mg L(-1); lethal dose [LD50] 1000 mg L(-1)). In addition, attachment of La2O3 NP on aquatic species was demonstrated using microscopy analysis. This study proved to be beneficial in understanding acute toxicity in order to provide environmental protection as part of risk assessment strategies. PMID:26022751

  8. Toxicity and accumulation of Cu and ZnO nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yinlong; Vijver, Martina G; Chen, Guangchao; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-04-01

    There is increasing recognition that the wide use of nanoparticles, such as Cu (CuNPs) and ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs), may pose risks to the environment. Currently there is insufficient insight in the contribution of metal-based nanoparticles and their dissolved ions to the overall toxicity and accumulation. To fill in this gap, we combined the fate assessment of CuNPs and ZnONPs in aquatic test media with the assessment of toxicity and accumulation of ions and particles present in the suspensions. It was found that at the LC50 level of Daphnia magna exposed to the nanoparticle suspensions, the relative contributions of ions released from CuNPs and ZnONPs to toxicity were around 26% and 31%, respectively, indicating that particles rather than the dissolved ions were the major source of toxicity. It was additionally found that at the low exposure concentrations of CuNPs and ZnONPs (below 0.05 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively) the dissolved ions were predominantly accumulated, whereas at the high exposure concentrations (above 0.1 mg/L and 1 mg/L, respectively), particles rather than the released ions played a dominant role in the accumulation process. Our results thus suggest that consideration on the contribution of dissolved ions to nanoparticle toxicity needs to be interpreted with care. PMID:25785366

  9. Toxicity and developmental defects of different sizes and shape nickel nanoparticles in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ispas, Cristina; Andreescu, Daniel; Patel, Avni; Goia, Dan V.; Andreescu, Silvana; Wallace, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles such as nickel are used in catalytic, sensing and electronic applications, but health and environmental affects have not been fully investigated. While some metal nanoparticles result in toxicity, it is also important to determine whether nanoparticles of the same metal but of different size and shape changes toxicity. Three different size nickel nanoparticle (Ni NPs) of 30, 60, and 100 nm and larger particle clusters of aggregated 60 nm entities with a dendritic structure were synthesized and exposed to zebrafish embryos assessing mortality and developmental defects. Ni NPs exposure was compared to soluble nickel salts. All three 30, 60, and 100 nm Ni NPs are equal to or less toxic than soluble nickel while dendritic clusters were more toxic. With each Ni NP exposure, thinning of the intestinal epithelium first occurs around the LD10 continuing into the LD50. LD50 exposure also results in skeletal muscle fiber separation. Exposure to soluble nickel does not cause intestinal defects while skeletal muscle separation occurs at concentrations well over LD50. These results suggest that configuration of nanoparticles may affect toxicity more than size and defects from Ni NPs exposure occur by different biological mechanisms than soluble nickel. PMID:19746736

  10. Physicochemical characteristics of nanomaterials that affect pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The increasing manufacture and use of products based on nanotechnology raises concerns for both workers and consumers. Various studies report induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, which can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Each of these aspects can affect their toxicity, although it is largely unknown to what extent. The aim of the current review is to analyse published data on inhalation of nanoparticles to identify and evaluate the contribution of their physicochemical characteristics to the onset and development of pulmonary inflammation. Many physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles affect their lung deposition, clearance, and pulmonary response that, in combination, ultimately determine whether pulmonary inflammation will occur and to what extent. Lung deposition is mainly determined by the physical properties of the aerosol (size, density, shape, hygroscopicity) in relation to airflow and the anatomy of the respiratory system, whereas clearance and translocation of nanoparticles are mainly determined by their geometry and surface characteristics. Besides size and chemical composition, other physicochemical characteristics influence the induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation. As some nanoparticles dissolve, they can release toxic ions that can damage the lung tissue, making dissolution rate an important characteristic that affects lung inflammation. Fibre-shaped materials are more toxic to the lungs compared to spherical shaped nanoparticles of the same chemical composition. In general, cationic nanoparticles are more cytotoxic than neutral or anionic nanoparticles. Finally, surface reactivity correlates well with observed pulmonary inflammation. With all these characteristics affecting different stages of the events leading to pulmonary inflammation, no unifying dose metric could be identified to describe pulmonary

  11. Toxicity Assessment of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Early Life Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoshan; Tian, Shengyan; Cai, Zhonghua

    2012-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been explored recently for their beneficial applications in many biomedical areas, in environmental remediation, and in various industrial applications. However, potential risks have also been identified with the release of nanoparticles into the environment. To study the ecological effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on aquatic organisms, we used early life stages of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) to examine such effects on embryonic development in this species. The results showed that ≥10 mg/L of iron oxide nanoparticles instigated developmental toxicity in these embryos, causing mortality, hatching delay, and malformation. Moreover, an early life stage test using zebrafish embryos/larvae is also discussed and recommended in this study as an effective protocol for assessing the potential toxicity of nanoparticles. This study is one of the first on developmental toxicity in fish caused by iron oxide nanoparticles in aquatic environments. The results will contribute to the current understanding of the potential ecotoxicological effects of nanoparticles and support the sustainable development of nanotechnology. PMID:23029464

  12. Intracellular calcium levels as screening tool for nanoparticle toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Meindl, Claudia; Kueznik, Tatjana; Bösch, Martina; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered nano-sized materials led to revolutionary developments in many industrial applications and in the medical field. These materials, however, also may cause cytotoxicity. In addition to size, surface properties and shape were identified as relevant parameters for cell damage. Cell damage may occur as disruption of membrane integrity, induction of apoptosis and by organelle damage. Generation of oxidative stress may serve as an indicator for cytotoxicity. Effects occurring upon short contact of particles with cells, for instance in the systemic blood circulation, could be identified according to increases of intracellular [Ca2+] levels, which are caused by variety of toxic stimuli. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane disruption, apoptosis, lysosome function, intracellular [Ca2+] levels and generation of oxidative stress. Silica particles served to test this hypothesis. Twenty nm polystyrene particles as well as 12 nm and 40 nm silica particles caused membrane damage and apoptosis with no preference of the surface charge. Only 20 nm plain and amine functionalized polystyrene particles cause oxidative stress and only the plain particles lysosomal damage. A potential role of surface charge was identified for 200 nm polystyrene particles, where only the amidine particles caused lysosomal damage. Increases in intracellular [Ca2+] levels and cytotoxicity after 24 h was often linked but determination of intracellular [Ca2+] levels could serve to characterize further the type of membrane damage. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Nano-sized materials may cause cytotoxicity. Negatively charged, neutral and positively charged polystyrene particles of different sizes and silica nanoparticles were used to study the role of size and surface properties on viability, membrane

