Sample records for nanoparticles exhibits cell

  1. Metallic Nickel Nanoparticles May Exhibit Higher Carcinogenic Potential than Fine Particles in JB6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Linda; Zou, Baobo; Mao, Guochuan; Xu, Jin; Castranova, Vincent; Zhao, Jinshun; Ding, Min

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies have described the pathogenic and carcinogenic effects of nickel compounds, little has been done on the biological effects of metallic nickel. Moreover, the carcinogenetic potential of metallic nickel nanoparticles is unknown. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) have been shown to play pivotal roles in tumor initiation, promotion, and progression. Mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is considered to be one of the steps leading to the neoplastic state. The present study examines effects of metallic nickel fine and nanoparticles on tumor promoter or suppressor gene expressions as well as on cell transformation in JB6 cells. Our results demonstrate that metallic nickel nanoparticles caused higher activation of AP-1 and NF-?B, and a greater decrease of p53 transcription activity than fine particles. Western blot indicates that metallic nickel nanoparticles induced a higher level of protein expressions for R-Ras, c-myc, C-Jun, p65, and p50 in a time-dependent manner. In addition, both metallic nickel nano- and fine particles increased anchorage-independent colony formation in JB6 P+ cells in the soft agar assay. These results imply that metallic nickel fine and nanoparticles are both carcinogenetic in vitro in JB6 cells. Moreover, metallic nickel nanoparticles may exhibit higher carcinogenic potential, which suggests that precautionary measures should be taken in the use of nickel nanoparticles or its compounds in nanomedicine. PMID:24691273

  2. Carboplatin loaded protein nanoparticles exhibit improve anti-proliferative activity in retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Farhan; Ali, Mohammad Javed; Kondapi, Anand K

    2014-09-01

    Retinoblastoma, a common neoplasm of eye in children accounts about 9-10% of all paediatric cancer. Carboplatin (carbo) is preferred chemotherapeutic regimen. In this study the prospective of carboplatin loaded apotranferrin (Apo-nano-carbo) and lactoferrin (Lacto-nano-carbo) nanoparticles have been demonstrated for the treatment of retinoblastoma. Apo-nano-carbo and Lacto-nano-carbo were prepared by sol-oil method (as a patented formula) with size of 82-92 nm and 68-81 nm, hydrodynamic size were 142±15 nm and 263±20 nm, encapsulation efficiency were 50%±2.3 and 52%±3.9 respectively. Results of pH dependent-drug release and receptor-blocking assay showed that nanoparticles may deliver drug through receptor mediated endocytosis. The carboplatin loaded nanoparticles shows greater intracellular uptake, sustained retention and thus, high anti-proliferative activity (Apo-nano-carbo IC50=4.31 ?g ml(-1), Lacto-nano-carbo IC50=4.16 ?g ml(-1), Sol-carbo IC50=13.498 ?g ml(-1)) into the retinoblastoma cells compared to their soluble counterpart. PMID:25088498

  3. Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit Reduced Toxicity to Mammalian Cells and Retain Antimicrobial Activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver nanomaterial stems from their antimicrobial properties. AgNPs are being added to clothing, paint, refrigerators, washing machines and a variety of other commercially available items. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies, howe...

  4. Dual-controlled nanoparticles exhibiting AND logic.

    PubMed

    Angelos, Sarah; Yang, Ying-Wei; Khashab, Niveen M; Stoddart, J Fraser; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2009-08-19

    Dual-controlled nanoparticles (DCNPs) are synthesized by attaching two different types of molecular machines, light-responsive nanoimpellers and pH-responsive nanovalves, to different regions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Nanoimpellers are based on azobenzene derivatives that are tethered to the nanopore interiors, while nanovalves are based on [2]pseudorotaxanes that are tethered to the nanoparticle surfaces. The different molecular machines operate through separate mechanisms to control the release of guest molecules that are loaded into the nanopores. When used in conjunction with one another, a sophisticated controllable release system behaving as an AND logic gate is obtained. PMID:19624127

  5. CuS Nanoparticles for Photothermal Ablation of Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Li, Yuebin; Li, Chun; Lu, Wei; Huang, Qian; Huang, Miao; University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019-0059 Team; The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 Team

    2011-03-01

    Here, we report the photothermal ablation effects of 3-nm CuS nanoparticles. CuS nanoparticles exhibited strong absorption in the near infrared (NIR) region. Irradiation by a laser beam at 808 nm elevated the temperature of aqueous solutions of CuS nanoparticles as a function of exposure time and nanoparticle concentration. CuS nanoparticles mediated photothermal destruction of HeLa cells in a laser dose- and nanoparticle concentration-dependent manner, and displayed minimal cytotoxic effects with a profile similar to that of gold nanoparticles. Owing to their unique optical property, small size, low cost of production, and low cytotoxicity, CuS nanoparticles are promising new nanomaterials for cancer photothermal ablation therapy.

  6. TUTORIAL Open Access Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TUTORIAL Open Access Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: Opportunity for magnetic cell nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell) cellular MRI, magnetic nanoparticles, magnetic cell labeling, magnetic vectorization Rationale Magnetic

  7. Preferential killing of cancer cells and activated human T cells using ZnO nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Cory; Layne, Janet; Punnoose, Alex; Reddy, K M; Coombs, Isaac; Coombs, Andrew; Feris, Kevin; Wingett, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly being recognized for their potential utility in biological applications including nanomedicine. Here we examine the response of normal human cells to ZnO nanoparticles under different signaling environments and compare it to the response of cancerous cells. ZnO nanoparticles exhibit a strong preferential ability to kill cancerous T cells (?28–35×) compared to normal cells. Interestingly, the activation state of the cell contributes toward nanoparticle toxicity, as resting T cells display a relative resistance while cells stimulated through the T cell receptor and CD28 costimulatory pathway show greater toxicity in direct relation to the level of activation. Mechanisms of toxicity appear to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species, with cancerous T cells producing higher inducible levels than normal T cells. In addition, nanoparticles were found to induce apoptosis and the inhibition of reactive oxygen species was found to be protective against nanoparticle induced cell death. The novel findings of cell selective toxicity, towards potential disease causing cells, indicate a potential utility of ZnO nanoparticles in the treatment of cancer and/or autoimmunity. PMID:18836572

  8. Cardiac side population cells exhibit endothelial differentiation potential.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihyun; Choi, Seung Cheol; Park, Chi Yeon; Shim, Wan Joo; Lim, Do-Sun

    2007-10-31

    Recent studies have shown that side population (SP) cells, isolated from adult myocardium, represent a distinct cardiac progenitor cell population that exhibits functional cardiomyogenic differentiation. However, information on the intrinsic characteristics and endothelial potential, of cardiac SP cells, is limited. The present study was designed to investigate whether cardiac SP cells exhibit endothelial differentiation potential. The cardiac SP cells more highly expressed the early cardiac transcription factors as well as endothelial cell markers compared to the bone marrow-SP cells. After treatment with VEGF, for 28 days, cardiac SP cells were able to differentiate into endothelial cells expressing von Willebrand factor as determined by immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, expression of endothelial cell markers increased several-fold in VEGF-treated cardiac SP cells compared to the control group when assessed by real-time PCR. We also confirmed that cardiac SP cells provided a significantly augmented ratio of ischemic/normal blood flow, in the cardiac SP cell-transplanted group compared with saline-treated controls on postoperative days 7, 14, 21 and 28, in a murine model. These results show that cardiac SP cells may contribute to regeneration of injured heart tissues partly by transdifferentiation into angiogenic lineages. PMID:18059141

  9. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  10. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  11. Cytotoxicity of monodispersed chitosan nanoparticles against the Caco-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Jing Wen [Laboratory for Drug Delivery, Pharmacy, Characterisation and Analysis, University of Western Australia (Australia)] [Laboratory for Drug Delivery, Pharmacy, Characterisation and Analysis, University of Western Australia (Australia); Saunders, Martin [Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, University of Western Australia (Australia)] [Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, University of Western Australia (Australia); Lim, Lee-Yong, E-mail: lee.lim@uwa.edu.au [Laboratory for Drug Delivery, Pharmacy, Characterisation and Analysis, University of Western Australia (Australia) [Laboratory for Drug Delivery, Pharmacy, Characterisation and Analysis, University of Western Australia (Australia); School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley 6009 (Australia)

    2012-08-01

    Published toxicology data on chitosan nanoparticles (NP) often lack direct correlation to the in situ size and surface characteristics of the nanoparticles, and the repeated NP assaults as experienced in chronic use. The aim of this paper was to breach these gaps. Chitosan nanoparticles synthesized by spinning disc processing were characterised for size and zeta potential in HBSS and EMEM at pHs 6.0 and 7.4. Cytotoxicity against the Caco-2 cells was evaluated by measuring the changes in intracellular mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, TEER and sodium fluorescein transport data and cell morphology. Cellular uptake of NP was observed under the confocal microscope. Contrary to established norms, the collective data suggest that the in vitro cytotoxicity of NP against the Caco-2 cells was less influenced by positive surface charges than by the particle size. Particle size was in turn determined by the pH of the medium in which the NP was dispersed, with the mean size ranging from 25 to 333 nm. At exposure concentration of 0.1%, NP of 25 ± 7 nm (zeta potential 5.3 ± 2.8 mV) was internalised by the Caco-2 cells, and the particles were observed to inflict extensive damage to the intracellular organelles. Concurrently, the transport of materials along the paracellular pathway was significantly facilitated. The Caco-2 cells were, however, capable of recovering from such assaults 5 days following NP removal, although a repeat NP exposure was observed to produce similar effects to the 1st exposure, with the cells exhibiting comparable resiliency to the 2nd assault. -- Highlights: ? Chitosan nanoparticles reduced mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. ? Cellular uptake of chitosan nanoparticles was observed. ? Chitosan nanoparticles inflicted extensive damage to the cell morphology. ? The transport of materials along the paracellular pathway was facilitated.

  12. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Delphinium denudatum root extract exhibits antibacterial and mosquito larvicidal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Gopal; Gunasekar, Poosali Hariharan; Kokila, Dhanasegaran; Prabhu, Durai; Dinesh, Devadoss; Ravichandran, Nagaiya; Ramesh, Balasubramanian; Koodalingam, Arunagirinathan; Vijaiyan Siva, Ganesan

    2014-06-01

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous root extract of Delphinium denudatum (Dd) by reduction of Ag+ ions from silver nitrate solution has been investigated. The synthesized DdAgNPs were characterized by using UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The prepared DdAgNPs showed maximum absorbance at 416 nm and particles were polydispersed in nature, spherical in shape and the size of the particle obtained was ?85 nm. The DdAgNPs exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus cereus NCIM 2106, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027. The DdAgNPs showed potent larvicidal activity against second instar larvae of dengue vector Aedes aegypti with a LC50 value of 9.6 ppm.

  13. Nanoparticle Solar Cell Final Technical Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Breeze; J Alison; Yudhisthira Sahoo; Damoder Reddy; Veronica Sholin; Sue Carter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells with photovoltaic performance extending into the near-IR region of the solar spectrum as a pathway towards improving power conversion efficiencies. The field of all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells is very new, with only one literature publication in the prior to our project. Very little is understood regarding how these

  14. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Keszenman, Deborah J; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E

    2015-05-01

    Cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability. PMID:25711497

  15. Hybrid solar cells using PbS nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Serap Günes; Karolina P. Fritz; Helmut Neugebauer; Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci; Sandeep Kumar; Gregory D. Scholes

    2007-01-01

    Solution-processed bilayer heterojunction hybrid solar cells have been fabricated using size-quantized PbS nanoparticles and poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). PbS was used as an electron-transporting layer whereas P3HT was used for hole transport. A photovoltaic device consisting of PbS and P3HT exhibited 3% incident photon to current efficiencies (IPCE) under 550-nm monochromatic irradiation.

  16. Exhibitions Exhibitions

    E-print Network

    Tennessee, University of

    in collaboration with Kevin Robinson and Eugene Moon for The Kentifrica Is: An Ethnomusicoloy Concert photo: Thom creeping out of the global recession.The German economy is predicted to exhibit modest growth in 2013

  17. Mammalian cell growth on gold nanoparticle-decorated substrates is influenced by the nanoparticle coating.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Christina; Pierrat, Sebastien; Tarantola, Marco; Schneider, David; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we study epithelial cell growth on substrates decorated with gold nanorods that are functionalized either with a positively charged cytotoxic surfactant or with a biocompatible polymer exhibiting one of two different end groups, resulting in a neutral or negative surface charge of the particle. Upon observation of cell growth for three days by live cell imaging using optical dark field microscopy, it was found that all particles supported cell adhesion while no directed cell migration and no significant particle internalization occurred. Concerning cell adhesion and spreading as compared to cell growth on bare substrates after 3 days of incubation, a reduction by 45% and 95%, respectively, for the surfactant particle coating was observed, whereas the amino-terminated polymer induced a reduction by 30% and 40%, respectively, which is absent for the carboxy-terminated polymer. Furthermore, interface-sensitive impedance spectroscopy (electric cell-substrate impedance sensing, ECIS) was employed in order to investigate the micromotility of cells added to substrates decorated with various amounts of surfactant-coated particles. A surface density of 65 particles/µm(2) (which corresponds to 0.5% of surface coverage with nanoparticles) diminishes micromotion by 25% as compared to bare substrates after 35 hours of incubation. We conclude that the surface coating of the gold nanorods, which were applied to the basolateral side of the cells, has a recognizable influence on the growth behavior and thus the coating should be carefully selected for biomedical applications of nanoparticles. PMID:25671143

  18. Mammalian cell growth on gold nanoparticle-decorated substrates is influenced by the nanoparticle coating

    PubMed Central

    Rosman, Christina; Pierrat, Sebastien; Tarantola, Marco; Schneider, David; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this work, we study epithelial cell growth on substrates decorated with gold nanorods that are functionalized either with a positively charged cytotoxic surfactant or with a biocompatible polymer exhibiting one of two different end groups, resulting in a neutral or negative surface charge of the particle. Upon observation of cell growth for three days by live cell imaging using optical dark field microscopy, it was found that all particles supported cell adhesion while no directed cell migration and no significant particle internalization occurred. Concerning cell adhesion and spreading as compared to cell growth on bare substrates after 3 days of incubation, a reduction by 45% and 95%, respectively, for the surfactant particle coating was observed, whereas the amino-terminated polymer induced a reduction by 30% and 40%, respectively, which is absent for the carboxy-terminated polymer. Furthermore, interface-sensitive impedance spectroscopy (electric cell–substrate impedance sensing, ECIS) was employed in order to investigate the micromotility of cells added to substrates decorated with various amounts of surfactant-coated particles. A surface density of 65 particles/µm2 (which corresponds to 0.5% of surface coverage with nanoparticles) diminishes micromotion by 25% as compared to bare substrates after 35 hours of incubation. We conclude that the surface coating of the gold nanorods, which were applied to the basolateral side of the cells, has a recognizable influence on the growth behavior and thus the coating should be carefully selected for biomedical applications of nanoparticles. PMID:25671143

  19. Imaging nanoparticles in cells by nanomechanical holography

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene [ORNL; Passian, Ali [ORNL; Venmar, Katherine T [ORNL; Lynch, Rachel M [ORNL; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Shekhawat, Gajendra [Northwestern University, Evanston; Dravid, Vinayak [Northwestern University, Evanston; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL

    2008-06-01

    Nanomaterials have potential medical applications, for example in the area of drug delivery, and their possible adverse effects and cytotoxicity are curently receiving attention1,2. Inhalation of nanoparticles is of great concern, because nanoparticles can be easily aerosolized. Imaging techniques that can visualize local populations of nanoparticles at nanometre resolution within the structures of cells are therefore important3. Here we show that cells obtained from mice exposed to single-walled carbon nanohorns can be probed using a scanning probe microscopy technique called scanning near field ultrasonic holography. The nanohorns were observed inside the cells, and this was further confirmed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Scanning near field ultrasonic holography is a useful technique for probing the interactions of engineered nanomaterials in biological systems, which will greatly benefit areas in drug delivery and nanotoxicology.

  20. Cell-targeted platinum nanoparticles and nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Papst, Stefanie; Brimble, Margaret A; Evans, Clive W; Verdon, Daniel J; Feisst, Vaughan; Dunbar, P Rod; Tilley, Richard D; Williams, David E

    2015-06-21

    Herein, we report the facile preparation of cell-targeted platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs), through the design of peptides that, as a single molecule added in small concentration during the synthesis, control the size of PtNP clusters during their growth, stabilise the PtNPs in aqueous suspension and enable the functionalisation of the PtNPs with a versatile range of cell-targeting ligands. Water-soluble PtNPs targeted respectively at blood group antigens and at integrin receptors are demonstrated. PMID:25978133

  1. Functionalized magnetic-fluorescent hybrid nanoparticles for cell labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Lei; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Zhengli; Li, Bo; Zhu, Jianzhong; Wang, Yiting; Huang, Rong; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2011-05-01

    A facile method of synthesizing 60 nm magnetic-fluorescent core-shell bifunctional nanocomposites with the ability to label cells is presented. Hydrophobic trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO)-capped CdSe@ZnS quantum dots (QDs) were assembled on polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNP). Polyethyleneimine was utilized for the realization of multifunction, including attaching 4 nm TOPO capped CdSe@ZnS quantum dots onto magnetite particles, altering the surface properties of quantum dots from hydrophobic to hydrophilic as well as preventing the formation of large aggregates. Results show that these water-soluble hybrid nanocomposites exhibit good colloidal stability and retain good magnetic and fluorescent properties. Because TOPO-capped QDs are assembled instead of their water-soluble equivalents, the nanocomposites are still highly luminescent with no shift in the PL peak position and present long-term fluorescence stability. Moreover, TAT peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPQ) functionalized hybrid nanoparticles were also studied due to their combined magnetic enrichment and optical detection for cell separation and rapid cell labelling. A cell viability assay revealed good biocompatibility of these hybrid nanoparticles. The potential application of the new magnetic-fluorescent nanocomposites in biological and medicine is demonstrated.

  2. Sonochemical synthesis of doped CeF3 nanoparticles exhibiting room temperature ferromagnetism and white light emission.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dimple P; Jayakumar, Onnattu D; Arya, Ashok; Tyagi, Avesh K

    2011-06-01

    In this study we demonstrate the remarkable bi-functionalities of doped CeF3 nanoparticles. The sonochemically synthesized triple doped CeF3:Mn2+:Dy3+:Tb3+ nanoparticles exhibited room temperature ferromagnetism and also serves as a good white light emitting phosphor material. The particles were found to be mostly spherical in shape and the average size was in the range of approximately 75 nm. Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed for this triple doped sample and the saturation magnetization was found to be 4.56 x 10(-3) microB/Mn atom. First-principles spin-polarized plane wave based supercell calculations, using the projector augmented wave potentials, on Mn-doped CeF3 confirmed its ferromagnetic properties. The simultaneous observation of both room temperature ferromagnetism and white light emission from doped fluoride nanoparticles reveals the complexity and uniqueness of these results. PMID:21770131

  3. Nanoparticle Solar Cell Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Breeze, Alison, J; Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Reddy, Damoder; Sholin, Veronica; Carter, Sue

    2008-06-17

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells with photovoltaic performance extending into the near-IR region of the solar spectrum as a pathway towards improving power conversion efficiencies. The field of all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells is very new, with only one literature publication in the prior to our project. Very little is understood regarding how these devices function. Inorganic solar cells with IR performance have previously been fabricated using traditional methods such as physical vapor deposition and sputtering, and solution-processed devices utilizing IR-absorbing organic polymers have been investigated. The solution-based deposition of nanoparticles offers the potential of a low-cost manufacturing process combined with the ability to tune the chemical synthesis and material properties to control the device properties. This work, in collaboration with the Sue Carter research group at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has greatly expanded the knowledge base in this field, exploring multiple material systems and several key areas of device physics including temperature, bandgap and electrode device behavior dependence, material morphological behavior, and the role of buffer layers. One publication has been accepted to Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells pending minor revision and another two papers are being written now. While device performance in the near-IR did not reach the level anticipated at the beginning of this grant, we did observe one of the highest near-IR efficiencies for a nanoparticle-based solar cell device to date. We also identified several key parameters of importance for improving both near-IR performance and nanoparticle solar cells in general, and demonstrated multiple pathways which showed promise for future commercialization with further research.

  4. Nanoparticle-based monitoring of cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenjie; Mu, Luye; Roes, Isaac; Miranda-Nieves, David; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Ankrum, James A; Zhao, Weian; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous cell therapy aims to replace/repair diseased or dysfunctional cells and promises to revolutionize medicine by restoring tissue and organ function. To develop effective cell therapy, the location, distribution and long-term persistence of transplanted cells must be evaluated. Nanoparticle (NP) based imaging technologies have the potential to track transplanted cells non-invasively. Here we summarize the most recent advances in NP-based cell tracking with emphasis on (1) the design criteria for cell tracking NPs, (2) protocols for cell labeling, (3) a comparison of available imaging modalities and their corresponding contrast agents, (4) a summary of preclinical studies on NP-based cell tracking and finally (5) perspectives and future directions. PMID:22101191

  5. Biocompatibility of cerium dioxide and silicon dioxide nanoparticles with endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Claudia; Förster, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cerium dioxide (CeO2) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles are of widespread use in modern life. This means that human beings are markedly exposed to them in their everyday life. Once passing biological barriers, these nanoparticles are expected to interact with endothelial cells, leading to systemic alterations with distinct influences on human health. In the present study we observed the metabolic impact of differently sized CeO2 (8 nm; 35 nm) and SiO2 nanoparticles (117 nm; 315 nm) on immortalized human microvascular (HMEC-1) and primary macrovascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), with particular focus on the CeO2 nanoparticles. The characterization of the CeO2 nanoparticles in cell culture media with varying serum content indicated a steric stabilization of nanoparticles due to interaction with proteins. After cellular uptake, the CeO2 nanoparticles were localized around the nucleus in a ring-shaped manner. The nanoparticles revealed concentration and time, but no size-dependent effects on the cellular adenosine triphosphate levels. HUVEC reacted more sensitively to CeO2 nanoparticle exposure than HMEC-1. This effect was also observed in relation to cytokine release after nanoparticle treatment. The CeO2 nanoparticles exhibited a specific impact on the release of diverse proteins. Namely, a slight trend towards pro-inflammatory effects, a slight pro-thrombotic impact, and an increase of reactive oxygen species after nanoparticle exposure were observed with increasing incubation time. For SiO2 nanoparticles, concentration- and time-dependent effects on the metabolic activity as well as pro-inflammatory reactions were detectable. In general, the effects of the investigated nanoparticles on endothelial cells were rather insignificant, since the alterations on the metabolic cell activity became visible at a nanoparticle concentration that is by far higher than those expected to occur in the in vivo situation (CeO2 nanoparticles: 100 µg/mL; SiO2 nanoparticles: 10 µg/mL). PMID:25383291

  6. Biocompatibility of cerium dioxide and silicon dioxide nanoparticles with endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Claudia; Förster, Martin; Hilger, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Cerium dioxide (CeO2) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles are of widespread use in modern life. This means that human beings are markedly exposed to them in their everyday life. Once passing biological barriers, these nanoparticles are expected to interact with endothelial cells, leading to systemic alterations with distinct influences on human health. In the present study we observed the metabolic impact of differently sized CeO2 (8 nm; 35 nm) and SiO2 nanoparticles (117 nm; 315 nm) on immortalized human microvascular (HMEC-1) and primary macrovascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), with particular focus on the CeO2 nanoparticles. The characterization of the CeO2 nanoparticles in cell culture media with varying serum content indicated a steric stabilization of nanoparticles due to interaction with proteins. After cellular uptake, the CeO2 nanoparticles were localized around the nucleus in a ring-shaped manner. The nanoparticles revealed concentration and time, but no size-dependent effects on the cellular adenosine triphosphate levels. HUVEC reacted more sensitively to CeO2 nanoparticle exposure than HMEC-1. This effect was also observed in relation to cytokine release after nanoparticle treatment. The CeO2 nanoparticles exhibited a specific impact on the release of diverse proteins. Namely, a slight trend towards pro-inflammatory effects, a slight pro-thrombotic impact, and an increase of reactive oxygen species after nanoparticle exposure were observed with increasing incubation time. For SiO2 nanoparticles, concentration- and time-dependent effects on the metabolic activity as well as pro-inflammatory reactions were detectable. In general, the effects of the investigated nanoparticles on endothelial cells were rather insignificant, since the alterations on the metabolic cell activity became visible at a nanoparticle concentration that is by far higher than those expected to occur in the in vivo situation (CeO2 nanoparticles: 100 µg/mL; SiO2 nanoparticles: 10 µg/mL). PMID:25383291

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with carboxymethylated polysaccharide shells—Interaction with human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotschadlo, Jana; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas; Wagner, Kerstin; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Dutz, Silvio; Müller, Robert; Steiniger, Frank; Schwalbe, Manuela; Kroll, Torsten C.; Höffken, Klaus; Buske, Norbert; Clement, Joachim H.

    2009-05-01

    The interaction of magnetic core shell nanoparticles with living cells depends on the structure of the shell. In this paper we demonstrate a strong difference in the cell-nanoparticle interaction depending on the backbone of carboxymethylated polysaccharides used as shell material. Carboxymethyl cellulose with its ?-1?4 linked structure and the carboxymethylated pullulan [?-1?6 linked maltotriose with ?-1?4 linkages] show a constant interaction rate with both, tumor cells and leukocytes. In contrast, carboxymethyl dextran with a ?-1?6 linked backbone exhibits a rapid interaction kinetic with tumor cells that is reduced with leukocytes as target.

  8. Synergistic Targeting of Cell Membrane, Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Cancer Cells using Rod-Shaped Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Sutapa; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Design of carriers for effective delivery and targeting of drugs to cellular and sub-cellular compartments is an unmet need in medicine. Here, we report pure drug nanoparticles comprising camptothecin (CPT), trastuzumab (TTZ) and doxorubicin (DOX) to enable cell-specific interactions, subcellular accumulation and growth inhibition of breast cancer cells. CPT is formulated in the form of nanorods which are coated with TTZ. DOX is encapsulated in the TTZ corona around the CPT nanoparticle. Our results show that TTZ/DOX-coated CPT nanorods exhibit cell-specific internalization in BT-474 breast cancer cells, after which TTZ is recycled to the plasma membrane leaving CPT nanorods in the perinuclear region and delivering DOX into the nucleus of the cells. The effects of CPT-TTZ-DOX nanoparticles on growth inhibition are synergistic (combination index = 0.17±0.03) showing 10-10,000 fold lower inhibitory concentrations (IC50) compared to those of individual drugs. The design of antibody-targeted pure drug nanoparticles offers a promising design strategy to facilitate intracellular delivery and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs. PMID:24053162

  9. Endometriotic mesenchymal stem cells exhibit a distinct immune phenotype.

    PubMed

    Koippallil Gopalakrishnan Nair, Aghila Rani; Pandit, Hrishikesh; Warty, Neeta; Madan, Taruna

    2015-04-01

    Endometriosis is a significant debilitating gynecological problem affecting women of the reproductive age group and post-menopause. Recent reports suggest a role for endometriotic mesenchymal stem cells (ectopic MSCs) in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. To investigate the plausible mechanisms leading to the pathogenic behavior of ectopic MSCs, we compared the immunomodulatory properties of eutopic (healthy) and ectopic MSCs. We analyzed MSC phenotypes, differentiation potential, differential gene expression for an array of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and pro-inflammatory cytokine release along with markers of migration and angiogenesis among eutopic and ectopic MSCs. Further, alterations in immunosuppressive functions of eutopic and ectopic MSCs were examined by co-culturing them with mitogen-activated allogeneic PBMCs. Transcripts of PRRs such as all Toll-like receptors (TLR1-10), except TLR8, collectins (CL-L1, CL-P1 and CL-K1), NOD-1 and NOD-2 receptors and secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-6, IFN-?, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor and MCP-1 were significantly up-regulated in ectopic MSCs. The anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor-? showed significant down-regulation, while IL-10 showed a significant increase in ectopic MSCs. Further, ectopic MSCs showed up-regulated expression for markers of migration and angiogenesis such as matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-3 and MMP-9 and VEGF, respectively. We report here that proliferation of PBMCs was less inhibited upon co-culture with ectopic MSCs compared with eutopic MSCs. The findings suggest that ectopic MSCs with increased levels of TLRs, collectins, pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers of migration and angiogenesis exhibit a distinct immune phenotype compared to eutopic MSCs. This distinct phenotype may be responsible for the reduced immunosuppressive property of ectopic MSCs and may be associated with the pathogenesis of endometriosis. PMID:25416515

  10. Lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite exhibit diverse neurotoxic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy

    Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are one of the components of Lunar soil simulants. Neurotoxic potential of lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite was analyzed. The size of particles, their effects on membrane potential, acidification of synaptic vesicles, uptake and ambient level of glutamate, which is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS, were studied in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) using photon correlation spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, radiolabeled assay, respectively. No significant effect of Lunar soil simulant and synthesized nanoparticles of magnetite on acidification of synaptic vesicles were found in synaptosomes. Also, nanoparticles did not influence the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. Unspecific binding of L-[14C]glutamate to synaptosomes was not altered by nanoparticles of magnetite, whereas in the presence of Lunar soil simulant this parameter was changed. Thus, it was suggested that Lunar soil simulant might disturb glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS.

