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Sample records for nanoparticles exhibits cell

  1. Metallic Nickel Nanoparticles May Exhibit Higher Carcinogenic Potential than Fine Particles in JB6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Linda; Zou, Baobo; Mao, Guochuan; Xu, Jin; Castranova, Vincent; Zhao, Jinshun; Ding, Min

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies have described the pathogenic and carcinogenic effects of nickel compounds, little has been done on the biological effects of metallic nickel. Moreover, the carcinogenetic potential of metallic nickel nanoparticles is unknown. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) have been shown to play pivotal roles in tumor initiation, promotion, and progression. Mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is considered to be one of the steps leading to the neoplastic state. The present study examines effects of metallic nickel fine and nanoparticles on tumor promoter or suppressor gene expressions as well as on cell transformation in JB6 cells. Our results demonstrate that metallic nickel nanoparticles caused higher activation of AP-1 and NF-?B, and a greater decrease of p53 transcription activity than fine particles. Western blot indicates that metallic nickel nanoparticles induced a higher level of protein expressions for R-Ras, c-myc, C-Jun, p65, and p50 in a time-dependent manner. In addition, both metallic nickel nano- and fine particles increased anchorage-independent colony formation in JB6 P+ cells in the soft agar assay. These results imply that metallic nickel fine and nanoparticles are both carcinogenetic in vitro in JB6 cells. Moreover, metallic nickel nanoparticles may exhibit higher carcinogenic potential, which suggests that precautionary measures should be taken in the use of nickel nanoparticles or its compounds in nanomedicine. PMID:24691273

  2. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit genotoxicity and impair DNA repair activity in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Jugan, Mary-Line; Barillet, Sabrina; Simon-Deckers, Angelique; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Douki, Thierry; Carriere, Marie

    2012-08-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs) are produced in large quantities, raising concerns about their impact for human health. The aim of this study was to deeply characterize TiO(2)-NPs genotoxic potential to lung cells, and to link genotoxicity to physicochemical characteristics, e.g., size, specific surface area, crystalline phase. A549 cells were exposed to a panel of TiO(2)-NPs with diameters ranging from 12 to 140 nm, either anatase or rutile. A set of complementary techniques (comet and micronucleus assays, gamma-H2AX immunostaining, 8-oxoGuanine analysis, H2-DCFDA, glutathione content, antioxidant enzymes activities) allowed us to demonstrate that small and spherical TiO(2)-NPs, both anatase and rutile, induce single-strand breaks and oxidative lesions to DNA, together with a general oxidative stress. Additionally we show that these NPs impair cell ability to repair DNA, by inactivation of both NER and BER pathways. This study thus confirms the genotoxic potential of TiO(2)-NPs, which may preclude their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. PMID:21995316

  3. Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit Reduced Toxicity to Mammalian Cells and Retain Antimicrobial Activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver nanomaterial stems from their antimicrobial properties. AgNPs are being added to clothing, paint, refrigerators, washing machines and a variety of other commercially available items. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies, howe...

  4. Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit the Dose-Dependent Anti-Proliferative Effect against Human Squamous Carcinoma Cells Attenuated in the Presence of Berberine.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Kubina, Robert; Bułdak, Rafał J; Skonieczna, Magda; Cholewa, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The biological activity of nanosize silver particles towards oral epithelium-derived carcinoma seems to be still underinvestigated. We evaluated the influence of low doses of nanosize scale silver particles on the proliferation and viability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes in vitro, alone and in conjunction with the plant alkaloid berberine. Cells of human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-25 (ATCC CRL-1628), cultivated with the mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, were exposed to silver nanoparticles alone (AgNPs, concentrations from 0.31 to 10 μg/mL) and to a combination of AgNPs with berberine chloride (BER, 1/2 IC50 concentration) during 24 h and 48 h. The cytotoxic activity of AgNPs with diameters of 10 nm ± 4 nm was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by treating cells with propidium iodide followed by flow-activated cell sorting. RT-QPCR reaction was used to assess expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein Bax genes expression. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles at a concentration of 10 μg/mL arrested SCC-25 cells cycle after 48 h at the G0/G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner through disruption G0/G1 checkpoint, with increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio gene expression. AgNPs exhibit cytotoxic effects on SCC-25 malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, which is diminished when combined with BER. The AgNPs concentration required to inhibit the growth of carcinoma cells by 50% (IC50) after 48 h was estimated at 5.19 μg/mL. AgNPs combined with BER increased the expression of Bcl-2 while decreasing the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in SCC-25 cells. Silver particles at low doses therefore reduce the proliferation and viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. SCC-25 cells are susceptible to damage from AgNPs-induced stress, which can be regulated by the natural alkaloid berberine, suggesting that nanoparticles may be potentially used in a chemoprevention/chemotherapy by augmentation of action of standard anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26999092

  5. Electroactive Polymer Nanoparticles Exhibiting Photothermal Properties.

    PubMed

    Cantu, Travis; Rodier, Bradley; Iszard, Zachary; Kilian, Alissa; Pattani, Varun; Walsh, Kyle; Weber, Katharina; Tunnell, James; Betancourt, Tania; Irvin, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    A method for the synthesis of electroactive polymers is demonstrated, starting with the synthesis of extended conjugation monomers using a three-step process that finishes with Negishi coupling. Negishi coupling is a cross-coupling process in which a chemical precursor is first lithiated, followed by transmetallation with ZnCl2. The resultant organozinc compound can be coupled to a dibrominated aromatic precursor to give the conjugated monomer. Polymer films can be prepared via electropolymerization of the monomer and characterized using cyclic voltammetry and ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) spectroscopy. Nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared via emulsion polymerization of the monomer using a two-surfactant system to yield an aqueous dispersion of the polymer NPs. The NPs are characterized using dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and UV-Vis-NIR-spectroscopy. Cytocompatibility of NPs is investigated using the cell viability assay. Finally, the NP suspensions are irradiated with a NIR laser to determine their effectiveness as potential materials for photothermal therapy (PTT). PMID:26780244

  6. Optical Manipulation and Spectroscopy Of Silicon Nanoparticles Exhibiting Dielectric Resonances.

    PubMed

    Andres-Arroyo, Ana; Gupta, Bakul; Wang, Fan; Gooding, J Justin; Reece, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that silicon (Si) nanoparticles with scattering properties exhibiting strong dielectric resonances can be successfully manipulated using optical tweezers. The large dielectric constant of Si has a distinct advantage over conventional colloidal nanoparticles in that it leads to enhanced trapping forces without the heating associated with metallic nanoparticles. Further, the spectral features of the trapped nanoparticles provide a unique marker for probing size, shape, orientation and local dielectric environment. We exploit these properties to investigate the trapping dynamics of Si nanoparticles with different dimensions ranging from 50 to 200 nm and aspect ratios between 0.4 and 2. The unique combination of spectral and trapping properties make Si nanoparticles an ideal system for delivering directed nanoscale sensing in a range of potential applications. PMID:26848883

  7. Cell tracking using nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Dennis E; Yang, Meiheng; Weinberg, James S; Reinhardt, Christopher P; Groman, Ernest V

    2008-09-01

    Tracking cells in regenerative medicine is becoming increasingly important for basic cell therapy science, for cell delivery optimization and for accurate biodistribution studies. This report describes nanoparticles that utilize stable-isotope metal labels for multiple detection technologies in preclinical studies. Cells labeled with nanoparticles can be imaged by electron microscopy, fluorescence, and magnetic resonance. The nanoparticle-labeled cells can be quantified by neutron activation, thereby allowing, with the use of standard curves, the determination of the number of labeled cells in tissue samples from in vivo sources. This report describes the characteristics of these nanoparticles and methods for using these nanoparticles to label and track cells. PMID:20559922

  8. Boron Polylactide Nanoparticles Exhibiting Fluorescence and Phosphorescence in Aqueous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Anne; Zhang, Guoqing; Zareno, Jessica; Horwitz, Alan F.; Fraser, Cassandra L.

    2008-01-01

    Difluoroboron dibenzoylmethane-polylactide, BF2dbmPLA, a biocompatible polymerluminophore conjugate was fabricated as nanoparticles. Spherical particles <100 nm in size were generated via nanoprecipitation. Intense blue fluorescence, two-photon absorption, and long-lived room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) are retained in aqueous suspension. The nanoparticles were internalized by cells and visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Luminescent boron biomaterials show potential for imaging and sensing. PMID:19081748

  9. SDF-1? in Glycan Nanoparticles Exhibits Full Activity and Reduces Pulmonary Hypertension in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Tao; Bader, Andrew R.; Hou, Tim K.; Maron, Bradley A.; Kao, Derrick D.; Qian, Ray; Kohane, Daniel S.; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Zhang, Ying-Yi

    2013-01-01

    In order to establish a homing signal in the lung to recruit circulating stem cells for tissue repair, we formulated a nanoparticle, SDF-1? NP, by complexing SDF-1? with dextran sulfate and chitosan. The data show that SDF-1? was barely released from the nanoparticles over an extended period of time in vitro (3% in 7 days at 37C); however, incorporated SDF-1? exhibited full chemotactic activity and receptor activation compared to its free form. The nanoparticles were not endocytosed after incubation with Jurkat cells. When aerosolized into the lungs of rats, SDF-1? NP displayed a greater retention time compared to free SDF-1? (64% vs. 2% remaining at 16 hr). In a rat model of monocrotaline-induced lung injury, SDF-1? NP, but not free form SDF-1?, was found to reduce pulmonary hypertension. These data suggest that the nanoparticle formulation protected SDF-1? from rapid clearance in the lung and sustained its biological function in vivo. PMID:24059347

  10. Nanoparticles functionalized with collagenase exhibit improved tumor accumulation in a murine xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Murty, Surya; Gilliland, Taylor; Qiao, Peter; Tabtieng, Tate; Higbee, Elizabeth; Al Zaki, Ajlan; Pur, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have garnered widespread interest for both the imaging and treatment of cancer due to their unique and tunable pharmacokinetics and their ability to carry a high payload of diverse compounds. However, despite these favorable attributes, the extent of tumor accumulation can be severely restricted due to the dense stroma surrounding the often-permeable blood vessel wall and high intratumoral pressure. In this study, we investigated whether modifying the surface of pegylated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with collagenase could improve the accumulation of nanoparticles within a murine tumor xenograft. It was determined that collagenase remains active after surface conjugation and the presence of collagenase has no measureable effect on cell proliferation in vitro. Following intravenous injection, the largest fractions of collagenase-labeled AuNPs were found in the liver and spleen. Histological analysis revealed no signs of toxicity in either of these organs. Blood chemistry revealed normal levels of liver enzymes, but a slightly elevated level of total bilirubin. Within the tumor, AuNPs labeled with collagenase exhibited a 35% increase in accumulation compared with unlabeled AuNPs. Therefore, these studies provide preliminary evidence that the functionalization of nanoparticles with collagenase represent an effective and safe approach to improve tumor accumulation. PMID:26380538

  11. Lipid-Coated Cisplatin Nanoparticles Induce Neighboring Effect and Exhibit Enhanced Anticancer Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shutao; Wang, Yuhua; Miao, Lei; Xu, Zhenghong; Lin, C. Michael; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin (CDDP) into nanoparticles (NPs) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency has been difficult due to the poor solubility of CDDP. However, this barrier has been overcome with a reverse microemulsion method appropriating CDDP’s poor solubility to our advantage promoting the synthesis of a pure cisplatin nanoparticle with a high drug loading capacity (approximately 80.8wt%). Actively targeted CDDP NPs exhibited significant accumulation in human A375M melanoma tumor cells in vivo. In addition, CDDP NPs achieved potent anti-tumor efficacy through the neighboring effect at a dose of 1 mg/kg when injected weekly via IV without inducing nephrotoxicity. The neighboring effect regards an observation made in vivo when the tumor cells that took up CDDP NPs released active drug following apoptosis. Via diffusion, surrounding cells that were previously unaffected showed intake of the released drug and their apoptosis soon followed. This observation was also made in vitro when A375M melanoma tumor cells incubated with CDDP NPs exhibited release of active drug and induced apoptosis on untreated neighboring cells. However, the neighboring effect was unique to rapidly proliferating tumor cells. Liver functional parameters and H&E staining of liver tissue in vivo failed to detect any difference between CDDP NP treated and control groups in terms of tissue health. By simultaneously promoting an increase in cytotoxicity and a lesser degree of side effects over free CDDP, CDDP NPs show great therapeutic potential with lower doses of drug while enhancing anti-cancer effectiveness. PMID:24083505

  12. Thymoquinone Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) Nanoparticles Exhibit Enhanced Anti-proliferative, Anti-inflammatory, and Chemosensitization Potential

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Jayaraj; Nair, Hareesh B; Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2010-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ), derived from the medicinal spice Nigella sativa (also called black cumin), has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. In this report we employed polymer-based nanoparticle approach to improve upon its effectiveness and bioavailability. TQ was encapsulated with 97.5% efficiency in biodegradable nanoparticulate formulation based on poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and the stabilizer polyethylene glycol (PEG)-5000. Dynamic laser light scattering and transmission electron microscopy confirmed particle diameter ranged between 150–200 nm. Electrophoretic gel shift mobility assay showed that TQ nanoparticles (NP) were more active than TQ in inhibiting NF-κB activation and in suppressing the expression of cyclin D1, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), markers of cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis, respectively. TQ-NP was also more potent than TQ in suppressing proliferation of colon cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma cells. Esterase staining for plasma membrane integrity revealed that TQ-NP was more potent than TQ in sensitizing leukemic cells to TNF- and paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Overall our results demonstrate that encapsulation of TQ into nanoparticles enhances its anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, and chemosensitizing effects. PMID:20105430

  13. Biosynthesis of platinum nanoparticles by Escherichia coli MC4100: can such nanoparticles exhibit intrinsic surface enantioselectivity?

    PubMed

    Attard, Gary; Casadess, Meritxell; Macaskie, Lynne E; Deplanche, Kevin

    2012-03-20

    The biomanufacture of two types of platinum bionanoparticle (bioNP) using Escherichia coli MC4100(1% and 20% by mass metal loading) together with a method for both liberating the nanoparticles (NPs) from the bacterial layer and their subsequent critical cleaning is reported. The possibility of an enantiomeric excess of chiral kink sites forming on the surface of the Pt nanoparticles produced by the bacteria was investigated using the electrooxidation of D- and L-glucose as the chiral probe. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Pt bioNPs (after recovery and cleaning) were typically 2.3 0.7 nm (1% loading) and 4.5 0.7 nm (20% loading) in diameter. The D- and L-glucose electrooxidation measurements did not give rise to any chiral response using either of the Pt bioNPs types but did display differing CV profiles. This suggested that the overall surface morphology of each bioNP could be controlled by the degree of metal loading but that no enantiomeric excess of intrinsically chiral surface kink sites was present. PMID:22329766

  14. Novel, silver-ion-releasing nanofibrous scaffolds exhibit excellent antibacterial efficacy without the use of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-05-01

    Nanofibers, with their morphological similarities to the extracellular matrix of skin, hold great potential for skin tissue engineering. Over the last decade, silver nanoparticles have been extensively investigated in wound-healing applications for their ability to provide antimicrobial benefits to nanofibrous scaffolds. However, the use of silver nanoparticles has raised concerns as these particles can penetrate into the stratum corneum of skin, or even diffuse into the cellular plasma membrane. We present and evaluate a new silver ion release polymeric coating that we have found can be applied to biocompatible, biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) nanofibrous scaffolds. Using this compound, custom antimicrobial silver-ion-releasing nanofibers were created. The presence of a uniform, continuous silver coating on the nanofibrous scaffolds was verified by XPS analysis. The antimicrobial efficacy of the antimicrobial scaffolds against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria was determined via industry-standard AATCC protocols. Cytotoxicity analyses of the antimicrobial scaffolds toward human epidermal keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts were performed via quantitative analyses of cell viability and proliferation. Our results indicated that the custom antimicrobial scaffolds exhibited excellent antimicrobial properties while also maintaining human skin cell viability and proliferation for silver ion concentrations below 62.5?gml(-1) within the coating solution. This is the first study to show that silver ions can be effectively delivered with nanofibrous scaffolds without the use of silver nanoparticles. PMID:24365706

  15. Zinc oxide nanoparticles as selective killers of proliferating cells

    PubMed Central

    Taccola, Liuba; Raffa, Vittoria; Riggio, Cristina; Vittorio, Orazio; Iorio, Maria Carla; Vanacore, Renato; Pietrabissa, Andrea; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    Background: It has recently been demonstrated that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) induce death of cancerous cells whilst having no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. However, there are several issues which need to be resolved before translation of zinc oxide nanoparticles into medical use, including lack of suitable biocompatible dispersion protocols and a better understanding being needed of the mechanism of their selective cytotoxic action. Methods: Nanoparticle dose affecting cell viability was evaluated in a model of proliferating cells both experimentally and mathematically. The key issue of selective toxicity of ZnO NPs toward proliferating cells was addressed by experiments using a biological model of noncancerous cells, ie, mesenchymal stem cells before and after cell differentiation to the osteogenic lineage. Results: In this paper, we report a biocompatible protocol for preparation of stable aqueous solutions of monodispersed zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that the threshold of intracellular ZnO NP concentration required to induce cell death in proliferating cells is 0.4 0.02 mM. Finally, flow cytometry analysis revealed that the threshold dose of zinc oxide nanoparticles was lethal to proliferating pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells but exhibited negligible cytotoxic effects to osteogenically differentiated mesenchymal stem cells. Conclusion: Results confirm the ZnO NP selective cytotoxic action on rapidly proliferating cells, whether benign or malignant. PMID:21698081

  16. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  17. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  18. Cisplatin-tethered gold nanoparticles that exhibit enhanced reproducibility, drug loading, and stability: a step closer to pharmaceutical approval?

    PubMed

    Craig, Gemma E; Brown, Sarah D; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Graham, Duncan; Wheate, Nial J

    2012-03-19

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be used as delivery vehicles for platinum anticancer drugs, improving their targeting and uptake into cells. Here, we examine the appropriateness of different-sized AuNPs as components of platinum-based drug-delivery systems, investigating their controlled synthesis, reproducibility, consistency of drug loading, and stability. The active component of cisplatin was tethered to 25, 55, and 90 nm AuNPs, with the nanoparticles being almost spherical in nature and demonstrating good batch-to-batch reproducibility (24.37 0.62, 55.2 1.75, and 89.1 2.32 nm). The size distribution of 25 nm AuNPs has been significantly improved, compared with a previous method that produces polydispersed nanoparticles. Attachment of platinum to the AuNP surface through a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker exhibits an increase in the drug loading with increasing particle size: 25 nm (815 106 drug molecules per AuNP), 55 nm (14216 880), and 90 nm (54487 15996). The stability of the naked, PEGylated, and platinum-conjugated nanoparticles has been examined over time under various conditions. When stored at 4 C, there is minimal variation in the diameter for all three AuNP sizes; variation after 28 days for the 25 nm AuNPs was 2.4%; 55 nm, 3.3%; and 90 nm, 3.6%. The 25 nm AuNPs also demonstrate minimal changes in UV-visible absorbance over the same time period. PMID:22390791

  19. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Cory; Layne, Janet; Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K M; Coombs, Isaac; Coombs, Andrew; Feris, Kevin; Wingett, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells (?2835) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity. PMID:18836572

  20. Levetiracetam exhibits protective properties on rat Schwann cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stettner, Mark; Dehmel, Thomas; Mausberg, Anne K; Khne, Angelika; Rose, Christine R; Kieseier, Bernd C

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation represent pathways causing substantial damage to the peripheral nervous system. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a commonly used antiepileptic drug targeting high-voltage activated N-type calcium channels. Recent evidence suggests that LEV may also act as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suggesting that this drug exhibits both anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects, and as such may represent an interesting candidate for treating inflammatory diseases affecting the peripheral nerve. Therefore, we analysed the influence of LEV ex vivo on purified Schwann cells from neonatal P3 rats as well as on dorsal root ganglia prepared from E15 rat embryos. LEV diminished a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase of the pro-inflammatory signature molecules tumour necrosis factor alpha, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and caspase 6. Furthermore, LEV decreased LPS-induced cell death and protected cells against oxidative stress in a glutamate-based oxidative stress model. MMP-2 activity, usually elevated during myelination and repair, was also found to be up-regulated following LEV, while LEV exhibited no negative effects on myelination. Intracellular sodium or calcium concentrations were unaltered by LEV. Thus, LEV may be a promising, well-tolerated drug that - besides its antiepileptic potential - mediates anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic properties that may potentially be useful in treating diseases of the peripheral nerve. PMID:22003940

  1. Identification of mouse mutant cells exhibiting the plastic mutant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Masatake; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Sakagami, Mari; Yamada, Yuji

    2010-08-01

    The initial processes involved in radiation carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We isolated mouse mutant cells exhibiting plasticity in their mutation phenotypes. These mutant cells were originally isolated from an irradiated cell population as 6-thioguanine resistant (6TGR) mutants that were deficient in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt, E.C.2.4.2.8) activity at the frequency of approximately 6.2 x 10(-5). Approximately 10% of 6TGR cells showed plasticity in their mutant phenotypes and reverted to HAT-resistant (HATR), which is Hprt-proficient, wild type phenotype. Eventually we identified the plastic mutants in the un-irradiated wild type cell population as well and found that ionizing irradiation enhanced the frequency of the plastic mutation approximately 24 times. Treatment with 5-aza-cytidine did not affect the plasticity of mutant phenotypes identified in this study, suggesting that DNA methylation was not involved in the plastic changes of the mutant phenotypes. The plastic mutant phenotype identified in our study is a new type of genomic instability induced by ionizing irradiation, and it is likely to be involved in one of the primary changes that occur in the process of radiation carcinogenesis, and may explain one element of carcinogenesis, which is composed of multi-stages. PMID:20811140

  2. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Delphinium denudatum root extract exhibits antibacterial and mosquito larvicidal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Gopal; Gunasekar, Poosali Hariharan; Kokila, Dhanasegaran; Prabhu, Durai; Dinesh, Devadoss; Ravichandran, Nagaiya; Ramesh, Balasubramanian; Koodalingam, Arunagirinathan; Vijaiyan Siva, Ganesan

    2014-06-01

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous root extract of Delphinium denudatum (Dd) by reduction of Ag+ ions from silver nitrate solution has been investigated. The synthesized DdAgNPs were characterized by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The prepared DdAgNPs showed maximum absorbance at 416 nm and particles were polydispersed in nature, spherical in shape and the size of the particle obtained was ⩽85 nm. The DdAgNPs exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus cereus NCIM 2106, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027. The DdAgNPs showed potent larvicidal activity against second instar larvae of dengue vector Aedes aegypti with a LC50 value of 9.6 ppm.

  3. Growth suppressing factor for endothelial cells exhibits tumor regressing activity.

    PubMed

    Usui, S; Matsunaga, T; Ukai, S; Kiho, T; Hirano, K

    1999-04-01

    Endothelium growth suppressing and tumor-regressing activities were copurified from the conditioned medium of P388D1 culture in the presence of 100 microg/ml carboxymethylated curdlan by a procedure including ammonium sulfate fractionation and six column chromatographies of Ceramic hydroxyapatite, Q-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-300 HR, Matrex PBA-30, PBE94, and anti-bovine serum albumin (anti-BSA) agarose. The intravenous administration of the purified growth suppressing factor for endothelial cells to sarcoma 180-bearing mouse caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable tumor cells in tumor lumps within 16 h. Immunohistochemical study showed that the intravenous injection of the purified factor to sarcoma 180-bearing mouse resulted in hemorrhagic disorder all over the tissue in the tumor lamp. Thus, the purified factor exhibited not only growth suppressing activity for endothelial cells but also tumor regressing activity at a concentration as low as about 15 ng/mouse. The purified factor significantly inhibited in vitro tubulogenesis of bovine artery, human umbilical vein, and adult human darmal microvascular endothelial cells on collagen gel at a concentration of about 5 ng/ml. After the tube formation of endothelial cells was completed on a collagen gel, the purified factor disrupted the tubes at a concentration of about 5 ng/ml within 48 h. These findings demonstrate that endothelium growth suppressing factor is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis as well as the growth of endothelial cells, and may bring about the regression of a solid tumor by inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:10328553

  4. Planktonic and biofilm-grown nitrogen-cycling bacteria exhibit different susceptibilities to copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Vincent C; Opot, Stephen O; Mahendra, Shaily

    2015-04-01

    Proper characterization of nanoparticle (NP) interactions with environmentally relevant bacteria under representative conditions is necessary to enable their sustainable manufacture, use, and disposal. Previous nanotoxicology research based on planktonic growth has not adequately explored biofilms, which serve as the predominant mode of bacterial growth in natural and engineered environments. Copper nanoparticle (Cu-NP) impacts on biofilms were compared with respective planktonic cultures of the ammonium-oxidizing Nitrosomonas europaea, nitrogen-fixing Azotobacter vinelandii, and denitrifying Paracoccus denitrificans using a suite of independent toxicity diagnostics. Median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values derived from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for Cu-NPs were lower in N. europaea biofilms (19.6??15.3?mg/L) than in planktonic cells (49.0??8.0?mg/L). However, in absorbance-based growth assays, compared with unexposed controls, N. europaea growth rates in biofilms were twice as resilient to inhibition than those in planktonic cultures. Similarly, relative to unexposed controls, growth rates and yields of P. denitrificans in biofilms exposed to Cu-NPs were 40-fold to 50-fold less inhibited than those in planktonic cells. Physiological evaluation of ammonium oxidation and nitrate reduction suggested that biofilms were also less inhibited by Cu-NPs than planktonic cells. Furthermore, functional gene expression for ammonium oxidation (amoA) and nitrite reduction (nirK) showed lower inhibition by NPs in biofilms relative to planktonic-grown cells. These results suggest that biofilms mitigate NP impacts, and that nitrogen-cycling bacteria in wastewater, wetlands, and soils might be more resilient to NPs than planktonic-based assessments suggest. PMID:25556815

  5. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  6. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  7. Cerium oxide nanoparticles exhibit minimal cardiac and cytotoxicity in the freshwater fish Catostomus commersonii.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Amanda; Robertson, Anne B; Blay, Alexandra M; Butler, Kathryn M A; Callaghan, Neal I; Dieni, Christopher A; MacCormack, Tyson J

    2016-01-01

    Metal oxide nanomaterials can cause oxidative, cardiorespiratory, and osmoregulatory stress in freshwater fish. In contrast, cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2) can have antioxidant effects but their aquatic toxicity has not been fully characterized. Heart rate and heart rate variability were followed in white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) acutely exposed to 1.0mgL(-1) nCeO2 for 25h. Malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured to assess oxidative tissue damage, and plasma cortisol, glucose, lactate, and osmolality were assessed as indicators of physiological and osmoregulatory stress. There was no MDA accumulation in gill or heart of fish exposed to nCeO2 and heart function was unchanged over the 25h treatment. Plasma cortisol increased 6-fold but there was no change in plasma glucose or lactate. Cellular osmoregulatory toxicity was studied using an isolated red blood cell (RBC) model. In vitro exposure to 1.0mgL(-1) nCeO2 for 1h had no effect on cell morphological parameters and did not sensitize RBCs to hemolysis under hypotonic stress. Overall, there were no indications of oxidative, cardiorespiratory, or osmoregulatory stress following acute exposure to nCeO2. Elevated plasma cortisol levels suggest that nCeO2 may exert mild toxicity to tissues outside of the cardiorespiratory system. PMID:26743956

  8. Acentrosomal Drosophila epithelial cells exhibit abnormal cell division, leading to cell death and compensatory proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, John S; Cuningham, John C; Peifer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mitotic spindles are critical for accurate chromosome segregation. Centrosomes, the primary microtubule nucleating centers of animal cells, play key roles in forming and orienting mitotic spindles. However, the survival of Drosophila without centrosomes suggested they are dispensable in somatic cells, challenging the canonical view. We used fly wing disc epithelia as a model to resolve these conflicting hypotheses, revealing that centrosomes play vital roles in spindle assembly, function, and orientation. Many acentrosomal cells exhibit prolonged spindle assembly, chromosome mis-segregation, DNA damage, misoriented divisions, and eventual apoptosis. We found that multiple mechanisms buffer the effects of centrosome loss, including alternative microtubule nucleation pathways and the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint. Apoptosis of acentrosomal cells is mediated by JNK signaling, which also drives compensatory proliferation to maintain tissue integrity and viability. These data reveal the importance of centrosomes in fly epithelia, but also demonstrate the robust compensatory mechanisms at the cellular and organismal level. PMID:25241934

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Quantitation by Whole Cell Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Aric W; Jeerage, Kavita M; Schwartz, Cindi L; Curtin, Alexandra E; Chiaramonti, Ann N

    2015-12-22

    Many proposed biomedical applications for engineered gold nanoparticles require their incorporation by mammalian cells in specific numbers and locations. Here, the number of gold nanoparticles inside of individual mammalian stem cells was characterized using fast focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy based tomography. Enhanced optical microscopy was used to provide a multiscale map of the in vitro sample, which allows cells of interest to be identified within their local environment. Cells were then serially sectioned using a gallium ion beam and imaged using a scanning electron beam. To confirm the accuracy of single cross sections, nanoparticles in similar cross sections were imaged using transmission electron microscopy and scanning helium ion microscopy. Complete tomographic series were then used to count the nanoparticles inside of each cell and measure their spatial distribution. We investigated the influence of slice thickness on counting single particles and clusters as well as nanoparticle packing within clusters. For 60 nm citrate stabilized particles, the nanoparticle cluster packing volume is 2.15 0.20 times the volume of the bare gold nanoparticles. PMID:26563983

  10. Cytotoxicity of monodispersed chitosan nanoparticles against the Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Jing Wen; Saunders, Martin; Lim, Lee-Yong; School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley 6009

    2012-08-01

    Published toxicology data on chitosan nanoparticles (NP) often lack direct correlation to the in situ size and surface characteristics of the nanoparticles, and the repeated NP assaults as experienced in chronic use. The aim of this paper was to breach these gaps. Chitosan nanoparticles synthesized by spinning disc processing were characterised for size and zeta potential in HBSS and EMEM at pHs 6.0 and 7.4. Cytotoxicity against the Caco-2 cells was evaluated by measuring the changes in intracellular mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, TEER and sodium fluorescein transport data and cell morphology. Cellular uptake of NP was observed under the confocal microscope. Contrary to established norms, the collective data suggest that the in vitro cytotoxicity of NP against the Caco-2 cells was less influenced by positive surface charges than by the particle size. Particle size was in turn determined by the pH of the medium in which the NP was dispersed, with the mean size ranging from 25 to 333 nm. At exposure concentration of 0.1%, NP of 25 ± 7 nm (zeta potential 5.3 ± 2.8 mV) was internalised by the Caco-2 cells, and the particles were observed to inflict extensive damage to the intracellular organelles. Concurrently, the transport of materials along the paracellular pathway was significantly facilitated. The Caco-2 cells were, however, capable of recovering from such assaults 5 days following NP removal, although a repeat NP exposure was observed to produce similar effects to the 1st exposure, with the cells exhibiting comparable resiliency to the 2nd assault. -- Highlights: ► Chitosan nanoparticles reduced mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. ► Cellular uptake of chitosan nanoparticles was observed. ► Chitosan nanoparticles inflicted extensive damage to the cell morphology. ► The transport of materials along the paracellular pathway was facilitated.

  11. Induced T cell cytokine production is enhanced by engineered nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weimin; Zhang, Quanxuan; Kaplan, Barbara L. F.; Baker, Gregory L.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are widely used in commercial products, and yet due to the paucity of safety information, there are concerns surrounding potential adverse health effects, especially from inhaled nanoparticles and their putative contribution to allergic airway disease. The objective of this study was to investigate whether size or surface chemistry of engineered nanoparticles can influence the immune enhancing properties of these agents on antigen-specific T cell responses. Ovalbumin (OVA)-derived peptides were presented to T cells by either spleen-derived endogenous antigen presenting cells or a mouse dendritic cell (DC) line, DC2.4. In all models, interferon (IFN)-? and interleukin (IL)-2 production by CD8+ or CD4+ T cells in response to peptide OVA257264 or OVA323339, respectively, was measured by flow cytometry. To address the study objective, silica nanoparticles (SNPs) were modified with alkyne-terminated surfaces and appended with polyethylene glycol chains via click chemistry. These modified SNPs were resistant to agglomerate in in vitro culture media, suggesting that their modulation of T cell responses is the result of true nanoscale-mediated effects. Under conditions of suboptimal T-cell activation, modified SNPs (up to 10 ?g/ml) enhanced the proportion of CD8+, but not CD4+, T cells producing IFN-? and IL-2. Various functional groups (COOH, NH2 and OH) on modified SNPs enhanced IFN-? and IL-2 production to different levels, with COOH SNPs being the most effective. Furthermore, 51 nm COOH SNPs exhibited a greater enhancing effect on the CD8+ T cell response than other sized particles. Collectively, our results show that modified SNPs can enhance antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, suggesting that certain modified SNPs exhibit potential adjuvant-like properties. PMID:24256152

  12. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-?-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes or pores in the cell membrane. The dissipation changes were small, which indicates that even with the membrane destabilization that occurs, the overall structure of the bilayer is not greatly perturbed. For the 80 nm nanoparticles, we initially saw the same pattern as the smaller nanoparticles with a mass loss from the membrane, but eventually we saw a large decrease in frequency, representing an increase in mass. This addition of mass may be attributed to adsorption of the gold nanoparticles onto the bilayer. The 80 nm particles also created a change in the energy dissipation, which suggests that the formation of the bilayer was altered with the adsorbed particles. This study suggests that nanoparticle size controls the mechanism by which nanoparticles interact with model cell membranes. We are extending this work to other types of gold nanoparticles. We are interested in examining the role of nanoparticle hydrophobicity and type of chemical functionalization on the interactions of the nanoparticle with a model membrane. We are also conducting studies on environmental bacteria, to correlate the mechanisms of nanoparticle cytoxicity with killing data on bacterial cells.

  13. Enhancement of cell radiation sensitivity by pegylated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chi-Jen; Wang, Chang-Hai; Chen, Shin-Tai; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Leng, Wei-Hua; Chien, Chia-Chi; Wang, Cheng-Liang; Kempson, Ivan M.; Hwu, Y.; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Hsiao, Michael; Yang, Chung-Shi; Chen, Yu-Jen; Margaritondo, G.

    2010-02-01

    Biocompatible Au nanoparticles with surfaces modified by PEG (polyethylene glycol) were developed in view of possible applications for the enhancement of radiotherapy. Such nanoparticles exhibit preferential deposition at tumor sites due to the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. Here, we systematically studied their effects on EMT-6 and CT26 cell survival rates during irradiation for a dose up to 10 Gy with a commercial biological irradiator (Eaverage = 73 keV), a Cu-K?1 x-ray source (8.048 keV), a monochromatized synchrotron source (6.5 keV), a radio-oncology linear accelerator (6 MeV) and a proton source (3 MeV). The percentage of surviving cells after irradiation was found to decrease by ~2-45% in the presence of PEG-Au nanoparticles ([Au] = 400, 500 or 1000 M). The cell survival rates decreased as a function of the dose for all sources and nanoparticle concentrations. These results could open the way to more effective cancer irradiation therapies by using nanoparticles with optimized surface treatment. Difficulties in applying MTT assays were also brought to light, showing that this approach is not suitable for radiobiology.

  14. Encapsulation of plasmid DNA in calcium phosphate nanoparticles: stem cell uptake and gene transfer efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xia; Deng, Wenwen; Wei, Yuan; Su, Weiyan; Yang, Yan; Wei, Yawei; Yu, Jiangnan; Xu, Ximing

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to develop calcium phosphate nanocomposite particles encapsulating plasmid DNA (CP-pDNA) nanoparticles as a nonviral vector for gene delivery. Methods CP-pDNA nanoparticles employing plasmid transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-?1) were prepared and characterized. The transfection efficiency and cell viability of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles were evaluated in mesenchymal stem cells, which were identified by immunofluorescence staining. Cytotoxicity of plasmid TGF-?1 and calcium phosphate to mesenchymal stem cells were evaluated by MTT assay. Results The integrity of TGF-?1 encapsulated in the CP-pDNA nanoparticles was maintained. The well dispersed CP-pDNA nanoparticles exhibited an ultralow particle size (2050 nm) and significantly lower cytotoxicity than Lipofectamine 2000. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the cultured cells in this study were probably mesenchymal stem cells. The cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles into the mesenchymal stem cells were higher than that of needle-like calcium phosphate nanoparticles and a standard calcium phosphate transfection kit. Furthermore, live cell imaging and confocal laser microscopy vividly showed the transportation process of the CP-pDNA nanoparticles in mesenchymal stem cells. The results of a cytotoxicity assay found that both plasmid TGF-?1 and calcium phosphate were not toxic to mesenchymal stem cells. Conclusion CP-pDNA nanoparticles can be developed into an effective alternative as a nonviral gene delivery system that is highly efficient and has low cytotoxicity. PMID:22229000

  15. Modeling of interactions between nanoparticles and cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Young-Min

    Rapid development of nanotechnology and ability to manufacture materials and devices with nanometer feature size leads to exciting innovations in many areas including the medical and electronic fields. However, the possible health and environmental impacts of manufactured nanomaterials are not fully known. Recent experimental reports suggest that some of the manufactured nanomaterials, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, are highly toxic even in small concentrations. The goal of the current work is to understand the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of nanomaterials. In the current study coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the interactions between NPs and cellular membranes at a molecular level. One of the possible toxicity mechanisms of the nanomaterials is membrane disruption. Possibility of membrane disruption exposed to the manufactured nanomaterials are examined by considering chemical reactions and non-reactive physical interactions as chemical as well as physical mechanisms. Mechanisms of transport of carbon-based nanoparticles (fullerene and its derivative) across a phospholipid bilayer are investigated. The free energy profile is obtained using constrained simulations. It is shown that the considered nanoparticles are hydrophobic and therefore they tend to reside in the interior of the lipid bilayer. In addition, the dynamics of the membrane fluctuations is significantly affected by the nanoparticles at the bilayer-water interface. The hydrophobic interaction between the particles and membrane core induces the strong coupling between the nanoparticle motion and membrane deformation. It is observed that the considered nanoparticles affect several physical properties of the membrane. The nanoparticles embedded into the membrane interior lead to the membrane softening, which becomes more significant with increase in CNT length and concentration. The lateral pressure profile and membrane energy in the membrane containing the nanoparticles exhibit localized perturbation around the nanoparticle. The nanoparticles are not likely to affect membrane protein function by the weak perturbation of the internal stress in the membrane. Due to the short-ranged interactions between the nanoparticles, the nanoparticles would not form aggregates inside membranes. The effect of lipid peroxidation on cell membrane deformation is assessed. The peroxidized lipids introduce a perturbation to the internal structure of the membrane leading to higher amplitude of the membrane fluctuations. Higher concentration of the peroxidized lipids induces more significant perturbation. Cumulative effects of lipid peroxidation caused by nanoparticles are examined for the first time. The considered amphiphilic particle appears to reduce the perturbation of the membrane structure at its equilibrium position inside the peroxidized membrane. This suggests a possibility of antioxidant effect of the nanoparticle.

  16. Ultraviolet Plasmonic Chirality from Colloidal Aluminum Nanoparticles Exhibiting Charge-Selective Protein Detection.

    PubMed

    McPeak, Kevin M; van Engers, Christian D; Bianchi, Sarah; Rossinelli, Aurelio; Poulikakos, Lisa V; Bernard, Laetitia; Herrmann, Sven; Kim, David K; Burger, Sven; Blome, Mark; Jayanti, Sriharsha V; Norris, David J

    2015-10-28

    Chiral aluminum nanoparticles, dispersed in water, are prepared, which provide strong ultraviolet plasmonic circular dichroism, high-energy superchiral near-fields, and charge-selective protein detection. PMID:26384604

  17. Kupffer Cell Isolation for Nanoparticle Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Bourgognon, Maxime; Klippstein, Rebecca; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2015-01-01

    The large majority of in vitro nanotoxicological studies have used immortalized cell lines for their practicality. However, results from nanoparticle toxicity testing in immortalized cell lines or primary cells have shown discrepancies, highlighting the need to extend the use of primary cells for in vitro assays. This protocol describes the isolation of mouse liver macrophages, named Kupffer cells, and their use to study nanoparticle toxicity. Kupffer cells are the most abundant macrophage population in the body and constitute part of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES), responsible for the capture of circulating nanoparticles. The Kupffer cell isolation method reported here is based on a 2-step perfusion method followed by purification on density gradient. The method, based on collagenase digestion and density centrifugation, is adapted from the original protocol developed by Smedsrd et al. designed for rat liver cell isolation and provides high yield (up to 14 x 10(6) cells per mouse) and high purity (>95%) of Kupffer cells. This isolation method does not require sophisticated or expensive equipment and therefore represents an ideal compromise between complexity and cell yield. The use of heavier mice (35-45 g) improves the yield of the isolation method but also facilitates remarkably the procedure of portal vein cannulation. The toxicity of functionalized carbon nanotubes f-CNTs was measured in this model by the modified LDH assay. This method assesses cell viability by measuring the lack of structural integrity of Kupffer cell membrane after incubation with f-CNTs. Toxicity induced by f-CNTs can be measured consistently using this assay, highlighting that isolated Kupffer cells are useful for nanoparticle toxicity testing. The overall understanding of nanotoxicology could benefit from such models, making the nanoparticle selection for clinical translation more efficient. PMID:26327223

  18. Stem cell tracking with optically active nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Cui, Yan; Chan, Jerry KY; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies hold promise and potential to address many unmet clinical needs. Cell tracking with modern imaging modalities offers insight into the underlying biological process of the stem-cell-based therapies, with the goal to reveal cell survival, migration, homing, engraftment, differentiation, and functions. Adaptability, sensitivity, resolution, and non-invasiveness have contributed to the longstanding use of optical imaging for stem cell tracking and analysis. To identify transplanted stem cells from the host tissue, optically active probes are usually used to label stem cells before the administration. In comparison to the traditional fluorescent probes like fluorescent proteins and dyes, nanoparticle-based probes are advantageous in terms of the photo-stabilities and minimal changes to the cell phenotype. The main focus here is to overview the recent development of optically active nanoparticles for stem cells tracking. The related optical imaging modalities include fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging. PMID:23638335

  19. Lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite exhibit diverse neurotoxic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy

    Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are one of the components of Lunar soil simulants. Neurotoxic potential of lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite was analyzed. The size of particles, their effects on membrane potential, acidification of synaptic vesicles, uptake and ambient level of glutamate, which is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS, were studied in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) using photon correlation spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, radiolabeled assay, respectively. No significant effect of Lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite on acidification of synaptic vesicles were found in synaptosomes. Also, nanoparticles did not influence the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. Unspecific binding of L-[14C]glutamate to synaptosomes was not altered by nanoparticles of magnetite, whereas in the presence of Lunar soil simulant this parameter was changed. Thus, it was suggested that Lunar soil simulant might disturb glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS.

  20. Organically Modified Silica Nanoparticles Interaction with Macrophage Cells: Assessment of Cell Viability on the Basis of Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Keshvan, Prashant C; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Mitra, Susmita

    2015-11-01

    Silica nanoparticles have drawn a lot of attention for nanomedicine application, and this is attributed to their biocompatibility and ease of surface functionalization. However, successful utilization of these inorganic systems for biomedical application depends on their physicochemical properties. This study, therefore, discusses in vitro toxicity of organically modified silica nanoparticles on the basis of size, shape, and surface properties of silica nanoparticles. Spherical- and oval-shaped nanoparticles having hydroxyl and amine groups were synthesized in Tween 80 micelles using different organosilanes. Nanoparticles of similar size and morphology were considered for comparative assessment. "As-prepared" nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, shape, and surface properties using ZetaSizer, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared to establish the above parameters. In vitro analysis in terms of nanoparticle-based toxicity was performed on J-774 (macrophage) cell line using propidium iodide-4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindol and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Fluorescent dye-entrapped nanoparticles were used to visualize the uptake of the nanoparticles by macrophage cells. Results from cell studies suggested low levels of toxicity for different nanoparticle formulations studied, therefore are suitable for nanocarrier application for poorly soluble molecules. On the contrary, the nanoparticles of similar size and shape, having amine groups and low net negative charge, do not exhibit any in vitro cytotoxicity. PMID:26295279

  1. Histone H1 null vertebrate cells exhibit altered nucleosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Takami, Yasunari; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Iwano, Hidetomo; Tachibana, Makoto; Takeda, Shunichi; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic nuclei, DNA is wrapped around an octamer of core histones to form nucleosomes, and chromatin fibers are thought to be stabilized by linker histones of the H1 type. Higher eukaryotes express multiple variants of histone H1; chickens possess six H1 variants. Here, we generated and analyzed the phenotype of a complete deletion of histone H1 genes in chicken cells. The H1-null cells showed decreased global nucleosome spacing, expanded nuclear volumes, and increased chromosome aberration rates, although proper mitotic chromatin structure appeared to be maintained. Expression array analysis revealed that the transcription of multiple genes was affected and was mostly downregulated in histone H1-deficient cells. This report describes the first histone H1 complete knockout cells in vertebrates and suggests that linker histone H1, while not required for mitotic chromatin condensation, plays important roles in nucleosome spacing and interphase chromatin compaction and acts as a global transcription regulator. PMID:20156997

  2. Modified Bleomycin Disaccharides Exhibiting Improved Tumor Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bleomycins (BLMs) are a family of antitumor antibiotics used clinically for anticancer chemotherapy. Their antitumor selectivity derives at least in part from their ability to target tumor cells, a property that resides in the carbohydrate moiety of the antitumor agent. In earlier studies, we have demonstrated that the tumor cell selectivity resides in the mannose carbamoyl moiety of the BLM saccharide and that both the BLM disaccharide and monosaccharide containing the carbamoyl moiety were capable of the delivery/uptake of a conjugated cyanine dye into cultured cancer cell lines. Presently, the nature of the participation of the carbamoyl moiety has been explored further to provide compounds of utility for defining the nature of the mechanism of tumor cell recognition and uptake by BLM saccharides and in the hope that more efficient compounds could be identified. A library of seven disaccharideCy5** dye conjugates was prepared that are structural analogues of the BLM disaccharide. These differed from the natural BLM disaccharide in the position, orientation, and substitution of the carbamoyl group. Studies of these compounds in four matched sets of tumor and normal cell lines revealed a few that were both tumor cell selective and internalized 24-fold more efficiently than the natural BLM disaccharide. PMID:25272367

  3. Variation in the uptake of nanoparticles by monolayer cultured cells using high resolution MeV ion beam imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ye; Mi, Zhaohong; Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Chen, Ce-Belle; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Watt, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Gold nanoparticle uptake by cells is being increasingly studied because of its potential in biomedical applications. In this work, we show how scanning transmission ion microscopy can be employed to visualize and quantify 50 nm gold nanoparticles taken up by individual cells. Preliminary studies have indicated that the cellular content of gold nanoparticles exhibits a wide variation (up to a factor of 10) among individual cells. This cell-to-cell variation can affect the efficiency of utilizing gold nanoparticles for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes.

  4. Nitric oxide-releasing silica nanoparticle inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Ellen V.; Wells, Alexis; Shin, Jae Ho; Liu, Jinsong; Der, Channing J.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Although the potent anti-tumor activity of nitric oxide (NO) supports its promise as an anti-neoplastic agent, effective and selective delivery and action on tumor and not normal cells remains a limiting factor. Nanoparticle-based delivery of NO has been considered as one approach to overcome these limitations. Therefore, we determined the utility of NO delivery using silica nanoparticles and evaluated their anti-tumor efficacy against human ovarian tumor and nontumor cells. The NO-releasing nanoparticles exhibited enhanced growth inhibition of ovarian tumor cells when compared to both control nanoparticles and a previously reported small molecule NO donor, PYRRO/NO. In addition, the NO-releasing nanoparticles showed greater inhibition of the anchorage-independent growth of tumor-derived and Ras-transformed ovarian cells. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that fluorescently-labeled NO-releasing nanoparticles entered the cytosol of the cell and localized to late endosomes and lysosomes. Furthermore, we observed a nanoparticle size dependency on efficacy against normal versus transformed ovarian cells. Our study provides the first application of nanoparticle-derived NO as an antitumor therapy and supports the merit for future studies examining nanoparticle formulation for in vivo applications. PMID:20205473

  5. Imaging nanoparticles in cells by nanomechanical holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Venmar, Katherine T.; Lynch, Rachel M.; Voy, Brynn H.; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Thundat, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Nanomaterials have potential medical applications, for example in the area of drug delivery, and their possible adverse effects and cytotoxicity are curently receiving attention. Inhalation of nanoparticles is of great concern, because nanoparticles can be easily aerosolized. Imaging techniques that can visualize local populations of nanoparticles at nanometre resolution within the structures of cells are therefore important. Here we show that cells obtained from mice exposed to single-walled carbon nanohorns can be probed using a scanning probe microscopy technique called scanning near field ultrasonic holography. The nanohorns were observed inside the cells, and this was further confirmed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Scanning near field ultrasonic holography is a useful technique for probing the interactions of engineered nanomaterials in biological systems, which will greatly benefit areas in drug delivery and nanotoxicology.

  6. Imaging nanoparticles in cells by nanomechanical holography

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Venmar, Katherine T; Lynch, Rachel M; Voy, Brynn H; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Thundat, Thomas George

    2008-06-01

    Nanomaterials have potential medical applications, for example in the area of drug delivery, and their possible adverse effects and cytotoxicity are curently receiving attention1,2. Inhalation of nanoparticles is of great concern, because nanoparticles can be easily aerosolized. Imaging techniques that can visualize local populations of nanoparticles at nanometre resolution within the structures of cells are therefore important3. Here we show that cells obtained from mice exposed to single-walled carbon nanohorns can be probed using a scanning probe microscopy technique called scanning near field ultrasonic holography. The nanohorns were observed inside the cells, and this was further confirmed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Scanning near field ultrasonic holography is a useful technique for probing the interactions of engineered nanomaterials in biological systems, which will greatly benefit areas in drug delivery and nanotoxicology.

  7. Mammalian cell growth on gold nanoparticle-decorated substrates is influenced by the nanoparticle coating

    PubMed Central

    Rosman, Christina; Pierrat, Sebastien; Tarantola, Marco; Schneider, David; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work, we study epithelial cell growth on substrates decorated with gold nanorods that are functionalized either with a positively charged cytotoxic surfactant or with a biocompatible polymer exhibiting one of two different end groups, resulting in a neutral or negative surface charge of the particle. Upon observation of cell growth for three days by live cell imaging using optical dark field microscopy, it was found that all particles supported cell adhesion while no directed cell migration and no significant particle internalization occurred. Concerning cell adhesion and spreading as compared to cell growth on bare substrates after 3 days of incubation, a reduction by 45% and 95%, respectively, for the surfactant particle coating was observed, whereas the amino-terminated polymer induced a reduction by 30% and 40%, respectively, which is absent for the carboxy-terminated polymer. Furthermore, interface-sensitive impedance spectroscopy (electric cell–substrate impedance sensing, ECIS) was employed in order to investigate the micromotility of cells added to substrates decorated with various amounts of surfactant-coated particles. A surface density of 65 particles/µm2 (which corresponds to 0.5% of surface coverage with nanoparticles) diminishes micromotion by 25% as compared to bare substrates after 35 hours of incubation. We conclude that the surface coating of the gold nanorods, which were applied to the basolateral side of the cells, has a recognizable influence on the growth behavior and thus the coating should be carefully selected for biomedical applications of nanoparticles. PMID:25671143

  8. Glucose transporter 1-positive endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma exhibit features of facultative stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lan; Nakayama, Hironao; Klagsbrun, Michael; Mulliken, John B.; Bischoff, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is a definitive and diagnostic marker for infantile hemangioma (IH), a vascular tumor of infancy. To date, GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in IH have not been quantified nor directly isolated and studied. We isolated GLUT1-positive and GLUT1-negative endothelial cells from IH specimens and characterized their proliferation, differentiation and response to propranolol, a first-line therapy for IH, and to rapamycin, an mTOR pathway inhibitor used to treat an increasingly wide array of proliferative disorders. Although freshly isolated GLUT1-positive cells, selected using anti-GLUT1 magnetic beads, expressed endothelial markers CD31, VE-Cadherin and VEGFR2, they converted to a mesenchymal phenotype after three weeks in culture. In contrast, GLUT1-negative endothelial cells exhibited a stable endothelial phenotype in vitro. GLUT1-selected cells were clonogenic when plated as single cells and could be induced to re-differentiate into endothelial cells, or into pericyte/smooth muscle cells or into adipocytes, indicating a stem cell-like phenotype. These data demonstrate that, although they appear and function in the tumor as bona fide endothelial cells, the GLUT1-positive endothelial cells display properties of facultative stem cells. Pretreatment with rapamycin for 4 days significantly slowed proliferation of GLUT1-selected cells, whereas propranolol pretreatment had no effect. These results reveal for the first time the facultative nature of GLUT1-positive endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma. PMID:25187207

  9. Application of fluorescence labeled liposome nanoparticles in the cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianbing; Li, Huimin; He, Xiaoxiao; Gong, Ping; Wang, Kemin; Zhang, Shouchun

    2007-05-01

    Fluorescence labeled liposome nanoparticles were prepared by dispersion of film method. The size of nanoparticles was around 50 nm. DPPE-FITC synthesized in our lab was used to label the liposome nanoparticles. Anti-cytokeratins 19 antibody was connected to the surface of the fluorescence liposome nanoparticles. After incubation with MGC cells and COS-7 cells for 30 min, MGC cells were selectively recognized by anti-cytokeratins 19 antibody modified liposome nanoparticles and well imaged under laser confocal microscope. This fluorescence labeled liposome nanoparticles is expected to have good applications in cell recognition and tumor diagnosis.

  10. Interaction of dermatologically relevant nanoparticles with skin cells and skin

    PubMed Central

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Nazemi, Berouz; Choe, Chun Sik; Darvin, Maxim E; Hadam, Sabrina; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Loza, Kateryna; Diendorf, Jrg; Epple, Matthias; Graf, Christina; Rhl, Eckart; Meinke, Martina C; Lademann, Jrgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary The investigation of nanoparticle interactions with tissues is complex. High levels of standardization, ideally testing of different material types in the same biological model, and combinations of sensitive imaging and detection methods are required. Here, we present our studies on nanoparticle interactions with skin, skin cells, and biological media. Silica, titanium dioxide and silver particles were chosen as representative examples for different types of skin exposure to nanomaterials, e.g., unintended environmental exposure (silica) versus intended exposure through application of sunscreen (titanium dioxide) or antiseptics (silver). Because each particle type exhibits specific physicochemical properties, we were able to apply different combinations of methods to examine skin penetration and cellular uptake, including optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy on cells and tissue sections, flow cytometry of isolated skin cells as well as Raman microscopy on whole tissue blocks. In order to assess the biological relevance of such findings, cell viability and free radical production were monitored on cells and in whole tissue samples. The combination of technologies and the joint discussion of results enabled us to look at nanoparticleskin interactions and the biological relevance of our findings from different angles. PMID:25551064

  11. Biomedical potential of silver nanoparticles synthesized from calli cells of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasingly common application is the use of silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial coatings, wound dressings, and biomedical devices. In this present investigation, we report, biomedical potential of silver nanopaticles synthesized from calli extract of Citrullus colocynthis on Human epidermoid larynx carcinoma (HEp -2) cell line. Methods The callus extract react with silver nitrate solution confirmed silver nanoparticles synthesis through the steady change of greenish colour to reddish brown and characterized by using FT-IR, AFM. Toxicity on HEp 2 cell line assessed using MTT assay, caspase -3 assay, Lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay and DNA fragmentation assay. Results The synthesized silver nanoparticles were generally found to be spherical in shape with size 31 nm by AFM. The molar concentration of the silver nanoparticles solution in our present study is 1100 nM/10 mL. The results exhibit that silver nanoparticles mediate a dose-dependent toxicity for the cell tested, and the silver nanoparticles at 500 nM decreased the viability of HEp 2 cells to 50% of the initial level. LDH activities found to be significantly elevated after 48 h of exposure in the medium containing silver nanoparticles when compared to the control and Caspase 3 activation suggested that silver nanoparticles caused cell death through apoptosis, which was further supported by cellular DNA fragmentation, showed that the silver nanoparticles treated HEp2 cells exhibited extensive double strand breaks, thereby yielding a ladder appearance (Lane 2), while the DNA of control HEp2 cells supplemented with 10% serum exhibited minimum breakage (Lane 1). This study revealed completely would eliminate the use of expensive drug for cancer treatment. PMID:21943321

  12. Biological cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report a manipulation of biological cells (erythrocytes) by magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The experiment was accomplished on the top of a micro-electromagnet consisting of two magnetic field generating contours. An electric current flowing through the contour(s) produces a non-uniform magnetic field, which is about 1.4 mT/μm in strength at 100 mA current in the vicinity of the current-carrying wire. In responses to the magnetic field, magnetic nanoparticles move towards the systems energy minima. In turn, magnetic nanoparticles drag biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data showing cell manipulation through the control of electric current. This technique allows us to capture and move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, whose frequency is controlled by an electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of non-destructive cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles with micrometer-scale precision.

  13. Radiosensitization of paclitaxel, etanidazole and paclitaxel+etanidazole nanoparticles on hypoxic human tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Bai, Ling; Wu, Hong; Tian, Furong; Guo, Guozhen

    2007-09-01

    Paclitaxel and etanidazole are hypoxic radiosensitizers that exhibit cytotoxic action at different mechanisms. The poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing paclitaxel, etanidazole and paclitaxel+etanidazole were prepared by o/w and w/o/w emulsification-solvent evaporation method. The morphology of the nanoparticles was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The drug encapsulation efficiency (EE) and release profile in vitro were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The cellular uptake of nanoparticles for the human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7) and the human carcinoma cervicis cells (HeLa) was evaluated by transmission electronic microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Cell viability was determined by the ability of single cell to form colonies in vitro. The prepared nanoparticles were spherical shape with size between 80 and 150 nm. The EE was higher for paclitaxel and lower for etanidazole. The drug release was controlled over time. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was observed. Co-culture of the two tumor cell lines with drug-loaded nanoparticles demonstrated that released drug effectively sensitized hypoxic tumor cells to radiation. The radiosensitization of paclitaxel+etanidazole nanoparticles was more significant than that of single drug-loaded nanoparticles. PMID:17509678

  14. Air stable organic-inorganic nanoparticles hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Lei; Yang, Jihua; Xue, Jiangeng; Holloway, Paul H.

    2015-09-29

    A solar cell includes a low work function cathode, an active layer of an organic-inorganic nanoparticle composite, a ZnO nanoparticle layer situated between and physically contacting the cathode and active layers; and a transparent high work function anode that is a bilayer electrode. The inclusion of the ZnO nanoparticle layer results in a solar cell displaying a conversion efficiency increase and reduces the device degradation rate. Embodiments of the invention are directed to novel ZnO nanoparticles that are advantageous for use as the ZnO nanoparticle layers of the novel solar cells and a method to prepare the ZnO nanoparticles.

  15. Nanoparticle Solar Cell Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Breeze, Alison, J; Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Reddy, Damoder; Sholin, Veronica; Carter, Sue

    2008-06-17

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells with photovoltaic performance extending into the near-IR region of the solar spectrum as a pathway towards improving power conversion efficiencies. The field of all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells is very new, with only one literature publication in the prior to our project. Very little is understood regarding how these devices function. Inorganic solar cells with IR performance have previously been fabricated using traditional methods such as physical vapor deposition and sputtering, and solution-processed devices utilizing IR-absorbing organic polymers have been investigated. The solution-based deposition of nanoparticles offers the potential of a low-cost manufacturing process combined with the ability to tune the chemical synthesis and material properties to control the device properties. This work, in collaboration with the Sue Carter research group at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has greatly expanded the knowledge base in this field, exploring multiple material systems and several key areas of device physics including temperature, bandgap and electrode device behavior dependence, material morphological behavior, and the role of buffer layers. One publication has been accepted to Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells pending minor revision and another two papers are being written now. While device performance in the near-IR did not reach the level anticipated at the beginning of this grant, we did observe one of the highest near-IR efficiencies for a nanoparticle-based solar cell device to date. We also identified several key parameters of importance for improving both near-IR performance and nanoparticle solar cells in general, and demonstrated multiple pathways which showed promise for future commercialization with further research.

  16. Femto-, pico- and nano-second refractive nonlinearities exhibited by Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Torres, C.; Tamayo Rivera, L.; Rangel-Rojo, R.; Reyes Esqueda, J. A.; Cheang-Wong, J. C.; Rodrguez-Fernndez, L.; Crespo-Sosa, A.; Oliver, A.

    2011-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have proven to be powerful tools in various ultrafast photonic, plasmonic and nanomedical applications. Numerous advances in the use of AuNPs include research on their interesting and remarkably fast changes influenced by Surface Plasmon Resonance excitations. Within this work we report theoretical and experimental results for the physical mechanisms that originate a nonlinearity of refractive index during different temporal regimes for a high-purity silica matrix containing Au nanoparticles. The nanocomposites were prepared by ion implantation into a silica matrix, followed by a thermal annealing. We used an optical Kerr gate with 80 fs pulses at 830 nm and a vectorial self-diffraction technique with 26 ps and with 7 ns at 532 nm in order to investigate the magnitude and response time of the resulting third order nonlinearity. In all cases we were able to measure and identify an electronic polarization responsible for the nonlinear refraction. For the pico- and nano-second near resonance irradiations, a contribution of a thermal effect could be stimulated and then the optical Kerr response enhanced. The presence of saturable absorption for the pico- and nano-second experiments was measured. We observe that our samples behave like waveguides in the near infrared spectrum and we estimate that they posses potential applications for all-optical switching devices.