  13. Carbon Black and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Distinct Molecular Mechanisms of Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Sonja; Hussain, Salik; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence link nanomaterials with adverse biological outcomes and due to the variety of applications and potential human exposures to nanoparticles it is thus important to evaluate their toxicity for the risk assessment of workers and consumers. It is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms of their toxicity as observation of similar effects after different nanomaterial exposures does not reflect similar intracellular processing and organelle interactions. A thorough understanding of mechanisms is not only needed for accurate prediction of potential toxicological impacts but also for the development of safer nanoapplications by modulating the physico-chemical characteristics. Furthermore biomedical applications may also take advantage of an in depth knowledge about the mode of action of nanotoxicity to design new nanoparticle-derived drugs. In the present manuscript we discuss the similarities and differences in molecular pathways of toxicity after carbon black and TiO2 nanoparticle exposures and identify the main toxicity mechanisms induced by these two nanoparticles which may also be indicative for the mode of action of other insoluble nanomaterials. We address the translocation, cell death induction, genotoxicity and inflammation induced by titanium dioxide and carbon black nanoparticles which depend on their internalisation, ROS production capacities and/or protein interactions. We summarise their distinct cellular mechanisms of toxicity and the crucial steps which may be targeted to avoid adverse effects or to induce them for nanomedical purposes. Several physico-chemical characteristics could influence these general toxicity pathways depicted here and the identification of common toxicity pathways could support the grouping of nanomaterials in terms of toxicity. PMID:25266826

  14. Relationship of pulmonary toxicity and carcinogenicity of fine and ultrafine granular dusts in a rat bioassay.

    PubMed

    Kolling, Angelika; Ernst, Heinrich; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Heinrich, Uwe

    2011-08-01

    The current carcinogenicity study with female rats focused on the toxicity and carcinogenicity of intratracheally instilled fine and ultrafine granular dusts. The positive control, crystalline silica, elicited the greatest magnitude and progression of pulmonary inflammatory reactions, fibrosis and the highest incidence of primary lung tumors (39.6%). Addition of poly-2-vinylpyridine-N-oxide decreased inflammatory responses, fibrosis, and the incidence of pulmonary tumors induced by crystalline quartz to 21.4%. After repeated instillation of soluble, ultrafine amorphous silica (15 mg) a statistically significant tumor response (9.4%) was observed, although, the inflammatory response in the lung was not as persistently severe as in rats treated with carbon black. Instillation of ultrafine carbon black (5 mg) caused a lung tumor incidence of 15%. In contrast to a preceding study using a dose of 66 mg coal dust, lung tumors were not detected after exposure to the same coal dust at a dose of 10 mg in this study. Pulmonary inflammatory responses to coal dust were very low indicating a mechanistic threshold for the development of lung tumors connected with particle related chronic inflammation. The animals treated with ultrafine carbon black and ultrafine amorphous silica showed significantly more severe lesions in non-cancerous endpoints when compared to animals treated with fine coal dust. Furthermore, carbon black treated rats showed more severe non-cancerous lung lesions than amorphous silica treated rats. Our data show a relationship between tumor frequencies and increasing scores when using a qualitative scoring system for specific non-cancerous endpoints such as inflammation, fibrosis, epithelial hyperplasia, and squamous metaplasia. PMID:21819261

  15. Relationship of pulmonary toxicity and carcinogenicity of fine and ultrafine granular dusts in a rat bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Kolling, Angelika; Ernst, Heinrich; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Heinrich, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The current carcinogenicity study with female rats focused on the toxicity and carcinogenicity of intratracheally instilled fine and ultrafine granular dusts. The positive control, crystalline silica, elicited the greatest magnitude and progression of pulmonary inflammatory reactions, fibrosis and the highest incidence of primary lung tumors (39.6%). Addition of poly-2-vinylpyridine-N-oxide decreased inflammatory responses, fibrosis, and the incidence of pulmonary tumors induced by crystalline quartz to 21.4%. After repeated instillation of soluble, ultrafine amorphous silica (15 mg) a statistically significant tumor response (9.4%) was observed, although, the inflammatory response in the lung was not as persistently severe as in rats treated with carbon black. Instillation of ultrafine carbon black (5 mg) caused a lung tumor incidence of 15%. In contrast to a preceding study using a dose of 66 mg coal dust, lung tumors were not detected after exposure to the same coal dust at a dose of 10 mg in this study. Pulmonary inflammatory responses to coal dust were very low indicating a mechanistic threshold for the development of lung tumors connected with particle related chronic inflammation. The animals treated with ultrafine carbon black and ultrafine amorphous silica showed significantly more severe lesions in non-cancerous endpoints when compared to animals treated with fine coal dust. Furthermore, carbon black treated rats showed more severe non-cancerous lung lesions than amorphous silica treated rats. Our data show a relationship between tumor frequencies and increasing scores when using a qualitative scoring system for specific non-cancerous endpoints such as inflammation, fibrosis, epithelial hyperplasia, and squamous metaplasia. PMID:21819261