  11. Hepatoma SK Hep-1 Cells Exhibit Characteristics of Oncogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Highly Metastatic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yanhong; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Ramsamooj, Rajen; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne; Theise, Neil D.; Zern, Mark A.; Duan, Yuyou

    2014-01-01

    Background SK Hep-1 cells (SK cells) derived from a patient with liver adenocarcinoma have been considered a human hepatoma cell line with mesenchymal origin characteristics, however, SK cells do not express liver genes and exhibit liver function, thus, we hypothesized whether mesenchymal cells might contribute to human liver primary cancers. Here, we characterized SK cells and its tumourigenicity. Methods and Principal Findings We found that classical mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers were presented on SK cells, but endothelial marker CD31, hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45 were negative. SK cells are capable of differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts as adipose-derived MSC (Ad-MSC) and bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) do. Importantly, a single SK cell exhibited a substantial tumourigenicity and metastatic capacity in immunodefficient mice. Metastasis not only occurred in circulating organs such as lung, liver, and kidneys, but also in muscle, outer abdomen, and skin. SK cells presented greater in vitro invasive capacity than those of Ad-MSC and BM-MSC. The xenograft cells from subcutaneous and metastatic tumors exhibited a similar tumourigenicity and metastatic capacity, and showed the same relatively homogenous population with MSC characteristics when compared to parental SK cells. SK cells could unlimitedly expand in vitro without losing MSC characteristics, its tumuorigenicity and metastatic capacity, indicating that SK cells are oncogenic MSC with enhanced self-renewal capacity. We believe that this is the first report that human MSC appear to be transformed into cancer stem cells (CSC), and that their derivatives also function as CSCs. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that SK cells represent a transformation mechanism of normal MSC into an enhanced self-renewal CSC with metastasis capacity, SK cells and their xenografts represent a same relative homogeneity of CSC with substantial metastatic capacity. Thus, it represents a novel mechanism of tumor initiation, development and metastasis by CSCs of non-epithelial and endothelia origin. PMID:25338121

  12. The effect of silica nanoparticle-modified surfaces on cell morphology, cytoskeletal organization and function

    PubMed Central

    Lipski, Anna M.; Pino, Christopher J.; Haselton, Frederick R.; Chen, I.-Wei; Shastri, V. Prasad

    2010-01-01

    Chemical and morphological characteristics of a biomaterial surface are thought to play an important role in determining cellular differentiation and apoptosis. In this report, we investigate the effect of nanoparticle (NP) assemblies arranged on a flat substrate on cytoskeletal organization, proliferation and metabolic activity on two cell types, Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) and mouse calvarial preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1). To vary roughness without altering chemistry, glass substrates were coated with monodispersed silica nanoparticles of 50, 100 and 300 nm in diameter. The impact of surface roughness at the nanoscale on cell morphology was studied by quantifying cell spreading, shape, cytoskeletal F-actin alignment, and recruitment of focal adhesion complexes (FAC) using image analysis. Metabolic activity was followed using a thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. In the two cell types tested, surface roughness introduced by nanoparticles had cell type specific effects on cell morphology and metabolism. While BAEC on NP-modified substrates exhibited smaller cell areas and fewer focal adhesion complexes compared to BAEC grown on glass, MC3T3-E1 cells in contrast exhibited larger cell areas on NP-modified surfaces and an increased number of FACs, in comparison to unmodified glass. However, both cell types on 50 nm NP had the highest proliferation rates (comparable to glass control) whereas cells grown on 300 nm NP exhibited inhibited proliferation. Interestingly, for both cell types surface roughness promoted the formation of long, thick F-actin fibers, which aligned with the long axis of each cell. These findings are consistent with our earlier result that osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal progenitor cells is enhanced on NP-modified surfaces. Our finding that nanoroughness, as imparted by nanoparticle assemblies, effects cellular processes in a cell specific manner, can have far reaching consequences on the development of “smart” biomaterials especially for directing stem cell differentiation. PMID:18606447

  13. Rabeprazole exhibits antiproliferative effects on human gastric cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mengli; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Xinxin; Ma, Han; Yao, Hangping; Ji, Feng

    2014-10-01

    Intracellular proton extrusion in gastric cancer cells has been reported to promote cancer cell survival under acidic conditions via hydrogen/potassium adenosine triphosphatase (H(+)/K(+)-ATPase). Rabeprazole is a frequently used second-generation proton pump inhibitor (PPI) that irreversibly inactivates gastric H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Therefore, we hypothesized that rabeprazole could reduce the viability of gastric cancer cells. In the present study, four human gastric cancer cell lines and one non-cancer gastric cell line were cultured. Cell viability, the ?- and ?-subunits of H(+)/K(+)-ATPase and cellular apoptosis were analyzed by dye exclusion assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, respectively. The expression level of total extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) and phosphorylated-ERK protein was detected by western blot analysis. Gastric cancer cell lines were more tolerant of the acidic culture media than non-cancer cells. Administration of rabeprazole led to a marked decrease in the viability of MKN-28 cells. Exposure to rabeprazole induced significant apoptosis in AGS cells. Rabeprazole completely inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the MKN-28 cells, whereas the same effect was not observed in either the KATO III or MKN-45 cells. The ERK 1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, attenuated the viability of the AGS cells. A similar antiproliferative effect was observed in the rabeprazole treatment group. In addition, PD98059 and rabeprazole were able to efficaciously inhibit the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the gastric cancer cells. Therefore, it was concluded that rabeprazole can attenuate the cell viability of human gastric cancer cells through inactivation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The results of the present study demonstrate that rabeprazole inhibits the viability of gastric cancer cells in vitro and may serve as a novel antineoplastic agent. PMID:25202402

  14. Human intestinal M cells exhibit enterocyte-like intermediate filaments

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzik, T; Lugering, N; Schmid, K; Schmidt, M; Stoll, R; Domschke, W

    1998-01-01

    Background—The derivation and ultrastructural composition of M cells covering the lymphoid follicles of Peyer's patches is still unknown. Results from different animal models have shown that there are species specific differences in the composition of intermediate filaments between M cells and neighbouring enterocytes. Little is known, however, about intermediate filaments of human M cells. ?Aims—To compare components of the cytoskeleton of human M cells with those of adjacent absorptive enterocytes. ?Methods—The expression and localisation of different cytokeratins, vimentin, and desmin in M cells was determined on follicle associated epithelia of human appendix using immunohistochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy. ?Results—Cytokeratins specific for human intestinal epithelial cells such as cytokeratins 8, 18, 19, and 20 were expressed in both absorptive enterocytes and M cells with no differences in intensity and cellular distribution between both cell types. Vimentin and desmin, tissue specific markers of either mesenchymal or myogenic cells, as well as other cytokeratins were not detectable in enterocytes or M cells. ?Conclusion—This is the first study on the structure of intermediate filaments in human intestinal M cells. Our results show that in contrast to several animal models, human M cells apparently do not differ from adjacent enterocytes in the composition of their intermediate filament cytoskeleton. The presence of enterocyte like cytokeratins and the absence of other cytokeratins as well as of vimentin and desmin supports the hypothesis of an epithelial origin of human intestinal M cells and suggests that M cells may derive from differentiated enterocytes. ?? Keywords: human intestinal M cells; appendix; cytokeratin; intermediate filaments; follicle associated epithelium PMID:9505886

  15. Bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by human epithelial cells, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Larios-Rodriguez, E; Rangel-Ayon, C; Castillo, S J; Zavala, G; Herrera-Urbina, R

    2011-09-01

    Healthy epithelial cells, in vivo, have the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles when aqueous tetrachloroauric acid is made to react with human skin. Neither a reducing agent nor a protecting chemical is needed for this bio-synthesis method. The first indication of gold nanoparticle formation is the staining of the skin, which turns deep purple. Stereoscopic optical micrographs of human skin tissue in contact with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid clearly show the staining of the epithelial cells. The UV-Vis spectrum of these epithelial cells shows an absorption band with a maximum at 553 nm. This absorption peak is within the wavelength region where the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of aqueous colloidal gold exhibits a maximum. Transmission electron micrographs show that gold nanoparticles synthesized by epithelial cells have sizes between 1 and 100 nm. The electron diffraction pattern of these nanoparticles reveals a crystalline structure whose interplanar distances correspond to fcc metallic gold. Transmission electron micrographs of ultra-thin (70 nm thick) slices of epithelial cells clearly and undoubtedly demonstrate that gold nanoparticles are inside the cell. According to high resolution transmission electron micrographs of intracellular single gold nanoparticles, they have the shape of a polyhedron. PMID:21817787

  16. Dynamics of Receptor-Mediated Nanoparticle Internalization into Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles offer a promising medical tool for targeted drug delivery, for example to treat inflamed endothelial cells during the development of atherosclerosis. To inform the design of such therapeutic strategies, we develop a computational model of nanoparticle internalization into endothelial cells, where internalization is driven by receptor-ligand binding and limited by the deformation of the cell membrane and cytoplasm. We specifically consider the case of nanoparticles targeted against ICAM-1 receptors, of relevance for treating atherosclerosis. The model computes the kinetics of the internalization process, the dynamics of binding, and the distribution of stresses exerted between the nanoparticle and the cell membrane. The model predicts the existence of an optimal nanoparticle size for fastest internalization, consistent with experimental observations, as well as the role of bond characteristics, local cell mechanical properties, and external forces in the nanoparticle internalization process. PMID:25901833

  17. Detection of squamous carcinoma cells using gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei-Yun; Lee, Sze-tsen; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study is to use gold nanoparticle as a diagnostic agent to detect human squamous carcinoma cells. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized and the gold nanoparticle size was 34.3 ± 6.2 nm. Based on the over-expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) biomarkers in squamous carcinoma cells, we hypothesized that EGFR could be a feasible biomarker with a target moiety for detection. We further modified polyclonal antibodies of EGFR on the surface of gold nanoparticles. We found selected squamous carcinoma cells can be selectively detected using EGFR antibody-modified gold nanoparticles via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Cell death was also examined to determine the survival status of squamous carcinoma cells with respect to gold nanoparticle treatment and EGFR polyclonal antibody modification.

  18. Human intestinal M cells exhibit enterocyte-like intermediate filaments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Kucharzik; N Lügering; K W Schmid; M A Schmidt; R Stoll; W Domschke

    1998-01-01

    Background—The derivation and ultrastructural composition of M cells covering the lymphoid follicles of Peyer’s patches is still unknown. Results from different animal models have shown that there are species specific differences in the composition of intermediate filaments between M cells and neighbouring enterocytes. Little is known, however, about intermediate filaments of human M cells.Aims—To compare components of the cytoskeleton of

  19. Preparation of novel (-)-gossypol nanoparticles and the effect on growth inhibition in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    JIN, CAI-LING; CHEN, MEI-LING; WANG, YING; KANG, XIAO-CHUN; HAN, GUANG-YE; XU, SU-LING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor effects and possible mechanism of (-)-gossypol nanoparticles, loaded with vv polyethylene glycol-maleimide (mPEG-Mal), in vitro. Emulsification-volatilization was used to prepare the loaded (-)-gossypol nanoparticles. The toxicity of blank nanoparticles on human prostate cancer PC-3 cells and human prostate RWPE-1 cells was measured. The antitumor effects of the nanoparticles on PC-3 cells were evaluated by an MTT assay, acridine orange staining and transmission electron microscopy in vitro, and the results were compared with those of free (-)-gossypol. In addition, the mRNA expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bak were measured using semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The growth inhibition activity of the loaded (-)-gossypol nanoparticles was found to be dose- and time-dependent, and similar to the activity of free (-)-gossypol. The nanoparticles induced apoptotic morphological changes on the PC-3 cells, downregulating the mRNA expression level of Bcl-2 and upregulating the mRNA expression level of Bak. Blank nanoparticles exhibited no evident toxicity on PC-3 and RWPE-1 cells at a high dose. Therefore, the mPEG-Mal loaded (-)-gossypol nanoparticles demonstrated a favorable antitumor activity and no toxicity. The nanoparticles were able to induce the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells; thus, may be a potential antitumor nanodrug. PMID:25667612

  20. Liposomal carfilzomib nanoparticles effectively target multiple myeloma cells and demonstrate enhanced efficacy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Jonathan D; Stefanick, Jared F; Schroeder, Valerie A; Suckow, Mark A; Alves, Nathan J; Suzuki, Rikio; Kikuchi, Shohei; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C; Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-12-28

    Carfilzomib, a recently FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, has remarkable anti-myeloma (MM) activity. However, its effectiveness is limited by associated severe side-effects, short circulation half-life, and limited solubility. Here, we report the engineering of liposomal carfilzomib nanoparticles to overcome these problems and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of carfilzomib by increasing tumoral drug accumulation while decreasing systemic toxicity. In our design, carfilzomib was loaded into the bilayer of liposomes to yield stable and reproducible liposomal nanoparticles. Liposomal carfilzomib nanoparticles were efficiently taken up by MM cells, demonstrated proteasome inhibition, induced apoptosis, and exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity against MM cells. In vivo, liposomal carfilzomib demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition and dramatically reduced overall systemic toxicity compared to free carfilzomib. Finally, liposomal carfilzomib demonstrated enhanced synergy in combination with doxorubicin. Taken together, this study establishes the successful synthesis of liposomal carfilzomib nanoparticles that demonstrates improved therapeutic index and the potential to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:25312543

  1. Hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells: preparation, principles and challenges.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Brian R

    2012-03-01

    Hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells have a light harvesting layer composed of semiconducting inorganic nanoparticles and a semiconducting conjugated polymer. They have potential to give high power conversion efficiencies (PCE). However, the PCE values reported for these solar cells are not currently as high as anticipated. This article reviews the main methods currently used for preparing hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells from the colloid perspective. PCE data for the period of 2005-2011 are presented for hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells and compared to those from polymer/fullerene cells. The key reasons for the relatively low PCE values for hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells are uncontrolled aggregation and residual insulating ligands at the nanoparticle surface. Two hybrid polymer/nanoparticle systems studied at Manchester are considered in which the onset of aggregation and its affect on composite film morphology were studied from the colloidal perspective. It is concluded that step-change approaches are required to increase the PCEs of hybrid polymer/nanoparticle solar cells and move them toward the 10% value required for widespread commercialisation. A range of nanoparticles that have potential for application in possible longer term terawatt solar energy production are discussed. PMID:22209577

  2. Aluminum plasmonic nanoparticles enhanced dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuxiang; Meng, Weisi; Cui, Kaiyu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2014-03-10

    We present an investigation on utilizing plasmonic aluminium (Al) nanoparticles (NPs) to enhance the optical absorption of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The Al NPs exhibit not only the light absorption enhancement in solar cells with localized surface plasmon (LSP) effect but also the chemical stability to iodide/triiodide electrolyte. Besides, the lower work function (~4.06 eV), compared with that of TiO? (~4.6 eV), may suppress the quenching processes, such as charge transfer to metal NPs, to reduce the loss. Thus, high concentration of Al NPs could be incorporated into the TiO? anodes, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSCs is improved by nearly 13%. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) characterization also indicates that the plasmonic DSCs with Al NPs present better electrochemical performance than regular ones, which contributes to the improvement of PCE of the device. PMID:24922239

  3. Aluminum plasmonic nanoparticles enhanced dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuxiang; Meng, Weisi; Cui, Kaiyu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2014-03-10

    We present an investigation on utilizing plasmonic aluminium (Al) nanoparticles (NPs) to enhance the optical absorption of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The Al NPs exhibit not only the light absorption enhancement in solar cells with localized surface plasmon (LSP) effect but also the chemical stability to iodide/triiodide electrolyte. Besides, the lower work function (~4.06 eV), compared with that of TiO(2) (~4.6 eV), may suppress the quenching processes, such as charge transfer to metal NPs, to reduce the loss. Thus, high concentration of Al NPs could be incorporated into the TiO(2) anodes, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSCs is improved by nearly 13%. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) characterization also indicates that the plasmonic DSCs with Al NPs present better electrochemical performance than regular ones, which contributes to the improvement of PCE of the device. PMID:24800286

  4. BaSnO3 perovskite nanoparticles for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Seong Sik; Lee, Sangwook; Cho, In Sun; Kim, Dong Hoe; Lee, Chan Woo; Jung, Hyun Suk; Hong, Kug Sun

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of highly crystalline perovskite BaSnO3 nanoparticles for use as photoanode materials in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is reported, and the photovoltaic properties of DSSCs based on BaSnO3 nanoparticles (BaSnO3 cells) are demonstrated. The resulting DSSCs exhibit remarkably rapid charge collection and a DSSC fabricated with a BaSnO3 film thickness of 43?µm leads to a high energy conversion efficiency of 5.2?%, which is one of the highest reported for ternary oxide-based DSSCs. More importantly, the BaSnO3 cells show superior charge collection in nanoparticle films compared to TiO2 cells and could offer a breakthrough in the efficiencies of DSSCs. PMID:23417972

  5. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives. PMID:24232694

  6. CD133 positive cells isolated from A549 cell line exhibited high liver metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Yang, N; Sun, B; Jiang, Y; Hou, C; Ji, C; Zhang, Y; Liu, Y; Zuo, P

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapy. In present study, we identified a subpopulation of cells isolated from the A549 cell line with marker CD133. In vivo results showed that A549 CD133+ cells displayed high liver metastatic potential. Severe liver cell damage with tumor cell invasion revealed by pathological examination and these changes were consistent with the results of serological tests where the plasma GPT and GOT level are significantly higher than that of the control group. Compared with A549 cells, A549 CD133+ cells expressed high levels of VEGF and exhibited high migration and invasion capability. In conclusion, we first reported that A549 CD133+ cells exhibited characteristic of high liver metastatic potential which makes it be a suitable model for further study of liver metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma and provide a potential platform for anti-metastatic drug discovery or evaluation. PMID:24299311

  7. Canine osteosarcoma cells exhibit resistance to aurora kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cannon, C M; Pozniak, J; Scott, M C; Ito, D; Gorden, B H; Graef, A J; Modiano, J F

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the effect of Aurora kinase inhibitors AZD1152 and VX680 on canine osteosarcoma cells. Cytotoxicity was seen in all four cell lines; however, half-maximal inhibitory concentrations were significantly higher than in human leukaemia and canine lymphoma cells. AZD1152 reduced Aurora kinase B phosphorylation, indicating resistance was not because of failure of target recognition. Efflux mediated by ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters is one known mechanism of resistance against these drugs and verapamil enhanced AZD1152-induced apoptosis; however, these transporters were only expressed by a small percentage of cells in each line and the effects of verapamil were modest, suggesting other mechanisms contribute to resistance. Our results indicate that canine osteosarcoma cells are resistant to Aurora kinase inhibitors and suggest that these compounds are unlikely to be useful as single agents for this disease. Further investigation of these resistance mechanisms and the potential utility of Aurora kinase inhibitors in multi-agent protocols is warranted. PMID:23410058

  8. Sensitive fluorometric nanoparticle assays for cell counting and viability.

    PubMed

    Pihlasalo, Sari; Pellonperä, Lotta; Martikkala, Eija; Hänninen, Pekka; Härmä, Harri

    2010-11-15

    We have developed easy-to-use homogeneous methods utilizing time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and fluorescence quenching for quantification of eukaryotic cells. The methods rely on a competitive adsorption of cells and fluorescently labeled protein onto citrate-stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles or carboxylate-modified polystyrene nanoparticles doped with an Eu(III) chelate. In the gold nanoparticle sensor, the adsorption of the labeled protein to the gold nanoparticles leads to quenching of the fluorochrome. Eukaryotic cells reduce the adsorption of labeled protein to the gold particles increasing the fluorescence signal. In the Eu(III) nanoparticle sensor, the time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the nanoparticles and an acceptor-labeled protein is detected; a decrease in the magnitude of the time-resolved energy transfer signal (sensitized time-resolved fluorescence) is proportional to the cell-nanoparticle interaction and subsequent reduced adsorption of the labeled protein. Less than five cells were detected and quantified with the nanoparticle sensors in the homogeneous microtiter assay format with a coefficient of variation of 6% for the gold and 12% for the Eu(III) nanoparticle sensor. The Eu(III) nanoparticle sensor was also combined with a cell impermeable nucleic acid dye assay to measure cell viability in a single tube test with cell counts below 1000 cells/tube. This sensitive and easy-to-use nanoparticle sensor combined with a viability test for a low concentration of cells could potentially replace existing microscopic methods in biochemical laboratories. PMID:20954745

  9. Noninvasive assessment of magnetic nanoparticle-cancer cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Perreard, Irina; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Weaver, John B.

    2012-01-01

    The success of magnetic nanoparticle (mNP)-based diagnostic and therapeutic techniques is dependent upon how the mNP are distributed in vivo. The potential efficacy and timing of a given magnetic nanoparticle treatment or diagnostic test is largely determined by the number of nanoparticles in each tissue and microscopic compartment: e.g., in the intravascular and extravascular spaces, in the interstitial space, cell surface and in cell cytoplasm. Techniques for monitoring these cell-level interactions generally require the harvesting and destruction of tissues or cells at each time point of interest. We present a method (magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion, MSB) for longitudinally monitoring nanoparticle binding to cell surface proteins and uptake by cancer cells in vitro using the harmonics of the magnetization produced by the nanoparticles. These harmonics can be measured rapidly and noninvasively without the need for nanoparticle modifications and without damaging the cells. We demonstrate sensitivity of this harmonic signal to the nanoparticles’ microenvironment and use this technique to monitor the nanoparticle binding activities of different cell lines. PMID:22945022

  10. Hybrid silver nanoparticle/conjugated polyelectrolyte nanocomposites exhibiting controllable metal-enhanced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; He, Fang; Zhu, Xi; Tang, Fu; Li, Lidong

    2014-03-01

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence of conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPs) is realized using a simple, green hybrid Ag nanocomposite film. Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are pre-prepared by sodium citrate reduction and incorporated into agarose by mixing to form an Ag-containing agarose film (Ag@agarose). Through variation of the amount of Ag NPs in the Ag@agarose film as well as the thickness of the interlayer between CPs and the Ag@agarose film prepared of layer-by-layer assembly of chitosan and sodium alginate, a maximum 8.5-fold increase in the fluorescence of CPs is obtained. After introducing tyrosinase, this system also can be used to detect phenolic compounds with high sensitivity and good visualization under ultraviolet light.

  11. Abstract Nanoparticles are rapidly emerging as promising vehicles for next-generation therapeutic delivery. These highly mobile nanomaterials exhibit

    E-print Network

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    225 Abstract Nanoparticles are rapidly emerging as promising vehicles for next describes a unique tool for functional nanoparticle delivery, called the Nanofountain Probe of microfluidic tools developed to deliver nanoparticles is presented. We then focus on the function

  12. Trypsinization-dependent cell labeling with fluorescent nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Trypsin is often used to detach adhered cell subculture from a substrate. However, the proteolytic activity of trypsin may harm cells by cleaving the cell membrane proteins. The present study shows that cellular uptake of fluorescent nanoparticles is remarkably increased within 24 h after trypsinization. These results highlight the trypsin-induced protein digestion, provoking leaky cell plasma membrane which leads to the strongly enhanced cellular uptake of the nanoparticles. To prevent this effect, one should expose cells to the nanoparticle (NP)-based fluorescent labels at least 48 h after trypsinization. PMID:25328505

  13. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:25216521

  14. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2014-08-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:25216521

  15. Biocompatibility of various ferrite nanoparticles evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Hirukawa, Atsuo; Yamada, Tsutomu; Morishita, Shin; Takemura, Yasushi

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for thermotherapy must be biocompatible and possess high thermal efficiency as heating elements. The biocompatibility of Fe 3O 4 (20-30 nm), ZnFe 2O 4 (15-30 nm) and NiFe 2O 4 (20-30 nm) nanoparticles was studied using a cytotoxicity colony formation assay and a cell viability assay. The Fe 3O 4 sample was found to be biocompatible on HeLa cells. While ZnFe 2O 4 and NiFe 2O 4 were non-toxic at low concentrations, HeLa cells exhibited cytotoxic effects when exposed to concentrations of 100 ?g/ml nanoparticles.

  16. DNA-Assembled Nanoparticle Rings Exhibit Electric and Magnetic Resonances at Visible Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures can be used to manipulate light on the subwavelength scale to create tailored optical material properties. Next to electric responses, artificial optical magnetism is of particular interest but difficult to achieve at visible wavelengths. DNA-self-assembly has proved to serve as a viable method to template plasmonic materials with nanometer precision and to produce large quantities of metallic objects with high yields. We present here the fabrication of self-assembled ring-shaped plasmonic metamolecules that are composed of four to eight single metal nanoparticles with full stoichiometric and geometric control. Scattering spectra of single rings as well as absorption spectra of solutions containing the metamolecules are used to examine the unique plasmonic features, which are compared to computational simulations. We demonstrate that the electric and magnetic plasmon resonance modes strongly correlate with the exact shape of the structures. In particular, our computations reveal the magnetic plasmons only for particle rings of broken symmetries, which is consistent with our experimental data. We stress the feasibility of DNA self-assembly as a method to create bulk plasmonic materials and metamolecules that may be applied as building blocks in plasmonic devices. PMID:25611357

  17. DNA-assembled nanoparticle rings exhibit electric and magnetic resonances at visible frequencies.

    PubMed

    Roller, Eva-Maria; Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Fedoruk, Michael; Schreiber, Robert; Govorov, Alexander O; Liedl, Tim

    2015-02-11

    Metallic nanostructures can be used to manipulate light on the subwavelength scale to create tailored optical material properties. Next to electric responses, artificial optical magnetism is of particular interest but difficult to achieve at visible wavelengths. DNA-self-assembly has proved to serve as a viable method to template plasmonic materials with nanometer precision and to produce large quantities of metallic objects with high yields. We present here the fabrication of self-assembled ring-shaped plasmonic metamolecules that are composed of four to eight single metal nanoparticles with full stoichiometric and geometric control. Scattering spectra of single rings as well as absorption spectra of solutions containing the metamolecules are used to examine the unique plasmonic features, which are compared to computational simulations. We demonstrate that the electric and magnetic plasmon resonance modes strongly correlate with the exact shape of the structures. In particular, our computations reveal the magnetic plasmons only for particle rings of broken symmetries, which is consistent with our experimental data. We stress the feasibility of DNA self-assembly as a method to create bulk plasmonic materials and metamolecules that may be applied as building blocks in plasmonic devices. PMID:25611357

  18. Ginger phytochemicals exhibit synergy to inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Meera; Gundala, Sushma R.; Asif, Ghazia; Shamsi, Shahab A; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Dietary phytochemicals offer non-toxic therapeutic management as well as chemopreventive intervention for slow-growing prostate cancers. However, the limited success of several single-agent clinical trials suggest a paradigm shift that the health benefits of fruits and vegetables are not ascribable due to individual phytochemicals rather may be ascribed to but to synergistic interactions among them. We recently reported growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing properties of ginger extract (GE) in in vitro and in vivo prostate cancer models. Nevertheless, the nature of interactions among the constituent ginger biophenolics, viz. 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, and 6-shogoal, remains elusive. Here we show antiproliferative efficacy of the most-active GE biophenolics as single-agents and in binary combinations, and investigate the nature of their interactions using the Chou-Talalay combination-index (CI) method. Our data demonstrate that binary combinations of ginger phytochemicals synergistically inhibit proliferation of PC-3 cells with CI values ranging from 0.03-0.88. To appreciate synergy among phytochemicals present in GE, the natural abundance of ginger biophenolics was quantitated using LC-UV/MS. Interestingly, combining GE with its constituents (in particular, 6-gingerol) resulted in significant augmentation of GE’s antiproliferative activity. These data generate compelling grounds for further preclinical evaluation of GE alone and in combination with individual ginger biophenols for prostate cancer management. PMID:23441614

  19. Doxorubicin-loaded mesoporous magnetic nanoparticles to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yan; Liu, Pin; Liu, Chuan-He; Zhi, Xu-Ting

    2015-02-01

    Selective targeting of chemotherapeutic drugs toward the cancer cells overcomes the limitations involved in chemotherapy. Ideally, targeted delivery system holds great potential in cancer therapy due to specific release of drug in the cancer tissues. In this regard, DOX-loaded chitosan coated mesoporous magnetic nanoparticles (DOX-CMMN) were prepared and evaluated for its physicochemical and biological characteristics. Nanosized magnetic nanoparticles were observed with a high loading capacity for DOX. The drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibited a controlled and sustained release of drug without any burst release phenomenon. The DOX-DMMN showed a concentration-dependent cell proliferation inhibitory action against breast cancer cells. The blank nanoparticles showed excellent biocompatibility with cell viability >85% at the maximum tested concentration. Our results showed that chitosan coated magnetic system has high potential for breast cancer targeting under an alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The present study showed that magnetic nanoparticles can be targeted to tumor cells under the presence of oscillating magnetic field. The combined effect of chemotherapy and thermotherapy can have a promising clinical potential for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25661382

  20. Hsp70 as an indicator of stress in the cells after contact with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardilová, Šárka; Havrdová, Markéta; Paná?ek, Aleš; Kvítek, Libor; Zbo?il, Radek

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, production of nanoparticles is increased and thus grows our contact with them too. Question of safety is closely related to the issue of use nanoparticles. There are a number of tests that monitor the viability, ROS production, the effect on the DNA and cell cycle, however, rarely encountered studies on stress in the cells after contact with nanoparticles. Heat shock proteins (HSP) are among the substances that can be used for monitoring stress in cells. HSP are structures with a chaperone activity. They are evolutionarily very old, conservative and they are found with a high degree of homology in prokaryotes and eukaryotes including humans. They exist at low concentrations under physiological conditions, while in the denaturing conditions e.g. high or low temperature, radiation, exposure to chemicals, heavy metals, or nanoparticles their expression is changed. HSPs are involved in maintaining homeostasis in the cell that the denatured protein conformations allow recovery to the original stage. One of the most common proteins from HSP family is Hsp70 - protein with a molecular weight of 70 kDa. The level of Hsp70 in a cell after exposure to the stress changes depending on the stress level to which the cell is exposed to and a time period during which lasted stressful conditions. Our research monitors stress levels of cells manifesting by Hsp70 production after contact with silver nanoparticles. Nanoparticles show different toxicity towards different types of target cells, which is reflected in the values of IC50 - concentration that kills 50% tested cells. Concentration of test substance toxic to one cell type may be innocuous to cells of another type. IC50 obtained from the MTT assay provides a suitable default data and if multiples of IC50 values are used, we can compare and generalize. Studies can be used to compare stress levels in cells that show different sensitivity to the tested nanoparticles compared with cells under optimal growth conditions. The study was done on two types of mouse fibroblasts NIH-3T3 and L929. While NIH-3T3 cells exhibit stress response proportional to the concentration of silver nanoparticles, for L929 cells this was not observed.

  1. Polylactic acid nanoparticles targeted to brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wang Huafang; Hu Yu; Sun Wangqiang; Xie Changsheng

    2005-01-01

    Summary  In this work, blank polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles with unstained surface were prepared by the nano-deposition method.\\u000a On the basis of the preparation, the effect of surface modification on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) targeting\\u000a was examined byin vivo experiments and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that PLA nanoparticles are less toxic than PACA nanoparticles\\u000a but their BMECs targeting is

  2. Nanoparticle PEBBLE sensors in live cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    Live cell studies are of fundamental importance to the life sciences and their medical applications. Nanoparticle (NP)-based sensor platforms have many advantages as sensors for intracellular measurements, due to their flexible engineerability, noninvasive nature (due to their nano-size and nontoxic matrix), and, for some of the NPs, intrinsic optical properties. NP-based fluorescent sensors for intracellular measurements, so called PEBBLE sensors, have been developed for many important intracellular analytes and functions, including ions, small molecules, reactive oxygen species, physical properties, and enzyme activities, which are involved in many chemical, biochemical, and physical processes taking place inside the cell. PEBBLE sensors can be used with a standard microscope for simultaneous optical imaging of cellular structures and sensing of composition and function, just like investigations performed with molecular probes. However, PEBBLE sensors of any design and matrix can be delivered into cells by several standard methods, unlike dye molecules that need to be cell permeable. Furthermore, new sensing possibilities are enabled by PEBBLE nanosensors, which are not possible with molecular probes. This review summarizes a variety of designs of the PEBBLE sensors, their characteristics, and their applications to cells. PMID:22264547

  3. Gold nanoparticle-enhanced electroporation for leukemia cell transfection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuyan; Zu, Yingbo; Wang, Shengnian

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation serves as an attractive nonviral gene delivery approach for its effectiveness, operational simplicity, and no restrictions of probe or cell type. The commercial electroporation systems have been widely adopted in research and clinics with protocols usually compromising appropriate transfection efficiency and cell viability. By introducing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we demonstrated greatly enhanced performance of electroporation from two aspects: the highly conductive, naked AuNPs help reduce the potential drop consumed by the electroporation solution so that the majority of the applied voltage of an electric pulse is truly imposed on cells with enhanced field strength; AuNPs with targeting ligands (e.g., transferrin-AuNPs or Tf-AuNPs) are bound to the cell membrane, working as virtual microelectrodes to create pores on cells with limited opening area while from many different sites. The addition of AuNPs during electroporation therefore benefits not only quicker recovery and better survival of cells but also more efficient uptake of the subjected probes. Such enhancement was successfully confirmed on a chronic myeloid leukemia cell line (i.e., K562 cells) in both a commercial batch electroporation system and a homemade flow system with pWizGFP plasmid DNA probes. The efficiency was found to be dependent on the size, concentration, and mixing ratio of free AuNPs/Tf-AuNPs. An equivalent mixture of free AuNPs and Tf-AuNPs exhibited the best enhancement with the transfection efficiency increase of two to threefold at a minimum sacrifice of the cell viability. PMID:24510813

  4. Uptake and cytotoxicity of chitosan nanoparticles in human liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Jing Wen [Laboratory for Drug Delivery, Pharmacy, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, 6009 (Australia); Yeoh, George [School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, 6009 (Australia); Centre for Medical Research, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Nedlands, WA 6009 (Australia); Saunders, Martin [Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, 6009 (Australia); Lim, Lee-Yong, E-mail: limly@cyllene.uwa.edu.a [Laboratory for Drug Delivery, Pharmacy, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, 6009 (Australia); School of Biomedical, Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, 6009 (Australia)

    2010-12-01

    Despite extensive research into the biomedical and pharmaceutical applications of nanoparticles, and the liver being the main detoxifying organ in the human body, there are limited studies which delineate the hepatotoxicity of nanoparticles. This paper reports on the biological interactions between liver cells and chitosan nanoparticles, which have been widely recognised as biocompatible. Using the MTT assay, human liver cells were shown to tolerate up to 4 h of exposure to 0.5% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles (18 {+-} 1 nm, 7.5 {+-} 1.0 mV in culture medium). At nanoparticle concentrations above 0.5% w/v, cell membrane integrity was compromised as evidenced by leakage of alanine transaminase into the extracellular milieu, and there was a dose-dependent increase in CYP3A4 enzyme activity. Uptake of chitosan nanoparticles into the cell nucleus was observed by confocal microscopic analysis after 4 h exposure with 1% w/v of chitosan nanoparticles. Electron micrographs further suggest necrotic or autophagic cell death, possibly caused by cell membrane damage and resultant enzyme leakage.