  17. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy. PMID:25492003

  18. Colloidal Nanoparticles for Intermediate Band Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Vrs, Mrton; Galli, Giulia; Zimanyi, Gergely T

    2015-07-28

    The Intermediate Band (IB) solar cell concept is a promising idea to transcend the Shockley-Queisser limit. Using the results of first-principles calculations, we propose that colloidal nanoparticles (CNPs) are a viable and efficient platform for the implementation of the IB solar cell concept. We focused on CdSe CNPs and we showed that intragap states present in the isolated CNPs with reconstructed surfaces combine to form an IB in arrays of CNPs, which is well separated from the valence and conduction band edges. We demonstrated that optical transitions to and from the IB are active. We also showed that the IB can be electron doped in a solution, e.g., by decamethylcobaltocene, thus activating an IB-induced absorption process. Our results, together with the recent report of a nearly 10% efficient CNP solar cell, indicate that colloidal nanoparticle intermediate band solar cells are a promising platform to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit. PMID:26042468

  19. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:25216521

  20. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2014-08-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:25216521

  1. Au nanoparticle/DNA rotaxane hybrid nanostructures exhibiting switchable fluorescence properties.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Alessandro; Lu, Chun-Hua; Elbaz, Johann; Willner, Itamar

    2013-01-01

    The preparation of a DNA rotaxane consisting of a circular nucleic acid interlocked, through hybridization, on a nucleic acid axle and stoppered by two 10-nm-sized Au nanoparticles (NPs) is described. By the tethering of 5-nm- or 15-nm-sized Au NPs on the ring, the supramolecular structure of the rotaxane is confirmed. Using nucleic acids as "fuels" and "anti-fuels", the cyclic and reversible transition of the rotaxane ring across two states is demonstrated. By the functionalization of the ring with fluorophore-modified nucleic acids in different orientations, the transitions of the rings between the sites are followed by fluorescence quenching or surface-enhanced fluorescence. The experimental results are supported by theoretical modeling. PMID:24245996

  2. Hybrid silver nanoparticle/conjugated polyelectrolyte nanocomposites exhibiting controllable metal-enhanced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; He, Fang; Zhu, Xi; Tang, Fu; Li, Lidong

    2014-03-01

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence of conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPs) is realized using a simple, green hybrid Ag nanocomposite film. Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are pre-prepared by sodium citrate reduction and incorporated into agarose by mixing to form an Ag-containing agarose film (Ag@agarose). Through variation of the amount of Ag NPs in the Ag@agarose film as well as the thickness of the interlayer between CPs and the Ag@agarose film prepared of layer-by-layer assembly of chitosan and sodium alginate, a maximum 8.5-fold increase in the fluorescence of CPs is obtained. After introducing tyrosinase, this system also can be used to detect phenolic compounds with high sensitivity and good visualization under ultraviolet light.

  3. Controlled self-assembly of multiferroic core-shell nanoparticles exhibiting strong magneto-electric effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Hamilton, Sean L.; Lehto, Piper R.; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Popov, Maksym; Chavez, Ferman A.

    2014-02-03

    Ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composites show strain mediated coupling between the magnetic and electric sub-systems due to magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects associated with the ferroic phases. We have synthesized core-shell multiferroic nano-composites by functionalizing 10–100 nm barium titanate and nickel ferrite nanoparticles with complementary coupling groups and allowing them to self-assemble in the presence of a catalyst. The core-shell structure was confirmed by electron microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Evidence for strong strain mediated magneto-electric coupling was obtained by static magnetic field induced variations in the permittivity over 16–18 GHz and polarization and by electric field induced by low-frequency ac magnetic fields.

  4. Hybrid silver nanoparticle/conjugated polyelectrolyte nanocomposites exhibiting controllable metal-enhanced fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyu; He, Fang; Zhu, Xi; Tang, Fu; Li, Lidong

    2014-01-01

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence of conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPs) is realized using a simple, green hybrid Ag nanocomposite film. Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are pre-prepared by sodium citrate reduction and incorporated into agarose by mixing to form an Ag-containing agarose film (Ag@agarose). Through variation of the amount of Ag NPs in the Ag@agarose film as well as the thickness of the interlayer between CPs and the Ag@agarose film prepared of layer-by-layer assembly of chitosan and sodium alginate, a maximum 8.5-fold increase in the fluorescence of CPs is obtained. After introducing tyrosinase, this system also can be used to detect phenolic compounds with high sensitivity and good visualization under ultraviolet light. PMID:24638208

  5. Nanoparticle-based monitoring of cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenjie; Mu, Luye; Roes, Isaac; Miranda-Nieves, David; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Ankrum, James A; Zhao, Weian; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2011-12-01

    Exogenous cell therapy aims to replace/repair diseased or dysfunctional cells and promises to revolutionize medicine by restoring tissue and organ function. To develop effective cell therapy, the location, distribution and long-term persistence of transplanted cells must be evaluated. Nanoparticle (NP) based imaging technologies have the potential to track transplanted cells non-invasively. Here we summarize the most recent advances in NP-based cell tracking with emphasis on (1) the design criteria for cell tracking NPs, (2) protocols for cell labeling, (3) a comparison of available imaging modalities and their corresponding contrast agents, (4) a summary of preclinical studies on NP-based cell tracking and finally (5) perspectives and future directions. PMID:22101191

  6. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of carbon-based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, in human glioblastoma and hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Samluk, Anna; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, S?awomir; Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, Andr; Pijanowska, Dorota Genowefa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests. PMID:25816103

  7. Analysis of the Cytotoxicity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles, Diamond and Graphite, in Human Glioblastoma and Hepatoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, S?awomir; Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, Andr; Pijanowska, Dorota Genowefa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests. PMID:25816103

  8. DNA-Assembled Nanoparticle Rings Exhibit Electric and Magnetic Resonances at Visible Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures can be used to manipulate light on the subwavelength scale to create tailored optical material properties. Next to electric responses, artificial optical magnetism is of particular interest but difficult to achieve at visible wavelengths. DNA-self-assembly has proved to serve as a viable method to template plasmonic materials with nanometer precision and to produce large quantities of metallic objects with high yields. We present here the fabrication of self-assembled ring-shaped plasmonic metamolecules that are composed of four to eight single metal nanoparticles with full stoichiometric and geometric control. Scattering spectra of single rings as well as absorption spectra of solutions containing the metamolecules are used to examine the unique plasmonic features, which are compared to computational simulations. We demonstrate that the electric and magnetic plasmon resonance modes strongly correlate with the exact shape of the structures. In particular, our computations reveal the magnetic plasmons only for particle rings of broken symmetries, which is consistent with our experimental data. We stress the feasibility of DNA self-assembly as a method to create bulk plasmonic materials and metamolecules that may be applied as building blocks in plasmonic devices. PMID:25611357

  9. Silver polyvinyl pyrrolidone nanoparticles exhibit a capsular polysaccharide influenced bactericidal effect against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bibbs, Ronda K.; Harris, Rhonda D.; Peoples, Veolanda A.; Barnett, Cleon; Singh, Shree R.; Dennis, Vida A.; Coats, Mamie T.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The highly adaptive nature of S. pneumoniae exemplifies the need for next generation antimicrobials designed to avoid high level resistance. Metal based nanomaterials fit this criterion. Our study examined the antimicrobial activity of gold nanospheres, silver coated polyvinyl pyrrolidone (AgPVP), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) against various serotypes of S. pneumoniae. Twenty nanometer spherical AgPVP demonstrated the highest level of killing among the tested materials. AgPVP (0.6 mg/mL) was able to kill pneumococcal serotypes 2, 3, 4, and 19F within 4 h of exposure. Detailed analysis of cultures during exposure to AgPVP showed that both the metal ions and the solid nanoparticles participate in the killing of the pneumococcus. The bactericidal effect of AgPVP was lessened in the absence of the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. Capsule negative strains, JD908 and RX1, were only susceptible to AgPVP at concentrations at least 33% higher than their respective capsule expressing counterparts. These findings suggest that mechanisms of killing used by nanomaterials are not serotype dependent and that the capsular polysaccharide participates in the inhibition. In the near future these mechanisms will be examined as targets for novel antimicrobials. PMID:25520713

  10. Biocompatibility of cerium dioxide and silicon dioxide nanoparticles with endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Claudia; Frster, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cerium dioxide (CeO2) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles are of widespread use in modern life. This means that human beings are markedly exposed to them in their everyday life. Once passing biological barriers, these nanoparticles are expected to interact with endothelial cells, leading to systemic alterations with distinct influences on human health. In the present study we observed the metabolic impact of differently sized CeO2 (8 nm; 35 nm) and SiO2 nanoparticles (117 nm; 315 nm) on immortalized human microvascular (HMEC-1) and primary macrovascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), with particular focus on the CeO2 nanoparticles. The characterization of the CeO2 nanoparticles in cell culture media with varying serum content indicated a steric stabilization of nanoparticles due to interaction with proteins. After cellular uptake, the CeO2 nanoparticles were localized around the nucleus in a ring-shaped manner. The nanoparticles revealed concentration and time, but no size-dependent effects on the cellular adenosine triphosphate levels. HUVEC reacted more sensitively to CeO2 nanoparticle exposure than HMEC-1. This effect was also observed in relation to cytokine release after nanoparticle treatment. The CeO2 nanoparticles exhibited a specific impact on the release of diverse proteins. Namely, a slight trend towards pro-inflammatory effects, a slight pro-thrombotic impact, and an increase of reactive oxygen species after nanoparticle exposure were observed with increasing incubation time. For SiO2 nanoparticles, concentration- and time-dependent effects on the metabolic activity as well as pro-inflammatory reactions were detectable. In general, the effects of the investigated nanoparticles on endothelial cells were rather insignificant, since the alterations on the metabolic cell activity became visible at a nanoparticle concentration that is by far higher than those expected to occur in the in vivo situation (CeO2 nanoparticles: 100 g/mL; SiO2 nanoparticles: 10 g/mL). PMID:25383291

  11. Cell-Mediated Delivery of Nanoparticles: Taking Advantage of Circulatory Cells to Target Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Cellular hitchhiking leverages the use of circulatory cells to enhance the biological outcome of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, which often suffer from poor circulation time and limited targeting. Cellular hitchhiking utilizes the natural abilities of circulatory cells to: (i) navigate the vasculature while avoiding immune system clearance, (ii) remain relatively inert until needed and (iii) perform specific functions, including nutrient delivery to tissues, clearance of pathogens, and immune system surveillance. A variety of synthetic nanoparticles attempt to mimic these functional attributes of circulatory cells for drug delivery purposes. By combining the advantages of circulatory cells and synthetic nanoparticles, many advanced drug delivery systems have been developed that adopt the concept of cellular hitchhiking. Here, we review the development and specific applications of cellular hitchhiking-based drug delivery systems. PMID:24747161

  12. Synthesis of folate- pegylated polyester nanoparticles encapsulating ixabepilone for targeting folate receptor overexpressing breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Siafaka, P; Betsiou, M; Tsolou, A; Angelou, E; Agianian, B; Koffa, M; Chaitidou, S; Karavas, E; Avgoustakis, K; Bikiaris, D

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation of novel polyester nanoparticles based on folic acid (FA)-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(propylene succinate) (PEG-PPSu) copolymer and loaded with the new anticancer drug ixabepilone (IXA). These nanoparticles may serve as a more selective (targeted) treatment of breast cancer tumors overexpressing the folate receptor. The synthesized materials were characterized by (1)H-NMR, FTIR, XRD and DSC. The nanoparticles were prepared by a double emulsification and solvent evaporation method and characterized with regard to their morphology by scanning electron microscopy, drug loading with HPLC-UV and size by dynamic light scattering. An average size of 195 nm and satisfactory drug loading efficiency (3.5%) were observed. XRD data indicated that IXA was incorporated into nanoparticles in amorphous form. The nanoparticles exhibited sustained drug release properties in vitro. Based on in vitro cytotoxicity studies, the blank FA-PEG-PPSu nanoparticles were found to be non-toxic to the cells. Fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared by conjugating Rhodanine B to PEG-PPSu, and live cell, fluorescence, confocal microscopy was applied in order to demonstrate the ability of FA-PEG-PPSu nanoparticles to enter into human breast cancer cells expressing the folate receptor. PMID:26543021

  13. Plasmonic silver nanoparticles loaded titania nanotube arrays exhibiting enhanced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishanthi, S. T.; Iyyapushpam, S.; Sundarakannan, B.; Subramanian, E.; Pathinettam Padiyan, D.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical anodization and photochemical reduction is employed to fabricate highly ordered silver loaded titania nanotubes (Ag/TNT) arrays. The Ag/TNT samples show an extended optical absorbance from UV to visible region owing to the surface plasmon resonance effect of Ag. The photoluminescence intensity of Ag/TNT is significantly lower than that of pure titania revealing a decrease in charge carrier recombination. The photoelectrochemical properties of the prepared samples are studied using linear sweep and transient photocurrent measurements. Compared with pure TNT, the Ag loaded samples show a higher photoelectrochemical activity. The results demonstrate an efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and the consequent increase in lifetime of charge carriers by Ag/TNT. The photocatalytic results of methyl orange dye degradation show that the Ag/TNT-3-05 sample exhibits the maximum degradation efficiency of 98.85% with kinetic rate constant of 0.0236(5) min-1 for 180 min light illumination.

  14. Gold nanoparticles enhanced electroporation for mammalian cell transfection.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yingbo; Huang, Shuyan; Liao, Wei-Ching; Lu, Yang; Wang, Shengnian

    2014-06-01

    Electroporation figured prominently as an effective nonviral gene delivery approach for its balance on the transfection efficiency and cell viability, no restrictions of probe or cell type, and operation simplicity. The commercial electroporation systems have been widely adopted in the past two decades while still carry drawbacks associated with the high applied electric voltage, unsatisfied delivery efficiency, and/or low cell viability. By adding highly conductive gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in electroporation solution, we demonstrated enhanced electroporation performance (i.e., better DNA delivery efficiency and higher cell viability) on mammalian cells from two different aspects: the free, naked AuNPs reduce the resistance of the electroporation solution so that the local pulse strength on cells was enhanced; targeting AuNPs (e.g., Tf-AuNPs) were brought to the cell membrane to work as virtual microelectrodes to porate cells with limited area from many different sites. The enhancement was confirmed with leukemia cells in both a commercial batch electroporation system and a home-made flow-through system using pWizGFP plasmid DNA probes. Such enhancement depends on the size, concentration, and the mixing ratio of free AuNPs/Tf-AuNPs. An equivalent mixture of free AuNPs and Tf-AuNPs exhibited the best enhancement with the transfection efficiency increased 2-3 folds at minimum sacrifice of cell viability. This new delivery concept, the combination of nanoparticles and electroporation technologies, may stimulate various in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications which rely on the efficient delivery of nucleic acids, anticancer drugs, or other therapeutic materials. PMID:24749393

  15. Gold Nanoparticles Enhanced Electroporation for Mammalian Cell Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Yingbo; Huang, Shuyan; Liao, Wei-Ching; Lu, Yang; Wang, Shengnian

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation figured prominently as an effective nonviral gene delivery approach for its balance on the transfection efficiency and cell viability, no restrictions of probe or cell type, and operation simplicity. The commercial electroporation systems have been widely adopted in the past two decades while still carry drawbacks associated with the high applied electric voltage, unsatisfied delivery efficiency, and/or low cell viability. By adding highly conductive gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in electroporation solution, we demonstrated enhanced electroporation performance (i.e. better DNA delivery efficiency and higher cell viability) on mammalian cells from two different aspects: the free, naked AuNPs reduce the resistance of the electroporation solution so that the local pulse strength on cells was enhanced; targeting AuNPs (e.g., Tf-AuNPs) were brought to the cell membrane to work as virtual microelectrodes to porate cells with limited area from many different sites. The enhancement was confirmed with leukemia cells in both a commercial batch electroporation system and a home-made flow-through system using pWizGFP plasmid DNA probes. Such enhancement depends on the size, concentration, and the mixing ratio of free AuNPs/Tf-AuNPs. An equivalent mixture of free AuNPs and Tf-AuNPs exhibited the best enhancement with the transfection efficiency increased 2-3 folds at minimum sacrifice of cell viability. This new delivery concept, the combination of nanoparticles and electroporation technologies, may stimulate various in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications which rely on the efficient delivery of nucleic acids, anticancer drugs, or other therapeutic materials. PMID:24749393

  16. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2) ) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2) ) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26817529

  17. Detection of squamous carcinoma cells using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei-Yun; Lee, Sze-tsen; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study is to use gold nanoparticle as a diagnostic agent to detect human squamous carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized and the gold nanoparticle size was 34.3 ± 6.2 nm. Based on the over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in squamous carcinoma cells, we hypothesized that EGFR could be a feasible biomarker with a target moiety for detection. We further modified polyclonal antibodies of EGFR on the surface of gold nanoparticles. We found selected squamous carcinoma cells can be selectively detected using EGFR antibody-modified gold nanoparticles via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Cell death was also examined to determine the survival status of squamous carcinoma cells with respect to gold nanoparticle treatment and EGFR polyclonal antibody modification.

  18. Dynamics of Receptor-Mediated Nanoparticle Internalization into Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles offer a promising medical tool for targeted drug delivery, for example to treat inflamed endothelial cells during the development of atherosclerosis. To inform the design of such therapeutic strategies, we develop a computational model of nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells, where internalization is driven by receptor-ligand binding and limited by the deformation of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. We specifically consider the case of nanoparticles targeted against ICAM-1 receptors, of relevance for treating atherosclerosis. The model computes the kinetics of the internalization process, the dynamics of binding, and the distribution of stresses exerted between the nanoparticle and the cell membrane. The model predicts the existence of an optimal nanoparticle size for fastest internalization, consistent with experimental observations, as well as the role of bond characteristics, local cell mechanical properties, and external forces in the nanoparticle internalization process. PMID:25901833

  19. Bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by human epithelial cells, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larios-Rodriguez, E; Rangel-Ayon, C; Castillo, S J; Zavala, G; Herrera-Urbina, R

    2011-09-01

    Healthy epithelial cells, in vivo, have the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles when aqueous tetrachloroauric acid is made to react with human skin. Neither a reducing agent nor a protecting chemical is needed for this bio-synthesis method. The first indication of gold nanoparticle formation is the staining of the skin, which turns deep purple. Stereoscopic optical micrographs of human skin tissue in contact with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid clearly show the staining of the epithelial cells. The UV-Vis spectrum of these epithelial cells shows an absorption band with a maximum at 553 nm. This absorption peak is within the wavelength region where the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of aqueous colloidal gold exhibits a maximum. Transmission electron micrographs show that gold nanoparticles synthesized by epithelial cells have sizes between 1 and 100 nm. The electron diffraction pattern of these nanoparticles reveals a crystalline structure whose interplanar distances correspond to fcc metallic gold. Transmission electron micrographs of ultra-thin (70 nm thick) slices of epithelial cells clearly and undoubtedly demonstrate that gold nanoparticles are inside the cell. According to high resolution transmission electron micrographs of intracellular single gold nanoparticles, they have the shape of a polyhedron. PMID:21817787

  20. Bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by human epithelial cells, in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larios-Rodriguez, E.; Rangel-Ayon, C.; Castillo, S. J.; Zavala, G.; Herrera-Urbina, R.

    2011-09-01

    Healthy epithelial cells, in vivo, have the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles when aqueous tetrachloroauric acid is made to react with human skin. Neither a reducing agent nor a protecting chemical is needed for this bio-synthesis method. The first indication of gold nanoparticle formation is the staining of the skin, which turns deep purple. Stereoscopic optical micrographs of human skin tissue in contact with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid clearly show the staining of the epithelial cells. The UV-Vis spectrum of these epithelial cells shows an absorption band with a maximum at 553 nm. This absorption peak is within the wavelength region where the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of aqueous colloidal gold exhibits a maximum. Transmission electron micrographs show that gold nanoparticles synthesized by epithelial cells have sizes between 1 and 100 nm. The electron diffraction pattern of these nanoparticles reveals a crystalline structure whose interplanar distances correspond to fcc metallic gold. Transmission electron micrographs of ultra-thin (70 nm thick) slices of epithelial cells clearly and undoubtedly demonstrate that gold nanoparticles are inside the cell. According to high resolution transmission electron micrographs of intracellular single gold nanoparticles, they have the shape of a polyhedron.

  1. Thiolated chitosan nanoparticles: transfection study in the Caco-2 differentiated cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martien, Ronny; Loretz, Brigitta; Sandbichler, Adolf Michael; Bernkop Schnürch, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the expression of secreted protein in differentiated Caco-2 cells after transfection with nanoparticles, in order to improve gene delivery. Based on unmodified chitosan and thiolated chitosan conjugates, nanoparticles with the gene reporter pSEAP (recombinant Secreted Alkaline Phosphatase) were generated at pH 4.0. Transfection studies of thiolated chitosan in Caco-2 cells during the exponential growth phase and differentiation growth phase of the cells led to a 5.0-fold and 2.0-fold increase in protein expression when compared to unmodified chitosan nanoparticles. The mean particle size for both unmodified chitosan and cross-linked thiolated chitosan nanoparticles is 212.2 ± 86 and 113.6 ± 40 nm, respectively. The zeta potential of nanoparticles was determined to be 7.9 ± 0.38 mV for unmodified chitosan nanoparticles and 4.3 ± 0.74 mV for cross-linked thiolated chitosan nanoparticles. Red blood cell lysis evaluation was used to evaluate the membrane damaging properties of unmodified and thiolated chitosan nanoparticles and led to 4.61 ± 0.36% and 2.29 ± 0.25% lysis, respectively. Additionally, cross-linked thiolated chitosan nanoparticles were found to exhibit higher stability toward degradation in gastric juices. Furthermore the reversible effect of thiolated chitosan on barrier properties was monitored by measuring the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and is supported by immunohistochemical staining for the tight junction protein claudin. According to these results cross-linked thiolated chitosan nanoparticles have the potential to be used as a non-viral vector system for gene therapy.

  2. Aluminum plasmonic nanoparticles enhanced dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuxiang; Meng, Weisi; Cui, Kaiyu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2014-03-10

    We present an investigation on utilizing plasmonic aluminium (Al) nanoparticles (NPs) to enhance the optical absorption of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The Al NPs exhibit not only the light absorption enhancement in solar cells with localized surface plasmon (LSP) effect but also the chemical stability to iodide/triiodide electrolyte. Besides, the lower work function (~4.06 eV), compared with that of TiO(2) (~4.6 eV), may suppress the quenching processes, such as charge transfer to metal NPs, to reduce the loss. Thus, high concentration of Al NPs could be incorporated into the TiO(2) anodes, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSCs is improved by nearly 13%. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) characterization also indicates that the plasmonic DSCs with Al NPs present better electrochemical performance than regular ones, which contributes to the improvement of PCE of the device. PMID:24800286

  3. Aluminum plasmonic nanoparticles enhanced dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuxiang; Meng, Weisi; Cui, Kaiyu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2014-03-10

    We present an investigation on utilizing plasmonic aluminium (Al) nanoparticles (NPs) to enhance the optical absorption of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The Al NPs exhibit not only the light absorption enhancement in solar cells with localized surface plasmon (LSP) effect but also the chemical stability to iodide/triiodide electrolyte. Besides, the lower work function (~4.06 eV), compared with that of TiO? (~4.6 eV), may suppress the quenching processes, such as charge transfer to metal NPs, to reduce the loss. Thus, high concentration of Al NPs could be incorporated into the TiO? anodes, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSCs is improved by nearly 13%. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) characterization also indicates that the plasmonic DSCs with Al NPs present better electrochemical performance than regular ones, which contributes to the improvement of PCE of the device. PMID:24922239

  4. Comparison of stem morphology and anatomy of two alfalfa clonal lines exhibiting divergent cell wall composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous research, two alfalfa clonal lines (252, 1283) were identified that exhibited environmentally stable differences in stem cell walls. Compared to stems of 1283, stems of 252 have a higher cell wall concentration and greater amounts of lignin and cellulose but reduced levels of pectic suga...

  5. Bimodal gold nanoparticle therapeutics for manipulating exogenous and endogenous protein levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Muroski, Megan E; Kogot, Joshua M; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2012-12-01

    A new advance in cell transfection protocol using a bimodal nanoparticle agent to selectively manipulate protein expression levels within mammalian cells is demonstrated. The nanoparticle based transfection approach functions by controlled release of gene regulatory elements from a 6 nm AuNP (gold nanoparticle) surface. The endosomal release of the regulatory elements from the nanoparticle surface results in endogenous protein knockdown simultaneously with exogenous protein expression for the first 48 h. The use of fluorescent proteins as the endogenous and exogenous signals for protein expression enables the efficiency of codelivery of siRNA (small interfering RNA) for GFP (green fluorescent protein) knockdown and a dsRed-express linearized plasmid for induction to be optically analyzed in CRL-2794, a human kidney cell line expressing an unstable green fluorescent protein. Delivery of the bimodal nanoparticle in cationic liposomes results in 20% GFP knockdown within 24 h of delivery and continues exhibiting knockdown for up to 48 h for the bimodal agent. Simultaneous dsRed expression is observed to initiate within the same time frame with expression levels reaching 34% after 25 days although cells have divided approximately 20 times, implying daughter cell transfection has occurred. Fluorescence cell sorting results in a stable colony, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis. The simultaneous delivery of siRNA and linearized plasmid DNA on the surface of a single nanocrystal provides a unique method for definitive genetic control within a single cell and leads to a very efficient cell transfection protocol. PMID:23131062

  6. Preparation of novel (-)-gossypol nanoparticles and the effect on growth inhibition in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    JIN, CAI-LING; CHEN, MEI-LING; WANG, YING; KANG, XIAO-CHUN; HAN, GUANG-YE; XU, SU-LING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor effects and possible mechanism of (-)-gossypol nanoparticles, loaded with vv polyethylene glycol-maleimide (mPEG-Mal), in vitro. Emulsification-volatilization was used to prepare the loaded (-)-gossypol nanoparticles. The toxicity of blank nanoparticles on human prostate cancer PC-3 cells and human prostate RWPE-1 cells was measured. The antitumor effects of the nanoparticles on PC-3 cells were evaluated by an MTT assay, acridine orange staining and transmission electron microscopy in vitro, and the results were compared with those of free (-)-gossypol. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bak were measured using semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The growth inhibition activity of the loaded (-)-gossypol nanoparticles was found to be dose- and time-dependent, and similar to the activity of free (-)-gossypol. The nanoparticles induced apoptotic morphological changes on the PC-3 cells, downregulating the mRNA expression level of Bcl-2 and upregulating the mRNA expression level of Bak. Blank nanoparticles exhibited no evident toxicity on PC-3 and RWPE-1 cells at a high dose. Therefore, the mPEG-Mal loaded (-)-gossypol nanoparticles demonstrated a favorable antitumor activity and no toxicity. The nanoparticles were able to induce the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells; thus, may be a potential antitumor nanodrug. PMID:25667612

  7. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B; Zholobak, Nadezhda M; Baranchikov, Alexander E; Ryabova, Anastasia V; Ivanov, Vladimir K

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF3:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. PMID:25746257

  8. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects of tea polyphenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles on human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jin; Li, Feng; Fang, Yong; Yang, Wenjian; An, Xinxin; Zhao, Liyan; Xin, Zhihong; Cao, Lin; Hu, Qiuhui

    2014-03-01

    Tea polyphenols have strong antioxidant and antitumor activities. However, these health benefits are limited due to their poor in vivo stability and low bioavailability. Chitosan nanoparticles as delivery systems may provide an alternative approach for enhancing bioavailability of poorly absorbed drugs. In this study, tea polyphenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles have been prepared using two different chitosan biomaterials, and their antitumor effects were evaluated in HepG2 cells, including cell cytotoxicity comparison, cell morphology analysis, cell apoptosis and cell cycle detection. The results indicated that the tea polyphenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles showed a branch shape and heterogeneous distribution in prepared suspension. MTT assay suggested that tea polyphenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles could inhibit the proliferation of HepG2 cells, and the cytotoxicity rates were increased gradually and appeared an obvious dose-dependent relationship. Transmission electron microscope images showed that the HepG2 cells treated with tea polyphenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles exhibited some typical apoptotic features, such as microvilli disappearance, margination of nuclear chromatin, intracytoplasmic vacuoles and the mitochondrial swelling. In addition, the tea polyphenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles had relatively weak inhibitory effects on HepG2 cancer cells compared with tea polyphenols. Tea polyphenols not only induced cancer cell apoptosis, but also promoted their necrosis. However, tea polyphenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles exhibited their antitumor effects mainly through inducing cell apoptosis. Our results revealed that the inhibition effects of tea polyphenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles on tumor cells probably depended on their controlled drug release and effective cell delivery. The chitosan nanoparticles themselves as the delivery carrier showed limited antitumor effects compared with their encapsulated drugs. PMID:24433880

  9. Stem cell tracking using iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Elizabeth; Madani, Seyed Yazdan; Sheth, Roosey; Seifalian, Amelia; Green, Mark; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are an exciting advancement in the field of nanotechnology. They expand the possibilities of noninvasive analysis and have many useful properties, making them potential candidates for numerous novel applications. Notably, they have been shown that they can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are capable of conjugation with various cell types, including stem cells. In-depth research has been undertaken to establish these benefits, so that a deeper level of understanding of stem cell migratory pathways and differentiation, tumor migration, and improved drug delivery can be achieved. Stem cells have the ability to treat and cure many debilitating diseases with limited side effects, but a main problem that arises is in the noninvasive tracking and analysis of these stem cells. Recently, researchers have acknowledged the use of SPIONs for this purpose and have set out to establish suitable protocols for coating and attachment, so as to bring MRI tracking of SPION-labeled stem cells into common practice. This review paper explains the manner in which SPIONs are produced, conjugated, and tracked using MRI, as well as a discussion on their limitations. A concise summary of recently researched magnetic particle coatings is provided, and the effects of SPIONs on stem cells are evaluated, while animal and human studies investigating the role of SPIONs in stem cell tracking will be explored. PMID:24729700

  10. Inhibiting EGFR clustering and cell proliferation with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Paviolo, Chiara; Chon, James W M; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2015-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles are functionalized with epidermal growth factor (EGF) molecules and incubated with HeLa cells. These new complexes mechanically interfere with the activation of EGF receptors in a length-dependent manner. Protein-functionalized gold nanoparticles hold great potential for unveiling the fundamental characteristics of cell receptors and for future pharmacological studies on receptor targeting. PMID:25504553

  11. Cell Surface-based Sensing with Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ziwen; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles provide versatile scaffolds for biosensing applications. In this review, we focus on the use of metallic nanoparticles for cell surface sensings. Examples of the use of both specific recognition and array-based “chemical nose” approaches to cell surface sensing will be discussed. PMID:25853985

  12. Cost-effective alternative to nano-encapsulation: Amorphous curcumin-chitosan nanoparticle complex exhibiting high payload and supersaturation generation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Hiep; Yu, Hong; Kiew, Tie Yi; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2015-10-01

    While the wide-ranging therapeutic activities of curcumin have been well established, its successful delivery to realize its true therapeutic potentials faces a major challenge due to its low oral bioavailability. Even though nano-encapsulation has been widely demonstrated to be effective in enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin, it is not without drawbacks (i.e. low payload and costly preparation). Herein we present a cost-effective bioavailability enhancement strategy of curcumin in the form of amorphous curcumin-chitosan nanoparticle complex (or curcumin nanoplex in short) exhibiting a high payload (>80%). The curcumin nanoplex was prepared by a simple yet highly efficient drug-polysaccharide complexation method that required only mixing of the curcumin and chitosan solutions under ambient condition. The effects of (1) pH and (2) charge ratio of chitosan to curcumin on the (i) physical characteristics of the nanoplex (i.e. size, colloidal stability and payload), (ii) complexation efficiency, and (iii) production yield were investigated from which the optimal preparation condition was determined. The nanoplex formation was found to favor low acidic pH and charge ratio below unity. At the optimal condition (i.e. pH 4.4. and charge ratio=0.8), stable curcumin nanoplex (?260nm) was prepared at >90% complexation efficiency and ?50% production yield. The amorphous state stability, colloidal stability, and in vitro non-cytotoxicity of the nanoplex were successfully established. The curcumin nanoplex produced prolonged supersaturation (3h) in the presence of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) at five times of the saturation solubility of curcumin. In addition, curcumin released from the nanoplex exhibited improved chemical stability owed to the presence of chitosan. Both results (i.e. high supersaturation and improved chemical stability) bode well for the ability of the curcumin nanoplex to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin clinically. PMID:26170159

  13. Trypsinization-dependent cell labeling with fluorescent nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Trypsin is often used to detach adhered cell subculture from a substrate. However, the proteolytic activity of trypsin may harm cells by cleaving the cell membrane proteins. The present study shows that cellular uptake of fluorescent nanoparticles is remarkably increased within 24h after trypsinization. These results highlight the trypsin-induced protein digestion, provoking leaky cell plasma membrane which leads to the strongly enhanced cellular uptake of the nanoparticles. To prevent this effect, one should expose cells to the nanoparticle (NP)-based fluorescent labels at least 48h after trypsinization. PMID:25328505

  14. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  15. Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Exhibit Dual-Phase Regulation to Exposed Arabidopsis Mesophyll Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hengguang; Hu, Shanglian; Huang, Peng; Song, Hua; Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; He, Rong; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-12-01

    Herein we are the first to report that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll cells exposed to different concentration of SWCNTs. The mesophyll protoplasts were prepared by enzyme digestion, and incubated with 15, 25, 50, 100 μg/ml SWCNTs for 48 h, and then were observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured. Partial protoplasts were stained with propidium iodide and 4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole, partial protoplasts were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled SWCNTs, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that SWCNTs could traverse both the plant cell wall and cell membrane, with less than or equal to 50 μg/ml in the culture medium, SWCNTs stimulated plant cells to grow out trichome clusters on their surface, with more than 50 μg/ml SWCNTs in the culture medium, SWCNTs exhibited obvious toxic effects to the protoplasts such as increasing generation of ROS, inducing changes of protoplast morphology, changing green leaves into yellow, and inducing protoplast cells' necrosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, single walled carbon nanotubes can get through Arabidopsis mesophyll cell wall and membrane, and exhibit dose-dependent dual-phase regulation to Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts such as low dose stimulating cell growth, and high dose inducing cells' ROS generation, necrosis or apoptosis.

  16. Cancer cells recovering from damage exhibit mitochondrial restructuring and increased aerobic glycolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akakura, Shin; Ostrakhovitch, Elena; Sanokawa-Akakura, Reiko; Tabibzadeh, Siamak

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • Some cancer cells recover from severe damage that causes cell death in majority of cells. • Damage-Recovered (DR) cancer cells show reduced mitochondria, mDNA and mitochondrial enzymes. • DR cells show increased aerobic glycolysis, ATP, cell proliferation, and resistance to damage. • DR cells recovered from in vivo damage also show increased glycolysis and proliferation rate. - Abstract: Instead of relying on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, most cancer cells rely heavily on aerobic glycolysis, a phenomenon termed as “the Warburg effect”. We considered that this effect is a direct consequence of damage which persists in cancer cells that recover from damage. To this end, we studied glycolysis and rate of cell proliferation in cancer cells that recovered from severe damage. We show that in vitro Damage-Recovered (DR) cells exhibit mitochondrial structural remodeling, display Warburg effect, and show increased in vitro and in vivo proliferation and tolerance to damage. To test whether cancer cells derived from tumor microenvironment can show similar properties, we isolated Damage-Recovered (T{sup DR}) cells from tumors. We demonstrate that T{sup DR} cells also show increased aerobic glycolysis and a high proliferation rate. These findings show that Warburg effect and its consequences are induced in cancer cells that survive severe damage.

  17. Highly fluorescent and bioresorbable polymeric nanoparticles with enhanced photostability for cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuo; Liu, Shiying; Wang, Kai; Yang, Cangjie; Luo, Yimin; Zhang, Yingdan; Cao, Bin; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Mingfeng

    2014-12-01

    We report a facile and general strategy for enhancing the photostability of organic fluorophores for bioimaging applications. As a proof of concept, bright and robust fluorescence was observed in solid states of a well-defined synthetic polymer polycaprolactone consisting of di(thiophene-2-yl)-diketopyrrolopyrrole covalently linked in the middle of the polymer chain as a biocompatible and bioresorbable matrix. The nanoparticles prepared through a nanoprecipitation process of these polymers could be internalized by both tumor cells and stem cells with little cytotoxicity. Moreover, these highly fluorescent nanoparticles exhibited significantly enhanced photostability compared to commercial quantum dots or physical blends of dye/polymer complexes in cell imaging and long-term tracing.We report a facile and general strategy for enhancing the photostability of organic fluorophores for bioimaging applications. As a proof of concept, bright and robust fluorescence was observed in solid states of a well-defined synthetic polymer polycaprolactone consisting of di(thiophene-2-yl)-diketopyrrolopyrrole covalently linked in the middle of the polymer chain as a biocompatible and bioresorbable matrix. The nanoparticles prepared through a nanoprecipitation process of these polymers could be internalized by both tumor cells and stem cells with little cytotoxicity. Moreover, these highly fluorescent nanoparticles exhibited significantly enhanced photostability compared to commercial quantum dots or physical blends of dye/polymer complexes in cell imaging and long-term tracing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, absorbance spectra, confocal microscopy characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05576d

  18. Targeting nanoparticles to dendritic cells for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luis J; Tacken, Paul J; Rueda, Felix; Domingo, Joan Carles; Albericio, Fernando; Figdor, Carl G

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and are currently exploited in immunotherapy for treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Development of targeted nanodelivery systems carrying vaccine components, including antigens and adjuvants, to DCs in vivo represents a promising strategy to enhance immune responses. Delivering particulate vaccines specifically to DCs and preventing nonspecific uptake by other endocytotic cells are challenging. Size represents a critical parameter determining whether particulate vaccines can penetrate lymph nodes and reach resident DCs. Specific delivery is further enhanced by actively targeting DC-specific receptors. This chapter discusses the rationale for the use of particle-based vaccines and provides an overview of antigen-delivery vehicles currently under investigation. In addition, we discuss how vaccine delivery systems may be developed, focusing on liposomes, PLGA polymers, and gold nanoparticles, to obtain safe and efficacious vaccines. PMID:22568905

  19. Meayamycin Inhibits pre-mRNA Splicing and Exhibits Picomolar Activity Against Multidrug Resistant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Brian J.; McPherson, Peter A.; O'Brien, Kristine; Czaicki, Nancy L.; DeStefino, Vincent; Osman, Sami; Li, Miaosheng; Day, Billy W.; Grabowski, Paula J.; Moore, Melissa J.; Vogt, Andreas; Koide, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    FR901464 is a potent antitumor natural product that binds to the SF3b complex and inhibits pre-mRNA splicing. Its analogue, meayamycin, is two orders of magnitude more potent as an antiproliferative agent against human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Here, we report the picomolar antiproliferative activity of meayamycin against various cancer cell lines and multidrug resistant cells. Time-dependence studies implied that meayamycin may form a covalent bond with its target protein(s). Meayamycin inhibited pre-mRNA splicing in HEK-293 cells but not alternative splicing in a neuronal system. Meayamycin exhibited specificity toward human lung cancer cells compared to non-tumorigenic human lung fibroblasts and retained picomolar growth inhibitory activity against multi-drug resistant cells. These data suggest that meayamycin is a useful chemical probe to study pre-mRNA splicing in live cells and is a promising lead as an anticancer agent. PMID:19671752

  20. Nanoparticle PEBBLE sensors in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    Live cell studies are of fundamental importance to the life sciences and their medical applications. Nanoparticle (NP)-based sensor platforms have many advantages as sensors for intracellular measurements, due to their flexible engineerability, noninvasive nature (due to their nano-size and nontoxic matrix), and, for some of the NPs, intrinsic optical properties. NP-based fluorescent sensors for intracellular measurements, so called PEBBLE sensors, have been developed for many important intracellular analytes and functions, including ions, small molecules, reactive oxygen species, physical properties, and enzyme activities, which are involved in many chemical, biochemical, and physical processes taking place inside the cell. PEBBLE sensors can be used with a standard microscope for simultaneous optical imaging of cellular structures and sensing of composition and function, just like investigations performed with molecular probes. However, PEBBLE sensors of any design and matrix can be delivered into cells by several standard methods, unlike dye molecules that need to be cell permeable. Furthermore, new sensing possibilities are enabled by PEBBLE nanosensors, which are not possible with molecular probes. This review summarizes a variety of designs of the PEBBLE sensors, their characteristics, and their applications to cells. PMID:22264547

  1. Cooperative entry of nanoparticles into the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiuling; Yao, Haimin; Shi, Xinghua

    2014-12-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with cell membrane is a crucial issue in studying drug delivery, photodynamic therapy system and cytotoxicity. Single NP with relatively small size cannot be fully wrapped by the cell membrane, which prohibits its uptake. One feasible way is cooperative entry, i.e., recruiting and assembling multiple small NPs to form a larger NP cluster to enter into a cell. In this work, we present theoretical analysis about the cooperative entry of multiple NPs. Through free energy calculation we investigate how the NPs' size, shape, interval and NP/cell interfacial binding energy influence the feasibility of entry. Interestingly we find that the cooperative entry of oblate ellipsoidal NPs can get larger energy compensation than individual ones as well as spherical ones. We also propose that soft NPs have preference in cooperative entry of the cell. Our work can be used to actively design and transfer NPs in applications such as drug delivery as well as to understand the shape effect on toxic mechanism of ellipsoidal NPs.

  2. Paclitaxel-loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for radiotherapy in hypoxic human tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Bai, Ling; Wu, Hong; Liu, Junye; Guo, Guozhen; Chen, Jingyuan

    2008-06-01

    Radioresistant hypoxic cells may contribute to the failure of radiation therapy in controlling certain tumors. Some studies have suggested the radiosensitizing effect of paclitaxel. The poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)(PLGA) nanoparticles containing paclitaxel were prepared by o/w emulsification-solvent evaporation method. The physicochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles (i.e., encapsulation efficiency, particle size distribution, morphology, in vitro release) were studied. The morphology of the two human tumor cell lines: a carcinoma cervicis (HeLa) and a hepatoma (HepG(2)), treated with paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was photomicrographed. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the number of the tumor cells held in the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was evaluated by transmission electronic microscopy. Cell viability was determined by the ability of single cell to form colonies in vitro. The prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape with size between 200 nm and 800 nm. The encapsulation efficiency was 85.5%. The release behaviour of paclitaxel from the nanoparticles exhibited a biphasic pattern characterised by a fast initial release during the first 24 h, followed by a slower and continuous release. Co-culture of the two tumor cell lines with paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles demonstrated that the cell morphology was changed and the released paclitaxel retained its bioactivity to block cells in the G(2)/M phase. The cellular uptake of nanoparticles was observed. The free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles effectively sensitized hypoxic HeLa and HepG(2) cells to radiation. Under this experimental condition, the radiosensitization of paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was more significant than that of free paclitaxel. PMID:18367873

  3. Transport across the cell-membrane dictates nanoparticle fate and toxicity: a new paradigm in nanotoxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Sabella, Stefania; Muscetti, Ornella; Belli, Valentina; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Fusco, Sabato; de Luca, Elisa; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2014-08-01

    The toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been fully ascertained, but the mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity remain still largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of MNPs is strictly reliant on the pathway of cellular internalization. In particular, if otherwise toxic gold, silver, and iron oxide NPs are forced through the cell membrane bypassing any form of active mechanism (e.g., endocytosis), no significant cytotoxic effect is registered. Pneumatically driven NPs across the cell membrane show a different distribution within the cytosol compared to NPs entering the cell by active endocytosis. Specifically, they exhibit free random Brownian motions within the cytosol and do not accumulate in lysosomes. Results suggest that intracellular accumulation of metallic nanoparticles into endo-lysosomal compartments is the leading cause of nanotoxicity, due to consequent nanoparticle degradation and in situ release of metal ions.The toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) has been fully ascertained, but the mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity remain still largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that the cytotoxicity of MNPs is strictly reliant on the pathway of cellular internalization. In particular, if otherwise toxic gold, silver, and iron oxide NPs are forced through the cell membrane bypassing any form of active mechanism (e.g., endocytosis), no significant cytotoxic effect is registered. Pneumatically driven NPs across the cell membrane show a different distribution within the cytosol compared to NPs entering the cell by active endocytosis. Specifically, they exhibit free random Brownian motions within the cytosol and do not accumulate in lysosomes. Results suggest that intracellular accumulation of metallic nanoparticles into endo-lysosomal compartments is the leading cause of nanotoxicity, due to consequent nanoparticle degradation and in situ release of metal ions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02008a

  4. Biogenic magnetic nanoparticles from Burkholderia sp. YN01 exhibiting intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and their applications.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Li, Na; Mu, Jianshuai; Zhou, Runhong; Xu, Yan; Cui, Daizong; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain containing biogenic magnetic nanoparticles (BMNPs) was isolated from the sediments of Songhua River in Harbin, China, and was identified as Burkholderia sp. YN01. Extracted BMNPs from YN01 were characterized as pure face-centered cubic Fe3O4 with an average size of 80 nm through transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hysteresis parameters of the BMNP samples such as Bc and Bcr and ratios Mrs/Ms were deduced as 35.6 mT, 43.2 mT, and 0.47, respectively, indicating that the BMNPs exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior. This is the first report concerning on biogenic Fe3O4 NPs produced in Burkholderia genus. Significantly, the BMNPs were proved to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity that could catalyze the oxidation of peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2. Kinetic analysis indicates that the catalytic behavior is in accord with typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and follows ping-pong mechanism. The catalytic constants (K cat) were 6.5??10(4) s(-1) and 0.78??10(4) s(-1) with H2O2 and TMB as substrate, respectively, which was higher than that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy experiments showed that the BMNPs could catalyze H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radicals. The origin of peroxidase-like activity is also associated with their ability to transfer electron between electrode and H2O2 according to an electrochemical study. As a novel peroxidase mimetic, the BMNPs were employed to offer a simple, sensitive, and selective colorimetric method for H2O2 and glucose determination, and the BMNPs could efficiently catalyze the degradation of phenol and Congo red dye. PMID:25030455

  5. Labeling of macrophage cell using biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Ji Sung; Kim, Kwanghee; Wu, Jun Hua; Jeong, Jaeho; Song, Ah Young; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Young Keun

    2011-04-01

    This work investigates the intrinsic cell labeling efficiency of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles prepared by a modified thermal decomposition method using nontoxic precursors and a biocompatible polymer surfactant. This method eliminates the current need for additional step of surface modification. The structural analysis reveals the highly crystalline feature of the nanoparticles, while the magnetic measurement shows their superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. Fe3O4 nanoparticles were efficiently incorporated into the murine macrophage cells (RAW264.7) without visible cytotoxicity. Cell labeling efficiency was found to be over 90% as measured by magnetically activated cell sorting and physical property measurement system. Therefore, such Fe3O4 nanoparticles could provide a useful magnetic cell labeling tool for macrophage cells using their phagocytic/endocytic activity and further apply to the other relevant biomedical applications.

  6. Probing stem cell behavior using nanoparticle-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sahishnu; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant clinical potential to treat numerous debilitating diseases and injures that currently have no treatment plan. While several advances have been made in developing stem cell platforms and methods to induce their differentiation, there are two critical aspects need to be addressed: (1) efficient delivery of nucleic acids and small molecules for stem cell differentiation, and (2) effective, noninvasive, and real-time tracking of transplanted stem cells. To address this, there has been a trend of utilizing various types of nanoparticles to not only deliver biomolecules to targeted site but also track the location of transplanted stem cells in real time. Over the past decade, various types of nanoparticles, including magnetic nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles, quantum dots, and gold nanoparticles, have been developed to serve as vehicles for targeted biomolecule delivery. In addition of being biocompatible without causing adverse side effect to stem cells, these nanoparticles have unique chemical and physical properties that allow tracking and imaging in real time using different imaging instruments that are commonly found in hospitals. A summary of the landmark and progressive demonstrations that utilize nanoparticles for stem cell application is described. PMID:25903468

  7. Hsp70 as an indicator of stress in the cells after contact with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardilová, Šárka; Havrdová, Markéta; Panáček, Aleš; Kvítek, Libor; Zbořil, Radek

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, production of nanoparticles is increased and thus grows our contact with them too. Question of safety is closely related to the issue of use nanoparticles. There are a number of tests that monitor the viability, ROS production, the effect on the DNA and cell cycle, however, rarely encountered studies on stress in the cells after contact with nanoparticles. Heat shock proteins (HSP) are among the substances that can be used for monitoring stress in cells. HSP are structures with a chaperone activity. They are evolutionarily very old, conservative and they are found with a high degree of homology in prokaryotes and eukaryotes including humans. They exist at low concentrations under physiological conditions, while in the denaturing conditions e.g. high or low temperature, radiation, exposure to chemicals, heavy metals, or nanoparticles their expression is changed. HSPs are involved in maintaining homeostasis in the cell that the denatured protein conformations allow recovery to the original stage. One of the most common proteins from HSP family is Hsp70 - protein with a molecular weight of 70 kDa. The level of Hsp70 in a cell after exposure to the stress changes depending on the stress level to which the cell is exposed to and a time period during which lasted stressful conditions. Our research monitors stress levels of cells manifesting by Hsp70 production after contact with silver nanoparticles. Nanoparticles show different toxicity towards different types of target cells, which is reflected in the values of IC50 - concentration that kills 50% tested cells. Concentration of test substance toxic to one cell type may be innocuous to cells of another type. IC50 obtained from the MTT assay provides a suitable default data and if multiples of IC50 values are used, we can compare and generalize. Studies can be used to compare stress levels in cells that show different sensitivity to the tested nanoparticles compared with cells under optimal growth conditions. The study was done on two types of mouse fibroblasts NIH-3T3 and L929. While NIH-3T3 cells exhibit stress response proportional to the concentration of silver nanoparticles, for L929 cells this was not observed.

  8. Imaging of Biological Cells Using Luminescent Silver Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, Vira; Almemar, Zamavang; Jiang, Ke; Culhane, Kyle; Machado, Rosa; Hagen, Guy; Kotko, Andriy; Dmytruk, Igor; Spendier, Kathrin; Pinchuk, Anatoliy

    2016-01-01

    The application of luminescent silver nanoparticles as imaging agents for neural stem and rat basophilic leukemia cells was demonstrated. The experimental size dependence of the extinction and emission spectra for silver nanoparticles were also studied. The nanoparticles were functionalized with fluorescent glycine dimers. Spectral position of the resonance extinction and photoluminescence emission for particles with average diameters ranging from 9 to 32 nm were examined. As the particle size increased, the spectral peaks for both extinction and the intrinsic emission of silver nanoparticles shifted to the red end of the spectrum. The intrinsic photoluminescence of the particles was orders of magnitude weaker and was spectrally separated from the photoluminescence of the glycine dimer ligands. The spectral position of the ligand emission was independent of the particle size; however, the quantum yield of the nanoparticle-ligand system was size-dependent. This was attributed to the enhancement of the ligand's emission caused by the local electric field strength's dependence on the particle size. The maximum quantum yield determined for the nanoparticle-ligand complex was (5.2 ± 0.1) %. The nanoparticles were able to penetrate cell membranes of rat basophilic leukemia and neural stem cells fixed with paraformaldehyde. Additionally, toxicity studies were performed. It was found that towards rat basophilic leukemia cells, luminescent silver nanoparticles had a toxic effect in the silver atom concentration range of 10-100 μM.

  9. Imaging of Biological Cells Using Luminescent Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kravets, Vira; Almemar, Zamavang; Jiang, Ke; Culhane, Kyle; Machado, Rosa; Hagen, Guy; Kotko, Andriy; Dmytruk, Igor; Spendier, Kathrin; Pinchuk, Anatoliy

    2016-12-01

    The application of luminescent silver nanoparticles as imaging agents for neural stem and rat basophilic leukemia cells was demonstrated. The experimental size dependence of the extinction and emission spectra for silver nanoparticles were also studied. The nanoparticles were functionalized with fluorescent glycine dimers. Spectral position of the resonance extinction and photoluminescence emission for particles with average diameters ranging from 9 to 32 nm were examined. As the particle size increased, the spectral peaks for both extinction and the intrinsic emission of silver nanoparticles shifted to the red end of the spectrum. The intrinsic photoluminescence of the particles was orders of magnitude weaker and was spectrally separated from the photoluminescence of the glycine dimer ligands. The spectral position of the ligand emission was independent of the particle size; however, the quantum yield of the nanoparticle-ligand system was size-dependent. This was attributed to the enhancement of the ligand's emission caused by the local electric field strength's dependence on the particle size. The maximum quantum yield determined for the nanoparticle-ligand complex was (5.2 ± 0.1) %. The nanoparticles were able to penetrate cell membranes of rat basophilic leukemia and neural stem cells fixed with paraformaldehyde. Additionally, toxicity studies were performed. It was found that towards rat basophilic leukemia cells, luminescent silver nanoparticles had a toxic effect in the silver atom concentration range of 10-100 μM. PMID:26781288

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exhibit Regulated Exocytosis in Response to Chemerin and IGF

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Holmberg, Chris; Balabanova, Silvia; Borysova, Lyudmyla; Burdyga, Ted; Beynon, Robert; Dockray, Graham J.; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play important roles in tissue repair and cancer progression. Our recent work suggests that some mesenchymal cells, notably myofibroblasts exhibit regulated exocytosis resembling that seen in neuroendocrine cells. We now report that MSCs also exhibit regulated exocytosis. Both a G-protein coupled receptor agonist, chemerin, and a receptor tyrosine kinase stimulant, IGF-II, evoked rapid increases in secretion of a marker protein, TGFβig-h3. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, also rapidly increased secretion of TGFβig-h3 while inhibitors of translation (cycloheximide) or secretory protein transport (brefeldin A) had no effect, indicating secretion from preformed secretory vesicles. Inhibitors of the chemerin and IGF receptors specifically reduced the secretory response. Confocal microscopy of MSCs loaded with Fluo-4 revealed chemerin and IGF-II triggered intracellular Ca2+ oscillations requiring extracellular calcium. Immunocytochemistry showed co-localisation of TGFβig-h3 and MMP-2 to secretory vesicles, and transmission electron-microscopy showed dense-core secretory vesicles in proximity to the Golgi apparatus. Proteomic studies on the MSC secretome identified 64 proteins including TGFβig-h3 and MMP-2 that exhibited increased secretion in response to IGF-II treatment for 30min and western blot of selected proteins confirmed these data. Gene ontology analysis of proteins exhibiting regulated secretion indicated functions primarily associated with cell adhesion and in bioassays chemerin increased adhesion of MSCs and adhesion, proliferation and migration of myofibroblasts. Thus, MSCs exhibit regulated exocytosis that is compatible with an early role in tissue remodelling. PMID:26513261

  11. Uptake and cytotoxicity of chitosan nanoparticles in human liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Jing Wen; Yeoh, George; Saunders, Martin; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2010-12-01

    Despite extensive research into the biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of nanoparticles, and the liver being the main detoxifying organ in the human body, there are limited studies which delineate the hepatotoxicity of nanoparticles. This paper reports on the biological interactions between liver cells and chitosan nanoparticles, which have been widely recognised as biocompatible. Using the MTT assay, human liver cells were shown to tolerate up to 4 h of exposure to 0.5% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles (18 {+-} 1 nm, 7.5 {+-} 1.0 mV in culture medium). At nanoparticle concentrations above 0.5% w/v, cell membrane integrity was compromised as evidenced by leakage of alanine transaminase into the extracellular milieu, and there was a dose-dependent increase in CYP3A4 enzyme activity. Uptake of chitosan nanoparticles into the cell nucleus was observed by confocal microscopic analysis after 4 h exposure with 1% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles. Electron micrographs further suggest necrotic or autophagic cell death, possibly caused by cell membrane damage and resultant enzyme leakage.

  12. Pdots, a new type of nanoparticle, bind to mTHPC via their lipid modified surface and exhibit very high FRET efficiency between the core and the sensitizer.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Sara; Lazar, Itay; Weitman, Hana; Senge, Mathias O; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2015-05-01

    Pdots are a new type of nanoparticle which exhibit strong potential for future applications in biophysics and cell biology. They are composed of organic chromophoric polymers, whose surfaces can be modified with different amphiphilic polymers, such as PEGylated lipids to make them very stable as colloids in water. We demonstrate in this manuscript that the lipid nano-coating around the Pdot can bind very efficiently to amphiphilic molecules, such as photosensitizers e.g. meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC). As a result the sensitizer is brought into very close contact with the cores of the Pdots, and resonance energy transfer from the core to the sensitizer is very efficient; in some cases it is close to 1. We show the spectroscopic properties of two types of Pdots; their sizes, which are in the 13-47 nm range, depend on the kind of polymer and the length of the PEGylated lipid chains that wrap it. We measured the efficiency of FRET by investigating the decrease in donor intensity or its lifetime upon binding with mTHPC. We also show the relative yields of singlet oxygen that are obtained via two pathways: by exciting the Pdots which transfer the energy to the attached sensitizer, or by exciting the sensitizer directly. This methodology could be used to enhance the use of a photosensitizer by employing both pathways in parallel. PMID:25853434

  13. Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) term amniotic-membrane-derived cells exhibited mesenchymal stem cells characteristics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaushalya; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Jarnail; Gahlawat, S K; Kumar, Dharmendra; Selokar, Naresh Lalaji; Yadav, S P; Gulati, B R; Yadav, P S

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies suggested that placentae amniotic membrane is a valuable source of stem cells in human as well as in livestock species. Advantages of amnion over other sources of stem cells included abundant availability, ethically non-objectionable and non-invasive source. The aim of the present study was the isolation, culture and characterization of amniotic-membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells from term placentae collected postpartum in buffalo. We have observed that both presumptive epithelial-like and fibroblast-like cells were cultured and maintained from term amnion. These cells were shown the positive expression of pluripotency markers (OCT-4, SOX-2, NANOG, TERT), mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD29, CD44, CD105) and negative for haematopoietic marker (CD34) genes at different passages. In addition, these cells were also positive for alkaline phosphatase staining. Stem-ness potential of any stem cells is determined by their potential to differentiate into specific lineages of cell type. In the present study, we have successfully differentiated the amniotic-membrane-derived cells into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages of cells in vitro. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that amniotic-membrane-derived cells expressed pluripotent and mesenchymal stem cells markers and have propensity to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineage cell type upon directed differentiation in vitro. PMID:26019121

  14. Bacteria-mediated delivery of nanoparticles and cargo into cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akin, Demir; Sturgis, Jennifer; Ragheb, Kathy; Sherman, Debby; Burkholder, Kristin; Robinson, J. Paul.; Bhunia, Arun K.; Mohammed, Sulma; Bashir, Rashid

    2007-07-01

    Nanoparticles and bacteria can be used, independently, to deliver genes and proteins into mammalian cells for monitoring or altering gene expression and protein production. Here, we show the simultaneous use of nanoparticles and bacteria to deliver DNA-based model drug molecules in vivo and in vitro. In our approach, cargo (in this case, a fluorescent or a bioluminescent gene) is loaded onto the nanoparticles, which are carried on the bacteria surface. When incubated with cells, the cargo-carrying bacteria (`microbots') were internalized by the cells, and the genes released from the nanoparticles were expressed in the cells. Mice injected with microbots also successfully expressed the genes as seen by the luminescence in different organs. This new approach may be used to deliver different types of cargo into live animals and a variety of cells in culture without the need for complicated genetic manipulations.