  16. Acute Amiodarone Pulmonary Toxicity after Drug Holiday: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Abuzaid, Ahmed; Saad, Marwan; Ayan, Mohamed; Kabach, Amjad; Mahfood Haddad, Toufik; Smer, Aiman; Arouni, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Amiodarone is reported to cause a wide continuum of serious clinical effects. It is often challenging to detect Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT). Typically, the diagnosis is made based on the clinical settings and may be supported by histopathology results, if available. We describe a 57-year-old patient who developed severe rapidly progressive respiratory failure secondary to AIPT with acute bilateral infiltrates and nodular opacities on chest imaging. Interestingly, Amiodarone was discontinued 3 weeks prior to his presentation. He had normal cardiac filling pressures confirmed by echocardiography. To our knowledge, this is the first case of isolated acute lung injury induced by Amiodarone, three weeks after therapy cessation, with adequate clinical improvement after supportive management and high dose steroid therapy. PMID:26075108

  17. Role of GDF15 (growth and differentiation factor 15) in pulmonary oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika

    2015-10-01

    GDF15 (growth and differentiation factor 15) is a secreted cytokine, a direct target of p53 and plays a role in cell proliferation and apoptosis. It is induced by oxidative stress and has anti-apoptotic effects. The role of GDF15 in hyperoxic lung injury is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that GDF15 will be induced in vitro, in a model of pulmonary oxygen toxicity, and will play a critical role in decreasing cell death and oxidative stress. BEAS-2B (human bronchial epithelial cells) and human pulmonary vascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) were exposed to hyperoxia, and expression of GDF15 and effect of GDF15 disruption on cell viability and oxidative stress was determined. Furthermore, we studied the effect of p53 knockdown on GDF15 expression. In vitro, both BEAS-2B and HPMEC cells showed a significant increase in GDF15 expression upon exposure to hyperoxia. After GDF15 knockdown, there was a significant decrease in cell viability and increase in oxidative stress compared to control cells transfected with siRNA with a scrambled sequence. Knockdown of p53 significantly decreased the induction of GDF15 by hyperoxia. In conclusion, we show that GDF15 has a pro-survival and anti-oxidant role in hyperoxia and that p53 plays a key role in its induction. PMID:26004619

  18. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, Stefania; Carney, Randy P.; Brunetti, Virgilio; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Al-Juffali, Noura; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Janes, Sam M.; Bakr, Osman M.; Cingolani, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where particles are abundantly internalized - is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a ``lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect'' since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments.The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where

  19. Interaction of silver nanoparticles with biological objects: antimicrobial properties and toxicity for the other living organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, E. M.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents several examples of the biological effects of small-sized silver nanoparticles (10.5±3.5nm) observed in experiments on bacteria, slim mold, unicellular alga and plant seeds. The nanoparticles were prepared by the biochemical synthesis, based on the reduction of metal ions in reverse vicelles by biological reductants - natural plant pigments (flavonoids). It is found that, except for the plant seeds, silver nanoparticles (SNP) act as a strong toxic agent, both in water solution and as part of liquid-phase material. It is shown also that the biological action of silver nanoparticles can not be reduced to the toxic action of silver ions in equivalent concentrations or to that of the surfactant (the SNP stabilizer) present in the SNP water solution. Possible SNP applications are suggested.

  20. Effect of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles on SERS spectral variance of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Li; Chen, Shaode; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-02-01

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively utilized in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for bacterial identification. However, Ag NPs are toxic to bacteria. Whether such toxicity can affect SERS features of bacteria and interfere with bacterial identification is still unknown and needed to explore. Here, by carrying out a comparative study on non-toxic Au NPs with that on toxic Ag NPs, we investigated the influence of nanoparticle concentration and incubation time on bacterial SERS spectral variance, both of which were demonstrated to be closely related to the toxicity of Ag NPs. Sensitive spectral alterations were observed on Ag NPs with increase of NPs concentration or incubation time, accompanied with an obvious decrease in number of viable bacteria. In contrast, SERS spectra and viable bacterial number on Au NPs were rather constant under the same conditions. A further analysis on spectral changes demonstrated that it was cell response (i.e. metabolic activity or death) to the toxicity of Ag NPs causing spectral variance. However, biochemical responses to the toxicity of Ag were very different in different bacteria, indicating the complex toxic mechanism of Ag NPs. Ag NPs are toxic to a great variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa etc., therefore, this work will be helpful in guiding the future application of SERS technique in various complex biological systems.

  1. Effect of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles on SERS spectral variance of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li; Chen, Shaode; Zhang, Kaisong

    2015-02-25

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively utilized in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for bacterial identification. However, Ag NPs are toxic to bacteria. Whether such toxicity can affect SERS features of bacteria and interfere with bacterial identification is still unknown and needed to explore. Here, by carrying out a comparative study on non-toxic Au NPs with that on toxic Ag NPs, we investigated the influence of nanoparticle concentration and incubation time on bacterial SERS spectral variance, both of which were demonstrated to be closely related to the toxicity of Ag NPs. Sensitive spectral alterations were observed on Ag NPs with increase of NPs concentration or incubation time, accompanied with an obvious decrease in number of viable bacteria. In contrast, SERS spectra and viable bacterial number on Au NPs were rather constant under the same conditions. A further analysis on spectral changes demonstrated that it was cell response (i.e. metabolic activity or death) to the toxicity of Ag NPs causing spectral variance. However, biochemical responses to the toxicity of Ag were very different in different bacteria, indicating the complex toxic mechanism of Ag NPs. Ag NPs are toxic to a great variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa etc., therefore, this work will be helpful in guiding the future application of SERS technique in various complex biological systems. PMID:25291503

  2. Critical determinants of uptake and translocation of nanoparticles by the human pulmonary alveolar epithelium.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Andrew J; Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Potter, Thomas E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2014-11-25

    The ability to manipulate the size and surface properties of nanomaterials makes them a promising vector for improving drug delivery and efficacy. Inhalation is a desirable route of administration as nanomaterials preferentially deposit in the alveolar region, a large surface area for drug absorption. However, as yet, the mechanisms by which particles translocate across the alveolar epithelial layer are poorly understood. Here we show that human alveolar type I epithelial cells internalize nanoparticles, whereas alveolar type II epithelial cells do not, and that nanoparticles translocate across the epithelial monolayer but are unable to penetrate the tight junctions between cells, ruling out paracellular translocation. Furthermore, using siRNA, we demonstrate that 50 nm nanoparticles enter largely by passive diffusion and are found in the cytoplasm, whereas 100 nm nanoparticles enter primarily via clathrin- and also caveolin-mediated endocytosis and are found in endosomes. Functionalization of nanoparticles increases their uptake and enhances binding of surfactant which further promotes uptake. Thus, we demonstrate that uptake and translocation across the pulmonary epithelium is controlled by alveolar type I epithelial cells, and furthermore, we highlight a number of factors that should be considered when designing new nanomedicines in order to improve drug delivery to the lung. PMID:25360809