  5. Plasmonic silver nanoparticles loaded titania nanotube arrays exhibiting enhanced photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishanthi, S. T.; Iyyapushpam, S.; Sundarakannan, B.; Subramanian, E.; Pathinettam Padiyan, D.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical anodization and photochemical reduction is employed to fabricate highly ordered silver loaded titania nanotubes (Ag/TNT) arrays. The Ag/TNT samples show an extended optical absorbance from UV to visible region owing to the surface plasmon resonance effect of Ag. The photoluminescence intensity of Ag/TNT is significantly lower than that of pure titania revealing a decrease in charge carrier recombination. The photoelectrochemical properties of the prepared samples are studied using linear sweep and transient photocurrent measurements. Compared with pure TNT, the Ag loaded samples show a higher photoelectrochemical activity. The results demonstrate an efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and the consequent increase in lifetime of charge carriers by Ag/TNT. The photocatalytic results of methyl orange dye degradation show that the Ag/TNT-3-05 sample exhibits the maximum degradation efficiency of 98.85% with kinetic rate constant of 0.0236(5) min-1 for 180 min light illumination.

  6. Fabrication of micropatterned arrays of gold nanoparticles for photothermal manipulation of living cells.

    PubMed

    Polleux, Julien; Baffou, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of micro/nanostructured surfaces functionalized with stimulus-responsive chemical groups proved to be an interesting approach to simultaneously confine cell adhesion and manipulate cell-substrate interactions down to the single cell level. However, reversibility of stimulus-triggered systems is often not possible or exhibits slow switching kinetics. In contrast to such setups, gold nanoparticles have the properties to efficiently and reversibly generate heat under illumination at their plasmon resonance band. Thus, photo-induced heating could be used to directly and locally interface living cells and dynamically tailor the interactions to their adhesive environment. In the present chapter, we will first detail the preparation of micropatterned and functionalized gold nanoparticles immobilized on glass coverslips, and then report how to reliably characterize the photothermal properties of such substrates that enable the dynamic manipulation of cells. PMID:24484663

  7. Endocytosis and exocytosis of nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Nuri; Park, Ji-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles that can be injected into the human body hold tremendous potential to detect and treat complex diseases. Understanding of the endocytosis and exocytosis mechanisms of nanoparticles is essential for safe and efficient therapeutic application. In particular, exocytosis is of significance in the removal of nanoparticles with drugs and contrast agents from the body, while endocytosis is of great importance for the targeting of nanoparticles in disease sites. Here, we review the recent research on the endocytosis and exocytosis of functionalized nanoparticles based on various sizes, shapes, and surface chemistries. We believe that this review contributes to the design of safe nanoparticles that can efficiently enter and leave human cells and tissues. PMID:24872703

  8. Size Effect of YSZ Nanoparticles on Sintering of Ni Nanoparticles in Ni/YSZ Anode of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell via Multi-Nanoparticle Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingxiang; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji

    2015-03-01

    Sintering of Ni nanoparticles leads to the degradation of a Ni/YSZ porous electrode of solid oxide fuel cell. We reported that the YSZ nanoparticle framework plays an important role in inhibition of sintering by using our multi-nanoparticle molecular dynamics simulation method. Size of YSZ nanoparticles affects the framework of YSZ nanoparticles and changes the sintering in Ni/YSZ porous structure. However, the mechanism of different sintering behavior by changing the size of YSZ nanoparticle has not been revealed. In this study, we used our multi-nanoparticle molecular dynamics simulation method to investigate the size effect of YSZ nanoparticles on the sintering of Ni nanoparticles in the Ni/YSZ porous structure. Then, Ni nanoparticles make contact with each other and the sintering proceeds by growth of contact area between Ni nanoparticles when YSZ nanoparticles are large. In contrast, the sintering of Ni nanoparticles is suppressed when YSZ nanoparticles are small. It is found that interfacial area between Ni and YSZ in the small YSZ nanoparticles model is larger than that in the large YSZ nanoparticles model. Thus, the movement of Ni nanoparticles is disturbed, and the sintering is inhibited.

  9. Size-dependent cytotoxicity of europium doped NaYF ? nanoparticles in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Zhang, Cuimiao; Jia, Guang; Duan, Jianlei; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2014-10-01

    Lanthanide-doped sodium yttrium fluoride (NaYF4) nanoparticles exhibit novel optical properties which make them be widely used in various fields. The extensive applications increase the chance of human exposure to these nanoparticles and thus raise deep concerns regarding their riskiness. In the present study, we have synthesized europium doped NaYF4 (NaYF4:Eu(3+)) nanoparticles with three diameters and used endothelial cells (ECs) as a cell model to explore the potential toxic effect. The cell viability, cytomembrane integrity, cellular uptake, intracellular localization, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), apoptosis detection, caspase-3 activity and expression of inflammatory gene were studied. The results indicated that these nanoparticles could be uptaken into ECs and decrease the cell viability, induce the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, increase the ROS level, and decrease the cell MMP in a size-dependent manner. Besides that, the cells were suffered to apoptosis with the caspase-3 activation, and the inflammation specific gene expressions (ICAM1 and VCAM1) were also increased. Our results suggest that the damage pathway may be related to the ROS generation and mitochondrial damage. The results provide novel evidence to elucidate their toxicity mechanisms and may be helpful for more rational applications of these compounds in the future. PMID:25175221

  10. Malaria ookinetes exhibit multiple markers for apoptosis-like programmed cell death in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shashini C Arambage; Karen M Grant; Ian Pardo; Lisa Ranford-Cartwright; Hilary Hurd

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A wide range of unicellular eukaryotes have now been shown to undergo a form of programmed cell death (PCD) that resembles apoptosis; exhibiting morphological and, in some cases, biochemical markers typical of metazoans. However, reports that sexual and asexual stages of malaria parasites exhibit these markers have been challenged. Here we use a rodent malaria model, Plasmodium berghei, to

  11. Biomineralization of iron phosphate nanoparticles in yeast cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen He; Weijia Zhou; Yingjun Wang; Xudong Zhang; Hongshi Zhao; Zhengmao Li; Shunpu Yan

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous iron phosphate nanoparticles mineralized in yeast cells are studied by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrograph and micro electrophoresis. Iron phosphate nanoparticles in yeast cells show uniform morphology with extensive surface roughness and disperse well. The size distribution of iron phosphate is about 50–200 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is used to analyze the chemical bond linkages between

  12. M-cell targeted biodegradable PLGA nanoparticles for oral immunization against hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prem N; Khatri, Kapil; Goyal, Amit K; Mishra, Neeraj; Vyas, Suresh P

    2007-12-01

    The transcytotic capability and expression of distinct carbohydrate receptors on the intestinal M-cells render it a potential portal for the targeted oral vaccine delivery. PLGA nanoparticles loaded with HBsAg were developed and antigen was stabilized by co-encapsulation of trehalose and Mg(OH)(2). Additionally, Ulex europaeus 1 (UEA-1) lectin was anchored to the nanoparticles to target them to M-cells of the peye's patches. The developed systems was characterized for shape, size, polydispersity index and loading efficiency. Bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) was used as a biological model for the in vitro determination of lectin activity and specificity. The targeting potential of the lectinized nanoparticles were determined by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) using dual staining technique. The immune stimulating potential was determined by measuring the anti-HBsAg titre in the serum of Balb/c mice orally immunized with various lectinized formulations and immune response was compared with the alum-HBsAg given intramuscularly. Induction of the mucosal immunity was assessed by estimating secretary IgA (sIgA) level in the salivary, intestinal and vaginal secretion. Additionally, cytokines (interleukin-2; IL-2 and interferon-gamma; IFN-gamma) level in the spleen homogenates was also determined. The results suggest that HBsAg can be successfully stabilized by co-encapsulation of protein stabilizers. The lectinized nanoparticles have demonstrated approximately 4-fold increase in the degree of interaction with the BSM as compared to plain nanoparticles and sugar specificity of the lectinized nanoparticles was also maintained. CLSM showed that lectinized nanoparticles were predominantly associated to M-cells. The serum anti-HBsAg titre obtained after oral immunization with HBsAg loaded stabilized lectinized nanoparticles was comparable with the titre recorded after alum-HBsAg given intramuscularly. The stabilized UEA-1 coupled nanopartilces exhibited enhanced immune response as compared to stabilized non-lectinized nanoparticles. Furthermore, the stabilized lectinized nanoparticles elicited sIgA in the mucosal secretion and IL-2 and IFN-gamma in the spleen homogenates. These stabilized lectinized nanoparticles could be a promising carrier-adjuvant for the targeted oral-mucosal immunization. PMID:18041638

  13. Dye-doped organosilicate nanoparticles as cell-preserving labels for photoacoustic signal generation.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I; Gutiérrez-Juárez Gerardo; Bok, Sangho; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Baker, Gary A; Polo-Parada, Luis

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound generation by pulsed laser or photoacoustic (PA) techniques has been employed in the study of several tissues both in vivo and in vitro. Among the many applications of this technology, the detection of few cells in vitro is of particular interest. However, the toxicity induced by laser irradiation used for PA signal generation, whether in the absence or the presence of PA enhancers, within single isolated cells has not yet been investigated in detail. Herein, we report our studies of the cellular health of two different nanoparticle-labeled cell lines one hour after being subjected to a single laser pulse in vitro. We selected for this study an Hs936 skin epithelial melanoma cell line, which can be naturally detected photoacoustically, as well as a T47D human mammary breast gland epithelial cell line which has proven difficult to detect photoacoustically due to the absence of natural melanin. We have evaluated the amplitude of the PA signal derived from these two cell types, unlabeled and labeled with nanoparticles of two types (gold nanoparticles, AuNPs, or rhodamine 6G-doped organosilicate nanoparticles, R6G-NPOs), and assessed their health one hour subsequent to laser treatment. The current work corroborates previous findings that, for unlabeled cells, Hs936 produces a detectable PA signal whereas the T47D line does not. Cells labeled with AuNPs or R6G-NPOs produced a detectable PA signal of similar amplitude for the two cell lines. A significant number of Hs936 cells (both unlabeled cells and those labeled with AuNPs) exhibited cell nuclei alterations, as revealed by DAPI staining conducted an hour after photo treatment. Remarkably, the T47D cells suffered damage only when labeled with AuNPs. A significant finding, the R6G-NPOs proved capable of non-destructive PA signal generation in both cell types. Our findings advocate a transformational path forward for the use of dye-doped silicate nanoparticles in cell-compatible PA studies permitting the handling and culturing of cells subsequent to their photoacoustic analysis. PMID:26000392

  14. Nanoparticles for gene transfer to human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Green, Jordan J; Zhou, Betty Y; Mitalipova, Maisam M; Beard, Caroline; Langer, Robert; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Anderson, Daniel G

    2008-10-01

    We develop biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles to facilitate nonviral gene transfer to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Small (approximately 200 nm), positively charged (approximately 10 mV) particles are formed by the self assembly of cationic, hydrolytically degradable poly(beta-amino esters) and plasmid DNA. By varying the end group of the polymer, we can tune the biophysical properties of the resulting nanoparticles and their gene-delivery efficacy. We created an OCT4-driven GFP hES cell line to allow the rapid identification of nanoparticles that facilitate gene transfer while maintaining an hESC undifferentiated state. Using this cell system, we synthesized nanoparticles that have gene delivery efficacy that is up to 4 times higher than that of the leading commercially available transfection agent, Lipofectamine 2000. Importantly, these materials have minimal toxicity and do not adversely affect hESC colony morphology or cause nonspecific differentiation. PMID:18754690

  15. Delivering nanoparticles to lungs while avoiding liver and spleen through adsorption on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gupta, Vivek; Zern, Blaine J; Pan, Daniel; Zakrewsky, Michael; Muzykantov, Vladimir; Mitragotri, Samir

    2013-12-23

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are one of the most widely investigated approaches for developing novel therapies for a variety of diseases. However, rapid clearance and poor targeting limit their clinical utility. Here, we describe an approach to harness the flexibility, circulation, and vascular mobility of red blood cells (RBCs) to simultaneously overcome these limitations (cellular hitchhiking). A noncovalent attachment of nanoparticles to RBCs simultaneously increases their level in blood over a 24 h period and allows transient accumulation in the lungs, while reducing their uptake by liver and spleen. RBC-adsorbed nanoparticles exhibited ?3-fold increase in blood persistence and ?7-fold higher accumulation in lungs. RBC-adsorbed nanoparticles improved lung/liver and lung/spleen nanoparticle accumulation by over 15-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Accumulation in lungs is attributed to mechanical transfer of particles from the RBC surface to lung endothelium. Independent tracing of both nanoparticles and RBCs in vivo confirmed that RBCs themselves do not accumulate in lungs. Attachment of anti-ICAM-1 antibody to the exposed surface of NPs that were attached to RBCs led to further increase in lung targeting and retention over 24 h. Cellular hitchhiking onto RBCs provides a new platform for improving the blood pharmacokinetics and vascular delivery of nanoparticles while simultaneously avoiding uptake by liver and spleen, thus opening the door for new applications. PMID:24182189

  16. Bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjiao; Zheng, Yang; You, Shusen; Wang, Feng; Gao, Zhuo; Shen, Jie; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2015-03-11

    A new type of bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent Fe3O4@SiO2-PDI-PAA/Ca(2+) nanoparticles has been prepared by coating PDI-cored star polymers (PDI-PAA) onto the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanostructures. The morphology and properties of the composite nanoparticles are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, fluorescence spectrometry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The composite nanoparticles display a strong red emission and superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. The cell viability and uptake assays reveal good biocompatibility of these hybrid nanoparticles. Hence, the composite nanoparticles are of potential to be further explored as therapeutic vector in biomedical field. PMID:25691125

  17. The effects of nanoparticles uptaken by cells on electrorotation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Cheng-Hsin; Hsu, You-Ming; Yeh, Chen-Che

    2009-05-01

    Electrorotation (ER) has become a very powerful diagnostic technique for the measurement of dielectric properties of cells. However, only a few papers have investigated the electric-induced rotation of particles in a stationary alternating (AC) electric field instead of a rotating electric field. In this study, a microchip composed of a top-grounded electrode, flow chamber and bottom chess-type electrode arrays was used to construct a stationary non-uniform AC electric field for the manipulation of cells by dielectrophoretic force. We focused on the effects of metal and dielectric nanoparticles uptaken by cells under ER, by using human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60), 13 nm Au and 19 nm SiO(2) nanoparticles. As revealed by the experimental results, both the percentage of cells in rotation and the range of rotational (ROT) frequency for the uptake of Au nanoparticle cells were higher and wider than in the case of SiO(2) nanoparticles. In addition, the rotation of lone cells and pearl-chain cells under non-uniform and uniform electric field were quantitatively investigated, respectively. The membrane capacitance and membrane conductance of HL-60 cells can be extracted from the ROT spectra as 10.18+/-1.92 mF/m(2) and 1500+/-321 S/m(2), respectively. In general, the ER of cells in a stationary AC electric field can be attributed to the highly non-uniform electric field and non-uniform dispersion of nanoparticles within cells; therefore, the electrical properties of uptaken nanoparticles and the aggregation phenomenon have significant influences on the resulting electrical torque. PMID:19350546

  18. Metal nanoparticles amplify photodynamic effect on skin cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Brigitte; Chen, Si; Käll, Mikael; Gunnarsson, Linda; Ericson, Marica B.

    2011-03-01

    We report on an investigation aimed to increase the efficiency of photodynamic therapy (PDT) through the influence of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR's) in metal nanoparticles. PDT is based on photosensitizers that generate singlet oxygen at the tumour site upon exposure to visible light. Although PDT is a well-established treatment for skin cancer, a major drawback is the low quantum yield for singlet-oxygen production. This motivates the development of novel methods that enhance singlet oxygen generation during treatment. In this context, we study the photodynamic effect on cultured human skin cells in the presence or absence of gold nanoparticles with well established LSPR and field-enhancement properties. The cultured skin cells were exposed to protoporphyrin IX and gold nanoparticles and subsequently illuminated with red light. We investigated the differences in cell viability by tuning different parameters, such as incubation time and light dose. In order to find optimal parameters for specific targeting of tumour cells, we compared normal human epidermal keratinocytes with a human squamous skin cancer cell line. The study indicates significantly enhanced cell death in the presence of nanoparticles and important differences in treatment efficiency between normal and tumour cells. These results are thus promising and clearly motivate further development of nanoparticle enhanced clinical PDT treatment.

  19. Bisphosphonamidate Clodronate Prodrug Exhibits Selective Cytotoxic Activity Against Melanoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Marie R.; Kamat, Chandrashekhar; Connis, Nick; Zhao, Ming; Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Hann, Christine L.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are used clinically to treat disorders of calcium metabolism and malignant bone disease and are known to inhibit cancer cell growth, adhesion, and invasion. However, clinical use of these agents for the treatment of extraskeletal disease is limited due to low cell permeability. We recently described a bisphosphonamidate prodrug strategy for efficient intracellular release of bisphosphonates, including clodronate (CLO), in NSCLC cells. To evaluate anticancer activity of this prodrug class across many cancer cell types, the bisphosphonamidate clodronate prodrug (CLO prodrug) was screened against the NCI-60 cell line panel, and was found to exhibit selectivity toward melanoma cell lines. Here, we confirm efficient cellular uptake and intracellular activation of this prodrug class in melanoma cells. We further demonstrate inhibition of melanoma cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and an anti-tumor effect of CLO prodrug in a xenograft model. These data suggest a novel therapeutic application for the CLO prodrug and potential to selectively target melanoma cells. PMID:24310621

  20. Distinct Stem Cells Subpopulations Isolated from Human Adipose Tissue Exhibit Different Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation Potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tommaso Rada; Rui L. Reis; Manuela E. Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Recently adipose tissue has become a research topic also for the\\u000d\\u000a searching for an alternative stem cells source to use in cell based\\u000d\\u000a therapies such as tissue engineer. In fact Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs)\\u000d\\u000a exhibit an important differentiation potential for several cell lineages\\u000d\\u000a such as chondrogenic, osteogenic, myogenic, adipogenic and endothelial\\u000d\\u000a cells. ASCs populations isolated using standard methodologies (i.e.,\\u000d\\u000a based

  1. Nanogel-quantum dot hybrid nanoparticles for live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Urara [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10, Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Center of Excellence Program for Frontier Research on Molecular Destruction and Reconstruction of Tooth and Bone, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10, Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Nomura, Shin-ichiro M. [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10, Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Center of Excellence Program for Frontier Research on Molecular Destruction and Reconstruction of Tooth and Bone, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10, Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Kaul, Sunil C. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Hirano, Takashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Akiyoshi, Kazunari [Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10, Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); Center of Excellence Program for Frontier Research on Molecular Destruction and Reconstruction of Tooth and Bone, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 2-3-10, Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062 (Japan); E-mail: akiyoshi.org@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    We report here a novel carrier of quantum dots (QDs) for intracellular labeling. Monodisperse hybrid nanoparticles (38 nm in diameter) of QDs were prepared by simple mixing with nanogels of cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHP) modified with amino groups (CHPNH{sub 2}). The CHPNH{sub 2}-QD nanoparticles were effectively internalized into the various human cells examined. The efficiency of cellular uptake was much higher than that of a conventional carrier, cationic liposome. These hybrid nanoparticles could be a promising fluorescent probe for bioimaging.

  2. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D cell culture. PMID:25595712

  3. Biogenic magnetic nanoparticles from Burkholderia sp. YN01 exhibiting intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and their applications.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Li, Na; Mu, Jianshuai; Zhou, Runhong; Xu, Yan; Cui, Daizong; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    A novel bacterial strain containing biogenic magnetic nanoparticles (BMNPs) was isolated from the sediments of Songhua River in Harbin, China, and was identified as Burkholderia sp. YN01. Extracted BMNPs from YN01 were characterized as pure face-centered cubic Fe3O4 with an average size of 80 nm through transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The hysteresis parameters of the BMNP samples such as Bc and Bcr and ratios Mrs/Ms were deduced as 35.6 mT, 43.2 mT, and 0.47, respectively, indicating that the BMNPs exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior. This is the first report concerning on biogenic Fe3O4 NPs produced in Burkholderia genus. Significantly, the BMNPs were proved to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity that could catalyze the oxidation of peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2. Kinetic analysis indicates that the catalytic behavior is in accord with typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics and follows ping-pong mechanism. The catalytic constants (K cat) were 6.5?×?10(4) s(-1) and 0.78?×?10(4) s(-1) with H2O2 and TMB as substrate, respectively, which was higher than that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy experiments showed that the BMNPs could catalyze H2O2 to produce hydroxyl radicals. The origin of peroxidase-like activity is also associated with their ability to transfer electron between electrode and H2O2 according to an electrochemical study. As a novel peroxidase mimetic, the BMNPs were employed to offer a simple, sensitive, and selective colorimetric method for H2O2 and glucose determination, and the BMNPs could efficiently catalyze the degradation of phenol and Congo red dye. PMID:25030455

  4. Targeted optical injection of gold nanoparticles into single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Craig; Stevenson, David J; Brown, Christian T A; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2009-12-01

    We present an all optical technique for the targeted delivery of single 100 nm diameter gold nanoparticles into a specified region of the interior of an individual mammalian cell through a combination of optical tweezing and optical injection. The internalisation of the nanoparticle is verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy and confocal laser scanning reflectance microscopy. This represents the first time that nano sized particles have been tweezed and optically injected into mammalian cells using only light, and provides a novel methodology for internalising nanosphere based biosensors within specific intracellular regions of a mammalian cell. PMID:19603388

  5. Au-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles exhibiting strong charge-transfer-induced SERS for recyclable SERS-active substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping; Yang, Haitao; Ren, Xiao; Tang, Jin; Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Xiangqun; Cheng, Zhaohua

    2015-03-01

    Flower-shaped Au-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles have been prepared via seeding growth and subsequent wet-chemical etching of Au-ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The etched Au-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles have shown a stronger surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of the nontotally symmetric (b2) vibrational modes of PATP molecules than Au nanoparticles alone, which is attributed to the chemical enhancement effect of the ZnO layer which is greatly excited by the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Au cores. Further, the mechanism of the LSPR-enhanced charge transfer (CT) effect has been proved by the SERS spectra of PATP molecules excited using different laser sources from 325 to 785 nm. Moreover, the photocatalytic experimental results indicated that Au-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles are promising as biologically compatible and recyclable SERS-active platforms for different molecular species.Flower-shaped Au-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles have been prepared via seeding growth and subsequent wet-chemical etching of Au-ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The etched Au-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles have shown a stronger surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of the nontotally symmetric (b2) vibrational modes of PATP molecules than Au nanoparticles alone, which is attributed to the chemical enhancement effect of the ZnO layer which is greatly excited by the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Au cores. Further, the mechanism of the LSPR-enhanced charge transfer (CT) effect has been proved by the SERS spectra of PATP molecules excited using different laser sources from 325 to 785 nm. Moreover, the photocatalytic experimental results indicated that Au-ZnO hybrid nanoparticles are promising as biologically compatible and recyclable SERS-active platforms for different molecular species. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00491h

  6. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheng, Lin; Huang, Yue-wern; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Ma, Yinfa

    2006-12-31

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 ?g/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, ?-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 ?g/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and ?-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

  7. Investigation of Biophysical Mechanisms in Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Manipulation of Cells Using a Multimodal Holographic and Fluorescence Imaging Setup

    PubMed Central

    Rakoski, Mirko S.; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin) served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy. PMID:25909631

  8. Performance enhancement of polymer solar cells using copper oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninayake, Aruna P.; Gunashekar, Subhashini; Li, Shengyi; Church, Benjamin C.; Abu-Zahra, Nidal

    2015-06-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) is a p-type semiconductor with a band gap energy of 1.5 eV, this is close to the ideal energy gap of 1.4 eV required for solar cells to allow good solar spectral absorption. The inherent electrical characteristics of CuO nanoparticles make them attractive candidates for improving the performance of polymer solar cells when incorporated into the active polymer layer. The UV-visible absorption spectra and external quantum efficiency of P3HT/PC70BM solar cells containing different weight percentages of CuO nanoparticles showed a clear enhancement in the photo absorption of the active layer, this increased the power conversion efficiency of the solar cells by 24% in comparison to the reference cell. The short circuit current of the reference cell was found to be 5.234 mA cm?2 and it seemed to increase to 6.484 mA cm?2 in cells containing 0.6 mg of CuO NPs; in addition, the fill factor increased from 61.15% to 68.0%, showing an enhancement of 11.2%. These observations suggest that the optimum concentration of CuO nanoparticles was 0.6 mg in the active layer. These significant findings can be applied to design high-efficiency polymer solar cells containing inorganic nanoparticles.

  9. Cell uptake enhancement of folate targeted polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Licciardi, Mariano; Scialabba, Cinzia; Cavallaro, Gennara; Sangregorio, Claudio; Fantechi, Elvira; Giammona, Gaetano

    2013-06-01

    Dual targeted drug delivery systems represent a potential platform for developing efficient vector to tumor sites. In this study we evaluated a folate- and magnetic-targeted nanocarriers based on 10 nm iron oxide nanodomais coated with the properly synthesized and characterized folic acid (FA)-functionalized amphiphilic copolymer PHEA-PLA-PEG-FA. FA was chemically conjugated to one end of diamino-polyethylene glycol of 2000 Da, in order to ensure its exposition on the polymer coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs-FA). The prepared nanoparticles have been exhaustively characterized by different methods, including DLS, SEM, FT-IR and magnetic measurements. Magnetic nanoparticles showed dimension of about 37 nm with a narrow size distribution and a characteristic superparamagnetic behaviour. The lack of cytotoxicity of MNPs-FA and MNPs was assessed both on MCF7 cells, used as a model tumor cell line, and on 16HBE, used as normal human cell model, by evaluating cell viability using MTS assay, while the preferential internalization of MNPs-FA into tumor cells rather that into normal cells was confirmed by the quantization of internalized iron oxide. Uptake studies were also performed in the presence of a permanent magnet in order to verify the synergistic effect of magnetic field in enhancing the internalization of magnetic nanoparticles. Finally, real-time confocal microscopy experiments were carried out to further confirmed that FA ligand enhances the MNPs-FA accumulation into cancer cell cytoplasm. PMID:23858959

  10. Three-dimensional hydrogel constructs for exposing cells to nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Elisabeth; Oreskovic, Tammy L; Rentz, Nikki S; Jeerage, Kavita M

    2014-06-01

    In evaluating nanoparticle risks to human health, there is often a disconnect between results obtained from in vitro toxicology studies and those from in vivo activity, prompting the need for improved methods to rapidly assess the hazards of engineered nanomaterials. In vitro studies of nanoparticle toxicology often rely on high doses and short exposure periods due to the difficulty of maintaining monolayer cell cultures over extended time periods as well as the difficulty of maintaining nanoparticle dispersions within the culture environment. In this work, tissue-engineered constructs are investigated as a platform for providing doses of nanoparticles over different exposure periods to cells within a three-dimensional environment that can be tuned to mimic in vivo conditions. Uptake of quantum dots (QDs) by model neural cells was first investigated in a high-dose exposure scenario, resulting in a strong concentration-dependent uptake of carboxyl-functionalised QDs. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel scaffolds with varying mesh sizes were then investigated for their ability to support cell survival and proliferation. Cells were co-encapsulated with carboxyl-functionalised poly(ethylene glycol)-coated QDs at a lower dose than is typical for monolayer cultures. Although the QDs leach from the hydrogel within 24 h, they are also incorporated by cells within the scaffold, enabling the use of these constructs in future studies of cell behaviour and function. PMID:23611448

  11. A Cell-Based Model Exhibiting Branching and Anastomosis during Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis

    E-print Network

    Jiang, Yi

    . Numerical simulations show: 1), different tumor-secreted pro-angiogenic factor gradient profiles therapies for treat- ing cancer and other angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Tumor-induced angiogenesisA Cell-Based Model Exhibiting Branching and Anastomosis during Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis Amy L

  12. Synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles for tracking of stem cells and dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Sebastian; Fernandes, Fabiana; Sanroman, Laura; Hodenius, Michael; Lang, Claus; Himmelreich, Uwe; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Schueler, Dirk; Hoehn, Mathias; Zenke, Martin; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Accurate delivery of cells to target organs is critical for success of cell-based therapies with stem cells or immune cells such as antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC). Labeling with contrast agents before implantation provides a powerful means for monitoring cellular migration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we investigated the uptake of fully synthesized or bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into hematopoietic Flt3 + stem cells and DC from mouse bone marrow. We show that (i) uptake of both synthetic and biogenic nanoparticles into cells endow magnetic activity and (ii) low numbers of MNP-loaded cells are readily detected by MRI.