  15. BTLA exhibits immune memory for ?? T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Lin, Dong-Zi; Yi, Lai-Long; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wan-Dang; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wu, Xian-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Chen, Zheng W; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Despite past extensive studies, the role of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) in ?? T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB) remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that BTLA expression on ?? T cells is decreased in patients with M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Particularly, BTLA expression levels are likely critical for ?? T cells to manifest and maintain an active central memory phenotype with high capacity for secretion of IFN-? and perforin, which are important for immune memory against TB infection. BTLAhigh ?? T cells also exhibited higher capacity in response to Mtb peptide stimulation. In contrast to the role of BTLA played for negative regulation of immune responses, our data in the current studies suggest that BTLA expression on ?? T cells is likely associated with protective immune memory against Mtb infection in the setting of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. This previous unappreciated role for BTLA may have implications for prevention and treatment of patients with Mtb infection. PMID:25360214

  16. Endocytosis and exocytosis of nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Nuri; Park, Ji-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles that can be injected into the human body hold tremendous potential to detect and treat complex diseases. Understanding of the endocytosis and exocytosis mechanisms of nanoparticles is essential for safe and efficient therapeutic application. In particular, exocytosis is of significance in the removal of nanoparticles with drugs and contrast agents from the body, while endocytosis is of great importance for the targeting of nanoparticles in disease sites. Here, we review the recent research on the endocytosis and exocytosis of functionalized nanoparticles based on various sizes, shapes, and surface chemistries. We believe that this review contributes to the design of safe nanoparticles that can efficiently enter and leave human cells and tissues. PMID:24872703

  17. Enhanced apoptotic effects of dihydroartemisinin-aggregated gelatin and hyaluronan nanoparticles on human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Teong, Benjamin; Chen, I-Fen; Chang, Shwu Jen; Gao, Jimin; Kuo, Shyh-Ming

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua L., has anticancer properties. Due to poor water solubility, poor oral activity, and a short plasma half-life, large doses of DHA have to be injected to achieve the necessary bioavailability. This study examined increasing DHA bioavailability by encapsulating DHA within gelatin (GEL) or hyaluronan (HA) nanoparticles via an electrostatic field system. Observations from transmission electron microscopy show that DHA in GEL and HA nanoparticles formed GEL/DHA and HA/DHA aggregates that were approximately 30-40 nm in diameter. The entrapment efficiencies for DHA were approximately 13 and 35% for the GEL/DHA and HA/DHA aggregates, respectively. The proliferation of A549 cells was inhibited by the GEL/DHA and HA/DHA aggregates. Fluorescent annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and propidium iodide (PI) staining displayed low background staining with annexin V-FITC or PI on DHA-untreated cells. In contrast, annexin V-FITC and PI stains dramatically increased when the cells were incubated with GEL/DHA and HA/DHA aggregates. These results suggest that DHA-aggregated GEL and HA nanoparticles exhibit higher anticancer proliferation activities than DHA alone in A549 cells most likely due to the greater aqueous dispersion after hydrophilic GEL or HA nanoparticles aggregation. These results demonstrate that DHA can aggregate with nanoparticles in an electrostatic field environment to form DHA nanosized aggregates. PMID:24039154

  18. Cationic surface modification of PLG nanoparticles offers sustained gene delivery to pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Baoum, Abdulgader; Dhillon, Navneet; Buch, Shilpa; Berkland, Cory

    2010-05-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles are currently being explored as a nonviral gene delivery system; however, many obstacles impede the translation of these nanomaterials. For example, nanoparticles delivered systemically are inherently prone to adsorbing serum proteins and agglomerating as a result of their large surface/volume ratio. What is desired is a simple procedure to prepare nanoparticles that may be delivered locally and exhibit minimal toxicity while improving entry into cells for effectively delivering DNA. The objective of this study was to optimize the formulation of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles for gene delivery performance to a model of the pulmonary epithelium. Using a simple solvent diffusion technique, the chemistry of the particle surface was varied by using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (approximately 200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for 2 weeks. In A549 alveolar lung epithelial cells, high levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least 2 weeks. In contrast, PEI gene expression ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. PMID:19911425

  19. Ex vivo expansion of canine cytotoxic large granular lymphocytes exhibiting characteristics of natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Jun; Park, Ji-Yun; Jang, Youn-Young; Lee, Je-Jung; Lee, Youn-Kyung; Shin, Myung-Geun; Jung, Ji-Youn; Carson, William E.; Cho, Duck; Kim, Sang-Ki

    2013-01-01

    Canine NK cells still are not well-characterized due to the lack of information concerning specific NK cell markers and the fact that NK cells are not an abundant cell population. In this study, we selectively expanded the canine cytotoxic large granular lymphocytes (CLGLs) that exhibit morphologic, genetic, and functional characteristics of NK cells from normal donor PBMCs. The cultured CLGLs were characterized by a high proportion of CD5(dim) expressing cells, of which the majority of cells co-expressed CD3 and CD8, but did not express TCRαβ and TCRγδ. The phenotype of the majority of the CLGLs was CD5(dim)CD3+CD8+ TCRαβ−TCRγδ−CD4−CD21−CD11c+/−CD11d+/−CD44+. The expression of mRNAs for NK cell-associated receptors (NKG2D, NKp30, NKp44, Ly49, perforin, and granzyme B) were highly upregulated in cultured CLGLs. Specifically, NKp46 was remarkably upregulated in the cultured CLGLs compared to PBMCs. The mRNAs for the NKT-associated iTCRα gene in CLGLs was present at a basal level. The cytotoxic activity of the CLGLs against canine NK cell-sensitive CTAC cells was remarkably elevated in a dose-dependent manner, and the CLGLs produced large amounts of IFN-γ. The antitumor activity of CLGLs extended to different types of canine tumor cells (CF41.Mg and K9TCC-pu-AXC) without specific antigen recognition. These results are consistent with prior reports, and strongly suggest that the selectively expanded CLGLs represent a population of canine NK cells. The results of this study will contribute to future research on canine NK cells as well as NK cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:23548866

  20. Chick hair cells do not exhibit voltage-dependent somatic motility

    PubMed Central

    He, David Z Z; Beisel, Kirk W; Chen, Lin; Ding, Da-Lian; Jia, Shuping; Fritzsch, Bernd; Salvi, Richard

    2003-01-01

    It is generally believed that mechanical amplification by cochlear hair cells is necessary to enhance the sensitivity and frequency selectivity of hearing. In the mammalian ear, the basis of cochlear amplification is believed to be the voltage-dependent electromotility of outer hair cells (OHCs). The avian basilar papilla contains tall and short hair cells, with the former being comparable to inner hair cells, and the latter comparable to OHCs, based on their innervation patterns. In this study, we sought evidence for somatic electromotility by direct measurements of voltage-dependent length changes in both tall and short hair cells at nanometre resolution. Microchamber and whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques were used. Motility was measured with a photodiode-based measurement system. Non-linear capacitance, an electrical signature of somatic motility, was also measured to complement motility measurement. Significantly, chick hair cells did not exhibit somatic motility nor express non-linear capacitance. The lack of somatic motility suggests that in avian hair cells the active process resides elsewhere, most likely in the hair cell stereocilia. PMID:12527737

  1. Carbohydrate-Based Nanocarriers Exhibiting Specific Cell Targeting with Minimum Influence from the Protein Corona.

    PubMed

    Kang, Biao; Okwieka, Patricia; Schttler, Susanne; Winzen, Svenja; Langhanki, Jens; Mohr, Kristin; Opatz, Till; Mailnder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Wurm, Frederik R

    2015-06-15

    Whenever nanoparticles encounter biological fluids like blood, proteins adsorb on their surface and form a so-called protein corona. Although its importance is widely accepted, information on the influence of surface functionalization of nanocarriers on the protein corona is still sparse, especially concerning how the functionalization of PEGylated nanocarriers with targeting agents will affect protein corona formation and how the protein corona may in turn influence the targeting effect. Herein, hydroxyethyl starch nanocarriers (HES-NCs) were prepared, PEGylated, and modified on the outer PEG layer with mannose to target dendritic cells (DCs). Their interaction with human plasma was then studied. Low overall protein adsorption with a distinct protein pattern and high specific affinity for DC binding were observed, thus indicating an efficient combination of "stealth" and targeting behavior. PMID:25940402

  2. Cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Luk, Brian T; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-12-28

    Nanoparticles can preferentially accumulate at sites of action and hold great promise to improve the therapeutic index of many drugs. While conventional methods of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery have focused on primarily synthetic approaches, engineering strategies that combine synthetic nanoparticles with natural biomaterials have recently gained much attention. In particular, cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles are a new class of biomimetic nanoparticles that combine the unique functionalities of cellular membranes and engineering versatility of synthetic nanomaterials for effective delivery of therapeutic agents. Herein, we report on the recent progress on cell membrane-coated nanoparticles for drug delivery. In particular, we highlight three areas: (i) prolonging systemic circulation via cell membrane coating, (ii) cell-specific targeting via cell membrane coating, and (iii) applications of cell membrane coating for drug delivery. The cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticle platform has emerged as a novel delivery strategy with the potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of a variety of diseases. PMID:26210440

  3. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pöttler, Marina; Staicu, Andreas; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Weigel, Bianca; Schreiber, Eveline; Hofmann, Simone; Wiest, Irmi; Jeschke, Udo; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5) were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA) only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEONLA-BSA), or with dextran (SEONDEX). Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEONLA-BSA, SEONDEX or SEONLA. Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system. PMID:26540051

  4. Nanoparticle-Based ARV Drug Combinations for Synergistic Inhibition of Cell-Free and Cell-Cell HIV Transmission.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yonghou; Cao, Shijie; Bright, Danielle K; Bever, Alaina M; Blakney, Anna K; Suydam, Ian T; Woodrow, Kim A

    2015-12-01

    Nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems are playing an emerging role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) chemoprophylaxis and treatment due to their ability to alter the pharmacokinetics and improve the therapeutic index of various antiretroviral (ARV) drug compounds used alone and in combination. Although several nanocarriers have been described for combination delivery of ARV drugs, measurement of drug-drug activities facilitated by the use of these nanotechnology platforms has not been fully investigated for topical prevention. Here, we show that physicochemically diverse ARV drugs can be encapsulated within polymeric nanoparticles to deliver multidrug combinations that provide potent HIV chemoprophylaxis in relevant models of cell-free, cell-cell, and mucosal tissue infection. In contrast to existing approaches that coformulate ARV drug combinations together in a single nanocarrier, we prepared single-drug-loaded nanoparticles that were subsequently combined upon administration. ARV drug-nanoparticles were prepared using emulsion-solvent evaporation techniques to incorporate maraviroc (MVC), etravirine (ETR), and raltegravir (RAL) into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. We compared the antiviral potency of the free and formulated drug combinations for all pairwise and triple drug combinations against both cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 infection in vitro. The efficacy of ARV-drug nanoparticle combinations was also assessed in a macaque cervicovaginal explant model using a chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) containing the reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1. We observed that our ARV-NPs maintained potent HIV inhibition and were more effective when used in combinations. In particular, ARV-NP combinations involving ETR-NP exhibited significantly higher antiviral potency and dose-reduction against both cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 BaL infection in vitro. Furthermore, ARV-NP combinations that showed large dose-reduction were identified to be synergistic, whereas the equivalent free-drug combinations were observed to be strictly additive. Higher intracellular drug concentration was measured for cells dosed with the triple ARV-NP combination compared to the equivalent unformulated drugs. Finally, as a first step toward evaluating challenge studies in animal models, we also show that our ARV-NP combinations inhibit RT-SHIV virus propagation in macaque cervicovaginal tissue and block virus transmission by migratory cells emigrating from the tissue. Our results demonstrate that ARV-NP combinations control HIV-1 transmission more efficiently than free-drug combinations. These studies provide a rationale to better understand the role of nanocarrier systems in facilitating multidrug effects in relevant cells and tissues associated with HIV infection. PMID:26529558

  5. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of europium doped NaYF ? nanoparticles in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Zhang, Cuimiao; Jia, Guang; Duan, Jianlei; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2014-10-01

    Lanthanide-doped sodium yttrium fluoride (NaYF4) nanoparticles exhibit novel optical properties which make them be widely used in various fields. The extensive applications increase the chance of human exposure to these nanoparticles and thus raise deep concerns regarding their riskiness. In the present study, we have synthesized europium doped NaYF4 (NaYF4:Eu(3+)) nanoparticles with three diameters and used endothelial cells (ECs) as a cell model to explore the potential toxic effect. The cell viability, cytomembrane integrity, cellular uptake, intracellular localization, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), apoptosis detection, caspase-3 activity and expression of inflammatory gene were studied. The results indicated that these nanoparticles could be uptaken into ECs and decrease the cell viability, induce the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, increase the ROS level, and decrease the cell MMP in a size-dependent manner. Besides that, the cells were suffered to apoptosis with the caspase-3 activation, and the inflammation specific gene expressions (ICAM1 and VCAM1) were also increased. Our results suggest that the damage pathway may be related to the ROS generation and mitochondrial damage. The results provide novel evidence to elucidate their toxicity mechanisms and may be helpful for more rational applications of these compounds in the future. PMID:25175221

  6. Selenoprotein K knockout mice exhibit deficient calcium flux in immune cells and impaired immune responses.

    PubMed

    Verma, Saguna; Hoffmann, FuKun W; Kumar, Mukesh; Huang, Zhi; Roe, Kelsey; Nguyen-Wu, Elizabeth; Hashimoto, Ann S; Hoffmann, Peter R

    2011-02-15

    Selenoprotein K (Sel K) is a selenium-containing protein for which no function has been identified. We found that Sel K is an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein expressed at relatively high levels in immune cells and is regulated by dietary selenium. Sel K(-/-) mice were generated and found to be similar to wild-type controls regarding growth and fertility. Immune system development was not affected by Sel K deletion, but specific immune cell defects were found in Sel K(-/-) mice. Receptor-mediated Ca(2+) flux was decreased in T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages from Sel K(-/-) mice compared with controls. Ca(2+)-dependent functions including T cell proliferation, T cell and neutrophil migration, and Fc? receptor-mediated oxidative burst in macrophages were decreased in cells from Sel K(-/-) mice compared with that in cells from controls. West Nile virus infections were performed, and Sel K(-/-) mice exhibited decreased viral clearance in the periphery and increased viral titers in brain. Furthermore, West Nile virus-infected Sel K(-/-) mice demonstrated significantly lower survival (2 of 23; 8.7%) compared with that of wild-type controls (10 of 26; 38.5%). These results establish Sel K as an endoplasmic reticulum-membrane protein important for promoting effective Ca(2+) flux during immune cell activation and provide insight into molecular mechanisms by which dietary selenium enhances immune responses. PMID:21220695

  7. Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumor Exhibiting a Discrepancy between Tumor Markers and Imaging: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Kei; Mukohara, Toru; Hirai, Chihoko; Funakoshi, Yohei; Nakamura, Yukiko; Chayahara, Naoko; Toyoda, Masanori; Kiyota, Naomi; Itoh, Tomoo; Yokozaki, Hiroshi; Minami, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    We report a mediastinal germ cell tumor (GCT) that exhibited a discrepancy between the time course of serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels and clinical consequences. An otherwise healthy man, aged 34 years, was diagnosed with a nonseminomatous GCT, most likely embryonal carcinoma (EC), based on a mediastinal tumor biopsy. Standard chemotherapy resulted in an optimal decrease in serum hCG levels. However, multiple lesions in the liver continued to enlarge, which led to his death. Autopsy revealed few viable tumor cells in the liver, with the great majority of the tumor cells appearing to have undergone necrosis, suggesting that they responded to the chemotherapy. The residual tumor cells in the mediastinum and the liver were similar to syncytiotrophoblast cells, suggesting a cho-riocarcinoma (CC). On immunohistochemical analysis, the mediastinal tumor cells in the diagnostic biopsy specimen expressed both CD30 and hCG, whereas residual mediastinal and hepatic tumor cells in the autopsy specimen after chemotherapy also expressed hCG, but not CD30. These findings suggested that the patient suffered from a primary mixed GCT consisting of an EC and a CC. Both pre- and postchemotherapy tumors strongly expressed matrix metalloproteinase-2, supporting the aggressive and invasive features of the tumor phenotype. We speculate that the extremely invasive tumor destroyed normal liver structure, whereas chemotherapy and central necrosis reduced the number of viable cells themselves, causing a discordant decrease in serum hCG levels. PMID:26351441

  8. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  9. Nanoparticle-labeled stem cells: a novel therapeutic vehicle

    PubMed Central

    El-Sadik, Abir O; El-Ansary, Afaf; Sabry, Sherif M

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been described as a general purpose technology. It has already generated a range of inventions and innovations. Development of nanotechnology will provide clinical medicine with a range of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities such as medical imaging, medical diagnosis, drug delivery, and cancer detection and management. Nanoparticles such as manganese, polystyrene, silica, titanium oxide, gold, silver, carbon, quantum dots, and iron oxide have received enormous attention in the creation of new types of analytical tools for biotechnology and life sciences. Labeling of stem cells with nanoparticles overcame the problems in homing and fixing stem cells to their desired site and guiding extension of stem cells to specific directions. Although the biologic effects of some nanoparticles have already been assessed, information on toxicity and possible mechanisms of various particle types remains inadequate. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the mechanisms of internalization and distribution of nanoparticles inside stem cells, as well as the influence of different types of nanoparticles on stem cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and cytotoxicity, and to assess the role of nanoparticles in tracking the fate of stem cells used in tissue regeneration. PMID:22291483

  10. Biodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene by microbial cells coated with magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shan, GuoBin; Xing, JianMin; Zhang, HuaiYing; Liu, HuiZhou

    2005-08-01

    Microbial cells of Pseudomonas delafieldii were coated with magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and then immobilized by external application of a magnetic field. Magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by a coprecipitation method followed by modification with ammonium oleate. The surface-modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles were monodispersed in an aqueous solution and did not precipitate in over 18 months. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the average size of the magnetic particles was found to be in the range from 10 to 15 nm. TEM cross section analysis of the cells showed further that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles were for the most part strongly absorbed by the surfaces of the cells and coated the cells. The coated cells had distinct superparamagnetic properties. The magnetization (delta(s)) was 8.39 emu.g(-1). The coated cells not only had the same desulfurizing activity as free cells but could also be reused more than five times. Compared to cells immobilized on Celite, the cells coated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles had greater desulfurizing activity and operational stability. PMID:16085841

  11. Helicobacter pylori Protein JHP0290 Exhibits Proliferative and Anti-Apoptotic Effects in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Raquel; Pathak, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric epithelial cell proliferation, apoptosis and signaling pathways contributes to the development of infection-associated diseases. Here we report that JHP0290, which is a poorly functionally characterized protein from H. pylori, regulates multiple responses in human gastric epithelial cells. The differential expression and release of JHP0290 homologues was observed among H. pylori strains. JHP0290 existed in monomeric and dimeric forms in H. pylori cell extracts and culture broth. Recombinant purified JHP0290 (rJHP0290) also showed monomeric and dimeric forms, whereas the rJHP0290 C162A mutant exhibited only a monomeric form. The dimeric form of the protein was found to bind more efficiently to gastric epithelial cells than the monomeric form. The exposure of gastric epithelial cells to rJHP0290 induced proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Faster progression into the cell cycle was observed in rJHP0290-challenged gastric epithelial cells. Furthermore, we detected an anti-apoptotic effect of rJHP0290 in gastric epithelial cells when the cells were treated with rJHP0290 in combination with Camptothecin (CPT), which is an inducer of apoptosis. CPT-induced caspase 3 activation was significantly reduced in the presence of rJHP0290. In addition, the activation of ERK MAPK and the transcription factor NF?B was observed in rJHP0290-challenged gastric epithelial cells lines. Our results suggest that JHP0290 may affect H. pylori-induced gastric diseases via the regulation of gastric epithelial cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways. PMID:25879227

  12. Infectious dengue vesicles derived from CD61+ cells in acute patient plasma exhibited a diaphanous appearance

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Alan Yi-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chen, Po-Lin; Chen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Tsai-Yun; Lo, Yu-Chih; Ho, Tzu-Chuan; Lee, Meed; Chen, Min-Ting; Chiu, Yen-Chi; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2015-01-01

    The levels of neutralizing antibody to a pathogen are an effective indicator to predict efficacy of a vaccine in trial. And yet not all the trial vaccines are in line with the theory. Using dengue virus (DENV) to investigate the viral morphology affecting the predictive value, we evaluated the viral morphology in acute dengue plasma compared to that of Vero cells derived DENV. The virions in plasma were infectious and heterogeneous in shape with a “sunny-side up egg” appearance, viral RNA was enclosed with CD61+ cell-derived membrane interspersed by the viral envelope protein, defined as dengue vesicles. The unique viral features were also observed from ex vivo infected human bone marrow. Dengue vesicles were less efficiently neutralized by convalescent patient serum, compared to virions produced from Vero cells. Our results exhibit a reason why potencies of protective immunity fail in vivo and significantly impact dengue vaccine and drug development. PMID:26657027

  13. Infectious dengue vesicles derived from CD61+ cells in acute patient plasma exhibited a diaphanous appearance.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Alan Yi-Hui; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chen, Po-Lin; Chen, Ya-Ping; Chen, Tsai-Yun; Lo, Yu-Chih; Ho, Tzu-Chuan; Lee, Meed; Chen, Min-Ting; Chiu, Yen-Chi; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2015-01-01

    The levels of neutralizing antibody to a pathogen are an effective indicator to predict efficacy of a vaccine in trial. And yet not all the trial vaccines are in line with the theory. Using dengue virus (DENV) to investigate the viral morphology affecting the predictive value, we evaluated the viral morphology in acute dengue plasma compared to that of Vero cells derived DENV. The virions in plasma were infectious and heterogeneous in shape with a "sunny-side up egg" appearance, viral RNA was enclosed with CD61+ cell-derived membrane interspersed by the viral envelope protein, defined as dengue vesicles. The unique viral features were also observed from ex vivo infected human bone marrow. Dengue vesicles were less efficiently neutralized by convalescent patient serum, compared to virions produced from Vero cells. Our results exhibit a reason why potencies of protective immunity fail in vivo and significantly impact dengue vaccine and drug development. PMID:26657027

  14. Full-length Mst1 exhibits growth promoting function in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yuen-Keng; Lau, Wing-Sze; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan; Cheng, Alfred Sze-Lok; Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing; Cheung, Yue Sun; Lai, Paul Bo San

    2013-03-01

    The putative tumor suppressor Mst1, when cleaved to its 36kDa cleaved form, amplifies apoptotic signals. We found that Mst1 was predominantly expressed in its full-length form in 76% (17/25 cases) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors. Mst1 cleavage was basically absent in HCC cells. Ectopic full-length Mst1 expression increased the growth of HCC cells by 55-80% within 3days after transfection. Expression of exogenous NORE1B, a tumor suppressor commonly lost in HCC tumors (~56% of our cohort), was sufficient to suppress the growth promotion of full-length Mst1. Hence, Mst1 exhibits a growth promoting activity in HCC cells upon NORE1B downregulation. PMID:23347832

  15. A Dual Gold Nanoparticle System for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ricles, L.M.; Nam, S.Y.; Treviño, E.A.; Emelianov, S.Y.; Suggs, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies have demonstrated improved outcomes in preclinical and clinical trials for treating cardiovascular ischemic diseases. However, the contribution of stem cells to vascular repair is poorly understood. To elucidate these mechanisms, many have attempted to monitor stem cells following their delivery in vivo, but these studies have been limited by the fact that many contrast agents, including nanoparticles, are commonly passed on to non-stem cells in vivo. Specifically, cells of the reticuloendothelial system, such as macrophages, frequently endocytose free contrast agents, resulting in the monitoring of macrophages instead of the stem cell therapy. Here we demonstrate a dual gold nanoparticle system which is capable of monitoring both delivered stem cells and infiltrating macrophages using photoacoustic imaging. In vitro analysis confirmed preferential labeling of the two cell types with their respective nanoparticles and the maintenance of cell function following nanoparticle labeling. In addition, delivery of the system within a rat hind limb ischemia model demonstrated the ability to monitor stem cells and distinguish and quantify macrophage infiltration. These findings were confirmed by histology and mass spectrometry analysis. This work has important implications for cell tracking and monitoring cell-based therapies. PMID:25709814

  16. Dendritic cells combined with doxorubicin induces immunogenic cell death and exhibits antitumor effects for osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    KAWANO, MASANORI; TANAKA, KAZUHIRO; ITONAGA, ICHIRO; IWASAKI, TATSUYA; MIYAZAKI, MASASHI; IKEDA, SHINICHI; TSUMURA, HIROSHI

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dendritic cells (DCs) with low dose doxorubicin on the enhancement of the systemic immune response, including the effects on calreticulin (CRT) expression, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on the cell surface expression, and the enhancement of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) release from cancer cells, remain unclear. The present study investigated whether the combination of DCs and doxorubicin (ADM) induces immune cell death, and leads to tumor growth inhibition in a murine osteosarcoma model. To evaluate immune response activation in vivo, 4 groups of mice were established: i) untreated mice, ii) DC-treated mice, iii) ADM-treated mice, and iv) DC and ADM-treated mice. Immunological cell death and CRT, HSP70, and HMGB1 expression levels were higher in doxorubicin-treated cells than those in untreated or those treated with DCs alone. NF-κB expression was higher in the DCs after ligand activation using CRT, HSP70, or HMGB1 in vitro. Mice treated with DCs and ADM displayed an increased number of CD8+ T-lymphocytes within metastatic tumors and inhibition of metastatic growth. The expression of CRT and the release of HMGB1 from tumor tissues were increased in the ADM-treated groups. Treatment with DCs and ADM resulted in the highest serum interferon-γ levels. Combining ADM, which can induce immunogenic cell death, with DCs enhanced the systemic immune response. The findings of the present study provide further support for the continued development of antitumor agents that induce cell death and the immune response to target osteosarcoma.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of jacalin-gold nanoparticles conjugates as specific markers for cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Valeria S; Paino, Ieda M; Zucolotto, Valtencir

    2013-12-01

    New nanobiocomposites that combine nanoparticles and biomolecules have been shown very relevant for medical applications. Recently, cancer diagnostics and treatment have benefited from the development of nanobiocomposites, in which metallic or magnetic nanoparticles are conjugated with specific biomolecules for selective cell uptake. Despite recent advances in this area, the biomedical applications of these materials are still limited by the low efficiency of functionalization, low stability, among other factors. In this study, we report the synthesis of jacalin-conjugated gold nanoparticles, a nanoconjugate with potential application in medical areas, especially for cancer diagnosis. Jacalin is a lectin protein and it was employed due to its ability to recognize the Galβ1-3GalNAc disaccharide, which is highly expressed in tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized in the presence of generation 4 polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM G4) and conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled jacalin. The AuNPs/jacalin nanoconjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR). We also performed an investigation using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and fluorescence quenching measurements to understand the interactions occurring between the AuNPs and jacalin, which revealed that the nanoconjugate formation is driven by an entropic process with good affinity. Furthermore, in vitro tests revealed that the AuNPs/jacalin-FITC nanoconjugates exhibited higher affinity for leukemic K562 cells than for healthy mononuclear blood cells, which could be useful for biomedical applications, including cancer cells imaging. PMID:24028851

  18. Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Monocytes Exhibit Tolerogenic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) is rich in diverse hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to differentiate into various cell types with immunological compatibility at transplantation. Thus, UCB is a potential source for the preparation of dendritic cells (DCs) to be used for cell therapy against inflammatory disorders or cancers. However, the immunological properties of UCB-derived DCs are not fully characterized. In this study, we investigated the phenotypes and functions of UCB monocyte-derived DCs (UCB-DCs) in comparison with those of adult peripheral blood (APB) monocyte-derived DCs (APB-DCs). UCB-DCs contained less CD1a(+) DCs, which is known as immunostimulatory DCs, than APB-DCs. UCB-DCs exhibited lower expression of CD80, MHC proteins, and DC-SIGN, but higher endocytic activity, than APB-DCs. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of UCB-DCs minimally augmented the expression of maturation markers and production of interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?, but potently expressed IL-10. When UCB-DCs were cocultured with CD14(+) cell-depleted allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells, they weakly induced the proliferation, surface expression of activation markers, and interferon (IFN)-? production of T lymphocytes compared with APB-DCs. UCB possessed higher levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than APB, which might be responsible for tolerogenic phenotypes and functions of UCB-DCs. Indeed, APB-DCs prepared in the presence of PGE2 exhibited CD1a(-)CD14(+) phenotypes with tolerogenic properties, including weak maturation, impaired IL-12 production, and negligible T lymphocyte activation as UCB-DCs did. Taken together, we suggest that UCB-DCs have tolerogenic properties, which might be due to PGE2 highly sustained in UCB. PMID:26203805

  19. Bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjiao; Zheng, Yang; You, Shusen; Wang, Feng; Gao, Zhuo; Shen, Jie; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2015-03-11

    A new type of bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent Fe3O4@SiO2-PDI-PAA/Ca(2+) nanoparticles has been prepared by coating PDI-cored star polymers (PDI-PAA) onto the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanostructures. The morphology and properties of the composite nanoparticles are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, fluorescence spectrometry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The composite nanoparticles display a strong red emission and superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. The cell viability and uptake assays reveal good biocompatibility of these hybrid nanoparticles. Hence, the composite nanoparticles are of potential to be further explored as therapeutic vector in biomedical field. PMID:25691125

  20. Nanoparticle accumulation and transcytosis in brain endothelial cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dong; Raghnaill, Michelle Nic; Bramini, Mattia; Mahon, Eugene; berg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2013-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier, which controls and limits access to the central nervous system (CNS). The selectivity of the BBB relies on specialized characteristics of the endothelial cells that line the microvasculature, including the expression of intercellular tight junctions, which limit paracellular permeability. Several reports suggest that nanoparticles have a unique capacity to cross the BBB. However, direct evidence of nanoparticle transcytosis is difficult to obtain, and we found that typical transport studies present several limitations when applied to nanoparticles. In order to investigate the capacity of nanoparticles to access and transport across the BBB, several different nanomaterials, including silica, titania and albumin- or transferrin-conjugated gold nanoparticles of different sizes, were exposed to a human in vitro BBB model of endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells. Extensive transmission electron microscopy imaging was applied in order to describe nanoparticle endocytosis and typical intracellular localisation, as well as to look for evidence of eventual transcytosis. Our results show that all of the nanoparticles were internalised, to different extents, by the BBB model and accumulated along the endo-lysosomal pathway. Rare events suggestive of nanoparticle transcytosis were also observed for several of the tested materials.The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier, which controls and limits access to the central nervous system (CNS). The selectivity of the BBB relies on specialized characteristics of the endothelial cells that line the microvasculature, including the expression of intercellular tight junctions, which limit paracellular permeability. Several reports suggest that nanoparticles have a unique capacity to cross the BBB. However, direct evidence of nanoparticle transcytosis is difficult to obtain, and we found that typical transport studies present several limitations when applied to nanoparticles. In order to investigate the capacity of nanoparticles to access and transport across the BBB, several different nanomaterials, including silica, titania and albumin- or transferrin-conjugated gold nanoparticles of different sizes, were exposed to a human in vitro BBB model of endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells. Extensive transmission electron microscopy imaging was applied in order to describe nanoparticle endocytosis and typical intracellular localisation, as well as to look for evidence of eventual transcytosis. Our results show that all of the nanoparticles were internalised, to different extents, by the BBB model and accumulated along the endo-lysosomal pathway. Rare events suggestive of nanoparticle transcytosis were also observed for several of the tested materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterization in relevant media by Dynamic Light Scattering and SDS-PAGE. Transport study for silica nanoparticles across the BBB layer. Additional Electron Microscopy images of cells treated with the different nanoparticles investigated and details of the filters of the transwell systems. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02905k

  1. Detecting polymeric nanoparticles with coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microscopy in tissues exhibiting fixative-induced autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, N. L.; Godfrey, L.; Lalatsa, A.; Serrano, D. R.; Uchegbu, I. F.; Schatzlein, A.; Moger, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in pharmaceutical nanotechnology have enabled the development of nano-particulate medicines with enhanced drug performance. Although the fate of these nano-particles can be macroscopically tracked in the body (e.g. using radio-labeling techniques), there is little information about the sub-cellular scale mechanistic processes underlying the particle-tissue interactions, or how these interactions may correlate with pharmaceutical efficacy. To rationally engineer these nano-particles and thus optimize their performance, these mechanistic interactions must be fully understood. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy provides a label-free means for visualizing biological samples, but can suffer from a strong non-resonant background in samples that are prepared using aldehyde-based fixatives. We demonstrate how formalin fixative affects the detection of polymeric nanoparticles within kidneys following oral administration using CARS microscopy, compared with samples that were snap-frozen. These findings have implications for clinical applications of CARS for probing nanoparticle distribution in tissue biopsies.

  2. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, R.; Harrich, D.; Garcia, J.A. ); Gaynor, R.B. Wadsworth Veterans Hospital, Los Angeles, CA )

    1988-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, the authors performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses.

  3. Molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles in human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Bhmert, Linda; Niemann, Birgit; Lichtenstein, Dajana; Juling, Sabine; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are used in consumer products like food contact materials, drinking water technologies and supplements, due to their antimicrobial properties. This leads to an oral uptake and exposure of intestinal cells. In contrast to other studies we found no apoptosis induction by surfactant-coated silver nanoparticles in the intestinal cell model Caco-2 in a previous study, although the particles induced oxidative stress, morphological changes and cell death. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells. We used global gene expression profiling in differentiated Caco-2 cells, supported by verification of the microarray data by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and microscopic analysis, impedance measurements and assays for apoptosis and oxidative stress. Our results revealed that surfactant-coated silver nanoparticles probably affect the cells by outside-in signaling. They induce oxidative stress and have an influence on canonical pathways related to FAK, ILK, ERK, MAPK, integrins and adherence and tight junctions, thereby inducing transcription factors like AP1, NFkB and NRF2, which mediate cellular reactions in response to oxidative stress and metal ions and induce changes in the cytoskeleton and cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts. The present data confirm the absence of apoptotic cell death. Non-apoptotic, necrotic cell death, especially in the intestine, can cause inflammation and influence the mucosal immune response. PMID:25997095

  4. Mice lacking TrkB in parvalbumin-positive cells exhibit sexually dimorphic behavioral phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Elizabeth K; Jegarl, Anita; Clem, Roger L

    2014-11-01

    Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) is required for cued fear memory consolidation and extinction. Although BDNF is primarily secreted from glutamatergic neurons, TrkB is expressed by other genetically defined cells whose contributions to the behavioral effects of BDNF remain poorly understood. Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, which are highly enriched in TrkB, are emerging as key regulators of fear memory expression. We therefore hypothesized that activity-dependent BDNF signaling in PV-interneurons may modulate emotional learning. To test this hypothesis, we utilized the LoxP/Cre system for conditional deletion of TrkB in PV-positive cells to examine the impact of cell-autonomous BDNF signaling on Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. However, behavioral abnormalities indicative of vestibular dysfunction precluded the use of homozygous conditional knockouts in tests of higher cognitive functioning. While vestibular dysfunction was apparent in both sexes, female conditional knockouts exhibited an exacerbated phenotype, including extreme motor hyperactivity and circling behavior, compared to their male littermates. Heterozygous conditional knockouts were spared of vestibular dysfunction. While fear memory consolidation was unaffected in heterozygotes of both sexes, males exhibited impaired extinction consolidation compared to their littermate controls. Our findings complement evidence from human and rodent studies suggesting that BDNF signaling promotes consolidation of extinction and point to PV-positive neurons as a discrete population that mediates these effects in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25127683

  5. Metal nanoparticles amplify photodynamic effect on skin cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Brigitte; Chen, Si; Käll, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Linda; Ericson, Marica B.

    2011-03-01

    We report on an investigation aimed to increase the efficiency of photodynamic therapy (PDT) through the influence of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR's) in metal nanoparticles. PDT is based on photosensitizers that generate singlet oxygen at the tumour site upon exposure to visible light. Although PDT is a well-established treatment for skin cancer, a major drawback is the low quantum yield for singlet-oxygen production. This motivates the development of novel methods that enhance singlet oxygen generation during treatment. In this context, we study the photodynamic effect on cultured human skin cells in the presence or absence of gold nanoparticles with well established LSPR and field-enhancement properties. The cultured skin cells were exposed to protoporphyrin IX and gold nanoparticles and subsequently illuminated with red light. We investigated the differences in cell viability by tuning different parameters, such as incubation time and light dose. In order to find optimal parameters for specific targeting of tumour cells, we compared normal human epidermal keratinocytes with a human squamous skin cancer cell line. The study indicates significantly enhanced cell death in the presence of nanoparticles and important differences in treatment efficiency between normal and tumour cells. These results are thus promising and clearly motivate further development of nanoparticle enhanced clinical PDT treatment.

  6. Nanoparticle facilitated extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Lieber, Alexander M; Jackan, Charles S; Biffinger, Justin C; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-11-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been the focus of substantial research interest due to their potential for long-term, renewable electrical power generation via the metabolism of a broad spectrum of organic substrates, although the low power densities have limited their applications to date. Here, we demonstrate the potential to improve the power extraction by exploiting biogenic inorganic nanoparticles to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in MFCs. Simultaneous short-circuit current recording and optical imaging on a nanotechnology-enabled platform showed substantial current increase from Shewanella PV-4 after the formation of cell/iron sulfide nanoparticle aggregates. Detailed characterization of the structure and composition of the cell/nanoparticle interface revealed crystalline iron sulfide nanoparticles in intimate contact with and uniformly coating the cell membrane. In addition, studies designed to address the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport in this hybrid system showed that charge transport only occurred in the presence of live Shewanella, and moreover demonstrated that the enhanced current output can be attributed to improved electron transfer at cell/electrode interface and through the cellular-networks. Our approach of interconnecting and electrically contacting bacterial cells through biogenic nanoparticles represents a unique and promising direction in MFC research and has the potential to not only advance our fundamental knowledge about electron transfer processes in these biological systems but also overcome a key limitation in MFCs by constructing an electrically connected, three-dimensional cell network from the bottom-up. PMID:25310721

  7. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and staining of cancer cells using ferrimagnetic H-ferritin nanoparticles with increasing core size

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yao; Cao, Changqian; He, Xiaoqing; Yang, Caiyun; Tian, Lanxiang; Zhu, Rixiang; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study is to demonstrate the nanoscale size effect of ferrimagnetic H-ferritin (M-HFn) nanoparticles on magnetic properties, relaxivity, enzyme mimetic activities, and application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunohistochemical staining of cancer cells. Materials and methods M-HFn nanoparticles with different sizes of magnetite cores in the range of 2.75.3 nm were synthesized through loading different amounts of iron into recombinant human H chain ferritin (HFn) shells. Core size, crystallinity, and magnetic properties of those M-HFn nanoparticles were analyzed by transmission electron microscope and low-temperature magnetic measurements. The MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were incubated with synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles for 24 hours in Dulbeccos Modified Eagles Medium. In vitro MRI of cell pellets after M-HFn labeling was performed at 7 T. Iron uptake of cells was analyzed by Prussian blue staining and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemical staining by using the peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles was carried out on MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue paraffin sections. Results The saturation magnetization (Ms), relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles were monotonously increased with the size of ferrimagnetic cores. The M-HFn nanoparticles with the largest core size of 5.3 nm exhibit the strongest saturation magnetization, the highest peroxidase activity in immunohistochemical staining, and the highest r2 of 321 mM?1 s?1, allowing to detect MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells as low as 104 cells mL?1. Conclusion The magnetic properties, relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles are size dependent, which indicates that M-HFn nanoparticles with larger magnetite core can significantly enhance performance in MRI and staining of cancer cells. PMID:25878496

  8. UCP2- and non-UCP2-mediated electric current in eukaryotic cells exhibits different properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruihua; MoYung, K C; Zhang, M H; Poon, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Using live eukaryotic cells, including cancer cells, MCF-7 and HCT-116, normal hepatocytes and red blood cells in anode and potassium ferricyanide in cathode of MFC could generate bio-based electric current. Electrons and protons generated from the metabolic reaction in both cytosol and mitochondria contributing to the leaking would mediate the generation of electric current. Both resveratrol (RVT) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) used to induce proton leak in mitochondria were found to promote electric current production in all cells except red blood cells without mitochondria. Proton leak might be important for electric current production by bringing the charge balance in cells to enhance the further electron leak. The induced electric current by RVT can be blocked by Genipin, an inhibitor of UCP2-mediated proton leak, while that induced by DNP cannot. RVT could reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in cells better than that of DNP. In addition, RVT increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while DNP decreased it. Results highly suggested the existence of at least two types of electric current that showed different properties. They included UCP2-mediated and non-UCP2-mediated electric current. UCP2-mediated electric current exhibited higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction effect per unit electric current production than that of non-UCP2-mediated electric current. Higher UCP2-mediated electric current observed in cancer cells might contribute to the mechanism of drug resistence. Correlation could not be established between electric current production with either ROS and MMP without distinguishing the types of electric current. PMID:26276275

  9. Immobilization of gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces for safe and enhanced gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalies, Stefan; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Gentemann, Lara; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-07-01

    In comparison to standard transfection methods, gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection has proven to be a versatile alternative. This is based on its minor influence on cell viability and its high efficiency, especially for the delivery of small molecules like small interfering RNA. However, in order to transfer it to routine usage, a safety aspect is of major concern: The avoidance of nanoparticle uptake by the cells is desired. The immobilization of the gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces can address this issue. In this study, we achieved this by silanization of the appropriate surfaces and the binding of gold nanoparticles to them. Comparable perforation efficiencies to the previous approaches of gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection with free gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. The uptake of the immobilized particles by the cells is unlikely. Consequently, these investigations offer the possibility of bringing gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection closer to routine usage.

  10. Cyclometalated Ruthenium(II) Anthraquinone Complexes Exhibit Strong Anticancer Activity in Hypoxic Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Leli; Chen, Yu; Huang, Huaiyi; Wang, Jinquan; Zhao, Donglei; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-10-19

    Hypoxia is the critical feature of the tumor microenvironment that is known to lead to resistance to many chemotherapeutic drugs. Six novel ruthenium(II) anthraquinone complexes were designed and synthesized; they exhibit similar or superior cytotoxicity compared to cisplatin in hypoxic HeLa, A549, and multidrug-resistant (A549R) tumor cell lines. Their anticancer activities are related to their lipophilicity and cellular uptake; therefore, these physicochemical properties of the complexes can be changed by modifying the ligands to obtain better anticancer candidates. Complex 1, the most potent member of the series, is highly active against hypoxic HeLa cancer cells (IC50 =0.53??M). This complex likely has 46-fold better activity than cisplatin (IC50 =24.62??M) in HeLa cells. This complex tends to accumulate in the mitochondria and the nucleus of hypoxic HeLa cells. Further mechanistic studies show that complex 1 induced cell apoptosis during hypoxia through multiple pathways, including those of DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the inhibition of DNA replication and HIF-1? expression, making it an outstanding candidate for further in vivo studies. PMID:26338207

  11. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin; Feitelson, Mark A.; Gao Hengjun; Zhu Minghua

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  12. Studies regarding the protective effects exhibited by antidepressants on cell models.

    PubMed

    Purdel, Nicoleta Carmen; D?nciulescu Miulescu, Rucsandra; Neam?u, Marius Cristian; Avramescu, Elena Taina; Ilie, Mihaela; Manda, Gina; Margin?, Denisa Marilena

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to assess in vitro the short-term effects exerted by fluoxetine, sertraline and venlafaxine on certain physiological properties in two different study models: U937 monocytes and erythrocytes isolated from patients treated with the above-mentioned molecules. Results on U937 cell suspensions revealed the depolarization of the cell membrane induced by the three antidepressants. The maximal depolarization effect was registered after 15 minutes of cell exposure and was concentration-dependent, in a non-monotonic manner. The effect was also dependent on the tested compound, fluoxetine presenting the strongest depolarizing effect compared to sertraline and venlafaxine. The erythrocyte susceptibility to lipid peroxidation and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity were assessed on red blood cells isolated from patients with depressive disorder. Our results revealed that antidepressant treatment induced the antioxidant defense, by decreasing erythrocyte susceptibility to lipid peroxidation and increasing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. The effect is more intense in the case of severe pathology and less evident in the case of moderate or minor disorder, as expressed by MADRS (Montgomery-sberg Depression Rating Scale) score. Our results could indicate that selected antidepressants at therapeutic concentrations, besides their known pharmacological effects, exhibit a protective effect against oxidative stress and also influence cells with immune properties. PMID:26429173

  13. Laser-targeted photofabrication of gold nanoparticles inside cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nicholas I; Mochizuki, Kentaro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Pavillon, Nicolas; Hobro, Alison J; Ando, Jun; Fujita, Katsumasa; Kumagai, Yutaro

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle manipulation is of increasing interest, since they can report single molecule-level measurements of the cellular environment. Until now, however, intracellular nanoparticle locations have been essentially uncontrollable. Here we show that by infusing a gold ion solution, focused laser light-induced photoreduction allows in situ fabrication of gold nanoparticles at precise locations. The resulting particles are pure gold nanocrystals, distributed throughout the laser focus at sizes ranging from 2 to 20?nm, and remain in place even after removing the gold solution. We demonstrate the spatial control by scanning a laser beam to write characters in gold inside a cell. Plasmonically enhanced molecular signals could be detected from nanoparticles, allowing their use as nano-chemical probes at targeted locations inside the cell, with intracellular molecular feedback. Such light-based control of the intracellular particle generation reaction also offers avenues for in situ plasmonic device creation in organic targets, and may eventually link optical and electron microscopy. PMID:25298313

  14. Glucose-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and their specific interaction with tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Fang-Kui; Dang, Qi-Feng; Liang, Xing-Guo; Chen, Xi-Guang

    2014-12-01

    A novel targeted drug delivery system, glucose-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (GCNPs), was developed for specific recognition and interaction with glucose transporters (Gluts) over-expressed by tumor cells. GC was synthesized by using succinic acid as a linker between glucosamine and chitosan (CS), and successful synthesis was confirmed by NMR and elemental analysis. GCNPs were prepared by ionic crosslinking method, and characterized in terms of morphology, size, and zeta potential. The optimally prepared nanoparticles showed spherical shapes with an average particle size of (187.9 ± 3.8) nm and a zeta potential of (- 15.43 ± 0.31) mV. The GCNPs showed negligible cytotoxicity to mouse embryo fibroblast and 4T1 cells. Doxorubicin (DOX) could be efficiently entrapped into GCNPs, with a loading capacity and encapsulation efficiency of 20.11% and 64.81%, respectively. DOX-loaded nanoparticles exhibited sustained-release behavior in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4). In vitro cellular uptake studies showed that the GCNPs had better endocytosis ability than CSNPs, and the antitumor activity of DOX/GCNPs was 4-5 times effectiveness in 4T1 cell killing than that of DOX/CSNPs. All the results demonstrate that nanoparticles decorated with glucose have specific interactions with cancer cells via the recognition between glucose and Gluts. Therefore, Gluts-targeted GCNPs may be promising delivery agents in cancer therapies.

  15. Nanogel-quantum dot hybrid nanoparticles for live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Urara; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Hirano, Takashi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; E-mail: akiyoshi.org@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    We report here a novel carrier of quantum dots (QDs) for intracellular labeling. Monodisperse hybrid nanoparticles (38 nm in diameter) of QDs were prepared by simple mixing with nanogels of cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHP) modified with amino groups (CHPNH{sub 2}). The CHPNH{sub 2}-QD nanoparticles were effectively internalized into the various human cells examined. The efficiency of cellular uptake was much higher than that of a conventional carrier, cationic liposome. These hybrid nanoparticles could be a promising fluorescent probe for bioimaging.

  16. T cells from CLL patients exhibit features of T-cell exhaustion but retain capacity for cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jeffrey K.; McClanahan, Fabienne; Fatah, Rewas; Iqbal, Sameena; Agrawal, Samir; Ramsay, Alan G.; Gribben, John G.

    2013-01-01

    T-cell exhaustion, originally described in chronic viral infections, was recently reported in solid and hematologic cancers. It is not defined whether exhaustion contributes to T-cell dysfunction observed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We investigated the phenotype and function of T cells from CLL patients and age-matched controls. CD8+ and CD4+ T cells from CLL patients had increased expression of exhaustion markers CD244, CD160, and PD1, with expansion of a PD1+BLIMP1HI subset. These molecules were most highly expressed in the expanded population of effector T cells in CLL. CLL CD8+ T cells showed functional defects in proliferation and cytotoxicity, with the cytolytic defect caused by impaired granzyme packaging into vesicles and nonpolarized degranulation. In contrast to virally induced exhaustion, CLL T cells showed increased production of interferon-? and TNF? and increased expression of TBET, and normal IL2 production. These defects were not restricted to expanded populations of cytomegalovirus (CMV)specific cells, although CMV seropositivity modulated the distribution of lymphocyte subsets, the functional defects were present irrespective of CMV serostatus. Therefore, although CLL CD8+ T cells exhibit features of T-cell exhaustion, they retain the ability to produce cytokines. These findings also exclude CMV as the sole cause of T-cell defects in CLL. PMID:23247726

  17. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Nanoparticles in Mammalian Germline Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Braydich-Stolle, Laura; Hussain, Saber; Schlager, John J.; Hofmann, Marie-Claude

    2010-01-01

    Gametogenesis is a complex biological process that is particularly sensitive to environmental insults such as chemicals. Many chemicals have a negative impact on the germline, either by directly affecting the germ cells, or indirectly through their action on the somatic nursing cells. Ultimately, these effects can inhibit fertility, and they may have negative consequences for the development of the offspring. Recently, nanomaterials such as nanotubes, nanowires, fullerene derivatives (buckyballs), and quantum dots have received enormous national attention in the creation of new types of analytical tools for biotechnology and the life sciences. Despite the wide application of nanomaterials, there is a serious lack of information concerning their impact on human health and the environment. Thus, there are limited studies available on toxicity of nanoparticles for risk assessment of nanomaterials. The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of a mouse spermatogonial stem cell line as a model to assess nanotoxicity in the male germline in vitro. The effects of different types of nanoparticles on these cells were evaluated by light microscopy, and by cell proliferation and standard cytotoxicity assays. Our results demonstrate a concentration-dependent toxicity for all types of particles tested, whereas the corresponding soluble salts had no significant effect. Silver nanoparticles were the most toxic while molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) nanoparticles were the least toxic. Our results suggest that this cell line provides a valuable model with which to assess the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in the germ line in vitro. PMID:16014736

  18. Laser heating of gold nanoparticles: photothermal cancer cell therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Toshkova, R. A.; Gardeva, E. G.; Yossifova, L. S.; Alexandrov, M. T.; Karashanova, D.

    2012-06-01

    In this work an application of gold nanoparticles in in-vitro photothermal cancer cell therapy is demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles with different diameters - 40, 100 and 200 nm are mixed with HeLa cancer cells. After incubation, the nanoparticles are found to be deposited on the cell's membrane or enter into the cells. Pulsed laser radiation at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG system is used to irradiate the samples. The experiments are performed at fluences in the range from 50 mJ/cm2 up to the established safety standard for medical lasers of 100 mJ/cm2. The cell viability as a function of the particle dimensions and laser fluence is estimated. The nanoparticles heating and cooling dynamics is traced by a numerical model based on heat diffusion equation combined with Mie theory for calculation of the optical properties of nanoparticles. The particle response to the nanosecond laser heating is investigated experimentally as gold colloids are irradiated at different fluences. The threshold fluences for particle's melting and boiling are defined. We show that at the presented fluence range the particles are decomposed into smaller fragments and even short irradiation time leads to decrease of cell viability.

  19. Novel STAT3 phosphorylation inhibitors exhibit potent growth suppressive activity in pancreatic and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Hutzen, Brian; Zuo, Mingxin; Ball, Sarah; Deangelis, Stephanie; Foust, Elizabeth; Pandit, Bulbul; Ihnat, Michael A.; Shenoy, Satyendra S.; Kulp, Samuel; Li, Pui-Kai; Li, Chenglong; Fuchs, James; Lin, Jiayuh

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive activation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently detected in most types of human cancer where it plays important roles in survival, drug-resistance, angiogenesis, and other functions. Targeting constitutive STAT3 signaling is thus an attractive therapeutic approach for these cancers. We have recently developed novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitors known as FLLL31 and FLLL32, which are derived from curcumin (the primary bioactive compound of turmeric). These compounds are designed to bind selectively to Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) and the STAT3 SH2 domain, which serves crucial roles in STAT3 dimerization and signal transduction. Here we show that FLLL31 and FLLL32 are effective inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation, DNA binding activity, and transactivation in vitro, leading to the impediment of multiple oncogenic processes and the induction of apoptosis in pancreatic and breast cancer cell lines. FLLL31 and FLLL32 also inhibit colony formation in soft agar, cell invasion, and exhibit synergy with the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin against breast cancer cells. In addition, we show that FLLL32 can inhibit the induction of STAT3 phosphorylation by Interferon-? (IFN?) and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in breast cancer cells. We also demonstrate that administration of FLLL32 can inhibit tumor growth and vascularity in chicken embryo xenografts as well as substantially reduce tumor volumes in mouse xenografts. Our findings highlight the potential of these new compounds and their efficacy in targeting pancreatic and breast cancers that exhibit constitutive STAT3 signaling. PMID:20215512

  20. Highly fluorescent and bioresorbable polymeric nanoparticles with enhanced photostability for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuo; Liu, Shiying; Wang, Kai; Yang, Cangjie; Luo, Yimin; Zhang, Yingdan; Cao, Bin; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Mingfeng

    2015-01-21

    We report a facile and general strategy for enhancing the photostability of organic fluorophores for bioimaging applications. As a proof of concept, bright and robust fluorescence was observed in solid states of a well-defined synthetic polymer polycaprolactone consisting of di(thiophene-2-yl)-diketopyrrolopyrrole covalently linked in the middle of the polymer chain as a biocompatible and bioresorbable matrix. The nanoparticles prepared through a nanoprecipitation process of these polymers could be internalized by both tumor cells and stem cells with little cytotoxicity. Moreover, these highly fluorescent nanoparticles exhibited significantly enhanced photostability compared to commercial quantum dots or physical blends of dye/polymer complexes in cell imaging and long-term tracing. PMID:25470662

  1. Vasopressin cell groups exhibit strongly divergent responses to copulation and male–male interactions in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jacqueline M.; Murray, John H.; Demas, Gregory E.; Goodson, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and its nonmammalian homolog arginine vasotocin influence social behaviors ranging from affiliation to resident–intruder aggression. Although numerous sites of action have been established for these behavioral effects, the involvement of specific AVP cell groups in the brain is poorly understood, and socially elicited Fos responses have not been quantified for many of the AVP cell groups found in rodents. Surprisingly, this includes the AVP population in the posterior part of the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTMP), which has been extensively implicated, albeit indirectly, in various aspects of affiliation and other social behaviors. We examined the Fos responses of eight hypothalamic and three extra-hypothalamic AVP-immunoreactive (-ir) cell groups to copulation, nonaggressive male–male interaction, and aggressive male–male interaction in both dominant and subordinate C57BL/6J mice. The BSTMP cells exhibited a response profile that was unlike all other cell groups: from a control baseline of ~5% of AVP-ir neurons colocalizing with Fos, colocalization increased significantly to ~12% following nonaggressive male–male interaction, and to ~70% following copulation. Aggressive interactions did not increase colocalization beyond the level observed in nonaggressive male mice. These results suggest that BSTMP neurons in mice may increase AVP-Fos colocalization selectively in response to affiliation-related stimuli, similar to findings in finches. In contrast, virtually all other cell groups were responsive to negative aspects of interaction, either through elevated AVP-Fos colocalization in subordinate animals, positive correlations of AVP-Fos colocalization with bites received, and/or negative correlations of AVP-Fos colocalization with dominance. These findings greatly expand what is known of the contributions of specific brain AVP cell groups to social behavior. PMID:20382147

  2. Simvastatin exhibits antiproliferative effects on spheres derived from canine mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian G; Olivares, Araceli; Stoore, Caroll

    2015-05-01

    Mammary cancer is the most frequent type of tumor in the female canine. Treatments are mainly limited to surgery and chemotherapy; however, these tumors may develop clinical recurrence, metastasis and chemoresistance. The existence of a subpopulation of cancer cells with stemness features called cancer stem-like cells, may explain in part these characteristics of tumor progression. The statins, potent blockers of cholesterol synthesis, have also shown antitumor effects on cancer mammary cells, changes mediated by a decrease in the isoprenylation of specific proteins. Few studies have shown that simvastatin, a lipophilic statin, sensitizes cancer stem-like cells eliminating drug resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on spheres derived from CF41.Mg canine mammary tumor cells, which were characterized by phenotypic and functional analyses. Spheres exhibited characteristics of stemness, primarily expressing a CD44?/CD24?/low phenotype, displaying auto-renewal and relative chemoresistance. Exposure to simvastatin induced a decrease in the sphere-forming capacity and cell viability, accompanied by a concentration- and time-dependent increase in caspase-3/7 activity. In addition, modulation of ?-catenin and p53 expression was observed. Simvastatin triggered a synergistic effect with doxorubicin, sensitizing the spheres to the cytotoxic effect exerted by the drug. Invasiveness of spheres was decreased in response to simvastatin and this effect was counteracted by the presence of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Our results suggest that simvastatin targets canine mammary cancer stem-like cells, supporting its therapeutical application as a novel agent to treat canine mammary cancer. PMID:25778435

  3. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D cell culture. PMID:25595712

  4. Nanoparticle derived contacts for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.S.

    1999-10-20

    Contacts are becoming increasingly important as PV devices move to higher efficiency and lower cost. The authors present an approach to developing contacts using nanoparticle-based precursors. Both elemental, alloy and compound nanoparticles can be employed for contacts. Ink based approaches can be utilized at low temperatures and utilize direct write techniques such as ink jet and screen printing. The ability to control the composition of the nanoparticle allows improved control of the contact metallurgy and the potential for thermodynamically stable interfaces. A key requirement is the ability to control the interface between particles and between particles and the substrate. The authors illustrate some of these principals with recent results on Al, Cu and (Hg,Cu)Te. They show that for the elemental materials control of the surface can prevent oxide formation and act as glue to control the reactivity of the nanoparticles.

  5. Glial cells, but not neurons, exhibit a controllable response to a localized inflammatory microenvironment in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sommakia, Salah; Rickus, Jenna L.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design long-lasting intracortical implants hinges on understanding the factors leading to the loss of neuronal density and the formation of the glial scar. In this study, we modify a common in vitro mixed cortical culture model using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to examine the responses of microglia, astrocytes, and neurons to microwire segments. We also use dip-coated polyethylene glycol (PEG), which we have previously shown can modulate impedance changes to neural microelectrodes, to control the cellular responses. We find that microglia, as expected, exhibit an elevated response to LPS-coated microwire for distances of up to 150 ?m, and that this elevated response can be mitigated by co-depositing PEG with LPS. Astrocytes exhibit a more complex, distance-dependent response, whereas neurons do not appear to be affected by the type or magnitude of glial response within this in vitro model. The discrepancy between our in vitro responses and typically observed in vivo responses suggest the importance of using a systems approach to understand the responses of the various brain cell types in a chronic in vivo setting, as well as the necessity of studying the roles of cell types not native to the brain. Our results further indicate that the loss of neuronal density observed in vivo is not a necessary consequence of elevated glial activation. PMID:25452724

  6. New Derivatives of Pyridoxine Exhibit High Antibacterial Activity against Biofilm-Embedded Staphylococcus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kayumov, Airat R.; Nureeva, Aliya A.; Trizna, Elena Yu.; Gazizova, Guzel R.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Shtyrlin, Nikita V.; Pugachev, Mikhail V.; Sapozhnikov, Sergey V.; Shtyrlin, Yurii G.

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis often form rigid biofilms on tissues and inorganic surfaces. In the biofilm bacterial cells are embedded in a self-produced polysaccharide matrix and thereby are inaccessible to biocides, antibiotics, or host immune system. Here we show the antibacterial activity of newly synthesized cationic biocides, the quaternary ammonium, and bisphosphonium salts of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) against biofilm-embedded Staphylococci. The derivatives of 6-hydroxymethylpyridoxine were ineffective against biofilm-embedded S. aureus and S. epidermidis at concentrations up to 64 μg/mL, although all compounds tested exhibited low MICs (2 μg/mL) against planktonic cells. In contrast, the quaternary ammonium salt of pyridoxine (N,N-dimethyl-N-((2,2,8-trimethyl-4H-[1,3]dioxino[4,5-c]pyridin-5-yl)methyl)octadecan-1-aminium chloride (3)) demonstrated high biocidal activity against both planktonic and biofilm-embedded bacteria. Thus, the complete death of biofilm-embedded S. aureus and S. epidermidis cells was obtained at concentrations of 64 and 16 μg/mL, respectively. We suggest that the quaternary ammonium salts of pyridoxine are perspective to design new synthetic antibiotics and disinfectants for external application against biofilm-embedded cells. PMID:26839888

  7. Resveratrol exhibits cytostatic and antiestrogenic properties with human endometrial adenocarcinoma (Ishikawa) cells.

    PubMed

    Bhat, K P; Pezzuto, J M

    2001-08-15

    Trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol), a polyphenolic compound found in the human diet, was reported recently to serve as an estrogen agonist with cultured MCF-7 cells transfected with estrogen response element-luciferase reporter plasmids. As currently shown, treatment of cultured human endometrial adenocarcinoma (Ishikawa) cells with resveratrol (concentrations as high as 10 microM) did not significantly increase the levels of an estrogen-inducible marker enzyme, alkaline phosphatase. To the contrary, when alkaline phosphatase was induced by treatment with 1 nM of 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), resveratrol exhibited a dose-dependent decrease in activity (IC(50) = 2.3 microM). Furthermore, when Ishikawa cells were treated with resveratrol as a single agent, estrogen-inducible progesterone receptor (PR) was not enhanced, and PR expression induced by treatment with E(2) was inhibited by resveratrol in a dose-dependent fashion at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, resveratrol mediated suppression of a functional activity of PR as demonstrated by down-regulation of alpha(1)-integrin expression induced by E(2) plus progesterone. With transient transfection experiments conducted with Ishikawa cells, antiestrogenic effects were confirmed by dose-dependent inhibition of E(2)-induced estrogen response element-luciferase transcriptional activity. Because resveratrol antagonized estrogenic effects in Ishikawa cells, competitive binding analyses were performed to examine the potential of displacing [(3)H]E(2) from human estrogen receptor (ER). Resveratrol showed no discernable activity with ER-alpha, but with ER-beta, E(2) was displaced with an IC(50) of 125 microM. However, mRNA and protein expression of ER-alpha but not ER-beta were suppressed by resveratrol in Ishikawa cells, in the concentration range of 5-15 microM. In addition, in the presence or absence of E(2), resveratrol inhibited Ishikawa cell proliferation in a time-dependent manner with cells accumulating in the S phase of the cycle < or =48 h. This effect was reversible. Analysis of some critical cell cycle proteins revealed a specific increase in expression of cyclins A and E but a decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase 2. These data suggest resveratrol exerts an antiproliferative effect in Ishikawa cells, and the effect may be mediated by both estrogen-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:11507064

  8. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheng, Lin; Huang, Yue-wern; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Ma, Yinfa

    2006-12-31

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

  9. Performance enhancement of polymer solar cells using copper oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninayake, Aruna P.; Gunashekar, Subhashini; Li, Shengyi; Church, Benjamin C.; Abu-Zahra, Nidal

    2015-06-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) is a p-type semiconductor with a band gap energy of 1.5 eV, this is close to the ideal energy gap of 1.4 eV required for solar cells to allow good solar spectral absorption. The inherent electrical characteristics of CuO nanoparticles make them attractive candidates for improving the performance of polymer solar cells when incorporated into the active polymer layer. The UV-visible absorption spectra and external quantum efficiency of P3HT/PC70BM solar cells containing different weight percentages of CuO nanoparticles showed a clear enhancement in the photo absorption of the active layer, this increased the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells by 24% in comparison to the reference cell. The short circuit current of the reference cell was found to be 5.234 mA cm-2 and it seemed to increase to 6.484 mA cm-2 in cells containing 0.6 mg of CuO NPs; in addition, the fill factor increased from 61.15% to 68.0%, showing an enhancement of 11.2%. These observations suggest that the optimum concentration of CuO nanoparticles was 0.6 mg in the active layer. These significant findings can be applied to design high-efficiency polymer solar cells containing inorganic nanoparticles.