  3. Critical Determinants of Uptake and Translocation of Nanoparticles by the Human Pulmonary Alveolar Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the size and surface properties of nanomaterials makes them a promising vector for improving drug delivery and efficacy. Inhalation is a desirable route of administration as nanomaterials preferentially deposit in the alveolar region, a large surface area for drug absorption. However, as yet, the mechanisms by which particles translocate across the alveolar epithelial layer are poorly understood. Here we show that human alveolar type I epithelial cells internalize nanoparticles, whereas alveolar type II epithelial cells do not, and that nanoparticles translocate across the epithelial monolayer but are unable to penetrate the tight junctions between cells, ruling out paracellular translocation. Furthermore, using siRNA, we demonstrate that 50 nm nanoparticles enter largely by passive diffusion and are found in the cytoplasm, whereas 100 nm nanoparticles enter primarily via clathrin- and also caveolin-mediated endocytosis and are found in endosomes. Functionalization of nanoparticles increases their uptake and enhances binding of surfactant which further promotes uptake. Thus, we demonstrate that uptake and translocation across the pulmonary epithelium is controlled by alveolar type I epithelial cells, and furthermore, we highlight a number of factors that should be considered when designing new nanomedicines in order to improve drug delivery to the lung. PMID:25360809

  4. In-vitro Cell Exposure Studies for the Assessment of Nanoparticle Toxicity in the Lung - A Dialogue between Aerosol Science and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Hanns-Rudolf, Paur; Cassee, Flemming R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Fissan, Heinz; Diabate, Silvia; Aufderheide, M.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Hanninen, Otto; Kasper, G.; Riediker, Michael; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Schmid, Otmar

    2011-10-01

    The rapid introduction of engineered nanostructured materials into numerous industrial and consumer products will result in enhanced exposure to engineered nanoparticles. Workplace exposure has been identified as the most likely source of uncontrolled inhalation of engineered aerosolized nanoparticles, but release of engineered nanoparticles may occur at any stage of the lifecycle of consumer products. The dynamic development of new nanomaterials with possibly unknown toxicological effects poses a challenge for the assessment of nanoparticle induced toxicity and safety. In this consensus document from a workshop on in-vitro cell systems for nanotoxicity testing an overview is given of the main issues concerning inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, lung physiology, nanoparticle-related biological mechanisms, in-vitro cell exposure systems for nanoparticles and social aspects of nanotechnology. The workshop participants recognized the large potential of in-vitro cell exposure systems for reliable, high-throughput screening of nanotoxicity. For the investigation of pulmonary nanotoxicity, a strong preference was expressed for air-liquid interface (ALI) cell exposure systems (rather than submerged cell exposure systems) as they closely resemble in-vivo conditions in the lungs and they allow for unaltered and dosimetrically accurate delivery of aerosolized nanoparticles to the cells. The members of the workshop believe that further advances in in-vitro cell exposure studies would be greatly facilitated by a more active role of the aerosol scientists. The technical know-how for developing and running ALI in-vitro exposure systems is available in the aerosol community and at the same time biologists/toxicologists are required for proper assessment of the biological impact of nanoparticles.

  5. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions. PMID:27094203

  6. The neglected nano-specific toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weicheng; Bao, Shaopan; Fang, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with unique physicochemical properties induce nano-specific (excess) toxicity in organisms compared with their bulk counterparts. Evaluation and consideration of nano-specific toxicity are meaningful for the safe design and environmental risk assessment of NPs. However, ZnO NPs have been reported to lack excess toxicity for diverse organisms. In the present study, the nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was evaluated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nano-specific toxicity of ZnO NPs was not observed in the wild type yeast. However, the ZnO NPs induced very similar nano-specific toxicities in the three mutants with comparable log Te (particle) values (0.64 vs 0.65 vs 0.62), suggesting that the mutants were more sensitive and specific for the NPs’ nano-specific toxicity. The toxic effects in the yeast were slightly attributable to dissolved zinc ions from the ZnO (nano or bulk) particles. Oxidative damage and mechanical damage contributed to the toxic effect of the ZnO particles. The mechanism of mechanical damage is proposed to be an inherent characteristic underlying the nano-specific toxicity in the mutants. The log Te (particle) was a useful parameter for evaluation of NPs nano-specific toxicity, whereas log Te (ion) efficiently determined the NPs toxicity associated with released ions.

  7. Controlled analysis of nanoparticle charge on mucosal and systemic antibody responses following pulmonary immunization.

    PubMed

    Fromen, Catherine A; Robbins, Gregory R; Shen, Tammy W; Kai, Marc P; Ting, Jenny P Y; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-01-13

    Pulmonary immunization enhances local humoral and cell-mediated mucosal protection, which are critical for vaccination against lung-specific pathogens such as influenza or tuberculosis. A variety of nanoparticle (NP) formulations have been tested preclinically for pulmonary vaccine development, yet the role of NP surface charge on downstream immune responses remains poorly understood. We used the Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT) process to synthesize hydrogel NPs that varied only in surface charge and otherwise maintained constant size, shape, and antigen loading. Pulmonary immunization with ovalbumin (OVA)-conjugated cationic NPs led to enhanced systemic and lung antibody titers compared with anionic NPs. Increased antibody production correlated with robust germinal center B-cell expansion and increased activated CD4(+) T-cell populations in lung draining lymph nodes. Ex vivo treatment of dendritic cells (DCs) with OVA-conjugated cationic NPs induced robust antigen-specific T-cell proliferation with ∼ 100-fold more potency than soluble OVA alone. Enhanced T-cell expansion correlated with increased expression of surface MHCII, T-cell coactivating receptors, and key cytokines/chemokine expression by DCs treated with cationic NPs, which were not observed with anionic NPs or soluble OVA. Together, these studies highlight the importance of NP surface charge when designing pulmonary vaccines, and our findings support the notion that cationic NP platforms engender potent humoral and mucosal immune responses. PMID:25548169

  8. Chitosan coating of copper nanoparticles reduces in vitro toxicity and increases inflammation in the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, Kristan L. S.; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Mapuskar, Kranti A.; Joshi, Vijaya B.; Guymon, C. Allan; Spitz, Douglas R.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Thorne, Peter S.; Salem, Aliasger K.