  13. Synergistic enhancement effect of magnetic nanoparticles on anticancer drug accumulation in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renyun; Wang, Xuemei; Wu, Chunhui; Song, Min; Li, Jingyuan; Lv, Gang; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Chen; Dai, Yongyuan; Gao, Feng; Fu, Degang; Li, Xiaomao; Guan, Zhiqun; Chen, Baoan

    2006-07-01

    Three kinds of magnetic nanoparticle, tetraheptylammonium capped nanoparticles of Fe3O4, Fe2O3 and Ni have been synthesized, and the synergistic effect of these nanoparticles on the drug accumulation of the anticancer drug daunorubicin in leukaemia cells has been explored. Our observations indicate that the enhancement effect of Fe3O4 nanoparticles is much stronger than that of Fe2O3 and Ni nanoparticles, suggesting that nanoparticle surface chemistry and size as well as the unique properties of the magnetic nanoparticles themselves may contribute to the synergistic enhanced effect of the drug uptake of targeted cancer cells.

  14. Toxicity of Calcium Hydroxide Nanoparticles on Murine Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Azadnia, Sina; Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major contributing factors, which may cause failure of endodontic treatment, is the presence of residual microorganisms in the root canal system. For years, most dentists have been using calcium hydroxide (CH) as the intracanal medicament between treatment sessions to eliminate remnant microorganisms. Reducing the size of CH particles into nanoparticles enhances the penetration of this medicament into dentinal tubules and increases their antimicrobial efficacy. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles and conventional CH on fibroblast cell line using the Mosmann’s Tetrazolium Toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on L929 murine fibroblast cell line by cell culture and evaluation of the direct effect of materials on the cultured cells. Materials were evaluated in two groups of 10 samples each at 24, 48 and 72 h. At each time point, 10 samples along with 5 positive and 5 negative controls were evaluated. The samples were transferred into tubes and exposed to fibroblast cells. The viability of cells was then evaluated. The Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Cytotoxicity of both materials decreased over time and for conventional CH was lower than that of nanoparticles. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles was similar to that of conventional CH. PMID:25598810

  15. Monitoring lysosomal activity in nanoparticle-treated cells.

    PubMed

    Neun, Barry W; Stern, Stephan T

    2011-01-01

    Certain nanoparticles have been shown to accumulate within lysosome and hence may cause lysosomal pathologies such as phospholipidosis, lysosomal overload, and autophagy. This chapter describes a method for evaluation of lysosomal activity in porcine kidney cells (LLC-PK1) after exposure to nanoparticles. This method uses the accumulation of a cationic fluorescent dye (LysoTracker Red) in acidic cellular compartments as an indicator of total lysosome content. The lysotracker signal is normalized to the signal from a thiol-reactive dye which is proportional to the total number of viable cells. PMID:21116970

  16. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  17. Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: Opportunity for magnetic cell imaging and cell manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial describes a method of controlled cell labeling with citrate-coated ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell detection by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to enable potential magnetic manipulation. In order to efficiently exploit labeled cells, quantify the magnetic load and deliver or follow-up magnetic cells, we herein describe the main requirements that should be applied during the labeling procedure. Moreover we present some recommendations for cell detection and quantification by MRI and detail magnetic guiding on some real-case studies in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24564857

  18. Amino-functionalized nanoparticles as inhibitors of mTOR and inducers of cell cycle arrest in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Loos, Cornelia; Syrovets, Tatiana; Musyanovych, Anna; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Simmet, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been implicated in anticancer drug resistance, type 2 diabetes, and aging. Here, we show that surface functionalization of polystyrene nanoparticles with amino groups (PS-NH2), but not with carboxyl groups (PS-COOH), induces G2 cell-cycle arrest and inhibition of proliferation in three leukemia cell lines. Besides, PS-NH2 inhibit angiogenesis and proliferation of leukemia cells xenografted onto the chick chorioallantoic membrane. At the molecular level, PS-NH2 inhibit, whereas PS-COOH activate mTOR signaling in leukemia cells. Consistently, PS-NH2 block activation of the mTOR downstream targets, Akt and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1, and induce overexpression of the cell-cycle regulator p21(Cip1/Waf1) and degradation of cyclin B1. After addition, both types of particles rapidly induce autophagy in leukemia cells. Yet, only in PS-NH2-treated cells, acidic vesicular organelles show elevated pH and impaired processing of procathepsin B. Moreover, solely in PS-NH2-treated cells, autophagy is followed by permeabilization of acidic vesicular organelles and induction of apoptosis. By contrast, primary macrophages, which do not exhibit activated mTOR signaling, proved relatively resistant to PS-NH2-induced toxicity. These data indicate that functionalized nanoparticles can be used to control activation of mTOR signaling pathways, and to influence proliferation and viability of malignant cells. PMID:24331713

  19. Nanoparticles blast cancerous cells with killer drugs | KurzweilAI http://www.kurzweilai.net/nanoparticles-blast-cancerous-cells-with-killer-drugs[5/2/2011 12:14:51 PM

    E-print Network

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Nanoparticles blast cancerous cells with killer drugs | KurzweilAI http://www.kurzweilai.net/nanoparticles-blast-cancerous-cells-with-killer-drugs[5/2/2011 12:14:51 PM] You are here: Home News Nanoparticles blast cancerous cells with killer drugs News ALL NEWS Confirm Like You like Nanoparticles blast cancerous cells with killer drugs | Kurzweil

  20. Particle-Cell Contact Enhances Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Ivask, Angela; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kurvet, Imbi; Kahru, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that antibacterial properties of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) are dictated by their dissolved fraction. However, dissolution-based concept alone does not fully explain the toxic potency of nanoparticulate silver compared to silver ions. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we demonstrated that the direct contact between bacterial cell and AgNPs' surface enhanced the toxicity of nanosilver. More specifically, cell-NP contact increased the cellular uptake of particle-associated Ag ions – the single and ultimate cause of toxicity. To prove that, we evaluated the toxicity of three different AgNPs (uncoated, PVP-coated and protein-coated) to six bacterial strains: Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. putida and P. aeruginosa and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. While the toxicity of AgNO3 to these bacteria varied only slightly (the 4-h EC50 ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 mg Ag/l), the 4-h EC50 values of protein-coated AgNPs for various bacterial strains differed remarkably, from 0.35 to 46 mg Ag/l. By systematically comparing the intracellular and extracellular free Ag+ liberated from AgNPs, we demonstrated that not only extracellular dissolution in the bacterial test environment but also additional dissolution taking place at the particle-cell interface played an essential role in antibacterial action of AgNPs. The role of the NP-cell contact in dictating the antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs was additionally proven by the following observations: (i) separation of bacterial cells from AgNPs by particle-impermeable membrane (cut-off 20 kDa, ?4 nm) significantly reduced the toxicity of AgNPs and (ii) P. aeruginosa cells which tended to attach onto AgNPs, exhibited the highest sensitivity to all forms of nanoparticulate Ag. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provide new insights into the mode of antibacterial action of nanosilver and explain some discrepancies in this field, showing that “Ag-ion” and “particle-specific” mechanisms are not controversial but, rather, are two faces of the same coin. PMID:23737965

  1. Comparative cytotoxicity of Al2O3, CeO2, TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles to human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Sun; Baek, Miri; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2010-05-01

    The increased applications of nanoparticles in a wide range of industrial fields raise the concern about their potential toxicity to human. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the toxicity of four different oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3, CeO2, TiO2 and ZnO) to human lung epithelial cells, A549 carcinoma cells and L-132 normal cells, in vitro. We focused on the toxicological effects of the present nanoparticles on cell proliferation, cell viability, membrane integrity and oxidative stress. The long-term cytotoxicity of nanoparticles was also evaluated by employing the clonogenic assay. Among four nanoparticles tested, ZnO exhibited the highest cytotoxicity in terms of cell proliferation, cell viability, membrane integrity and colony formation in both cell lines. Al2O3, CeO2 and TiO2 showed little adverse effects on cell proliferation and cell viability. However, TiO2 induced oxidative stress in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. CeO2 caused membrane damage and inhibited colony formation in long-term, but with different degree depending on cell lines. Al2O3 seems to be less toxic than the other nanoparticles even after long time exposure. These results highlight the need for caution during manufacturing process of nanomaterials as well as further investigation on the toxicity mechanism. PMID:20358977

  2. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zi, Xiao-Yuan; Su, Juan; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Xin-Rong; Zhu, Hai-Ying; Li, Jian-Xiu; Yin, Meng; Yang, Feng; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy. PMID:22679374

  3. Antibiotic-induced bacterial cell death exhibits physiological and biochemical hallmarks of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Daniel J; Camacho, Diogo M; Kohanski, Michael A; Callura, Jarred M; Collins, James J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Programmed cell death is a gene-directed process involved in the development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. The most common mode of programmed cell death is apoptosis, which is characterized by a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological hallmarks. Here we report that Escherichia coli also exhibit characteristic markers of apoptosis – including phosphatidylserine exposure, chromosome condensation and DNA fragmentation – when faced with cell death-triggering stress, namely bactericidal antibiotic treatment. Notably, we also provide proteomic and genetic evidence for the ability of multifunctional RecA to bind peptide sequences that serve as substrates for eukaryotic caspases, and regulation of this phenotype by the protease, ClpXP, under conditions of cell death. Our findings illustrate that prokaryotic organisms possess mechanisms to dismantle and mark dying cells in response to diverse noxious stimuli, and suggest that elaborate, multilayered proteolytic regulation of these features may have evolved in eukaryotes to harness and exploit their deadly potential. PMID:22633370

  4. BTLA exhibits immune memory for ?? T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Lin, Dong-Zi; Yi, Lai-Long; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wan-Dang; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wu, Xian-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Chen, Zheng W; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Despite past extensive studies, the role of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) in ?? T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB) remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that BTLA expression on ?? T cells is decreased in patients with M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Particularly, BTLA expression levels are likely critical for ?? T cells to manifest and maintain an active central memory phenotype with high capacity for secretion of IFN-? and perforin, which are important for immune memory against TB infection. BTLAhigh ?? T cells also exhibited higher capacity in response to Mtb peptide stimulation. In contrast to the role of BTLA played for negative regulation of immune responses, our data in the current studies suggest that BTLA expression on ?? T cells is likely associated with protective immune memory against Mtb infection in the setting of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. This previous unappreciated role for BTLA may have implications for prevention and treatment of patients with Mtb infection. PMID:25360214

  5. Protamine sulfate-nanodiamond hybrid nanoparticles as a vector for MiR-203 restoration in esophageal carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minjun; Deng, Xiongwei; Su, Shishuai; Zhang, Fang; Xiao, Xiangqian; Hu, Qin; Fu, Yongwei; Yang, Burton B.; Wu, Yan; Sheng, Wang; Zeng, Yi

    2013-11-01

    We report an innovative approach for miRNA-203 delivery in esophageal cancer cells using protamine sulphate (PS)-nanodiamond (ND) nanoparticles. The efficient delivery of miR-203 significantly suppressed the proliferation and migration of cancer cells through targeting Ran and ?Np63, exhibiting a great potential for PS@ND nanoparticles in miRNA-based cancer therapy.We report an innovative approach for miRNA-203 delivery in esophageal cancer cells using protamine sulphate (PS)-nanodiamond (ND) nanoparticles. The efficient delivery of miR-203 significantly suppressed the proliferation and migration of cancer cells through targeting Ran and ?Np63, exhibiting a great potential for PS@ND nanoparticles in miRNA-based cancer therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (1) Experimental section; (2) Results: serum stability of miR-203/PS@NDs and miR-203 release curve (Fig. S1). Cytotoxicity assay of PS@NDs to Ec-109 cells (Fig. S2); confocal image and FACS analysis of intracellular uptake of cy3-labeled miR-203 (Fig. S3 and S4); real-time PCR analysis of miR-203 restoration (Fig. S5); Ran and ?Np63 expression (Fig. S6); the sizes and zeta potentials of miRNA/PS@NDs (Table S1); the sequences of the microRNA mimics and primers (Table S2, S3 and S4). See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04056a

  6. Internalization of Nanoparticles into Spiral Ganglion Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malin Anderson; A. H. Johnston; T. A. Newman; P. D. Dalton; Helge Rask-Andersen

    2008-01-01

    The delivery of drugs or genes to the inner ear in a controlled and biocompatible manner could lead to new treat- ments for conditions such as Ménière's disease, tinnitus, schwannomas of the ear, and for improving hearing. The concept of multifunctional nanoparticles, which are targetable, biodegradable, and traceable, has led to new approaches to controlled drug release and localized delivery

  7. Crocin Exhibits Antitumor Effects on Human Leukemia HL-60 Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Xu, Hui-Juan; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Wang, Ling-Zhen; Sun, Li-Rong; Wang, Zhi; Sun, Xiu-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Crocin is a carotenoid of the saffron extract that exhibits antitumor activity against many human tumors. However, the effects of crocin on HL-60 cells in vivo have not been evaluated. This study aimed to examine the effects of crocin on HL-60 cells in vitro and in vivo and investigate the underlying mechanisms. HL-60 cells were treated by crocin, and cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle profiles were examined by MTT assay, AO/EB staining, and flow cytometry, respectively. Furthermore, HL-60 cells were xenografted into nude mice and treated by crocin, the tumor weight and size were calculated, and the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in xenografts was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The results showed that crocin (0.625-5?mg/mL) inhibited HL-60 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, in a concentration and time-dependent manner. In addition, crocin (6.25, 25?mg/kg) inhibited the tumor weight and size of HL-60 xenografts in nude mice, inhibited Bcl-2 expression, and increased Bax expression in xenografts. In summary, crocin inhibits the proliferation and tumorigenicity of HL-60 cells, which may be mediated by the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax expression. PMID:23573146

  8. Geminin-Deficient Neural Stem Cells Exhibit Normal Cell Division and Normal Neurogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn M. Schultz; Ghazal Banisadr; Ruben O. Lastra; Tammy McGuire; John A. Kessler; Richard J. Miller; Thomas J. McGarry; Cesario Borlongan

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are the progenitors of neurons and glial cells during both embryonic development and adult life. The unstable regulatory protein Geminin (Gmnn) is thought to maintain neural stem cells in an undifferentiated state while they proliferate. Geminin inhibits neuronal differentiation in cultured cells by antagonizing interactions between the chromatin remodeling protein Brg1 and the neural-specific transcription factors

  9. Comparative evaluation of the impact on endothelial cells induced by different nanoparticle structures and functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ines; Ernst, Peter; Schäfer, Miriam; Rosman, Christina; Schick, Isabel; Köhler, Oskar; Oehring, Hartmut; Breus, Vladimir V; Basché, Thomas; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In the research field of nanoparticles, many studies demonstrated a high impact of the shape, size and surface charge, which is determined by the functionalization, of nanoparticles on cell viability and internalization into cells. This work focused on the comparison of three different nanoparticle types to give a better insight into general rules determining the biocompatibility of gold, Janus and semiconductor (quantum dot) nanoparticles. Endothelial cells were subject of this study, since blood is the first barrier after intravenous nanoparticle application. In particular, stronger effects on the viability of endothelial cells were found for nanoparticles with an elongated shape in comparison to spherical ones. Furthermore, a positively charged nanoparticle surface (NH2, CyA) leads to the strongest reduction in cell viability, whereas neutral and negatively charged nanoparticles are highly biocompatible to endothelial cells. These findings are attributed to a rapid internalization of the NH2-functionalized nanoparticles in combination with the damage of intracellular membranes. Interestingly, the endocytotic pathway seems to be a size-dependent process whereas nanoparticles with a size of 20 nm are internalized by caveolae-mediated endocytosis and nanoparticles with a size of 40 nm are taken up by clathrin-mediated internalization and macropinocytosis. Our results can be summarized to formulate five general rules, which are further specified in the text and which determine the biocompatibility of nanoparticles on endothelial cells. Our findings will help to design new nanoparticles with optimized properties concerning biocompatibility and uptake behavior with respect to the respective intended application. PMID:25821668

  10. Cell adhesion and proliferation on polyethylene grafted with Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasálková, N. Slepi?ková; Slepi?ka, P.; Kolská, Z.; Sajdl, P.; Ba?áková, L.; Rimpelová, S.; Švor?ík, V.

    2012-02-01

    Plasma treatment and subsequent Au nano-particles grafting of polyethylene (PE) lead to changes in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, significantly increasing the attractiveness of the material for cells. The PE samples were exposed to argon plasma. Plasma modified PE was chemically grafted by immersion to biphenyldithiol and consequently into solution of Au nano-particles. Changes in chemical structure of the modified PE were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and electrokinetic analysis ( ?-potential). The surface wettability of the modified PE samples was examined by measurement of the contact angle by standard goniometry. The surface morphology of the plasma modified PE and that grafted with Au nano-particles was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The modified PE samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Chemically bounded biphenyldithiol increases the number of the incorporated gold nano-particles and changes sample surface properties. The presence of the biphenyldithiol and the gold nano-particles on the PE surface influences dramatically adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs.

  11. Nanoparticle effects on rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayer barrier properties

    PubMed Central

    Yacobi, Nazanin R.; Phuleria, Harish C.; Demaio, Lucas; Liang, Chi H.; Peng, Ching-An; Sioutas, Constantinos; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D.

    2007-01-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have been reported to contribute to deleterious effects on human health. In this study, we investigated the effects of ultrafine ambient particulate suspensions (UAPS), polystyrene nanoparticles (PNP; positively and negatively charged; 20, 100, 120 nm), quantum dots (QD; positively and negatively charged; 30 nm) and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on alveolar epithelial cell barrier properties. Transmonolayer resistance (Rt) and equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq) of primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers were measured in the presence and absence of varying concentrations of apical nanoparticles. In some experiments, apical-to-basolateral fluxes of radiolabeled mannitol or inulin were determined with or without apical UAPS exposure and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was analyzed after UAPS or SWCNT exposure. Results revealed that exposure to UAPS decreased Rt and Ieq significantly over 24 hours, although neither mannitol nor inulin fluxes changed. Positively charged QD decreased Rt significantly (with subsequent recovery), while negatively charged QD did not. Rt decreased significantly after SWCNT exposure (with subsequent recovery). On the other hand, PNP exposure had no effects on Rt or Ieq. No significant increases in LDH release were observed after UAPS or SWCNT exposure. These data indicate that disruption of alveolar epithelial barrier properties due to apical nanoparticle exposure likely involves alteration of cellular transport pathways and is dependent on specific nanoparticle composition, shape and/or surface charge. PMID:17555923

  12. Platinum nanoparticle deposition on polymeric membranes for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, A. J.; Lopera, S.; Ordonez, N.; Mansano, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    This work aimed to show an alternative to produce platinum nanoparticles directly on a polymeric membrane using plasma technique, in order to make these nanoparticles adhere to the membrane, in size, shape and homogeneity controlled by the process without damaging the polymeric material. In this manner the cell's production time is reduced since the catalyst is directly deposited on the polymeric membrane; the time of the process is approximately five minutes for each side of the membrane, and the total time for each membrane is 10 minutes. With this exposure time, and the advantage of controlling the other parameters such as pressure, RF power, gas flow rate and temperature of the electrode, it was possible to obtain platinum nanoparticles with dimensions of about 50 nm scattered homogenously on the membrane, without damaging the structure of the polymeric material and, consequently, affecting its performance. Together with platinum nanoparticles were also deposited carbon nanoparticles, so that these acted as catalyst support, avoiding self poisoning. Electrochemical activity tests were performed to test the efficiency of the cell where it was exposed to different pressures and flow rates of O2 and H2, reaching open-circuit voltage of 750 mVolts.

  13. Metallic nanoparticles as intermediate reflectors in tandem solar cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Fahr; Carsten Rockstuhl; Falk Lederer

    2009-01-01

    Tandem thin film solar cells made of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon offer the potential for high conversion efficiencies at low costs. However, their finite thickness imposed by intrinsic materials properties hinders the complete absorption of light and requires smart photon management. We reveal a genuine strategy to use metallic nanoparticles, appropriately tailored to provide a spectrally selective reflection, as an

  14. Synthesizing Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles to Image Cell Signaling Pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernadette A. Hernandez-Sanchez; Timothy N. Lambert; Sherrika D. Daniel-Taylor; Janet M. Oliver; Bridget S. Wilson; Diane S. Lidke; Nicholas L. Andrews

    2006-01-01

    This minireview outlines the synthetic efforts, from our research group, to produce nanomaterials for use as imaging agents to study cell signaling pathways. An overview of our approach to the synthesis and biofunctionalization of metal, semiconductor, and ceramic nanomaterials is presented. The probes investigated include coinage metals, Cd-based, Gedeg, naturally occurring fluorescent (NOF) minerals, and Ln-based nanoparticles which were synthesized

  15. Monitoring the endocytosis of magnetic nanoparticles by cells using permanent micro-flux sources.

    PubMed

    Osman, O; Zanini, L F; Frénéa-Robin, M; Dumas-Bouchiat, F; Dempsey, N M; Reyne, G; Buret, F; Haddour, N

    2012-10-01

    Trapping of cells is essential to perform basic handling operations in cell-based microsystems, such as media exchange, concentration, cell isolation and cell sorting. Cell trapping by magnetophoresis typically requires cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles. Here we report on endocytotic uptake of 100 nm magnetic nanoparticles by Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells. The attraction of labeled cells by micro-magnet arrays characterised by very high magnetic field gradients (?10? T/m) was studied as a function of labeling conditions (nanoparticle concentration in the extracellular medium, incubation time). The threshold incubation conditions for effective magnetophoretic trapping were established. This simple technique may be exploited to minimise the quantity of magnetic nanoparticles needed for efficient cell trapping, thus reducing stress or nanoparticle-mediated toxicity. Nanoparticle internalization into cells was confirmed using both confocal and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). PMID:22773161

  16. Carbohydrate-Based Nanocarriers Exhibiting Specific Cell Targeting with Minimum Influence from the Protein Corona.

    PubMed

    Kang, Biao; Okwieka, Patricia; Schöttler, Susanne; Winzen, Svenja; Langhanki, Jens; Mohr, Kristin; Opatz, Till; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Wurm, Frederik R

    2015-06-15

    Whenever nanoparticles encounter biological fluids like blood, proteins adsorb on their surface and form a so-called protein corona. Although its importance is widely accepted, information on the influence of surface functionalization of nanocarriers on the protein corona is still sparse, especially concerning how the functionalization of PEGylated nanocarriers with targeting agents will affect protein corona formation and how the protein corona may in turn influence the targeting effect. Herein, hydroxyethyl starch nanocarriers (HES-NCs) were prepared, PEGylated, and modified on the outer PEG layer with mannose to target dendritic cells (DCs). Their interaction with human plasma was then studied. Low overall protein adsorption with a distinct protein pattern and high specific affinity for DC binding were observed, thus indicating an efficient combination of "stealth" and targeting behavior. PMID:25940402

  17. Effect of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles on Skin Tumor Cells and Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Alili, Lirija; Chapiro, Swetlana; Marten, Gernot U.; Schmidt, Annette M.; Zanger, Klaus; Brenneisen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles have been used in many biomedical approaches. The toxicity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on mammalian cells was published recently. Though, little is known about the viability of human cells after treatment with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Herein, we examined the toxicity, production of reactive oxygen species, and invasive capacity after treatment of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and cells of the squamous tumor cell line (SCL-1) with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These nanoparticles had an average size of 65?nm. Fe3O4 nanoparticles induced oxidative stress via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent initiation of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, the question was addressed of whether Fe3O4 nanoparticles affect myofibroblast formation, known to be involved in tumor invasion. Herein, Fe3O4 nanoparticles prevent the expression alpha-smooth muscle actin and therefore decrease the number of myofibroblastic cells. Moreover, our data show in vitro that concentrations of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which are nontoxic for normal cells, partially reveal a ROS-triggered cytotoxic but also a pro-invasive effect on the fraction of squamous cancer cells surviving the treatment with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The data herein show that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles appear not to be adequate for use in therapeutic approaches against cancer cells, in contrast to recently published data with cerium oxide nanoparticles. PMID:26090418

  18. Effect of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles on Skin Tumor Cells and Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Alili, Lirija; Chapiro, Swetlana; Marten, Gernot U; Schmidt, Annette M; Zanger, Klaus; Brenneisen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles have been used in many biomedical approaches. The toxicity of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on mammalian cells was published recently. Though, little is known about the viability of human cells after treatment with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Herein, we examined the toxicity, production of reactive oxygen species, and invasive capacity after treatment of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and cells of the squamous tumor cell line (SCL-1) with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These nanoparticles had an average size of 65?nm. Fe3O4 nanoparticles induced oxidative stress via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent initiation of lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, the question was addressed of whether Fe3O4 nanoparticles affect myofibroblast formation, known to be involved in tumor invasion. Herein, Fe3O4 nanoparticles prevent the expression alpha-smooth muscle actin and therefore decrease the number of myofibroblastic cells. Moreover, our data show in vitro that concentrations of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which are nontoxic for normal cells, partially reveal a ROS-triggered cytotoxic but also a pro-invasive effect on the fraction of squamous cancer cells surviving the treatment with Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The data herein show that the Fe3O4 nanoparticles appear not to be adequate for use in therapeutic approaches against cancer cells, in contrast to recently published data with cerium oxide nanoparticles. PMID:26090418

  19. Detecting polymeric nanoparticles with coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microscopy in tissues exhibiting fixative-induced autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, N. L.; Godfrey, L.; Lalatsa, A.; Serrano, D. R.; Uchegbu, I. F.; Schatzlein, A.; Moger, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in pharmaceutical nanotechnology have enabled the development of nano-particulate medicines with enhanced drug performance. Although the fate of these nano-particles can be macroscopically tracked in the body (e.g. using radio-labeling techniques), there is little information about the sub-cellular scale mechanistic processes underlying the particle-tissue interactions, or how these interactions may correlate with pharmaceutical efficacy. To rationally engineer these nano-particles and thus optimize their performance, these mechanistic interactions must be fully understood. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy provides a label-free means for visualizing biological samples, but can suffer from a strong non-resonant background in samples that are prepared using aldehyde-based fixatives. We demonstrate how formalin fixative affects the detection of polymeric nanoparticles within kidneys following oral administration using CARS microscopy, compared with samples that were snap-frozen. These findings have implications for clinical applications of CARS for probing nanoparticle distribution in tissue biopsies.

  20. PEG-templated mesoporous silica nanoparticles exclusively target cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Catia; Maris, Pamela; Sisci, Diego; Perrotta, Enrico; Brunelli, Elvira; Perrotta, Ida; Panno, Maria Luisa; Tagarelli, Antonio; Versace, Carlo; Casula, Maria Francesca; Testa, Flaviano; Andò, Sebastiano; Nagy, Janos B.; Pasqua, Luigi

    2011-08-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been proposed as DNA and drug delivery carriers, as well as efficient tools for fluorescent cell tracking. The major limitation is that MSNs enter cells regardless of a target-specific functionalization. Here we show that non functionalized MSNs, synthesized using a PEG surfactant-based interfacial synthesis procedure, do not enter cells, while a highly specific, receptor mediated, cellular internalization of folic acid (FOL) grafted MSNs (MSN-FOL), occurs exclusively in folate receptor (FR) expressing cells. Neither the classical clathrin pathway nor macropinocytosis is involved in the MSN endocytic process, while fluorescent MSNs (MSN-FITC) enter cells through aspecific, caveolae-mediated, endocytosis. Moreover, internalized particles seem to be mostly exocytosed from cells within 96 h. Finally, cisplatin (Cp) loaded MSN-FOL were tested on cancerous FR-positive (HeLa) or normal FR-negative (HEK293) cells. A strong growth arrest was observed only in HeLa cells treated with MSN-FOL-Cp. The results presented here show that our mesoporous nanoparticles do not enter cells unless opportunely functionalized, suggesting that they could represent a promising vehicle for drug targeting applications.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been proposed as DNA and drug delivery carriers, as well as efficient tools for fluorescent cell tracking. The major limitation is that MSNs enter cells regardless of a target-specific functionalization. Here we show that non functionalized MSNs, synthesized using a PEG surfactant-based interfacial synthesis procedure, do not enter cells, while a highly specific, receptor mediated, cellular internalization of folic acid (FOL) grafted MSNs (MSN-FOL), occurs exclusively in folate receptor (FR) expressing cells. Neither the classical clathrin pathway nor macropinocytosis is involved in the MSN endocytic process, while fluorescent MSNs (MSN-FITC) enter cells through aspecific, caveolae-mediated, endocytosis. Moreover, internalized particles seem to be mostly exocytosed from cells within 96 h. Finally, cisplatin (Cp) loaded MSN-FOL were tested on cancerous FR-positive (HeLa) or normal FR-negative (HEK293) cells. A strong growth arrest was observed only in HeLa cells treated with MSN-FOL-Cp. The results presented here show that our mesoporous nanoparticles do not enter cells unless opportunely functionalized, suggesting that they could represent a promising vehicle for drug targeting applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10253b

  1. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weisheng Lin; Yue-wern Huang; Xiao-Dong Zhou; Yinfa Ma

    2006-01-01

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomate-rials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 µg\\/ml of CeO2

  2. Nanoparticles Based Stem Cell Tracking in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Edmundson, Matthew; Thanh, Nguyen TK; Song, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapies offer great potentials in the treatment for a wide range of diseases and conditions. With so many stem cell replacement therapies going through clinical trials currently, there is a great need to understand the mechanisms behind a successful therapy, and one of the critical points of discovering them is to track stem cell migration, proliferation and differentiation in vivo. To be of most use tracking methods should ideally be non-invasive, high resolution and allow tracking in three dimensions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the ideal methods, but requires a suitable contrast agent to be loaded to the cells to be tracked, and one of the most wide-spread in stem cell tracking is a group of agents known as magnetic nanoparticles. This review will explore the current use of magnetic nanoparticles in developing and performing stem cell therapies, and will investigate their potential limitations and the future directions magnetic nanoparticle tracking is heading in. PMID:23946823

  3. Carbon composites with metal nanoparticles for Alcohol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrapragada, Lakshman; Siddhardha, R. S.; Podilla, Ramakrishna; Muthukumar, V. S.; Creager, Stephen; Rao, A. M.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2015-03-01

    Graphene due to its high surface area and superior conductivity has attracted wide attention from both industrial and scientific communities. We chose graphene as a substrate for metal nanoparticle deposition for fuel cell applications. There are many chemical routes for fabrication of metal-graphene composites, but they have an inherent disadvantage of low performance due to the usage of surfactants, that adsorb on their surface. Here we present a design for one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles and simultaneous deposition on graphene with laser ablation of gold strip and functionalized graphene. In this process there are two natural advantages, the nanoparticles are synthesized without any surfactants, therefore they are pristine and subsequent impregnation on graphene is linker free. These materials are well characterized with electron microscopy to find their morphology and spectroscopic techniques like Raman, UV-Vis. for functionality. This gold nanoparticle decorated graphene composite has been tested for its electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols for alkaline fuel cell applications. An electrode made of this composite showed good stability for more than 200 cycles of operation and reported a low onset potential of 100 mV more negative, an important factor for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  4. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  5. The effects of different size gold nanoparticles on mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells under mechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieu, Tri Minh

    Nanotechnology is an emerging and promising frontier for medicine and biomedical research due to its potential for applications such as drug delivery, imaging enhancement, and cancer treatment. While these materials may possess significant possibilities, the effects of these particles in the body and how the particles affect the cells is not fully understood. In this study, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) will be exposed to 5 and 20 nm diameter citrate AuNPs under mechanical conditions. The cytotoxicity properties of these particles will be investigated using LDH and MTT assays. Atomic force microscopy will be used to study how the size of the nanoparticles affect the mechanical properties of the VSMCs. Immunofluorescence staining for alpha actin will also be performed to enhance understanding of the phenotypic shift. The LDH and MTT cytotoxicity assay results demonstrated that neither 5 nor 20 nm diameter nanoparticles are cytotoxic to the cells. However, the mechanical properties and cell morphology of the VSMCs was altered. Under static conditions, both AuNP treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells. The size of the nanoparticles had a softening effect on elastic modulus of the cell and sign of a synthetic phenotype was observed. The VSMCs subjected to mechanical stretching exhibited higher elastic modulus compared to the static experimental groups. Again, both AuNPs treatments decreased the mechanical properties of the cells and signs of more synthetic phenotype was seen. However, the size of the nanoparticles did not have any influence on cell's elastic modulus unlike the static treated cells. The mechanical testing condition provided a better look at how these particles would affect the cells in vivo. While the nanoparticles are not cytotoxic to the VSMCs, they are altering the mechanical properties and phenotype of the cell.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Protein JHP0290 Exhibits Proliferative and Anti-Apoptotic Effects in Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Raquel; Pathak, Sushil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric epithelial cell proliferation, apoptosis and signaling pathways contributes to the development of infection-associated diseases. Here we report that JHP0290, which is a poorly functionally characterized protein from H. pylori, regulates multiple responses in human gastric epithelial cells. The differential expression and release of JHP0290 homologues was observed among H. pylori strains. JHP0290 existed in monomeric and dimeric forms in H. pylori cell extracts and culture broth. Recombinant purified JHP0290 (rJHP0290) also showed monomeric and dimeric forms, whereas the rJHP0290 C162A mutant exhibited only a monomeric form. The dimeric form of the protein was found to bind more efficiently to gastric epithelial cells than the monomeric form. The exposure of gastric epithelial cells to rJHP0290 induced proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Faster progression into the cell cycle was observed in rJHP0290-challenged gastric epithelial cells. Furthermore, we detected an anti-apoptotic effect of rJHP0290 in gastric epithelial cells when the cells were treated with rJHP0290 in combination with Camptothecin (CPT), which is an inducer of apoptosis. CPT-induced caspase 3 activation was significantly reduced in the presence of rJHP0290. In addition, the activation of ERK MAPK and the transcription factor NF?B was observed in rJHP0290-challenged gastric epithelial cells lines. Our results suggest that JHP0290 may affect H. pylori-induced gastric diseases via the regulation of gastric epithelial cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways. PMID:25879227

  7. Glass frits coated with silver nanoparticles for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingfen; Gan, Weiping; Zhou, Jian; Li, Biyuan

    2015-06-01

    Glass frits coated with silver nanoparticles were prepared by electroless plating. Gum Arabic (GA) was used as the activating agent of glass frits without the assistance of stannous chloride or palladium chloride. The silver-coated glass frits prepared with different GA dosages were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The characterization results indicated that silver-coated glass frits had the structures of both glass and silver. Spherical silver nanoparticles were distributed on the glass frits evenly. The density and particle size of silver nanoparticles on the glass frits can be controlled by adjusting the GA dosage. The silver-coated glass frits were applied to silver pastes to act as both the densification promoter and silver crystallite formation aid in the silver electrodes. The prepared silver-coated glass frits can improve the photovoltaic performances of solar cells.