  10. Quercetin conjugated superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles for in-vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines for chemotherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Rajesh; Priyatharshni, S; Babu, V N; Mangalaraj, D; Viswanathan, C; Kannan, S; Ponpandian, N

    2014-12-15

    The magnetic nanoparticles attract increasing interest due to their opportunities in cancer therapy and used as drug carriers for several other diseases. The present study investigates the quercetin conjugated superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles for in-vitro analysis of breast cancer cell lines for chemotherapy. A simple precipitation method was used to prepare the dextran coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles and the anticancer flavonoid quercetin was conjugated on the surface via carboxylic/amine group using nanoprecipitation method. The structural, morphological and the magnetic properties of the prepared materials were studied by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transformed infer-red spectrometer (FTIR), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiahiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium) assay of dextran coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles did not exhibit notable toxicity against MCF7 cells, whereas the cytotoxicity of quercetin conjugated Fe3O4 nanoparticles increased significantly in comparison with pure quercetin. The incubation of MCF-7 cells with quercetin conjugated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (QCMNPs) shows significant changes in cellular morphology observed through fluorescent microscopy. The results validate the prepared quercetin conjugated Fe3O4 nanoparticles are promising anticancer agents for targeted drug delivery. PMID:25278361

  11. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2013-12-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives.Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ESI containing 1H NMR spectra and additional fibroblast characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04794f

  12. Antitumor effect of TRAIL on oral squamous cell carcinoma using magnetic nanoparticle-mediated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Miao, Leiying; Liu, Chao; Ge, Jiuyu; Yang, Weidong; Liu, Jinzhong; Sun, Weibin; Yang, Bai; Zheng, Changyu; Sun, Hongchen; Hu, Qingang

    2014-07-01

    We developed a new magnetic nanovector to improve the efficiency and targeting of transgene therapy for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Positively charged polymer PEI-modified Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles were tested as gene transfer vectors in the presence of a magnetic field. The Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were prepared by a co-precipitation method and had good dispersibility in water. These nanoparticles modified by PEI were combined with negatively charged pACTERT-EGFP via electrostatic interaction. The transfection efficiency of the magnetic nano-gene vector with the magnetic field was determined by a fluorescence-inverted microscope and flow cytometry. The results showed significant improvement compared with the control group (p < 0.05). The magnetic complexes also exhibited up to 6-times higher transfection efficiency compared with commonly used PEI or lipofectin. On the basis of these results, the antitumor effect with suicide gene therapy using pACTERT-TRAIL in vitro and vivo was evaluated. In vitro apoptosis was determined with the Annexin V-FITC Apoptosis Detection Kit. The results suggested that PEI-modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles could mediate the killing of Tca83 cells. Furthermore, treatment with pACTERT-TRAIL delivered by magnetic nanoparticles showed a significant cytostatic effect through the induction of apoptosis in a xenograft model. This indicates that magnetic nano-gene vectors could improve the transgene efficiency for Tca83 cells and could exhibit antitumor functions with the plasmid pACTERT-TRAIL. This may be a new way to treat OSCC. PMID:24563116

  13. Nanoparticle-Delivered Antisense MicroRNA-21 Enhances the Effects of Temozolomide on Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ananta, Jeyarama S; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Massoud, Tarik F

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) generally exhibits high IC50 values for its standard drug treatment, temozolomide (TMZ). MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is an oncomiR overexpressed in GBM, thus controlling important aspects of glioma biology. We hypothesized that PLGA nanoparticles carrying antisense miR-21 to glioblastoma cells might beneficially knock down endogenous miR-21 prior to TMZ treatment. PLGA nanoparticles encapsulating antisense miR-21 were effective in intracellular delivery and sustained silencing (p < 0.01) of miR-21 function in U87 MG, LN229, and T98G cells. Prior antisense miR-21 delivery significantly reduced the number of viable cells (p < 0.001), and increased (1.6-fold) cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase upon TMZ treatment in U87 MG cells. There was overexpression of the miR-21 target genes PTEN (by 67%) and caspase-3 (by 15%) upon cotreatment. This promising PLGA nanoparticle-based platform for antisense miR-21 delivery to GBM is an effective cotherapeutic strategy in cell culture, warranting the need for further studies prior to future clinical translation. PMID:26559642

  14. Salinomycin encapsulated nanoparticles as a targeting vehicle for glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tığlı Aydın, R Seda; Kaynak, Gökçe; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-02-01

    Salinomycin has been introduced as a novel alternative to traditional anti-cancer drugs. The aim of this study was to test a strategy designed to deliver salinomycin to glioblastoma cells in vitro. Salinomycin-encapsulated polysorbate 80-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (P80-SAL-PLGA) were prepared and characterized with respect to particle size, morphology, thermal properties, drug encapsulation efficiency and controlled salinomycin-release behaviour. The in vitro cellular uptake of P80-SAL-PLGA (5 and 10 µM) or uncoated nanoparticles was assessed in T98G human glioblastoma cells, and the cell viability was investigated with respect to anti-growth activities. SAL, which was successfully transported to T98G glioblastoma cells via P80 coated nanoparticles (∼14% within 60 min), greatly decreased (p < 0.01) the cellular viability of T98G cells. Substantial morphological changes were observed in the T98G cells with damaged actin cytoskeleton. Thus, P80-SAL-PLGA nanoparticles induced cell death, suggesting a potential therapeutic role for this salinomycin delivery system in the treatment of human glioblastoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 455-464, 2016. PMID:26476239

  15. Hurler disease bone marrow stromal cells exhibit altered ability to support osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Francesca; Redaelli, Daniela; Salvad, Agnese; Marzorati, Simona; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Ferina, Chiara; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Bertola, Francesca; Romano, Michela; Villani, Guglielmo; Antolini, Laura; Rovelli, Attilio; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Biondi, Andrea; Riminucci, Mara; Bianco, Paolo; Serafini, Marta

    2012-06-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome) is a rare genetic disorder that is caused by mutations in the ?-L-iduronidase (IDUA) gene, resulting in the deficiency of IDUA enzyme activity and intra-cellular accumulation of glycosaminoglycans. A characteristic skeletal phenotype is one of the many clinical manifestations in Hurler disease. Since the mechanism(s) underlying these skeletal defects are not completely understood, and bone and cartilage are mesenchymal lineages, we focused on the characterization of mesenchymal cells isolated from the bone marrow (BM) of 5 Hurler patients. IDUA-mutated BM stromal cells (BMSC) derived from MPS IH patients exhibited decreased IDUA activity, consistent with the disease genotype. The expansion rate, phenotype, telomerase activity, and differentiation capacity toward adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and smooth muscle cells in vitro of the MPS I BMSC lines were similar to those of BMSC from age-matched normal control donors. MPS I BMSC also had a similar in vivo osteogenic capacity as normal BMSC. However, MPS I BMSC displayed an increased capacity to support osteoclastogenesis, which may correlate with the up-regulation of the RANKL/RANK/OPG molecular pathway in MPS I BMSC compared with normal BMSC. PMID:22280094

  16. Investigation of Biophysical Mechanisms in Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Manipulation of Cells Using a Multimodal Holographic and Fluorescence Imaging Setup

    PubMed Central

    Rakoski, Mirko S.; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin) served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy. PMID:25909631

  17. A Tetrameric Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibits Specific Cytotoxic Effects against Oral Squamous-Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Solarte, Víctor A.; Rosas, Jaiver E.; Rivera, Zuly J.; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L.; García, Javier E.; Vernot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several short linear peptides derived from cyclic bovine lactoferricin were synthesized and tested for their cytotoxic effect against the oral cavity squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines CAL27 and SCC15. As a control, an immortalized and nontumorigenic cell line, Het-1A, was used. Linear peptides based on the RRWQWR core sequence showed a moderate cytotoxic effect and specificity towards tumorigenic cells. A tetrameric peptide, LfcinB(20–25)4, containing the RRWQWR motif, exhibited greater cytotoxic activity (>90%) in both OSCC cell lines compared to the linear lactoferricin peptide or the lactoferrin protein. Additionally, this tetrameric peptide showed the highest specificity towards tumorigenic cells among the tested peptides. Interestingly, this effect was very fast, with cell shrinkage, severe damage to cell membrane permeability, and lysis within one hour of treatment. Our results are consistent with a necrotic effect rather than an apoptotic one and suggest that this tetrameric peptide could be considered as a new candidate for the therapeutic treatment of OSCC. PMID:26609531

  18. Differential nanoreprotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in male somatic cells and spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Choi, Yun-Jung; Han, Jae Woong; Kim, Eunsu; Park, Jung Hyun; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) possess unique physical, chemical, and biological properties. AgNPs have been increasingly used as anticancer, antiangiogenic, and antibacterial agents for the treatment of bacterial infections in open wounds as well as in ointments, bandages, and wound dressings. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of two different sizes of AgNPs (10 nm and 20 nm) in male somatic Leydig (TM3) and Sertoli (TM4) cells and spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). Methods Here, we demonstrate a green and simple method for the synthesis of AgNPs using Bacillus cereus culture supernatants. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized using ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The toxicity of the synthesized AgNPs was evaluated by the effects on cell viability, metabolic activity, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and expression of genes encoding steroidogenic and tight junction proteins. Results AgNPs inhibited the viability and proliferation of TM3 and TM4 cells in a dose- and size-dependent manner by damaging cell membranes and inducing the generation of reactive oxygen species, which in turn affected SSC growth on TM3 and TM4 as feeder cells. Small AgNPs (10 nm) were more cytotoxic than medium-sized nanoparticles (20 nm). TEM revealed the presence of AgNPs in the cell cytoplasm and nucleus, and detected mitochondrial damage and enhanced formation of autosomes and autolysosomes in the AgNP-treated cells. Flow cytometry analysis using Annexin V/propidium iodide staining showed massive cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses indicated that in TM3 and TM4 cells, AgNPs activated the p53, p38, and pErk1/2 signaling pathways and significantly downregulated the expression of genes related to testosterone synthesis (TM3) and tight junctions (TM4). Furthermore, the exposure of TM3 and TM4 cells to AgNPs inhibited proliferation and self-renewal of SSCs. Conclusion Our results suggest that AgNPs exhibit size-dependent nanoreprotoxicity in male somatic cells and SSCs, strongly suggesting that applications of AgNPs in commercial products must be carefully evaluated. Further studies of AgNPs-induced nanoreprotoxicity in animal models are required. PMID:25733828

  19. Lymphoid Organ-Resident Dendritic Cells Exhibit Unique Transcriptional Fingerprints Based on Subset and Site

    PubMed Central

    Elpek, Kutlu G.; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angelique; Malhotra, Deepali; Reynoso, Erika D.; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Turley, Shannon J.

    2011-01-01

    Lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets are thought to play unique roles in determining the fate of T cell responses. Recent studies focusing on a single lymphoid organ identified molecular pathways that are differentially operative in each DC subset and led to the assumption that a given DC subset would more or less exhibit the same genomic and functional profiles throughout the body. Whether the local milieu in different anatomical sites can also influence the transcriptome of DC subsets has remained largely unexplored. Here, we interrogated the transcriptional relationships between lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets from spleen, gut- and skin-draining lymph nodes, and thymus of C57BL/6 mice. For this purpose, major resident DC subsets including CD4 and CD8 DCs were sorted at high purity and gene expression profiles were compared using microarray analysis. This investigation revealed that lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets exhibit divergent genomic programs across lymphoid organs. Interestingly, we also found that transcriptional and biochemical properties of a given DC subset can differ between lymphoid organs for lymphoid organ-resident DC subsets, but not plasmacytoid DCs, suggesting that determinants of the tissue milieu program resident DCs for essential site-specific functions. PMID:21886840

  20. RASSF6 exhibits promoter hypermethylation in metastatic melanoma and inhibits invasion in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mezzanotte, Jessica J; Hill, Victoria; Schmidt, M Lee; Shinawi, Thoraia; Tommasi, Stella; Krex, Dietmar; Schackert, Gabriele; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Latif, Farida; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a major contributor to cancer mortality, yet, the genetic changes underlying the development of this capacity remain poorly understood. RASSF proteins are a family of tumor suppressors that often suffer epigenetic inactivation during tumorigenesis. However, their epigenetic status in brain metastases has not been well characterized. We have examined the promoter methylation of the classical RASSF members (RASSF1A-RASSF6) in a panel of metastatic brain tumor samples. RASSF1A and RASSF2 have been shown to undergo promoter methylation at high frequency in primary lung and breast tumors and in brain metastases. Other members exhibited little or no methylation in these tumors. In examining melanoma metastases, however, we found that RASSF6 exhibits the highest frequency of inactivation in melanoma and in melanoma brain metastases. Most melanomas are driven by an activating mutation in B-Raf. Introduction of RASSF6 into a B-RafV600E-containing metastatic melanoma cell line inhibited its ability to invade through collagen and suppressed MAPK pathway activation and AKT. RASSF6 also appears to increase the association of mutant B-Raf and MST1, providing a potential mechanism by which RASSF6 is able to suppress MAPK activation. Thus, we have identified a novel potential role for RASSF6 in melanoma development. Promoter methylation leading to reduced expression of RASSF6 may play an important role in melanoma development and may contribute to brain metastases. PMID:25482183

  1. Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder exhibit an altered phenotype of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a key role in immune homeostasis in vivo. Tregs have a critical role in preventing the development of autoimmune diseases and defects in Treg function are implicated in various autoimmune disorders. Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have higher prevalence of autoimmune disorders than the general population. We hypothesized that war veterans with PTSD would exhibit a decreased number and/or altered phenotype of Tregs. Methods We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with PTSD (N?=?21) (mean age?=?45.9) and age-matched healthy controls (N?=?23) (mean age?=?45.7) to determine the proportion of Tregs and their phenotype according to the expression of CD127 and HLA-DR markers which describe the differentiation stages of Tregs. In addition, we analyzed the expression of membrane ectoenzyme CD39 on Tregs of the study groups, an important component of the suppressive machinery of Tregs. Results We found no differences in the proportion of Tregs between PTSD patients and controls, but PTSD patients had a higher percentage of CD127-HLA-DR- Tregs and a lower percentage of CD127loHLA-DR+ Tregs compared to controls. There was no difference in expression of CD39 on Tregs of the study groups. Conclusions Although the proportions of Tregs in PTSD patients were unchanged, we found that they exhibit a different phenotype of Tregs that might be less suppressive. Impaired differentiation and function of Tregs is likely involved in disruption of immune homeostasis in PTSD. PMID:25670936

  2. Novel cell lines isolated from mouse embryonic stem cells exhibiting de novo methylation of the E-cadherin promoter.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Kate; Keramari, Maria; Soncin, Francesca; Segal, Joe M; Mohamet, Lisa; Miazga, Natalie; Ritson, Sarah; Bobola, Nicoletta; Merry, Catherine L R; Ward, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and epiblast stem cells represent the naïve and primed pluripotent states, respectively. These cells self-renew via distinct signaling pathways and can transition between the two states in the presence of appropriate growth factors. Manipulation of signaling pathways has therefore allowed the isolation of novel pluripotent cell types such as Fibroblast growth factor, Activin and BIO-derived stem cells and IESCs. However, the effect of cell seeding density on pluripotency remains unexplored. In this study, we have examined whether mESCs can epigenetically regulate E-cadherin to enter a primed-like state in response to low cell seeding density. We show that low density seeding in the absence of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induces decreased apoptosis and maintenance of pluripotency via Activin/Nodal, concomitant with loss of E-cadherin, Signal transducer and activator of transcription phosphorylation, and chimera-forming ability. These cells, E-cadherin negative proliferating stem cells (ENPSCs) can be reverted to a naïve phenotype by addition of LIF or forced E-cadherin expression. However, prolonged culture of ENPSCs without LIF leads to methylation of the E-cadherin promoter (ENPSC(M)), which cannot be reversed by LIF supplementation, and increased histone H3K27 and decreased H3K4 trimethylation. Transcript analysis of ENPSC(M) revealed a primed-like phenotype and their differentiation leads to enrichment of neuroectoderm cells. The generation of ENPSCs is similar to tumorigenesis as ENPSCs exhibit transcript alterations associated with neoplasia, hyperplasia, carcinoma, and metastasis. We therefore describe a novel cell model to elucidate the role of E-cadherin in pluripotency and to investigate epigenetic regulation of this gene during mESC differentiation and tumor metastasis. PMID:25074424

  3. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  4. Cell-specific expression of artificial microRNAs targeting essential genes exhibit potent antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chenyu; Liu, Hao; Chen, Ping; Ye, Jingjia; Teng, Lisong; Jia, Zhenyu; Cao, Jiang

    2015-03-20

    To achieve specific and potent antitumor effect of hepatocyte carcinoma cells, replication defective adenoviral vectors, namely rAd/AFP-amiRG, rAd/AFP-amiRE and rAd/AFP-amiRP, were constructed which were armed with artificial microRNAs (amiRs) targeting essential functional genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E and DNA polymerase ? respectively under the control of a recombinant promoter comprised of human ?-fetoprotein enhancer and basal promoter. The AFP enhancer/promoter showed specific high transcription activity in AFP-positive HCC cells Hep3B, HepG2 and SMMC7721, while low in AFP-negative cell Bcap37. All artificial microRNAs exhibited efficient knockdown of target genes. Decreased ATP production and protein synthesis was observed in rAd/AFP-amiRG and rAd/AFP-amiRE treated HCC cells. All three recombinant adenoviruses showed efficient blockage of cell cycle progression and significant suppression of HCC cells in vitro. In nude mice model bearing Hep3B xenograft, administration of rAd/AFP-amiRG showed potent antitumor effect. The strategy of tumor-specific knockdown of genes essential for cell survival and proliferation may suggest a novel promising approach for HCC gene therapy. PMID:25691059

  5. Do cancer cells in human and meristematic cells in plant exhibit similar responses toward plant extracts with cytotoxic activities?

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Noha S; Barakat, Hoda S; Elhallouty, Salwa; Salem, Dina

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of water extracts of Persea americana fruit, and of the leaves of Tabernamontana divericata, Nerium oleander and Annona cherimolia (positive control) on Vicia faba root cells. We had confirmed in our previously published data the cytotoxicity of these plant extracts on four human cancer cell lines: liver (HepG-2), lung (A549), colon (HT-29) and breast (MCF-7). Vicia faba roots were soaked in plant extracts at dilutions of 100, 1,250, 2,500, 5,000, 10,000, 20,000 ppm for 4 and 24 h. All treatments resulted in a significant reduction in the mitotic index in a dose dependant manner. Root cells treated with T. divericata, N. oleander and A. cherimolia exhibited a decrease in prophase cell percentage, increase in micronuclei and chromosomal abnormalities as concentration increased. The P. americana treatment showed the highest cytotoxic effect on cancer cells, prophase cell percentage increased linearly with the applied concentration and no micronuclei were detected. This study shows that root tip assay of beans can be used in initial screening for new plant extracts to validate their use as candidates for containing active cytotoxic agents against malignant cells. This will greatly help in exploring new plant extracts as drugs for cancer treatment. PMID:24705601

  6. Dietary Phenolic Acids Act as Effective Antioxidants in Membrane Models and in Cultured Cells, Exhibiting Proapoptotic Effects in Leukaemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zambonin, Laura; Caliceti, Cristiana; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana; Landi, Laura; Prata, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic, syringic, and protocatechuic acids are phenolic acids derived directly from food intake or come from the gut metabolism of polyphenols. In this study, the antioxidant activity of these compounds was at first evaluated in membrane models, where caffeic acid behaved as a very effective chain-breaking antioxidant, whereas syringic and protocatechuic acids were only retardants of lipid peroxidation. However, all three compounds acted as good scavengers of reactive species in cultured cells subjected to exogenous oxidative stress produced by low level of H2O2. Many tumour cells are characterised by increased ROS levels compared with their noncancerous counterparts. Therefore, we investigated whether phenolic acids, at low concentrations, comparable to those present in human plasma, were able to decrease basal reactive species. Results show that phenolic acids reduced ROS in a leukaemia cell line (HEL), whereas no effect was observed in normal cells, such as HUVEC. The compounds exhibited no toxicity to normal cells while they decreased proliferation in leukaemia cells, inducing apoptosis. In the debate on optimal ROS-manipulating strategies in cancer therapy, our work in leukaemia cells supports the antioxidant ROS-depleting approach. PMID:22792417

  7. Synergistic enhancement effect of magnetic nanoparticles on anticancer drug accumulation in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renyun; Wang, Xuemei; Wu, Chunhui; Song, Min; Li, Jingyuan; Lv, Gang; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Chen; Dai, Yongyuan; Gao, Feng; Fu, Degang; Li, Xiaomao; Guan, Zhiqun; Chen, Baoan

    2006-07-01

    Three kinds of magnetic nanoparticle, tetraheptylammonium capped nanoparticles of Fe3O4, Fe2O3 and Ni have been synthesized, and the synergistic effect of these nanoparticles on the drug accumulation of the anticancer drug daunorubicin in leukaemia cells has been explored. Our observations indicate that the enhancement effect of Fe3O4 nanoparticles is much stronger than that of Fe2O3 and Ni nanoparticles, suggesting that nanoparticle surface chemistry and size as well as the unique properties of the magnetic nanoparticles themselves may contribute to the synergistic enhanced effect of the drug uptake of targeted cancer cells.

  8. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Lvy, Raphal; Shaheen, Umbreen; Cesbron, Yann; Se, Violaine

    2010-01-01

    Functional nanomaterials have recently attracted strong interest from the biology community, not only as potential drug delivery vehicles or diagnostic tools, but also as optical nanomaterials. This is illustrated by the explosion of publications in the field with more than 2,000 publications in the last 2 years (4,000 papers since 2000; from ISI Web of Knowledge, nanoparticle and cell hit). Such a publication boom in this novel interdisciplinary field has resulted in papers of unequal standard, partly because it is challenging to assemble the required expertise in chemistry, physics, and biology in a single team. As an extreme example, several papers published in physical chemistry journals claim intracellular delivery of nanoparticles, but show pictures of cells that are, to the expert biologist, evidently dead (and therefore permeable). To attain proper cellular applications using nanomaterials, it is critical not only to achieve efficient delivery in healthy cells, but also to control the intracellular availability and the fate of the nanomaterial. This is still an open challenge that will only be met by innovative delivery methods combined with rigorous and quantitative characterization of the uptake and the fate of the nanoparticles. This review mainly focuses on gold nanoparticles and discusses the various approaches to nanoparticle delivery, including surface chemical modifications and several methods used to facilitate cellular uptake and endosomal escape. We will also review the main detection methods and how their optimum use can inform about intracellular localization, efficiency of delivery, and integrity of the surface capping. PMID:22110850

  9. Antimicrobial efficacy and ocular cell toxicity from silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Colleen M; Duchsherer, Nicole L; Grainger, David W

    2007-05-01

    Silver in various forms has long been recognized for antimicrobial properties, both in biomedical devices and in eyes. However, soluble drugs used on the ocular surface are rapidly cleared through tear ducts and eventually ingested, resulting in decreased efficacy of the drug on its target tissue and potential concern for systemic side effects. Silver nanoparticles were studied as a source of anti-microbial silver for possible controlled-release contact lens controlled delivery formulations. Silver ion release over a period of several weeks from nanoparticle sources of various sizes and doses in vitro was evaluated in vitro against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA01. Mammalian cell viability and cytokine expression in response to silver nanoparticle exposure is evaluated using corneal epithelial cells and eye-associated macrophages cultured in vitro in serum-free media. Minimal microcidal and cell toxic effects were observed for several silver nanoparticle suspensions and aqueous extraction times for bulk total silver concentrations commensurate with comparative silver ion (e.g., Ag(+) ((aq))) toxicity. This indicates that (1) silver particles themselves are not microcidal under conditions tested, and (2) insufficient silver ion is generated from these particles at these loadings to produce observable biological effects in these in vitro assays. If dosing allows substantially increased silver particle loading in the lens, the bactericidal efficacy of silver nanoparticles in vitro is one possible approach to limiting bacterial colonization problems associated with extended-wear contact lenses. PMID:19865601

  10. Korean red ginseng extract exhibits neuroprotective effects through inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunyoung; Lee, Youngmoon; Cho, Jungsook

    2014-01-01

    Red ginseng has long been used as a traditional medicine in many East Asian countries including Korea. It is known to exhibit various pharmacological effects, including anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-stress and anti-diabetes activities. To further explore its actions, the present study evaluated effects of Korean red ginseng (KRG) extract on neuronal injury induced by various types of insults using primary cultured rat cortical cells. KRG extract inhibited neuronal damage and generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by excitatory amino acids, such as glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), or by A?(25-35). To elucidate possible mechanism(s) by which KRG extract exerts neuroprotective action, its effects on apoptosis and apoptosis-related signaling molecules in neurons were assessed. KRG extract markedly increased phosphorylation of Bad at Ser 112 and inhibited Bax expression and caspase 3 activity. It also inhibited DNA fragmentation induced by NMDA or A?(25-35). These results indicate that KRG extract protects cultured neurons from excitotoxicity and A?(25-35)-induced toxicity through inhibition of ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. In addition, KRG extract inhibited ?-secretase activity, implying that it may reduce A? peptide formation. Taken together, these findings suggest that KRG extract may be beneficial for the prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24882407

  11. Collective optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles embedded in ion-implanted silica.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torres, C; Lpez-Surez, A; Can-Uc, B; Rangel-Rojo, R; Tamayo-Rivera, L; Oliver, A

    2015-07-24

    The study of the third-order optical nonlinear response exhibited by a composite containing gold nanoparticles and silicon quantum dots nucleated by ion implantation in a high-purity silica matrix is presented. The nanocomposites were explored as an integrated configuration containing two different ion-implanted distributions. The time-resolved optical Kerr gate and z-scan techniques were conducted using 80 fs pulses at a 825 nm wavelength; while the nanosecond response was investigated by a vectorial two-wave mixing method at 532 nm with 1 ns pulses. An ultrafast purely electronic nonlinearity was associated to the optical Kerr effect for the femtosecond experiments, while a thermal effect was identified as the main mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical refraction induced by nanosecond pulses. Comparative experimental tests for examining the contribution of the Au and Si distributions to the total third-order optical response were carried out. We consider that the additional defects generated by consecutive ion irradiations in the preparation of ion-implanted samples do not notably modify the off-resonance electronic optical nonlinearities; but they do result in an important change for near-resonant nanosecond third-order optical phenomena exhibited by the closely spaced nanoparticle distributions. PMID:26135968

  12. Collective optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles embedded in ion-implanted silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Torres, C.; López-Suárez, A.; Can-Uc, B.; Rangel-Rojo, R.; Tamayo-Rivera, L.; Oliver, A.

    2015-07-01

    The study of the third-order optical nonlinear response exhibited by a composite containing gold nanoparticles and silicon quantum dots nucleated by ion implantation in a high-purity silica matrix is presented. The nanocomposites were explored as an integrated configuration containing two different ion-implanted distributions. The time-resolved optical Kerr gate and z-scan techniques were conducted using 80 fs pulses at a 825 nm wavelength; while the nanosecond response was investigated by a vectorial two-wave mixing method at 532 nm with 1 ns pulses. An ultrafast purely electronic nonlinearity was associated to the optical Kerr effect for the femtosecond experiments, while a thermal effect was identified as the main mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical refraction induced by nanosecond pulses. Comparative experimental tests for examining the contribution of the Au and Si distributions to the total third-order optical response were carried out. We consider that the additional defects generated by consecutive ion irradiations in the preparation of ion-implanted samples do not notably modify the off-resonance electronic optical nonlinearities; but they do result in an important change for near-resonant nanosecond third-order optical phenomena exhibited by the closely spaced nanoparticle distributions.

  13. Particle-Cell Contact Enhances Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Ivask, Angela; Kkinen, Aleksandr; Kurvet, Imbi; Kahru, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that antibacterial properties of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) are dictated by their dissolved fraction. However, dissolution-based concept alone does not fully explain the toxic potency of nanoparticulate silver compared to silver ions. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we demonstrated that the direct contact between bacterial cell and AgNPs' surface enhanced the toxicity of nanosilver. More specifically, cell-NP contact increased the cellular uptake of particle-associated Ag ions the single and ultimate cause of toxicity. To prove that, we evaluated the toxicity of three different AgNPs (uncoated, PVP-coated and protein-coated) to six bacterial strains: Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. putida and P. aeruginosa and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. While the toxicity of AgNO3 to these bacteria varied only slightly (the 4-h EC50 ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 mg Ag/l), the 4-h EC50 values of protein-coated AgNPs for various bacterial strains differed remarkably, from 0.35 to 46 mg Ag/l. By systematically comparing the intracellular and extracellular free Ag+ liberated from AgNPs, we demonstrated that not only extracellular dissolution in the bacterial test environment but also additional dissolution taking place at the particle-cell interface played an essential role in antibacterial action of AgNPs. The role of the NP-cell contact in dictating the antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs was additionally proven by the following observations: (i) separation of bacterial cells from AgNPs by particle-impermeable membrane (cut-off 20 kDa, ?4 nm) significantly reduced the toxicity of AgNPs and (ii) P. aeruginosa cells which tended to attach onto AgNPs, exhibited the highest sensitivity to all forms of nanoparticulate Ag. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provide new insights into the mode of antibacterial action of nanosilver and explain some discrepancies in this field, showing that Ag-ion and particle-specific mechanisms are not controversial but, rather, are two faces of the same coin. PMID:23737965

  14. Muscle precursor cells isolated from aged rats exhibit an increased TNF-α response

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Simon J.; Zwetsloot, Kevin A.; Booth, Frank W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Improving muscle precursor cell (MPC, muscle-specific stem cells) function during aging has been implicated as a key therapeutic target for improving age-related skeletal muscle loss. MPC dysfunction during aging can be attributed to both the aging MPC population and the changing environment in skeletal muscle. Previous reports have identified elevated levels TNF-α in aging, both circulating and locally in skeletal muscle. The purpose of the present study was to determine if age-related differences existed between TNF-α-induced NF-κB activation and expression of apoptotic gene targets. MPCs isolated from 32-mo-old animals (32-mo) exhibited an increased NF-κB activation in response to 1, 5, and 20 ng/ml TNF-α, compared to MPCs isolated from 3-mo-old animals (3-mo). No age differences were observed in the rapid canonical signaling events leading to NF-κB activation or in the increase in mRNA levels for TNF receptor 1, TNF receptor 2, TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2), or Fas (CD95) observed after 2 hr of TNF-α stimulation. Interestingly, mRNA levels for TRAF2 and the cell death inducing receptor, Fas (CD95) were persistently upregulated in response to 24 hr TNF-α treatment in MPCs isolated from 32-mo, compared to 3-mo. Our data indicate that age-related differences may exist in the regulatory mechanisms responsible for NF-κB inactivation, which may have an effect on TNF-α-induced apoptotic signaling. These findings improve our understanding of the interaction between aged MPCs and the changing environment associated with age, which is critical for the development of potential clinical interventions aimed at improving MPC function with age. PMID:19053972

  15. Nanoparticle PEBBLE sensors in live cells and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Smith, Ron; Kopelman, Raoul

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticle sensors have been developed for real-time imaging and dynamic monitoring, both in live cells and in vivo, of molecular and ionic components, constructs, forces, and dynamics observed during biological, chemical, and physical processes. With their biocompatible small size and inert matrix, nanoparticle sensors have been successfully applied to noninvasive real-time measurements of analytes and fields in cells and in rodents, with spatial, temporal, physical, and chemical resolution. This review describes the diverse designs of nanoparticle sensors for ions and small molecules, physical fields, and biological features, as well as the characterization, properties, and applications of these nanosensors to in vitro and in vivo measurements. Their floating as well as localization abilities in biological media are captured by the acronym PEBBLE: photonic explorer for bioanalysis with biologically localized embedding. PMID:20098636

  16. Nanoparticle PEBBLE sensors in live cells and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticle sensors have been developed for imaging and dynamic monitoring, in live cells and in vivo, of the molecular or ionic components, constructs, forces and dynamics, all in real time, during biological/chemical/physical processes. With their biocompatible small size and inert matrix, nanoparticle sensors have been successfully applied for non-invasive real-time measurements of analytes and fields in cells and rodents, with spatial, temporal, physical and chemical resolution. This review describes the diverse designs of nanoparticle sensors for ions and small molecules, physical fields and biological features, as well as the characterization, properties, and applications of these nanosensors to in vitro and in vivo measurements. Their floating as well as localization ability in biological media is captured by the acronym PEBBLE: photonic explorer for bioanalysis with biologically localized embedding. PMID:20098636

  17. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  18. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology. PMID:26996121

  19. Optical micromanipulation of nanoparticles and cells inside living zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Patrick Lie; Fenaroli, Federico; Evensen, Lasse; Griffiths, Gareth; Koster, Gerbrand

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of biological processes is often based on physical interactions between cells and their microenvironment. To unravel how and where interactions occur, micromanipulation methods can be used that offer high-precision control over the duration, position and magnitude of interactions. However, lacking an in vivo system, micromanipulation has generally been done with cells in vitro, which may not reflect the complex in vivo situation inside multicellular organisms. Here using optical tweezers we demonstrate micromanipulation throughout the transparent zebrafish embryo. We show that different cells, as well as injected nanoparticles and bacteria can be trapped and that adhesion properties and membrane deformation of endothelium and macrophages can be analysed. This non-invasive micromanipulation inside a whole-organism gives direct insights into cell interactions that are not accessible using existing approaches. Potential applications include screening of nanoparticle-cell interactions for cancer therapy or tissue invasion studies in cancer and infection biology. PMID:26996121

  20. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  1. Physical Property Control on the Cellular Uptake Pathway and Spatial Distribution of Nanoparticles in Cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungsook; Seo, Eunseok; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles have been developed in broad biomedical research in terms of effective cellular interactions to treat and visualize diseased cells. Considering the charge and polar functional groups of proteins that are embedded in cellular membranes, charged nanoparticles have been strategically developed to enhance electrostatic cellular interactions. In this study, we show that cellular uptake efficiency, pathway, and spatial distribution of gold nanoparticles in a cell are significantly modulated based on the surface condition of gold nanoparticles and human cancer cells that were tuned by controlling the pH of the medium and by introducing an electron beam. Cellular uptake efficiency is increased when electrostatic attraction is induced between the cells and the gold nanoparticles. Cell surface modification changes the cellular uptake pathways of the gold nanoparticles and concentrates the gold nanoparticles at the membrane region. Surface modification of the gold nanoparticles also contributes to deep penetration and homogeneous spatial distributions in a cell. PMID:26353594

  2. NKp46+CD3+ cells - a novel non-conventional T-cell subset in cattle exhibiting both NK cell and T-cell features

    PubMed Central

    Connelley, Timothy K.; Longhi, Cassandra; Burrells, Alison; Degnan, Kathryn; Hope, Jayne; Allan, Alasdair; Hammond, John A.; Storset, Anne K.; Morrison, W. Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The NKp46 receptor demonstrates a high degree of lineage-specificity, being expressed almost exclusively in natural killer cells. Previous studies have demonstrated NKp46 expression by T-cells, but NKp46+CD3+ cells are rare and almost universally associated with NKp46 acquisition by T-cells following stimulation. In this study we demonstrate the existence of a population of NKp46+CD3+ cells resident in normal bovine PBMC which include cells of both the ?? TCR+ and ?? TCR+ lineages and is present at a frequency of 0.1-1.7%. NKp46+CD3+ cells express transcripts for a broad repertoire of both natural killer (NKR) and T-cell receptors (TCR) and also the CD3?, DAP10 and Fc?R1? but not DAP12 adaptor proteins. In vitro functional analysis of NKp46+CD3+ cells confirm that NKp46, CD16 and CD3 signalling pathways are all functionally competent and capable of mediating-re-direct cytolysis. However, only CD3 cross-ligation elicits IFN-? release. NKp46+CD3+ cells exhibit cytotoxic activity against autologous Theileria parva infected cells in vitro and during in vivo challenge with this parasite an expansion of NKp46+CD3+ cells was observed in some animals, indicating the cells have the potential to act as an anti-pathogen effector population. The results presented herein identifies and describes a novel non-conventional NKp46+CD3+ T-cell subset that is phenotypically and functionally distinct from conventional NK and T-cells. The ability to exploit both NKR and TCR suggests these cells may fill a functional niche at the interface of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:24639352

  3. Nanocomposite of tin sulfide nanoparticles with reduced graphene oxide in high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zuo, Xueqin; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Guang; Wu, Mingzai; Ma, Yongqing; Jin, Shaowei; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2015-01-14

    A nanocomposite of SnS2 nanoparticles with reduced graphene oxide (SnS2@RGO) had been successfully synthesized as a substitute conventional Pt counter electrode (CE) in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) system. The SnS2 nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed onto graphene sheets, which formed a nanosized composite system. The effectiveness of this nanocomposite exhibited remarkable electrocatalytic properties upon reducing the triiodide, owning to synergistic effects of SnS2 nanoparticles dispersed on graphene sheet and improved conductivity. Consequently, the DSSC equipped with SnS2@RGO nanocomposite CE achieved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.12%, which was higher than those of SnS2 nanoparticles (5.58%) or graphene sheet alone (3.73%) as CEs and also comparable to the value (6.79%) obtained with pure Pt CE as a reference. PMID:25230916

  4. Platinum nanoparticle deposition on polymeric membranes for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, A. J.; Lopera, S.; Ordonez, N.; Mansano, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    This work aimed to show an alternative to produce platinum nanoparticles directly on a polymeric membrane using plasma technique, in order to make these nanoparticles adhere to the membrane, in size, shape and homogeneity controlled by the process without damaging the polymeric material. In this manner the cell's production time is reduced since the catalyst is directly deposited on the polymeric membrane; the time of the process is approximately five minutes for each side of the membrane, and the total time for each membrane is 10 minutes. With this exposure time, and the advantage of controlling the other parameters such as pressure, RF power, gas flow rate and temperature of the electrode, it was possible to obtain platinum nanoparticles with dimensions of about 50 nm scattered homogenously on the membrane, without damaging the structure of the polymeric material and, consequently, affecting its performance. Together with platinum nanoparticles were also deposited carbon nanoparticles, so that these acted as catalyst support, avoiding self poisoning. Electrochemical activity tests were performed to test the efficiency of the cell where it was exposed to different pressures and flow rates of O2 and H2, reaching open-circuit voltage of 750 mVolts.

  5. The role of surface charge on the uptake and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with osteoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Mccrate, Joseph M.; Lee, James C-M.; Li, Hao

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with different surface charges on the cellular uptake behavior and in vitro cell viability and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cell lines (osteoblast). The nanoparticles surface charge was varied by the surface modification with two carboxylic acids: 12-aminododecanoic acid (positive) and dodecanedioic acid (negative). The untreated HAP nanoparticles and dodecanoic acid modified HAP nanoparticles (neutral) were used as the control. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed that surface modifications by the three carboxylic acids did not change the crystal structure of HAP nanoparticles; Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the adsorption and binding of the carboxylic acids on HAP nanoparticle surface; and zeta potential measurement confirmed that the chemicals successfully modified the surface charge of HAP nanoparticles in water based solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that positively charged, negatively charged and untreated HAP nanoparticles, with similar size and shape, all penetrated into the cells and cells had more uptake of HAP nanoparticles with positive charge compared to those with negative charge, which might be attributed to the attractive or repulsive interaction between the negatively charged cell membrane and positively/negatively charged HAP nanoparticles. The neutral HAP nanoparticles could not penetrate cell membrane due to the larger size. MTT assay and LDH assay results indicated that as compared with the polystyrene control, greater cell viability and cell proliferation were measured on MC3T3-E1 cells treated with the three kinds of the HAP nanoparticles (neutral, positive, and untreated), among which positively charged HAP nanoparticles shows strongest improvement for cell viability and cell proliferation. In summary, the surface charge of HAP nanoparticles can be modified to influence the cellular uptake of HAP nanoparticles and the different uptake also influence the behavior of cells. These in-vitro results may also provide useful information for investigations of HAP nanoparticles applications in the gene delivery and intracellular drug delivery. PMID:21289408

  6. Targeting myeloid cells using nanoparticles to improve cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Amoozgar, Zohreh; Goldberg, Michael S

    2015-08-30

    While nanoparticles have traditionally been used to deliver cytotoxic drugs directly to tumors to induce cancer cell death, emerging data suggest that nanoparticles are likely to generate a larger impact on oncology through the delivery of agents that can stimulate antitumor immunity. Tumor-targeted nanocarriers have generally been used to localize chemotherapeutics to tumors and thus decrease off-target toxicity while enhancing efficacy. Challengingly, tumor heterogeneity and evolution render tumor-intrinsic approaches likely to succumb to relapse. The immune system offers exquisite specificity, cytocidal potency, and long-term activity that leverage an adaptive memory response. For this reason, the ability to manipulate immune cell specificity and function would be desirable, and nanoparticles represent an exciting means by which to perform such manipulation. Dendritic cells and tumor-associated macrophages are cells of the myeloid lineage that function as natural phagocytes, so they naturally take up nanoparticles. Dendritic cells direct the specificity and potency of cellular immune responses that can be targeted for cancer vaccines. Herein, we discuss the specific criteria needed for efficient vaccine design, including but not limited to the route of administration, size, morphology, surface charge, targeting ligands, and nanoparticle composition. In contrast, tumor-associated macrophages are critical mediators of immunosuppression whose trans-migratory abilities can be exploited to localize therapeutics to the tumor core and which can be directly targeted for elimination or for repolarization to a tumor suppressive phenotype. It is likely that a combination of targeting dendritic cells to stimulate antitumor immunity and tumor-associated macrophages to reduce immune suppression will impart significant benefits and result in durable antitumor responses. PMID:25280471

  7. Optical injection of gold nanoparticles into living cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Lohmller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-01-14

    The controlled injection of nanoscopic objects into living cells with light offers promising prospects for the development of novel molecular delivery strategies or intracellular biosensor applications. Here, we show that single gold nanoparticles from solution can be patterned on the surface of living cells with a continuous wave laser beam. In a second step, we demonstrate how the same particles can then be injected into the cells through a combination of plasmonic heating and optical force. We find that short exposure times are sufficient to perforate the cell membrane and inject the particles into cells with a survival rate of >70%. PMID:25496343

  8. Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells Exhibit Increased Levels of Lysosomal Proteolysis as Compared to Other Human Dendritic Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    McCurley, Nathanael; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Background Fine control of lysosomal degradation for limited processing of internalized antigens is a hallmark of professional antigen presenting cells. Previous work in mice has shown that dendritic cells (DCs) contain lysosomes with remarkably low protease content. Combined with the ability to modulate lysosomal pH during phagocytosis and maturation, murine DCs enhance their production of class II MHC-peptide complexes for presentation to T cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we extend these findings to human DCs and distinguish between different subsets of DCs based on their ability to preserve internalized antigen. Whereas DCs derived in vitro from CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells or isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors are protease poor, DCs derived in vitro from monocytes (MDDCs) are more similar to macrophages (M?s) in protease content. Unlike other DCs, MDDCs also fail to reduce their intralysosomal pH in response to maturation stimuli. Indeed, functional characterization of lysosomal proteolysis indicates that MDDCs are comparable to M?s in the rapid degradation of antigen while other human DC subtypes are attenuated in this capacity. Conclusions/Significance Human DCs are comparable to murine DCs in exhibiting a markedly reduced level of lysosomal proteolysis. However, as an important exception to this, human MDDCs stand apart from all other DCs by a heightened capacity for proteolysis that resembles that of M?s. Thus, caution should be exercised when using human MDDCs as a model for DC function and cell biology. PMID:20689855

  9. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Pöttler, Marina; Staicu, Andreas; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Weigel, Bianca; Schreiber, Eveline; Hofmann, Simone; Wiest, Irmi; Jeschke, Udo; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5) were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA) only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEON(LA-BSA)), or with dextran (SEON(DEX)). Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEON(LA-BSA), SEON(DEX) or SEON(LA). Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system. PMID:26540051

  10. Magnetic CoPt nanoparticles as MRI contrast agent for transplanted neural stem cells detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaoting; Seton, Hugh C.; Lu, Le T.; Prior, Ian A.; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.; Song, Bing

    2011-03-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) exhibit features that make them suitable candidates for stem cell replacement therapy and spinal cord reconstruction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the potential to track cells in vivo using innovative approaches to cell labeling and image acquisition. In this study, experiments were carried out to optimize the loading condition of magnetic CoPt hollow nanoparticles (CoPt NPs) into neural stem cells and to define appropriate MRI parameters. Both cell viability and multipotency analysis showed that CoPt NPs at a concentration of 16 g ml-1 reduced T2 relaxation times in labeled rat NSCs, producing greater contrast on spin echo acquisitions at 4.7 T, yet did not affect cell viability and in vitro differentiation potential compared to controls. After optimizing nanoparticle loading concentrations and labeled cell numbers for MRI detection, CoPt-loaded NSCs were transplanted into organotypic spinal cord slices. The results showed that MRI could efficiently detect low numbers of CoPt-labeled NSCs with the enhanced image contrast. Our study demonstrated that MRI of grafted NSCs labeled with CoPt NPs is a useful tool to evaluate organotypic spinal cord slice models and has potential applications in other biological systems.

  11. In vitro toxicity of nanoparticles in BRL 3A rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S M; Hess, K L; Gearhart, J M; Geiss, K T; Schlager, J J

    2005-10-01

    This study was undertaken to address the current deficient knowledge of cellular response to nanosized particle exposure. The study evaluated the acute toxic effects of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles proposed for future use in industrial production methods using the in vitro rat liver derived cell line (BRL 3A). Different sizes of nanoparticles such as silver (Ag; 15, 100 nm), molybdenum (MoO(3); 30, 150 nm), aluminum (Al; 30, 103 nm), iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4); 30, 47 nm), and titanium dioxide (TiO(2); 40 nm) were evaluated for their potential toxicity. We also assessed the toxicity of relatively larger particles of cadmium oxide (CdO; 1 microm), manganese oxide (MnO(2); 1-2 microm), and tungsten (W; 27 microm), to compare the cellular toxic responses with respect to the different sizes of nanoparticles with different core chemical compositions. For toxicity evaluations, cellular morphology, mitochondrial function (MTT assay), membrane leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay), reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were assessed under control and exposed conditions (24h of exposure). Results showed that mitochondrial function decreased significantly in cells exposed to Ag nanoparticles at 5-50 microg/ml. However, Fe(3)O(4), Al, MoO(3) and TiO(2) had no measurable effect at lower doses (10-50 microg/ml), while there was a significant effect at higher levels (100-250 microg/ml). LDH leakage significantly increased in cells exposed to Ag nanoparticles (10-50 microg/ml), while the other nanoparticles tested displayed LDH leakage only at higher doses (100-250 microg/ml). In summary the Ag was highly toxic whereas, MoO(3) moderately toxic and Fe(3)O(4), Al, MnO(2) and W displayed less or no toxicity at the doses tested. The microscopic studies demonstrated that nanoparticle-exposed cells at higher doses became abnormal in size, displaying cellular shrinkage, and an acquisition of an irregular shape. Due to toxicity of silver, further study conducted with reference to its oxidative stress. The results exhibited significant depletion of GSH level, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in ROS levels, which suggested that cytotoxicity of Ag (15, 100 nm) in liver cells is likely to be mediated through oxidative stress. PMID:16125895

  12. Water soluble nanoporous nanoparticle for in vivo targeted drug delivery and controlled release in B cells tumor context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, F.; Pujia, A.; Falcone, C.; Iaccino, E.; Palmieri, C.; Liberale, C.; Mecarini, F.; Candeloro, P.; Luberto, L.; de Laurentiis, A.; Das, G.; Scala, G.; di Fabrizio, E.

    2010-10-01

    Multitasking nanoparticles are gaining great attention for smart drug delivery systems. The exploration of the nano-scale opens new concrete opportunities for revealing new properties and undiscovered cell-particle interactions. Here we present a biodegradable nanoporous silicon nanoparticle that can be successfully employed for in vivo targeted drug delivery and sustained release. The bare nanoporous nanocarriers can be accurately designed and fabricated with an effective control of porosity, surface chemistry and particle size, up to a few nm. The proposed nanoparticles exhibit several remarkable features including high payload, biodegradability, no toxicity, and multiple loading in water without the need of additional chemical reagents at room temperature. The targeting strategy is based on phage display technology that was successfully used to discover cell surface binding peptide for murine B lymphoma A20 cell line. The peptide used in combination with the nanoporous nanoparticles allows an efficient in vivo targeting, a sustained release and a sensible therapeutic effect.Multitasking nanoparticles are gaining great attention for smart drug delivery systems. The exploration of the nano-scale opens new concrete opportunities for revealing new properties and undiscovered cell-particle interactions. Here we present a biodegradable nanoporous silicon nanoparticle that can be successfully employed for in vivo targeted drug delivery and sustained release. The bare nanoporous nanocarriers can be accurately designed and fabricated with an effective control of porosity, surface chemistry and particle size, up to a few nm. The proposed nanoparticles exhibit several remarkable features including high payload, biodegradability, no toxicity, and multiple loading in water without the need of additional chemical reagents at room temperature. The targeting strategy is based on phage display technology that was successfully used to discover cell surface binding peptide for murine B lymphoma A20 cell line. The peptide used in combination with the nanoporous nanoparticles allows an efficient in vivo targeting, a sustained release and a sensible therapeutic effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticles fabrication; payload evaluation; dissolution and release profiles; multivalent loading; targeting specifity on A20 Cells; cell cycle analysis; in vitro cytotoxicity assay; in vivo cytotoxicity assay. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00161a

  13. Effects of As2O3 nanoparticles on cell growth and apoptosis of NB4 cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, XIAOYAN; MA, NING; LIU, MENGMENG; LIU, ZILING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the preparation of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) nanoparticles and examine the antitumor effects of these nanoparticles on NB4 cells. As2O3 nanoparticles were prepared using the sol-gel method and characterized using transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results indicated that the As2O3 nanoparticles prepared in the present study were round or elliptical, well dispersed and had an ~40-nm or <10-nm diameter. The antitumor effects of As2O3 nanoparticles at various concentrations were analyzed by flow cytometry and the MTT assay, and were compared with those of traditional As2O3 solution. At the same concentration and incubation time (48 h), the survival rate of cells treated with As2O3 nanoparticles was significantly lower than that of cells treated with the As2O3 solution. The growth inhibition rate under both treatments was time- and dose-dependent. In addition, at the same concentration and incubation time, the apoptosis rate of the cells treated with As2O3 nanoparticles was significantly higher than that of the cells treated with the As2O3 solution. Furthermore, As2O3 nanoparticles resulted in a greater reduction in the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 compared with the As2O3 solution. In conclusion, As2O3 nanoparticles, prepared using the sol-gel method, were found to produce a stronger cytotoxic effect on tumor cells than that produced by the As2O3 solution, possibly by inhibiting Bcl-2 expression. PMID:26622477

  14. The Cell Division Protein FtsZ from Streptococcus pneumoniae Exhibits a GTPase Activity Delay.

    PubMed

    Salvarelli, Estefana; Krupka, Marcin; Rivas, Germn; Mingorance, Jesus; Gmez-Puertas, Paulino; Alfonso, Carlos; Rico, Ana Isabel

    2015-10-01

    The cell division protein FtsZ assembles in vitro by a mechanism of cooperative association dependent on GTP, monovalent cations, and Mg(2+). We have analyzed the GTPase activity and assembly dynamics of Streptococcus pneumoniae FtsZ (SpnFtsZ). SpnFtsZ assembled in an apparently cooperative process, with a higher critical concentration than values reported for other FtsZ proteins. It sedimented in the presence of GTP as a high molecular mass polymer with a well defined size and tended to form double-stranded filaments in electron microscope preparations. GTPase activity depended on K(+) and Mg(2+) and was inhibited by Na(+). GTP hydrolysis exhibited a delay that included a lag phase followed by a GTP hydrolysis activation step, until reaction reached the GTPase rate. The lag phase was not found in polymer assembly, suggesting a transition from an initial non-GTP-hydrolyzing polymer that switches to a GTP-hydrolyzing polymer, supporting models that explain FtsZ polymer cooperativity. PMID:26330552

  15. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Niluka M.; Current, Kelley M.; Obare, Sherine O.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism’s ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells. PMID:26437397

  16. EpCAM aptamer-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for efficient colon cancer cell-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaodong; Li, Fengqiao; Zhang, Huijuan; Lu, Yusheng; Lian, Shu; Lin, Hang; Gao, Yu; Jia, Lee

    2016-02-15

    Targeted delivery of anticancer agents by functional nanoparticles is an attractive strategy to increase their therapeutic efficacy while reducing toxicity. In this work, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were modified with aptamer (Ap) against the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery of DOX to colon cancer cells. These nanoparticles (Ap-MSN-DOX) were characterized by particle size, zeta potential, aptamer conjugation efficiency, drug encapsulation efficiency, and drug release properties. The in vitro cell recognition, cellular uptake, EpCAM protein inhibition efficiency, and cytotoxicity of Ap-MSN-DOX were also studied. Results demonstrated that EpCAM conjugation increased binding of Ap-MSN-DOX to EpCAM over-expressing SW620 colon cancer cells but not EpCAM-negative Ramos cells, resulting in enhanced cellular uptake and increased cytotoxicity of the DOX in SW620 cells when compared to non-Ap-modified nanoparticles (MSN-DOX). Additionally, Ap-MSN-DOX exhibited significant inhibition effects on the expression of EpCAM on SW620 cells. These results suggested that Ap-MSN-DOX has the potential for the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents into EpCAM positive colon cancer cells to improve therapeutic index while reducing side effects. PMID:26690044

  17. T cells enhance gold nanoparticle delivery to tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) has shown great potential for the treatment of cancer in mouse studies and is now being evaluated in clinical trials. For this therapy, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are injected intravenously and are allowed to accumulate within the tumor via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The tumor is then irradiated with a near infrared laser, whose energy is absorbed by the AuNPs and translated into heat. While reliance on the EPR effect for tumor targeting has proven adequate for vascularized tumors in small animal models, the efficiency and specificity of tumor delivery in vivo, particularly in tumors with poor blood supply, has proven challenging. In this study, we examine whether human T cells can be used as cellular delivery vehicles for AuNP transport into tumors. We first demonstrate that T cells can be efficiently loaded with 45 nm gold colloid nanoparticles without affecting viability or function (e.g. migration and cytokine production). Using a human tumor xenograft mouse model, we next demonstrate that AuNP-loaded T cells retain their capacity to migrate to tumor sites in vivo. In addition, the efficiency of AuNP delivery to tumors in vivo is increased by more than four-fold compared to injection of free PEGylated AuNPs and the use of the T cell delivery system also dramatically alters the overall nanoparticle biodistribution. Thus, the use of T cell chaperones for AuNP delivery could enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle-based therapies and imaging applications by increasing AuNP tumor accumulation. PMID:21711861

  18. T cells enhance gold nanoparticle delivery to tumors in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Laura C.; Bear, Adham S.; Young, Joseph K.; Lewinski, Nastassja A.; Kim, Jean; Foster, Aaron E.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2011-12-01

    Gold nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) has shown great potential for the treatment of cancer in mouse studies and is now being evaluated in clinical trials. For this therapy, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are injected intravenously and are allowed to accumulate within the tumor via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. The tumor is then irradiated with a near infrared laser, whose energy is absorbed by the AuNPs and translated into heat. While reliance on the EPR effect for tumor targeting has proven adequate for vascularized tumors in small animal models, the efficiency and specificity of tumor delivery in vivo, particularly in tumors with poor blood supply, has proven challenging. In this study, we examine whether human T cells can be used as cellular delivery vehicles for AuNP transport into tumors. We first demonstrate that T cells can be efficiently loaded with 45 nm gold colloid nanoparticles without affecting viability or function (e.g. migration and cytokine production). Using a human tumor xenograft mouse model, we next demonstrate that AuNP-loaded T cells retain their capacity to migrate to tumor sites in vivo. In addition, the efficiency of AuNP delivery to tumors in vivo is increased by more than four-fold compared to injection of free PEGylated AuNPs and the use of the T cell delivery system also dramatically alters the overall nanoparticle biodistribution. Thus, the use of T cell chaperones for AuNP delivery could enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle-based therapies and imaging applications by increasing AuNP tumor accumulation.

  19. Enhancement of the optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lpez-Surez, A.; R, Rangel-Rojo; Torres-Torres, C.; Benami, A.; L, Tamayo-Rivera; Reyes-Esqueda, J. A.; Cheang-Wong, J. C.; Rodrguez-Fernndez, L.; Crespo-Sosa, A.; Oliver, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present nonlinear refractive results for three different systems produced by ion implantation: high purity silica substrates with silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs), silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs), and one sample containing both. We used a femtosecond optical Kerr gate (OKG) with 80 fs pulses at 830 nm to investigate the magnitude and response time of their nonlinear response. The Ag-NPs samples were prepared implanting 2 MeV Ag2+ ions at different fluencies. A sample with 11017 ions/cm2 showed no discernible Kerr signal, while for one with 2.41017 ions/cm2 we measured |?(3)|1111 = 5.110-11 esu. The Si-QDs sample required irradiation with 1.5 MeV Si2+ ions, at a 2.51017 ions/cm2 fluence in order that the OKG results for this sample yielded a similar |?(3)|1111 value. The sample containing the Si-QDs was then irradiated by 1 MeV Ag2+ ions at a 4.44 1016 ions/cm2 fluence and thermally treated, for which afterward we measured |?(3)|1111 = 1.710-10 esu. In all cases the response time was quasi-instantaneous. These results imply that the inclusion of Ag-NPs at low fluence, enhances the nonlinearity of the composite by a factor of around three, and that this is purely electronic in nature. Pump-probe results show that there is not any nonlinear absorption present. We estimate that the confinement effect of the Si-QDs in the sample plays an important role for the excitation of the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) related to the Ag-NPs. A theoretical model that describes the modification of the third order nonlinearity is also presented.

  20. Nanobarcoding: a novel method of single nanoparticle detection in cells and tissues for nanomedical biodistribution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F.

    2011-10-01

    Determination of whether nanoparticles accumulate in target or non-target tissues is critical in assessing a nanoparticle formulation for nanomedical purposes. There is an overwhelming need for a sensitive and efficient imaging-based method that can (1) detect small numbers of (even single) nanoparticles, (2) associate nanoparticle uptake with cell type, and (3) allow for rapid detection in large tissue samples. We propose a novel method for nanoparticle detection that utilizes an oligonucleotide "nanobarcode" conjugated to the nanoparticle surface, which amplifies the optical signal from a single nanoparticle via in situ PCR. Herein, we describe the design process of the nanobarcoding method.

  1. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells using magnetic carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardarajan, V.; Gu, L.; Kanneganti, A.; Mohanty, S. K.; Koymen, A. R.

    2011-03-01

    Photothermal therapy offers a solution for the destruction of cancer cells without significant collateral damage to otherwise healthy cells. Several attempts are underway in using carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and nanotubes due to their excellent absorption properties in the near-infrared spectrum of biological window. However, minimizing the required number of injected nanoparticles, to ensure minimal cytotoxicity, is a major challenge. We report on the introduction of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) onto cancer cells, localizing them in a desired region by applying an external magnetic field and irradiating them with a near-infrared laser beam. The MCNPs were prepared in Benzene, using an electric plasma discharge, generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. The CNPs were made ferromagnetic by use of Fe-electrodes to dope the CNPs, as confirmed by magnetometry. Transmission electron microscopy measurements showed the size distribution of these MCNPs to be in the range of 5-10 nm. For photothermal irradiation, a tunable continuous wave Ti: Sapphire laser beam was weakly focused on to the cell monolayer under an inverted fluorescence microscope. The response of different cell types to photothermal irradiation was investigated. Cell death in the presence of both MCNPs and laser beam was confirmed by morphological changes and propidium iodide fluorescence inclusion assay. The results of our study suggest that MCNP based photothermal therapy is a promising approach to remotely guide photothermal therapy.