    2013-10-01

    Despite their potential for a variety of applications, copper nanoparticles induce very strong inflammatory responses and cellular toxicity following aerosolized delivery. Coating metallic nanoparticles with polysaccharides, such as biocompatible and antimicrobial chitosan, has the potential to reduce this toxicity. In this study, copper nanoparticles were coated with chitosan using a newly developed and facile method. The presence of coating was confirmed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, rhodamine tagging of chitosan followed by confocal fluorescence imaging of coated particles and observed increases in particle size and zeta potential. Further physical and chemical characteristics were evaluated using dissolution and x-ray diffraction studies. The chitosan coating was shown to significantly reduce the toxicity of copper nanoparticles after 24 and 52 h and the generation of reactive oxygen species as assayed by DHE oxidation after 24 h in vitro. Conversely, inflammatory response, measured using the number of white blood cells, total protein, and cytokines/chemokines in the bronchoalveolar fluid of mice exposed to chitosan coated versus uncoated copper nanoparticles, was shown to increase, as was the concentration of copper ions. These results suggest that coating metal nanoparticles with mucoadhesive polysaccharides (e.g. chitosan) could increase their potential for use in controlled release of copper ions to cells, but will result in a higher inflammatory response if administered via the lung.

  9. Encapsulation of Aconitine in Self-Assembled Licorice Protein Nanoparticles Reduces the Toxicity In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Li-jing; Gao, Guan-zhen; Shen, Yong; Zhou, Jian-wu; Rao, Ping-fan

    2015-11-01

    Many herbal medicines and compositions are clinically effective but challenged by its safety risks, i.e., aconitine (AC) from aconite species. The combined use of Radix glycyrrhizae (licorice) with Radix aconite L. effectively eliminates toxicity of the later while increasing efficacy. In this study, a boiling-stable 31-kDa protein (namely GP) was purified from licorice and self-assembled into nanoparticles (206.2 ± 2.0 nm) at pH 5.0, 25 °C. The aconitine-encapsulated GP nanoparticles (238.2 ± 1.2 nm) were prepared following the same procedure and tested for its toxicity by intraperitoneal injection on ICR mouse ( n = 8). Injection of GP-AC nanoparticles and the mixed licorice-aconite decoction, respectively, caused mild recoverable toxic effects and no death, while the aconitine, particle-free GP-AC mixture and aconite decoction induced sever toxic effects and 100 % death. Encapsulation of poisonous alkaloids into self-assembled herbal protein nanoparticles contributes to toxicity attenuation of combined use of herbs, implying a prototype nanostructure and a universal principle for the safer clinical applications of herbal medicines.

  10. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems. PMID:27539747

  11. Intracellular Uptake: A Possible Mechanism for Silver Engineered Nanoparticle Toxicity to a Freshwater Alga Ochromonas danica

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ai-Jun; Luo, Zhiping; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Chin, Wei-Chun; Santschi, Peter H.; Quigg, Antonietta

    2010-01-01

    The behavior and toxicity of silver engineered nanoparticles (Ag-ENs) to the mixotrophic freshwater alga Ochromonas danica were examined in the present study to determine whether any other mechanisms are involved in their algal toxicity besides Ag+ liberation outside the cells. Despite their good dispersability, the Ag-ENs were found to continuously aggregate and dissolve rapidly. When the initial nanoparticle concentration was lower than 10 µM, the total dissolved Ag+ concentration ([Ag+]T) in the suspending media reached its maximum after 1 d and then decreased suggesting that Ag+ release might be limited by the nanoparticle surface area under these conditions. Furthermore, Ag-EN dissolution extent remarkably increased in the presence of glutathione. In the Ag-EN toxicity experiment, glutathione was also used to eliminate the indirect effects of Ag+ that was released. However, remarkable toxicity was still observed although the free Ag+ concentration in the media was orders of magnitude lower than the non-observed effect concentration of Ag+ itself. Such inhibitive effects were mitigated when more glutathione was added, but could never be completely eliminated. Most importantly, we demonstrate, for the first time, that Ag-ENs can be taken in and accumulated inside the algal cells, where they exerted their toxic effects. Therefore, nanoparticle internalization may be an alternative pathway through which algal growth can be influenced. PMID:21203552

  12. Effects from Filtration, Capping Agents, and Presence/Absence of Food on the Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles to Daphnia Magna

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relatively little is known regarding the behavior and toxicity of nanoparticles in the environment. The objectives of the work presented here include establishing the toxicity of a variety of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to Daphnia magna neonates, assessing the applicability of ...