  8. Controlling the hydrophilicity and contact resistance of fuel cell bipolar plate surfaces using layered nanoparticle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng

    Hybrid nanostructured coatings exhibiting the combined properties of electrical conductivity and surface hydrophilicity were obtained by using Layer-by-Layer (LBL) assembly of cationic polymer, silica nanospheres, and carbon nanoplatelets. This work demonstrates that by controlling the nanoparticle zeta (zeta) potential through the suspension parameters (pH, organic solvent type and amount, and ionic content) as well as the assembly sequence, the nanostructure and composition of the coatings may be adjusted to optimize the desired properties. Two types of silica nanospheres were evaluated as the hydrophilic component: X-TecRTM 3408 from Nano-X Corporation, with a diameter of about 20 nm, and polishing silica from Electron Microscopy Supply, with diameter of about 65 nm. Graphite nanoplatelets with a thickness of 5~10nm (Aquadag RTM E from Acheson Industries) were used as electrically conductive filler. A cationic copolymer of acrylamide and a quaternary ammonium salt (SuperflocRTM C442 from Cytec Corporation) was used as the binder for the negatively charged nanoparticles. Coatings were applied to gold-coated stainless steel substrates presently used a bipolar plate material for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Coating thickness was found to vary nearly linearly with the number of polymer-nanoparticle layers deposited while a monotonic increase in coating contact resistance was observed for all heterogeneous and pure silica coatings. Thickness increased if the difference in the oppositely charged zeta potentials of the adsorbing components was enhanced through alcohol addition. Interestingly, an opposite effect was observed if the zeta potential difference was increased through pH variation. This previously undocumented difference in adsorption behavior is herein related to changes to the surface chemical heterogeneity of the nanoparticles. Coating contact resistance and surface wettability were found to have a more subtle dependence on the assembly sequence and coating composition. Various LBL assembly sequences were investigated to control heterogeneous coating nanostructure and tune their hydrophilic and electrically conductive properties. Assembly from mixed nanoparticle suspensions yielded competitive nanoparticle adsorption and is denoted as cLBL assembly. The absence of intervening polymer binder during sequential deposition from first carbon then silica nanoparticle suspensions directed the assembly process with each applied layer and is denoted as dLBL assembly. Use of intervening polymer binder as in standard LBL deposition is denoted as sLBL assembly. The cLBL assembly sequence was found to yield nanoparticle competition for available surface sites between the heterogeneous nanoparticles and result in phase separation within each layer, producing coatings with high electrical contact resistance but poor hydrophilicity. Coatings prepared using dLBL assembly exhibited improved contact resistance due to improved alignment of a carbon phase perpendicular to the substrate surface but continued poor hydrophilicity. The sLBL assembly scheme produced optimum coating performance due to the adsorption of highly dispersed silica layers directly onto the graphite platelets, while maintaining through-plane platelet to platelet contact. The wetting behavior of the prepared coatings was satisfactorily described by Johnson-Dettre model while exhibiting little response to changes in surface morphology (in contrast to Wenzel's equation). Hydrophilicity of the cLBL assembled coatings could be enhanced by altering the silica nanoparticle zeta potential in mixed suspensions. Coating durability was demonstrated through LBL assembly onto industrial-size bipolar plate materials and testing under PEM fuel cell operating conditions.

  9. Sensitization of ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sounik; Robertson, David J.; McMeekin, Scott; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Recently we reported that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) inhibit ovarian tumor growth and metastasis in mice by reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Since EMT is known to confer drug resistance to cancer cells, we wanted to investigate whether anti-EMT property of AuNP could be utilized to sensitize ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin. Herein, we report that AuNPs prevent cisplatin-induced acquired chemoresistance and stemness in ovarian cancer cells and sensitize them to cisplatin. AuNPs inhibit cisplatin induced EMT, decrease the side population cells and key stem cell markers such as ALDH1, CD44, CD133, Sox2, MDR1 and ABCG2 in ovarian cancer cells. Mechanistically, AuNPs prevent cisplatin-induced activation of Akt and NF-?B signaling axis in ovarian cancer cells that are critical for EMT, stem cell maintenance and drug resistance. In vivo, AuNPs sensitize orthotopically implanted ovarian tumor to a low dose of cisplatin and significantly inhibit tumor growth via facilitated delivery of both AuNP and cisplatin. These findings suggest that by depleting stem cell pools and inhibiting key molecular pathways gold nanoparticles sensitize ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin and may be used in combination to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in ovarian cancer. PMID:25071019

  10. Nanoparticle effects on rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayer barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Yacobi, Nazanin R; Phuleria, Harish C; Demaio, Lucas; Liang, Chi H; Peng, Ching-An; Sioutas, Constantinos; Borok, Zea; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Crandall, Edward D

    2007-12-01

    Inhaled nanoparticles have been reported to contribute to deleterious effects on human health. In this study, we investigated the effects of ultrafine ambient particulate suspensions (UAPS), polystyrene nanoparticles (PNP; positively and negatively charged; 20, 100, 120 nm), quantum dots (QD; positively and negatively charged; 30 nm) and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on alveolar epithelial cell barrier properties. Transmonolayer resistance (R(t)) and equivalent short-circuit current (I(eq)) of primary rat alveolar epithelial monolayers were measured in the presence and absence of varying concentrations of apical nanoparticles. In some experiments, apical-to-basolateral fluxes of radiolabeled mannitol or inulin were determined with or without apical UAPS exposure and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was analyzed after UAPS or SWCNT exposure. Results revealed that exposure to UAPS decreased R(t) and I(eq) significantly over 24 h, although neither mannitol nor inulin fluxes changed. Positively charged QD decreased R(t) significantly (with subsequent recovery), while negatively charged QD did not. R(t) decreased significantly after SWCNT exposure (with subsequent recovery). On the other hand, PNP exposure had no effects on R(t) or I(eq). No significant increases in LDH release were observed after UAPS or SWCNT exposure. These data indicate that disruption of alveolar epithelial barrier properties due to apical nanoparticle exposure likely involves alteration of cellular transport pathways and is dependent on specific nanoparticle composition, shape and/or surface charge. PMID:17555923

  11. Graphite-coated magnetic nanoparticle microarray for few-cells enrichment and detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuo; Hong, Guosong; Wang, Hailiang; Welsher, Kevin; Tabakman, Scott M; Sherlock, Sarah P; Robinson, Joshua T; Liang, Yongye; Dai, Hongjie

    2012-02-28

    Graphite-coated, highly magnetic FeCo core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition method and solubilized in aqueous solution through a unique polymer mixture modification, which significantly improved the biocompatibility and stability of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Such functionalized MNPs were proven to be very stable in different conditions which would be significant for biological applications. Cell staining, manipulation, enrichment, and detection were developed with these MNPs. Under external magnetic manipulation, the MNP-stained cells exhibited directed motions. Moreover, MNPs were printed on substrates to modulate the magnetic field distribution on the surface. Capture and detection of sparse populations of cancer cells spiked into whole blood has been explored in a microarray fashion. Cancer cells from hundreds down to only two were able to be simply and efficiently detected from 1 mL of whole blood on the MNP microarray chips. Interestingly, the cells captured through the MNP microarray still showed viability and adhered to the MNP spots after incubation, which could be utilized for cancer cell detection, localized growth, and proliferation. PMID:22229344

  12. Electrical transport and optical studies of ferromagnetic cobalt doped ZnO nanoparticles exhibiting a metal insulator transition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Naeem; S. K. Hasanain; A. Mumtaz

    2008-01-01

    The observed correlation of oxygen vacancies and room temperature ferromagnetic ordering in Co doped ZnO1-delta nanoparticles reported earlier (Naeem et al 2006 Nanotechnology 17 2675-80) has been further explored by transport and optical measurements. In these particles room temperature ferromagnetic ordering had been observed to occur only after annealing in forming gas. In the current work the optical properties have

  13. Intracellular partitioning of cell organelles and extraneous nanoparticles during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Symens, Nathalie; Soenen, Stefaan J; Rejman, Joanna; Braeckmans, Kevin; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Remaut, Katrien

    2012-01-01

    The nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of nanoparticles as a result of cell division is highly relevant to the field of nonviral gene delivery. We reviewed the literature on the intracellular distribution of cell organelles (the endosomal vesicles, Golgi apparatus, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus), foreign macromolecules (dextrans and plasmid DNA) and inorganic nanoparticles (gold, quantum dot and iron oxide) during mitosis. For nonviral gene delivery particles (lipid- or polymer-based), indirect proof of nuclear entry during mitosis is provided. We also describe how retroviruses and latent DNA viruses take advantage of mitosis to transfer their viral genome and segregate their episomes into the host daughter nuclei. Based on this knowledge, we propose strategies to improve nonviral gene delivery in dividing cells with the ultimate goal of designing nonviral gene delivery systems that are as efficient as their viral counterparts but non-immunogenic, non-oncogenic and easy and inexpensive to prepare. PMID:22210278

  14. Muscle satellite cells are multipotential stem cells that exhibit myogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic differentiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Atsushi Asakura; Michael A. Rudnicki; Motohiro Komaki

    2001-01-01

    Muscle satellite cells are believed to represent a committed stem cell population that is responsible for the postnatal growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle. However, the observation that cultured myoblasts differentiate into osteocytes or adipocytes following treatment with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) or adipogenic inducers, respectively, suggests some degree of plasticity within the mesenchymal lineage. To further investigate this phenomenon,

  15. Synergistic Effect of Functionalized Nickel Nanoparticles and Quercetin on Inhibition of the SMMC-7721 Cells Proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dadong; Wu, Chunhui; Li, Jingyuan; Guo, Airong; Li, Qingning; Jiang, Hui; Chen, Baoan; Wang, Xuemei

    2009-12-01

    The effect of functionalized nickel (Ni) nanoparticles capped with positively charged tetraheptylammonium on cellular uptake of drug quercetin into hepatocellular carcinoma cells (SMMC-7721) has been explored in this study via microscopy and electrochemical characterization as well as MTT assay. Meanwhile, the influence of Ni nanoparticles and/or quercetin on cell proliferation has been further evaluated by the real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) study. Our observations indicate that Ni nanoparticles could efficiently improve the permeability of cancer cell membrane, and remarkably enhance the accumulation of quercetin in SMMC-7721 cells, suggesting that Ni nanoparticles and quercetin would facilitate the synergistic effect on inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells.

  16. Polylactide-based paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles fabricated by dispersion polymerization: characterization, evaluation in cancer cell lines, and preliminary biodistribution studies.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Simeon K; Holly, Alesia; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Capala, Jacek; Akala, Emmanuel O

    2014-08-01

    The macromonomer method was used to prepare cross-linked, paclitaxel-loaded polylactide (PLA)-polyethylene glycol (stealth) nanoparticles using free-radical dispersion polymerization. The method can facilitate the attachment of other molecules to the nanoparticle surface to make it multifunctional. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectra confirm the synthesis of PLA macromonomer and cross-linking agent. The formation of stealth nanoparticles was confirmed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The drug release isotherm of paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles shows that the encapsulated drug is released over 7 days. In vitro cytotoxicity assay in selected breast and ovarian cancer cell lines reveal that the blank nanoparticle is biocompatible compared with medium-only treated controls. In addition, the paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles exhibit similar cytotoxicity compared with paclitaxel in solution. Confocal microscopy reveals that the nanoparticles are internalized by MCF-7 breast cancer cells within 1 h. Preliminary biodistribution studies also show nanoparticle accumulation in tumor xenograft model. The nanoparticles are suitable for the controlled delivery of bioactive agents. PMID:24961596

  17. Influence of HepG2 cell shape on nanoparticle uptake.

    PubMed

    Prats-Mateu, Batirtze; Ertl, Peter; Toca-Herrera, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    Cell mechanics provides insights in cell responses to external stress, which is an important parameter known to influence a variety of cell functions. Understanding the interdependence between mechanical stimulus, cell shape and function is essential in controlling cell culture microenvironment. In this paper, we report on the effect of cationic and anionic interfaces on cell shape and nanoparticle uptake activity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells HepG2. The shape of HepG2 cells changed from a round-like shape to a spread-like form exhibiting lamellar protrusions by incubating them on coated polystyrene well plates with polystyrene sulfonate and poly-ethylene imine (PEI), respectively. This change in shape of HepG2 cells did not influence the uptake of 49-nm particles (which entered the cells by diffusion). However, the internalization of 240-nm diameter particles was larger on cells seeded on cationic PEI. Particle uptake was measured at 4°C and 37°C; the optimal incubation time was 6 h. Cell shape and particle uptake were monitored by fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Quantification of particle internalization was carried out with flow cytometry. PMID:24807829

  18. Vaccinium corymbosum L. (blueberry) extracts exhibit protective action against cadmium toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Eliza; Ruta, Lavinia L; Nicolau, Ioana; Popa, Claudia V; Neagoe, Aurora D; Farcasanu, Ileana C

    2014-01-01

    Blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) are a rich source of antioxidants and their consumption is believed to contribute to food-related protection against oxidative stress. In the present study, the chemoprotective action of blueberry extracts against cadmium toxicity was investigated using a cadmium-hypersensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four varieties of blueberries were used in the study, and it was found that the extracts with high content of total anthocyanidins exhibited significant protective effect against the toxicity of cadmium and H2O2. Both the blueberry extracts and pure cyanidin exhibited protective effects against cadmium in a dose-dependent manner, but without significantly interfering with the cadmium accumulation by the yeast cells. The results imply that the blueberry extracts might be a potentially valuable food supplement for individuals exposed to high cadmium. PMID:24444969

  19. Mice deficient in heparanase exhibit impaired dendritic cell migration and reduced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Poon, Ivan K H; Goodall, Katharine J; Phipps, Simon; Chow, Jenny D Y; Pagler, Eloisa B; Andrews, Daniel M; Conlan, Carly L; Ryan, Gemma F; White, Julie A; Wong, Michael K L; Horan, Catherine; Matthaei, Klaus I; Smyth, Mark J; Hulett, Mark D

    2014-04-01

    Heparanase is a ?-d-endoglucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulphate, a key component of the ECM and basement membrane. The remodelling of the ECM by heparanase has been proposed to regulate both normal physiological and pathological processes, including wound healing, inflammation, tumour angiogenesis and cell migration. Heparanase is also known to exhibit non-enzymatic functions by regulating cell adhesion, cell signalling and differentiation. In this study, constitutive heparanase-deficient (Hpse(-/-) ) mice were generated on a C57BL/6 background using the Cre/loxP recombination system, with a complete lack of heparanase mRNA, protein and activity. Although heparanase has been implicated in embryogenesis and development, Hpse(-/-) mice are anatomically normal and fertile. Interestingly, consistent with the suggested function of heparanase in cell migration, the trafficking of dendritic cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes was markedly reduced in Hpse(-/-) mice. Furthermore, the ability of Hpse(-/-) mice to generate an allergic inflammatory response in the airways, a process that requires dendritic cell migration, was also impaired. These findings establish an important role for heparanase in immunity and identify the enzyme as a potential target for regulation of an immune response. PMID:24532362

  20. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles protect cells from oxidant-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrea; Zhu, Aiping; Sun, Kai; Petty, Howard R.

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic nanoparticles represent a potential clinical approach to replace or correct aberrant enzymatic activities in patients. Several diseases, including many blinding eye diseases, are promoted by excessive oxidant stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles represent two potentially therapeutic nanoparticles that de-toxify ROS. In the present study we directly compare these two classes of catalytic nanoparticles. Cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles were found to be 16±2.4 nm and 1.9±0.2 nm in diameter, respectively. Using surface plasmon enhanced microscopy, we find that these nanoparticles associate with cells. Furthermore, cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles demonstrated superoxide dismutase catalytic activity, but did not promote hemolytic or cytolytic pathways in living cells. Importantly, both cerium oxide and platinum nanoparticles reduce oxidant-mediated apoptosis in target cells as judged by the activation of caspase 3. The ability to diminish apoptosis may contribute to maintaining healthy tissues. PMID:22039334

  1. Selective reduction of the interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with leukocytes and tumor cells by human plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalbe, Manuela; Jörke, Cornelia; Buske, Norbert; Höffken, Klaus; Pachmann, Katharina; Clement, Joachim H.

    2005-05-01

    Carboxymethyl-dextran coated magnetic nanoparticles can interact with viable human cells. The interaction of the nanoparticles is cell-type specific. The addition of human plasma led to a dramatic reduction of magnetically separable leukocytes in comparison to tumor cells. We conclude that low plasma concentrations might support an efficient enrichment of circulating epithelial cells from the peripheral blood of tumor patients.

  2. Effect of nonendocytic uptake of nanoparticles on human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Wu, Yun; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Kwak, Kwang Joo; Gupta, Cherry; Ouyang, Xilian; Lee, L James

    2015-03-17

    The toxicity of artificial nanoparticles is a major concern in industrial applications. Cellular uptake of hard nanoparticles could follow either endocytic or nonendocytic pathways, leading to different stimuli to the cells. Yet the cellular responses to nanoparticles following different pathways have not been compared due to the lack of an independent nonendocytic delivery method. We applied a unique delivery method, nanochannel electroporation (NEP), to produce predominantly nonendocytic uptakes of quantum dots (Q-dots) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different chemical modifications. NEP delivery bypassed endocytosis by electrophoretic injection of nanoparticles into human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells at different dosages. Conventional exposure by direct nanoparticle suspending in cell culture medium was also performed as control. The dosage-dependent responses to nanoparticles under different uptake pathways were compared. Fluorescence colocalization demonstrated that nanoparticles followed both endocytic and nonendocytic pathways for cell entry in contact exposure, whereas NEP delivery of nanoparticles bypassed endocytosis. Nonendocytic entry resulted in much higher oxidation stress and, for MWCNTs, more cell death in BEAS-2B cells. Despite the observation that most nanoparticles were taken up by cells through endocytosis, the minor nonendocytic entry of nanoparticles seemed to dominate the overall cellular response in conventional contact exposure. Our finding suggests that prevention against nonendocytic uptake could help reduce the toxicity of hard nanoparticles. PMID:25671340

  3. PLGA-based gene delivering nanoparticle enhance suppression effect of miRNA in HePG2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Liang, Gao; Zhu, Yan Liang; Sun, Bo; Hu, Fei Hu; Tian, Tian; Li, Shu Chun; Xiao, Zhong Dang

    2011-07-01

    The biggest challenge in the field of gene therapy is how to effectively deliver target genes to special cells. This study aimed to develop a new type of poly( D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based nanoparticles for gene delivery, which are capable of overcoming the disadvantages of polyethylenimine (PEI)- or cationic liposome-based gene carrier, such as the cytotoxicity induced by excess positive charge, as well as the aggregation on the cell surface. The PLGA-based nanoparticles presented in this study were synthesized by emulsion evaporation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The size of PLGA/PEI nanoparticles in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was about 60 nm at the optimal charge ratio. Without observable aggregation, the nanoparticles showed a better monodispersity. The PLGA-based nanoparticles were used as vector carrier for miRNA transfection in HepG2 cells. It exhibited a higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells compared to the PEI/DNA complex. The N/P ratio (ratio of the polymer nitrogen to the DNA phosphate) 6 of the PLGA/PEI/DNA nanocomplex displays the best property among various N/P proportions, yielding similar transfection efficiency when compared to Lipofectamine/DNA lipoplexes. Moreover, nanocomplex shows better serum compatibility than commercial liposome. PLGA nanocomplexes obviously accumulate in tumor cells after transfection, which indicate that the complexes contribute to cellular uptake of pDNA and pronouncedly enhance the treatment effect of miR-26a by inducing cell cycle arrest. Therefore, these results demonstrate that PLGA/PEI nanoparticles are promising non-viral vectors for gene delivery.

  4. Graphene nanosheets inserted by silver nanoparticles as zero-dimensional nanospacers for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Quanhong; Wang, Zhenping; Wang, Jinzhong; Yan, Yuan; Ma, Zhoujing; Zhu, Jianxiao; Shi, Wangzhou; Chen, Qi; Yu, Qingjiang; Huang, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional Ag nanoparticle/GNs (Ag/GNs) hybrids as highly efficient counter electrode (CE) materials for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is described, highlighting the Ag nanoparticles as zero-dimensional nanospacers inserting into GNs to lift the interspacing layer between individual GNs. It is demonstrated that, when the hybrids are used as CE materials for DSSCs, compared to their pure GNs, Ag/GNs hybrids without agglomerates have a significant improvement in their electrochemical properties such as high current density, narrow peak-to-peak separation (Epp) and low charge transfer resistance (RCT). The enhancement of electrochemical performance can be attributed to the increased electrode conductivity, an extended interlayer distance and the reduction of the restacking of graphene sheets due to the insertion of metallic Ag nanoparticles into GNs. The DSSC with this hybrid CE exhibited an energy conversion efficiency (?) of 7.72% with an open circuit voltage (VOC), short circuit photocurrent density (JSC), and fill factor (FF) of 732 mV, 14.67 mA cm-2, and 71.8%, respectively.Three-dimensional Ag nanoparticle/GNs (Ag/GNs) hybrids as highly efficient counter electrode (CE) materials for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is described, highlighting the Ag nanoparticles as zero-dimensional nanospacers inserting into GNs to lift the interspacing layer between individual GNs. It is demonstrated that, when the hybrids are used as CE materials for DSSCs, compared to their pure GNs, Ag/GNs hybrids without agglomerates have a significant improvement in their electrochemical properties such as high current density, narrow peak-to-peak separation (Epp) and low charge transfer resistance (RCT). The enhancement of electrochemical performance can be attributed to the increased electrode conductivity, an extended interlayer distance and the reduction of the restacking of graphene sheets due to the insertion of metallic Ag nanoparticles into GNs. The DSSC with this hybrid CE exhibited an energy conversion efficiency (?) of 7.72% with an open circuit voltage (VOC), short circuit photocurrent density (JSC), and fill factor (FF) of 732 mV, 14.67 mA cm-2, and 71.8%, respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06340b

  5. Aronia melanocarpa fruit extract exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in human aortic endothelial cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Zapolska-DownarD; D. Bryk; M. Ma?ecki; K. Hajdukiewicz; D. Sitkiewicz

    Background  Altered expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) has been implicated in a variety of chronic inflammatory conditions,\\u000a including atherosclerosis. Regulation of adhesion molecule expression by specific redox-sensitive mechanisms has been reported.\\u000a Additionally, it has been observed that the extract of Aronia melanocarpa (A. Melanocarpa) fruits, rich in polyphenols, exhibits potent anti-oxidant properties and displays cardioprotective activity.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods and results  Human aortic

  6. Cladribine and bendamustine exhibit inhibitory activity in dexamethasone-sensitive and -resistant multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bo; Wang, Shuiliang; Huang, Jingcao; Lee, Choon-Kee; Gao, Chunji; Liu, Bolin

    2013-01-01

    Cladribine (2-CDA) is a well-known purine nucleoside analog with activities against lymphoproliferative disorders such as hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Bendamustine, a hybrid molecule of purine analog and alkylator, induces apoptosis via DNA damage response and inhibition of mitotic checkpoint. Their therapeutic potential in patients with multiple myeloma (MM), particularly those become resistant to traditional chemotherapeutic agents, remains unclear. Here we study the effects of cladribine or bendamustine on dexamethasone-sensitive (MM1.S) and -resistant (MM1.R) MM cells. MTS-based proliferation assays showed that cladribine and bendamustine exhibited similar anti-proliferation/anti-survival effects on MM1.S and MM1.R cells in a dose-dependent manner. The IC50s of cladribine were approximately 35.3 nmol/L and 58 nmol/L for MM1.S and MM1.R cells, respectively. The IC50s of bendamustine were approximately 119.8 ?mol/L (MM1.S) and 138 ?mol/L (MM1.R). An apoptotic-ELISA and western blot assays of PARP cleavage and activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 indicated that cladribine or bendamustine induced apoptosis in both cell lines. Similar results were obtained with flow cytometric analysis showing that cladribine or bendamustine increased the sub-G1 population. Treatment with bendamustine but not cladribine also resulted in cell cycle S-phase arrest. Either cladribine or bendamustine led to a remarkable increase of the phosphorylated H2A.X, CHK1 and CHK2 in both MM1.S and MM1.R cells, suggesting an induction of DNA damage response. Collectively, we demonstrate that cladribine and bendamustine exert potent inhibitory effects on dexamethasone-sensitive and -resistant MM cells in vitro. Our data suggest that MM patients, including those with dexamethasone resistance, may particularly benefit from cladribine or bendamustine. PMID:23390564

  7. Human memory CD8+ T-cells exhibit an intrinsic metabolic advantage as reflected by increased mitochondrial functionality

    E-print Network

    Amrhein, Valentin

    Human memory CD8+ T-cells exhibit an intrinsic metabolic advantage as reflected by increased memory CD8+ T-cells are unknown. Here we show that human effector memory CD8+ T- cells possess and memory CD8+ T-cells affect both quality and quantity of cognate antigen response. Cellular immune

  8. Substituted titanocenes induce caspase-dependent apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma cells in vitro and exhibit antitumour activity in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J H Bannon; I Fichtner; A O'Neill; C Pampillón; N J Sweeney; K Strohfeldt; R W Watson; M Tacke; M M Mc Gee; MM Mc Gee

    2007-01-01

    Titanocene compounds are a novel series of agents that exhibit cytotoxic effects in a variety of human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the antiproliferative activity of two titanocenes (Titanocenes X and Y) was evaluated in human epidermoid cancer cells in vitro. Titanocenes X and Y induce apoptotic cell death in epidermoid cancer cells, with IC50

  9. Self-crack-filled graphene films by metallic nanoparticles for high-performance graphene heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Po-Hsun; Liou, Yi-Ting; Chuang, Chien-Hsun; Lin, Shih-Wei; Tseng, Chi-Yang; Wang, Di-Yan; Chen, Chia-Chun; Hung, Wen-Yi; Wen, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Chun-Wei

    2015-03-11

    Graphene, with cracks filled with gold nanoparticles, is grown by chemical vapor deposition on a Cu substrate. The crack-filled graphene not only exhibits superior electrical properties but also forms a better junction with other semiconductors. A high-quality crack-filled graphene/Si Schottky junction solar cell is achieved, demonstrating the highest fill factor (0.79) and best efficiency (12.3%). PMID:25619427

  10. Firefly Luciferase and Rluc8 Exhibit Differential Sensitivity to Oxidative Stress in Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czupryna, Julie; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, firefly Luciferase (fLuc) has been used in a wide range of biological assays, providing insight into gene regulation, protein-protein interactions, cell proliferation, and cell migration. However, it has also been well established that fLuc activity can be highly sensitive to its surrounding environment. In this study, we found that when various cancer cell lines (HeLa, MCF-7, and 293T) stably expressing fLuc were treated with staurosporine (STS), there was a rapid loss in bioluminescence. In contrast, a stable variant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc), RLuc8, exhibited significantly prolonged functionality under the same conditions. To identify the specific underlying mechanism(s) responsible for the disparate sensitivity of RLuc8 and fLuc to cellular stress, we conducted a series of inhibition studies that targeted known intracellular protein degradation/modification pathways associated with cell death. Interestingly, these studies suggested that reactive oxygen species, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), was responsible for the diminution of fLuc activity. Consistent with these findings, the direct application of H2O2 to HeLa cells also led to a reduction in fLuc bioluminescence, while H2O2 scavengers stabilized fLuc activity. Comparatively, RLuc8 was far less sensitive to ROS. These observations suggest that fLuc activity can be substantially altered in studies where ROS levels become elevated and can potentially lead to ambiguous or misleading findings. PMID:21603648

  11. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin [Department of Pathology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 174 Changhai Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Feitelson, Mark A. [Department of Biology, College of Science and Technology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122 (United States); Gao Hengjun [National Engineering Center for Biochip at Shanghai, Shanghai 201203 (China); Zhu Minghua [Department of Pathology, Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, 174 Changhai Road, Shanghai 200433 (China)], E-mail: mhzhu2000@hotmail.com

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  12. Targeted images of KB cells using folate-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathinaraj, Pierson; Lee, Kyubae; Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid-coated gold (GM) nanoparticles were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Folic acid (F) was then conjugated to the GM to preferentially target oral squamous cancer (KB) cells with folate receptors expressed on their membranes and facilitate the transit of the nanoparticles across the cell membrane. Finally, a fluorescence dye (Atto) was conjugated to the nanoparticles to visualize their internalization into KB cells. After culture of the cells in a medium containing GM and folate-conjugated GM (GF), the interaction of surface-modified gold nanoparticles with KB cells was studied.