  2. Effect of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles on Skin Tumor Cells and Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Alili, Lirija; Chapiro, Swetlana; Marten, Gernot U.; Schmidt, Annette M.; Zanger, Klaus; Brenneisen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles have been used in many biomedical approaches. The toxicity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on mammalian cells was published recently. Though, little is known about the viability of human cells after treatment with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Herein, we examined the toxicity, production of reactive oxygen species, and invasive capacity after treatment of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and cells of the squamous tumor cell line (SCL-1) with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These nanoparticles had an average size of 65 nm. Fe3O4 nanoparticles induced oxidative stress via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent initiation of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, the question was addressed of whether Fe3O4 nanoparticles affect myofibroblast formation, known to be involved in tumor invasion. Herein, Fe3O4 nanoparticles prevent the expression alpha-smooth muscle actin and therefore decrease the number of myofibroblastic cells. Moreover, our data show in vitro that concentrations of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which are nontoxic for normal cells, partially reveal a ROS-triggered cytotoxic but also a pro-invasive effect on the fraction of squamous cancer cells surviving the treatment with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The data herein show that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles appear not to be adequate for use in therapeutic approaches against cancer cells, in contrast to recently published data with cerium oxide nanoparticles. PMID:26090418

  3. Effect of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles on Skin Tumor Cells and Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Alili, Lirija; Chapiro, Swetlana; Marten, Gernot U; Schmidt, Annette M; Zanger, Klaus; Brenneisen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles have been used in many biomedical approaches. The toxicity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on mammalian cells was published recently. Though, little is known about the viability of human cells after treatment with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Herein, we examined the toxicity, production of reactive oxygen species, and invasive capacity after treatment of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and cells of the squamous tumor cell line (SCL-1) with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These nanoparticles had an average size of 65 nm. Fe3O4 nanoparticles induced oxidative stress via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent initiation of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, the question was addressed of whether Fe3O4 nanoparticles affect myofibroblast formation, known to be involved in tumor invasion. Herein, Fe3O4 nanoparticles prevent the expression alpha-smooth muscle actin and therefore decrease the number of myofibroblastic cells. Moreover, our data show in vitro that concentrations of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which are nontoxic for normal cells, partially reveal a ROS-triggered cytotoxic but also a pro-invasive effect on the fraction of squamous cancer cells surviving the treatment with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The data herein show that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles appear not to be adequate for use in therapeutic approaches against cancer cells, in contrast to recently published data with cerium oxide nanoparticles. PMID:26090418

  4. Carbon composites with metal nanoparticles for Alcohol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrapragada, Lakshman; Siddhardha, R. S.; Podilla, Ramakrishna; Muthukumar, V. S.; Creager, Stephen; Rao, A. M.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2015-03-01

    Graphene due to its high surface area and superior conductivity has attracted wide attention from both industrial and scientific communities. We chose graphene as a substrate for metal nanoparticle deposition for fuel cell applications. There are many chemical routes for fabrication of metal-graphene composites, but they have an inherent disadvantage of low performance due to the usage of surfactants, that adsorb on their surface. Here we present a design for one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles and simultaneous deposition on graphene with laser ablation of gold strip and functionalized graphene. In this process there are two natural advantages, the nanoparticles are synthesized without any surfactants, therefore they are pristine and subsequent impregnation on graphene is linker free. These materials are well characterized with electron microscopy to find their morphology and spectroscopic techniques like Raman, UV-Vis. for functionality. This gold nanoparticle decorated graphene composite has been tested for its electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols for alkaline fuel cell applications. An electrode made of this composite showed good stability for more than 200 cycles of operation and reported a low onset potential of 100 mV more negative, an important factor for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  5. Biogenic-production of SnO2 nanoparticles and its cytotoxic effect against hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2).

    PubMed

    Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Kumar, Subramanian Hari Subbish; Madhumitha, Gunabalan; Suthindhiran, Krishnamurthy

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we have established for the first time, the terrific efficiency of aqueous extract of agricultural waste dried peel of sugar apple (Annona squamosa) in the rapid synthesis of stable SnO2 nanoparticles. In topical years, the deployment of secondary metabolites from plant extract has emerged as a novel technology for the synthesis of various nanoparticles. In this paper, we have studied the potential of SnO2 nanoparticles assembly using agricultural waste source for the first time. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized and confirmed as SnO2 nanoparticles by using UV-visible spectroscopy, XRD, and TEM analysis. The motivation of this study was to examine cytotoxicity study of SnO2 nanoparticles against hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2). SnO2 nanoparticles inhibited the cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 148 μg/mL. The treated cells showed an altered morphology with increasing concentrations of SnO2 nanoparticles. Our result shows that the SnO2 nanoparticles exhibit moderate cytotoxicity towards the hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) at tested concentrations. PMID:25410804

  6. Glass frits coated with silver nanoparticles for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingfen; Gan, Weiping; Zhou, Jian; Li, Biyuan

    2015-06-01

    Glass frits coated with silver nanoparticles were prepared by electroless plating. Gum Arabic (GA) was used as the activating agent of glass frits without the assistance of stannous chloride or palladium chloride. The silver-coated glass frits prepared with different GA dosages were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The characterization results indicated that silver-coated glass frits had the structures of both glass and silver. Spherical silver nanoparticles were distributed on the glass frits evenly. The density and particle size of silver nanoparticles on the glass frits can be controlled by adjusting the GA dosage. The silver-coated glass frits were applied to silver pastes to act as both the densification promoter and silver crystallite formation aid in the silver electrodes. The prepared silver-coated glass frits can improve the photovoltaic performances of solar cells.

  7. Core-shell polymer nanoparticles for prevention of GSH drug detoxification and cisplatin delivery to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surnar, Bapurao; Sharma, Kavita; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2015-10-01

    Platinum drug delivery against the detoxification of cytoplasmic thiols is urgently required for achieving efficacy in breast cancer treatment that is over expressed by glutathione (GSH, thiol-oligopeptide). GSH-resistant polymer-cisplatin core-shell nanoparticles were custom designed based on biodegradable carboxylic functional polycaprolactone (PCL)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) diblock copolymers. The core of the nanoparticle was fixed as 100 carboxylic units and the shell part was varied using various molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ethers (MW of PEGs = 100-5000 g mol-1) as initiator in the ring-opening polymerization. The complexation of cisplatin aquo species with the diblocks produced core-shell nanoparticles of 75 nm core with precise size control the particles up to 190 nm. The core-shell nanoparticles were found to be stable in saline solution and PBS and they exhibited enhanced stability with increase in the PEG shell thickness at the periphery. The hydrophobic PCL layer on the periphery of the cisplatin core behaved as a protecting layer against the cytoplasmic thiol residues (GSH and cysteine) and exhibited <5% of drug detoxification. In vitro drug-release studies revealed that the core-shell nanoparticles were ruptured upon exposure to lysosomal enzymes like esterase at the intracellular compartments. Cytotoxicity studies were performed both in normal wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (Wt-MEFs), and breast cancer (MCF-7) and cervical cancer (HeLa) cell lines. Free cisplatin and polymer drug core-shell nanoparticles showed similar cytotoxicity effects in the HeLa cells. In MCF-7 cells, the free cisplatin drug exhibited 50% cell death whereas complete cell death (100%) was accomplished by the polymer-cisplatin core-shell nanoparticles. Confocal microscopic images confirmed that the core-shell nanoparticles were taken up by the MCF-7 and HeLa cells and they were accumulated both at the cytoplasm as well at peri-nuclear environments. The present investigation lays a new foundation for the polymer-based core-shell nanoparticles approach for overcoming detoxification in platinum drugs for the treatment of GSH over-expressed breast cancer cells.Platinum drug delivery against the detoxification of cytoplasmic thiols is urgently required for achieving efficacy in breast cancer treatment that is over expressed by glutathione (GSH, thiol-oligopeptide). GSH-resistant polymer-cisplatin core-shell nanoparticles were custom designed based on biodegradable carboxylic functional polycaprolactone (PCL)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) diblock copolymers. The core of the nanoparticle was fixed as 100 carboxylic units and the shell part was varied using various molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ethers (MW of PEGs = 100-5000 g mol-1) as initiator in the ring-opening polymerization. The complexation of cisplatin aquo species with the diblocks produced core-shell nanoparticles of 75 nm core with precise size control the particles up to 190 nm. The core-shell nanoparticles were found to be stable in saline solution and PBS and they exhibited enhanced stability with increase in the PEG shell thickness at the periphery. The hydrophobic PCL layer on the periphery of the cisplatin core behaved as a protecting layer against the cytoplasmic thiol residues (GSH and cysteine) and exhibited <5% of drug detoxification. In vitro drug-release studies revealed that the core-shell nanoparticles were ruptured upon exposure to lysosomal enzymes like esterase at the intracellular compartments. Cytotoxicity studies were performed both in normal wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (Wt-MEFs), and breast cancer (MCF-7) and cervical cancer (HeLa) cell lines. Free cisplatin and polymer drug core-shell nanoparticles showed similar cytotoxicity effects in the HeLa cells. In MCF-7 cells, the free cisplatin drug exhibited 50% cell death whereas complete cell death (100%) was accomplished by the polymer-cisplatin core-shell nanoparticles. Confocal microscopic images confirmed that the core-shell nanoparticles were taken up by the MCF-7 and HeLa cells and they were accumulated both at the cytoplasm as well at peri-nuclear environments. The present investigation lays a new foundation for the polymer-based core-shell nanoparticles approach for overcoming detoxification in platinum drugs for the treatment of GSH over-expressed breast cancer cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TGA profile and DSC thermogram of all polymers, DLS data, AFM image, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MALDI spectra of all polymers and monomers. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04963f

  8. Sensitization of ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sounik; Robertson, David J.; McMeekin, Scott; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Recently we reported that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) inhibit ovarian tumor growth and metastasis in mice by reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Since EMT is known to confer drug resistance to cancer cells, we wanted to investigate whether anti-EMT property of AuNP could be utilized to sensitize ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin. Herein, we report that AuNPs prevent cisplatin-induced acquired chemoresistance and stemness in ovarian cancer cells and sensitize them to cisplatin. AuNPs inhibit cisplatin induced EMT, decrease the side population cells and key stem cell markers such as ALDH1, CD44, CD133, Sox2, MDR1 and ABCG2 in ovarian cancer cells. Mechanistically, AuNPs prevent cisplatin-induced activation of Akt and NF-?B signaling axis in ovarian cancer cells that are critical for EMT, stem cell maintenance and drug resistance. In vivo, AuNPs sensitize orthotopically implanted ovarian tumor to a low dose of cisplatin and significantly inhibit tumor growth via facilitated delivery of both AuNP and cisplatin. These findings suggest that by depleting stem cell pools and inhibiting key molecular pathways gold nanoparticles sensitize ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin and may be used in combination to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in ovarian cancer. PMID:25071019

  9. Tumor-targeted Chlorotoxin-coupled Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Delivery to Glioblastoma Cells: A Promising System for Glioblastoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro M; Cardoso, Ana L; Mendona, Liliana S; Serani, Angelo; Custdia, Carlos; Conceio, Mariana; Simes, Srgio; Moreira, Joo N; Pereira de Almeida, Lus; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed at the development and application of a lipid-based nanocarrier for targeted delivery of nucleic acids to glioblastoma (GBM). For this purpose, chlorotoxin (CTX), a peptide reported to bind selectively to glioma cells while showing no affinity for non-neoplastic cells, was covalently coupled to liposomes encapsulating antisense oligonucleotides (asOs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The resulting targeted nanoparticles, designated CTX-coupled stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs), exhibited excellent features for in vivo application, namely small size (<180?nm) and neutral surface charge. Cellular association and internalization studies revealed that attachment of CTX onto the liposomal surface enhanced particle internalization into glioma cells, whereas no significant internalization was observed in noncancer cells. Moreover, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing in U87 human GBM and GL261 mouse glioma cells resulted in increased levels of the tumor suppressors PTEN and PDCD4, caspase 3/7 activation and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Preliminary in vivo studies revealed that CTX enhances particle internalization into established intracranial tumors. Overall, our results indicate that the developed targeted nanoparticles represent a valuable tool for targeted nucleic acid delivery to cancer cells. Combined with a drug-based therapy, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing constitutes a promising multimodal therapeutic approach towards GBM.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e100; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.30; published online 18 June 2013. PMID:23778499

  10. Tumor-targeted Chlorotoxin-coupled Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Delivery to Glioblastoma Cells: A Promising System for Glioblastoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro M; Cardoso, Ana L; Mendona, Liliana S; Serani, Angelo; Custdia, Carlos; Conceio, Mariana; Simes, Srgio; Moreira, Joo N; Pereira de Almeida, Lus; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed at the development and application of a lipid-based nanocarrier for targeted delivery of nucleic acids to glioblastoma (GBM). For this purpose, chlorotoxin (CTX), a peptide reported to bind selectively to glioma cells while showing no affinity for non-neoplastic cells, was covalently coupled to liposomes encapsulating antisense oligonucleotides (asOs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The resulting targeted nanoparticles, designated CTX-coupled stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs), exhibited excellent features for in vivo application, namely small size (<180?nm) and neutral surface charge. Cellular association and internalization studies revealed that attachment of CTX onto the liposomal surface enhanced particle internalization into glioma cells, whereas no significant internalization was observed in noncancer cells. Moreover, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing in U87 human GBM and GL261 mouse glioma cells resulted in increased levels of the tumor suppressors PTEN and PDCD4, caspase 3/7 activation and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Preliminary in vivo studies revealed that CTX enhances particle internalization into established intracranial tumors. Overall, our results indicate that the developed targeted nanoparticles represent a valuable tool for targeted nucleic acid delivery to cancer cells. Combined with a drug-based therapy, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing constitutes a promising multimodal therapeutic approach towards GBM. PMID:23778499

  11. Synthesis of nanoparticles of P3HT and PCBM for optimizing morphology in polymeric solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satapathi, Soumitra; Gill, Hardeep Singh; Li, Lian; Samuelson, Lynne; Kumar, Jayant; Mosurkal, Ravi

    2014-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with opposite charges of a donor polymer, poly(3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) and an acceptor molecule, phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were synthesized using simple mini-emulsion technique. The NPs were examined by dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to confirm the formation of the NPs. The NPs were assembled into thin films by spin-coating of a blend of the NPs dispersion. The built-up of a five layered film was monitored by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Our preliminary study demonstrated that a solar cell made from an annealed NP film can exhibit photovoltaic response.

  12. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  13. Controlling the hydrophilicity and contact resistance of fuel cell bipolar plate surfaces using layered nanoparticle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng

    Hybrid nanostructured coatings exhibiting the combined properties of electrical conductivity and surface hydrophilicity were obtained by using Layer-by-Layer (LBL) assembly of cationic polymer, silica nanospheres, and carbon nanoplatelets. This work demonstrates that by controlling the nanoparticle zeta (zeta) potential through the suspension parameters (pH, organic solvent type and amount, and ionic content) as well as the assembly sequence, the nanostructure and composition of the coatings may be adjusted to optimize the desired properties. Two types of silica nanospheres were evaluated as the hydrophilic component: X-TecRTM 3408 from Nano-X Corporation, with a diameter of about 20 nm, and polishing silica from Electron Microscopy Supply, with diameter of about 65 nm. Graphite nanoplatelets with a thickness of 5~10nm (Aquadag RTM E from Acheson Industries) were used as electrically conductive filler. A cationic copolymer of acrylamide and a quaternary ammonium salt (SuperflocRTM C442 from Cytec Corporation) was used as the binder for the negatively charged nanoparticles. Coatings were applied to gold-coated stainless steel substrates presently used a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Coating thickness was found to vary nearly linearly with the number of polymer-nanoparticle layers deposited while a monotonic increase in coating contact resistance was observed for all heterogeneous and pure silica coatings. Thickness increased if the difference in the oppositely charged zeta potentials of the adsorbing components was enhanced through alcohol addition. Interestingly, an opposite effect was observed if the zeta potential difference was increased through pH variation. This previously undocumented difference in adsorption behavior is herein related to changes to the surface chemical heterogeneity of the nanoparticles. Coating contact resistance and surface wettability were found to have a more subtle dependence on the assembly sequence and coating composition. Various LBL assembly sequences were investigated to control heterogeneous coating nanostructure and tune their hydrophilic and electrically conductive properties. Assembly from mixed nanoparticle suspensions yielded competitive nanoparticle adsorption and is denoted as cLBL assembly. The absence of intervening polymer binder during sequential deposition from first carbon then silica nanoparticle suspensions directed the assembly process with each applied layer and is denoted as dLBL assembly. Use of intervening polymer binder as in standard LBL deposition is denoted as sLBL assembly. The cLBL assembly sequence was found to yield nanoparticle competition for available surface sites between the heterogeneous nanoparticles and result in phase separation within each layer, producing coatings with high electrical contact resistance but poor hydrophilicity. Coatings prepared using dLBL assembly exhibited improved contact resistance due to improved alignment of a carbon phase perpendicular to the substrate surface but continued poor hydrophilicity. The sLBL assembly scheme produced optimum coating performance due to the adsorption of highly dispersed silica layers directly onto the graphite platelets, while maintaining through-plane platelet to platelet contact. The wetting behavior of the prepared coatings was satisfactorily described by Johnson-Dettre model while exhibiting little response to changes in surface morphology (in contrast to Wenzel's equation). Hydrophilicity of the cLBL assembled coatings could be enhanced by altering the silica nanoparticle zeta potential in mixed suspensions. Coating durability was demonstrated through LBL assembly onto industrial-size bipolar plate materials and testing under PEM fuel cell operating conditions.

  14. Polystyrene nanoparticles internalization in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Tussellino, Margherita; Carotenuto, Rosa; Prisco, Marina; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Valiante, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The increase in the use of nanoparticles, as a promising tool for drug delivery or as a food additive, raises questions about their interaction with biological systems, especially in terms of evoked responses. In this work, we evaluated the kinetics of uptake of 44nm (NP44) and 100nm (NP100) unmodified polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) in gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells, as well as the endocytic mechanism involved, and the effect on cell viability and gene expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inflammation processes. We showed that NP44 accumulate rapidly and more efficiently in the cytoplasm of AGS compared to NP100; both PS-NPs showed an energy dependent mechanism of internalization and a clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Dose response treatments revealed a non-linear curve. PS-NPs also affected cell viability, inflammatory gene expression and cell morphology. NP44 strongly induced an up-regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 genes, two of the most important cytokines involved in gastric pathologies. Our study suggests that parameters such as time, size and concentration of NPs must be taken carefully into consideration during the development of drug delivery systems based on NPs and for the management of nanoparticles associated risk factors. PMID:26585375

  15. The effects of different size gold nanoparticles on mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells under mechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Tri Minh

    Nanotechnology is an emerging and promising frontier for medicine and biomedical research due to its potential for applications such as drug delivery, imaging enhancement, and cancer treatment. While these materials may possess significant possibilities, the effects of these particles in the body and how the particles affect the cells is not fully understood. In this study, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) will be exposed to 5 and 20 nm diameter citrate AuNPs under mechanical conditions. The cytotoxicity properties of these particles will be investigated using LDH and MTT assays. Atomic force microscopy will be used to study how the size of the nanoparticles affect the mechanical properties of the VSMCs. Immunofluorescence staining for alpha actin will also be performed to enhance understanding of the phenotypic shift. The LDH and MTT cytotoxicity assay results demonstrated that neither 5 nor 20 nm diameter nanoparticles are cytotoxic to the cells. However, the mechanical properties and cell morphology of the VSMCs was altered. Under static conditions, both AuNP treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells. The size of the nanoparticles had a softening effect on elastic modulus of the cell and sign of a synthetic phenotype was observed. The VSMCs subjected to mechanical stretching exhibited higher elastic modulus compared to the static experimental groups. Again, both AuNPs treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells and signs of more synthetic phenotype was seen. However, the size of the nanoparticles did not have any influence on cell's elastic modulus unlike the static treated cells. The mechanical testing condition provided a better look at how these particles would affect the cells in vivo. While the nanoparticles are not cytotoxic to the VSMCs, they are altering the mechanical properties and phenotype of the cell.

  16. Evaluating mononuclear cells as nanoparticle delivery vehicles for the treatment of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Jaclyn K.; Hu, Chelin; Ahmed, Mona M.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Nysus, Monique; Anderson Daniels, Tamara; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

    2015-08-01

    In breast cancer, certain types of circulating immune cells respond to long-range chemical signals from tumors by leaving the blood stream to actively infiltrate tumor tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether immune cells could be used to deliver therapeutic nanoparticles into breast tumors in mice. Mononuclear splenocytes (MS) were harvested from donor mice, labeled with Indium-111, injected intravenously into immune-competent recipient mice (3 tumor-bearing and 3 control), and imaged longitudinally by SPECT/CT. For comparison, the biodistribution of bonemarrow derived macrophages (BMDM) in one pair of mice was also imaged. Quantitative analysis of the SPECT images demonstrates that, after 24 hours, the concentration of MS detected in mammary tumors is more than 3-fold higher than the concentration detected in normal mammary glands. The ratio of MS concentration in mammary tissue to MS concentration in non-target tissues (muscle, lung, heart, liver, spleen, and kidney) was enhanced in tumor-bearing mice (compared to controls), with statistical significance achieved for mammary/muscle (p<0.01), mammary/lung (p<0.05), and mammary/kidney (p<0.05). By contrast, BMDM did not show a different affinity for tumors relative to normal mammary tissue. MS were incubated with 100 nm red fluorescent nanoparticles, and flow cytometry demonstrated that ~35% of the MS population exhibited strong phagocytic uptake of the nanoparticles. After intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice, fluorescence microscopy images of tumor sections show qualitatively that nanoparticle-loaded MS retain the ability to infiltrate mammary tumors. Taken together, these results suggest that MS carriers are capable of actively targeting therapeutic nanoparticles to breast tumors.

  17. Effect of carbon nanoparticles on renal epithelial cell structure, barrier function, and protein expression

    PubMed Central

    BLAZER-YOST, BONNIE L.; BANGA, AMIRAJ; AMOS, ADAM; CHERNOFF, ELLEN; LAI, XIANYIN; LI, CHENG; MITRA, SOMENATH; WITZMANN, FRANK A.

    2011-01-01

    To assess effects of carbon nanoparticle (CNP) exposure on renal epithelial cells, fullerenes (C60), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were incubated with a confluent renal epithelial line for 48 h. At low concentrations, CNP-treated cells exhibited significant decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) but no changes in hormone-stimulated ion transport or CNP-induced toxicity or stress responses as measured by lactate dehydrogenase or cytokine release. The changes in TEER, manifested as an inverse relationship with CNP concentration, were mirrored by an inverse correlation between dose and changes in protein expression. Lower, more physiologically relevant, concentrations of CNP have the most profound effects on barrier cell function and protein expression. These results indicate an impact of CNPs on renal epithelial cells at concentrations lower than have been previously studied and suggest caution with regard to increasing CNP levels entering the food chain due to increasing environmental pollution. PMID:21067278

  18. Nanoparticle scaffolds for syngas-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Yu, Jingwen; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Ilavsky, Jan; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brandon, Nigel

    2014-12-17

    Incorporation of nanoparticles into devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may provide benefits such as higher surface areas or finer control over microstructure. However, their use with traditional fabrication techniques such as screen-printing is problematic. Here, we show that mixing larger commercial particles with nanoparticles allows traditional ink formulation and screen-printing to be used while still providing benefits of nanoparticles such as increased porosity and lower sintering temperatures. SOFC anodes were produced by impregnating ceria–gadolinia (CGO) scaffolds with nickel nitrate solution. The scaffolds were produced from inks containing a mixture of hydrothermally-synthesised nanoparticle CGO, commercial CGO and polymericmore » pore formers. The scaffolds were heat-treated at either 1000 or 1300 °C, and were mechanically stable. In situ ultra-small X-ray scattering (USAXS) shows that the nanoparticles begin sintering around 900–1000 °C. Analysis by USAXS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the low temperature heat-treated scaffolds possessed higher porosity. Impregnated scaffolds were used to produce symmetrical cells, with the lower temperature heat-treated scaffolds showing improved gas diffusion, but poorer charge transfer. Using these scaffolds, lower temperature heat-treated cells of Ni–CGO/200 μm YSZ/CGO-LSCF performed better at 700 °C (and below) in hydrogen, and performed better at all temperatures using syngas, with power densities of up to 0.15 W cm-2 at 800 °C. This approach has the potential to allow the use of a wider range of materials and finer control over microstructure.« less

  19. Nanoparticle scaffolds for syngas-fed solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Yu, Jingwen; Gruar, Robert I.; Tighe, Christopher J.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Ilavsky, Jan; Darr, Jawwad A.; Brandon, Nigel

    2014-12-17

    Incorporation of nanoparticles into devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may provide benefits such as higher surface areas or finer control over microstructure. However, their use with traditional fabrication techniques such as screen-printing is problematic. Here, we show that mixing larger commercial particles with nanoparticles allows traditional ink formulation and screen-printing to be used while still providing benefits of nanoparticles such as increased porosity and lower sintering temperatures. SOFC anodes were produced by impregnating ceria–gadolinia (CGO) scaffolds with nickel nitrate solution. The scaffolds were produced from inks containing a mixture of hydrothermally-synthesised nanoparticle CGO, commercial CGO and polymeric pore formers. The scaffolds were heat-treated at either 1000 or 1300 °C, and were mechanically stable. In situ ultra-small X-ray scattering (USAXS) shows that the nanoparticles begin sintering around 900–1000 °C. Analysis by USAXS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the low temperature heat-treated scaffolds possessed higher porosity. Impregnated scaffolds were used to produce symmetrical cells, with the lower temperature heat-treated scaffolds showing improved gas diffusion, but poorer charge transfer. Using these scaffolds, lower temperature heat-treated cells of Ni–CGO/200 μm YSZ/CGO-LSCF performed better at 700 °C (and below) in hydrogen, and performed better at all temperatures using syngas, with power densities of up to 0.15 W cm-2 at 800 °C. This approach has the potential to allow the use of a wider range of materials and finer control over microstructure.

  20. Synergistic Effect of Functionalized Nickel Nanoparticles and Quercetin on Inhibition of the SMMC-7721 Cells Proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dadong; Wu, Chunhui; Li, Jingyuan; Guo, Airong; Li, Qingning; Jiang, Hui; Chen, Baoan; Wang, Xuemei

    2009-12-01

    The effect of functionalized nickel (Ni) nanoparticles capped with positively charged tetraheptylammonium on cellular uptake of drug quercetin into hepatocellular carcinoma cells (SMMC-7721) has been explored in this study via microscopy and electrochemical characterization as well as MTT assay. Meanwhile, the influence of Ni nanoparticles and/or quercetin on cell proliferation has been further evaluated by the real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) study. Our observations indicate that Ni nanoparticles could efficiently improve the permeability of cancer cell membrane, and remarkably enhance the accumulation of quercetin in SMMC-7721 cells, suggesting that Ni nanoparticles and quercetin would facilitate the synergistic effect on inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells.

  1. Nanoparticles-Assisted Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Li, Jun; Wang, Yulin; Lai, Hao; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has attracted increasing attention as a promising treatment strategy for cardiac repair in ischemic heart disease. Nanoparticles (NPs), with their superior physical and chemical properties, have been widely utilized to assist stem cell therapy. With the help of NPs, stem cells can be genetically engineered for enhanced paracrine profile. To further understand the fate and behaviors of stem cells in ischemic myocardium, imaging NPs can label stem cells and be tracked in vivo under multiple modalities. Besides that, NPs can also be used to enhance stem cell retention in myocardium. These facts have raised efforts on the development of more intelligent and multifunctional NPs for cellular application. Herein, an overview of the applications of NPs-assisted stem cell therapy is given. Key issues and future prospects are also critically addressed. PMID:26839552

  2. Intracellular Uptake and Trafficking of Difluoroboron Dibenzoylmethane-Poly(lactic acid) Nanoparticles in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Janette; Xie, Jiansong; Chen, Yin Jie; Pei, Hua; Zhang, Guoqing; Fraser, Cassandra L.; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, nanoparticles based on difluoroboron dibenzoylmethane-poly(lactic acid) (BF2dbmPLA) are prepared. Polylactic acid or polylactide is a commonly used degradable polymer, while the boron dye possesses a large extinction coefficient, high emission quantum yield, 2-photon absorption, and sensitivity to the surrounding environment. BF2dbmPLA exhibits molecular weight-dependent emission properties, and can be formulated as stable nanoparticles, suggesting that its unique optical properties may be useful in multiple contexts for probing intracellular environments. Here we show that BF2dbmPLA nanoparticles are internalized into cultured HeLa cells by endocytosis, and that within the cellular milieu they retain their fluorescence properties. BF2dbmPLA nanoparticles are photostable, resisting laser-induced photobleaching under conditions that destroy the fluorescence of a common photostable probe, LysoTracker blue. Their endocytosis is also lipid raft-dependent, as evidenced by their significant co-localization with cholera toxin B subunit in membrane compartments after uptake, and their sensitivity of uptake to methyl-?-cyclodextrin. Additionally, BF2dbmPLA nanoparticle endocytosis utilizes microtubules and actin filaments. Internalized BF2dbmPLA nanoparticles do not accumulate in acidic late endosomes and lysosomes, but within a perinuclear non-lysosomal compartment. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using novel BF2dbmPLA nanoparticles exhibiting diverse emission properties for in situ, live cell imaging, and suggest that their endogenous uptake occurs through a lipid-raft dependent endocytosis mechanism. PMID:20420413

  3. Nuclear entry of hyperbranched polylysine nanoparticles into cochlear cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weikai; Zhang, Ya; Lbler, Marian; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Ahmad, Aqeel; Pyykk, Ilmari; Zou, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Background: Gene therapy is a potentially effective therapeutic modality for treating sensorineural hearing loss. Nonviral gene delivery vectors are expected to become extremely safe and convenient, and nanoparticles are the most promising types of vectors. However, infrequent nuclear localization in the cochlear cells limits their application for gene therapy. This study aimed to investigate the potential nuclear entry of hyperbranched polylysine nanoparticles (HPNPs) for gene delivery to cochlear targets. Methods: Rat primary cochlear cells and cochlear explants generated from newborn rats were treated with different concentrations of HPNPs. For the in vivo study, HPNPs were administered to the rats round window membranes. Subcellular distribution of HPNPs in different cell populations was observed with confocal microscope 24 hours after administration. Results: Nuclear entry was observed in various cochlear cell types in vitro and in vivo. In the primary cochlear cell culture, concentration-dependent internalization was observed. In the cochlear organotypic culture, abundant HPNPs were found in the modiolus, including the spiral ganglion, organ of Corti, and lateral wall tissues. In the in vivo study, a gradient distribution of HPNPs through different layers of the round window membrane was observed. HPNPs were also distributed in the cells of the middle ear tissue. Additionally, efficient internalization of HPNPs was observed in the organ of Corti and spiral ganglion cells. In primary cochlear cells, HPNPs induced higher transfection efficiency than did Lipofectamine. Conclusion: These results suggest that HPNPs are potentially an ideal carrier for gene delivery into the cochlea. PMID:21468356

  4. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles protect cells from oxidant-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrea; Zhu, Aiping; Sun, Kai; Petty, Howard R.

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic nanoparticles represent a potential clinical approach to replace or correct aberrant enzymatic activities in patients. Several diseases, including many blinding eye diseases, are promoted by excessive oxidant stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles represent two potentially therapeutic nanoparticles that de-toxify ROS. In the present study we directly compare these two classes of catalytic nanoparticles. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles were found to be 16±2.4 nm and 1.9±0.2 nm in diameter, respectively. Using surface plasmon enhanced microscopy, we find that these nanoparticles associate with cells. Furthermore, cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles demonstrated superoxide dismutase catalytic activity, but did not promote hemolytic or cytolytic pathways in living cells. Importantly, both cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles reduce oxidant-mediated apoptosis in target cells as judged by the activation of caspase 3. The ability to diminish apoptosis may contribute to maintaining healthy tissues. PMID:22039334

  5. Polylactide-based Paclitaxel-loaded Nanoparticles Fabricated by Dispersion Polymerization: Characterization, Evaluation in Cancer Cell Lines, and Preliminary Biodistribution Studies

    PubMed Central

    Adesina, Simeon K.; Holly, Alesia; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Capala, Jacek; Akala, Emmanuel O.

    2015-01-01

    The macromonomer method was used to prepare crosslinked, paclitaxel-loaded polylactide-polyethylene glycol (stealth) nanoparticles using free-radical dispersion polymerization. The method can facilitate the attachment of other molecules to the nanoparticle surface to make it multifunctional. Proton NMR and FT-IR spectra confirm the synthesis of polylactide macromonomer and crosslinking agent. Formation of stealth nanoparticles was confirmed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The drug release isotherm of paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles shows that the encapsulated drug is released over 7 days. In vitro cytotoxicity assay in selected breast and ovarian cancer cell lines reveal that the blank nanoparticle is biocompatible compared to medium-only treated controls. In addition, the paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles exhibit similar cytotoxicity compared to paclitaxel in solution. Confocal microscopy reveals that the nanoparticles are internalized by MCF-7 breast cancer cells within one hour. Preliminary biodistribution studies also show nanoparticle accumulation in tumour xenograft model. The nanoparticles are suitable for the controlled delivery of bioactive agents. PMID:24961596

  6. Cytotoxicity evaluation of silica nanoparticles using fish cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nguyen T K; Bufalino, Mary R; Hartlen, Kurtis D; Kitaev, Vladimir; Lee, Lucy E J

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have extensive industrial, biotechnological, and biomedical/pharmaceutical applications, leading to concerns over health risks to humans and biota. Among various types of nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) have become popular as nanostructuring, drug delivery, and optical imaging agents. SiO2 NPs are highly stable and could bioaccumulate in the environment. Although toxicity studies of SiO2 NPs to human and mammalian cells have been reported, their effects on aquatic biota, especially fish, have not been significantly studied. Twelve adherent fish cell lines derived from six species (rainbow trout, fathead minnow, zebrafish, goldfish, haddock, and American eel) were used to comparatively evaluate viability of cells by measuring metabolic impairment using Alamar Blue. Toxicity of SiO2 NPs appeared to be size-, time-, temperature-, and dose-dependent as well as tissue-specific. However, dosages greater than 100?g/mL were needed to achieve 24h EC50 values (effective concentrations needed to reduce cell viability by 50%). Smaller SiO2 NPs (16nm) were relatively more toxic than larger sized ones (24 and 44nm) and external lining epithelial tissue (skin, gills)-derived cells were more sensitive than cells derived from internal tissues (liver, brain, intestine, gonads) or embryos. Higher EC50 values were achieved when toxicity assessment was performed at higher incubation temperatures. These findings are in overall agreement with similar human and mouse cell studies reported to date. Thus, fish cell lines could be valuable for screening emerging contaminants in aquatic environments including NPs through rapid high-throughput cytotoxicity bioassays. PMID:24357037

  7. Effect of nonendocytic uptake of nanoparticles on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Wu, Yun; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Kwak, Kwang Joo; Gupta, Cherry; Ouyang, Xilian; Lee, L James

    2015-03-17

    The toxicity of artificial nanoparticles is a major concern in industrial applications. Cellular uptake of hard nanoparticles could follow either endocytic or nonendocytic pathways, leading to different stimuli to the cells. Yet the cellular responses to nanoparticles following different pathways have not been compared due to the lack of an independent nonendocytic delivery method. We applied a unique delivery method, nanochannel electroporation (NEP), to produce predominantly nonendocytic uptakes of quantum dots (Q-dots) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different chemical modifications. NEP delivery bypassed endocytosis by electrophoretic injection of nanoparticles into human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells at different dosages. Conventional exposure by direct nanoparticle suspending in cell culture medium was also performed as control. The dosage-dependent responses to nanoparticles under different uptake pathways were compared. Fluorescence colocalization demonstrated that nanoparticles followed both endocytic and nonendocytic pathways for cell entry in contact exposure, whereas NEP delivery of nanoparticles bypassed endocytosis. Nonendocytic entry resulted in much higher oxidation stress and, for MWCNTs, more cell death in BEAS-2B cells. Despite the observation that most nanoparticles were taken up by cells through endocytosis, the minor nonendocytic entry of nanoparticles seemed to dominate the overall cellular response in conventional contact exposure. Our finding suggests that prevention against nonendocytic uptake could help reduce the toxicity of hard nanoparticles. PMID:25671340

  8. Targeting cancer stem cells by using the nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hong, In-Sun; Jang, Gyu-Beom; Lee, Hwa-Yong; Nam, Jeong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been shown to be markedly resistant to conventional cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs will ultimately lead to better cancer treatments. Currently, accessible conventional therapeutic agents mainly eliminate the bulk tumor but do not eliminate CSCs. Therefore, the discovery and improvement of CSC-targeting therapeutic agents are necessary. Nanoparticles effectively inhibit multiple types of CSCs by targeting specific signaling pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, transforming growth factor-β, and hedgehog signaling) and/or specific markers (aldehyde dehydrogenases, CD44, CD90, and CD133) critically involved in CSC function and maintenance. In this review article, we summarized a number of findings to provide current information about their therapeutic potential of nanoparticles in various cancer cell types and CSCs. PMID:26425092

  9. Exocytosis of peptide functionalized gold nanoparticles in endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, Dorota; Nitti, Simone; Millar, Timothy M.; Kanaras, Antonios G.

    2012-07-01

    We present the exocytosis profile of two types of peptide-coated nanoparticles, which have similar charge and size but different functionality. While one kind of particles appears to progressively exocytose, the other one has a more complex profile, suggesting that some of the particles are re-uptaken by the cells. Both types of particles retain their colloidal stability after exocytosis.We present the exocytosis profile of two types of peptide-coated nanoparticles, which have similar charge and size but different functionality. While one kind of particles appears to progressively exocytose, the other one has a more complex profile, suggesting that some of the particles are re-uptaken by the cells. Both types of particles retain their colloidal stability after exocytosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ICP-AES DLS and zeta potential measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31064c

  10. A multifunctional core-shell nanoparticle for dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Cheong, Taek-Chin; Min, Ji Hyun; Wu, Jun Hua; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Daehong; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Young Keun; Seong, Seung-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires tumour antigens to be delivered efficiently into dendritic cells and their migration to be monitored in vivo. Nanoparticles have been explored as carriers for antigen delivery, but applications have been limited by the toxicity of the solvents used to make nanoparticles, and by the need to use transfection agents to deliver nanoparticles into cells. Here we show that an iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticle can deliver carcinoembryonic antigen into dendritic cells while simultaneously acting as an imaging agent. The nanoparticle-antigen complex is efficiently taken up by dendritic cells within one hour and can be detected in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Mice immunized with dendritic cells containing the nanoparticle-antigen complex showed enhanced tumour antigen specific T-cell responses, delayed tumour growth and better survival than controls.

  11. Effects of Internalized Gold Nanoparticles with Respect to Cytotoxicity and Invasion Activity in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhirui; Liu, Ying; Shen, Yujie; Zhou, Ping; Lu, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles on lung cancer cells is not yet clear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and cell invasion activity of lung cancer cells after treatment with gold nanoparticles and showed that small gold nanoparticles can be endocytosed by lung cancer cells and that they facilitate cell invasion. The growth of A549 cells was inhibited after treatment with 5-nm gold nanoparticles, but cell invasion increased. Endocytosed gold nanoparticles (size, 10 nm) notably promoted the invasion activity of 95D cells. All these effects of gold nanoparticles were not seen after treatment with larger particles (20 and 40 nm). The enhanced invasion activity may be associated with the increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. In this study, we obtained evidence for the effect of gold nanoparticles on lung cancer cell invasion activity in vitro. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, key modulators of cell invasion, were found to be regulated by gold nanoparticles. These data also demonstrate that the responses of the A549 and 95D cells to gold nanoparticles have a remarkable relationship with their unique size-dependent physiochemical properties. Therefore, this study provides a new perspective for cell biology research in nanomedicine. PMID:24901215

  12. Size-Dependent Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles on Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Neural Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Senut, Marie-Claude; Zhang, Yanhua; Liu, Fangchao; Sen, Arko; Ruden, Douglas M; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-02-01

    This study explores the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for assessing nanotoxicology, specifically, the effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different core sizes (1.5, 4, and 14 nm) on the viability, pluripotency, neuronal differentiation, and DNA methylation of hESCs. The hESCs exposed to 1.5 nm thiolate-capped AuNPs exhibit loss of cohesiveness and detachment suggesting ongoing cell death at concentrations as low as 0.1 μg mL(-1) . The cells exposed to 1.5 nm AuNPs at this concentration do not form embryoid bodies but rather disintegrate into single cells within 48 h. Cell death caused by 1.5 nm AuNPs also occur in hESC-derived neural progenitor cells. None of the other nanoparticles exhibit toxic effects on the hESCs at concentrations as high as 10 μg mL(-1) during a 19 d neural differentiation period. Thiolate-capped 4 nm AuNPs at 10 μg mL(-1) cause a dramatic decrease in global DNA methylation (5 mC) and a corresponding increase in global DNA hydroxymethylation (5 hmC) of the hESC's DNA in only 24 h. This work identifies a type of AuNPs highly toxic to hESCs and demonstrates the potential of hESCs in predicting nanotoxicity and characterizing their ability to alter the DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation patterns in the cells. PMID:26676601

  13. A genetically engineered human pancreatic β cell line exhibiting glucose-inducible insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ravassard, Philippe; Hazhouz, Yasmine; Pechberty, Séverine; Bricout-Neveu, Emilie; Armanet, Mathieu; Czernichow, Paul; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Despite intense efforts over the past 30 years, human pancreatic β cell lines have not been available. Here, we describe a robust technology for producing a functional human β cell line using targeted oncogenesis in human fetal tissue. Human fetal pancreatic buds were transduced with a lentiviral vector that expressed SV40LT under the control of the insulin promoter. The transduced buds were then grafted into SCID mice so that they could develop into mature pancreatic tissue. Upon differentiation, the newly formed SV40LT-expressing β cells proliferated and formed insulinomas. The resulting β cells were then transduced with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), grafted into other SCID mice, and finally expanded in vitro to generate cell lines. One of these cell lines, EndoC-βH1, expressed many β cell–specific markers without any substantial expression of markers of other pancreatic cell types. The cells secreted insulin when stimulated by glucose or other insulin secretagogues, and cell transplantation reversed chemically induced diabetes in mice. These cells represent a unique tool for large-scale drug discovery and provide a preclinical model for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. This technology could be generalized to generate other human cell lines when the cell type–specific promoter is available. PMID:21865645

  14. Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tefft, Brandon J; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J Jonathan; Klabusay, Martin; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cells and therapeutic agents would benefit a wide range of biomedical applications by concentrating the therapeutic effect at the target site while minimizing deleterious effects to off-target sites. Magnetic cell targeting is an efficient, safe, and straightforward delivery technique. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be endocytosed into cells to render them responsive to magnetic fields. The synthesis process involves creating magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles followed by high-speed emulsification to form a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating. The PLGA-magnetite SPIONs are approximately 120 nm in diameter including the approximately 10 nm diameter magnetite core. When placed in culture medium, SPIONs are naturally endocytosed by cells and stored as small clusters within cytoplasmic endosomes. These particles impart sufficient magnetic mass to the cells to allow for targeting within magnetic fields. Numerous cell sorting and targeting applications are enabled by rendering various cell types responsive to magnetic fields. SPIONs have a variety of other biomedical applications as well including use as a medical imaging contrast agent, targeted drug or gene delivery, diagnostic assays, and generation of local hyperthermia for tumor therapy or tissue soldering. PMID:26554870

  15. Recombinant Nox4 cytosolic domain produced by a cell or cell-free base systems exhibits constitutive diaphorase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Zhang, Leilei; Lhomme, Stanislas; Mouz, Nicolas

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A comparison of two bacterial cell and cell-free protein expression systems is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins are produced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nox4 has a constitutive diaphorase activity which is independent of cytosolic factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isoform Nox4B is unable to initiate the first electronic transfer step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of Nox4 oxidase activity. -- Abstract: The membrane protein NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase Nox4 constitutively generates reactive oxygen species differing from other NADPH oxidases activity, particularly in Nox2 which needs a stimulus to be active. Although the precise mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species by Nox2 is well characterized, the electronic transfer throughout Nox4 remains unclear. Our study aims to investigate the initial electronic transfer step (diaphorase activity) of the cytosolic tail of Nox4. For this purpose, we developed two different approaches to produce soluble and active truncated Nox4 proteins. We synthesized soluble recombinant proteins either by in vitro translation or by bacteria induction. While proteins obtained by bacteria induction demonstrate an activity of 4.4 {+-} 1.7 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 20.5 {+-} 2.8 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c, the soluble proteins produced by cell-free expression system exhibit a diaphorase activity with a turn-over of 26 {+-} 2.6 nmol/min/nmol when measured against iodonitro tetrazolium chloride and 48 {+-} 20.2 nmol/min/nmol with cytochrome c. Furthermore, the activity of the soluble proteins is constitutive and does not need any stimulus. We also show that the cytosolic tail of the isoform Nox4B lacking the first NADPH binding site is unable to demonstrate any diaphorase activity pointing out the importance of this domain.

  16. Large identified pyramidal cells in macaque motor and premotor cortex exhibit “thin spikes”: implications for cell type classification

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswaran, G.; Kraskov, A.; Lemon, R. N.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that extracellular recordings of putative cortical interneurons have briefer spikes that those of pyramidal neurons, providing a means of identifying cortical cell types in recordings from awake monkeys. To test this, we investigated the spike duration of antidromically identified pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) recorded from primary motor (M1) or ventral premotor cortex (F5) in 4 awake macaque monkeys. M1 antidromic latencies (ADLs) were skewed towards short ADLs (151 PTNs; 0.5-5.5 ms, median 1.1 ms) and significantly different from that of F5 ADLs (54 PTNs; 1.0-6.9 ms, median 2.6 ms). The duration of PTN spikes, recorded with a high pass filter of 300 Hz and measured from the negative trough to the positive peak of the spike waveform, ranged from 0.15 to 0.71 ms. Importantly, we found a positive linear correlation between ADL and spike duration in both M1 (R2=0.40, p<0.001) and F5 (R2=0.57, p<0.001). Thus PTNs with the shortest ADL (fastest axons) had the briefest spikes, and since PTN soma size is correlated with axon size and conduction velocity, it is likely that the largest pyramidal neurons (Betz cells in M1) have spikes with short durations (0.15 to 0.45 ms), which overlap heavily with those reported for putative interneurons in previous studies in non-primates. In summary, one class of physiologically identified cortical pyramidal neuron exhibits a wide variety of spike durations and the results suggest that spike duration alone may not be a reliable indicator of cell type. PMID:21976508

  17. Silver Nanoparticle Enhanced Freestanding Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winans, Joshua David

    As the supply of fossil fuels diminishes in quantity the demand for alternative energy sources will consistently increase. Solar cells are an environmentally friendly and proven technology that suffer in sales due to a large upfront cost. In order to help facilitate the transition from fossil fuels to photovoltaics, module costs must be reduced to prices well below $1/Watt. Thin-film solar cells are more affordable because of the reduced materials costs, but lower in efficiency because less light is absorbed before passing through the cell. Silver nanoparticles placed at the front surface of the solar cell absorb and reradiate the energy of the light in ways such that more of the light ends being captured by the silicon. Silver nanoparticles can do this because they have free electron clouds that can take on the energy of an incident photon through collective action. This bulk action of the electrons is called a plasmon. This work begins by discussing the economics driving the need for reduced material use, and the pros and cons of taking this step. Next, the fundamental theory of light-matter interaction is briefly described followed by an introduction to the study of plasmonics. Following that we discuss a traditional method of silver nanoparticle formation and the initial experimental studies of their effects on the ability of thin-film silicon to absorb light. Then, Finite-Difference Time-Domain simulation software is used to simulate the effects of nanoparticle morphology and size on the scattering of light at the surface of the thin-film.

  18. PLGA-based gene delivering nanoparticle enhance suppression effect of miRNA in HePG2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Liang, Gao; Zhu, Yan Liang; Sun, Bo; Hu, Fei Hu; Tian, Tian; Li, Shu Chun; Xiao, Zhong Dang

    2011-07-01

    The biggest challenge in the field of gene therapy is how to effectively deliver target genes to special cells. This study aimed to develop a new type of poly( D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based nanoparticles for gene delivery, which are capable of overcoming the disadvantages of polyethylenimine (PEI)- or cationic liposome-based gene carrier, such as the cytotoxicity induced by excess positive charge, as well as the aggregation on the cell surface. The PLGA-based nanoparticles presented in this study were synthesized by emulsion evaporation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The size of PLGA/PEI nanoparticles in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was about 60 nm at the optimal charge ratio. Without observable aggregation, the nanoparticles showed a better monodispersity. The PLGA-based nanoparticles were used as vector carrier for miRNA transfection in HepG2 cells. It exhibited a higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells compared to the PEI/DNA complex. The N/P ratio (ratio of the polymer nitrogen to the DNA phosphate) 6 of the PLGA/PEI/DNA nanocomplex displays the best property among various N/P proportions, yielding similar transfection efficiency when compared to Lipofectamine/DNA lipoplexes. Moreover, nanocomplex shows better serum compatibility than commercial liposome. PLGA nanocomplexes obviously accumulate in tumor cells after transfection, which indicate that the complexes contribute to cellular uptake of pDNA and pronouncedly enhance the treatment effect of miR-26a by inducing cell cycle arrest. Therefore, these results demonstrate that PLGA/PEI nanoparticles are promising non-viral vectors for gene delivery.

  19. Quantitative intracellular magnetic nanoparticle uptake measured by live cell magnetophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ying; Mal, Niladri; Williams, P. Stephen; Mayorga, Maritza; Penn, Marc S.; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles have been used successfully as an intracellular contrast agent for nuclear MRI cell tracking in vivo. We present a method of detecting intracellular SPIO colloid uptake in live cells using cell magnetophoresis, with potential applications in measuring intracellular MRI contrast uptake. The method was evaluated by measuring shifts in mean and distribution of the cell magnetophoretic mobility, and the concomitant changes in population frequency of the magnetically positive cells when compared to the unmanipulated negative control. Seven different transfection agent (TA) -SPIO complexes based on dendrimer, lipid, and polyethylenimine compounds were used as test standards, in combination with 3 different cell types: mesenchymal stem cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and cultured KG-1a hematopoietic stem cells. Transfectol (TRA) -SPIO incubation resulted in the highest frequency of magnetically positive cells (>90%), and Fugene 6 (FUG) -SPIO incubation the lowest, below that when using SPIO alone. A highly regular process of cell magnetophoresis was amenable to intracellular iron mass calculations. The results were consistent in all the cell types studied and with other reports. The cell magnetophoresis depends on the presence of high-spin iron species and is therefore expected to be directly related to the cell MRI contrast level.Jing, Y., Mal, N., Williams, P. S., Mayorga, M., Penn, M. S., Chalmers, J. J., Zborowski, M. Quantitative intracellular magnetic nanoparticle uptake measured by live cell magnetophoresis. PMID:18725459

  20. Human dendritic cells and macrophages. In situ immunophenotypic definition of subsets that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Turner, R. R.; Shiurba, R. A.; Eng, L.; Warnke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and antisera in situ, the authors have defined subsets of human dendritic cells and macrophages that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics. All subsets contained cells that reacted with antibodies directed against HLA-A,B,C, HLA-Dr, leukocyte common, Leu-M3, and Leu-3(T4) antigens. R4/23 and anti-S100 defined three major subsets. R4/23+, S100- cells constituted the B-cell-related follicular dendritic cells, which were identified only within the germinal center/mantle microenvironment of lymphoid follicles. R4/23-, S100+ cells constituted the T-cell-related dendritic cell subset. Anti-Leu-6(T6) further subdivided this group into Leu-6(T6)- interdigitating cells within the T-cell microenvironments of lymphoid organs and Leu-6(T6)+ Langerhans cells found predominantly in epithelial microenvironments, especially the skin. R4/23-, S100- cells constituted the nondendritic tissue macrophage subset which was widely distributed, primarily outside of dendritic-cell microenvironments. These data indicate that although dendritic cells and macrophages share several common antigenic features, morphologically and microenvironmentally distinct subsets express distinct immunologic phenotypes. Such data may provide insight into the ontogeny and function of these subsets and constitute a basis for the comparison of normal dendritic cells and macrophages to various histiocytic proliferative disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p78-c Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3985124

  1. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Nanoparticle-Enabled Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Andrew R.; Singh, Ravi N.; Carroll, David L.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that multiple tumor types are sustained by a small population of transformed stem-like cells that have the ability to both self-renew and give rise to non-tumorigenic daughter cells that constitute the bulk of a tumor. These cells, which generally constitute a minority of the overall cancer cell population, are highly resistant to conventional therapies and persist following treatment, leading to disease relapse and the formation of distant metastases. Therapies that disrupt the maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells are the subject of active current investigation. This review discusses recent approaches to the application of nanomedicine to the targeting and elimination of cancer stem cells. Specifically, recent publications in the areas of nanoparticle-enabled drug and nucleic acid delivery and photothermal therapy are addressed. PMID:24383043

  2. Nanoparticle analysis of cancer cells by light transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, N; Johnson, J; Stack, M S; Szajko, J; Sander, C; Rebuyon, R; Deatsch, A; Easton, J; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T

    2015-09-01

    We have measured the optical properties of cancer and normal whole cells and lysates using light transmission spectroscopy (LTS). LTS provides both the optical extinction coefficient in the wavelength range from 220 to 1100nm and (by spectral inversion using a Mie model) the particle distribution density in the size range from 1 to 3000nm. Our current work involves whole cells and lysates of cultured human oral cells in liquid suspension. We found systematic differences in the optical extinction between cancer and normal whole cells and lysates, which translate to different particle size distributions (PSDs) for these materials. Specifically, we found that cancer cells have distinctly lower concentrations of nanoparticles with diameters less than 100nm and have higher concentrations of particles with diameters from 100 to 1000nm-results that hold for both whole cells and lysates. We also found a power-law dependence of particle density with diameter over several orders of magnitude. PMID:25981981

  3. Microfluidic Synthesis of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Controlled Lipid Layers: Understanding Flexibility-Regulated Cell-Nanoparticle Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Jiuling; Zhang, Shuai; Ding, Baoquan; Wei, Yujie; Dong, Mingdong; Ryu, Ji-Young; Yoon, Tae-Young; Shi, Xinghua; Sun, Jiashu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-10-27

    The functionalized lipid shell of hybrid nanoparticles plays an important role for improving their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Yet few efforts have been made to critically examine the shell structure of nanoparticles and its effect on cell-particle interaction. Here we develop a microfluidic chip allowing for the synthesis of structurally well-defined lipid-polymer nanoparticles of the same sizes, but covered with either lipid-monolayer-shell (MPs, monolayer nanoparticles) or lipid-bilayer-shell (BPs, bilayer nanoparticles). Atomic force microscope and atomistic simulations reveal that MPs have a lower flexibility than BPs, resulting in a more efficient cellular uptake and thus anticancer effect than BPs do. This flexibility-regulated cell-particle interaction may have important implications for designing drug nanocarriers. PMID:26448362

  4. Stable Self-Assembly of Bovine ?-Lactalbumin Exhibits Target-Specific Antiproliferative Activity in Multiple Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Sailendra; Paul, Subhankar

    2015-12-30

    Self-assembly of a protein is a natural phenomenon; however, the process can be performed under a suitable condition in vitro. Since proteins are nontoxic, biodegradable, and biocompatible in nature, they are used in various industrial applications such as biocatalyst, therapeutic agent, and drug carriers. Moreover, their flexible structural state and specific activity are being used as sensors and immensely attract many new applications. However, the inherent potential of protein self-assembly for various applications is yet to be explored in detail. In this study, spherical self-assembly of bovine ?-lactalbumin (nsBLA) was synthesized using an optimized ethanol-mediated desolvation process with an average diameter of approximately 300 nm. The self-assembly was found to be highly stable against thermal, pH, and proteases stress. When nsBLA was administered in various cancer cells, it demonstrated high cytotoxicity in three different cancer cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, whereas it exhibited negligible toxicity in normal human and murine cells. When nsBLA was conjugated with folic acid, it improved the cytotoxicity and perhaps mediated through enhanced cellular uptake in cancer cells through binding with folate receptors. Further, experimental results confirmed that the cancer cell death induced by nsBLA was not caused by apoptosis but a necrotic-like death mechanism. When compared with a well-known protein-based anticancer agent BAMLET (bovine ?-lactalbumin made lethal against tumor cell), the self-assembled BLA clearly exhibited higher cytotoxicity to cancer cells than BAMLET. While BAMLET exhibits poor biocompatibility, our nsBLA demonstrated excellent biocompatibility to normal cells. Therefore, in this study, we prepared self-assembled ?-lactalbumin that exhibits strong inherent antiproliferative potential in multiple cancer cells which can be used for efficient therapeutic approach in cancer. PMID:26440360

  5. New mechanisms for non-porative ultrasound stimulation of cargo delivery to cell cytosol with targeted perfluorocarbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, N. R.; Marsh, J. N.; Lanza, G. M.; Wickline, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    The cell membrane constitutes a major barrier for non-endocytotic intracellular delivery of therapeutic molecules from drug delivery vehicles. Existing approaches to breaching the cell membrane include cavitational ultrasound (with microbubbles), electroporation and cell-penetrating peptides. We report the use of diagnostic ultrasound for intracellular delivery of therapeutic bulky cargo with the use of molecularly targeted liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles. To demonstrate the concept, we used a lipid with a surrogate polar head group, nanogold-DPPE, incorporated into the nanoparticle lipid monolayer. Melanoma cells were incubated with nanogold particles and this was followed by insonication with continuous wave ultrasound (2.25 MHz, 5 min, 0.6 MPa). Cells not exposed to ultrasound showed gold particles partitioned only in the outer bilayer of the cell membrane with no evidence of the intracellular transit of nanogold. However, the cells exposed to ultrasound exhibited numerous nanogold-DPPE components inside the cell that appeared polarized inside intracellular vesicles demonstrating cellular uptake and trafficking. Further, ultrasound-exposed cells manifested no incorporation of calcein or the release of lactate dehydrogenase. These observations are consistent with a mechanism that suggests that ultrasound is capable of stimulating the intracellular delivery of therapeutic molecules via non-porative mechanisms. Therefore, non-cavitational adjunctive ultrasound offers a novel paradigm in intracellular cargo delivery from PFC nanoparticles.

  6. Effect of ?-cyclodextrin on the internalization of nanoparticles into intestine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Garca-Gonzlez, Lorena; Ypez-Mula, Lilin; Ganem, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The influence of ?-cyclodextrin on the interaction and internalization of PLGA nanoparticles into intestine epithelial cells was assessed. For this purpose ?-cyclodextrin was adsorbed on PLGA nanoparticles. Interaction of nanoparticles with Caco-2 cells, determined by fluorescence, was expressed as the number of particles per cell. Confocal microscopy confirmed the localization of the particles in the cell monolayer. The results showed that adsorption of ?-cyclodextrin on the surface of PLGA nanoparticles reduces interaction with mucin, enhancing in this way the internalization into the Caco-2 cells. PMID:26478186

  7. Targeted images of KB cells using folate-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathinaraj, Pierson; Lee, Kyubae; Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid-coated gold (GM) nanoparticles were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Folic acid (F) was then conjugated to the GM to preferentially target oral squamous cancer (KB) cells with folate receptors expressed on their membranes and facilitate the transit of the nanoparticles across the cell membrane. Finally, a fluorescence dye (Atto) was conjugated to the nanoparticles to visualize their internalization into KB cells. After culture of the cells in a medium containing GM and folate-conjugated GM (GF), the interaction of surface-modified gold nanoparticles with KB cells was studied.

  8. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  9. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events. PMID:26787230

  10. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, Harold N; Muir, Mark F; Taggart, Laura E; McMahon, Stephen J; Coulter, Jonathan A; Hyland, Wendy B; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M; Hirst, David G; Botchway, Stanley W; Currell, Fred J

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events. PMID:26787230

  11. Primary rat Sertoli and interstitial cells exhibit a differential response to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, S.R.; Welsh, M.J.; Payne, A.H.; Brown, C.D.; Brabec, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Two cell types central to the support of spermatogenesis, the Sertoli cell and the interstitial (Leydig) cell, were isolated from the same cohort of young male rats and challenged with cadmium chloride to compare their susceptibility to the metal. Both cell types were cultured under similar conditions, and similar biochemical endpoints were chosen to minimize experimental variability. These endpoints include the uptake of 109Cd, reduction of the vital tetrazolium dye MTT, incorporation of 3H-leucine, change in heat-stable cadmium binding capacity, and production of lactate. Using these parameters, it was observed that the Sertoli cell cultures were adversely affected in a dose-and time-dependent manner, while the interstitial cell cultures, treated with identical concentrations of CdCl2, were less affected. The 72-hr LC50's for Sertoli cells and interstitial cells were 4.1 and 19.6 microM CdCl2, respectively. Thus, different cell populations within the same tissue may differ markedly in susceptibility to a toxicant. These in vitro data suggest that the Sertoli cell, in relation to the interstitium, is particularly sensitive to cadmium. Because the Sertoli cell provides functional support for the seminiferous epithelium, the differential sensitivity of this cell type may, in part, explain cadmium-induced testicular dysfunction, particularly at doses that leave the vascular epithelium intact.

  12. Induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells by targeting mitochondria with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire, M M; Lakatos, M; Springer, A; Clemens, A; Appelhans, D; Krause-Buchholz, U; Pompe, W; Rdel, G; Mkandawire, M

    2015-06-28

    A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell death. The ability to target Au nanoparticles into mitochondria of breast cancer cells and induce apoptosis reveals an alternative application of Au nanoparticles in photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26022234

  13. Polymeric nanoparticle-based delivery of microRNA-199a-3p inhibits proliferation and growth of osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; lyer, Arun K; Yang, Xiaoqian; Kobayashi, Eisuke; Guo, Yuqi; Mankin, Henry; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Our prior screening of microRNAs (miRs) identified that miR-199a-3p expression is reduced in osteosarcoma cells, one of the most common types of bone tumor. miR-199a-3p exhibited functions of tumor cell growth inhibition, suggesting the potential application of miR-199a-3p as an anticancer agent. In the study reported here, we designed and developed a lipid-modified dextran-based polymeric nanoparticle platform for encapsulation of miRs, and determined the efficiency and efficacy of delivering miR-199a-3p into osteosarcoma cells. In addition, another potent miR, let-7a, which also displayed tumor suppressive ability, was selected as a candidate miR for evaluation. Fluorescence microscopy studies and real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed that dextran nanoparticles could deliver both miR-199a-3p and let-7a into osteosarcoma cell lines (KHOS and U-2OS) successfully. Western blotting analysis and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays demonstrated that dextran nanoparticles loaded with miRs could efficiently downregulate the expression of target proteins and effectively inhibit the growth and proliferation of osteosarcoma cells. These results demonstrate that a lipid-modified dextran-based polymeric nanoparticle platform may be an effective nonviral carrier for potential miR-based anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25931818

  14. A light-trapping strategy for nanocrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells using three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Kyungyeon; Jang, Eunseok; Jang, Segeun; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jang, Min Seok; Choi, Hoseop; Cho, Jun-Sik; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-02-01

    We report three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures inducing multiple plasmon resonances for broadband light harvesting in nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin-film solar cells. A three-dimensional multiscale (3DM) assembly of nanoparticles generated using a multi-pin spark discharge method has been accomplished over a large area under atmospheric conditions via ion-assisted aerosol lithography. The multiscale features of the sophisticated 3DM structures exhibit surface plasmon resonances at multiple frequencies, which increase light scattering and absorption efficiency over a wide spectral range from 350–1100 nm. The multiple plasmon resonances, together with the antireflection functionality arising from the conformally deposited top surface of the 3D solar cell, lead to a 22% and an 11% improvement in power conversion efficiency of the nc-Si:H thin-film solar cells compared to flat cells and cells employing nanoparticle clusters, respectively. Finite-difference time-domain simulations were also carried out to confirm that the improved device performance mainly originates from the multiple plasmon resonances generated from three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures.