  13. Analysis of copper nanoparticles toxicity based on a stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Lei, Chunyang; Shen, Qinpeng; Li, Lijun; Wang, Ming; Guo, Manli; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2012-12-01

    The rapid development in nanoparticle production and application during the past decade requires an easy, rapid, and predictive screening method for nanoparticles toxicity assay. In this study, the toxicological effects and the source of toxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) are investigated based on a stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array. According to the responses of the biosensing strains, it is found that CuNPs induce not only oxidative stress in E. coli, but also protein damage, DNA damage, and cell membrane damage, and ultimately cause cell growth inhibition. Through enzyme detoxification analysis, the toxicological effects of CuNPs are traced to H2O2 generation from CuNPs. Rapid copper release from CuNPs and Cu(i) production are observed. The oxidation of the released Cu(i) has a close relation to H2O2 production, as tris-(hydroxypropyltriazolylmethyl) amine, the specific Cu(i) chelator, can largely protect the cells from the toxicity of CuNPs. In addition, the TEM study shows that CuNPs can be adsorbed and incepted fast by the cells. Comparatively, copper microparticles are relatively stable in the system and practically non-toxic, which indicates the importance of toxic estimation of materials at the nanoscale. In addition, the Cu(ii) ion can induce protein damage, membrane damage, and slight DNA damage only at a relatively high concentration. The current study reveals the preliminary mechanism of toxicity of CuNPs, and suggests that the stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array can be used as a simple and promising tool for rapid screening in vitro toxicity of nanoparticles and studying the primary mechanism of the toxicity.The rapid development in nanoparticle production and application during the past decade requires an easy, rapid, and predictive screening method for nanoparticles toxicity assay. In this study, the toxicological effects and the source of toxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) are investigated based on a stress

  14. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile. PMID:21281223

  15. Exposure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to functionalized polystyrene latex nanoparticles: influence of surface charge on toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Jumpei; Miyamoto, Akihisa; Kuriyama, Yuta; Tokumoto, Hayato; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2013-04-01

    Novel nanoparticles with unique physicochemical characteristics are being developed with increasing frequency, leading to higher probability of nanoparticle release and environmental accumulation. Therefore, it is important to assess the potential environmental and biological adverse effects of nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the toxicity and behavior of surface-functionalized nanoparticles toward yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The colony count method and confocal microscopy were used to examine the cytotoxicity of manufactured polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticles with various functional groups (amine, carboxyl, sulfate, and nonmodified). S. cerevisiae were exposed to PSL nanoparticles (40 mg/L) dispersed in 5-154 mM NaCl solutions for 1 h. Negatively charged nanoparticles had little or no toxic effect. Interestingly, nanoparticles with positively charged amine groups (p-Amine) were not toxic in 154 mM NaCl, but highly toxic in 5 mM NaCl. Confocal microscopy indicated that in 154 mM NaCl, the p-Amine nanoparticles were internalized by endocytosis, whereas in 5 mM NaCl they covered the dead cell surfaces. This demonstrates that nanoparticle-induced cell death might to be related to their adhesion to cells rather than their internalization. Together, these findings identify important factors in determining nanoparticle toxicity that might affect their impact on the environment and human health. PMID:23448545

  16. In vivo toxicity of enoxaparin encapsulated in mucoadhesive nanoparticles: Topical application in a wound healing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, S. C.; Marcato, P. D.; Barbosa, R. M.; Duran, N.; Annichino-Bizzacchi, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Wound healing comprises four distinct phases and involves many cell events and biologic markers. The use of nanoparticles for topical application has gaining attention due to its deeper penetration in the skin and the retention capacity of the drug in the site of application. In this study the effect and toxicity of mucoadhesive polymeric nanoparticles loaded with enoxaparin was evaluated in in vivo model of skin ulcer. Our results showed an interesting formulation based on mucoadhesive nanoparticles with enoxaparin that improved wound healing without cytotoxicity in vitro in all endpoint evaluated. Then, this semi-solid formulation is a promising option for skin ulcer treatment.

  17. Oxidative Dissolution of Silver Nanoparticles by Chlorine: Implications to Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shikha; Rong, Hongyan; Miller, Christopher J; Waite, T David

    2016-04-01

    The kinetics of oxidative dissolution of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by chlorine is investigated in this work, with results showing that AgNPs are oxidized in the presence of chlorine at a much faster rate than observed in the presence of dioxygen and/or hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation of AgNPs by chlorine occurs in air-saturated solution in stoichiometric amounts with 2 mol of AgNPs oxidized for each mole of chlorine added. Dioxygen plays an important role in OCl(-)-mediated AgNP oxidation, especially at lower OCl(-) concentrations, with the mechanism shifting from stoichiometric oxidation of AgNPs by OCl(-) in the presence of dioxygen to catalytic removal of OCl(-) by AgNPs in the absence of dioxygen. These results suggest that the presence of chlorine will mitigate AgNP toxicity by forming less-reactive AgCl(s) following AgNP oxidation, although the disinfection efficiency of OCl(-) may not be significantly impacted by the presence of AgNPs because a chlorine-containing species is formed on OCl(-) decay that has significant oxidizing capacity. Our results further suggest that the antibacterial efficacy of nanosilver particles embedded on fabrics may be negated when treated with detergents containing strong oxidants, such as chlorine. PMID:26986484

  18. The chronic toxicity of CuO nanoparticles and copper salt to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Adam, Nathalie; Vakurov, Alexander; Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of CuO nanoparticles and CuCl2·2H2O were tested on Daphnia magna under chronic exposure scenarios. During a 21-day exposure to the nanoparticles and salt, the reproduction was followed by a daily count of the number of offspring. After the exposure, the adult Daphnia length and uptake of copper was measured. The dissolved, nanoparticle and aggregated fractions were distinguished in the exposure medium. The results showed that only a small fraction of the nanoparticles dissolved, while the majority of the particles formed large aggregates (>450 nm). The dissolved fraction of the nanoparticles corresponded with the dissolved fraction of the copper salt. The effects of the nanoparticles (reproduction EC10: 0.546 mg Cu/l, EC20: 0.693 mg Cu/l, EC50: 1.041 mg Cu/l) on reproduction and length were much lower than the effects of the copper salts (reproduction EC10: 0.017 mg Cu/l, EC20: 0.019 mg Cu/l, EC50: 0.022 mg Cu/l). Based upon total body analysis, the Daphnia copper concentration appeared much higher when exposed to the nanoparticles than when exposed to the salt. These combined results indicate that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to D. magna is caused by copper ions formed during dissolution of the nanoparticles in the exposure medium. PMID:25464278

  19. Silver nanoparticle toxicity is related to coating materials and disruption of sodium concentration regulation.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Kevin W H; Dong, Wu; Marinakos, Stella M; Liu, Jie; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Wiesner, Mark R; Chernick, Melissa; Hinton, David E