  13. Induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells by targeting mitochondria with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire, M M; Lakatos, M; Springer, A; Clemens, A; Appelhans, D; Krause-Buchholz, U; Pompe, W; Rödel, G; Mkandawire, M

    2015-06-28

    A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell death. The ability to target Au nanoparticles into mitochondria of breast cancer cells and induce apoptosis reveals an alternative application of Au nanoparticles in photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26022234

  14. Collective optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles embedded in ion-implanted silica.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torres, C; López-Suárez, A; Can-Uc, B; Rangel-Rojo, R; Tamayo-Rivera, L; Oliver, A

    2015-07-24

    The study of the third-order optical nonlinear response exhibited by a composite containing gold nanoparticles and silicon quantum dots nucleated by ion implantation in a high-purity silica matrix is presented. The nanocomposites were explored as an integrated configuration containing two different ion-implanted distributions. The time-resolved optical Kerr gate and z-scan techniques were conducted using 80 fs pulses at a 825 nm wavelength; while the nanosecond response was investigated by a vectorial two-wave mixing method at 532 nm with 1 ns pulses. An ultrafast purely electronic nonlinearity was associated to the optical Kerr effect for the femtosecond experiments, while a thermal effect was identified as the main mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical refraction induced by nanosecond pulses. Comparative experimental tests for examining the contribution of the Au and Si distributions to the total third-order optical response were carried out. We consider that the additional defects generated by consecutive ion irradiations in the preparation of ion-implanted samples do not notably modify the off-resonance electronic optical nonlinearities; but they do result in an important change for near-resonant nanosecond third-order optical phenomena exhibited by the closely spaced nanoparticle distributions. PMID:26135968

  15. Human Endometrial Side Population Cells Exhibit Genotypic, Phenotypic and Functional Features of Somatic Stem Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irene Cervelló; Claudia Gil-Sanchis; Aymara Mas; Francisco Delgado-Rosas; José Antonio Martínez-Conejero; Amparo Galán; Alicia Martínez-Romero; Sebastian Martínez; Ismael Navarro; Jaime Ferro; José Antonio Horcajadas; Francisco José Esteban; José Enrique O'Connor; Antonio Pellicer; Carlos Simón; Joanna Mary Bridger

    2010-01-01

    During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC) population. Here we

  16. Nanoparticle analysis of cancer cells by light transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, N; Johnson, J; Stack, M S; Szajko, J; Sander, C; Rebuyon, R; Deatsch, A; Easton, J; Tanner, C E; Ruggiero, S T

    2015-09-01

    We have measured the optical properties of cancer and normal whole cells and lysates using light transmission spectroscopy (LTS). LTS provides both the optical extinction coefficient in the wavelength range from 220 to 1100nm and (by spectral inversion using a Mie model) the particle distribution density in the size range from 1 to 3000nm. Our current work involves whole cells and lysates of cultured human oral cells in liquid suspension. We found systematic differences in the optical extinction between cancer and normal whole cells and lysates, which translate to different particle size distributions (PSDs) for these materials. Specifically, we found that cancer cells have distinctly lower concentrations of nanoparticles with diameters less than 100nm and have higher concentrations of particles with diameters from 100 to 1000nm-results that hold for both whole cells and lysates. We also found a power-law dependence of particle density with diameter over several orders of magnitude. PMID:25981981

  17. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells with Nanoparticle-Enabled Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Andrew R.; Singh, Ravi N.; Carroll, David L.; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that multiple tumor types are sustained by a small population of transformed stem-like cells that have the ability to both self-renew and give rise to non-tumorigenic daughter cells that constitute the bulk of a tumor. These cells, which generally constitute a minority of the overall cancer cell population, are highly resistant to conventional therapies and persist following treatment, leading to disease relapse and the formation of distant metastases. Therapies that disrupt the maintenance and survival of cancer stem cells are the subject of active current investigation. This review discusses recent approaches to the application of nanomedicine to the targeting and elimination of cancer stem cells. Specifically, recent publications in the areas of nanoparticle-enabled drug and nucleic acid delivery and photothermal therapy are addressed. PMID:24383043

  18. Biomedical Applications of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Delivering Genes and Remote Control of Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Jon

    2013-03-01

    The use of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for biomedical applications was first proposed in the 1920s as a way to measure the rehological properties of the cell's cytoplasm. Since that time, magnetic micro- and nanoparticle synthesis, coating and bio-functionalization have advanced significantly, as have the applications for these particles. Magnetic micro- and nanoparticles are now used in a variety of biomedical techniques such as targeted drug delivery, MRI contrast enhancement, gene transfection, immno-assay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. This talk will focus on magnetic nanoparticle targeting to and actuation of cell surface receptors to control cell signaling cascades to control cell behavior. This technology has applications in disease therapy, cell engineering and regenerative medicine. The use of magnetic nanoparticles and oscillating magnet arrays for enhanced gene delivery will also be discussed.

  19. Self-assembled targeting of cancer cells by iron(III)-doped, silica nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Self-assembled targeting of cancer cells by iron(III)- doped, silica nanoparticles K. K. Pohaku for endocytosis. Compared to plain silica nanoparticles, iron enriched ones are shown to be target imaging, by making them more selective and thereby reducing the nanoparticle dose. Iron

  20. A rapid bioassay for single bacterial cell quantitation using bioconjugated nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Tan, Weihong

    A rapid bioassay for single bacterial cell quantitation using bioconjugated nanoparticles Xiaojun for analysis. Here, we report a bioconjugated nanoparticle-based bioassay for in situ pathogen quantification down to single bacterium within 20 min. The bio- conjugated nanoparticle provides an extremely high

  1. Glial cells, but not neurons, exhibit a controllable response to a localized inflammatory microenvironment in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sommakia, Salah; Rickus, Jenna L.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design long-lasting intracortical implants hinges on understanding the factors leading to the loss of neuronal density and the formation of the glial scar. In this study, we modify a common in vitro mixed cortical culture model using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to examine the responses of microglia, astrocytes, and neurons to microwire segments. We also use dip-coated polyethylene glycol (PEG), which we have previously shown can modulate impedance changes to neural microelectrodes, to control the cellular responses. We find that microglia, as expected, exhibit an elevated response to LPS-coated microwire for distances of up to 150 ?m, and that this elevated response can be mitigated by co-depositing PEG with LPS. Astrocytes exhibit a more complex, distance-dependent response, whereas neurons do not appear to be affected by the type or magnitude of glial response within this in vitro model. The discrepancy between our in vitro responses and typically observed in vivo responses suggest the importance of using a systems approach to understand the responses of the various brain cell types in a chronic in vivo setting, as well as the necessity of studying the roles of cell types not native to the brain. Our results further indicate that the loss of neuronal density observed in vivo is not a necessary consequence of elevated glial activation. PMID:25452724

  2. Enhanced low-temperature power density of solid oxide fuel cell by nickel nanoparticle infiltration into pre-fired Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia anode.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lee-Seung; Park, Jae Layng; Lee, Sungkyu; Jin, Yun-Ho; Hong, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Chan-Gi; Kim, Bum Sung

    2014-12-01

    The Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode morphology of an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) unit cell was improved by nickel nanoparticle infiltration. A colloidal route was selected for efficient fabrication of nickel metal nanoparticles and subsequent infiltration into the Ni/YSZ anode of a pre-fired SOFC unit cell. The power density of the anode-supported SOFC unit cell was measured by the potentiostatic method to investigate the effect of nickel nanoparticle infiltration. The increase in the power density of the Ni/YSZ anode with nickel nanoparticle infiltration became gradually less significant as the SOFC operating temperature increased from 700 to 800 degrees C. The improved performance of the Ni/YSZ anode with nickel nanoparticle infiltration compared to that of an anode without nickel nanoparticles is tentatively attributed to two factors: The discretely distributed nanoparticles on the nanostructured electrodes exhibited significant catalytic effects on the electrochemical performance of the electrodes, in addition to substantially increasing the triple phase boundary lengths. PMID:25970993

  3. Doxycycline exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in CF bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bensman, Timothy J; Nguyen, Albert N; Rao, Adupa P; Beringer, Paul M

    2012-10-01

    A hallmark of cystic fibrosis is the massive recruitment of neutrophils into the lung compartment in response to chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. The overexuberant neutrophilic response results in release of proteases (e.g. neutrophil elastase and matrix metalloproteinase-9) leading to matrix breakdown, airway remodeling, and progressive loss of lung function. Doxycycline is used clinically for the management of periodontitis due to its potent direct inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases; however, little is known regarding its potential anti-inflammatory properties and clinical utility in the context of cystic fibrosis airway disease. CF (IB3-1) and corrected (S9) bronchial epithelial cell lines were used to determine the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects of doxycycline in-vitro. Exposure to doxycycline, at low concentrations, resulted in minimal cell death and dose dependent reductions in release of CXCL-8 and MMP-9 protein. To confirm these findings, mechanistic analysis revealed ERK 1/2, p38, and JNK, but not NF-?B p65 dependent cell signaling inhibition with doxycycline treatment. These findings indicate that doxycycline exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in CF lung epithelial cells at concentrations below the cytotoxic potential. These data are encouraging and indicate in-vivo studies are warranted. PMID:22771903

  4. A dose-controlled system for air-liquid interface cell exposure and application to zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anke Gabriele Lenz; Erwin Karg; Bernd Lentner; Vlad Dittrich; Christina Brandenberger; Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser; Holger Schulz; George A Ferron; Otmar Schmid

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Engineered nanoparticles are becoming increasingly ubiquitous and their toxicological effects on human health, as well as on the ecosystem, have become a concern. Since initial contact with nanoparticles occurs at the epithelium in the lungs (or skin, or eyes), in vitro cell studies with nanoparticles require dose-controlled systems for delivery of nanoparticles to epithelial cells cultured at the air-liquid

  5. Genotoxic responses to titanium dioxide nanoparticles and fullerene in gpt delta transgenic MEF cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    An Xu; Yunfei Chai; Takehiko Nohmi; Tom K Hei

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles and fullerene (C60) are two attractive manufactured nanoparticles with great promise in industrial and medical applications. However, little is known about the genotoxic response of TiO2 nanoparticles and C60 in mammalian cells. In the present study, we determined the mutation fractions induced by either TiO2 nanoparticles or C60 in gpt delta transgenic mouse primary embryo

  6. Biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles for in vivo stem cell tracking.

    PubMed

    Cova, Lidia; Bigini, Paolo; Diana, Valentina; Sitia, Leopoldo; Ferrari, Raffaele; Pesce, Ruggiero Maria; Khalaf, Rushd; Bossolasco, Patrizia; Ubezio, Paolo; Lupi, Monica; Tortarolo, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Giardino, Daniela; Silani, Vincenzo; Morbidelli, Massimo; Salmona, Mario; Moscatelli, Davide

    2013-06-21

    Efficient application of stem cells to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases requires safe cell tracking to follow stem cell fate over time in the host environment after transplantation. In this work, for the first time, fluorescent and biocompatible methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based nanoparticles (fluoNPs) were synthesized through a free-radical co-polymerization process with a fluorescent macromonomer obtained by linking Rhodamine B and hydroxyethyl methacrylate. We demonstrate that the fluoNPs produced by polymerization of MMA-Rhodamine complexes (1) were efficient for the labeling and tracking of multipotent human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs); (2) did not alter the main biological features of hAFCs (such as viability, cell growth and metabolic activity); (3) enabled us to determine the longitudinal bio-distribution of hAFCs in different brain areas after graft in the brain ventricles of healthy mice by a direct fluorescence-based technique. The reliability of our approach was furthermore confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging analyses, carried out by incubating hAFCs with both superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and fluoNPs. Our data suggest that these finely tunable and biocompatible fluoNPs can be exploited for the longitudinal tracking of stem cells. PMID:23690139

  7. Intracellular drug release from curcumin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles induces G2/M block in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Verderio, Paolo; Bonetti, Paolo; Colombo, Miriam; Pandolfi, Laura; Prosperi, Davide

    2013-03-11

    PLGA nanoparticles are among the most studied polymer nanoformulations for several drugs against different kinds of malignant diseases, thanks to their in vivo stability and tumor localization exploiting the well-documented "enhanced permeation and retention" (EPR) effect. In this paper, we have developed uniform curcumin-bearing PLGA nanoparticles by a single-emulsion process, which exhibited a curcumin release following a Fickian-law diffusion over 10 days in vitro. PLGA nanoparticles were about 120 nm in size, as determined by dynamic light scattering, with a surface negative charge of -30 mV. The loading ratio of encapsulated drug in our PLGA nanoformulation was 8 wt%. PLGA encapsulation provided efficient protection of curcumin from environment, as determined by fluorescence emission experiments. Next, we have investigated the possibility to study the intracellular degradation of nanoparticles associated with a specific G2/M blocking effect on MCF7 breast cancer cells caused by curcumin release in the cytoplasm, which provided direct evidence on the mechanism of action of our nanocomplex. This study was carried out using Annexin V-based cell death analysis, MTT assessment of proliferation, flow cytometry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. PLGA nanoparticles proved to be completely safe, suggesting a potential utilization of this nanocomplex to improve the intrinsically poor bioavailability of curcumin for the treatment of severe malignant breast cancer. PMID:23350530

  8. Commercial Nanoparticles for Stem Cell Labeling and Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqi; Xu, Chenjie; Ow, Hooisweng

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy provides promising solutions for diseases and injuries that conventional medicines and therapies cannot effectively treat. To achieve its full therapeutic potentials, the homing process, survival, differentiation, and engraftment of stem cells post transplantation must be clearly understood. To address this need, non-invasive imaging technologies based on nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed to track transplanted stem cells. Here we summarize existing commercial NPs which can act as contrast agents of three commonly used imaging modalities, including fluorescence imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging, for stem cell labeling and tracking. Specifically, we go through their technologies, industry distributors, applications and existing concerns in stem cell research. Finally, we provide an industry perspective on the potential challenges and future for the development of new NP products. PMID:23946821

  9. Nanoparticle assisted photothermal deformation of individual neuronal organelles and cells.

    PubMed

    Romero, V H; Kereselidze, Z; Egido, W; Michaelides, E A; Santamaria, F; Peralta, X G

    2014-11-01

    Stimulation of the localized surface plasmon of metallic nanoparticles has been shown to be an effective mechanism to induce photothermal damage in biological tissues. However, few studies have focused on single cell or subcellular ablation. Our results show that, upon incubation, gold nanostars are internalized by neurons of acute mouse cerebellar brain slices, clustering inside or close to the nucleus. By stimulating the nanostars' surface plasmon using a femtosecond laser, we show deformation of single nuclei and single cells. Given its precision and extremely localized effect, this is a promising technique for photothermal therapy in areas sensitive to collateral thermal damage such as the nervous system. PMID:25426326

  10. Nanoparticle assisted photothermal deformation of individual neuronal organelles and cells

    PubMed Central

    Romero, V. H.; Kereselidze, Z.; Egido, W.; Michaelides, E. A.; Santamaria, F.; Peralta, X. G.

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of the localized surface plasmon of metallic nanoparticles has been shown to be an effective mechanism to induce photothermal damage in biological tissues. However, few studies have focused on single cell or subcellular ablation. Our results show that, upon incubation, gold nanostars are internalized by neurons of acute mouse cerebellar brain slices, clustering inside or close to the nucleus. By stimulating the nanostars’ surface plasmon using a femtosecond laser, we show deformation of single nuclei and single cells. Given its precision and extremely localized effect, this is a promising technique for photothermal therapy in areas sensitive to collateral thermal damage such as the nervous system. PMID:25426326

  11. Mast cells contribute to altered vascular reactivity and ischemia-reperfusion injury following cerium oxide nanoparticle instillation

    PubMed Central

    WINGARD, CHRISTOPHER J.; WALTERS, DIANNE M.; CATHEY, BROOK L.; HILDERBRAND, SUSANA C.; KATWA, PRANITA; LIN, SIJIE; KE, PU CHUN; PODILA, RAMAKRISHNA; RAO, APPARAO; LUST, ROBERT M.; BROWN, JARED M.

    2011-01-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) represents an important nanomaterial with wide ranging applications. However, little is known regarding how CeO2 exposure may influence pulmonary or systemic inflammation. Furthermore, how mast cells would influence inflammatory responses to a nanoparticle exposure is unknown. We thus compared pulmonary and cardiovascular responses between C57BL/6 and B6.Cg-KitW-sh mast cell deficient mice following CeO2 nanoparticle instillation. C57BL/6 mice instilled with CeO2 exhibited mild pulmonary inflammation. However, B6.Cg-KitW-sh mice did not display a similar degree of inflammation following CeO2 instillation. Moreover, C57BL/6 mice instilled with CeO2 exhibited altered aortic vascular responses to adenosine and an increase in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury which was absent in B6.Cg-KitW-sh mice. In vitro CeO2 exposure resulted in increased production of PGD2, TNF-?, IL-6 and osteopontin by cultured mast cells. These findings demonstrate that CeO2 nanoparticles activate mast cells contributing to pulmonary inflammation, impairment of vascular relaxation and exacerbation of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:21043986

  12. Congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia iPS cells exhibit defective MPL-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Shinji; Takayama, Naoya; Jono-Ohnishi, Ryoko; Endo, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Sou; Dohda, Takeaki; Nishi, Masanori; Hamazaki, Yuhei; Ishii, Ei-ichi; Kaneko, Shin; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kunishima, Shinji; Eto, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (CAMT) is caused by the loss of thrombopoietin receptor–mediated (MPL-mediated) signaling, which causes severe pancytopenia leading to bone marrow failure with onset of thrombocytopenia and anemia prior to leukopenia. Because Mpl–/– mice do not exhibit the human disease phenotype, we used an in vitro disease tracing system with induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from a CAMT patient (CAMT iPSCs) and normal iPSCs to investigate the role of MPL signaling in hematopoiesis. We found that MPL signaling is essential for maintenance of the CD34+ multipotent hematopoietic progenitor (MPP) population and development of the CD41+GPA+ megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitor (MEP) population, and its role in the fate decision leading differentiation toward megakaryopoiesis or erythropoiesis differs considerably between normal and CAMT cells. Surprisingly, complimentary transduction of MPL into normal or CAMT iPSCs using a retroviral vector showed that MPL overexpression promoted erythropoiesis in normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), but impaired erythropoiesis and increased aberrant megakaryocyte production in CAMT iPSC–derived CD34+ HPCs, reflecting a difference in the expression of the transcription factor FLI1. These results demonstrate that impaired transcriptional regulation of the MPL signaling that normally governs megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis underlies CAMT. PMID:23908116

  13. A cleavage-resistant urokinase plasminogen activator receptor exhibits dysregulated cell-surface clearance.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Evelyn C; Manchanda, Naveen

    2010-04-23

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) binds urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) and participates in plasminogen activation in addition to modulating several cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and migration. u-PAR is susceptible to proteolysis by its cognate ligand and several other proteases. To elucidate the biological significance of receptor cleavage by u-PA, we engineered and expressed a two-chain urokinase plasminogen activator (tcu-PA) cleavage-resistant u-PAR (cr-u-PAR). This mutated receptor was similar to wild-type u-PAR in binding u-PA and initiating plasminogen activation. However, cr-u-PAR exhibited accelerated internalization and resurfacing due to direct association with the endocytic receptor alpha(2)-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in the absence of the enzyme x inhibitor complex of tcu-PA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (tcu-PA.PAI-1). cr-u-PAR-expressing cells had enhanced migration compared with wild-type u-PAR-expressing cells, and cr-u-PAR was less sensitive to chymotrypsin cleavage as compared with wt u-PAR. Our studies suggest that these mutations in the linker region result in a rearrangement within the cr-u-PAR structure that makes it resemble its ligand-bound form. This constitutively active variant may mimic highly glycosylated cleavage-resistant u-PAR expressed in certain highly malignant cancer-cells. PMID:20177061

  14. Damnacanthal, a noni component, exhibits antitumorigenic activity in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nualsanit, Thararat; Rojanapanthu, Pleumchitt; Gritsanapan, Wandee; Lee, Seong-Ho; Lawson, Darunee; Baek, Seung Joon

    2012-08-01

    Damnacanthal, an anthraquinone compound, is isolated from the roots of Morinda citrifolia L. (noni), which has been used for traditional therapy in several chronic diseases including cancer. Although noni has been consumed for a long time in Asian and Polynesian countries, the molecular mechanisms by which it exerts several benefits are starting to emerge. In this report, we examined systematic approaches on the cancer-suppressing capability of damnacanthal in colorectal tumorigenesis. Damnacanthal exhibits cell growth arrest as well as caspase activity induction in colorectal cancer cells. We also examined several potential target proteins and found that the proapoptotic protein nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory activated gene-1 (NAG-1) is highly induced. Subsequently, we have found that damnacanthal also enhances transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein ? (C/EBP?), which controls NAG-1 transcriptional activity. Blocking of C/EBP? by shRNA results in the reduction of NAG-1 expression as well as caspase activity in the presence of damnacanthal. Taken together, these results indicate that damnacanthal increases antitumorigenic activity in human colorectal cancer cells and that C/EBP? plays a role in damnacanthal-induced NAG-1 expression. PMID:21852088

  15. Gold nanoparticles electroporation enhanced polyplex delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuyan; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Rajagopalan, Kartik Kumar; Wang, Shengnian

    2014-07-01

    Nonviral methods have been explored as the replacement of viral systems for their low toxicity and immunogenicity. However, they have yet to reach levels competitive to their viral counterparts. In this paper, we combined physical and chemical methods to improve the performance of polyplex delivery of DNA and small interfering RNA. Specifically, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used to carry polyplex (a chemical approach) while electroporation (a physical approach) was applied for fast and direct cytosolic delivery. In this hybrid approach, cationic polymer molecules condense and/or protect genetic probes as usual while AuNPs help fix polycations to reduce their cytotoxicity and promote the transfection efficiency of electroporation. AuNPs of various sizes were first coated with polyethylenimine, which were further conjugated with DNA plasmids or small interfering RNA molecules to form AuNPs-polyplex. The hybrid nanoparticles were then mixed with cells and introduced into cell cytosol by electroporation. The delivery efficiency was evaluated with both model anchor cells (i.e., NIH/3T3) and suspension cells (i.e., K562), together with their impact on cell viability. We found that AuNP-polyplex showed 1.5?2 folds improvement on the transfection efficiency with no significant increase of toxicity when compared to free plasmid delivery by electroporation alone. Such a combination of physical and chemical delivery concept may stimulate further exploration in the delivery of various therapeutic materials for both in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24777715

  16. Cell-specific expression of artificial microRNAs targeting essential genes exhibit potent antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chenyu; Liu, Hao; Chen, Ping; Ye, Jingjia; Teng, Lisong; Jia, Zhenyu; Cao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    To achieve specific and potent antitumor effect of hepatocyte carcinoma cells, replication defective adenoviral vectors, namely rAd/AFP-amiRG, rAd/AFP-amiRE and rAd/AFP-amiRP, were constructed which were armed with artificial microRNAs (amiRs) targeting essential functional genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E and DNA polymerase ? respectively under the control of a recombinant promoter comprised of human ?-fetoprotein enhancer and basal promoter. The AFP enhancer/promoter showed specific high transcription activity in AFP-positive HCC cells Hep3B, HepG2 and SMMC7721, while low in AFP-negative cell Bcap37. All artificial microRNAs exhibited efficient knockdown of target genes. Decreased ATP production and protein synthesis was observed in rAd/AFP-amiRG and rAd/AFP-amiRE treated HCC cells. All three recombinant adenoviruses showed efficient blockage of cell cycle progression and significant suppression of HCC cells in vitro. In nude mice model bearing Hep3B xenograft, administration of rAd/AFP-amiRG showed potent antitumor effect. The strategy of tumor-specific knockdown of genes essential for cell survival and proliferation may suggest a novel promising approach for HCC gene therapy. PMID:25691059

  17. Comparative cytotoxicity studies of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles in murine glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Grudzinski, Ireneusz P; Bystrzejewski, Michal; Cywinska, Monika A; Kosmider, Anita; Poplawska, Magdalena; Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Fijalek, Zbigniew; Ostrowska, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (CEINs) have recently emerged as a new class of magnetic nanomaterials with a great potential for an increasing number of biomedical applications. To address the current deficient knowledge of cellular responses due to CEIN exposures, we focused on the investigation of internalization profile and resulting cytotoxic effects of CEINs (0.0001-100 ?g/ml) in murine glioma cells (GL261) in vitro. The studied CEIN samples were characterized (TEM, FT-IR, Zeta potential, Boehm titration) and examined as raw and purified nanomaterials with various surface chemistry composition. Of the four type CEINs (the mean diameter 47-56 nm) studied here, the as-synthesized raw nanoparticles (Fe@C/Fe) exhibited high cytotoxic effects on the plasma cell membrane (LDH, Calcein AM/PI) and mitochondria (MTT, JC-1) causing some pro-apoptotic evens (Annexin V/PI) in glioma cells. The effects of the purified (Fe@C) and surface-modified (Fe@C-COOH and Fe@C-(CH2)2COOH) CEINs were found in quite similar patterns; however, most of these cytotoxic events were slightly diminished compared to those induced by Fe@C/Fe. The study showed that the surface-functionalized CEINs affected the cell cycle progression in both S and G2/M phases to a greater extent compared to that of the rest of nanoparticles studied to data. Taken all together, the present results highlight the importance of the rational design of CEINs as their physicochemical features such as morphology, hydrodynamic size, impurity profiles, and especially surface characteristics are critical determinants of different cytotoxic responses. PMID:24632386

  18. Manganese Nanoparticle Activates Mitochondrial Dependent Apoptotic Signaling and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-01-01

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles (~25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25–400 µg/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C? (PKC?), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. PMID:21856324

  19. NKp46+CD3+ cells - a novel non-conventional T-cell subset in cattle exhibiting both NK cell and T-cell features

    PubMed Central

    Connelley, Timothy K.; Longhi, Cassandra; Burrells, Alison; Degnan, Kathryn; Hope, Jayne; Allan, Alasdair; Hammond, John A.; Storset, Anne K.; Morrison, W. Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The NKp46 receptor demonstrates a high degree of lineage-specificity, being expressed almost exclusively in natural killer cells. Previous studies have demonstrated NKp46 expression by T-cells, but NKp46+CD3+ cells are rare and almost universally associated with NKp46 acquisition by T-cells following stimulation. In this study we demonstrate the existence of a population of NKp46+CD3+ cells resident in normal bovine PBMC which include cells of both the ?? TCR+ and ?? TCR+ lineages and is present at a frequency of 0.1-1.7%. NKp46+CD3+ cells express transcripts for a broad repertoire of both natural killer (NKR) and T-cell receptors (TCR) and also the CD3?, DAP10 and Fc?R1? but not DAP12 adaptor proteins. In vitro functional analysis of NKp46+CD3+ cells confirm that NKp46, CD16 and CD3 signalling pathways are all functionally competent and capable of mediating-re-direct cytolysis. However, only CD3 cross-ligation elicits IFN-? release. NKp46+CD3+ cells exhibit cytotoxic activity against autologous Theileria parva infected cells in vitro and during in vivo challenge with this parasite an expansion of NKp46+CD3+ cells was observed in some animals, indicating the cells have the potential to act as an anti-pathogen effector population. The results presented herein identifies and describes a novel non-conventional NKp46+CD3+ T-cell subset that is phenotypically and functionally distinct from conventional NK and T-cells. The ability to exploit both NKR and TCR suggests these cells may fill a functional niche at the interface of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:24639352

  20. Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder exhibit an altered phenotype of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a key role in immune homeostasis in vivo. Tregs have a critical role in preventing the development of autoimmune diseases and defects in Treg function are implicated in various autoimmune disorders. Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have higher prevalence of autoimmune disorders than the general population. We hypothesized that war veterans with PTSD would exhibit a decreased number and/or altered phenotype of Tregs. Methods We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with PTSD (N?=?21) (mean age?=?45.9) and age-matched healthy controls (N?=?23) (mean age?=?45.7) to determine the proportion of Tregs and their phenotype according to the expression of CD127 and HLA-DR markers which describe the differentiation stages of Tregs. In addition, we analyzed the expression of membrane ectoenzyme CD39 on Tregs of the study groups, an important component of the suppressive machinery of Tregs. Results We found no differences in the proportion of Tregs between PTSD patients and controls, but PTSD patients had a higher percentage of CD127-HLA-DR- Tregs and a lower percentage of CD127loHLA-DR+ Tregs compared to controls. There was no difference in expression of CD39 on Tregs of the study groups. Conclusions Although the proportions of Tregs in PTSD patients were unchanged, we found that they exhibit a different phenotype of Tregs that might be less suppressive. Impaired differentiation and function of Tregs is likely involved in disruption of immune homeostasis in PTSD. PMID:25670936

  1. Everolimus exhibits efficacy as a radiosensitizer in a model of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mauceri, Helena J; Sutton, Harold G; Darga, Thomas E; Kocherginsky, Masha; Kochanski, Joel; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Vokes, Everett E

    2012-05-01

    Signaling pathways that activate mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) are altered in many human cancers and these alterations are associated with prognosis and treatment response. mTOR inhibition can restore sensitivity to DNA damaging agents such as cisplatin. The rapamycin derivative everolimus exhibits antitumor activity and is approved for patients with renal cell cancer. Clinically, everolimus has also been evaluated in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that were refractory to chemotherapy and epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We tested the effects of combined treatment with everolimus (RAD001) and fractionated radiation using a xenograft model of human NSCLC (A549 cells). In growth studies, mean tumor volume was reduced in the everolimus plus 30 Gy cohort with significant tumor growth suppression compared to 30 Gy alone (p=0015), or everolimus alone (p<0.001, ANOVA). everolimus (20 nM) significantly reduced protein levels of the mTOR downstream effector p70-S6K compared with radiation and vehicle (p=0.05, ANOVA) and significantly suppressed phospho-p70-S6K levels compared with all other treatments (p<0.001, ANOVA). We also evaluated everolimus and radiation effects on gene expression in A549 cells. Everolimus ± 5 Gy suppressed endothelin 1 and lactate dehydrogenase expression and increased VEGFA, p21, hypoxia-inducible factor-1? and SLC2A1 (facilitated glucose transporter 1). mTOR mRNA levels were unaffected while TNF-? levels were increased with everolimus + 5 Gy compared to either treatment alone. These findings suggest that everolimus increases the antitumor activity of radiation. Clinical trials combining everolimus with fractionated radiation in patients with NSCLC are warranted. PMID:22294050

  2. Differential uptake of nanoparticles by endothelial cells through polyelectrolytes with affinity for caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Julia; Christensen, Jon; Shastri, V. Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) constitute an important medium for the targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics. Targeting of NPs to a specific cell type is traditionally achieved through the modification of the NP surface with peptides, aptamers, or other motifs that specifically recognize a cell-surface receptor, leading to internalization of NPs via clathrin and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. We have discovered that modifying the NP surface with anionic polyelectrolytes of varying lipophilicity can regulate the uptake of lipid NPs by endothelial and epithelial cells. Furthermore, we report the finding that synthetic polyelectrolytes composed of an aromatic sulfonic acid backbone exhibit specific affinity for caveolae of endothelial cells. By exploiting the higher expression of caveolae in endothelial cells in comparison with epithelial cells, a purely physiochemical approach to the targeted uptake of lipid NPs to endothelial cells is demonstrated. The ability to confer preferential affinity for NPs to cell surface domains by varying the charge and lipophilic characteristics of an NP surface offers a general means of achieving targeted delivery without the need for receptor–ligand-type targeting strategies. PMID:24516167

  3. Differential uptake of nanoparticles by endothelial cells through polyelectrolytes with affinity for caveolae.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Julia; Christensen, Jon; Shastri, V Prasad

    2014-02-25

    Nanoparticles (NPs) constitute an important medium for the targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics. Targeting of NPs to a specific cell type is traditionally achieved through the modification of the NP surface with peptides, aptamers, or other motifs that specifically recognize a cell-surface receptor, leading to internalization of NPs via clathrin and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. We have discovered that modifying the NP surface with anionic polyelectrolytes of varying lipophilicity can regulate the uptake of lipid NPs by endothelial and epithelial cells. Furthermore, we report the finding that synthetic polyelectrolytes composed of an aromatic sulfonic acid backbone exhibit specific affinity for caveolae of endothelial cells. By exploiting the higher expression of caveolae in endothelial cells in comparison with epithelial cells, a purely physiochemical approach to the targeted uptake of lipid NPs to endothelial cells is demonstrated. The ability to confer preferential affinity for NPs to cell surface domains by varying the charge and lipophilic characteristics of an NP surface offers a general means of achieving targeted delivery without the need for receptor-ligand-type targeting strategies. PMID:24516167

  4. Photothermal release of small molecules from gold nanoparticles in live cells.

    PubMed

    Zandberg, Wesley F; Bakhtiari, Amir Bahman Samsam; Erno, Zach; Hsiao, Dennis; Gates, Byron D; Claydon, Thomas; Branda, Neil R

    2012-08-01

    The ability of gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs) to generate heat efficiently by absorbing visible and near-infrared (NIR) light holds great promise as a means to trigger chemical and biochemical events near the NPs. Previous demonstrations show that pulsed laser irradiation can selectively elicit the release of a fluorescent dye covalently anchored to the NP surface through a heat-labile linker without measurably changing the temperature of the surroundings. This article reports that the authors demonstrate the biological efficacy of this approach to photodelivery by showing that the decorated Au NPs are rapidly internalized by cells, are stable under physiological conditions, are nontoxic, and exhibit nonlethal photorelease following exposure to pulsed laser radiation. These observations, further supported by the versatility of our delivery motif, reaffirm the potential for further development of nonlethal photothermal therapeutics and their future relevance to such fields as gene therapy and stem-cell differentiation. PMID:22100758

  5. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Sargassum swartzii and its cytotoxicity effect on HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhas, T. Stalin; Kumar, V. Ganesh; Karthick, V.; Govindaraju, K.; Shankara Narayana, T.