  15. A light-trapping strategy for nanocrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells using three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyungyeon; Jang, Eunseok; Jang, Segeun; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jang, Min Seok; Choi, Hoseop; Cho, Jun-Sik; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-02-01

    We report three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures inducing multiple plasmon resonances for broadband light harvesting in nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin-film solar cells. A three-dimensional multiscale (3DM) assembly of nanoparticles generated using a multi-pin spark discharge method has been accomplished over a large area under atmospheric conditions via ion-assisted aerosol lithography. The multiscale features of the sophisticated 3DM structures exhibit surface plasmon resonances at multiple frequencies, which increase light scattering and absorption efficiency over a wide spectral range from 350-1100 nm. The multiple plasmon resonances, together with the antireflection functionality arising from the conformally deposited top surface of the 3D solar cell, lead to a 22% and an 11% improvement in power conversion efficiency of the nc-Si:H thin-film solar cells compared to flat cells and cells employing nanoparticle clusters, respectively. Finite-difference time-domain simulations were also carried out to confirm that the improved device performance mainly originates from the multiple plasmon resonances generated from three-dimensionally assembled nanoparticle structures. PMID:26751935

  16. Magnetic field-guided cell delivery with nanoparticle-loaded human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Moysidis, Stavros N; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Peschansky, Veronica J; Salero, Enrique; Weisman, Alejandra D; Bartakova, Alena; Raffa, Gabriella A; Merkhofer, Richard M; Kador, Karl E; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    To improve the delivery and integration of cell therapy using magnetic cell guidance for replacement of corneal endothelium, here we assess magnetic nanoparticles' (MNPs') effects on human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. Biocompatible, 50 nm superparamagnetic nanoparticles endocytosed by cultured HCECs induced no short- or long-term change in viability or identity. Assessment of guidance of the magnetic HCECs in the presence of different magnet shapes and field strengths showed a 2.4-fold increase in delivered cell density compared to gravity alone. After cell delivery, HCECs formed a functional monolayer, with no difference in tight junction formation between MNP-loaded and control HCECs. These data suggest that nanoparticle-mediated magnetic cell delivery may increase the efficiency of cell delivery without compromising HCEC survival, identity or function. Future studies may assess the safety and efficacy of this therapeutic modality in vivo. From the clinical editor: The authors show in this article that magnetic force facilitates the delivery of human corneal endothelial cells loaded by superparamagnetic nanoparticles to cornea, without changing their morphology, identity or functional properties. This novel idea can potentially have vast impact in the treatment of corneal endothelial dystrophies by providing self-endothelial cells after ex-vivo expansion. PMID:25596075

  17. Nucleosome-binding protein HMGN2 exhibits antitumor activity in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    HU, ANKANG; DONG, XIAOQIAN; LIU, XIQIAN; ZHANG, PING; ZHANG, YONGHONG; SU, NING; CHEN, QIANMING; FENG, YUN

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) serve as effectors in the antitumor response. High mobility group nucleosomal binding domain 2 (HMGN2) is a candidate effector molecule involved in CTL and NK cell function. In the current study, recombinant human HMGN2 was isolated and purified from transformed Escherichia coli. Tca8113 cells, an oral squamous cell carcinoma line, were treated with a variety of HMGN2 protein concentrations and cell growth was analyzed. HMGN2 significantly inhibited the growth of Tca8113 cells and was predicted to arrest cells in the S phase. Moreover, HMGN2 treatment increased the apoptosis rate of Tca8113 cells. Western blotting indicated the upregulation of p53 and Bax proteins, whereas Bcl-2 was significantly downregulated. In addition, caspase-3 was found to be activated. Furthermore, the HMGN2 protein may suppress the growth of Tca8113 cells in vivo. The results of the current study indicated that the HMGN2 protein may inhibit the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma and HMGN2 may represent an antitumor effector molecule of CTL or NK cells. PMID:24348831

  18. Breast Cancer Cell Lines Exhibit Differential Sensitivities to Microtubule-targeting Drugs Independent of Doubling Time

    PubMed Central

    RISINGER, APRIL L.; DYBDAL-HARGREAVES, NICHOLAS F.; MOOBERRY, SUSAN L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are a mainstay in breast cancer treatment, yet patient responses differ. The underlying mechanisms of these differences are unknown. While MTAs are mitotic inhibitors, recent evidence highlights that non-mitotic effects of these drugs can contribute to their anticancer effects. It is critical to identify the non-mitotic mechanisms that could contribute to differences among MTAs. However, it is not clear whether rapidly dividing cells in culture are optimal tools to address these mechanistic questions in interphase cells. Materials and Methods Detailed concentration response curves for five MTAs in a panel of diverse breast cancer cell lines were generated. Results Substantial differences among both drugs and cell lines, consistent with the clinical scenario, were observed. Importantly, these differences do not correlate with cell doubling time. Conclusion The interphase actions of MTAs are critical to the full spectrum of their effects in cancer cells, even in cell culture models. PMID:26504006

  19. Amorphous silica nanoparticles enhance cross-presentation in murine dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Takahashi, Hideki; Ichihashi, Ko-ichi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tochigi, Saeko; Nagano, Kazuya; Abe, Yasuhiro; The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 ; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085; The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticles enhanced cross-presentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticles induced endosomal release of exogenous antigens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticle-induced cross-presentation was mediated by scavenger receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-modification may enable the manufacture of safer silica nanoparticles. -- Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties and innovative functions, and they are increasingly being used in a wide variety of fields. Ensuring the safety of NMs is now an urgent task. Recently, we reported that amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSPs), one of the most widely used NMs, enhance antigen-specific cellular immune responses and may therefore aggravate immune diseases. Thus, to ensure the design of safer nSPs, investigations into the effect of nSPs on antigen presentation in dendritic cells, which are central orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, are now needed. Here, we show that nSPs with diameters of 70 and 100 nm enhanced exogenous antigen entry into the cytosol from endosomes and induced cross-presentation, whereas submicron-sized silica particles (>100 nm) did not. Furthermore, we show that surface modification of nSPs suppressed cross-presentation. Although further studies are required to investigate whether surface-modified nSPs suppress immune-modulating effects in vivo, the current results indicate that appropriate regulation of the characteristics of nSPs, such as size and surface properties, will be critical for the design of safer nSPs.

  20. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Delivering Genes and Remote Control of Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for biomedical applications was first proposed in the 1920s as a way to measure the rehological properties of the cell's cytoplasm. Since that time, magnetic micro- and nanoparticle synthesis, coating and bio-functionalization have advanced significantly, as have the applications for these particles. Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles are now used in a variety of biomedical techniques such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement, gene transfection, immno-assay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. This talk will focus on magnetic nanoparticle targeting to and actuation of cell surface receptors to control cell signaling cascades to control cell behavior. This technology has applications in disease therapy, cell engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of magnetic nanoparticles and oscillating magnet arrays for enhanced gene delivery will also be discussed.

  1. Biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles for in vivo stem cell tracking.

    PubMed

    Cova, Lidia; Bigini, Paolo; Diana, Valentina; Sitia, Leopoldo; Ferrari, Raffaele; Pesce, Ruggiero Maria; Khalaf, Rushd; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Ubezio, Paolo; Lupi, Monica; Tortarolo, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Giardino, Daniela; Silani, Vincenzo; Morbidelli, Massimo; Salmona, Mario; Moscatelli, Davide

    2013-06-21

    Efficient application of stem cells to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases requires safe cell tracking to follow stem cell fate over time in the host environment after transplantation. In this work, for the first time, fluorescent and biocompatible methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based nanoparticles (fluoNPs) were synthesized through a free-radical co-polymerization process with a fluorescent macromonomer obtained by linking Rhodamine B and hydroxyethyl methacrylate. We demonstrate that the fluoNPs produced by polymerization of MMA-Rhodamine complexes (1) were efficient for the labeling and tracking of multipotent human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs); (2) did not alter the main biological features of hAFCs (such as viability, cell growth and metabolic activity); (3) enabled us to determine the longitudinal bio-distribution of hAFCs in different brain areas after graft in the brain ventricles of healthy mice by a direct fluorescence-based technique. The reliability of our approach was furthermore confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging analyses, carried out by incubating hAFCs with both superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and fluoNPs. Our data suggest that these finely tunable and biocompatible fluoNPs can be exploited for the longitudinal tracking of stem cells. PMID:23690139

  2. Biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles for in vivo stem cell tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cova, Lidia; Bigini, Paolo; Diana, Valentina; Sitia, Leopoldo; Ferrari, Raffaele; Pesce, Ruggiero Maria; Khalaf, Rushd; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Ubezio, Paolo; Lupi, Monica; Tortarolo, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Giardino, Daniela; Silani, Vincenzo; Morbidelli, Massimo; Salmona, Mario; Moscatelli, Davide

    2013-06-01

    Efficient application of stem cells to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases requires safe cell tracking to follow stem cell fate over time in the host environment after transplantation. In this work, for the first time, fluorescent and biocompatible methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based nanoparticles (fluoNPs) were synthesized through a free-radical co-polymerization process with a fluorescent macromonomer obtained by linking Rhodamine B and hydroxyethyl methacrylate. We demonstrate that the fluoNPs produced by polymerization of MMA-Rhodamine complexes (1) were efficient for the labeling and tracking of multipotent human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs); (2) did not alter the main biological features of hAFCs (such as viability, cell growth and metabolic activity); (3) enabled us to determine the longitudinal bio-distribution of hAFCs in different brain areas after graft in the brain ventricles of healthy mice by a direct fluorescence-based technique. The reliability of our approach was furthermore confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging analyses, carried out by incubating hAFCs with both superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and fluoNPs. Our data suggest that these finely tunable and biocompatible fluoNPs can be exploited for the longitudinal tracking of stem cells.

  3. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors. PMID:26901756

  4. LAMP-2-deficient human B cells exhibit altered MHC class II presentation of exogenous antigens

    PubMed Central

    Crotzer, Victoria L; Glosson, Nicole; Zhou, Delu; Nishino, Ichizo; Blum, Janice S

    2010-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules present antigenic peptides derived from engulfed exogenous proteins to CD4+ T cells. Exogenous antigens are processed in mature endosomes and lysosomes where acidic proteases reside and peptide-binding to class II alleles is favoured. Hence, maintenance of the microenvironment within these organelles is probably central to efficient MHC class II-mediated antigen presentation. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins such as LAMP-2 reside in mature endosomes and lysosomes, yet their role in exogenous antigen presentation pathways remains untested. In this study, human B cells lacking LAMP-2 were examined for changes in MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation. MHC class II presentation of exogenous antigen and peptides to CD4+ T cells was impaired in the LAMP-2-deficient B cells. Peptide-binding to MHC class II on LAMP-2-deficient B cells was reduced at physiological pH compared with wild-type cells. However, peptide-binding and class II-restricted antigen presentation were restored by incubation of LAMP-2-negative B cells at acidic pH, suggesting that efficient loading of exogenous epitopes by MHC class II molecules is dependent upon LAMP-2 expression in B cells. Interestingly, class II presentation of an epitope derived from an endogenous transmembrane protein was detected using LAMP-2-deficient B cells. Consequently, LAMP-2 may control the repertoire of peptides displayed by MHC class II molecules on B cells and influence the balance between endogenous and exogenous antigen presentation. PMID:20518820

  5. Fixed endothelial cells exhibit physiologically relevant nanomechanics of the cortical actin web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodo Grimm, Kai; Oberleithner, Hans; Fels, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    It has been unknown whether cells retain their mechanical properties after fixation. Therefore, this study was designed to compare the stiffness properties of the cell cortex (the 50-100 nm thick zone below the plasma membrane) before and after fixation. Atomic force microscopy was used to acquire force indentation curves from which the nanomechanical cell properties were derived. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of actin destabilizing agent cytochalasin D, which results in a gradual softening of the cell cortex. Then cells were studied alive or fixed. We show that the cortical stiffness of fixed endothelial cells still reports functional properties of the actin web qualitatively comparable to those of living cells. Myosin motor protein activity, tested by blebbistatin inhibition, can only be detected, in terms of cortical mechanics, in living but not in fixed cells. We conclude that fixation interferes with motor proteins while maintaining a functional cortical actin web. Thus, fixation of cells opens up the prospect of differentially studying the actions of cellular myosin and actin.

  6. Heat shock protein expression in testis and bladder cancer cell lines exhibiting differential sensitivity to heat.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, E. H.; Hickman, J. A.; Masters, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Testis cancer cells are more sensitive than bladder and most other cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs both in the clinic and in vitro. In this study we show that they are also more sensitive than bladder cancer cells to heat. Since heat and drug sensitivity may be related to the ability of a cell to mount a stress response, constitutive and induced levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in three testis and three bladder human cancer cell lines were measured using Western blotting and scanning densitometry. No correlation between constitutive levels of HSP 90 or HSP 73/72 and cellular heat sensitivity was found. However, HSP 27 levels were much lower in the testis tumour cells, suggesting that low HSP 27 expression might contribute to heat sensitivity. Protein synthesis studies using [35S]methionine indicated that, for the same heat shocks, the kinetics of synthesis and decay of HSP 90 and HSP 73/72 in 833K (the most heat sensitive testis cells) was similar to or greater than that in HT1376 (the most heat-resistant bladder cells). Both 833K and HT1376 developed thermotolerance, and this followed an increase in synthesis of HSPs. These results indicate that, although there are differences in the constitutive levels of HSPs between testis and bladder cancer cells, both cell types are capable of mounting an induced heat shock response and can develop a similar degree of thermotolerance. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7669571

  7. Influence of surface charge on the potential toxicity of PLGA nanoparticles towards Calu-3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Mura, Simona; Hillaireau, Herve; Nicolas, Julien; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin; Gueutin, Claire; Zanna, Sandrine; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias

    2011-01-01

    Background Because of the described hazards related to inhalation of manufactured nanoparticles, we investigated the lung toxicity of biodegradable poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles displaying various surface properties on human bronchial Calu-3 cells. Methods Positively and negatively charged as well as neutral nanoparticles were tailored by coating their surface with chitosan, Poloxamer, or poly (vinyl alcohol), respectively. Nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, zeta potential, and surface chemical composition, confirming modifications provided by hydrophilic polymers. Results Although nanoparticle internalization by lung cells was clearly demonstrated, the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles was very limited, with an absence of inflammatory response, regardless of the surface properties of the PLGA nanoparticles. Conclusion These in vitro results highlight the safety of biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles in the bronchial epithelium and provide initial data on their potential effects and the risks associated with their use as nanomedicines. PMID:22114491

  8. Mammal-derived respiratory lipocalin allergens do not exhibit dendritic cell-activating capacity.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, S; Kinnunen, T; Rytknen-Nissinen, M; Nieminen, A; Liukko, A; Virtanen, T

    2013-03-01

    Most mammal-derived respiratory allergens belong to the lipocalin family of proteins. Determinants of their allergenic capacity are still unknown. Innate immune cells, in particular dendritic cells, have been shown to be involved in the allergenicity of some proteins. As recognition by dendritic cells is one of the few plausible mechanisms for the allergenicity of proteins, we wanted to investigate their role in the allergenicity of lipocalin allergens. Therefore, we first incubated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells with immunologically functional recombinant allergens mouse Mus m 1, dog Can f 1 and 2, cow Bos d 2, horse Equ c 1 and natural Bos d 2. Then, the surface marker expression and cytokine production of dendritic cells and their capacity to promote T cell proliferation and Th2 immune deviation in nave CD4(+) T cells were examined in vitro. We found that near to endotoxin-free lipocalin allergens had no effect on the activation, allostimulatory capacity or cytokine production of dendritic cells. The dendritic cells could not induce immune deviation in nave CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, lipopolysaccharide activated the dendritic cells efficiently. However, lipocalin allergens were not able to modify the lipopolysaccharide-induced responses. We conclude that an important group of mammal-derived respiratory allergens, lipocalins, appear not to be able to activate dendritic cells, a major component involved in the allergenicity of some proteins. It is conceivable that this incapacity of lipocalin allergens to arouse innate immunity may be associated with their poor capacity to induce a strong T cell response, verified in several studies. PMID:23298316

  9. Carbon black and titanium dioxide nanoparticles elicit distinct apoptotic pathways in bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Increasing environmental and occupational exposures to nanoparticles (NPs) warrant deeper insight into the toxicological mechanisms induced by these materials. The present study was designed to characterize the cell death induced by carbon black (CB) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs in bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o- cell line and primary cells) and to investigate the implicated molecular pathways. Results Detailed time course studies revealed that both CB (13 nm) and TiO2(15 nm) NP exposed cells exhibit typical morphological (decreased cell size, membrane blebbing, peripheral chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation) and biochemical (caspase activation and DNA fragmentation) features of apoptotic cell death. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of Bax and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were only observed in case of CB NPs whereas lipid peroxidation, lysosomal membrane destabilization and cathepsin B release were observed during the apoptotic process induced by TiO2 NPs. Furthermore, ROS production was observed after exposure to CB and TiO2 but hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was only involved in apoptosis induction by CB NPs. Conclusions Both CB and TiO2 NPs induce apoptotic cell death in bronchial epithelial cells. CB NPs induce apoptosis by a ROS dependent mitochondrial pathway whereas TiO2 NPs induce cell death through lysosomal membrane destabilization and lipid peroxidation. Although the final outcome is similar (apoptosis), the molecular pathways activated by NPs differ depending upon the chemical nature of the NPs. PMID:20398356

  10. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells. PMID:26948803

  11. Targeting and Imaging of Cancer Cells via Monosaccharide-Imprinted Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuangshou; Yin, Danyang; Wang, Wenjing; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Liu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of cancer cells is a key for cancer diagnosis and therapy, but the specificity highly relies on the use of biorecognition molecules particularly antibodies. Because biorecognition molecules suffer from some apparent disadvantages, such as hard to prepare and poor storage stability, novel alternatives that can overcome these disadvantages are highly important. Here we present monosaccharide-imprinted fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for targeting and imaging of cancer cells. The molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) probe was fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) doped silica NPs with a shell imprinted with sialic acid, fucose or mannose as the template. The monosaccharide-imprinted NPs exhibited high specificity toward the target monosaccharides. As the template monosaccharides used are over-expressed on cancer cells, these monosaccharide-imprinted NPs allowed for specific targeting cancer cells over normal cells. Fluorescence imaging of human hepatoma carcinoma cells (HepG-2) over normal hepatic cells (L-02) and mammary cancer cells (MCF-7) over normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A) by these NPs was demonstrated. As the imprinting approach employed herein is generally applicable and highly efficient, monosaccharide-imprinted NPs can be promising probes for targeting cancer cells. PMID:26948803

  12. An aqueous red emitting fluorescent fluoride sensing probe exhibiting a large Stokes shift and its application in cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Hou, Peng; Chen, Song; Wang, Hongbo; Wang, Jianxiu; Voitchovsky, Kislon; Song, Xiangzhi

    2014-01-11

    A novel red emitting fluorescent probe exhibiting a 143 nm Stokes shift for the detection of fluoride ions in an aqueous solution was developed. The probe displays a rapid response, high selectivity and good sensitivity towards F(-). Application of the probe for the selective detection of intracellular F(-) has been successfully demonstrated in living cells. PMID:24232231

  13. CMTM5 exhibits tumor suppressor activity through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heyu; Nan, Xu; Li, Xuefen; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jianyun; Sun, Lisha; Han, Wenlin; Li, Tiejun

    2014-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies in the head and neck region. CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 5 (CMTM5) has been recently implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancer types. Herein, we examined the expression and function of CMTM5 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CMTM5 was down-regulated in oral squamous cell lines and tumor samples from patients with promoter methylation. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored CMTM5 expression. In the OSCC cell lines CAL27 and GNM, the ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. In addition, CMTM5-v1 inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Therefore, CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24721428

  14. Commercial Nanoparticles for Stem Cell Labeling and Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqi; Xu, Chenjie; Ow, Hooisweng

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy provides promising solutions for diseases and injuries that conventional medicines and therapies cannot effectively treat. To achieve its full therapeutic potentials, the homing process, survival, differentiation, and engraftment of stem cells post transplantation must be clearly understood. To address this need, non-invasive imaging technologies based on nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed to track transplanted stem cells. Here we summarize existing commercial NPs which can act as contrast agents of three commonly used imaging modalities, including fluorescence imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging, for stem cell labeling and tracking. Specifically, we go through their technologies, industry distributors, applications and existing concerns in stem cell research. Finally, we provide an industry perspective on the potential challenges and future for the development of new NP products. PMID:23946821

  15. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  16. Nanoparticle assisted photothermal deformation of individual neuronal organelles and cells

    PubMed Central

    Romero, V. H.; Kereselidze, Z.; Egido, W.; Michaelides, E. A.; Santamaria, F.; Peralta, X. G.

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of the localized surface plasmon of metallic nanoparticles has been shown to be an effective mechanism to induce photothermal damage in biological tissues. However, few studies have focused on single cell or subcellular ablation. Our results show that, upon incubation, gold nanostars are internalized by neurons of acute mouse cerebellar brain slices, clustering inside or close to the nucleus. By stimulating the nanostars surface plasmon using a femtosecond laser, we show deformation of single nuclei and single cells. Given its precision and extremely localized effect, this is a promising technique for photothermal therapy in areas sensitive to collateral thermal damage such as the nervous system. PMID:25426326

  17. SERS measurement of the bladder cancer cells with the nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di; Chen, Haige; Cao, Ming; Yang, Guoliang; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran

    2015-09-01

    The surfaced enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of bladder cancer cells and tissues were measured in this paper. Both depth SERS and map SERS of SCABER bladder cancer cells were measured with confocal Raman microscope using gold nanoparticles as the enhance substrate. We also measured SERS of normal bladder tissue and bladder cancer tissue, and analyzed the difference of two different tissues. The SERS spectra of more samples need to be measured and analyzed for bladder cancer tissue and the normal bladder tissue in the future and the spectra will be helpful for bladder cancer diagnosis. PMID:26525026

  18. Nanoparticle assisted photothermal deformation of individual neuronal organelles and cells.

    PubMed

    Romero, V H; Kereselidze, Z; Egido, W; Michaelides, E A; Santamaria, F; Peralta, X G

    2014-11-01

    Stimulation of the localized surface plasmon of metallic nanoparticles has been shown to be an effective mechanism to induce photothermal damage in biological tissues. However, few studies have focused on single cell or subcellular ablation. Our results show that, upon incubation, gold nanostars are internalized by neurons of acute mouse cerebellar brain slices, clustering inside or close to the nucleus. By stimulating the nanostars' surface plasmon using a femtosecond laser, we show deformation of single nuclei and single cells. Given its precision and extremely localized effect, this is a promising technique for photothermal therapy in areas sensitive to collateral thermal damage such as the nervous system. PMID:25426326

  19. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells exhibit two bioenergetic steady-states in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hammami, Ines; Chen, Jingkui; Bronte, Vincenzo; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2011-03-10

    Growing tumours have acquired several mechanisms to resist to immune recognition. Among these strategies, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) contribute to tumour escape by suppressing T-cell specific anti-tumoural functions. The development of therapies that could specifically inhibit MDSC maturation, recruitment, accumulation and immunosuppressive functions is thus of great interest. This requires the identification of valuable biomarkers of MDSC behaviour in vitro. As for immune cells, whose energetic state is known as a biomarker of their functionality, we have characterized in vitro the metabolic and energetic behaviour of MSC-1 cells, an immortalized cell line derived from mouse MDSCs and used as model cell line. Combined results from in vitro(31)P-NMR with living cells and HPLC-MS analyses from cell extracts allowed to identify two distinct bioenergetic steady-states that coincided with exponential and stationary growth phases. While the adenylate energy charge remained constant throughout the culture duration, both the percentage of total pyrimidines, the UTP-to-ATP and PME (phosphomonoesters)-to-NTP ratios were higher at the exponential growth phase compared to the plateau phase, suggesting metabolically active cells and the production of growth-related molecules. Conversely, the NTP ratio increased at the entry of the stationary phase revealing the deterioration of the global bioenergetic status and the arrest of anabolic processes. PMID:21262283

  20. Developmental factor IRF6 exhibits tumor suppressor activity in squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Botti, Elisabetta; Spallone, Giulia; Moretti, Francesca; Marinari, Barbara; Pinetti, Valentina; Galanti, Sergio; De Meo, Paolo D'Onorio; De Nicola, Francesca; Ganci, Federica; Castrignan, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Chimenti, Sergio; Guerrini, Luisa; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Blandino, Giovanni; Karin, Michael; Costanzo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) regulates craniofacial development and epidermal proliferation. We recently showed that IRF6 is a component of a regulatory feedback loop that controls the proliferative potential of epidermal cells. IRF6 is transcriptionally activated by p63 and induces its proteasome-mediated down-regulation, thereby limiting keratinocyte proliferative potential. We hypothesized that IRF6 may also be involved in skin carcinogenesis. Hence, we analyzed IRF6 expression in a large series of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and found a strong down-regulation of IRF6 that correlated with tumor invasive and differentiation status. IRF6 down-regulation in SCC cell lines and primary tumors correlates with methylation on a CpG dinucleotide island located in its promoter region. To identify the molecular mechanisms regulating IRF6 potential tumor suppressive activity, we performed a genome-wide analysis by combining ChIP sequencing for IRF6 binding sites and gene expression profiling in primary human keratinocytes after siRNA-mediated IRF6 depletion. We observed dysregulation of cell cycle-related genes and genes involved in differentiation, cell adhesion, and cellcell contact. Many of these genes were direct IRF6 targets. We also performed in vitro invasion assays showing that IRF6 down-regulation promotes invasive behavior and that reintroduction of IRF6 into SCC cells strongly inhibits cell growth. These results indicate a function for IRF6 in suppression of tumorigenesis in stratified epithelia. PMID:21807998

  1. EGFR-Targeted Hybrid Plasmonic Magnetic Nanoparticles Synergistically Induce Autophagy and Apoptosis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Shinji; Scott, Ailing W.; Aaron, Jesse; Larson, Tim; Shanker, Manish; Correa, Arlene M.; Kondo, Seiji; Roth, Jack A.; Sokolov, Konstantin; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in 80% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is associated with poor survival. In recent years, EGFR-targeted inhibitors have been tested in the clinic for NSCLC. Despite the emergence of novel therapeutics and their application in cancer therapy, the overall survival rate of lung cancer patients remains 15%. To develop more effective therapies for lung cancer we have combined the anti-EGFR antibody (Clone 225) as a molecular therapeutic with hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles (NP) and tested on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Cell viability was determined by trypan-blue assay. Cellular protein expression was determined by Western blotting. C225-NPs were detected by electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, and EGFR expression using immunocytochemistry. C225-NP exhibited a strong and selective antitumor effect on EGFR-expressing NSCLC cells by inhibiting EGFR-mediated signal transduction and induced autophagy and apoptosis in tumor cells. Optical images showed specificity of interactions between C225-NP and EGFR-expressing NSCLC cells. No binding of C225-NP was observed for EGFR-null NSCLC cells. C225-NP exhibited higher efficiency in induction of cell killing in comparison with the same amount of free C225 antibody in tumor cells with different levels of EGFR expression. Furthermore, in contrast to C225-NP, free C225 antibody did not induce autophagy in cells. However, the therapeutic efficacy of C225-NP gradually approached the level of free antibodies as the amount of C225 antibody conjugated per nanoparticle was decreased. Finally, attaching C225 to NP was important for producing the enhanced tumor cell killing as addition of mixture of free C225 and NP did not demonstrate the same degree of cell killing activity. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism of C225-NP induced cytotoxic effects in lung cancer cells that are not characteristic for free molecular therapeutics thus increasing efficacy of therapy against NSCLC. PMID:22087216

  2. Engineered nanoparticles interacting with cells: size matters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid advancement of nanoscience and nanotechnology, detailed knowledge of interactions between engineered nanomaterials and cells, tissues and organisms has become increasingly important, especially in regard to possible hazards to human health. This review intends to give an overview of current research on nano-bio interactions, with a focus on the effects of NP size on their interactions with live cells. We summarize common techniques to characterize NP size, highlight recent work on the impact of NP size on active and passive cellular internalization and intracellular localization. Cytotoxic effects are also discussed. PMID:24491160

  3. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump in Pancreatic Cancer Cells Exhibiting the Warburg Effect Relies on Glycolytic ATP.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew D; Patel, Waseema; Butt, Zohra; Adiamah, Magretta; Dakhel, Raga; Latif, Ayse; Uggenti, Carolina; Swanton, Eileithyia; Imamura, Hiromi; Siriwardena, Ajith K; Bruce, Jason I E

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), which is critical for maintaining a low intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), utilizes glycolytically derived ATP in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and that inhibition of glycolysis in PDAC cell lines results in ATP depletion, PMCA inhibition, and an irreversible [Ca(2+)]i overload. We explored whether this is a specific weakness of highly glycolytic PDAC by shifting PDAC cell (MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1) metabolism from a highly glycolytic phenotype toward mitochondrial metabolism and assessing the effects of mitochondrial versus glycolytic inhibitors on ATP depletion, PMCA inhibition, and [Ca(2+)]i overload. The highly glycolytic phenotype of these cells was first reversed by depriving MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells of glucose and supplementing with ?-ketoisocaproate or galactose. These culture conditions resulted in a significant decrease in both glycolytic flux and proliferation rate, and conferred resistance to ATP depletion by glycolytic inhibition while sensitizing cells to mitochondrial inhibition. Moreover, in direct contrast to cells exhibiting a high glycolytic rate, glycolytic inhibition had no effect on PMCA activity and resting [Ca(2+)]i in ?-ketoisocaproate- and galactose-cultured cells, suggesting that the glycolytic dependence of the PMCA is a specific vulnerability of PDAC cells exhibiting the Warburg phenotype. PMID:26294767

  4. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump in Pancreatic Cancer Cells Exhibiting the Warburg Effect Relies on Glycolytic ATP*

    PubMed Central

    James, Andrew D.; Patel, Waseema; Butt, Zohra; Adiamah, Magretta; Dakhel, Raga; Latif, Ayse; Uggenti, Carolina; Swanton, Eileithyia; Imamura, Hiromi; Siriwardena, Ajith K.; Bruce, Jason I. E.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA), which is critical for maintaining a low intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), utilizes glycolytically derived ATP in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and that inhibition of glycolysis in PDAC cell lines results in ATP depletion, PMCA inhibition, and an irreversible [Ca2+]i overload. We explored whether this is a specific weakness of highly glycolytic PDAC by shifting PDAC cell (MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1) metabolism from a highly glycolytic phenotype toward mitochondrial metabolism and assessing the effects of mitochondrial versus glycolytic inhibitors on ATP depletion, PMCA inhibition, and [Ca2+]i overload. The highly glycolytic phenotype of these cells was first reversed by depriving MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells of glucose and supplementing with ?-ketoisocaproate or galactose. These culture conditions resulted in a significant decrease in both glycolytic flux and proliferation rate, and conferred resistance to ATP depletion by glycolytic inhibition while sensitizing cells to mitochondrial inhibition. Moreover, in direct contrast to cells exhibiting a high glycolytic rate, glycolytic inhibition had no effect on PMCA activity and resting [Ca2+]i in ?-ketoisocaproate- and galactose-cultured cells, suggesting that the glycolytic dependence of the PMCA is a specific vulnerability of PDAC cells exhibiting the Warburg phenotype. PMID:26294767

  5. Reactive oxygen species mediated DNA damage in human lung alveolar epithelial (A549) cells from exposure to non-cytotoxic MFI-type zeolite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kunal; Naha, Pratap C; Naydenova, Izabela; Mintova, Svetlana; Byrne, Hugh J

    2012-12-17

    Increasing utilization of engineered nanoparticles in the field of electronics and biomedical applications demands an assessment of risk associated with deliberate or accidental exposure. Metal based nanoparticles are potentially most important of all the nanoparticles in terms of health risks. Microporous alumino-silicates and pure silicates named as zeolites and zeo-type materials with variety of structures, chemical compositions, particle sizes and morphologies have a significant number of industrial uses such as in catalysis, sorption and ion-exchange processes. In particular, the nanosized particles due to their unique properties are used in hybrid organic-inorganic materials for photography, photonics, electronics, labeling, imaging, and sensing. The aim of the current study is to investigate pure silica MFI-type zeolites nanoparticles with sizes of 50nm and 100nm (samples MFI-50 and MFI-100) under suspended conditions and their toxicological effects on human lung alveolar (A549) cells under in vitro conditions. Live cell imaging showed that the nanoparticles precipitated from the colloidal suspension of cell culture media as large agglomerates, coming in contact with the cell surface through sedimentation. A cellular proliferative capacity test showed the zeolite nanoparticles to exhibit no significant cytotoxicity below a concentration of 100?g/ml. However, both the MFI-50 and MFI-100 nanoparticles induced high intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and elevated mitochondrial membrane potential in the A549 cells over the measured time period of 12h and at concentrations up to ?50?g/ml. DNA fragmentation analysis using the comet assay showed that the MFI-50 and MFI-100 nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in a concentration dependent manner. Furthermore, the rate at which maximum genomic damage was caused by MFI-100 nanoparticles in the A549 cells was found to be high as compared to the MFI-50 nanoparticles. However, the damage caused by the MFI-50 nanoparticles was found to accumulate over a longer period of time as compared to MFI-100 nanoparticles. The study therefore points towards the capability of the non-cytotoxic zeolite nanoparticles to induce oxidative stress resulting in short-term altered cellular metabolism up-regulation and genomic instability. Although the damage was found to be short-lived, its persistence over longer durations, or stabilization cannot be neglected. Further studies are in progress to yield a better understanding of the mechanisms for oxidative stress and resulting cascade of events leading to genetic damage in the human lung alveolar epithelial cells following exposure to zeolite nanoparticles of different sizes. PMID:23103338

  6. Geranylated 4-Phenylcoumarins Exhibit Anticancer Effects against Human Prostate Cancer Cells through Caspase-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Suparji, Noor Shahirah; Chan, Gomathi; Sapili, Hani; Arshad, Norhafiza M.; In, Lionel L. A.; Awang, Khalijah; Hasima Nagoor, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Geranylated 4-phenylcoumarins, DMDP-1 & -2 isolated from Mesua elegans were investigated for anticancer potential against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 resulted in cell death in a time and dose dependent manner in an MTT assay on all cancer cell lines tested with the exception of lung adenocarcinoma cells. DMDP-1 showed highest cytotoxic efficacy in PC-3 cells while DMDP-2 was most potent in DU 145 cells. Flow cytometry indicated that both coumarins were successful to induce programmed cell death after 24 h treatment. Elucidation on the mode-of-action via protein arrays and western blotting demonstrated death induced without any significant expressions of caspases, Bcl-2 family proteins and cleaved PARP, thus suggesting the involvement of caspase-independent pathways. In identifying autophagy, analysis of GFP-LC3 showed increased punctate in PC-3 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-1. In these cells decreased expression of autophagosome protein, p62 and cathepsin B further confirmed autophagy. In contrary, the DU 145 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-2 has reduced GFP-LC3 punctate although the number of cells with obvious GFP-LC3 puncta was significantly increased in the inhibitor-treated cells. The increase level of p62 suggested leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol to trigger potential downstream death mediators. This correlated with increased expression of cathepsin B and reduced expression after treatment with its inhibitor, CA074. Also auto-degradation of calpain-2 upon treatment with DMDP-1 &-2 and its inhibitor alone, calpeptin compared with the combination treatment, further confirmed involvement of calpain-2 in PC-3 and DU 145 cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 also showed up-regulation of total and phosphorylated p53 levels in a time dependent manner. Hence, DMDP-1 & -2 showed ability to activate multiple death pathways involving autophagy, lysosomal and endoplasmic reticulum death proteins which could potentially be manipulated to develop anti-cancer therapy in apoptosis resistant cells. PMID:26974436

  7. Enhanced low-temperature power density of solid oxide fuel cell by nickel nanoparticle infiltration into pre-fired Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia anode.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lee-Seung; Park, Jae Layng; Lee, Sungkyu; Jin, Yun-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Chan-Gi; Kim, Bum Sung

    2014-12-01

    The Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode morphology of an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) unit cell was improved by nickel nanoparticle infiltration. A colloidal route was selected for efficient fabrication of nickel metal nanoparticles and subsequent infiltration into the Ni/YSZ anode of a pre-fired SOFC unit cell. The power density of the anode-supported SOFC unit cell was measured by the potentiostatic method to investigate the effect of nickel nanoparticle infiltration. The increase in the power density of the Ni/YSZ anode with nickel nanoparticle infiltration became gradually less significant as the SOFC operating temperature increased from 700 to 800 degrees C. The improved performance of the Ni/YSZ anode with nickel nanoparticle infiltration compared to that of an anode without nickel nanoparticles is tentatively attributed to two factors: The discretely distributed nanoparticles on the nanostructured electrodes exhibited significant catalytic effects on the electrochemical performance of the electrodes, in addition to substantially increasing the triple phase boundary lengths. PMID:25970993

  8. Gold Nanoparticles Electroporation Enhanced Polyplex Delivery to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuyan; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Rajagopalan, Kartik Kumar; Wang, Shengnian

    2015-01-01

    Non-viral methods have been explored as the replacement of viral systems for their low toxicity and immunogenicity. However, they have yet to reach levels competitive to their viral counterparts. In this paper, we combined physical and chemical methods to improve the performance of polyplex delivery of DNA and siRNA. Specifically, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used to carry polyplex (a chemical approach) while electroporation (a physical approach) was applied for fast and direct cytosolic delivery. In this hybrid approach, cationic polymer molecules condense and/or protect genetic probes as usual while AuNPs help fix polycations to reduce their cytotoxicity and promote the transfection efficiency of electroporation. AuNPs of various sizes were first coated with polyethylenimine (PEI), which were further conjugated with DNA plasmids or siRNA molecules to form AuNPs-polyplex. The hybrid nanoparticles were then mixed with cells and introduced into cell cytosol by electroporation. The delivery efficiency was evaluated with both model anchor cells (i.e., NIH 3T3) and suspension cells (i.e., K562), together with their impact on cell viability. We found that AuNP-polyplex showed 1.5~2 folds improvement on the transfection efficiency with no significant increase of toxicity when compared to free plasmid delivery by electroporation alone. Such a combination of physical and chemical delivery concept may stimulate further exploration in the delivery of various therapeutic materials for both in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24777715

  9. Comparative evaluation of novel biodegradable nanoparticles for the drug targeting to breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mattu, C; Pabari, R M; Boffito, M; Sartori, S; Ciardelli, G; Ramtoola, Z

    2013-11-01

    Nanomedicine formulations such as biodegradable nanoparticles (nps) and liposomes offer several advantages over traditional routes of administration: due to their small size, nanocarriers are able to selectively accumulate inside tumours or inflammatory tissues, resulting in improved drug efficacy and reduced side effects. To further augment targeting ability of nanoparticles towards tumour cells, specific ligands or antibodies that selectively recognise biomarkers over-expressed on cancer cells, can be attached to the surface either by chemical bond or by hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. In the present work, Herceptin (HER), a monoclonal antibody (mAb) able to selectively recognise HER-2 over-expressing tumour cells (such as breast and ovarian cancer cells), was absorbed on the surface of nanoparticles through hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. Nps were prepared by a modified single emulsion solvent evaporation method with five different polymers: three commercial polyesters (poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL), poly (D,L-lactide) (PLA) and poly (D,L-lactide-co-.glycolide) (PLGA)) and two novel biodegradable polyesterurethanes (PURs) based on Poly(?-caprolactone) blocks, synthesised with different chain extenders (1,4-cyclohexane dimethanol (CDM) and N-Boc-serinol). Polyurethanes were introduced as matrix-forming materials for nanoparticles due to their high chemical versatility, which allows tailoring of the materials final properties by properly selecting the reagents. All nps exhibited a small size and negative surface charge, suitable for surface functionalisation with mAb through hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions. The extent of cellular internalisation was tested on two different cell lines: MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells showing a normal and a high expression of the HER-2 receptor, respectively. Paclitaxel, a model anti-neoplastic drug, was encapsulated inside all nps, and release profiles and cytotoxicity on SK-BR-3 cells were also assessed. Interestingly, PUR nps were superior to commercial polyester-based nps in terms of higher cellular internalisation and cytotoxic activity on the tested cell lines. Results obtained warrants further investigation on the application of these PUR nps for controlled drug delivery and targeting. PMID:23916461

  10. Morphological studies of living cells using gold nanoparticles and dark-field optical section microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chia-Wei; Chen, Miin Jang; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Wei, Pei-Kuen

    2009-05-01

    The morphologic changes of living cells under drug interactions were studied by using 80-nm gold nanoparticles and dark-field optical section microscopy. The gold nanoparticles were coated with poly (L-lysine), which attached to the membranes of various cells by way of electrostatic attractive force. A three-dimensional (3-D) morphological image was obtained by measuring the peak scattering intensities of gold nanoparticles at different focal planes. An algorithm for the reconstruction of 3-D cell morphology was presented. With the measured nanoparticle images and calculations, we show morphologic changes of lung cancer cells under the interaction of cytochalasin D drug at different times.

  11. NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive T cell receptors exhibit diverse therapeutic capability.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Conrad, Heinke; Krnig, Holger; Gelfort, Haike; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2013-03-15

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has been used as a target for different immunotherapies like vaccinations and adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, as it is expressed in various tumor types and has limited expression in normal cells. The in vitro generation of T cells with defined antigen specificity by T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an established method to create cells for immunotherapy. However, an extensive characterization of TCR which are candidates for treatment of patients is crucial for successful therapies. The TCR has to be efficiently expressed, their affinity to the desired antigen should be high enough to recognize low amounts of endogenously processed peptides on tumor cells, and the TCR should not be cross-reactive to other antigens. We characterized three NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones which were generated by different approaches of T cell priming (autologous, allogeneic), and transferred their TCR into donor T cells for more extensive evaluations. Although one TCR most efficiently bound MHC-multimers loaded with NY-ESO-1 peptide, T cells expressing this transgenic TCR were not able to recognize endogenously processed antigen. A second TCR recognized HLA-A2 independent of the bound peptide beside its much stronger recognition of NY-ESO-1 bound to HLA-A2. A third TCR displayed an intermediate but peptide-specific performance in all functional assays and, therefore, is the most promising candidate TCR for further clinical development. Our data indicate that multiple parameters of TCR gene-modified T cells have to be evaluated to identify an optimal TCR candidate for adoptive therapy. PMID:22907642

  12. MMP2-sensing up-conversion nanoparticle for fluorescence biosensing in head and neck cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yung-Chieh; Chen, Chieh-Wei; Chan, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Yu-Chan; Chang, Wei-Min; Chi, Li-Hsing; Yu, Hui-Ming; Lin, Yuan-Feng; Tsai, Din Ping; Liu, Ru-Shi; Hsiao, Michael

    2016-06-15

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have extensive biological-applications because of their bio-compatibility, tunable optical properties and their ability to be excited by infrared radiation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in extracellular matrix remodelling; they are usually found to significantly increase during cancer progression, and these increases may lead to poor patient survival. In this study, we produced a biosensor that can be recognized by MMP2 and then be unravelled by the attached quencher to emit visible light. We used 3.5-nm gold nanoparticles as a quencher that absorbed emission from UCNPs at a wavelength of 540nm. The biosensor consists of an upconversion nanoparticle, MMP2-recognized polypeptides and quenchers. Here, UCNPs consisting of NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) were prepared via a high temperature co-precipitation method while protecting the oleic acid ligand. To improve the biocompatibility and modify the UCNPs with a polypeptide, they were coated with a silica shell and further conjugated with MMP-recognizing polypeptides. The polypeptide has two ends of featuring carboxylic and thiol groups that react with UCNPs and AuNPs, and the resulting nanoparticles were referred to as UCNP@p-Au. According to the in vitro cell viability analysis, UCNP@p-Au exhibited little toxicity and biocompatibility in head and neck cancer cells. Cellular uptake studies showed that the MMP-based biosensor was activated by 980-nm irradiation to emit green light. This MMP-based biosensor may serve as sensitive and specific molecular fluorescent probe in biological-applications. PMID:26820361

  13. Silver nanoparticles-induced cytotoxicity requires ERK activation in human bladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Castiglioni, Sara; Cazzaniga, Alessandra; Perrotta, Cristiana; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2015-09-17

    Silver nanoparticles are toxic both in vitro and in vivo. We have investigated the possibility to exploit the cytotoxic potential of silver nanoparticles in T24 bladder carcinoma cells using both bare and PolyVinylPyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles. We show that the two types of silver nanoparticles promote morphological changes and cytoskeletal disorganization, are cytotoxic and induce cell death. These effects are due to the increased production of reactive oxygen species which are responsible, at least in part, for the sustained activation of ERK1/2. Indeed, both cytotoxicity and ERK1/2 activation are prevented by exposing the cells to the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine. Also blocking the ERK1/2 pathway with the MEK inhibitor PD98059 protects the cells from nanoparticles' cytotoxicity. Our findings suggest that ERK activation plays a role in silver nanoparticle-mediated cytotoxicity in T24 cells. PMID:26149761

  14. Staphylococcus aureus exhibit similarities in their interactions with Acanthamoeba and ThP1 macrophage-like cells.

    PubMed

    Cardas, Mihaela; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Alsam, Selwa

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Haematogenous spread is a pre-requisite but it is not clear how S. aureus survive the onslaught of macrophages. Acanthamoeba is a protozoan pathogen that is remarkably similar to macrophages, particularly in their cellular structure (morphological and ultra-structural features), molecular motility, biochemical physiology, ability to capture prey by phagocytosis and interactions with microbial pathogens. Thus, we hypothesize that S. aureus exhibit similarities in their interactions with Acanthamoeba and ThP1 macrophage-like cells. Here, we studied interactions of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) with Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype and macrophage-like cells (ThP1). The findings revealed that both MRSA and MSSA exhibited similarities in their binding/association and invasion of A. castellanii and ThP1 cells. Long-term incubation showed that MRSA and MSSA can survive intracellularly of both Acanthamoeba and ThP1 cells. Overall, these findings suggest that Acanthamoeba exhibit similar characteristics with ThP1 macrophage-like cells in their interaction with MRSA and MSSA. Additionally it was shown that bacteria survive inside Acanthamoeba during the encystment process as evidenced by bacterial recovery from mature cysts. Given that Acanthamoeba cysts are airborne, these findings suggest that cysts may act as "Trojan horse" to help spread MRSA to susceptible hosts. PMID:23000484

  15. CMTM5 exhibits tumor suppressor activity through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Heyu; Nan, Xu; Li, Xuefen; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jianyun; Sun, Lisha; Han, Wenlin; Li, Tiejun

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Down-regulation of CMTM5 expression in OSCC tissues was found. • The promoter methylation status of CMTM5 was measured. • CMTM5-v1 inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. • CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene in OSCC. - Abstract: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common types of malignancies in the head and neck region. CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing member 5 (CMTM5) has been recently implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancer types. Herein, we examined the expression and function of CMTM5 in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CMTM5 was down-regulated in oral squamous cell lines and tumor samples from patients with promoter methylation. Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored CMTM5 expression. In the OSCC cell lines CAL27 and GNM, the ectopic expression of CMTM5-v1 strongly inhibited cell proliferation and migration and induced apoptosis. In addition, CMTM5-v1 inhibited tumor formation in vivo. Therefore, CMTM5 might act as a putative tumor suppressor gene through promoter methylation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  16. Sphere-derived tumor cells exhibit impaired metastasis by a host-mediated quiescent phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bleau, Anne-Marie; Zandueta, Carolina; Redrado, Miriam; Martínez-Canarias, Susana; Larzábal, Leyre; Montuenga, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of lung cancer cells to distant sites represents a common event associated with poor prognosis. A fraction of tumor cells named cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to overcome therapeutic stress and remain quiescent. However, whether these CSCs have also the capacity to initiate and sustain metastasis remains unclear. Here, we used tumor sphere cultures (TSC) isolated from mouse and human lung cancer models to enrich for CSCs, and assessed their metastatic potential as compared to non-CSCs. As expected, TSC overexpressed a variety of stem cell markers and displayed chemoresistance. The CSC phenotype of TSC was confirmed by their higher growth ability in soft agar and tumorigenic potential in vivo, despite their reduced in vitro cell growth kinetics. Surprisingly, the appearance of spontaneous lung metastases was strongly delayed in mice injected with TSC as compared to non-TSC cells. Similarly, this finding was confirmed in several other models of metastasis, an effect associated with a retarded colonization activity. Interestingly, such delay correlated with a quiescent phenotype whose underlined mechanisms included an increase in p27 protein and lower phospho-ERK1/2 levels. Thus, these data suggest that cells enriched for CSC properties display an impaired metastatic activity, a finding with potential clinical implications. PMID:26318423

  17. MicroRNA-21 Exhibits Antiangiogenic Function by Targeting RhoB Expression in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bovy, Nicolas; Deroanne, Christophe; Lambert, Vincent; Gonzalez, Maria-Luz Alvarez; Colige, Alain; Rakic, Jean-Marie; Noël, Agnès; Martial, Joseph A.; Struman, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The recent discovery of the involvement of these RNAs in the control of angiogenesis renders them very attractive in the development of new approaches for restoring the angiogenic balance. Whereas miRNA-21 has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in endothelial cells, the potential function of this miRNA in angiogenesis has never been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings We first observed in endothelial cells a negative regulation of miR-21 expression by serum and bFGF, two pro-angiogenic factors. Then using in vitro angiogenic assays, we observed that miR-21 acts as a negative modulator of angiogenesis. miR-21 overexpression reduced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and the ability of these cells to form tubes whereas miR-21 inhibition using a LNA-anti-miR led to opposite effects. Expression of miR-21 in endothelial cells also led to a reduction in the organization of actin into stress fibers, which may explain the decrease in cell migration. Further mechanistic studies showed that miR-21 targets RhoB, as revealed by a decrease in RhoB expression and activity in miR-21 overexpressing cells. RhoB silencing impairs endothelial cell migration and tubulogenesis, thus providing a possible mechanism for miR-21 to inhibit angiogenesis. Finally, the therapeutic potential of miR-21 as an angiogenesis inhibitor was demonstrated in vivo in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization. Conclusions/Significance Our results identify miR-21 as a new angiogenesis inhibitor and suggest that inhibition of cell migration and tubulogenesis is mediated through repression of RhoB. PMID:21347332

  18. Irgm1-deficient mice exhibit Paneth cell abnormalities and increased susceptibility to acute intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Gulati, Ajay S.; Cantillana, Viviana; Henry, Stanley C.; Schmidt, Elyse A.; Daniell, Xiaoju; Grossniklaus, Emily; Schoenborn, Alexi A.; Sartor, R. Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory disorder of the intestine that has been linked to numerous susceptibility genes, including the immunity-related GTPase (IRG) M (IRGM). IRGs comprise a family of proteins known to confer resistance to intracellular infections through various mechanisms, including regulation of phagosome processing, cell motility, and autophagy. However, despite its association with CD, the role of IRGM and other IRGs in regulating intestinal inflammation is unclear. We investigated the involvement of Irgm1, an ortholog of IRGM, in the genesis of murine intestinal inflammation. After dextran sodium sulfate exposure, Irgm1-deficient [Irgm1 knockout (KO)] mice showed increased acute inflammation in the colon and ileum, with worsened clinical responses. Marked alterations of Paneth cell location and granule morphology were present in Irgm1 KO mice, even without dextran sodium sulfate exposure, and were associated with impaired mitophagy and autophagy in Irgm1 KO intestinal cells (including Paneth cells). This was manifested by frequent tubular and swollen mitochondria and increased LC3-positive autophagic structures. Interestingly, these LC3-positive structures often contained Paneth cell granules. These results suggest that Irgm1 modulates acute inflammatory responses in the mouse intestine, putatively through the regulation of gut autophagic processes, that may be pivotal for proper Paneth cell functioning. PMID:23989005

  19. Dunaliella salina exhibits an antileukemic immunity in a mouse model of WEHI-3 leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Chen; Ho, Yung-Chyuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lu, Fung-Jou

    2014-11-26

    Dunaliella salina has been shown to have antioxidant property and induce apoptotic cell death of human cancer cells in vitro. However, there is no information available on D. salina showing an antileukemia effect or immunomodulatory activity in vivo. This study applied D. salina to syngeneic leukemia-implanted mice (BALB/c and WEHI-3) to investigate its immunological and antileukemia properties. Oral administration of D. salina (184.5, 369, and 922.5 mg/kg) inhibited spleen metastasis and prolonged the survival in BALB/c mice that had received an intravenous injection of WEHI-3 cells. The results revealed that D. salina had reduced spleen enlargement in murine leukemia. It had also increased the population and proliferation of T-cells (CD3) and B-cells (CD19) following Con A/LPS treatment on flow cytometry and MTT assay, respectively. Furthermore, D. salina increased the phagocytosis of macrophages and enhanced the cytotoxicity of natural killer cells on flow cytometry and LDH assay. Moreover, D. salina enhanced the levels of interferon-? and interleukin 2 (IL-2) but reduced the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in leukemic mice. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the application of D. salina had beneficial effects on WEHI-3 leukemic mice by prolonging survival via modulating the immune responses. PMID:25380534

  20. Comparative cytotoxicity studies of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles in murine glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Grudzinski, Ireneusz P; Bystrzejewski, Michal; Cywinska, Monika A; Kosmider, Anita; Poplawska, Magdalena; Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Fijalek, Zbigniew; Ostrowska, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CEINs) have recently emerged as a new class of magnetic nanomaterials with a great potential for an increasing number of biomedical applications. To address the current deficient knowledge of cellular responses due to CEIN exposures, we focused on the investigation of internalization profile and resulting cytotoxic effects of CEINs (0.0001-100 μg/ml) in murine glioma cells (GL261) in vitro. The studied CEIN samples were characterized (TEM, FT-IR, Zeta potential, Boehm titration) and examined as raw and purified nanomaterials with various surface chemistry composition. Of the four type CEINs (the mean diameter 47-56 nm) studied here, the as-synthesized raw nanoparticles (Fe@C/Fe) exhibited high cytotoxic effects on the plasma cell membrane (LDH, Calcein AM/PI) and mitochondria (MTT, JC-1) causing some pro-apoptotic evens (Annexin V/PI) in glioma cells. The effects of the purified (Fe@C) and surface-modified (Fe@C-COOH and Fe@C-(CH2)2COOH) CEINs were found in quite similar patterns; however, most of these cytotoxic events were slightly diminished compared to those induced by Fe@C/Fe. The study showed that the surface-functionalized CEINs affected the cell cycle progression in both S and G2/M phases to a greater extent compared to that of the rest of nanoparticles studied to data. Taken all together, the present results highlight the importance of the rational design of CEINs as their physicochemical features such as morphology, hydrodynamic size, impurity profiles, and especially surface characteristics are critical determinants of different cytotoxic responses. PMID:24632386

  1. Manganese Nanoparticle Activates Mitochondrial Dependent Apoptotic Signaling and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-01-01

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles (~25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25400 g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C? (PKC?), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. PMID:21856324

  2. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-11-15

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles ({approx} 25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25-400 {mu}g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin 1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles activate mitochondrial cell death signaling in dopaminergic neuron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles activate caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of PKC{delta} cascade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles induce loss of TH{sup +} neurons in primary mesencephalic cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study emphasizes neurotoxic risks of Mn nanoparticles to nigral dopaminergic system.

  3. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of silver nanoparticles in testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Asare, Nana; Instanes, Christine; Sandberg, Wiggo J; Refsnes, Magne; Schwarze, Per; Kruszewski, Marcin; Brunborg, Gunnar

    2012-01-27

    Serious concerns have been expressed about potential risks of engineered nanoparticles. Regulatory health risk assessment of such particles has become mandatory for the safe use of nanomaterials in consumer products and medicines; including the potential effects on reproduction and fertility, are relevant for this risk evaluation. In this study, we examined effects of silver particles of nano- (20nm) and submicron- (200nm) size, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs; 21nm), with emphasis on reproductive cellular- and genotoxicity. Ntera2 (NT2, human testicular embryonic carcinoma cell line), and primary testicular cells from C57BL6 mice of wild type (WT) and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase knock-out (KO, mOgg1(-/-)) genotype were exposed to the particles. The latter mimics the repair status of human testicular cells vs oxidative damage and is thus a suitable model for human male reproductive toxicity studies. The results suggest that silver nano- and submicron-particles (AgNPs) are more cytotoxic and cytostatic compared to TiO(2)-NPs, causing apoptosis, necrosis and decreased proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The 200nm AgNPs in particular appeared to cause a concentration-dependent increase in DNA-strand breaks in NT2 cells, whereas the latter response did not seem to occur with respect to oxidative purine base damage analysed with any of the particles tested. PMID:22085606

  4. Optoacoustic imaging of gold nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghtedari, Mohammad; Motamedi, Massoud; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2004-07-01

    Optoacoustic Tomography (OAT) is a rapidly growing technology that enables noninvasive deep imaging of biological tissues based on their light absorption. In OAT, the interaction of a pulsed laser with tissue increases the temperature of the absorbing components in a confined volume of tissue. Rapid perturbation of the temperature (<1C) deep within tissue produces weak acoustic waves that easily travel to the surface of the tissue with minor attenuation. Abnormal angiogenesis in a malignant tumor, that increases its blood content, makes a native contrast for optoacoustic imaging; however, the application of OAT for early detection of malignant tumors requires the enhancement of optoacoustic signals originated from tumor by using an exogenous contrast agent. Due to their strong absorption, we have used gold nanoparticles (NP) as a contrast agent. 40nm spherical gold nanoparticles were attached to monoclonal antibody to target cell surface of breast cancer cells. The targeted cancer cells were implanted at depth of 5-6cm within a gelatinous object that optically resembles human breast. Experimental sensitivity measurements along with theoretical analysis showed that our optoacoustic imaging system is capable of detecting a phantom breast tumor with the volume of 0.15ml, which is composed of 25 million NP-targeted cancer cells, at a depth of 5 centimeters in vitro.

  5. A Selective and Purification-Free Strategy for Labeling Adherent Cells with Inorganic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Lim, Jing; Yeo, David Chen Loong; Liao, Shanshan; Lans, Malin; Wang, Yaqi; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Goh, Bee Tin; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-03-16

    Cellular labeling with inorganic nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, quantum dots, and fluorescent silica nanoparticles is an important method for the noninvasive visualization of cells using various imaging modalities. Currently, this is mainly achieved through the incubation of cultured cells with the nanoparticles that eventually reach the intracellular compartment through specific or nonspecific internalization. This classic method is advantageous in terms of simplicity and convenience, but it suffers from issues such as difficulties in fully removing free nanoparticles (suspended in solution) and the lack of selectivity on cell types. This article reports an innovative strategy for the specific labeling of adherent cells without the concern of freely suspended nanoparticles. This method relies on a nanocomposite film that is prepared by homogeneously dispersing nanoparticles within a biodegradable polymeric film. When adherent cells are seeded on the film, they adhere, spread, and filtrate into the film through the micropores formed during the film fabrication. The pre-embedded nanoparticles are thus internalized by the cells during this infiltration process. As an example, fluorescent silica nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed within a polycaprolactone film by utilizing cryomilling and heat pressing. Upon incubation within physiological buffer, no silica nanoparticles were released from the nanocomposite film even after 20 d of incubation. However, when adherent cells (e.g., human mesenchymal stem cells) were grown on the film, they became fluorescent after 3 d, which suggests internalization of silica nanoparticles by cells. In comparison, the suspension cells (e.g., monocytes) in the medium remained nonfluorescent no matter whether there was the presence of adherent cells or not. This strategy eventually allowed the selective and concomitant labeling of mesenchymal stem cells during their harvest from bone marrow aspiration. PMID:26928268

  6. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. This study investigated the genotoxicity of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide nanoparticles of va...