    2016-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been increasingly commercialized and their release into the environment is imminent. Toxicity of AgNP has been studied with a wide spectrum of organisms, yet the mechanism of toxicity remains largely unknown. This study systematically compared toxicity of 10 AgNPs of different particle diameters and coatings to Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) larvae to understand how characteristics of AgNP relate to toxicity. Dissolution of AgNPs was largely dependent on particle size, but their aggregation behavior and toxicity were more dependent on coating materials. 96 h lethal concentration 50% (LC50) values correlated with AgNP aggregate size rather than size of individual nanoparticles. Of the AgNPs studied, the dissolved Ag concentration in the test suspensions did not account for all of the observed toxicity, indicating the role of NP-specific characteristics in resultant toxicity. Exposure to AgNP led to decrease of sodium concentration in the tissue and increased expression of Na(+)/K(+ )ATPase. Gene expression patterns also suggested that toxicity was related to disruption of sodium regulation and not to oxidative stress. PMID:27345576

  20. Reduced in vivo toxicity of doxorubicin by encapsulation in cholesterol-containing self-assembled nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fajardo, Laura; Mahajan, Lalit H; Ndaya, Dennis; Hargrove, Derek; Manautou, José E; Liang, Bruce T; Chen, Ming-Hui; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Lu, Xiuling

    2016-05-01

    We previously reported the development of an amphiphilic brush-like block copolymer composed of polynorbornene-cholesterol/polyethylene glycol (P(NBCh9-b-NBPEG)) that self-assembles in aqueous media to form long circulating nanostructures capable of encapsulating doxorubicin (DOX-NPs). Biodistribution studies showed that this formulation preferentially accumulates in tumor tissue with markedly reduced accumulation in the heart and other major organs. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the in vivo efficacy and toxicity of DOX containing self-assembled polymer nanoparticles in a mouse xenograft tumor model and compare its effects with the hydrochloride non-encapsulated form (free DOX). DOX-NPs significantly reduced the growth of tumors without inducing any apparent toxicity. Conversely, mice treated with free DOX exhibited significant weight loss, early toxic cardiomyopathy, acute toxic hepatopathy, reduced hematopoiesis and fatal toxicity. The improved safety profile of the polymeric DOX-NPs can be explained by the low circulating concentration of non-nanoparticle-associated drug as well as the reduced accumulation of DOX in non-target organs. These findings support the use of P(NBCh9-b-NBPEG) nanoparticles as delivery platforms for hydrophobic anticancer drugs intended to reduce the toxicity of conventional treatments. PMID:26976795

  1. Gold-magnetite nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates: Synthesis, properties and toxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariti, Akshay

    This thesis study focuses on synthesizing and characterizing gold-magnetite optically active magnetic nanoparticle and its conjugation with biomolecules for biomedical applications, especially magnetic fluid hyperthermia treatment for cancerous tissue. Gold nanoparticles have already displayed their potential in the biomedical field. They exhibit excellent optical properties and possess strong surface chemistry which renders them suitable for various biomolecule attachments. Studies have showed gold nanoparticles to be a perfect biocompatible vector. However, clinical trials for gold mediated drug delivery and treatment studied in rat models identified some problems. Of these problems, the low retention time in bloodstream and inability to maneuver externally has been the consequential. To further enhance their potential applications and overcome the problems faced in using gold nanoparticles alone, many researchers have synthesized multifunctional magnetic materials with gold at one terminal. Magnetite, among the investigated magnetic materials is a promising and reliable candidate because of its high magnetic saturation moment and low toxicity. This thesis showcases a simple and facile one pot synthesis of gold-magnetite nanoparticles with an average particle size of 80 nm through hot injection method. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, TEM, Mossbauer spectroscopy, SQUID and MTS toxicity studies. The superparamagnetism of the as-synthesized nanoparticles has an interestingly high saturation magnetization moment and low toxicity than the literature values reported earlier. L-cysteine and (-)-EGCG (epigallacatechin-3-gallate) were attached to this multifunctional nanoparticles through the gold terminal and characterized to show the particles applicability through Raman, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  2. Effects of copper nanoparticle exposure on host defense in a murine pulmonary infection model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) and environmental bacteria can occur simultaneously. NPs induce inflammatory responses and oxidative stress but may also have immune-suppressive effects, impairing macrophage function and altering epithelial barrier functions. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential pulmonary effects of inhalation and instillation exposure to copper (Cu) NPs using a model of lung inflammation and host defense. Methods We used Klebsiella pneumoniae (K.p.) in a murine lung infection model to determine if pulmonary bacterial clearance is enhanced or impaired by Cu NP exposure. Two different exposure modes were tested: sub-acute inhalation (4 hr/day, 5 d/week for 2 weeks, 3.5 mg/m3) and intratracheal instillation (24 hr post-exposure, 3, 35, and 100 μg/mouse). Pulmonary responses were evaluated by lung histopathology plus measurement of differential cell counts, total protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Results Cu NP exposure induced inflammatory responses with increased recruitment of total cells and neutrophils to the lungs as well as increased total protein and LDH activity in BAL fluid. Both inhalation and instillation exposure to Cu NPs significantly decreased the pulmonary clearance of K.p.-exposed mice measured 24 hr after bacterial infection following Cu NP exposure versus sham-exposed mice also challenged with K.p (1.4 × 105 bacteria/mouse). Conclusions Cu NP exposure impaired host defense against bacterial lung infections and induced a dose-dependent decrease in bacterial clearance in which even our lowest dose demonstrated significantly lower clearance than observed in sham-exposed mice. Thus, exposure to Cu NPs may increase the risk of pulmonary infection. PMID:21943386