    2014-12-01

    In this investigation, biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Sargassum swartzii and its cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells is reported. The biological synthesis involved the reduction of chloroauric acid led to the formation of AuNPs within 5 min at 60 °C and the formation of AuNPs was confirmed using UV-vis spectrophotometer. The AuNPs were stable; spherical in shape with well-defined dimensions, and the average size of the particle is 35 nm. A zeta potential value of -27.6 mV revealed synthesized AuNPs were highly stable. The synthesized AuNPs exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis was measured by DAPI (4?,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride) staining.

  6. NKp46+ CD3+ cells: a novel nonconventional T cell subset in cattle exhibiting both NK cell and T cell features.

    PubMed

    Connelley, Timothy K; Longhi, Cassandra; Burrells, Alison; Degnan, Kathryn; Hope, Jayne; Allan, Alasdair J; Hammond, John A; Storset, Anne K; Morrison, W Ivan

    2014-04-15

    The NKp46 receptor demonstrates a high degree of lineage specificity, being expressed almost exclusively in NK cells. Previous studies have demonstrated NKp46 expression by T cells, but NKp46+ CD3+ cells are rare and almost universally associated with NKp46 acquisition by T cells following stimulation. In this study we demonstrate the existence of a population of NKp46+ CD3+ cells resident in normal bovine PBMCs that includes cells of both the ?? TCR+ and ?? TCR+ lineages and is present at a frequency of 0.1-1.7%. NKp46+ CD3+ cells express transcripts for a broad repertoire of both NKRs and TCRs and also the CD3?, DAP10, and Fc?R1? but not DAP12 adaptor proteins. In vitro functional analysis of NKp46+ CD3+ cells confirm that NKp46, CD16, and CD3 signaling pathways are all functionally competent and capable of mediating/redirecting cytolysis. However, only CD3 cross-ligation elicits IFN-? release. NKp46+ CD3+ cells exhibit cytotoxic activity against autologous Theileria parva-infected cells in vitro, and during in vivo challenge with this parasite an expansion of NKp46+ CD3+ cells was observed in some animals, indicating the cells have the potential to act as an anti-pathogen effector population. The results in this study identify and describe a novel nonconventional NKp46+ CD3+ T cell subset that is phenotypically and functionally distinct from conventional NK and T cells. The ability to exploit both NKRs and TCRs suggests these cells may fill a functional niche at the interface of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:24639352

  7. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Silver Nanoparticle Induced Stress on Optically-Trapped Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Krishnamurthy, R. Sagar; Zachariah, Elsa; Santhosh, Chidangil; Chougule, Basavaraj; Praveen, Bhavishna; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    We report here results of a single-cell Raman spectroscopy study of stress effects induced by silver nanoparticles in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A high-sensitivity, high-resolution Raman Tweezers set-up has been used to monitor nanoparticle-induced biochemical changes in optically-trapped single cells. Our micro-Raman spectroscopic study reveals that hMSCs treated with silver nanoparticles undergo oxidative stress at doping levels in excess of 2 µg/ml, with results of a statistical analysis of Raman spectra suggesting that the induced stress becomes more dominant at nanoparticle concentration levels above 3 µg/ml. PMID:22514708

  8. Luminescent solar concentrators and all-inorganic nanoparticle solar cells for solar energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholin, Veronica

    Increasing energy demand and the parallel increase of greenhouse gas emissions are challenging researchers to find new and cleaner energy sources. Solar energy harvesting is arguably the most promising candidate for replacing fossil-fuel power generation. Photovoltaics are the most direct way of collecting solar energy; cost continues to hinder large-scale implementation of photovoltaics, however. Therefore, alternative technologies that will allow the extraction of solar power, while maintaining the overall costs of fabrication, installation, collection, and distribution low, must be explored. This thesis focuses on the fabrication and testing of two types of devices that step up to this challenge: the luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) and all-inorganic nanoparticle solar cells. In these devices I make use of novel materials, semiconducting polymers and inorganic nanoparticles, both of which have lower costs than the crystalline materials used in the fabrication of traditional photovoltaics. Furthermore, the cost of manufacturing LSCs and the nanoparticle solar cells is lower than the manufacturing cost of traditional optics-based concentrators and crystalline solar cells. An LSC is essentially a slab of luminescent material that acts as a planar light pipe. The LSC absorbs incoming photons and channels fluoresced photons toward appropriately located solar cells, which perform the photovoltaic conversion. By covering large areas with relatively inexpensive fluorescing organic dyes or semiconducting polymers, the area of solar cell needed is greatly reduced. Because semiconducting polymers and quantum dots may have small absorption/emission band overlaps, tunable absorption, and longer lifetimes, they are good candidates for LSC fabrication, promising improvement with respect to laser dyes traditionally used to fabricate LSCs. Here the efficiency of LSCs consisting of liquid solutions of semiconducting polymers encased in glass was measured and compared to the efficiency of LSCs based on small molecule laser dyes and on quantum dots. Factors affecting the optical efficiency of the system such as the luminescing properties of the fluorophors were examined. The experimental results were compared to Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results suggest that commercially available quantum dots cannot serve as viable LSC dyes because of large absorption/emission band overlap and relatively low quantum yield. Materials such as Red F demonstrate that semi-conducting polymers with high quantum yield and small absorption/emission band overlap are good candidates for LSCs. Recently, a solar cell system based purely on CdSe and Cite nanoparticles as the absorbing materials was proposed ans it was suggested that its operational mechanism was that of polymer donor/acceptor systems. Here we present solar cells consisting of a sintered active bilayer of CdSe and PbSe nanoparticles in the structure ITO/CdSe/interlayer/PbSe/Al, where an interlayer of LiF or Al2O3 was found necessary to prevent low shunt resistance from suppressing the photovoltaic behavior. We fabricated unoptimized solar cells with a short-circuit current of 6 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 0.18 V, and a fill factor of 41%. External quantum efficiency spectra revealed that photons from the infrared portion of the spectrum were not collected, suggesting that the low bandgap PbSe film did not contribute to the photocurrent of the structure despite exhibiting photoconductivity. Other measurements, however, showed that the PbSe film was indeed necessary to produce a photovoltage and transport electrons. Through sintering, the nanoparticle films acquired bandgaps similar to those of the corresponding bulk materials and became more conductive. Because the PbSe films were found to be considerably more conductive than the CdSe ones, we suggest that the PbSe layer is effectively behaving like a low conductivity electrical contact. Therefore, in contrast to the photovoltaics presented in the seminal research on CdSe/Cite solar cells, the CdSe/PbSe solar cell system presented here d

  9. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. This study investigated the genotoxicity of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide nanoparticles of va...

  10. Drug loading and release on tumor cells using silk fibroin-albumin nanoparticles as carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subia, B.; Kundu, S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric and biodegradable nanoparticles are frequently used in drug delivery systems. In this study silk fibroin-albumin blended nanoparticles were prepared using the desolvation method without any surfactant. These nanoparticles are easily internalized by the cells, reside within perinuclear spaces and act as carriers for delivery of the model drug methotrexate. Methotrexate loaded nanoparticles have better encapsulation efficiency, drug loading ability and less toxicity. The in vitro release behavior of methotrexate from the nanoparticles suggests that about 85% of the drug gets released after 12 days. The encapsulation and loading of a drug would depend on factors such as size, charge and hydrophobicity, which affect drug release. MTT assay and conjugation of particles with FITC demonstrate that the silk fibroin-albumin nanoparticles do not affect the viability and biocompatibility of cells. This blended nanoparticle, therefore, could be a promising nanocarrier for the delivery of drugs and other bioactive molecules.

  11. Biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted ultrasound imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Jie; Rosol, Thomas J; Pan, Xueliang; Voorhees, Jeffrey L

    2007-08-21

    Disease-specific enhanced imaging through a targeted agent promises to improve the specificity of medical ultrasound. Nanoparticles may provide unique advantages for targeted ultrasound imaging due to their novel physical and surface properties. In this study, we examined a nanoparticle agent developed from a biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA). The nanoparticles (mean diameter = 250 nm) were surface conjugated to an anti-Her2 antibody (i.e., Herceptin) for specific binding to breast cancer cells that overexpress Her2 receptors. We examined the targeting specificity and the resultant ultrasound enhancement in Her2-positive and negative cells. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging were used to assess the nanoparticle-cell binding. Her2-positive cells demonstrated substantial staining after incubation with nanoparticle/antibody conjugates, while minimal staining was found in Her2-negative cells, indicating receptor-specific binding of the conjugated PLA nanoparticles. In high-resolution ultrasound B-mode images, the average gray scale of the Her2-positive cells was consistently and significantly higher after nanoparticle treatment (133 +/- 4 in treated cells versus 109 +/- 4 in control, p < 0.001, n = 5), while no difference was detected in the cells that did not overexpress the receptors (117 +/- 3 in treated cells versus 118 +/- 5 in control). In conclusion, the feasibility of using targeted nanoparticles to enhance ultrasonic images was demonstrated in vitro. This may be a promising approach to target cancer biomarkers for site-specific ultrasound imaging. PMID:17671332

  12. Biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted ultrasound imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Jie; Rosol, Thomas J.; Pan, Xueliang; Voorhees, Jeffrey L.

    2007-08-01

    Disease-specific enhanced imaging through a targeted agent promises to improve the specificity of medical ultrasound. Nanoparticles may provide unique advantages for targeted ultrasound imaging due to their novel physical and surface properties. In this study, we examined a nanoparticle agent developed from a biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA). The nanoparticles (mean diameter = 250 nm) were surface conjugated to an anti-Her2 antibody (i.e., Herceptin) for specific binding to breast cancer cells that overexpress Her2 receptors. We examined the targeting specificity and the resultant ultrasound enhancement in Her2-positive and negative cells. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging were used to assess the nanoparticle-cell binding. Her2-positive cells demonstrated substantial staining after incubation with nanoparticle/antibody conjugates, while minimal staining was found in Her2-negative cells, indicating receptor-specific binding of the conjugated PLA nanoparticles. In high-resolution ultrasound B-mode images, the average gray scale of the Her2-positive cells was consistently and significantly higher after nanoparticle treatment (133 ± 4 in treated cells versus 109 ± 4 in control, p < 0.001, n = 5), while no difference was detected in the cells that did not overexpress the receptors (117 ± 3 in treated cells versus 118 ± 5 in control). In conclusion, the feasibility of using targeted nanoparticles to enhance ultrasonic images was demonstrated in vitro. This may be a promising approach to target cancer biomarkers for site-specific ultrasound imaging.

  13. Korean red ginseng extract exhibits neuroprotective effects through inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunyoung; Lee, Youngmoon; Cho, Jungsook

    2014-01-01

    Red ginseng has long been used as a traditional medicine in many East Asian countries including Korea. It is known to exhibit various pharmacological effects, including anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-stress and anti-diabetes activities. To further explore its actions, the present study evaluated effects of Korean red ginseng (KRG) extract on neuronal injury induced by various types of insults using primary cultured rat cortical cells. KRG extract inhibited neuronal damage and generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by excitatory amino acids, such as glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), or by A?(25-35). To elucidate possible mechanism(s) by which KRG extract exerts neuroprotective action, its effects on apoptosis and apoptosis-related signaling molecules in neurons were assessed. KRG extract markedly increased phosphorylation of Bad at Ser 112 and inhibited Bax expression and caspase 3 activity. It also inhibited DNA fragmentation induced by NMDA or A?(25-35). These results indicate that KRG extract protects cultured neurons from excitotoxicity and A?(25-35)-induced toxicity through inhibition of ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. In addition, KRG extract inhibited ?-secretase activity, implying that it may reduce A? peptide formation. Taken together, these findings suggest that KRG extract may be beneficial for the prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24882407

  14. Structure and dynamics of ferroelectric liquid crystal cells exhibiting thresholdless switching.

    PubMed

    Copic, Martin; Maclennan, Joseph E; Clark, Noel A

    2002-02-01

    Surface-stabilized ferroelectric liquid crystal cells are usually bistable, with the spontaneous polarization either up or down, perpendicular to the plane of the cell. In materials with high spontaneous polarization the polarization charge self-interaction leads to a monostable structure that exhibits a thresholdless, "V-shaped" switching of the optical response to an applied voltage. With a model that includes the electrostatic self-energy of the spontaneous polarization, we examine the transition from bistablity to monostability as a function of the polar and nonpolar anchoring energies, the liquid crystal elasticity, and the thickness of the alignment layers. Two bistable and one monostable structures are possible. The bistable state is only obtained when the thickness of the insulating alignment layer and the polar anchoring energy are small, or when the spontaneous polarization is small. From linear stability analysis we get analytical expressions for the limits of stability of the structures. Numerical calculations show that in some ranges of the parameters two structures can coexist. We also present the calculation of the polarization fluctuation modes. The lowest one becomes soft at the continuous transitions among the structures and at the limits of stability. PMID:11863546

  15. Scaffold-independent Patterning of Cells using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suvojit; Biswas, Moanaro; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Puri, Ishwar

    2013-03-01

    Spatial patterning of cells in vitro relies on direct contact of cells on to solid surfaces. Scaffold independent patterning of cells has never been achieved so far. Patterning of cells has wide applications including stem cell biology, tissue architecture and regenerative medicine besides fundamental biology. Magnetized cells in a suspension can be manipulated using an externally applied magnetic field enabling directed patterning. We magnetized mammalian cells by internalization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). A magnetic field is then used to arrange cells in a desired pattern on a substrate or in suspension. The control strategy is derived from the self-assembly of magnetic colloids in a liquid considering magnetostatic interactions. The range of achievable structural features promise novel experimental methods investigating the influence of tissue shape and size on cell population dynamics wherein Fickian diffusion of autocrine growth signals are known to play a significant role. By eliminating the need for a scaffold, intercellular adhesion mechanics and the effects of temporally regulated signals can be investigated. The findings can be applied to novel tissue engineering methods.

  16. Antiproliferative effect of ASC-J9 delivered by PLGA nanoparticles against estrogen-dependent breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Verderio, Paolo; Pandolfi, Laura; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Marinozzi, Maria Rosaria; Vanna, Renzo; Gramatica, Furio; Corsi, Fabio; Colombo, Miriam; Morasso, Carlo; Prosperi, Davide

    2014-08-01

    Among polymeric nanoparticles designed for cancer therapy, PLGA nanoparticles have become one of the most popular polymeric devices for chemotherapeutic-based nanoformulations against several kinds of malignant diseases. Promising properties, including long-circulation time, enhanced tumor localization, interference with "multidrug" resistance effects, and environmental biodegradability, often result in an improvement of the drug bioavailability and effectiveness. In the present work, we have synthesized 1,7-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-hydroxyhepta-1,4,6-trien-3-one (ASC-J9) and developed uniform ASC-J9-loaded PLGA nanoparticles of about 120 nm, which have been prepared by a single-emulsion process. Structural and morphological features of the nanoformulation were analyzed, followed by an accurate evaluation of the in vitro drug release kinetics, which exhibited Fickian law diffusion over 10 days. The intracellular degradation of ASC-J9-bearing nanoparticles within estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells was correlated to a time- and dose-dependent activity of the released drug. A cellular growth inhibition associated with a specific cell cycle G2/M blocking effect caused by ASC-J9 release inside the cytosol allowed us to put forward a hypothesis on the action mechanism of this nanosystem, which led to the final cell apoptosis. Our study was accomplished using Annexin V-based cell death analysis, MTT assessment of proliferation, radical scavenging activity, and intracellular ROS evaluation. Moreover, the intracellular localization of nanoformulated ASC-J9 was confirmed by a Raman optical imaging experiment designed ad hoc. PLGA nanoparticles and ASC-J9 proved also to be safe for a healthy embryo fibroblast cell line (3T3-L1), suggesting a possible clinical translation of this potential nanochemotherapeutic to expand the inherently poor bioavailability of hydrophobic ASC-J9 that could be proposed for the treatment of malignant breast cancer. PMID:24945469

  17. Endothelial Cells Obtained from Patients Affected by Chronic Venous Disease Exhibit a Pro-Inflammatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tisato, Veronica; Zauli, Giorgio; Voltan, Rebecca; Gianesini, Sergio; di Iasio, Maria Grazia; Volpi, Ilaria; Fiorentini, Guido; Zamboni, Paolo; Secchiero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Background The inflammatory properties of vein endothelium in relation to chronic venous disease (CVD) have been poorly investigated. Therefore, new insights on the characteristics of large vein endothelium would increase our knowledge of large vessel physiopathology. Methodology/Principal Findings Surgical specimens of veins were obtained from the tertiary venous network (R3) and/or saphenous vein (SF) of patients affected by CVD and from control individuals. Highly purified venous endothelial cell (VEC) cultures obtained from CVD patients were characterized for morphological, phenotypic and functional properties compared to control VEC. An increase of CD31/PECAM-1, CD146 and ICAM-1 surface levels was documented at flow cytometry in pathological VEC with respect to normal controls. Of note, the strongest expression of these pro-inflammatory markers was observed in VEC obtained from patients with more advanced disease. Similarly, spontaneous cell proliferation and resistance to starvation was higher in pathological than in normal VEC, while the migratory response of VEC showed an opposite trend, being significantly lower in VEC obtained from pathological specimens. In addition, in keeping with a higher baseline transcriptional activity of NF-kB, the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines osteoprotegerin (OPG) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was higher in pathological VEC cultures with respect to control VEC. Interestingly, there was a systemic correlation to these in vitro data, as demonstrated by higher serum OPG and VEGF levels in CVD patients with respect to normal healthy controls. Conclusion/Significance Taken together, these data indicate that large vein endothelial cells obtained from CVD patients exhibit a pro-inflammatory phenotype, which might significantly contribute to systemic inflammation in CVD patients. PMID:22737245

  18. Cell death pathway induced by resveratrol-bovine serum albumin nanoparticles in a human ovarian cell line

    PubMed Central

    GUO, LIYUAN; PENG, YAN; LI, YULIAN; YAO, JINGPING; ZHANG, GUANGMEI; CHEN, JIE; WANG, JING; SUI, LIHUA

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol-bovine serum albumin nanoparticles (RES-BSANP) exhibit chemotherapeutic properties, which trigger apoptosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the caspase-independent cell death pathway induced by RES-BSANP in human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and to analyze its mechanism. Morphological changes were observed by apoptotic body/cell nucleus DNA staining using inverted and fluorescence microscopy. The cell death pathway was determined by phosphatidylserine translocation. Western blot analysis was conducted to detect the activation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), cytochrome c (Cyto c) and B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein (Bax). Apoptotic body and nuclear condensation and fragmentation were observed simultaneously following treatment with RES-BSANP. RES-BSANP induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in the human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells. The translocation of AIF from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm occurred earlier than that of Cyto c. In addition, Bax binding to the mitochondria was required for the release of AIF and Cyto c from the mitochondria. The AIF apoptosis pathway may present an alternative caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway in human ovarian cell death induced by RES-BSANP. Elucidation of this pathway may be critical for the treatment of cancer using high doses of RES-BSANP. PMID:25663913

  19. Manganese-impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for signal enhancement in MRI cell labelling studies.

    PubMed

    Guillet-Nicolas, Rémy; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Nair, Mahesh M; Chevallier, Pascale; Lagueux, Jean; Gossuin, Yves; Laurent, Sophie; Kleitz, Freddy; Fortin, Marc-André

    2013-12-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn(2+) is already implemented as a "positive" cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(II) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn(2+) leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM(-1) s(-1) were measured at 60 MHz and 37 °C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness, while maintaining an open porosity and relatively high pore volume. Because these Mn-labelled M48SNs express strong "positive" contrast media properties at low concentrations, they are potentially applicable for cell tracking and drug delivery methodologies. PMID:24178890

  20. Role of sustained antigen release from nanoparticle vaccines in shaping the T cell memory phenotype

    E-print Network

    Fahmy, Tarek

    PLGA Nanoparticle Persistence Vaccine Memory T cells a b s t r a c t Particulate vaccines are emerging. Immunization with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles elicited prolonged antibody titers compared with PLGA, which also showed a higher frequency of effector-like memory T cell phenotype, leading

  1. Morphological effect of oscillating magnetic nanoparticles in killing tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Guoxin; Shi, Hongcheng

    2014-04-01

    Forced oscillation of spherical and rod-shaped iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) via low-power and low-frequency alternating magnetic field (AMF) was firstly used to kill cancer cells in vitro. After being loaded by human cervical cancer cells line (HeLa) and then exposed to a 35-kHz AMF, MNPs mechanically damaged cell membranes and cytoplasm, decreasing the cell viability. It was found that the concentration and morphology of the MNPs significantly influenced the cell-killing efficiency of oscillating MNPs. In this preliminary study, when HeLa cells were pre-incubated with 100 ?g/mL rod-shaped MNPs (rMNP, length of 200 ± 50 nm and diameter of 50 to 120 nm) for 20 h, MTT assay proved that the cell viability decreased by 30.9% after being exposed to AMF for 2 h, while the cell viability decreased by 11.7% if spherical MNPs (sMNP, diameter of 200 ± 50 nm) were used for investigation. Furthermore, the morphological effect of MNPs on cell viability was confirmed by trypan blue assay: 39.5% rMNP-loaded cells and 15.1% sMNP-loaded cells were stained after being exposed to AMF for 2 h. It was also interesting to find that killing tumor cells at either higher (500 ?g/mL) or lower (20 ?g/mL) concentration of MNPs was less efficient than that achieved at 100 ?g/mL concentration. In conclusion, the relatively asymmetric morphological rod-shaped MNPs can kill cancer cells more effectively than spherical MNPs when being exposed to AMF by virtue of their mechanical oscillations.

  2. Quantum dots incorporated magnetic nanoparticles for imaging colon carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Engineered multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) have made a tremendous impact on the biomedical sciences, with advances in imaging, sensing and bioseparation. In particular, the combination of optical and magnetic responses through a single particle system allows us to serve as novel multimodal molecular imaging contrast agents in clinical settings. Despite of essential medical imaging modalities and of significant clinical application, only few nanocomposites have been developed with dual imaging contrast. A new method for preparing quantum dots (QDs) incorporated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) based on layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly techniques have developed and used for cancer cells imaging. Methods Here, citrate - capped negatively charged Fe3O4 NPs were prepared and coated with positively - charged hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). Then, thiol - capped negatively charged CdTe QDs were electrostatically bound with CTAB. Morphological, optical and magnetic properties of the fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) were characterized. Prepared FMNPs were additionally conjugated with hCC49 antibodies fragment antigen binding (Fab) having binding affinity to sialylated sugar chain of TAG-72 region of LS174T cancer cells, which was prepared silkworm expression system, and then were used for imaging colon carcinoma cells. Results The prepared nanocomposites were magnetically responsive and fluorescent, simultaneously that are useful for efficient cellular imaging, optical sensing and magnetic separation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the particle size is around 50 nm in diameter with inner magnetic core and outer CdTe QDs core-shell structure. Cytotoxicity test of prepared FMNPs indicates high viability in Vero cells. NPs conjugated with anti cancer antibodies were successfully labeled on colon carcinoma cells (LS174) in vitro and showed significant specificity to target cells. Conclusion The present report demonstrates a simple synthesis of CdTe QDs-Fe3O4 NPs. The surface of the prepared FMNPs was enabled simple conjugation to monoclonal antibodies by electrostatic interaction. This property further extended their in vitro applications as cellular imaging contrast agents. Such labeling of cells with new fluorescent-magneto nanoprobes for living detection is of interest to various biomedical applications and has demonstrated the potential for future medical use. PMID:23957878

  3. Infrared light-absorbing gold/gold sulfide nanoparticles induce cell death in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Gobin, Andre M; Dryden, Gerald W; Kang, Xinqin; Xiao, Deyi; Li, Su Ping; Zhang, Guandong; Martin, Robert CG

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles and near infrared-absorbing light are each innocuous to tissue but when combined can destroy malignant tissue while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. This study investigated the feasibility of photothermal ablation therapy for esophageal adenocarcinoma using chitosan-coated gold/gold sulfide (CS-GGS) nanoparticles. A rat esophagoduodenal anastomosis model was used for the in vivo ablation study, and three human esophageal cell lines were used to study the response of cancer cells and benign cells to near infrared light after treatment with CS-GGS. The results indicate that both cancerous tissue and cancer cells took up more gold nanoparticles and were completely ablated after exposure to near infrared light. The benign tissue and noncancerous cells showed less uptake of these nanoparticles, and remained viable after exposure to near infrared light. CS-GGS nanoparticles could provide an optimal endoluminal therapeutic option for near infrared light ablation of esophageal cancer. PMID:23818775

  4. Modulating Gold Nanoparticle in vivo Delivery for Photothermal Therapy Applications Using a T Cell Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Laura Carpin

    This thesis reports new gold nanoparticle-based methods to treat chemotherapy-resistant and metastatic tumors that frequently evade conventional cancer therapies. Gold nanoparticles represent an innovative generation of diagnostic and treatment agents due to the ease with which they can be tuned to scatter or absorb a chosen wavelength of light. One area of intensive investigation in recent years is gold nanoparticle photothermal therapy (PTT), in which gold nanoparticles are used to heat and destroy cancer. This work demonstrates the utility of gold nanoparticle PTT against two categories of cancer that are currently a clinical challenge: trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer and metastatic cancer. In addition, this thesis presents a new method of gold nanoparticle delivery using T cells that increases gold nanoparticle tumor accumulation efficiency, a current challenge in the field of PTT. I ablated trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer in vitro for the first time using anti-HER2 labeled silica-gold nanoshells, demonstrating the potential utility of PTT against chemotherapy-resistant cancers. I next established for the first time the use of T cells as gold nanoparticle vehicles in vivo. When incubated with gold nanoparticles in culture, T cells can internalize up to 15000 nanoparticles per cell with no detrimental effects to T cell viability or function (e.g. migration and cytokine secretion). These AuNP-T cells can be systemically administered to tumor-bearing mice and deliver gold nanoparticles four times more efficiently than by injecting free nanoparticles. In addition, the biodistribution of AuNP-T cells correlates with the normal biodistribution of T cell carrier, suggesting the gold nanoparticle biodistribution can be modulated through the choice of nanoparticle vehicle. Finally, I apply gold nanoparticle PTT as an adjuvant treatment for T cell adoptive transfer immunotherapy (Hyperthermia-Enhanced Immunotherapy or HIT) of distant tumors in a melanoma mouse model. The results presented in this thesis expand the potential of gold nanoparticle PTT from only chemotherapy-sensitive or localized cancers to chemotherapy-resistant non-localized cancers that currently defy conventional therapies.