  7. Synthesis and fluorescence properties of N-substituted 1-cyanobenz[f]isoindole chitosan polymers and nanoparticles for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Gonil, Pattarapond; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong; Na Ubol, Preeyawis; Treetong, Alongkot; Opanasopit, Praneet; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2014-08-11

    Highly fluorescent N-substituted 1-cyanobenz[f]isoindole chitosans (CBI-CSs) with various degrees of N-substitution (DS) were synthesized by reacting chitosan (CS) with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) in the presence of cyanide under mild acidic conditions. Introduction of 1-cyanobenz[f]isoindole moieties into the CS backbone resulted in lowering of polymer thermal stability and crystallinity. The fluorescence quantum yield (?f) of CBI-CS was found to be DS- and molecular-weight-dependent, with ?f decreasing as DS and molecular weight were increased. At similar DS values, CBI-CS exhibited 26 times higher ?f in comparison with fluorescein isothiocyanate-substituted chitosan (FITC-CS). CBI-CS/TPP nanoparticles were fabricated using an ionotropic gelation method in which pentasodium triphosphate (TPP) acted as a cross-linking agent. CS and CBI-CS exhibited low cytotoxicity to normal skin fibroblast cells over a concentration range of 0.1-1000 ?g/mL, while an increased cytotoxicity level was evident in CBI-CS/TPP nanoparticles at concentrations greater than 100 ?g/mL. In contrast with CBI-CS polymers, the CBI-CS/TPP nanoparticles exhibited lower fluorescence; however, confocal microscopy results showed that living normal skin fibroblast cells became fluorescent on nanoparticle uptake. These results suggest that CBI-CS and fabricated nanoparticles thereof may be promising fluorescence probes for live cell imaging. PMID:24956200

  8. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates with different virulence genes content exhibit similar pathologic influence on Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Jamil M A S; Mansour, Samira R; Elshahedy, Mohammed S; Rabie, Tarik E; Azab, Adel M H

    2014-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli are the major causative agent of urinary tract infection--they may simultaneously express a number of virulence factors to cause disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between virulence factors content of fifteen UPEC isolates and their pathogenic potential. The isolates belonged to the five serotypes O78:K80, O114:K90, O142:K86, O164 and O157. Nine of the virulence factors have been explored, ibeA, pap, sfa/foc, cnfl, hly, fyuA, pil, ompT and traT. Virulence factors profiling of the isolates revealed a different content ranging from 22% to 100% of the virulence genes explored. The pathogenic capacity of all fifteen isolates when tested on Vero cells showed that the cytotoxicity for all tested strains on Vero cells was approximately equal and enhanced after growth in syncase broth, leading mainly to cell lysis. The toxic effects reduced slightly after heat treatment of the toxin, and greatly after formalin detoxification, but not all the deleterious effect was abolished. Endotoxin also has cytotoxic effects on Vero cells, but longer time is needed for cytolysis which is greatly diminished with formalin treatment. In conclusion, our study revealed that pathogenic strains of UPEC can exert their pathogenic effect on live cells or system with limited virulence factors gene content. PMID:25033661

  9. Different Drosophila cell types exhibit differences in mitotic centrosome assembly dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Conduit, Paul T.; Raff, Jordan W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Centrosomes are major microtubule organising centres comprising a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM). The PCM expands dramatically as cells enter mitosis, and we previously showed that two key PCM components, Centrosomin (Cnn) and Spd-2, cooperate to form a scaffold structure around the centrioles that recruits the mitotic PCM in Drosophila; the SPD-5 and SPD-2 proteins appear to play a similar function in C. elegans[13]. In fly syncytial embryos, Cnn and Spd-2 are initially recruited into a central region of the PCM and then flux outwards [46]. This centrosomal flux is potentially important, but it has so far not been reported in any other cell type. Here we examine the dynamic behaviour of Cnn and Spd-2 in Drosophila larval brain cells. Spd-2 fluxes outwards from the centrioles in both brains and embryos in a microtubule-independent manner. In contrast, although Cnn is initially incorporated into the region of the PCM occupied by Spd-2 in both brains and embryos, Cnn fluxes outwards along microtubules in embryos, but not in brain cells, where it remains concentrated around the centrosomal Spd-2. Thus, the microtubule-independent centrosomal-flux of Spd-2 occurs in multiple fly cell types, while the microtubule-dependent outward flux of Cnn appears to be restricted to the syncytial embryo. PMID:26241137

  10. Endothelial, epithelial, and fibroblast cells exhibit specific splicing programs independently of their tissue of origin

    PubMed Central

    Mallinjoud, Pierre; Villemin, Jean-Philippe; Mortada, Hussein; Polay Espinoza, Micaela; Desmet, François-Olivier; Samaan, Samaan; Chautard, Emilie; Tranchevent, Léon-Charles; Auboeuf, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is the main mechanism of increasing the proteome diversity coded by a limited number of genes. It is well established that different tissues or organs express different splicing variants. However, organs are composed of common major cell types, including fibroblasts, epithelial, and endothelial cells. By analyzing large-scale data sets generated by The ENCODE Project Consortium and after extensive RT-PCR validation, we demonstrate that each of the three major cell types expresses a specific splicing program independently of its organ origin. Furthermore, by analyzing splicing factor expression across samples, publicly available splicing factor binding site data sets (CLIP-seq), and exon array data sets after splicing factor depletion, we identified several splicing factors, including ESRP1 and 2, MBNL1, NOVA1, PTBP1, and RBFOX2, that contribute to establishing these cell type–specific splicing programs. All of the analyzed data sets are freely available in a user-friendly web interface named FasterDB, which describes all known splicing variants of human and mouse genes and their splicing patterns across several dozens of normal and cancer cells as well as across tissues. Information regarding splicing factors that potentially contribute to individual exon regulation is also provided via a dedicated CLIP-seq and exon array data visualization interface. To the best of our knowledge, FasterDB is the first database integrating such a variety of large-scale data sets to enable functional genomics analyses at exon-level resolution. PMID:24307554

  11. Chromatin Structure Exhibits Spatio-Temporal Heterogeneity within the Cell Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Bidisha; Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Shivashankar, G.V.

    2006-01-01

    Local chromatin compaction undergoes dynamic perturbations to regulate genetic processes. To address this, the direct measurement of the fluidity of chromatin structure is carried out in single live cells using steady-state anisotropy imaging and polarization modulation microscopy. Fluorescently tagged core and linker histones are used to probe different structural aspects of chromatin compaction. A graded spatial heterogeneity in compaction is observed for the chromatin besides the distinct positional ordering of core and linker histones. These spatio-temporal features are maintained by active processes and perturbed during death. With cell cycle, the distribution in compaction heterogeneity continually changes maximizing during M-G1 transition where it displays bimodal behavior. Such measurements of spatio-temporal chromatin fluidity could have broader implications in understanding chromatin remodeling within living cells. PMID:16815897

  12. A two-step route to planar perovskite cells exhibiting reduced hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, Alexander H.; Adachi, Michael M.; McDowell, Jeffrey J.; Xu, Jixian; Sargent, Edward H.; Quan, Li Na; Kim, Dong Ha

    2015-04-06

    A simple two-step method was used to produce efficient planar organolead halide perovskite solar cells. Films produced using solely iodine containing precursors resulted in poor morphology and failed devices, whereas addition of chlorine to the process greatly improved morphology and resulted in dense, uniform perovskite films. This process was used to produce perovskite solar cells with a fullerene-based passivation layer. The hysteresis effect, to which planar perovskite devices are otherwise prone, was greatly suppressed through the use of this interface modifier. The combined techniques resulted in perovskite solar cells having a stable efficiency exceeding 11%. This straightforward fabrication procedure holds promise in development of various optoelectronic applications of planar perovskite films.

  13. Metre-long cell-laden microfibres exhibit tissue morphologies and functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoe, Hiroaki; Okitsu, Teru; Itou, Akane; Kato-Negishi, Midori; Gojo, Riho; Kiriya, Daisuke; Sato, Koji; Miura, Shigenori; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kuribayashi-Shigetomi, Kaori; Matsunaga, Yukiko T.; Shimoyama, Yuto; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2013-06-01

    Artificial reconstruction of fibre-shaped cellular constructs could greatly contribute to tissue assembly in vitro. Here we show that, by using a microfluidic device with double-coaxial laminar flow, metre-long core-shell hydrogel microfibres encapsulating ECM proteins and differentiated cells or somatic stem cells can be fabricated, and that the microfibres reconstitute intrinsic morphologies and functions of living tissues. We also show that these functional fibres can be assembled, by weaving and reeling, into macroscopic cellular structures with various spatial patterns. Moreover, fibres encapsulating primary pancreatic islet cells and transplanted through a microcatheter into the subrenal capsular space of diabetic mice normalized blood glucose concentrations for about two weeks. These microfibres may find use as templates for the reconstruction of fibre-shaped functional tissues that mimic muscle fibres, blood vessels or nerve networks in vivo.

  14. Effect of transplanted adipose?derived stem cells in mice exhibiting idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongbin; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Zhemin; Ren, Shengxiang; Zhang, Chuansen

    2015-10-01

    Stem cell?based cell therapy has provided a promising method for the treatment of pulmonary diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Furthermore, adipose?derived stem cells (ADSCs) have been reported to be effective in lung repair and regeneration. In the current study, IPF was induced in mice by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (BLM), and ADSCs were delivered systemically into the mice via the tail vein to evaluate the effects of ADSC transplantation. The ADSC engraftment rate and morphometric changes in lung tissue samples in vivo were investigated by histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, as well as by western blotting. The results indicated that ADSCs may relieve IPF and provide a significant contribution to lung repair when administered at an early stage. PMID:26252797

  15. Nanoparticles for Applications as Counter Electrodes of CdS Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiuquan; Zhang, Shuang; Qiang, Yinghuai; Zhao, Yulong; Zhu, Lei

    2014-07-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanoparticles have been synthesized through a one-step solvothermal route, which exhibited a nearly single kesterite structure with a fundamental band gap of 1.54 eV. Quantum dots-sensitized solar cells were fabricated based on CZTS counter electrodes and CdS QD-sensitized TiO2 NRs photoelectrodes with various thicknesses of QD sensitization layers. The cells based on a CZTS electrode, compared with other single-layer DSSCs in this study, had the highest conversion efficiency of 0.27% (for CdS layer numbers of 9), which was obviously higher than Pt. The performance improvement was attributed to the better stability, sunlight sensitivity, and the resulting photoelectrocatalytic activity of the CZTS electrodes.

  16. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Sargassum swartzii and its cytotoxicity effect on HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhas, T. Stalin; Kumar, V. Ganesh; Karthick, V.; Govindaraju, K.; Shankara Narayana, T.

    2014-12-01

    In this investigation, biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Sargassum swartzii and its cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells is reported. The biological synthesis involved the reduction of chloroauric acid led to the formation of AuNPs within 5 min at 60 C and the formation of AuNPs was confirmed using UV-vis spectrophotometer. The AuNPs were stable; spherical in shape with well-defined dimensions, and the average size of the particle is 35 nm. A zeta potential value of -27.6 mV revealed synthesized AuNPs were highly stable. The synthesized AuNPs exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis was measured by DAPI (4?,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride) staining.

  17. Chronically HIV-1 Infected Patients Exhibit Low Frequencies of CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Cesar Mauricio Rueda; Velilla, Paula Andrea; Rugeles, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of regulatory T cells (Treg) during HIV infection has become of particular interest considering their potential role in the pathogenesis of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Different reports on Tregs in HIV-infected patients vary greatly, depending on the state of disease progression, anatomical compartment, and the phenotypic markers used to define this cell subpopulation. To determine the frequency of Tregs we included paired samples from peripheral blood and rectal biopsies from controls and chronic HIV patients with or without detectable viral load. Tregs were determined by flow cytometry using three different protocols: CD4+Foxp3+; CD4+Foxp3+CD127Low/-, and CD4+CD25+CD127Low/-. In addition, and with the purpose to compare the different protocols we also characterized Tregs in peripheral blood of HIV negative individuals with influenza like symptoms. Here, we report that Treg characterization in HIV-infected patients as CD4+Foxp3+ and CD4+Foxp3+CD127Low/- cells was similar, indicating that both protocols represent a suitable method to determine the frequency of Tregs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). In contrast, in HIV but not in flu-like patients, detection of Tregs as CD4+CD25+CD127Low/- cells resulted in a significantly lower percentage of these cells. In both, HIV patients and controls the frequency of Treg was significantly higher in GALT compared to PBMC. The frequency of Tregs in PBMC and GALT using CD4+Foxp3+ and CD4+Foxp3+CD127Low/- was higher in HIV patients than in controls. Similarly, the frequency of Treg using any protocol was higher in flu-like patients compared to controls. The results suggest that relying on the expression of CD25 could be unsuitable to characterize Tregs in PBMC and GALT samples from a chronic infection such as HIV. PMID:22582105

  18. Enhanced penetration into 3D cell culture using two and three layered gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    England, Christopher G; Priest, Thomas; Zhang, Guandong; Sun, Xinghua; Patel, Dhruvinkumar N; McNally, Lacey R; van Berkel, Victor; Gobin, André M; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2013-01-01

    Nano-scale particles sized 10–400 nm administered systemically preferentially extravasate from tumor vasculature due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Therapeutic success remains elusive, however, because of inhomogeneous particle distribution within tumor tissue. Insufficient tumor vascularization limits particle transport and also results in avascular hypoxic regions with non-proliferating cells, which can regenerate tissue after nanoparticle-delivered cytotoxicity or thermal ablation. Nanoparticle surface modifications provide for increasing tumor targeting and uptake while decreasing immunogenicity and toxicity. Herein, we created novel two layer gold-nanoshell particles coated with alkanethiol and phosphatidylcholine, and three layer nanoshells additionally coated with high-density-lipoprotein. We hypothesize that these particles have enhanced penetration into 3-dimensional cell cultures modeling avascular tissue when compared to standard poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated nanoshells. Particle uptake and distribution in liver, lung, and pancreatic tumor cell cultures were evaluated using silver-enhancement staining and hyperspectral imaging with dark field microscopy. Two layer nanoshells exhibited significantly higher uptake compared to PEGylated nanoshells. This multilayer formulation may help overcome transport barriers presented by tumor vasculature, and could be further investigated in vivo as a platform for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:24124360

  19. Thiolated-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine protected silver nanoparticles as novel photo-induced cell-killing agents.

    PubMed

    Sangsuwan, Arunee; Kawasaki, Hideya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have several medical applications as antimicrobial agents such as in drug delivery and cancer therapy. However, AgNPs are of limited use because of their toxicity, which may damage the surrounding healthy tissue. In this study, thiolated-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC-SH) protected silver nanoparticles (MPC-AgNPs) are prepared as cell-killing agents under UV irradiation. MPC-AgNPs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of MPC-AgNPs is observed at 404nm, and the average diameter of the particles is determined at 13.4±2.2nm through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and at 18.4nm (PDI=0.18) through dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability in contact with MPC-AgNPs is relatively high, and MPC-AgNPs also exhibit a cell-killing effect under UV irradiation. PMID:26752209

  20. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  1. Tuning surface plasmon resonance by the plastic deformation of Au nanoparticles within a diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yongjun; Zhao, Bin; Tang, Xinyu; Hou, Dongjie; Cai, Jian; Tang, Shan; Liu, Junsong; Wang, Fei; Cui, Tian

    2015-11-01

    In this work, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is tuned by controlling the deformation of Au nanoparticles within a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Colloidal Au nanoparticles were loaded into a DAC and pressurized into a mixture of ice and Au nanoparticles. The Au nanoparticles were reshaped by their anisotropic compression of surrounding ice, which leads to the spectral variations of absorption peaks, broadening or red-shifting. These spectral features are well tuned by controlling the deformation process of Au nanoparticle with choosing the initial intended thickness of DAC gasket. The mechanical properties of Au nanoparticles are also revealed by the shape-dependent SPR in nanometer scale. This result provides us a way to fabricate Au nanoparticles into new shapes and tune SPR of metallic nanoparticles with pressure.

  2. Salmonella enterica Serovars Gallinarum and Pullorum Expressing Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Type 1 Fimbriae Exhibit Increased Invasiveness for Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rebecca L.; Elthon, Jessica; Clegg, Steven; Jones, Bradley D.

    2000-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Gallinarum and Pullorum are S. enterica biotypes that exhibit host specificity for poultry and aquatic birds and are not normally capable of causing disease in mammalian hosts. During their evolution toward host restriction serovars Gallinarum and Pullorum lost their ability to mediate mannose-sensitive hemagglutination (MSHA), a phenotype correlated with adherence to certain cell types. Because adherence is an essential requirement for invasion of cells by bacterial pathogens, we examined whether MHSA type 1 fimbriae would increase the ability of serovars Pullorum and Gallinarum to invade normally restrictive cells. Serovars Gallinarum and Pullorum expressing S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 type 1 fimbriae exhibited a 10- to 20-fold increased ability to adhere to and a 20- to 60-fold increased invasion efficiency of the human epithelial HEp-2 cell line. Invasion was accompanied by extensive ruffling of the membranes of the HEp-2 cells. In a murine ligated ileal loop model, a 32% increase in the number of M-cell ruffles was seen when serovar Gallinarum expressed serovar Typhimurium type 1 fimbriae. PMID:10899888

  3. Trisomy 12 chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells exhibit upregulation of integrin signaling that is modulated by NOTCH1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Riches, John C.; O’Donovan, Conor J.; Kingdon, Sarah J.; McClanahan, Fabienne; Clear, Andrew J.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Werner, Lillian; Croce, Carlo M.; Ramsay, Alan G.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Gribben, John G.

    2014-01-01

    The leukocyte adhesion cascade is important in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), as it controls migration of malignant cells into the pro-survival lymph node microenvironment. Circulating trisomy 12 CLL cells have increased expression of the integrins CD11a and CD49d, as well as CD38, but the tissue expression of these and other molecules, and the functional and clinical sequelae of these changes have not been described. Here, we demonstrate that circulating trisomy 12 CLL cells also have increased expression of the integrins CD11b, CD18, CD29, and ITGB7, and the adhesion molecule CD323. Notably, there was reduced expression of CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 in trisomy 12 cases with NOTCH1 mutations compared with wild type. Trisomy 12 cells also exhibit upregulation of intracellular integrin signaling molecules CALDAG-GEFI, RAP1B, and Ras-related protein ligand, resulting in enhanced very late antigen-4 [VLA-4] directed adhesion and motility. CD38 expression in CLL has prognostic significance, but the increased CD38 expression in trisomy 12 CLL cells must be taken into account in this subgroup, and the threshold of CD38 positivity should be raised to 40% for this marker to retain its prognostic value. In conclusion, trisomy 12 CLL cells exhibit functional upregulation of integrin signaling, with β2-integrin expression being modulated by NOTCH1 mutation status. PMID:24829201

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Obtained from Synovial Fluid Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells on a Matrigel Coating Exhibited Enhanced Proliferation and Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Liu, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Wen-Yu; Zheng, You-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) serve as a promising source for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, optimal methods for transforming iPSCs into MSCs and the characteristics of iPSC-MSCs obtained from different methods remain poorly understood. In this study, we developed a one-step method for obtaining iPSC-MSCs (CD146+STRO-1+ MSCs) from human synovial fluid MSC-derived induced iPSCs (SFMSC-iPSCs). CD146-STRO-1-SFMSCs were reprogrammed into iPSCs by transduction with lentivirus-mediated Sox2, Oct-3/4, klf4, and c-Myc. SFMSC-iPSCs were maintained with mTeSR1 medium in Matrigel-coated culture plates. Single dissociated cells were obtained by digesting the SFMSC-iPSCs with trypsin. The dissociated cells were then plated into Matrigel-coated culture plate with alpha minimum essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 1 Glutamax, and the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. Cells were then passaged in standard cell culture plates with alpha minimum essential medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1 Glutamax. After passaging in vitro, the cells showed a homogenous spindle-shape similar to their ancestor cells (SFMSCs), but with more robust proliferative activity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed typical MSC surface markers, including expression of CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD44 and lack of CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19, and HLA-DR. However, these cells were positive for CD146 and stro-1, which the ancestor cells were not. Moreover, the cells could also be induced to differentiate in osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages in vitro. The differentiation potential was improved compared with the ancestor cells in vitro. The cells were not found to exhibit oncogenicity in vivo. Therefore, the method presented herein facilitated the generation of STRO-1+CD146+ MSCs from SFMSC-iPSCs exhibiting enhanced proliferation and differentiation potential. PMID:26649753

  5. Embryonic Stem Cells Exhibit mRNA Isoform Specific Translational Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Qian Yi; Zhao, Tian Yun; Luo, Raymond; Archer, Stuart K.; Preiss, Thomas; Tanavde, Vivek; Vardy, Leah A.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of multiple variants for many mRNAs is a major contributor to protein diversity. The processing of these variants is tightly controlled in a cell-type specific manner and has a significant impact on gene expression control. Here we investigate the differential translation rates of individual mRNA variants in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in ESC derived Neural Precursor Cells (NPCs) using polysome profiling coupled to RNA sequencing. We show that there are a significant number of detectable mRNA variants in ESCs and NPCs and that many of them show variant specific translation rates. This is correlated with differences in the UTRs of the variants with the 5’UTR playing a predominant role. We suggest that mRNA variants that contain alternate UTRs are under different post-transcriptional controls. This is likely due to the presence or absence of miRNA and protein binding sites that regulate translation rate. This highlights the importance of addressing translation rate when using mRNA levels as a read out of protein abundance. Additional analysis shows that many annotated non-coding mRNAs are present on the polysome fractions in ESCs and NPCs. We believe that the use of polysome fractionation coupled to RNA sequencing is a useful method for analysis of the translation state of many different RNAs in the cell. PMID:26799392

  6. Embryonic Stem Cells Exhibit mRNA Isoform Specific Translational Regulation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Queenie Wing-Lei; Vaz, Candida; Lee, Qian Yi; Zhao, Tian Yun; Luo, Raymond; Archer, Stuart K; Preiss, Thomas; Tanavde, Vivek; Vardy, Leah A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of multiple variants for many mRNAs is a major contributor to protein diversity. The processing of these variants is tightly controlled in a cell-type specific manner and has a significant impact on gene expression control. Here we investigate the differential translation rates of individual mRNA variants in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in ESC derived Neural Precursor Cells (NPCs) using polysome profiling coupled to RNA sequencing. We show that there are a significant number of detectable mRNA variants in ESCs and NPCs and that many of them show variant specific translation rates. This is correlated with differences in the UTRs of the variants with the 5'UTR playing a predominant role. We suggest that mRNA variants that contain alternate UTRs are under different post-transcriptional controls. This is likely due to the presence or absence of miRNA and protein binding sites that regulate translation rate. This highlights the importance of addressing translation rate when using mRNA levels as a read out of protein abundance. Additional analysis shows that many annotated non-coding mRNAs are present on the polysome fractions in ESCs and NPCs. We believe that the use of polysome fractionation coupled to RNA sequencing is a useful method for analysis of the translation state of many different RNAs in the cell. PMID:26799392

  7. Effect of ZnO nanoparticles on nasopharyngeal cancer cells viability and respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, R.; Gopinath, D.

    2013-03-01

    Development of a therapeutic drugs based on nanoparticles requires a better understanding of the mechanism of selective cyto-toxic effects of nanopaticles over cancer cells. Scanning electrochemical microscopy provides opportunity to measure the real time chemical process at cell proximity in the presence of nanoparticle. Herein, the respiration process in nasopharyngeal cancer cells is investigated with the help of scanning electrochemical microscopy. The cell viability has been tested with MTT assay. The results show that ZnO nanoparticles have time and dose dependent effect in nasopharyngeal cancer cells and the cell respiration rate decreases with time.

  8. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Silver Nanoparticle Induced Stress on Optically-Trapped Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Krishnamurthy, R. Sagar; Zachariah, Elsa; Santhosh, Chidangil; Chougule, Basavaraj; Praveen, Bhavishna; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    We report here results of a single-cell Raman spectroscopy study of stress effects induced by silver nanoparticles in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A high-sensitivity, high-resolution Raman Tweezers set-up has been used to monitor nanoparticle-induced biochemical changes in optically-trapped single cells. Our micro-Raman spectroscopic study reveals that hMSCs treated with silver nanoparticles undergo oxidative stress at doping levels in excess of 2 µg/ml, with results of a statistical analysis of Raman spectra suggesting that the induced stress becomes more dominant at nanoparticle concentration levels above 3 µg/ml. PMID:22514708

  9. Drug loading and release on tumor cells using silk fibroin-albumin nanoparticles as carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subia, B.; Kundu, S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric and biodegradable nanoparticles are frequently used in drug delivery systems. In this study silk fibroin-albumin blended nanoparticles were prepared using the desolvation method without any surfactant. These nanoparticles are easily internalized by the cells, reside within perinuclear spaces and act as carriers for delivery of the model drug methotrexate. Methotrexate loaded nanoparticles have better encapsulation efficiency, drug loading ability and less toxicity. The in vitro release behavior of methotrexate from the nanoparticles suggests that about 85% of the drug gets released after 12 days. The encapsulation and loading of a drug would depend on factors such as size, charge and hydrophobicity, which affect drug release. MTT assay and conjugation of particles with FITC demonstrate that the silk fibroin-albumin nanoparticles do not affect the viability and biocompatibility of cells. This blended nanoparticle, therefore, could be a promising nanocarrier for the delivery of drugs and other bioactive molecules.

  10. Multidentate zwitterionic chitosan oligosaccharide modified gold nanoparticles: stability, biocompatibility and cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangsheng; Huang, Haoyuan; Liu, Gongyan; Zhou, Wenbo; Chen, Yangjun; Jin, Qiao; Ji, Jian

    2013-04-01

    Surface engineering of nanoparticles plays an essential role in their colloidal stability, biocompatibility and interaction with biosystems. In this study, a novel multidentate zwitterionic biopolymer derivative is obtained from conjugating dithiolane lipoic acid and zwitterionic acryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine to the chitosan oligosaccharide backbone. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified by this polymer exhibit remarkable colloidal stabilities under extreme conditions including high salt conditions, wide pH range and serum or plasma containing media. The AuNPs also show strong resistance to competition from dithiothreitol (as high as 1.5 M). Moreover, the modified AuNPs demonstrate low cytotoxicity investigated by both MTT and LDH assays, and good hemocompatibility evaluated by hemolysis of human red blood cells. In addition, the intracellular fate of AuNPs was investigated by ICP-MS and TEM. It showed that the AuNPs are uptaken by cells in a concentration dependent manner, and they can escape from endosomes/lysosomes to cytosol and tend to accumulate around the nucleus after 24 h incubation but few of them are excreted out of the cells. Gold nanorods are also stabilized by this ligand, which demonstrates robust dispersion stability and excellent hemocompatibility. This kind of multidentate zwitterionic chitosan derivative could be widely used for stabilizing other inorganic nanoparticles, which will greatly improve their performance in a variety of bio-related applications.Surface engineering of nanoparticles plays an essential role in their colloidal stability, biocompatibility and interaction with biosystems. In this study, a novel multidentate zwitterionic biopolymer derivative is obtained from conjugating dithiolane lipoic acid and zwitterionic acryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine to the chitosan oligosaccharide backbone. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified by this polymer exhibit remarkable colloidal stabilities under extreme conditions including high salt conditions, wide pH range and serum or plasma containing media. The AuNPs also show strong resistance to competition from dithiothreitol (as high as 1.5 M). Moreover, the modified AuNPs demonstrate low cytotoxicity investigated by both MTT and LDH assays, and good hemocompatibility evaluated by hemolysis of human red blood cells. In addition, the intracellular fate of AuNPs was investigated by ICP-MS and TEM. It showed that the AuNPs are uptaken by cells in a concentration dependent manner, and they can escape from endosomes/lysosomes to cytosol and tend to accumulate around the nucleus after 24 h incubation but few of them are excreted out of the cells. Gold nanorods are also stabilized by this ligand, which demonstrates robust dispersion stability and excellent hemocompatibility. This kind of multidentate zwitterionic chitosan derivative could be widely used for stabilizing other inorganic nanoparticles, which will greatly improve their performance in a variety of bio-related applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: More experimental details for the synthesis of AuNPs and AuNRs. Fig. S1, 1H NMR spectrum of LA-CSO-PC and Fig. S2, FT-IR spectrum of AuNP-LA-CSO-PC. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00284e

  11. Ultrasound associated uptake of chitosan nanoparticles in MC3T3-E1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junyi

    Chitosan is a natural linear polysaccharide that has been well known for its applications in drug delivery system due to its unique physicochemical and biological properties. However, challenges still remain for it to become a fully realized therapeutic agent. In this study, we investigated the uptake of chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) under the ultrasound stimulation, using a model cell culture system (MC3T3-E1 mouse pre-osteoblasts). The CNP were fabricated by an ionic gelation method and were lyophilized prior to characterization and delivery to cells. Particle size and zeta potential were measured using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS); the efficiency of chitosan complexation was measured using the ninhydrin assay. Cytotoxicity was examined by neutral red assay within 48 hours after delivery. The effect of ultrasound (US) on the efficiency of nanoparticle delivery to the MC3T3-E1 cells was examined at 1MHz and at either 1 or 2 W/cm2. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated-CNP were used to visualize the internalized particles within the cytosol. The uptake of FITC-CNP exhibits a dose and time dependent effect, a strong FITC fluorescence was detected at the concentration of 500microg/mL under fluorescence microscope. Ultrasound assisted uptake of FITC-CNP performed a significant positive effect at 2W/cm2 with 60s of ultrasound exposure time. CNP displayed a slightly decrease in cell viability from 25microg/mL to 100microg/mL, while higher concentration of CNP facilitates the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Less than 10% of reduction in cell viability was observed for US at 1W/cm2 and 2W/cm2 with 30s and 60s of exposure time, which suggest a mild effect of US to MC3T3-E1 cell line.

  12. Biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted ultrasound imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Jie; Rosol, Thomas J.; Pan, Xueliang; Voorhees, Jeffrey L.

    2007-08-01

    Disease-specific enhanced imaging through a targeted agent promises to improve the specificity of medical ultrasound. Nanoparticles may provide unique advantages for targeted ultrasound imaging due to their novel physical and surface properties. In this study, we examined a nanoparticle agent developed from a biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA). The nanoparticles (mean diameter = 250 nm) were surface conjugated to an anti-Her2 antibody (i.e., Herceptin) for specific binding to breast cancer cells that overexpress Her2 receptors. We examined the targeting specificity and the resultant ultrasound enhancement in Her2-positive and negative cells. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging were used to assess the nanoparticle-cell binding. Her2-positive cells demonstrated substantial staining after incubation with nanoparticle/antibody conjugates, while minimal staining was found in Her2-negative cells, indicating receptor-specific binding of the conjugated PLA nanoparticles. In high-resolution ultrasound B-mode images, the average gray scale of the Her2-positive cells was consistently and significantly higher after nanoparticle treatment (133 4 in treated cells versus 109 4 in control, p < 0.001, n = 5), while no difference was detected in the cells that did not overexpress the receptors (117 3 in treated cells versus 118 5 in control). In conclusion, the feasibility of using targeted nanoparticles to enhance ultrasonic images was demonstrated in vitro. This may be a promising approach to target cancer biomarkers for site-specific ultrasound imaging.

  13. Detection of fluorescent nanoparticle interactions with primary immune cell subpopulations by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gamucci, Olimpia; Bertero, Alice; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Sabella, Stefania; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Bardi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are endowed with very promising properties for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This work describes a fast and reliable method of analysis by flow cytometry to study nanoparticle interaction with immune cells. Primary immune cells can be easily purified from human or mouse tissues by antibody-mediated magnetic isolation. In the first instance, the different cell populations running in a flow cytometer can be distinguished by the forward-scattered light (FSC), which is proportional to cell size, and the side-scattered light (SSC), related to cell internal complexity. Furthermore, fluorescently labeled antibodies against specific cell surface receptors permit the identification of several subpopulations within the same sample. Often, all these features vary when cells are boosted by external stimuli that change their physiological and morphological state. Here, 50 nm FITC-SiO2 nanoparticles are used as a model to identify the internalization of nanostructured materials in human blood immune cells. The cell fluorescence and side-scattered light increase after incubation with nanoparticles allowed us to define time and concentration dependence of nanoparticle-cell interaction. Moreover, such protocol can be extended to investigate Rhodamine-SiO2 nanoparticle interaction with primary microglia, the central nervous system resident immune cells, isolated from mutant mice that specifically express the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) in the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Finally, flow cytometry data related to nanoparticle internalization into the cells have been confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:24747480

  14. Variable Nanoparticle-Cell Adhesion Strength Regulates Cellular Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongyan; Li, Ju; Bao, Gang; Zhang, Sulin

    2010-09-01

    In receptor-mediated endocytosis, cells exercise biochemical control over the mechanics of adhesion to engulf foreign particles, featuring a variable adhesion strength. Here we present a thermodynamic model with which we elucidate that the variable adhesion strength critically governs the cellular uptake, yielding an uptake phase diagram in the space of ligand density and particle size. We identify from the diagram an endocytosed phase with markedly high uptake, encompassed by a lower and an upper phase boundary that are set, respectively, by the enthalpic and entropic limits of the adhesion strength. The phase diagram may provide useful guidance to the rational design of nanoparticle-based therapeutic and diagnostic agents.

  15. Morphological effect of oscillating magnetic nanoparticles in killing tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Guoxin; Shi, Hongcheng

    2014-04-01

    Forced oscillation of spherical and rod-shaped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via low-power and low-frequency alternating magnetic field (AMF) was firstly used to kill cancer cells in vitro. After being loaded by human cervical cancer cells line (HeLa) and then exposed to a 35-kHz AMF, MNPs mechanically damaged cell membranes and cytoplasm, decreasing the cell viability. It was found that the concentration and morphology of the MNPs significantly influenced the cell-killing efficiency of oscillating MNPs. In this preliminary study, when HeLa cells were pre-incubated with 100 ?g/mL rod-shaped MNPs (rMNP, length of 200 50 nm and diameter of 50 to 120 nm) for 20 h, MTT assay proved that the cell viability decreased by 30.9% after being exposed to AMF for 2 h, while the cell viability decreased by 11.7% if spherical MNPs (sMNP, diameter of 200 50 nm) were used for investigation. Furthermore, the morphological effect of MNPs on cell viability was confirmed by trypan blue assay: 39.5% rMNP-loaded cells and 15.1% sMNP-loaded cells were stained after being exposed to AMF for 2 h. It was also interesting to find that killing tumor cells at either higher (500 ?g/mL) or lower (20 ?g/mL) concentration of MNPs was less efficient than that achieved at 100 ?g/mL concentration. In conclusion, the relatively asymmetric morphological rod-shaped MNPs can kill cancer cells more effectively than spherical MNPs when being exposed to AMF by virtue of their mechanical oscillations.

  16. Laser nanothermolysis of human leukemia cells using functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liopo, Anton V.; Conjusteau, Andr; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we present the use of gold nanorods as plasmonic nanoparticles for selective photothermal therapy of human acute (HL-60) and chronicle (K-562) leukemia cells using a near-infrared laser. We improved a published methodology of gold nanorods conjugation to generate high yields of narrow band gold nanorods with an optical absorption centered at 760 nm. The manufactured nanorods were pegylated and conjugated with monoclonal antibody to become non-toxic as biocompatible nanothermolysis agent. Gold nanorods are synthesized and conjugated to CD33 monoclonal antibody. After pegylation, or conjugation with CD33 antibody, gold nanorods were non-toxic to acute and chronic leukemia cells. Our modified gold nanorods CD33 conjugates shown high level of accumulation for both leukemia cell lines, and successful used for nanothermolysis of human leukemia cells in vitro. Each sample was illuminated with 1 or 3 laser shots as for low and for high laser fluence. The radiation was provided by a Quanta Systems q-switched titanium sapphire laser, and the system was designed for maximum sample coverage using non-focused illumination. HL-60 and K-562 cells were treated for 45 min with gold nanorods CD33 conjugated, or with pegylated gold nanorods. The effect of pulsed-laser nanothermolysis for acute and chronic leukemia cells were investigated with cell counting for number of living cells, percentage of cell death and functional parameters such as damage of cell membrane and metabolic activity. Gold nanorods CD33 conjugates significantly increase cell damage for low fluence laser and completely destroyed cancer cells after 3 pulses for low fluence (acute leukemia) and for high fluence laser as for HL-60 (acute) and for K-562 (chronicle) leukemia cells. PMID:22720194

  17. Signet ring cell tumor of the minor salivary gland exhibiting benign behavior.

    PubMed

    Foschini, Maria P; Baldovini, Chiara; Pennesi, Maria G; Cocchi, Roberto; Simpson, Roderick H W

    2012-02-01

    Signet ring cell (SRC) carcinomas are usually aggressive malignancies, arising most frequently in the stomach and gastrointestinal tract, but also, although less often, in other organs such as the breast, bladder, and lungs. They are particularly unusual in the salivary glands, and the aim of the present study is to report a case of a tumor of the minor salivary glands of the lower lip composed largely of SRCs but which displayed benign clinical behavior. PMID:21813157

  18. In vitro fermented nuts exhibit chemopreventive effects in HT29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lux, Stefanie; Scharlau, Daniel; Schlrmann, Wiebke; Birringer, Marc; Glei, Michael

    2012-10-01

    It is proven that nuts contain essential macro- and micronutrients, e.g. fatty acids, vitamins and dietary fibre (DF). Fermentation of DF by the gut microflora results in the formation of SCFA which are recognised for their chemopreventive potential, especially by influencing cell growth. However, little is known about cellular response to complex fermentation samples of nuts. Therefore, we prepared and analysed (pH, SCFA, bile acids, tocopherol, antioxidant capacity) fermentation supernatant (fs) fractions of nuts (almonds, macadamias, hazelnuts, pistachios, walnuts) after in vitro fermentation and determined their effects on growth of HT29 cells as well as their genotoxic/anti-genotoxic potential. The fermented nut samples contained 2- to 3-fold higher amounts of SCFA than the faeces control, but considerable reduced levels of bile acids. While most of the investigated native nuts comprised relatively high amounts of tocopherol (?-tocopherol in almonds and hazelnuts and ?- and ?-tocopherol in pistachios and walnuts), rather low concentrations were found in the fs. All nut extracts and nut fs showed a strong antioxidant potential. Furthermore, all fs, except the fs pistachio, reduced growth of HT29 cells significantly. DNA damage induced by H?O? was significantly reduced by the fs of walnuts after 15 min co-incubation of HT29 cells. In conclusion, this is the first study which presents the chemopreventive effects (reduction of tumour-promoting desoxycholic acid, rise in chemopreventive SCFA, protection against oxidative stress) of different nuts after in vitro digestion and fermentation, and shows the potential importance of nuts in the prevention of colon cancer. PMID:22172380

  19. Cells exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses exhibit biomarkers of mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Moen, Erick K.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2015-03-01

    Exposure of cells to very short (<1 ?s) electric pulses in the megavolt/meter range have been shown to cause disruption of the plasma membrane. This disruption is often characterized by the formation of numerous small pores (<2 nm in diameter) in the plasma membrane that last for several minutes, allowing the flow of ions into the cell. These small pores are called nanopores and the resulting damage to the plasma membrane is referred to as nanoporation. Nanosecond electrical pulse (nsEP) exposure can impart many different stressors on a cell, including electrical, electro-chemical, and mechanical stress. Thus, nsEP exposure is not a "clean" insult, making determination of the mechanism of nanoporation quite difficult. We hypothesize that nsEP exposure creates acoustic shock waves capable of causing nanoporation. Microarray analysis of primary adult human dermal fibroblasts (HDFa) exposed to nsEP, indicated several genes associated with mechanical stress were selectively upregulated 4 h post exposure. The idea that nanoporation is caused by external mechanical force from acoustic shock waves has, to our knowledge, not been investigated. This work will critically challenge the existing paradigm that nanoporation is caused solely by an electric-field driven event and could provide the basis for a plausible explanation for electroporation.

  20. VMP1-deficient Chlamydomonas exhibits severely aberrant cell morphology and disrupted cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The versatile Vacuole Membrane Protein 1 (VMP1) has been previously investigated in six species. It has been shown to be essential in macroautophagy, where it takes part in autophagy initiation. In addition, VMP1 has been implicated in organellar biogenesis; endo-, exo- and phagocytosis, and protein secretion; apoptosis; and cell adhesion. These roles underly its proven involvement in pancreatitis, diabetes and cancer in humans. Results In this study we analyzed a VMP1 homologue from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. CrVMP1 knockdown lines showed severe phenotypes, mainly affecting cell division as well as the morphology of cells and organelles. We also provide several pieces of evidence for its involvement in macroautophagy. Conclusion Our study adds a novel role to VMP1's repertoire, namely the regulation of cytokinesis. Though the directness of the observed effects and the mechanisms underlying them remain to be defined, the protein's involvement in macroautophagy in Chlamydomonas, as found by us, suggests that CrVMP1 shares molecular characteristics with its animal and protist counterparts. PMID:24885763

  1. Viola tricolor induces apoptosis in cancer cells and exhibits antiangiogenic activity on chicken chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani Hesari, Taghi; Mortazavian, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra; Ghorbani, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of hydroalcoholic extract and ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol, and water fractions (0-800 μg/mL) of Viola tricolor were investigated in Neuro2a mouse neuroblastoma and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In addition, antiangiogenic effect of EtOAc fraction was evaluated on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The quality of EtOAc fraction was also characterized using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that EtOAc fraction was the most potent among all fractions with maximal effect on MCF-7 and minimal toxicity against normal murine fibroblast L929 cells. Apoptosis induction by EtOAc fraction was confirmed by increased sub-G1 peak of propidium iodide (PI) stained cells. This fraction triggered the apoptotic pathway by increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 level. Moreover, treatment with EtOAc fraction significantly decreased the diameter of vessels on CAM, while the number of newly formed blood vessels was not suppressed significantly. Analysis of quality of EtOAc fraction using HPLC fingerprint showed six major peaks with different retention times. The results of the present study suggest that V. tricolor has potential anticancer property by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:25243166

  2. Viola tricolor Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cells and Exhibits Antiangiogenic Activity on Chicken Chorioallantoic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani Hesari, Taghi; Mortazavian, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of hydroalcoholic extract and ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol, and water fractions (0–800 μg/mL) of Viola tricolor were investigated in Neuro2a mouse neuroblastoma and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. In addition, antiangiogenic effect of EtOAc fraction was evaluated on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The quality of EtOAc fraction was also characterized using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that EtOAc fraction was the most potent among all fractions with maximal effect on MCF-7 and minimal toxicity against normal murine fibroblast L929 cells. Apoptosis induction by EtOAc fraction was confirmed by increased sub-G1 peak of propidium iodide (PI) stained cells. This fraction triggered the apoptotic pathway by increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 level. Moreover, treatment with EtOAc fraction significantly decreased the diameter of vessels on CAM, while the number of newly formed blood vessels was not suppressed significantly. Analysis of quality of EtOAc fraction using HPLC fingerprint showed six major peaks with different retention times. The results of the present study suggest that V. tricolor has potential anticancer property by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:25243166

  3. Rationally engineered nanoparticles target multiple myeloma cells, overcome cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance, and show enhanced efficacy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kiziltepe, T; Ashley, J D; Stefanick, J F; Qi, Y M; Alves, N J; Handlogten, M W; Suckow, M A; Navari, R M; Bilgicer, B

    2012-01-01

    In the continuing search for effective cancer treatments, we report the rational engineering of a multifunctional nanoparticle that combines traditional chemotherapy with cell targeting and anti-adhesion functionalities. Very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) mediated adhesion of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to bone marrow stroma confers MM cells with cell-adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). In our design, we used micellar nanoparticles as dynamic self-assembling scaffolds to present VLA-4-antagonist peptides and doxorubicin (Dox) conjugates, simultaneously, to selectively target MM cells and to overcome CAM-DR. Dox was conjugated to the nanoparticles through an acid-sensitive hydrazone bond. VLA-4-antagonist peptides were conjugated via a multifaceted synthetic procedure for generating precisely controlled number of targeting functionalities. The nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by MM cells and induced cytotoxicity. Mechanistic studies revealed that nanoparticles induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis in MM cells. Importantly, multifunctional nanoparticles overcame CAM-DR, and were more efficacious than Dox when MM cells were cultured on fibronectin-coated plates. Finally, in a MM xenograft model, nanoparticles preferentially homed to MM tumors with ?10 fold more drug accumulation and demonstrated dramatic tumor growth inhibition with a reduced overall systemic toxicity. Altogether, we demonstrate the disease driven engineering of a nanoparticle-based drug delivery system, enabling the model of an integrative approach in the treatment of MM. PMID:22829966

  4. Photovoltaic study of dye sensitized solar cells based on TiO2, ZnO:Al3+ nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snchez Godoy, H. E.; Rodrguez-Rojas, R. A.; Castaeda-Contreras, J.; Maran-Ruiz, V. F.; Prez-Ladrn de Guevara, H.; Lpez-Luke, T.; De la Rosa-Cruz

    2015-10-01

    A technique to fabricate dye (rhodamine B) sensitized solar cells based on Titanium Oxide (TiO2) and Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are reported. The TiO2 was synthesized using the sol-gel method and the ZnO was synthesized by hydrolysis method to obtain nanoparticles of ~ 5 nm and 150 nm respectively. ZnO was doped with Al3+ in order to enhance the photovoltaic efficiency to promote the electrons mobility. The photovoltaic conversion characterization of films of TiO2, ZnO and ZnO:Al3+ nanoparticles is also reported. The generated photocurrent was measured by two methods; one of those uses a three electrode electrochemical cell and the other use an electronic array where the cells were exposed to UV lamp and the sun light. The role of the TiO2, ZnO and Al3+ doped ZnO nanoparticles is discussed to obtain a better efficiency in the generation of photocurrent (PC). The results exhibited by the electrochemical cell method, efficiencies of 0.55 (PC=187 ?A/cm2) and 0.22 (PC=149 ?A/cm2) for TiO2 and undoped ZnO respectively. However, when ZnO is doped with Al3+ at the higher concentration the efficiency was 0.44. While using the electronic array the results exhibited efficiencies of 0.31 (PC=45 ?A/cm2) and 0.09 (PC=16 ?A/cm2) for TiO2 and undoped ZnO respectively. However, when ZnO is doped with Al3+ at the higher concentration the efficiency was 0.44 and 0.48 for electrochemical cell and electronic array respectively. This shows that Al3+ enhances the photogenerated charge carriers increasing the mobility of electrons.

  5. Stable self-assembled nanostructured hen egg white lysozyme exhibits strong anti-proliferative activity against breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Sailendra; Paul, Subhankar; Srivastava, Ankit; Pastor, Ashutosh; Kundu, Bishwajit; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy side effects have long been a matter of great concern. Here we describe a structurally stable self-assembled nanostructured lysozyme (snLYZ) synthesized using a simple desolvation technique that exhibited anticancer activity, as well as excellent hemocompatibility. Field emission scanning electron microscopy; atomic force microscopy and dynamic particle size analyzer were used for analyzing the synthesized snLYZ. The analysis revealed spherical shape with an average size of 300 nm. Circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed its gross change in secondary as well as the tertiary level of the structure. snLYZ also demonstrated excellent structural as well as the functional stability of LYZ in a wide range of pH and temperature with a fair level of protection against proteinase K digestion. When applied to MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it exhibited approximately 95% cell death within 24h, involving a reactive oxygen species (ROS) based mechanism, and showed excellent hemocompatibility. Fluorescence microscopy imaging revealed distinct cellular internalization of snLYZ and the formation of cytoplasmic granules, which initiated a cell-killing process through membrane damage. In order to mimic targeted therapy, we tagged folic acid with snLYZ, which further enhanced cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells. Therefore, this is the first report of its kind where we demonstrated the preparation of a highly stable self-assembled nanostructured lysozyme with a strong anti-proliferative activity against breast cancer cells. PMID:25935265

  6. Coating Solid Lipid Nanoparticles with Hyaluronic Acid Enhances Antitumor Activity against Melanoma Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongxin; Shi, Sanjun; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Successful anticancer chemotherapy requires targeting tumors efficiently and further potential to eliminate cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulations. Since CD44 is present on many types of CSCs, and it binds specially to hyaluronic acid (HA), we tested whether coating solid lipid nanoparticles with hyaluronan (HA-SLNs)would allow targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to CD44-overexpressing B16F10 melanoma cells. First, we developed a model system based on melanoma stem-like cells for experiments in vitro and in mouse xenografts, and we showed that cells expressing high levels of CD44 (CD44(+)) displayed a strong CSC phenotype while cells expressing low levels of CD44 (CD44(-)) did not. This phenotype included sphere and colony formation, higher proportion of side population cells, expression of CSC-related markers (ALDH, CD133, Oct-4) and tumorigenicity in vivo. Next we showed that administering PTX-loaded HA-SLNs led to efficient intracellular delivery of PTX and induced substantial apoptosis in CD44(+) cells in vitro. In the B16F10-CD44(+) lung metastasis model, PTX-loaded HA-SLNs targeted the tumor-bearing lung tissues well and subsequently exhibited significant antitumor effects with a relative low dose of PTX, which provided significant survival benefit without evidence of adverse events. These findings suggest that the HA-SLNs targeting system shows promise for enhancing cancer therapy. PMID:25897340

  7. Magnetite nanoparticles induced adaptive mechanisms counteract cell death in human pulmonary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Radu, Mihaela; Dinu, Diana; Sima, Cornelia; Burlacu, Radu; Hermenean, Anca; Ardelean, Aurel; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-10-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) have attracted great interest for biomedical applications due to their unique chemical and physical properties, but the MNP impact on human health is not fully known. Consequently, our study proposes to highlight the biochemical mechanisms that underline the toxic effects of MNP on a human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). The cytotoxicity generated by MNP in MRC-5 cells was dose and time-dependent. MNP-treated MRC-5 cells accumulated large amount of iron and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exhibited elevated antioxidant scavenger enzymes. Reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion and enhanced lipid peroxidation (LPO) processes were also observed. The cellular capacity to counteract the oxidative damage was sustained by high levels of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a protein that confers resistance against ROS attack and inhibition of cell death. While significant augmentations in nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandine E2 (PGE2) levels were detected after 72 h of MNP-exposure only, caspase-1 was activated earlier starting with 24h post-treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that MRC-5 cells have the capacity to develop cell protection mechanisms against MNP. Detailed knowledge of the mechanisms induced by MNP in cell culture could be essential for their prospective use in various in vivo biochemical applications. PMID:26065626

  8. Coating Solid Lipid Nanoparticles with Hyaluronic Acid Enhances Antitumor Activity against Melanoma Stem-like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongxin; Shi, Sanjun; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Successful anticancer chemotherapy requires targeting tumors efficiently and further potential to eliminate cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulations. Since CD44 is present on many types of CSCs, and it binds specially to hyaluronic acid (HA), we tested whether coating solid lipid nanoparticles with hyaluronan (HA-SLNs)would allow targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to CD44-overexpressing B16F10 melanoma cells. First, we developed a model system based on melanoma stem-like cells for experiments in vitro and in mouse xenografts, and we showed that cells expressing high levels of CD44 (CD44+) displayed a strong CSC phenotype while cells expressing low levels of CD44 (CD44-) did not. This phenotype included sphere and colony formation, higher proportion of side population cells, expression of CSC-related markers (ALDH, CD133, Oct-4) and tumorigenicity in vivo. Next we showed that administering PTX-loaded HA-SLNs led to efficient intracellular delivery of PTX and induced substantial apoptosis in CD44+ cells in vitro. In the B16F10-CD44+ lung metastasis model, PTX-loaded HA-SLNs targeted the tumor-bearing lung tissues well and subsequently exhibited significant antitumor effects with a relative low dose of PTX, which provided significant survival benefit without evidence of adverse events. These findings suggest that the HA-SLNs targeting system shows promise for enhancing cancer therapy. PMID:25897340

  9. Manganese-impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for signal enhancement in MRI cell labelling studies.

    PubMed

    Guillet-Nicolas, Rmy; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Nair, Mahesh M; Chevallier, Pascale; Lagueux, Jean; Gossuin, Yves; Laurent, Sophie; Kleitz, Freddy; Fortin, Marc-Andr

    2013-12-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn(2+) is already implemented as a "positive" cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(II) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn(2+) leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM(-1) s(-1) were measured at 60 MHz and 37 C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness, while maintaining an open porosity and relatively high pore volume. Because these Mn-labelled M48SNs express strong "positive" contrast media properties at low concentrations, they are potentially applicable for cell tracking and drug delivery methodologies. PMID:24178890

  10. Antiproliferative effect of ASC-J9 delivered by PLGA nanoparticles against estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Verderio, Paolo; Pandolfi, Laura; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Marinozzi, Maria Rosaria; Vanna, Renzo; Gramatica, Furio; Corsi, Fabio; Colombo, Miriam; Morasso, Carlo; Prosperi, Davide

    2014-08-01

    Among polymeric nanoparticles designed for cancer therapy, PLGA nanoparticles have become one of the most popular polymeric devices for chemotherapeutic-based nanoformulations against several kinds of malignant diseases. Promising properties, including long-circulation time, enhanced tumor localization, interference with "multidrug" resistance effects, and environmental biodegradability, often result in an improvement of the drug bioavailability and effectiveness. In the present work, we have synthesized 1,7-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-hydroxyhepta-1,4,6-trien-3-one (ASC-J9) and developed uniform ASC-J9-loaded PLGA nanoparticles of about 120 nm, which have been prepared by a single-emulsion process. Structural and morphological features of the nanoformulation were analyzed, followed by an accurate evaluation of the in vitro drug release kinetics, which exhibited Fickian law diffusion over 10 days. The intracellular degradation of ASC-J9-bearing nanoparticles within estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells was correlated to a time- and dose-dependent activity of the released drug. A cellular growth inhibition associated with a specific cell cycle G2/M blocking effect caused by ASC-J9 release inside the cytosol allowed us to put forward a hypothesis on the action mechanism of this nanosystem, which led to the final cell apoptosis. Our study was accomplished using Annexin V-based cell death analysis, MTT assessment of proliferation, radical scavenging activity, and intracellular ROS evaluation. Moreover, the intracellular localization of nanoformulated ASC-J9 was confirmed by a Raman optical imaging experiment designed ad hoc. PLGA nanoparticles and ASC-J9 proved also to be safe for a healthy embryo fibroblast cell line (3T3-L1), suggesting a possible clinical translation of this potential nanochemotherapeutic to expand the inherently poor bioavailability of hydrophobic ASC-J9 that could be proposed for the treatment of malignant breast cancer. PMID:24945469

  11. Characterization and anticancer potential of ferulic acid-loaded chitosan nanoparticles against ME-180 human cervical cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Richa; Sharma, Asvene K.; Kaloti, Mandeep; Dutt, Dharm; Pruthi, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a widely distributed hydroxycinnamic acid found in various cereals and fruits exhibiting potent antioxidant and anticancer activities. However, due to low solubility and permeability, its availability to biological systems is limited. Non-toxic chitosan-tripolyphosphate pentasodium (CS-TPP) nanoparticles (NPs) are used to load sparingly soluble molecules and drugs, increasing their bioavailability. In the present work, we have encapsulated FA into the CS-TPP NPs to increase its potential as a therapeutic agent. Different concentrations of FA were tested to obtain optimum sized FA-loaded CS-TPP nanoparticles (FA/CS-TPP NPs) by ionic gelation method. Nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analyses and evaluated for their anticancer activity against ME-180 human cervical cancer cell lines. The FTIR spectra confirmed the encapsulation of FA and thermal analysis depicted its degradation profile. A concentration-dependent relationship between FA encapsulation efficiency and FA/CS-TPP NPs diameter was observed. Smooth and spherical FA-loaded cytocompatible nanoparticles with an average diameter of 125 nm were obtained at 40 µM FA conc. The cytotoxicity of 40 µM FA/CS-TPP NPs against ME-180 cervical cancer cell lines was found to be higher as compared to 40 µM native FA. Apoptotic morphological changes as cytoplasmic remnants and damaged wrinkled cells in ME-180 cells were visualized using scanning electron microscopic and fluorescent microscopic techniques. Data concluded that chitosan enveloped FA nanoparticles could be exploited as an excellent therapeutic drug against cancer cells proliferation.

  12. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  13. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:26578100

  14. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells.

  15. Enhancing the methanol tolerance of platinum nanoparticles for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells through a geometric design.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Mastery over the structure of nanoparticles might be an effective way to enhance their performance for a given application. Herein we demonstrate the design of cage-bell nanostructures to enhance the methanol tolerance of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles while remaining their catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell-shell nanoparticles with Pt and silver (Ag) residing respectively in the core and inner shell regions, which are then agitated with saturated sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to eliminate the Ag component from the inner shell region, leading to the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a metal shell with nano-channels, which exhibit superior methanol-tolerant property in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction due to the different diffusion behaviour of methanol and oxygen in the porous metal shell of cage-bell structured nanoparticles. In particular, the use of remarkably inexpensive chemical agent (NaCl) to promote the formation of cage-bell structured particles containing a wide spectrum of metal shells highlights its engineering merit to produce highly selective electrocatalysts on a large scale for the cathode reaction of direct methanol fuel cells. PMID:26578100

  16. Toxicity of Tungsten Carbide and Cobalt-Doped Tungsten Carbide Nanoparticles in Mammalian Cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meißner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Background Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. Objective We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobaltdoped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. Methods We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendro cyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Results Chemical–physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect. PMID:19440490

  17. Substituted titanocenes induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma cells in vitro and exhibit antitumour activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, J H; Fichtner, I; O'Neill, A; Pampilln, C; Sweeney, N J; Strohfeldt, K; Watson, R W; Tacke, M; Mc Gee, M M

    2007-01-01

    Titanocene compounds are a novel series of agents that exhibit cytotoxic effects in a variety of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the antiproliferative activity of two titanocenes (Titanocenes X and Y) was evaluated in human epidermoid cancer cells in vitro. Titanocenes X and Y induce apoptotic cell death in epidermoid cancer cells, with IC50 values that are comparable to cisplatin. Characterisation of the cell death pathway induced by titanocene compounds in A431 cells revealed that apoptosis is preceded by cell cycle arrest and the inhibition of cell proliferation. The induction of apoptosis is dependent on the activation of caspase-3 and -7 but not caspase-8. Furthermore, the antitumour activity of Titanocene Y was tested in an A431 xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. Results indicate that Titanocene Y significantly reduced the growth of A431 xenografts with an antitumour effect similar to cisplatin. These results suggest that titanocenes represent a novel series of promising antitumour agents. PMID:17923871

  18. Novel curcumin analogue IHCH exhibits potent anti?proliferative effects by inducing autophagy in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Zhou; Xu, Su-Li; Sun, Gang-Chun; Chen, Xiao-Bing

    2014-07-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound that exhibits strong antioxidant and anticancer activities; however, low bioavailability has restricted its application in chemotherapeutic trials. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of the novel curcumin derivative 2E,6E?2?(1H?indol?3?yl) methylene)?6?(4?hydroxy?3?methoxy benzylidene)?cyclohexanone (IHCH) on A549 lung cancer cells. Cells were treated with IHCH at different concentrations (1?40M) for different time periods (1?36h). Microscopic analysis revealed that IHCH inhibited A549 cell growth and induced the formation of characteristic autophagolysosomes in a dose? and time?dependent manner. Furthermore, the inhibitory rate of IHCH (40M) on A549 cell viability was 77.34% after 36h of treatment. Acridine orange staining revealed an increase in autophagic vacuoles in the IHCH?treated A549 cells. Monodansylcadaverine staining was used to analyze autophagy rate. Immunocytochemistry revealed an increase in light chain (LC)3 protein expression in the IHCH?treated cells and western blot analysis detected the conversion of LC3?I to LC3?II, as well as the recruitment of LC3 to autophagosomes in the cytoplasmatic compartment, suggesting the occurrence of autophagy. These findings show that IHCH induced autophagy in A549cells, which is a novel cell death mechanism induced by curcumin derivatives. PMID:24788478

  19. A novel innexin2 forming membrane hemichannel exhibits immune responses and cell apoptosis in Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Ping; Chen, Fang-Yi; Dong, Li-Xia; Zhang, Ya-Qun; Chen, Hui-Yun; Qiao, Kun; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2015-11-01

    Innexins are a class of transmembrane proteins that are important for embryonic development, morphogenesis and electrical synapse formation. In the present study, a novel innexin2 gene from Scylla paramamosain was named Sp-inx2 and characterized. The complete cDNA and genomic DNA sequences of Sp-inx2 were revealed. Sp-inx2 mRNA transcripts were distributed in various tissues of S. paramamosain and were most abundant in the hemocytes. The Sp-inx2 was significantly upregulated in hemocyte, gill and hepatopancreas tissues with the challenge of either Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus or lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) when analyzed at 3 and 6 h using quantitative real-time PCR, suggesting that it could activate an immune response against the challenge of LPSs or Vibrio species. Using the chemical inhibitors carbenoxolone and probenecid, the absorption of the fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow decreased in the primary cultured hemocytes of crabs, thus confirming that hemichannels composed of Sp-inx2 existed in the crab hemocytes. With LPS stimulation, the level of mRNA transcripts and protein expression of Sp-inx2 in the same cultured hemocytes gradually increased from 6 to 48 h, while the activity of hemichannels was down-regulated at 6 and 12 h, demonstrating that LPSs could modulate the absorption activity of hemichannels in addition to its upregulation of Sp-inx2 gene expression. Furthermore, the dye uptake rate in HeLa cells in which Sp-inx2 was ectopically expressed increased dramatically but the increase was significantly down-regulated with the addition of 50 ?g mL(-1) LPS, suggesting that the LPS stimulation could effectively reduce the activity of hemichannels. Interestingly, with the ectopic expression of Sp-inx2 in HeLa and EPC cells, apoptosis spontaneously occurred in both cultured cell lines when detected using TUNEL assay. In summary, a new Sp-inx2 gene was first characterized in a marine animal S. paramamosain and it had a function associated with immune response and cell apoptosis. PMID:26384843

  20. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Ruan, Jing; Yang, Meng; Pan, Fei; Gao, Guo; Qu, Su; Shen, You-Lan; Dang, Yong-Jun; Wang, Kan; Jin, Wei-Lin; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Methods Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. The mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. The nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic field and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. Results iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cells in vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growth in vivo through the external magnetic field. Conclusion FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer. PMID:26487961

  1. Cytotoxicity of various types of gold-mesoporous silica nanoparticles in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guomu; Li, Qiongshu; Ni, Weihua; Zhang, Nannan; Zheng, Xiao; Wang, Yingshuai; Shao, Dan; Tai, Guixiang

    2015-01-01

    Recently, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have shown promising biological applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, the potential toxicity of AuNPs remains a major hurdle that impedes their use in clinical settings. Mesoporous silica is very suitable for the use as a coating material for AuNPs and might not only reduce the cytotoxicity of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide-coated AuNPs but might also facilitate the loading and delivery of drugs. Herein, three types of rod-like gold-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (termed bare AuNPs, core–shell Au@mSiO2NPs, and Janus Au@mSiO2NPs) were specially designed, and the effects of these AuNPs on cellular uptake, toxic behavior, and mechanism were then systematically studied. Our results indicate that bare AuNPs exerted higher toxicity than the Au@mSiO2NPs and that Janus Au@mSiO2NPs exhibited the lowest toxicity in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, consistent with the endocytosis capacity of the nanoparticles, which followed the order, bare AuNPs > core–shell Au@mSiO2NPs > Janus Au@mSiO2NPs. More importantly, the AuNPs-induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells exhibited features that were characteristic of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, an enhanced Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio, and loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Simultaneously, cytochrome c was released from mitochondria, and the caspase-3/9 cascade was activated. Moreover, both ROS scavenger (N-acetylcysteine) and JNK inhibitor (SP600125) partly blocked the induction of apoptosis in all AuNPs-treated cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that all AuNPs induce apoptosis through the ROS-/JNK-mediated mitochondrial pathway. Thus, Janus Au@mSiO2NPs exhibit the potential for applications in biomedicine, thus aiding the clinical translation of AuNPs. PMID:26491285

  2. Characteristics of Cell-Penetrating Peptide/Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Margus, Helerin; Arukuusk, Piret; Langel, lo; Pooga, Margus

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acids are highly promising candidates for the treatment of various genetic diseases. However, due to the large size and negative charge, nucleic acids are not efficiently taken up by cells, and thus, their clinical potential remains limited so far. Therefore, various delivery vehicles have been designed to assist the cellular uptake of nucleic acids. Among these, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have gained increasing popularity as efficient and nontoxic delivery vectors. CPPs can be coupled to nucleic acids either by covalent or noncovalent association. Noncovalent coupling, which is based on the formation of nanoparticle-like nanocomplexes (NP), has received much attention in recent years, and the number of studies employing the strategy is explosively increasing due to the high therapeutic potential. However, the properties of CPP/nucleic acid NPs have not been characterized in sufficient detail yet. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the size and morphology of nucleic acid nanoparticles with novel transfection peptides, PepFects (PFs) and NickFects (NFs), using negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, we examined whether the attachment of fluorescence or (nano)gold label to nucleic acid affects the nanocomplex formation or its morphology. We demonstrated that transportan-10-based new generation CPPs from PF and NF families condense nucleic acids to NPs of homogeneous size and shape. The size and shape of assembled nanoparticles depend on the type of the complexed nucleic acid and the sequence of the used peptide, whereas the label on the nucleic acid does not influence the gross characteristics of formed NPs. PMID:26561739

  3. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in mouse embryonic stem cells and chemical based reprogramming of somatic cells to sphere cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajanahalli Krishnamurthy, Pavan

    Abstract 1: Silver nanoparticles (Ag Np's) have an interesting surface chemistry and unique plasmonic properties. They are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from consumer products like socks, medical dressing, computer chips and it is also shown to have antimicrobial, anti bacterial activity and wound healing. Ag Np toxicity studies have been limited to date which needs to be critically addressed due to its wide applications. Mouse embryonic stem (MES) cells represent a unique cell population with the ability to undergo both self renewal and differentiation. They exhibit very stringent and tightly regulated mechanisms to circumvent DNA damage and stress response. We used 10 nm coated (polysaccharide) and uncoated Ag Np's to test its toxic effects on MES cells. MES cells and embryoid bodies (EB's) were treated with two concentrations of Ag Np's: 5 microg/ml and 50 ug/ml and exposed for 24, 48 and 72 hours. Increased cell death, ROS production and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and alkaline phosphatase (AP) occur in a time and a concentration dependant manner. Due to increased cell death, there is a progressive increase in Annexin V (apoptosis) and Propidium Iodide (PI) staining (necrosis). Oct4 and Nanog undergo ubiquitination and dephosphorylation post-translational modifications in MES cells thereby altering gene expression of pluripotency factors and differentiation of EB's into all the three embryonic germ layers with specific growth factors were also inhibited after Ag Np exposure. Flow cytometry analysis revealed Ag Np's treated cells had altered cell cycle phases correlating with altered self renewal capacity. Our results suggest that Ag Np's effect MES cell self renewal, pluripotency and differentiation and serves as a perfect model system for studying toxicity induced by engineered Ag Np's. Abstract 2: The reprogramming of fibroblasts to pluripotent stem cells and the direct conversion of fibroblasts to functional neurons has been successfully manipulated by ectopic expression of defined factors. We demonstrate that mouse fibroblasts can be converted into sphere cells by detaching fibroblast cells by proteases and then using AlbuMAX I-containing culture medium without genetic alteration. AlbuMAX I is a lipid-rich albumin. Albumin-associated lipids arachidonic acid (AA) and pluronic F-68 were responsible for this effect. The converted colonies were positive for both alkaline phosphatase and stage specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1) staining. Global gene expression analysis indicated that the sphere cells were in an intermediate state compared with MES cells and MEF cells. The sphere cells were able to differentiate into tissues representing all three embryonic germ layers following retinoic acid treatment, and also differentiated into smooth muscle cells following treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The study presented a potential novel approach to transdifferentiate mouse fibroblast cells into other cell lineages mediated by AlbuMAX I-containing culture medium.