  3. Sub-chronic toxicity of gold nanoparticles in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Ajdary, Marziyeh; Ghahnavieh, Marziyeh Ziaee; Naghsh, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gold nanoparticles have many industrial applications; moreover, they are photothermic agents for clinical treatment of cancer. This study was provided to investigate the effects associated with different doses of applied gold nanoparticles by injection and contact procedures on the alterations of the serum levels and certain factors in male mice. Materials and Methods: 72 male mice were randomly assigned into two protocols in terms of touching and injection. The injection protocol was included of five groups: Sham, control, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. They received gold nanoparticles at 25, 50, and 100 ppm concentrations administered in form of 0.3 ml/day for the period of 14 days and that of touching protocol were received 0.2 ml/day gold nanoparticles. Blood sample of which was taken to measure the serum level of creatine kinase phosphate, fasting blood, creatinine, albumin, blood urea nitrogen and eventually, the kidney was dissected for the intent of pathological analysis. Results: The serum level of creatine kinase phosphate and fasting blood sugar at middle dose was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) in touching protocol. In both protocols, the serum level of creatinine in high and medium doses showed a significant difference (P < 0.05) associated with the treated group. In the touching method, in high and medium doses administered to the treated group, the alteration was significant (P ≤ 0.05). In the both protocols, the serum level of albumin in high and medium doses of the treated group showed significant difference (P < 0.05). Thus, the gold nanoparticles could result in undesirable effects upon kidney tissue. Conclusion: The result of this study indicated that the administration of gold nanoparticles by touching method was more effective on the serum levels of these factors than that of injection method. PMID:25878992

  4. Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingbo; Cao, Jianzhong; Yuan, Shuanghu; Arenberg, Douglas; Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

  5. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Mousavi, Maral P. S.; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag+ influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM’s chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution. PMID:26047330

  6. Toxicity of bare and surfaced functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles towards microalgae.

    PubMed

    Toh, Pey Yi; Tai, Wan Yii; Ahmad, Abdul Latif; Lim, Jit Kang; Chan, Derek Juinn Chieh

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the toxicity of bare iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and surface functionalization iron oxide nanoparticles (SF-IONPs) to the growth of freshwater microalgae Chlorella sp. This study is important due to the increased interest on the application of the magnetic responsive IONPs in various fields, such as biomedical, wastewater treatment, and microalgae harvesting. This study demonstrated that the toxicity of IONPs was mainly contributed by the indirect light shading effect from the suspending nanoparticles which is nanoparticles concentration-dependent, direct light shading effect caused by the attachment of IONPs on cell and the cell aggregation, and the oxidative stress from the internalization of IONPs into the cells. The results showed that the layer of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) tended to mask the IONPs and hence eliminated oxidative stress toward the protein yield but it in turn tended to enhance the toxicity of IONPs by enabling the IONPs to attach on cell surfaces and cause cell aggregation. Therefore, the choice of the polymer that used for surface functionalize the IONPs is the key factor to determine the toxicity of the IONPs. PMID:26389846

  7. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gunsolus, Ian L; Mousavi, Maral P S; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L

    2015-07-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag(+) influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM's chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution. PMID:26047330

  8. Toxicity assessment of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and applications of nanoparticles (NP) in diverse fields has steadily increased in recent decades; however, knowledge about risks of NP to human health and ecosystems is still scarce. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used engineere...

  9. TLR4 Signaling Is Involved in Brain Vascular Toxicity of PCB153 Bound to Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bei; Choi, Jeong June; Eum, Sung Yong; Daunert, Sylvia; Toborek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    PCBs bind to environmental particles; however, potential toxicity exhibited by such complexes is not well understood. The aim of the present study is to study the hypothesis that assembling onto nanoparticles can influence the PCB153-induced brain endothelial toxicity via interaction with the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). To address this hypothesis, TLR4-deficient and wild type control mice (males, 10 week old) were exposed to PCB153 (5 ng/g body weight) bound to chemically inert silica nanoparticles (PCB153-NPs), PCB153 alone, silica nanoparticles (NPs; diameter, 20 nm), or vehicle. Selected animals were also subjected to 40 min ischemia, followed by a 24 h reperfusion. As compared to exposure to PCB153 alone, treatment with PCB153-NP potentiated the brain infarct volume in control mice. Importantly, this effect was attenuated in TLR4-deficient mice. Similarly, PCB153-NP-induced proinflammatory responses and disruption of tight junction integrity were less pronounced in TLR4-deficient mice as compared to control animals. Additional in vitro experiments revealed that TLR4 mediates toxicity of PCB153-NP via recruitment of tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6). The results of current study indicate that binding to seemingly inert nanoparticles increase cerebrovascular toxicity of PCBs and suggest that targeting the TLR4/TRAF6 signaling may protect against these effects. PMID:23690990

  10. Surface engineering of silica nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery: characterization and cell toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Tatiana; Kiill, Charlene P; de Souza, Ana Luiza R; Fangueiro, Joana F; Fernandes, Lisete; Doktorovová, Slavomira; Santos, Dario L; Garcia, Maria L; Gremião, Maria Palmira D; Souto, Eliana B; Silva, Amélia M

    2014-11-01

    The present work aimed at studying the interaction between insulin and SiNP surfaced with mucoadhesive polymers (chitosan, sodium alginate or polyethylene glycol) and the evaluation of their biocompatibility with HepG2 and Caco-2 cell lines, which mimic in vivo the target of insulin-loaded nanoparticles upon oral administration. Thus, a systematic physicochemical study of the surface-modified insulin-silica nanoparticles (Ins-SiNP) using mucoadhesive polymers has been described. The surfacing of nanoparticle involved the coating of silica nanoparticles (SiNP) with different mucoadhesive polymers, to achieve high contact between the systems and the gut mucosa to enhance the oral insulin bioavailability. SiNP were prepared by a modified Stöber method at room temperature via hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Interaction between insulin and nanoparticles was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) studies. The high efficiency of nanoparticles' coating resulted in more stable system. FTIR spectra of insulin-loaded nanoparticles showed amide absorption bands which are characteristic of α-helix content. In general, all developed nanoparticles demonstrated high biocompatible, at the tested concentrations (50-500 μg/mL), revealing no or low toxicity in the two human cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Caco-2). In conclusion, the developed insulin-loaded SiNP surfaced with mucoadhesive polymers demonstrated its added value for oral administration of proteins. PMID:25466464