  4. Modulating Gold Nanoparticle in vivo Delivery for Photothermal Therapy Applications Using a T Cell Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Laura Carpin

    This thesis reports new gold nanoparticle-based methods to treat chemotherapy-resistant and metastatic tumors that frequently evade conventional cancer therapies. Gold nanoparticles represent an innovative generation of diagnostic and treatment agents due to the ease with which they can be tuned to scatter or absorb a chosen wavelength of light. One area of intensive investigation in recent years is gold nanoparticle photothermal therapy (PTT), in which gold nanoparticles are used to heat and destroy cancer. This work demonstrates the utility of gold nanoparticle PTT against two categories of cancer that are currently a clinical challenge: trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer and metastatic cancer. In addition, this thesis presents a new method of gold nanoparticle delivery using T cells that increases gold nanoparticle tumor accumulation efficiency, a current challenge in the field of PTT. I ablated trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer in vitro for the first time using anti-HER2 labeled silica-gold nanoshells, demonstrating the potential utility of PTT against chemotherapy-resistant cancers. I next established for the first time the use of T cells as gold nanoparticle vehicles in vivo. When incubated with gold nanoparticles in culture, T cells can internalize up to 15000 nanoparticles per cell with no detrimental effects to T cell viability or function (e.g. migration and cytokine secretion). These AuNP-T cells can be systemically administered to tumor-bearing mice and deliver gold nanoparticles four times more efficiently than by injecting free nanoparticles. In addition, the biodistribution of AuNP-T cells correlates with the normal biodistribution of T cell carrier, suggesting the gold nanoparticle biodistribution can be modulated through the choice of nanoparticle vehicle. Finally, I apply gold nanoparticle PTT as an adjuvant treatment for T cell adoptive transfer immunotherapy (Hyperthermia-Enhanced Immunotherapy or HIT) of distant tumors in a melanoma mouse model. The results presented in this thesis expand the potential of gold nanoparticle PTT from only chemotherapy-sensitive or localized cancers to chemotherapy-resistant non-localized cancers that currently defy conventional therapies.

  5. Infrared light-absorbing gold/gold sulfide nanoparticles induce cell death in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Gobin, Andre M; Dryden, Gerald W; Kang, Xinqin; Xiao, Deyi; Li, Su Ping; Zhang, Guandong; Martin, Robert CG

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles and near infrared-absorbing light are each innocuous to tissue but when combined can destroy malignant tissue while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. This study investigated the feasibility of photothermal ablation therapy for esophageal adenocarcinoma using chitosan-coated gold/gold sulfide (CS-GGS) nanoparticles. A rat esophagoduodenal anastomosis model was used for the in vivo ablation study, and three human esophageal cell lines were used to study the response of cancer cells and benign cells to near infrared light after treatment with CS-GGS. The results indicate that both cancerous tissue and cancer cells took up more gold nanoparticles and were completely ablated after exposure to near infrared light. The benign tissue and noncancerous cells showed less uptake of these nanoparticles, and remained viable after exposure to near infrared light. CS-GGS nanoparticles could provide an optimal endoluminal therapeutic option for near infrared light ablation of esophageal cancer. PMID:23818775

  6. Rac1 GTPase-deficient mouse lens exhibits defects in shape, suture formation, fiber cell migration and survival.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Chauhan, Bharesh K; Walker, Christopher; Zheng, Yi; Robinson, Michael L; Lang, Richard A; Rao, Ponugoti V

    2011-12-01

    Morphogenesis and shape of the ocular lens depend on epithelial cell elongation and differentiation into fiber cells, followed by the symmetric and compact organization of fiber cells within an enclosed extracellular matrix-enriched elastic capsule. The cellular mechanisms orchestrating these different events however, remain obscure. We investigated the role of the Rac1 GTPase in these processes by targeted deletion of expression using the conditional gene knockout (cKO) approach. Rac1 cKO mice were derived from two different Cre (Le-Cre and MLR-10) transgenic mice in which lens-specific Cre expression starts at embryonic day 8.75 and 10.5, respectively, in both the lens epithelium and fiber cells. The Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO mice exhibited an early-onset (E12.5) and severe lens phenotype compared to the MLR-10/Rac1 cKO (E15.5) mice. While the Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO lenses displayed delayed primary fiber cell elongation, lenses from both Rac1 cKO strains were characterized by abnormal shape, impaired secondary fiber cell migration, sutural defects and thinning of the posterior capsule which often led to rupture. Lens fiber cell N-cadherin/?-catenin/Rap1/Nectin-based cell-cell junction formation and WAVE-2/Abi-2/Nap1-regulated actin polymerization were impaired in the Rac1 deficient mice. Additionally, the Rac1 cKO lenses were characterized by a shortened epithelial sheet, reduced levels of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data uncover the essential role of Rac1 GTPase activity in establishment and maintenance of lens shape, suture formation and capsule integrity, and in fiber cell migration, adhesion and survival, via regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesive interactions and ECM turnover. PMID:21945075

  7. Comparison of intracellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of free mTHPC and mTHPC-loaded PLGA nanoparticles in human colon carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löw, Karin; Knobloch, Thomas; Wagner, Sylvia; Wiehe, Arno; Engel, Andrea; Langer, Klaus; von Briesen, Hagen

    2011-06-01

    The second generation photosensitizer mTHPC was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the palliative treatment of advanced head and neck cancer in October 2001. It is known that mTHPC possesses a significant phototoxicity against a variety of human cancer cells in vitro but also exhibits dark toxicity and can cause adverse effects (especially skin photosensitization). Due to its poor water solubility, the administration of hydrophobic photosensitizer still presents several difficulties. To overcome the administration problems, the use of nanoparticles as drug carrier systems is much investigated. Nanoparticles based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) have been extensively studied as delivery systems into tumours due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability. The goal of this study was the comparison of free mTHPC and mTHPC-loaded PLGA nanoparticles concerning cytotoxicity and intracellular accumulation in human colon carcinoma cells (HT29). The nanoparticles delivered the photosensitizer to the colon carcinoma cells and enabled drug release without losing its activity. The cytotoxicity assays showed a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and viability after illumination. However, first and foremost mTHPC lost its dark toxic effects using the PLGA nanoparticles as a drug carrier system. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticles are a promising drug carrier system for the hydrophobic photosensitizer mTHPC.

  8. Relating Intercellular Variability in Nanoparticle Uptake with Biological Consequence: A Quantitative X-ray Fluorescence Study for Radiosensitization of Cells.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Tyron; Douglass, Michael; Paterson, David; Bezak, Eva; Thierry, Benjamin; Kempson, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Internalized gold nanoparticles were quantified in large numbers of individual prostate cancer cells using large area synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Cells were also irradiated with a 6 MV linear accelerator to assess the biological consequence of radiosensitization with gold nanoparticles. A large degree of heterogeneity in nanoparticle uptake between cells resulted in influenced biological effect. PMID:26461268

  9. Photocurrent enhancements of organic solar cells by altering dewetting of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Fleetham, Tyler; Choi, Jea-Young; Choi, Hyung Woo; Alford, Terry; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Taek Sung; Lee, Wook Seong; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Li, Jian; Kim, Inho

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of metal nanoparticles into active layers of organic solar cells is one of the promising light trapping approaches. The size of metal nanoparticles is one of key factors to strong light trapping, and the size of thermally evaporated metal nanoparticles can be tuned by either post heat treatment or surface modification of substrates. We deposited Ag nanoparticles on ITO by varying nominal thicknesses, and post annealing was carried out to increase their size in radius. PEDOT:PSS was employed onto the ITO substrates as a buffer layer to alter the dewetting behavior of Ag nanoparticles. The size of Ag nanoparticles on PEDOT:PSS were dramatically increased by more than three times compared to those on the ITO substrates. Organic solar cells were fabricated on the ITO and PEDOT:PSS coated ITO substrates with incorporation of those Ag nanoparticles, and their performances were compared. The photocurrents of the cells with the active layers on PEDOT:PSS with an optimal choice of the Ag nanoparticles were greatly enhanced whereas the Ag nanoparticles on the ITO substrates did not lead to the photocurrent enhancements. The origin of the photocurrent enhancements with introducing the Ag nanoparticles on PEDOT:PSS are discussed. PMID:26388104

  10. Photocurrent enhancements of organic solar cells by altering dewetting of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleetham, Tyler; Choi, Jea-Young; Choi, Hyung Woo; Alford, Terry; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Taek Sung; Lee, Wook Seong; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Li, Jian; Kim, Inho

    2015-09-01

    Incorporation of metal nanoparticles into active layers of organic solar cells is one of the promising light trapping approaches. The size of metal nanoparticles is one of key factors to strong light trapping, and the size of thermally evaporated metal nanoparticles can be tuned by either post heat treatment or surface modification of substrates. We deposited Ag nanoparticles on ITO by varying nominal thicknesses, and post annealing was carried out to increase their size in radius. PEDOT:PSS was employed onto the ITO substrates as a buffer layer to alter the dewetting behavior of Ag nanoparticles. The size of Ag nanoparticles on PEDOT:PSS were dramatically increased by more than three times compared to those on the ITO substrates. Organic solar cells were fabricated on the ITO and PEDOT:PSS coated ITO substrates with incorporation of those Ag nanoparticles, and their performances were compared. The photocurrents of the cells with the active layers on PEDOT:PSS with an optimal choice of the Ag nanoparticles were greatly enhanced whereas the Ag nanoparticles on the ITO substrates did not lead to the photocurrent enhancements. The origin of the photocurrent enhancements with introducing the Ag nanoparticles on PEDOT:PSS are discussed.

  11. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) as an approach for nanoparticle detection inside cells.

    PubMed

    Havrdova, M; Polakova, K; Skopalik, J; Vujtek, M; Mokdad, A; Homolkova, M; Tucek, J; Nebesarova, J; Zboril, R

    2014-12-01

    When developing new nanoparticles for bio-applications, it is important to fully characterize the nanoparticle's behavior in biological systems. The most common techniques employed for mapping nanoparticles inside cells include transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). These techniques entail passing an electron beam through a thin specimen. STEM or TEM imaging is often used for the detection of nanoparticles inside cellular organelles. However, lengthy sample preparation is required (i.e., fixation, dehydration, drying, resin embedding, and cutting). In the present work, a new matrix (FTO glass) for biological samples was used and characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to generate images comparable to those obtained by TEM. Using FE-SEM, nanoparticle images were acquired inside endo/lysosomes without disruption of the cellular shape. Furthermore, the initial steps of nanoparticle incorporation into the cells were captured. In addition, the conductive FTO glass endowed the sample with high stability under the required accelerating voltage. Owing to these features of the sample, further analyses could be performed (material contrast and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS)), which confirmed the presence of nanoparticles inside the cells. The results showed that FE-SEM can enable detailed characterization of nanoparticles in endosomes without the need for contrast staining or metal coating of the sample. Images showing the intracellular distribution of nanoparticles together with cellular morphology can give important information on the biocompatibility and demonstrate the potential of nanoparticle utilization in medicine. PMID:25173605

  12. Augmented cellular uptake of nanoparticles using tea catechins: effect of surface modification on nanoparticle-cell interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Ching; Luo, Pei-Chun; Huang, Chun-Wan; Leu, Yann-Lii; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Ma, Yunn-Hwa

    2014-08-01

    Nanoparticles may serve as carriers in targeted therapeutics; interaction of the nanoparticles with a biological system may determine their targeting effects and therapeutic efficacy. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of tea catechins, has been conjugated with nanoparticles and tested as an anticancer agent. We investigated whether EGCG may enhance nanoparticle uptake by tumor cells. Cellular uptake of a dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was determined by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry or a potassium thiocyanate colorimetric method. We demonstrated that EGCG greatly enhanced interaction and/or internalization of MNPs (with or without polyethylene glycol) by glioma cells, but not vascular endothelial cells. The enhancing effects are both time- and concentration-dependent. Such effects may be induced by a simple mix of MNPs with EGCG at a concentration as low as 1-3 μM, which increased MNP uptake 2- to 7-fold. In addition, application of magnetic force further potentiated MNP uptake, suggesting a synergetic effect of EGCG and magnetic force. Because the effects of EGCG were preserved at 4 °C, but not when EGCG was removed from the culture medium prior to addition of MNPs, a direct interaction of EGCG and MNPs was implicated. Use of an MNP-EGCG composite produced by adsorption of EGCG and magnetic separation also led to an enhanced uptake. The results reveal a novel interaction of a food component and nanocarrier system, which may be potentially amenable to magnetofection, cell labeling/tracing, and targeted therapeutics.

  13. Augmented cellular uptake of nanoparticles using tea catechins: effect of surface modification on nanoparticle-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Ching; Luo, Pei-Chun; Huang, Chun-Wan; Leu, Yann-Lii; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Ma, Yunn-Hwa

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticles may serve as carriers in targeted therapeutics; interaction of the nanoparticles with a biological system may determine their targeting effects and therapeutic efficacy. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of tea catechins, has been conjugated with nanoparticles and tested as an anticancer agent. We investigated whether EGCG may enhance nanoparticle uptake by tumor cells. Cellular uptake of a dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was determined by confocal microscopy, flow cytometry or a potassium thiocyanate colorimetric method. We demonstrated that EGCG greatly enhanced interaction and/or internalization of MNPs (with or without polyethylene glycol) by glioma cells, but not vascular endothelial cells. The enhancing effects are both time- and concentration-dependent. Such effects may be induced by a simple mix of MNPs with EGCG at a concentration as low as 1-3 ?M, which increased MNP uptake 2- to 7-fold. In addition, application of magnetic force further potentiated MNP uptake, suggesting a synergetic effect of EGCG and magnetic force. Because the effects of EGCG were preserved at 4 C, but not when EGCG was removed from the culture medium prior to addition of MNPs, a direct interaction of EGCG and MNPs was implicated. Use of an MNP-EGCG composite produced by adsorption of EGCG and magnetic separation also led to an enhanced uptake. The results reveal a novel interaction of a food component and nanocarrier system, which may be potentially amenable to magnetofection, cell labeling/tracing, and targeted therapeutics. PMID:25069428

  14. Interaction of multi-functional silver nanoparticles with living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Ilknur; Cam, Dilek; Kahraman, Mehmet; Baysal, Asli; Culha, Mustafa

    2010-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in household products and in medicine due to their antibacterial and to wound healing properties. In recent years, there is also an effort for their use in biomedical imaging and photothermal therapy. The primary reason behind the effort for their utility in biomedicine and therapy is their unique plasmonic properties and easy surface chemistry for a variety of functionalizations. In this study, AgNPs modified with glucose, lactose, oligonucleotides and combinations of these ligands are investigated for their cytotoxicity and cellular uptake in living non-cancer (L929) and cancer (A549) cells. It is found that the chemical nature of the ligand strongly influences the toxicity and cellular uptake into the model cells. While the lactose-and glucose-modified AgNPs enter the L929 cells at about the same rate, a significant increase in the rate of lactose-modified AgNPs into the A549 cells is observed. The binding of oligonucleotides along with the carbohydrate on the AgNP surfaces influences the differential uptake rate pattern into the cells. The cytotoxicity study with the modified AgNPs reveals that only naked AgNPs influence the viability of the A549 cells. The findings of this study may provide the key to developing effective applications in medicine such as cancer therapy.

  15. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted radiosensitization of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Menon, Jyothi U; Tumati, Vasu; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Nguyen, Kytai T; Saha, Debabrata

    2015-05-01

    One of the many issues of using radiosensitizers in a clinical setting is timing daily radiation treatments to coincide with peak drug concentration in target tissue. To overcome this deficit, we have synthesized a novel nanoparticle (NP) system consisting of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) NPs conjugated with prostate cancer cell penetrating peptide-R11 and encapsulated with a potent radio-sensitizer 8-dibenzothiophen-4-yl-2-morpholin-4-yl-chromen-4-one (NU7441) to allow prostate cancer-specific targeting and sustained delivery over 3 weeks. Preliminary characterization studies showed that the R11-conjugated NPs (R11-NU7441 NPs) had an average size of about 274 ± 80 nm and were stable for up to 5 days in deionized water and serum. The NPs were cytocompatible with immortalized prostate cells (PZ-HPV-7). Further, the particles showed a bi-phasic release of encapsulated NU7441 and were taken up by PC3 prostate cancer cells in a dose- and magnetic field-dependent manner while not being taken up in nonprostate cancer cell lines. In addition, R11-NU7441 NPs were effective radiation sensitizers of prostate cancer cell lines in vitro. These results thus demonstrate the potential of R11-conjugated PLGA NPs as novel platforms for targeted radiosensitization of prostate cancer cells. PMID:25088162

  16. Molecular interactions between gold nanoparticles and model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peipei; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Zhan

    2015-04-21

    The interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and cells are of huge interest because NPs have been extensively researched for biomedical applications. For the cellular entry of NPs, it remains unclear how the cell membrane molecules respond to the exposure of NPs due to a lack of appropriate surface/interface-sensitive techniques to study NP-cell membrane interactions in situ in real time. In this study, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was employed to examine the interactions between lipid bilayers (serving as model mammalian cell membranes) and Au NPs of four different sizes with the same mass, or the same NP number, or the same NP surface area. It was found that lipid flip-flop was induced by Au NPs of all four sizes. Interestingly, the lipid flip-flop rate was found to increase as the Au NP size increased with respect to the same particle number or the same NP surface area. However, the induced lipid flip-flop rate was the same for Au NPs with different sizes with the same mass, which was interpreted by the same "effective surface contact area" between Au NPs and the model cell membrane. We believe that this study provided the first direct observation of the lipid flip-flop induced by the interactions between Au NPs and the model mammalian cell membrane. PMID:25776800

  17. Autistic Children Exhibit Decreased Levels of Essential Fatty Acids in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brigandi, Sarah A.; Shao, Hong; Qian, Steven Y.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai-Lin; Kang, Jing X.

    2015-01-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are essential nutrients for brain development and function. However, whether or not the levels of these fatty acids are altered in individuals with autism remains debatable. In this study, we compared the fatty acid contents between 121 autistic patients and 110 non-autistic, non-developmentally delayed controls, aged 3–17. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids showed that the percentage of total PUFA was lower in autistic patients than in controls; levels of n-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were particularly decreased (p < 0.001). In addition, plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory AA metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were higher in a subset of the autistic participants (n = 20) compared to controls. Our study demonstrates an alteration in the PUFA profile and increased production of a PUFA-derived metabolite in autistic patients, supporting the hypothesis that abnormal lipid metabolism is implicated in autism. PMID:25946342

  18. Cell penetrating synthetic antimicrobial peptides (SAMPs) exhibiting potent and selective killing of mycobacterium by targeting its DNA.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Pohane, Amol Arunrao; Bansal, Sandhya; Bajaj, Avinash; Jain, Vikas; Srivastava, Aasheesh

    2015-02-23

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are powerful defence tools to tackle pathogenic microbes. However, limited natural production and high synthetic costs in addition to poor selectivity limit large-scale use of AMPs in clinical settings. Here, we present a series of synthetic AMPs (SAMPs) that exhibit highly selective and potent killing of Mycobacterium (minimum inhibitory concentration <20??g?mL(-1)) over E.?coli or mammalian cells. These SAMPs are active against rapidly multiplying as well as growth saturated Mycobacterium cultures. These SAMPs are not membrane-lytic in nature, and are readily internalized by Mycobacterium and mammalian cells; whereas in E.?coli, the lipopolysaccharide layer inhibits their cellular uptake, and hence, their antibacterial action. Upon internalization, these SAMPs interact with the unprotected genomic DNA of mycobacteria, and impede DNA-dependent processes, leading to bacterial cell death. PMID:25608020

  19. DNAM-1-based chimeric antigen receptors enhance T cell effector function and exhibit in vivo efficacy against melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Zhang, Tong; Alcon, Andre; Sentman, Charles L

    2015-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies hold great potential for treating cancers, and new CARs that can target multiple tumor types and have the potential to target non-hematological malignancies are needed. In this study, the tumor recognition ability of a natural killer cell-activating receptor, DNAM-1 was harnessed to design CARs that target multiple tumor types. DNAM-1 ligands, PVR and nectin-2, are expressed on primary human leukemia, myeloma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and Ewing sarcoma. DNAM-1 CARs exhibit high tumor cell cytotoxicity but low IFN-? secretion in vitro. In contrast to other CAR designs, co-stimulatory domains did not improve the expression and function of DNAM-1 CARs. A DNAM-1/CD3zeta CAR reduced tumor burden in a murine melanoma model in vivo. In conclusion, DNAM-1-based CARs may have the potential to treat PVR and nectin-2 expressing hematological and solid tumors. PMID:25549845

  20. Toxicological mode of action of ZnO nanoparticles: Impact on immune cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ruchi; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2015-02-01

    The use of nanoscale materials is growing exponentially as concerns rise about the human hazards to it. It is assumed that living beings are coevolved with nanoparticles ever since the origin of life on earth and therefore, they must have developed the defense and toxicity mitigating mechanisms for nanoparticles. Although having peculiar properties these new materials also present new health risks upon interacting with biological systems. Zinc oxide is the most widely used nanoparticles among various nanomaterials. Recently, these nanoparticles have been shown to specifically kill cancerous cells; therefore, it is believed that these nanoparticles may be used as an alternative anti-tumor agent. However, it is also known that these nanoparticles pose several deleterious effects to living beings. It is therefore critical to understand the nature and origin of the toxicity imposed by these nanomaterials. Keeping these points in mind the present review provides updated information on various aspects of toxicities induced by these engineered nanoparticles. PMID:25193324

  1. Anticancer studies of the synthesized gold nanoparticles against MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamala Priya, M. R.; Iyer, Priya R.

    2014-09-01

    It has been previously stated that gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized using various green extracts of plants. The synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized under scanning electron microscopy and EDX to identify the size of the nanoparticles. It was found that the nanoparticles were around 30 nm in size, which is a commendable nano dimension achieved through a plant mediated synthesis. The nanoparticles were further studied for their various applications. In the current study, we have made attempts to exploit the anticancer ability of the gold nano particles. The nanoparticles were studied against MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines. The results obtained from the studies of anticancer activity showed that gold nanoparticles gave an equivalent good results, in par with the standard drugs against cancer. The AuNP's proved to be efficient even from the minimum concentrations of 2 μg/ml, and as the concentration increased the anticancer efficacy as well increased.

  2. Anticancer studies of the synthesized gold nanoparticles against MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamala Priya, M. R.; Iyer, Priya R.

    2015-04-01

    It has been previously stated that gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized using various green extracts of plants. The synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized under scanning electron microscopy and EDX to identify the size of the nanoparticles. It was found that the nanoparticles were around 30 nm in size, which is a commendable nano dimension achieved through a plant mediated synthesis. The nanoparticles were further studied for their various applications. In the current study, we have made attempts to exploit the anticancer ability of the gold nano particles. The nanoparticles were studied against MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines. The results obtained from the studies of anticancer activity showed that gold nanoparticles gave an equivalent good results, in par with the standard drugs against cancer. The AuNP's proved to be efficient even from the minimum concentrations of 2 μg/ml, and as the concentration increased the anticancer efficacy as well increased.

  3. Cytotoxicity of nickel zinc ferrite nanoparticles on cancer cells of epithelial origin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Rasedee, Abdullah; Flaifel, Moayad Husein; Ahmad, Sahrim HJ; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Eid, Eltayeb EM; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Saeed, Mohd; Ilowefah, Muna; Fakurazi, Sharida; Isa, Norhaszalina Mohd; Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat El

    2013-01-01

    In this study, in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles against human colon cancer HT29, breast cancer MCF7, and liver cancer HepG2 cells was examined. The morphology, homogeneity, and elemental composition of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The exposure of cancer cells to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles (15.61,000 ?g/mL; 72 hours) has resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The quantification of caspase-3 and -9 activities and DNA fragmentation to assess the cell death pathway of the treated cells showed that both were stimulated when exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles. Light microscopy examination of the cells exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles demonstrated significant changes in cellular morphology. The HepG2 cells were most prone to apoptosis among the three cells lines examined, as the result of treatment with NiZn nanoparticles. In conclusion, NiZn ferrite nanoparticles are suggested to have potential cytotoxicity against cancer cells. PMID:23885175

  4. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors improve parenchymal findings of liver cirrhosis in a patient exhibiting concomitant hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    KUS, TULAY; AKTAS, GOKMEN; SEVINC, ALPER; OKTAY, CEMIL; KALENDER, MEHMET EMIN; CAMCI, CELALETDIN

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and renal cell cancer (RCC) are malignancies, which are chemotherapy resistant and fatal at the advanced stages. Previously developed tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used in the treatment of advanced stage disease. In the present case study, a patient using sunitinib for stage IV RCC presented with HCC following 2 years of treatment. A patient who exhibited Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis initially, exhibited a marked improvement of hepatocellular parenchyma findings following treatment with sunitinib. Sunitinib is suggested to have preventive effects on the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in vitro, via an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and anti-platelet-derived growth factor mechanism. However, no clinical supportive study has been performed until now. Improvement of liver functions may be explained in this manner. Therefore, investigations are required with different doses of sunitinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors in order to evaluate the efficacy on treatment of cirrhosis progression.

  5. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (? 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5-10 ppm, with concentrations ? 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles. PMID:26039692

  6. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (≥ 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5–10 ppm, with concentrations ≤ 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles. PMID:26039692

  7. Effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on the permeability properties of Sf21cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianye; Zhao, Gang; Shu, Zhiquan; Zhou, Ping; Cao, Yunxia; Gao, Dayong

    2016-02-01

    It was recently reported that nanoparticles could significantly modulate the thermal properties of solutions at subzero temperatures, and as a result, nanoparticles have been widely used in both cryopreservation and cryosurgery. In cryopreservation, the water permeability coefficient of cell membrane is an essential parameter for quantitative investigation of cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation. However, few studies were focused on the effects of nanoparticles on the permeability properties of cell membrane. In order to optimize the processes of cryopreservation with nanoparticles, we measured the permeability properties of Sf21cells in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in this study. The responses of Sf21cells with iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by the microperfusion system at-2, 5, 15 and 25C, respectively. The osmotically inactive cell volume (Vb), the cell membrane hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and it's activation energy (ELp), and the reference value of Lp at the reference temperature (Lpg) with 0.02%, 0.1% and 0.5% (w/w) iron oxide nanoparticles were determined by 2-parameter (2-p) model at-2, 5, 15 and 25C. We analyzed the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on the permeability properties of the Sf21cells. The results indicated that iron oxide nanoparticles have a significant influence on membrane permeability properties (Lpg and ELp) of Sf21cells. The introduction of iron oxide nanoparticles tends to increase the values of Vb and Lpg, while decrease the value of ELp. These findings may provide a new route to optimize the biomaterial cryopreservation. PMID:26705894

  8. Use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles biosynthesized by Bacillus mycoides in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges of nanotechnology during the last decade has been the development of new procedures to synthesize nanoparticles. In this context, biosynthetic methods have taken hold since they are simple, safe and eco-friendly. Results In this study, we report the biosynthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles by an environmental isolate of Bacillus mycoides, a poorly described Gram-positive bacterium able to form colonies with novel morphologies. This isolate was able to produce TiO2 nanoparticles at 37°C in the presence of titanyl hydroxide. Biosynthesized nanoparticles have anatase polymorphic structure, spherical morphology, polydisperse size (40–60 nm) and an organic shell as determined by UV–vis spectroscopy, TEM, DLS and FTIR, respectively. Also, conversely to chemically produced nanoparticles, biosynthesized TiO2 do not display phototoxicity. In order to design less expensive and greener solar cells, biosynthesized nanoparticles were evaluated in Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells (QDSSCs) and compared with chemically produced TiO2 nanoparticles. Solar cell parameters such as short circuit current density (ISC) and open circuit voltage (VOC) revealed that biosynthesized TiO2 nanoparticles can mobilize electrons in QDSSCs similarly than chemically produced TiO2. Conclusions Our results indicate that bacterial extracellular production of TiO2 nanoparticles at low temperatures represents a novel alternative for the construction of green solar cells. PMID:25027643

  9. Galactosylated Chitosan Oligosaccharide Nanoparticles for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell-Targeted Delivery of Adenosine Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiu Liang; Du, Yong Zhong; Yu, Ri Sheng; Liu, Ping; Shi, Dan; Chen, Ying; Wang, Ying; Huang, Fang Fang

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles composed of galactosylated chitosan oligosaccharide (Gal-CSO) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were prepared for hepatocellular carcinoma cell-specific uptake, and the characteristics of Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles were evaluated. CSO/ATP nanoparticles were prepared as a control. The average diameter and zeta potential of Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles were 51.03 3.26 nm and 30.50 1.25 mV, respectively, suggesting suitable properties for a drug delivery system. Subsequently, the cytotoxicity of Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles were examined by the methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values were calculated with HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line) cells. The results showed that the cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles on HepG2 cells was low. In the meantime, it was also found that the Gal-CSO/ATP nanoparticles could be uptaken by HepG2 cells, due to expression of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) on their surfaces. The presented results indicate that the Gal-CSO nanoparticles might be very attractive to be used as an intracellular drug delivery carrier for hepatocellular carcinoma cell targeting, thus warranting further in vivo or clinical investigations. PMID:23899789

  10. A New Interleukin-13 Amino-Coated Gadolinium Metallofullerene Nanoparticle for Targeted MRI Detection of Glioblastoma Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tinghui; Murphy, Susan; Kiselev, Boris; Bakshi, Kanwarpal S; Zhang, Jianyuan; Eltahir, Amnah; Zhang, Yafen; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Jie; Davis, Richey M; Madsen, Louis A; Morris, John R; Karolyi, Daniel R; LaConte, Stephen M; Sheng, Zhi; Dorn, Harry C

    2015-06-24

    The development of new nanoparticles as next-generation diagnostic and therapeutic ("theranostic") drug platforms is an active area of both chemistry and cancer research. Although numerous gadolinium (Gd) containing metallofullerenes as diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have been reported, the metallofullerene cage surface, in most cases, consists of negatively charged carboxyl or hydroxyl groups that limit attractive forces with the cellular surface. It has been reported that nanoparticles with a positive charge will bind more efficiently to negatively charged phospholipid bilayer cellular surfaces, and will more readily undergo endocytosis. In this paper, we report the preparation of a new functionalized trimetallic nitride template endohedral metallofullerene (TNT EMF), Gd3N@C80(OH)x(NH2)y, with a cage surface bearing positively charged amino groups (-NH3(+)) and directly compare it with a similar carboxyl and hydroxyl functionalized derivative. This new nanoparticle was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and infrared spectroscopy. It exhibits excellent (1)H MR relaxivity. Previous studies have clearly demonstrated that the cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13) effectively targets glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells, which are known to overexpress IL-13R?2. We also report that this amino-coated Gd-nanoplatform, when subsequently conjugated with interleukin-13 peptide IL-13-Gd3N@C80(OH)x(NH2)y, exhibits enhanced targeting of U-251 GBM cell lines and can be effectively delivered intravenously in an orthotopic GBM mouse model. PMID:26022213

  11. Normal and Cystic Fibrosis Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exhibit Distinct Gene Activation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Balloy, Viviane; Varet, Hugo; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Proux, Caroline; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Tabary, Olivier; Corvol, Harriet; Chignard, Michel; Guillot, Loïc

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims In cystic fibrosis (CF), Pseudomonas aeruginosa is not eradicated from the lower respiratory tract and is associated with epithelial inflammation that eventually causes tissue damage. To identify the molecular determinants of an effective response to P. aeruginosa infection, we performed a transcriptomic analysis of primary human bronchial epithelial cells from healthy donors (CTRL) 2, 4, and 6 h after induced P. aeruginosa infection. Compared to noninfected cells, infected cells showed changes in gene activity, which were most marked 6 h postinfection and usually consisted in upregulation. Results By comparing for each time point of infection, the transcriptomic response of epithelial cells from CF patients and healthy donors, we identified 851, 638, 667, and 980 differentially expressed genes 0, 2, 4, and 6 h postinfection, respectively. Gene selection followed by bioinformatic analysis showed that most of the differentially expressed genes, either up- or downregulated, were in the protein-binding and catalytic gene-ontology categories. Finally, we established that the protein products of the genes exhibiting the greatest differential upregulation (CSF2, CCL2, TNF, CSF3, MMP1, and MMP10) between CF patients and CTRL were produced in higher amounts by infected cells from CF patients versus CTRL. Conclusions The differentially expressed genes in CF patients may constitute a signature for a detrimental inflammatory response and for an inefficient P. aeruginosa host-cell response. PMID:26485688

  12. Recognition and transmembrane delivery of bioconjugated Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles with living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Linlin; Wang, Jine; Wang, Zhenxin

    2010-02-01

    Here, we describe the synthesis of peptide- and/or protein-functionalized Fe2O3 core-Au shell (Fe2O3@Au) nanoparticles for imaging and targeting of living cells. When functionalized with the transmembrane peptide RRRRRRRR (R8), the Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles (R8-Fe2O3@Au) are able to serve as cellular trafficking agents with excellent biocompatibility. The internalization mechanism and delivery efficiency of the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles have been characterized with dark-field microscopy and fluorescence confocal scanning laser microcopy. Experimental result suggests that the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles are internalized initially by binding with the membrane-associated proteoglycans on cell surfaces, especially heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), following an energy-dependent endocytosis process to enter into living cells. After conjugation with the epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR), these nanoparticles can also be used for the recognition of cell membrane antigens to specifically label tumor cells.Here, we describe the synthesis of peptide- and/or protein-functionalized Fe2O3 core-Au shell (Fe2O3@Au) nanoparticles for imaging and targeting of living cells. When functionalized with the transmembrane peptide RRRRRRRR (R8), the Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles (R8-Fe2O3@Au) are able to serve as cellular trafficking agents with excellent biocompatibility. The internalization mechanism and delivery efficiency of the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles have been characterized with dark-field microscopy and fluorescence confocal scanning laser microcopy. Experimental result suggests that the R8-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles are internalized initially by binding with the membrane-associated proteoglycans on cell surfaces, especially heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), following an energy-dependent endocytosis process to enter into living cells. After conjugation with the epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR), these nanoparticles can also be used for the recognition of cell membrane antigens to specifically label tumor cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of Fe2O3 nanoparticles, stability of peptide conjugated Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles; Inhibition of cellular proliferation by nanoparticles and biotin-R8, ICP-MS analysis of HeLa cells incubated with R8-Fe2O3@Au, F-R8-Fe2O3@Au, or F-Fe2O3@Au nanoparticles as a function of incubation time and anti-EGFR blocking study. See DOI: 10.1039/b9nr00152b

  13. Adhesion of Candida biofilm cells to human epithelial cells and polystyrene after treatment with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Negri, Melyssa; Silva, Snia; Gorup, Luiz Fernando; de Camargo, Emerson Rodrigues; Oliveira, Rosrio; Barbosa, Debora Barros; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the adhesion to human epithelial cells and polystyrene surface of viable yeasts recovered from Candida biofilms treated with silver nanoparticles (SN). Biofilm resuspended Candida cells were added to HeLa cells or to empty wells of microtiter plates and the adhesion was verified using crystal violet staining. The adhesion of Candida cells was significantly reduced, mainly when biofilms were pretreated with 54 ?g/mL SN. These new findings allow to conclude that SN may induce changes in viable yeasts, which can decrease the dissemination of Candida infections, mainly in susceptible patients. PMID:24257686

  14. CdS/CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cells based on ZnO nanoparticle/nanorod composite electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Raj, C. Justin; Kim, Hee-Je

    2014-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) films were deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass substrates with the application of polysulfide redox reactions and a CuS counter electrode to fabricate CdS/CdSe quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). In the present study, ZnO nanoparticles were deposited in the interstices of the ZnO nanorods. The performance of the QDSCs was improved by the ZnO nanoparticle/ nanorod composite structure because the ZnO nanorods exhibit high electron transport, and while the ZnO nanoparticles have a large surface area for QD deposition. The ZnO nanoparticle/nanorod composite films represent a promising achievement for enhancing the conversion efficiency of QDSCs. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Magnetic Carbon nanoparticles enabled efficient photothermal alteration of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Thomas, Patrick; Yu, Lingfeng; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    While cw near-infrared (NIR) laser beams have been finding widespread application in photothermal therapy of cancer and pulsed NIR laser microbeams are recently being used for optoporation of exogeneous impermeable materials into cells. Since, carbon nanomaterials are very good in photothermal conversion, we utilized carbon nanoparticles (CNP) doped with Fe, so that they can be localized in a defined area by two fold selectivity, (i) external magnetic field for retention of the CNP in targeted area and (ii) surface functionalization for binding the targeted cells. Here, we report efficient photothermal therapy as well as poration of cells using magnetic CNPs with very low power continuous wave laser beam. Localization of CNPs on cell membrane under application of magnetic field was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. At different power levels, cells could be damaged or microinjected with fluorescence protein-encoding plasmids or impermeable dyes. Monte Carlo simulation showed that the dose of NIR laser beam is sufficient to elicit response for magnetic CNP based photothermal treatment at significant depth. The results of our study suggest that magnetic CNP based photothermal alteration is a viable approach to remotely guide treatments offering high efficiency with significantly reduced cytotoxicity.

  16. Internalized Chitosan Nanoparticles Persist for Long Time in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Malatesta, M.; Grecchi, S.; Chiesa, E.; Cisterna, B.; Costanzo, M.; Zancanaro, C.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-based nanoparticles (chiNPs) are considered to be potentially good carriers for the sustained intracellular delivery of specific molecules. However, scarce attention has been paid to the long-lasting permanence of these NPs in the intracellular milieu, as well as to their intracellular fate (i.e., distribution, interaction with cell organelles, and degradation) in the long term. In the present study, the presence and subcellular location of FITC-labelled chiNPs were monitored in HeLa cells up to 14 days post-administration using multicolorfluorescence confocal microscopy and diaminobenzidine photo-oxidation at transmission electron microscopy. The main result of the present study is the demonstration that internalized chiNPs persist inside the cell up to two weeks, occurring in both the cytoplasm and nucleus; accordingly, chiNPs are able to pass from mother to daughter cells through several mitotic cycles. The cells did not show increased mortality or structural damage up to 14 days after chiNP exposure. PMID:25820565

  17. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Lin Jianguo; Sun Yuliang; Bennouna, Soumaya; Lo, Michael; Wu Qingyang; Bu Zhigao; Pulendran, Bali; Compans, Richard W. . E-mail: compans@microbio.emory.edu; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection.

  18. Non-small cell lung cancer stem/progenitor cells are enriched in multiple distinct phenotypic subpopulations and exhibit plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Akunuru, S; James Zhai, Q; Zheng, Y

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a population of cancer cells that possess unique self-renewal and differentiation characteristics required for tumorigenesis and are resistant to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Lung CSCs can be enriched by several markers including drug-resistant side population (SP), CD133pos and ALDHhigh. Using human non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and patient-derived primary tumor cells, we demonstrate that SP cells represent a subpopulation distinct from other cancer stem/progenitor cell (CS/PC) populations marked by CD133pos or ALDHhigh. The non-CS/PCs and CS/PCs of each subpopulation are interconvertible. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) promotes the formation of CD133pos and ALDHhigh CS/PC subpopulations while suppressing the SP CS/PC subpopulation. Rac1 GTPase activity is significantly increased in cells that have undergone EMT, and targeting Rac1 is effective in inhibiting the dynamic conversion of non-CS/PCs to CS/PCs, as well as the CS/PC activity. These results imply that various subpopulations of CS/PCs and non-CS/PCs may achieve a stochastic equilibrium in a defined microenvironment, and eliminating multiple subpopulations of CS/PCs and effectively blocking non-CS/PC to CS/PC transition, by an approach such as targeting Rac1, can be a more effective therapy. PMID:22825470

  19. Characterization of a multidrug resistant human erythroleukemia cell line (K562) exhibiting spontaneous resistance to 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Grant, S; Turner, A; Nelms, P; Yanovich, S

    1995-05-01

    We have assessed the response of a previously characterized multidrug resistant (MDR) human erythroleukemia cell line (K562R) to the nucleoside analog antimetabolite 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). This cell line has been subjected to selection pressure by intermittent exposure to daunorubicin, but not ara-C, since its initial isolation. In comparison to the parental line (K562S), K562R were approximately 15-fold more resistant to ara-C as determined by 3H-dThd incorporation, MTT dye reduction and clonogenicity. Following a 4-h exposure to 10 microM ara-C, K562S accumulated approximately seven times more ara-CTP, and incorporated approximately 250% more ara-C into DNA than their resistant counterparts. The intracellular generation of ara-CTP was not significantly influenced by the cytidine deaminase inhibitor THU or the deoxycytidylate deaminase inhibitor dTHU (1 mM each) in either cell line. Rates of dephosphorylation of ara-CTP were equivalent in sensitive and resistant cells, as were intracellular levels of both ribonucleotide and deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates. However, K562R displayed a significant (ie 70%) reduction in the level of activity of the pyrimidine salvage pathway enzyme, deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), compared to K562S cells. In contrast to U937 leukemic cells, DNA extracted from K562S and K562R cells following exposure to 10 microM ara-C for 6 h did not exhibit the characteristic internucleosomal DNA cleavage on agarose gel electrophoresis typical of drug-induced apoptosis. Lastly, Northern analysis revealed equivalent levels of dCK message in the two cell lines. K562R represents an unusual example of a classical multidrug resistant human leukemic cell line exhibiting spontaneous cross-resistance to the antimetabolite ara-C, and may prove of value in attempts to understand the mechanism(s) by which human leukemic myeloblasts survive in vivo exposure to combination chemotherapeutic regimens containing drugs that are not classically associated with the multidrug resistance phenomenon. PMID:7769843

  20. Oxidative stress mediated cytotoxicity of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of biologically prepared small size of silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells A549. Herein, we describe a facile method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by treating the supernatant from a culture of Escherichia coli with silver nitrate. The formation of silver nanoparticles was characterized using various analytical techniques. The results from UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis show a characteristic strong resonance centered at 420 nm and a single crystalline nature, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the possible bio-molecules responsible for the reduction of silver from silver nitrate into nanoparticles. The particle size analyzer and transmission electron microscopy results suggest that silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 nm. The results derived from in vitro studies showed a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability when A549 cells were exposed to silver nanoparticles. This decrease in cell viability corresponded to increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). Furthermore, uptake and intracellular localization of silver nanoparticles were observed and were accompanied by accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in A549 cells. The results indicate that silver nanoparticles play a significant role in apoptosis. Interestingly, biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles showed more potent cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested compared to that shown by chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Therefore, our results demonstrated that human lung epithelial A549 cells could provide a valuable model to assess the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:25242904

  1. Oxidative stress mediated cytotoxicity of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae Woong; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of biologically prepared small size of silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells A549. Herein, we describe a facile method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by treating the supernatant from a culture of Escherichia coli with silver nitrate . The formation of silver nanoparticles was characterized using various analytical techniques. The results from UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis show a characteristic strong resonance centered at 420 nm and a single crystalline nature, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the possible bio-molecules responsible for the reduction of silver from silver nitrate into nanoparticles. The particle size analyzer and transmission electron microscopy results suggest that silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 nm. The results derived from in vitro studies showed a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability when A549 cells were exposed to silver nanoparticles. This decrease in cell viability corresponded to increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). Furthermore, uptake and intracellular localization of silver nanoparticles were observed and were accompanied by accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in A549 cells. The results indicate that silver nanoparticles play a significant role in apoptosis. Interestingly, biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles showed more potent cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested compared to that shown by chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Therefore, our results demonstrated that human lung epithelial A549 cells could provide a valuable model to assess the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles.

  2. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  3. Multidrug-resistant hela cells overexpressing MRP1 exhibit sensitivity to cell killing by hyperthermia: Interactions with etoposide

    SciTech Connect

    Souslova, Tatiana; Averill-Bates, Diana A. . E-mail: averill.diana@uqam.ca

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains one of the primary obstacles in cancer chemotherapy and often involves overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1). Regional hyperthermia is undergoing clinical investigation in combination with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This study evaluates whether hyperthermia can reverse MDR mediated by MRP1 in human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells. Methods and materials: Cytotoxicity of hyperthermia and/or etoposide was evaluated using sulforhodamine-B in HeLa cells overexpressing MRP1 and their drug-sensitive counterparts. Glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were quantified by spectrophotometry. GST isoenzymes were quantified by immunodetection. Caspase activation was evaluated by fluorometry and chromatin condensation by fluorescence microscopy using Hoechst 33258. Necrosis was determined using propidium iodide. Results: The major finding is that HeLa and HeLaMRP cells are both sensitive to cytotoxicity of hyperthermia (41-45 deg C). Hyperthermia induced activation of caspase 3 and chromatin condensation. Although total levels of cell killing were similar, there was a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in MDR cells. This could be explained by decreased glutathione and GPx in MDR cells. MDR cells also contained very low levels of GST and were resistant to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia caused a modest increase in etoposide-induced apoptosis in HeLa and HeLaMRP cells, which required appropriate heat-drug scheduling. Conclusions: Hyperthermia could be useful in eliminating MDR cells that overexpress MRP1.

  4. Preparation, characterization and toxicological investigation of copper loaded chitosan nanoparticles in human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells.

    PubMed

    Arora, Divya; Dhanwal, Vandna; Nayak, Debasis; Saneja, Ankit; Amin, Hina; Ur Rasool, Reyaz; Gupta, Prem Narayan; Goswami, Anindya

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles often attribute severe adverse effects to the various organs or tissues at the molecular level despite of their applications in medical, laboratory and industrial sectors. The present study highlights the preparation of copper adsorbed chitosan nanoparticles (CuCSNPs), its characterization and validation of cytotoxicity in human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells. Particle size of the CuCSNPs was determined by using Zetasizer and the copper loading was quantified with the help of ICP/MS. Further characterization of CuCSNPs was carried out by FT-IR analysis to determine the formation of nanoparticles and SEM was conducted for the morphological analysis of the CuCSNPs. The CuCSNPs exhibited pronounced cytotoxic effects towards HEK-293 cells as analyzed by MTT assay. Moreover, the CuCSNPs inhibited the colony formation and induced nuclear damage at the dose of 100?g/mL, much more effectively than the in built control copper sulfate (CuSO4). At the molecular level, the CuCSNPs were found to be triggering reactive oxygen species (ROS), activating effector caspases and subsequent PARP cleavage to induce cell death in HEK-293 cells. PMID:26838845

  5. The Influences of Cell Type and ZnO Nanoparticle Size on Immune Cell Cytotoxicity and Cytokine Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Cory; Thurber, Aaron; Hanna, Charles; Punnoose, Alex; Zhang, Jianhui; Wingett, Denise G.

    2009-12-01

    Nanotechnology represents a new and enabling platform that promises to provide a range of innovative technologies for biological applications. ZnO nanoparticles of controlled size were synthesized, and their cytotoxicity toward different human immune cells evaluated. A differential cytotoxic response between human immune cell subsets was observed, with lymphocytes being the most resistant and monocytes being the most susceptible to ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity. Significant differences were also observed between previously activated memory lymphocytes and naive lymphocytes, indicating a relationship between cell-cycle potential and nanoparticle susceptibility. Mechanisms of toxicity involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with monocytes displaying the highest levels, and the degree of cytotoxicity dependent on the extent of nanoparticle interactions with cellular membranes. An inverse relationship between nanoparticle size and cytotoxicity, as well as nanoparticle size and reactive oxygen species production was observed. In addition, ZnO nanoparticles induce the production of the proinflammatory cytokines, IFN-?, TNF-?, and IL-12, at concentrations below those causing appreciable cell death. Collectively, these results underscore the need for careful evaluation of ZnO nanoparticle effects across a spectrum of relevant cell types when considering their use for potential new nanotechnology-based biological applications.

  6. LaB6 nanoparticles with carbon-doped silica coating for fluorescence imaging and near-IR photothermal therapy of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, B-H; Chen, D-H

    2013-07-01

    In this study, LaB6 nanoparticles are used as a novel nanomaterial for near-infrared (NIR) photothermal therapy because they are cheaper than nanostructured gold, are easy to prepare and have an excellent NIR photothermal conversion property. Furthermore, the surface of LaB6 nanoparticles is coated with a carbon-doped silica (C-SiO2) shell to introduce a fluorescent property and improve stability and biocompatibility. The resulting LaB6@C-SiO2 nanoparticles retain the excellent NIR photothermal conversion property and exhibit a bright blue emission under UV irradiation or a green emission under visible irradiation. Using a HeLa cancer cell line, it is demonstrated that LaB6@C-SiO2 nanoparticles have no significant cytotoxicity, but their presence leads to remarkable cell death after NIR irradiation. In addition, from the observation of cellular uptake, the fluorescence labeling function of LaB6@SiO2 (LaB6 core/SiO2 shell) nanoparticles is also confirmed. These results suggest that LaB6@C-SiO2 nanoparticles may potentially serve as an efficient multifunctional nano-platform for simultaneous fluorescent imaging and NIR-triggered photothermal therapy of cancer cells. PMID:23542555

  7. Mechanodelivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, Nyssa T.; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Yang, Haw

    2014-04-01

    Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials.Nanotechnology has opened up the opportunity to probe, sense, and manipulate the chemical environment of biological systems with an unprecedented level of spatiotemporal control. A major obstacle to the full realization of these novel technologies is the lack of a general, robust, and simple method for the delivery of arbitrary nanostructures to the cytoplasm of intact live cells. Here, we identify a new delivery modality, based on mechanical disruption of the plasma membrane, which efficiently mediates the delivery of nanoparticles to the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. We use two distinct execution modes, two adherent cell lines, and three sizes of semiconducting nanocrystals, or quantum dots, to demonstrate its applicability and effectiveness. As the underlying mechanism is purely physical, we anticipate that such ``mechanodelivery'' can be generalized to other modes of execution as well as to the cytoplasmic introduction of a structurally diverse array of functional nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD diameter, passivation of QDs, electroporation protocol, flow cytometric data analysis, and additional epifluorescence images of QD labeled cells, including Table S1 and Fig. S1-S15. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06468a

  8. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  9. Fabrication, performance and atmospheric stability of inverted ZnO nanoparticle/polymer solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhaolin

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs, ~5 nm) were first synthesized by a simple wet chemical method. A mixture of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) was used as the photoactive layer, and an inverted solar cell with a structure of ITO/ZnO NPs/P3HT:PCBM/MoO3/Ag was fabricated. Its performance and stability in the ambient atmosphere were investigated in detail. The results showed that the fabricated solar cell under 100 mW/cm2 AM1.5 illumination exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.28 %. In addition, illumination intensity had significant effect on open circuit voltage ( V oc), short circuit current ( J sc), fill factor (FF), and PCE of the fabricated solar cell. The dark storability (darkness, room temperature, and 50-60 % relative humidity) was shown to exceed 4,416 h without notable loss in PCE. The fabricated solar cell with excellent long-term stability was achieved in an ambient atmosphere; also, the stable mechanism of the solar cell in the ambient atmosphere was illuminated.

  10. DNA damage response to different surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Karns, Michael; Goodson, Michael; Rowe, John; Hussain, Saber M.; Schlager, John J.

    2008-12-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have recently received much attention for their possible applications in biotechnology and life sciences. Ag NPs are of interest to defense and engineering programs for new material applications as well as for commercial purposes as an antimicrobial. However, little is known about the genotoxicity of Ag NPs following exposure to mammalian cells. This study was undertaken to examine the DNA damage response to polysaccharide surface functionalized (coated) and non-functionalized (uncoated) Ag NPs in two types of mammalian cells; mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). Both types of Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51 and phosphorylated-H2AX expression. Furthermore both of them induced cell death as measured by the annexin V protein expression and MTT assay. Our observations also suggested that the different surface chemistry of Ag NPs induce different DNA damage response: coated Ag NPs exhibited more severe damage than uncoated Ag NPs. The results suggest that polysaccharide coated particles are more individually distributed while agglomeration of the uncoated particles limits the surface area availability and access to membrane bound organelles.

  11. In vitro toxicity of silica nanoparticles in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Weisheng; Huang Yuewern; Zhou Xiaodong; Ma Yinfa . E-mail: yinfa@umr.edu

    2006-12-15

    The cytotoxicity of 15-nm and 46-nm silica nanoparticles was investigated by using crystalline silica (Min-U-Sil 5) as a positive control in cultured human bronchoalveolar carcinoma-derived cells. Exposure to 15-nm or 46-nm SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles for 48 h at dosage levels between 10 and 100 {mu}g/ml decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Both SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were more cytotoxic than Min-U-Sil 5; however, the cytotoxicities of 15-nm and 46-nm silica nanoparticles were not significantly different. The 15-nm SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were used to determine time-dependent cytotoxicity and oxidative stress responses. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of both nanoparticle dosage (10-100 {mu}g/ml) and exposure time (24 h, 48 h, and 72 h). Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione, malondialdehyde, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. Exposure to SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles increased ROS levels and reduced glutathione levels. The increased production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase release from the cells indicated lipid peroxidation and membrane damage. In summary, exposure to SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles results in a dose-dependent cytotoxicity in cultural human bronchoalveolar carcinoma-derived cells that is closely correlated to increased oxidative stress.

  12. Gold nanoparticle biodistribution: Cell, blood, and tissue interactions as a function of nanoparticle surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Neha B.

    Intravenously injected gold nanoparticles (GNPs) hold a great promise for clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A critical issue in their implementation is incomplete mechanistic understanding of their in vivo biodistribution. Two major limitations in optimizing the biodistribution of NPs are: (1) achieving the highest accumulation at the disease site, and (2) avoiding accumulation in healthy organs including liver and spleen. To overcome these limitations, the interactions of GNPs with biological system must be better understood. The research described in this dissertation sought to advance the field of GNP in vivo biodistribution by elucidating the effects of GNP surface properties such as surface charge, ligand, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coverage. It was shown that the interactions of GNPs with cells and tissues were a function of their surface properties. A Confocal Raman Microscopy based technique was developed to study GNPs interactions with cells in vitro in fast, label-free, and non-invasive way. It was further shown that GNP surface properties strongly influence their blood circulation time in vivo. It was demonstrated that GNPs interact with circulating blood cells including platelets and monocytes, which may play a role in their clearance from blood stream. Most of the injected dose was shown to accumulate in liver and spleen; however, both organs displayed a different mechanism of uptake and distribution of GNPs. Long-term biodistribution studies further suggested that GNPs were still found in liver and spleen after 4 months, but GNPs showed clearance from liver overtime.

  13. Induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells by targeting mitochondria with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkandawire, M. M.; Lakatos, M.; Springer, A.; Clemens, A.; Appelhans, D.; Krause-Buchholz, U.; Pompe, W.; Rödel, G.; Mkandawire, M.

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell death. The ability to target Au nanoparticles into mitochondria of breast cancer cells and induce apoptosis reveals an alternative application of Au nanoparticles in photothermal therapy of cancer.A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell death. The ability to target Au nanoparticles into mitochondria of breast cancer cells and induce apoptosis reveals an alternative application of Au nanoparticles in photothermal therapy of cancer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: PPI-Mal-III G3 dendrimers; SEM of AuNPs and TEM of AuNP interaction with cancerous cells; and comparison of brightfield and caspase 3 fluorescence staining verifying apoptosis. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01483b

  14. Intracellular distribution of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in both human and mouse cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palihawadana Arachchige, Maheshika; Laha, Suvra; Rajagopal, Amulya; Kulkarni, Sanjana; Wang, Shuo; Flack, Amanda; Li, Chunying; Jena, Bhanu; Lawes, Gavin

    2014-03-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in developing Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications including targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Understanding of the intracellular distribution of these nanoparticles is crucial when considering these nanoparticles for specific applications. We have synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles having average size of 14 nm using a co-precipitation technique, which were coated with dextran. We studied the structural and morphological characteristics of the nanoparticles using x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. We also characterized the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. In order to investigate the intracellular distribution of these Fe3O4 nanoparticles, we functionalized the dextran coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with a fluorescent dye, Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and cultured them with both mouse insulinoma MIN 6 cells and human pancreatic MIA PaCa 2 cells. Using optical microscope we investigated the intracellular distribution of the nanoparticles and the effects on cell growth.

  15. Manganese-impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for signal enhancement in MRI cell labelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet-Nicolas, Rmy; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Nair, Mahesh M.; Chevallier, Pascale; Lagueux, Jean; Gossuin, Yves; Laurent, Sophie; Kleitz, Freddy; Fortin, Marc-Andr

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in dru