  5. Specific cell targeting with nanobody conjugated branched gold nanoparticles for photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Van de Broek, Bieke; Devoogdt, Nick; D'Hollander, Antoine; Gijs, Hannah-Laura; Jans, Karolien; Lagae, Liesbet; Muyldermans, Serge; Maes, Guido; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2011-06-28

    Branched gold nanoparticles are potential photothermal therapy agents because of their large absorption cross section in the near-infrared window. Upon laser irradiation they produce enough heat to destroy tumor cells. In this work, branched gold nanoparticles are biofunctionalized with nanobodies, the smallest fully functional antigen-binding fragments evolved from the variable domain, the VHH, of a camel heavy chain-only antibody. These nanobodies bind to the HER2 antigen which is highly expressed on breast and ovarian cancer cells. Flow cytometric analysis and dark field images of HER2 positive SKOV3 cells incubated with anti-HER2 conjugated branched gold nanoparticles show specific cell targeting. Laser irradiation studies reveal that HER2 positive SKOV3 cells exposed to the anti-HER2 targeted branched gold nanoparticles are destroyed after five minutes of laser treatment at 38 W/cm(2) using a 690 nm continuous wave laser. Starting from a nanoparticle optical density of 4, cell death is observed, whereas the control samples, nanoparticles with anti-PSA nanobodies, nanoparticles only, and laser only, do not show any cell death. These results suggest that this new type of bioconjugated branched gold nanoparticles are effective antigen-targeted photothermal therapeutic agents for cancer treatment. PMID:21609027

  6. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Oxidative Stress and Genotoxicity in Human Skin Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Daoud; Alarifi, Saud; Alkahtani, Saad; AlKahtane, Abdullah A; Almalik, Abdulaziz

    2014-11-14

    Extensive applications of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles require a better understanding of their possible effects on human health. However, data demonstrating the effect of CeO2 nanoparticles on the human skin melanoma cell remain scanty. In the current study, we determined the mechanism through which CeO2 nanoparticles (APS <25 nm) induce toxicity in human skin melanoma cells (A375). The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] and neutral red uptake assays showed concentration and time-dependent cytotoxicity of CeO2 nanoparticles in A375 cells. CeO2 nanoparticles significantly induced the generation reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and decreased glutathione levels in A375 cells. It was also observed that the CeO2 nanoparticles induced chromosomal condensation and caspase-3 activity. CeO2 nanoparticles exposed cells revealed the formation of DNA double-strand breakage as measured by percent tail DNA and olive tail moment through comet assay. The decline of cell viability, production of ROS, and DNA damage in A375 cells specifies that CeO2 nanoparticles have less capable to induce cyto and genotoxicity. PMID:25395198

  7. Carbon nanoparticles for gene transfection in eukaryotic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zanin, H; Hollanda, L M; Ceragioli, H J; Ferreira, M S; Machado, D; Lancellotti, M; Catharino, R R; Baranauskas, V; Lobo, A O

    2014-06-01

    For the first time, oxygen terminated cellulose carbon nanoparticles (CCN) was synthesised and applied in gene transfection of pIRES plasmid. The CCN was prepared from catalytic of polyaniline by chemical vapour deposition techniques. This plasmid contains one gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in eukaryotic cells, making them fluorescent. This new nanomaterial and pIRES plasmid formed ?-stacking when dispersed in water by magnetic stirring. The frequencies shift in zeta potential confirmed the plasmid strongly connects to the nanomaterial. In vitro tests found that this conjugation was phagocytised by NG97, NIH-3T3 and A549 cell lines making them fluorescent, which was visualised by fluorescent microscopy. Before the transfection test, we studied CCN in cell viability. Both MTT and Neutral Red uptake tests were carried out using NG97, NIH-3T3 and A549 cell lines. Further, we use metabolomics to verify if small amounts of nanomaterial would be enough to cause some cellular damage in NG97 cells. We showed two mechanisms of action by CCN-DNA complex, producing an exogenous protein by the transfected cell and metabolomic changes that contributed by better understanding of glioblastoma, being the major finding of this work. Our results suggested that this nanomaterial has great potential as a gene carrier agent in non-viral based therapy, with low cytotoxicity, good transfection efficiency, and low cell damage in small amounts of nanomaterials in metabolomic tests. PMID:24863237

  8. Mechanisms of gold nanoparticle mediated ultrashort laser cell membrane perforation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, M.; Baumgart, J.; Motekaitis, D.; Heinemann, D.; Krawinkel, J.; Pangalos, M.; Bintig, W.; Boulais, E.; Lachaine, R.; St.-Louis Lalonde, B.; Ngezahayo, A.; Meunier, M.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2011-03-01

    The gold nanoparticle (AuNP) mediated ultrashort laser cell membrane perforation has been proven as an efficient delivery method to bring membrane impermeable molecules into the cytoplasm. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully determined yet. Different effects may occur when irradiating a AuNP with ultrashort laser pulses and finally enable the molecule to transfer. Depending on the parameters (pulse length, laser fluence and wavelength, particle size and shape, etc.) light absorption or an enhanced near field scattering can lead to perforation of the cell membrane when the particle is in close vicinity. Here we present our experimental results to clarify the perforation initiating mechanisms. The generation of cavitation and gas bubbles due to the laser induced effects were observed via time resolved imaging. Additionally, pump-probe experiments for bubble detection was performed. Furthermore, in our patch clamp studies a depolarization of the membrane potential and the current through the membrane of AuNP loaded cell during laser treatment was detected. This indicates an exchange of extra- and intra cellular ions trough the perforated cell membrane for some milliseconds. Additionally investigations by ESEM imaging were applied to study the interaction of cells and AuNP after co incubation. The images show an attachment of AuNP at the cell membrane after several hours of incubation. Moreover, images of irradiated and AuNP loaded cells were taken to visualize the laser induced effects.

  9. Nanoparticle interactions with live cells: Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of nanoparticle size effects.

    PubMed

    Shang, Li; Nienhaus, Karin; Jiang, Xiue; Yang, Linxiao; Landfester, Katharina; Mailänder, Volker; Simmet, Thomas; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials are known to enter human cells, often via active endocytosis. Mechanistic details of the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) with cells are still not well enough understood. NP size is a key parameter that controls the endocytic mechanism and affects the cellular uptake yield. Therefore, we have systematically analyzed the cellular uptake of fluorescent NPs in the size range of 3.3-100 nm (diameter) by live cells. By using spinning disk confocal microscopy in combination with quantitative image analysis, we studied the time courses of NP association with the cell membrane and subsequent internalization. NPs with diameters of less than 10 nm were observed to accumulate at the plasma membrane before being internalized by the cells. In contrast, larger NPs (100 nm) were directly internalized without prior accumulation at the plasma membrane, regardless of their surface charges. We attribute this distinct size dependence to the requirement of a sufficiently strong local interaction of the NPs with the endocytic machinery in order to trigger the subsequent internalization. PMID:25551067

  10. Efficacy of lytic peptide-bound magnetite nanoparticles in destroying breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Challa S; Leuschner, Carola; Doomes, E E; Henry, Larry; Juban, Martha; Hormes, Josef

    2004-03-01

    A 23-amino-acid synthetic lytic peptide (Hecate) was covalently linked to magnetite nanoparticles and the lytic peptide-bound nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron diffraction. Investigation of magnetic properties with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer has shown a reduction in the saturation magnetization (Ms) of magnetite nanoparticles after binding with lytic peptide. An in vitro cell culture assay with breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-435S revealed that the lytic peptide-bound magnetite nanoparticles were therapeutically active. PMID:15233083

  11. AS1411 aptamer tagged PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles for tumor cell targeting and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Aravind, Athulya; Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Nair, Remya; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2012-11-01

    Liposomes and polymers are widely used drug carriers for controlled release since they offer many advantages like increased treatment effectiveness, reduced toxicity and are of biodegradable nature. In this work, anticancer drug-loaded PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and were functionalized with AS1411 anti-nucleolin aptamers for site-specific targeting against tumor cells which over expresses nucleolin receptors. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The drug-loading efficiency, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release studies were conducted using UV spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out in two different cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and GI-1 cells and two different normal cells, L929 cells and HMEC cells. Confocal microscopy and flowcytometry confirmed the cellular uptake of particles and targeted drug delivery. The morphology analysis of the NPs proved that the particles were smooth and spherical in shape with a size ranging from 60 to 110?nm. Drug-loading studies indicated that under the same drug loading, the aptamer-targeted NPs show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted NPs. In addition, the PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs exhibited high encapsulation efficiency and superior sustained drug release than the drug loaded in plain PLGA NPs. The results confirmed that AS1411 aptamer-PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs are potential carrier candidates for differential targeted drug delivery. PMID:22615073

  12. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in mouse embryonic stem cells and chemical based reprogramming of somatic cells to sphere cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajanahalli Krishnamurthy, Pavan

    Abstract 1: Silver nanoparticles (Ag Np's) have an interesting surface chemistry and unique plasmonic properties. They are used in a wide variety of applications ranging from consumer products like socks, medical dressing, computer chips and it is also shown to have antimicrobial, anti bacterial activity and wound healing. Ag Np toxicity studies have been limited to date which needs to be critically addressed due to its wide applications. Mouse embryonic stem (MES) cells represent a unique cell population with the ability to undergo both self renewal and differentiation. They exhibit very stringent and tightly regulated mechanisms to circumvent DNA damage and stress response. We used 10 nm coated (polysaccharide) and uncoated Ag Np's to test its toxic effects on MES cells. MES cells and embryoid bodies (EB's) were treated with two concentrations of Ag Np's: 5 microg/ml and 50 ug/ml and exposed for 24, 48 and 72 hours. Increased cell death, ROS production and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and alkaline phosphatase (AP) occur in a time and a concentration dependant manner. Due to increased cell death, there is a progressive increase in Annexin V (apoptosis) and Propidium Iodide (PI) staining (necrosis). Oct4 and Nanog undergo ubiquitination and dephosphorylation post-translational modifications in MES cells thereby altering gene expression of pluripotency factors and differentiation of EB's into all the three embryonic germ layers with specific growth factors were also inhibited after Ag Np exposure. Flow cytometry analysis revealed Ag Np's treated cells had altered cell cycle phases correlating with altered self renewal capacity. Our results suggest that Ag Np's effect MES cell self renewal, pluripotency and differentiation and serves as a perfect model system for studying toxicity induced by engineered Ag Np's. Abstract 2: The reprogramming of fibroblasts to pluripotent stem cells and the direct conversion of fibroblasts to functional neurons has been successfully manipulated by ectopic expression of defined factors. We demonstrate that mouse fibroblasts can be converted into sphere cells by detaching fibroblast cells by proteases and then using AlbuMAX I-containing culture medium without genetic alteration. AlbuMAX I is a lipid-rich albumin. Albumin-associated lipids arachidonic acid (AA) and pluronic F-68 were responsible for this effect. The converted colonies were positive for both alkaline phosphatase and stage specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1) staining. Global gene expression analysis indicated that the sphere cells were in an intermediate state compared with MES cells and MEF cells. The sphere cells were able to differentiate into tissues representing all three embryonic germ layers following retinoic acid treatment, and also differentiated into smooth muscle cells following treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The study presented a potential novel approach to transdifferentiate mouse fibroblast cells into other cell lineages mediated by AlbuMAX I-containing culture medium.

  13. Bridged polysilsesquioxanes: Hybrid organic-inorganic materials as fuel cell polyelectrolyte membranes and functional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiterer, Mariya

    2007-05-01

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of organic-inorganic hybrid materials. Several classes of bridged polysilsesquioxanes are presented. The first class is a membrane material suitable for fuel cell technology as a proton conducting polyelectrolyte. The second class includes hybrid nanoparticles for display device applications and chromatographic media. Chapter 1 is an introduction to hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Sol-gel chemistry is discussed, followed by a survey of prominent examples of silica hybrids. Examples of physical organic-silica blends and covalent organo-silicas, including ORMOCERSRTM, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, and bridged polysilsesquioxanes are discussed. Bridged polysilsesquioxanes are described in great detail. Monomer synthesis, sol-gel chemistry, processing, characterization, and physical properties are included. Chapter 2 describes the design of polyelectrolyte bridged polysilsesquioxane membranes. The materials contain covalently bound sulfonic acid groups originating from the corresponding disulfides. These organic-inorganic hybrid materials integrate a network supporting component which is systematically changed to fine-tune their physical properties. The membranes are characterized as PEM fuel cell electrolytes, where proton conductivities of 4-6 mS cm-1 were measured. In Chapter 3 techniques for the preparation of bridged polysilsesquioxane nanoparticles are described. An inverse water-in-oil microemulsion polymerization method is developed to prepare cationic nanoparticles, including viologen-bridged materials with applications in electrochromic display devices. An aqueous ammonia system is used to prepare neutral nanoparticles containing hydrocarbon bridging groups, which have potential applications as chromatographic media. Chapter 4 describes electrochromic devices developed in collaboration with the Heflin group of Virginia Tech, which incorporate viologen bridged nanoparticles described in Chapter 3. The devices are prepared via the layer-by-layer deposition technique and characterized by voltammetry and transmission spectroscopy. Contrast ratios between yellow and violet states were 45-50% with switching times of 3-3.5 seconds. Finally, Appendix I describes the resolution of racemic 3,3.3',3'-Tetramethyl-1,1"-spirobisindane-5,5',6,6'-tetrol by diastereomeric complex formation with (8S,9R)-(-)-N-benzylcinchonidinium chloride. Enantiomerically pure bisspirocatechol is used to prepare a chiral polymer, which exhibits differences in solid state packing from polymer made with the racemic monomer. Preliminary results on the use of the chiral polymer in enantioselective membrane separations technology are described.

  14. Cytotoxicity of nickel zinc ferrite nanoparticles on cancer cells of epithelial origin

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Rasedee, Abdullah; Flaifel, Moayad Husein; Ahmad, Sahrim HJ; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Eid, Eltayeb EM; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Saeed, Mohd; Ilowefah, Muna; Fakurazi, Sharida; Isa, Norhaszalina Mohd; Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat El

    2013-01-01

    In this study, in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles against human colon cancer HT29, breast cancer MCF7, and liver cancer HepG2 cells was examined. The morphology, homogeneity, and elemental composition of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The exposure of cancer cells to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles (15.6–1,000 ?g/mL; 72 hours) has resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The quantification of caspase-3 and -9 activities and DNA fragmentation to assess the cell death pathway of the treated cells showed that both were stimulated when exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles. Light microscopy examination of the cells exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles demonstrated significant changes in cellular morphology. The HepG2 cells were most prone to apoptosis among the three cells lines examined, as the result of treatment with NiZn nanoparticles. In conclusion, NiZn ferrite nanoparticles are suggested to have potential cytotoxicity against cancer cells. PMID:23885175

  15. Toxicological mode of action of ZnO nanoparticles: Impact on immune cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ruchi; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2015-02-01

    The use of nanoscale materials is growing exponentially as concerns rise about the human hazards to it. It is assumed that living beings are coevolved with nanoparticles ever since the origin of life on earth and therefore, they must have developed the defense and toxicity mitigating mechanisms for nanoparticles. Although having peculiar properties these new materials also present new health risks upon interacting with biological systems. Zinc oxide is the most widely used nanoparticles among various nanomaterials. Recently, these nanoparticles have been shown to specifically kill cancerous cells; therefore, it is believed that these nanoparticles may be used as an alternative anti-tumor agent. However, it is also known that these nanoparticles pose several deleterious effects to living beings. It is therefore critical to understand the nature and origin of the toxicity imposed by these nanomaterials. Keeping these points in mind the present review provides updated information on various aspects of toxicities induced by these engineered nanoparticles. PMID:25193324

  16. A New Interleukin-13 Amino-Coated Gadolinium Metallofullerene Nanoparticle for Targeted MRI Detection of Glioblastoma Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tinghui; Murphy, Susan; Kiselev, Boris; Bakshi, Kanwarpal S; Zhang, Jianyuan; Eltahir, Amnah; Zhang, Yafen; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Jie; Davis, Richey M; Madsen, Louis A; Morris, John R; Karolyi, Daniel R; LaConte, Stephen M; Sheng, Zhi; Dorn, Harry C

    2015-06-24

    The development of new nanoparticles as next-generation diagnostic and therapeutic ("theranostic") drug platforms is an active area of both chemistry and cancer research. Although numerous gadolinium (Gd) containing metallofullerenes as diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have been reported, the metallofullerene cage surface, in most cases, consists of negatively charged carboxyl or hydroxyl groups that limit attractive forces with the cellular surface. It has been reported that nanoparticles with a positive charge will bind more efficiently to negatively charged phospholipid bilayer cellular surfaces, and will more readily undergo endocytosis. In this paper, we report the preparation of a new functionalized trimetallic nitride template endohedral metallofullerene (TNT EMF), Gd3N@C80(OH)x(NH2)y, with a cage surface bearing positively charged amino groups (-NH3(+)) and directly compare it with a similar carboxyl and hydroxyl functionalized derivative. This new nanoparticle was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and infrared spectroscopy. It exhibits excellent (1)H MR relaxivity. Previous studies have clearly demonstrated that the cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13) effectively targets glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells, which are known to overexpress IL-13R?2. We also report that this amino-coated Gd-nanoplatform, when subsequently conjugated with interleukin-13 peptide IL-13-Gd3N@C80(OH)x(NH2)y, exhibits enhanced targeting of U-251 GBM cell lines and can be effectively delivered intravenously in an orthotopic GBM mouse model. PMID:26022213

  17. Enhancing light trapping properties of thin film solar cells by plasmonic effect of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jung, Junhee; Ha, Kyungyeon; Cho, Jaehyun; Ahn, Shihyun; Park, Hyeongsik; Hussain, Shahzada Qamar; Choi, Mansoo; Yi, Junsin

    2013-12-01

    The preparation of thin film silicon solar cells containing Ag nanoparticles is reported in this article. Ag nanoparticles were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates by the evaporation and condensation method. a-Si:H solar cells were deposited on these substrates by cluster type plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. We discuss the double textured surface effect with respect to both the surface morphology of the substrate and the plasmonic effect of the Ag nanoparticles. Ag nanoparticles of various sizes from 10 to 100 nm were deposited. The haze values of the Ag embedded samples increased with increasing particle size whereas the optical transmittance decreased at the same conditions. The solar cell with the 30 nm size Ag nanoparticles showed a short circuit current density of 12.97 mA/cm2, which is 0.53 mA/cm2 higher than that of the reference solar cell without Ag nanoparticles, and the highest quantum efficiency for wavelengths from 550 to 800 nm. When 30 nm size nanoparticles were employed, the conversion efficiency of the solar cell was increased from 6.195% to 6.696%. This study reports the application of the scattering effect of Ag nanoparticles for the improvement of the conversion efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cells. PMID:24266153

  18. Use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles biosynthesized by Bacillus mycoides in quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges of nanotechnology during the last decade has been the development of new procedures to synthesize nanoparticles. In this context, biosynthetic methods have taken hold since they are simple, safe and eco-friendly. Results In this study, we report the biosynthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles by an environmental isolate of Bacillus mycoides, a poorly described Gram-positive bacterium able to form colonies with novel morphologies. This isolate was able to produce TiO2 nanoparticles at 37°C in the presence of titanyl hydroxide. Biosynthesized nanoparticles have anatase polymorphic structure, spherical morphology, polydisperse size (40–60 nm) and an organic shell as determined by UV–vis spectroscopy, TEM, DLS and FTIR, respectively. Also, conversely to chemically produced nanoparticles, biosynthesized TiO2 do not display phototoxicity. In order to design less expensive and greener solar cells, biosynthesized nanoparticles were evaluated in Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells (QDSSCs) and compared with chemically produced TiO2 nanoparticles. Solar cell parameters such as short circuit current density (ISC) and open circuit voltage (VOC) revealed that biosynthesized TiO2 nanoparticles can mobilize electrons in QDSSCs similarly than chemically produced TiO2. Conclusions Our results indicate that bacterial extracellular production of TiO2 nanoparticles at low temperatures represents a novel alternative for the construction of green solar cells. PMID:25027643

  19. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (? 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5–10 ppm, with concentrations ? 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles. PMID:26039692

  20. ZnO Nanoparticles Affect Bacillus subtilis Cell Growth and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Ke, Wan-Ju; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chiang, Chao-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are an important antimicrobial additive in many industrial applications. However, mass-produced ZnO NPs are ultimately disposed of in the environment, which can threaten soil-dwelling microorganisms that play important roles in biodegradation, nutrient recycling, plant protection, and ecological balance. This study sought to understand how ZnO NPs affect Bacillus subtilis, a plant-beneficial bacterium ubiquitously found in soil. The impact of ZnO NPs on B. subtilis growth, FtsZ ring formation, cytosolic protein activity, and biofilm formation were assessed, and our results show that B. subtilis growth is inhibited by high concentrations of ZnO NPs (? 50 ppm), with cells exhibiting a prolonged lag phase and delayed medial FtsZ ring formation. RedoxSensor and Phag-GFP fluorescence data further show that at ZnO-NP concentrations above 50 ppm, B. subtilis reductase activity, membrane stability, and protein expression all decrease. SDS-PAGE Stains-All staining results and FT-IR data further demonstrate that ZnO NPs negatively affect exopolysaccharide production. Moreover, it was found that B. subtilis biofilm surface structures became smooth under ZnO-NP concentrations of only 5-10 ppm, with concentrations ? 25 ppm significantly reducing biofilm formation activity. XANES and EXAFS spectra analysis further confirmed the presence of ZnO in co-cultured B. subtilis cells, which suggests penetration of cell membranes by either ZnO NPs or toxic Zn+ ions from ionized ZnO NPs, the latter of which may be deionized to ZnO within bacterial cells. Together, these results demonstrate that ZnO NPs can affect B. subtilis viability through the inhibition of cell growth, cytosolic protein expression, and biofilm formation, and suggest that future ZnO-NP waste management strategies would do well to mitigate the potential environmental impact engendered by the disposal of these nanoparticles. PMID:26039692

  1. Specific biomolecule corona is associated with ring-shaped organization of silver nanoparticles in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, Daniela; Guttmann, Peter; Büchner, Tina; Werner, Stephan; Laube, Gregor; Hornemann, Andrea; Tarek, Basel; Schneider, Gerd; Kneipp, Janina

    2013-09-01

    We correlate the localization of silver nanoparticles inside cells with respect to the cellular architecture with the molecular information in the vicinity of the particle surface by combining nanoscale 3D cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The interaction of the silver nanoparticle surface with small molecules and biopolymers was monitored by SERS in vitro over time in living cells. The spectra indicate a stable, time-independent surface composition of silver nanoparticles, despite the changing environment in the endosomal structure. Cryo-SXT reveals a characteristic ring-shaped organization of the silver nanoparticles in endosomes of different cell types. The ring-like structures inside the endosomes suggest a strong association among silver particles and with membrane structures. The comparison of the data with those obtained with gold nanoparticles suggests that the interactions between the nanoparticles and with the endosomal component are influenced by the molecular composition of the corona.We correlate the localization of silver nanoparticles inside cells with respect to the cellular architecture with the molecular information in the vicinity of the particle surface by combining nanoscale 3D cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The interaction of the silver nanoparticle surface with small molecules and biopolymers was monitored by SERS in vitro over time in living cells. The spectra indicate a stable, time-independent surface composition of silver nanoparticles, despite the changing environment in the endosomal structure. Cryo-SXT reveals a characteristic ring-shaped organization of the silver nanoparticles in endosomes of different cell types. The ring-like structures inside the endosomes suggest a strong association among silver particles and with membrane structures. The comparison of the data with those obtained with gold nanoparticles suggests that the interactions between the nanoparticles and with the endosomal component are influenced by the molecular composition of the corona. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Description of additional experiments. Explanation of transmitted intensity and linear absorption coefficient in a cryo-XRT experiment (Fig. S1 and S2). Additional X-ray data (Fig. S3 and Movie S1). Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (Fig. S4). X-ray microscopy and SERS experiments with gold nanoparticles (Fig. S5 and S6). Size, plasmonic properties, and stability of silver and gold nanoparticles (Fig. S7-S9). Distribution of the silver nanoparticles in the cells using SERS mapping (Fig. S10). Tentative band assignments (Table S1). See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02129g

  2. Molecular interactions between gold nanoparticles and model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peipei; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Zhan

    2015-04-21

    The interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and cells are of huge interest because NPs have been extensively researched for biomedical applications. For the cellular entry of NPs, it remains unclear how the cell membrane molecules respond to the exposure of NPs due to a lack of appropriate surface/interface-sensitive techniques to study NP-cell membrane interactions in situ in real time. In this study, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was employed to examine the interactions between lipid bilayers (serving as model mammalian cell membranes) and Au NPs of four different sizes with the same mass, or the same NP number, or the same NP surface area. It was found that lipid flip-flop was induced by Au NPs of all four sizes. Interestingly, the lipid flip-flop rate was found to increase as the Au NP size increased with respect to the same particle number or the same NP surface area. However, the induced lipid flip-flop rate was the same for Au NPs with different sizes with the same mass, which was interpreted by the same "effective surface contact area" between Au NPs and the model cell membrane. We believe that this study provided the first direct observation of the lipid flip-flop induced by the interactions between Au NPs and the model mammalian cell membrane. PMID:25776800

  3. Functionalization of whole?cell bacterial reporters with magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayi; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Özmen, Mustafa; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jian; Paunov, Vesselin N.; Li, Guanghe; Huang, Wei E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We developed a biocompatible and highly efficient approach for functionalization of bacterial cell wall with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Three Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 chromosomally based bioreporters, which were genetically engineered to express bioluminescence in response to salicylate, toluene/xylene and alkanes, were functionalized with 18?±?3?nm iron oxide MNPs to acquire magnetic function. The efficiency of MNPs functionalization of Acinetobacter bioreporters was 99.96?±?0.01%. The MNPs?functionalized bioreporters (MFBs) can be remotely controlled and collected by an external magnetic field. The MFBs were all viable and functional as good as the native cells in terms of sensitivity, specificity and quantitative response. More importantly, we demonstrated that salicylate sensing MFBs can be applied to sediments and garden soils, and semi?quantitatively detect salicylate in those samples by discriminably recovering MFBs with a permanent magnet. The magnetically functionalized cells are especially useful to complex environments in which the indigenous cells, particles and impurities may interfere with direct measurement of bioreporter cells and conventional filtration is not applicable to distinguish and harvest bioreporters. The approach described here provides a powerful tool to remotely control and selectively manipulate MNPs?functionalized cells in water and soils. It would have a potential in the application of environmental microbiology, such as bioremediation enhancement and environment monitoring and assessment. PMID:21255376

  4. Functionalization of whole-cell bacterial reporters with magnetic nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dayi; Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Özmen, Mustafa; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jian; Paunov, Vesselin N; Li, Guanghe; Huang, Wei E

    2011-01-01

    We developed a biocompatible and highly efficient approach for functionalization of bacterial cell wall with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Three Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 chromosomally based bioreporters, which were genetically engineered to express bioluminescence in response to salicylate, toluene/ xylene and alkanes, were functionalized with 18 3 nm iron oxide MNPs to acquire magnetic function. The efficiency of MNPs functionalization of Acinetobacter bioreporters was 99.96 0.01%. The MNPs-functionalized bioreporters (MFBs) can be remotely controlled and collected by an external magnetic field. The MFBs were all viable and functional as good as the native cells in terms of sensitivity, specificity and quantitative response. More importantly, we demonstrated that salicylate sensing MFBs can be applied to sediments and garden soils, and semiquantitatively detect salicylate in those samples by discriminably recovering MFBs with a permanent magnet. The magnetically functionalized cells are especially useful to complex environments in which the indigenous cells, particles and impurities may interfere with direct measurement of bioreporter cells and conventional filtration is not applicable to distinguish and harvest bioreporters. The approach described here provides a powerful tool to remotely control and selectively manipulate MNPs-unctionalized cells in water and soils. It would have a potential in the application of environmental microbiology, such as bioremediation enhancement and environment monitoring and assessment. PMID:21255376

  5. Gold nanoparticles explore cells: cellular uptake and their use as intracellular probes.

    PubMed

    Huefner, Anna; Septiadi, Dedy; Wilts, Bodo D; Patel, Imran I; Kuan, Wei-Li; Fragniere, Alexandra; Barker, Roger A; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2014-07-01

    Understanding uptake of nanomaterials by cells and their use for intracellular sensing is important for studying their interaction and toxicology as well as for obtaining new biological insight. Here, we investigate cellular uptake and intracellular dynamics of gold nanoparticles and demonstrate their use in reporting chemical information from the endocytotic pathway and cytoplasm. The intracellular gold nanoparticles serve as probes for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) allowing for biochemical characterisation of their local environment. In particular, in this work we compare intracellular SERS using non-functionalised and functionalised nanoparticles in their ability to segregate different but closely related cell phenotypes. The results indicate that functionalised gold nanoparticles are more efficient in distinguishing between different types of cells. Our studies pave the way for understanding the uptake of gold nanoparticles and their utilisation for SERS to give rise to a greater biochemical understanding in cell-based therapies. PMID:24583117

  6. Active targeting of cancer cells using folic acid-conjugated platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teow, Yiwei; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2010-12-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with human cells is an interesting topic for understanding toxicity and developing potential drug candidates. Water soluble platinum nanoparticles were synthesized via reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid using sodium borohydride in the presence of capping agents. The bioactivity of folic acid and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) capped platinum nanoparticles (Pt-nps) has been investigated using commercially available cell lines. In the cell viability experiments, PVP-capped nanoparticles were found to be less toxic (>80% viability), whereas, folic acid-capped platinum nanoparticles showed a reduced viability down to 24% after 72 h of exposure at a concentration of 100 ?g ml-1 for MCF7 breast cancer cells. Such toxicity, combined with the possibility to incorporate functional organic molecules as capping agents, can be used for developing new drug candidates.

  7. Oxidative stress mediated cytotoxicity of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae Woong; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of biologically prepared small size of silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells A549. Herein, we describe a facile method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by treating the supernatant from a culture of Escherichia coli with silver nitrate . The formation of silver nanoparticles was characterized using various analytical techniques. The results from UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis show a characteristic strong resonance centered at 420 nm and a single crystalline nature, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the possible bio-molecules responsible for the reduction of silver from silver nitrate into nanoparticles. The particle size analyzer and transmission electron microscopy results suggest that silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 nm. The results derived from in vitro studies showed a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability when A549 cells were exposed to silver nanoparticles. This decrease in cell viability corresponded to increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). Furthermore, uptake and intracellular localization of silver nanoparticles were observed and were accompanied by accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in A549 cells. The results indicate that silver nanoparticles play a significant role in apoptosis. Interestingly, biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles showed more potent cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested compared to that shown by chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Therefore, our results demonstrated that human lung epithelial A549 cells could provide a valuable model to assess the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles.

  8. Efficient gene transfer into rat mesenchymal stem cells with cationized Lycium barbarum polysaccharides nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miao Wang; Wenwen Deng; Min Fu; Xia Cao; Yan Yang; Weiyan Su; Jiangnan Yu; Ximing Xu

    2011-01-01

    A new gene vector, cationized Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (cLBP) nanoparticles, prepared with different amine compounds for non-viral delivery of plasmid DNA encoding for transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF?-1) was developed and the efficiency of these nanoparticles to transfect rat mesenchymal stem cells in vitro was determined. The spherical cLBP-plasmid TGF?-1 nanoparticles were 160–330nm in diameter and can retard the

  9. Examining changes in cellular communication in neuroendocrine cells after noble metal nanoparticle exposure.

    PubMed

    Love, Sara A; Liu, Zhen; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-07-01

    As nanoparticles enjoy increasingly widespread use in commercial applications, the potential for unintentional exposure has become much more likely during any given day. Researchers in the field of nanotoxicity are working to determine the physicochemical nanoparticle properties that lead to toxicity in an effort to establish safe design rules. This work explores the effects of noble metal nanoparticle exposure in murine chromaffin cells, focusing on examining the effects of size and surface functionality (coating) in silver and gold, respectively. Carbon-fibre microelectrode amperometry was utilized to examine the effect of exposure on exocytosis function, at the single cell level, and provided new insights into the compromised functions of cells. Silver nanoparticles of varied size, between 15 and 60 nm diameter, were exposed to cells and found to alter the release kinetics of exocytosis for those cells exposed to the smallest examined size. Effects of gold were examined after modification with two commonly used 'bio-friendly' polymers, either heparin or poly (ethylene glycol), and gold nanoparticles were found to induce altered cellular adhesion or the number of chemical messenger molecules released, respectively. These results support the body of work suggesting that noble metal nanoparticles perturb exocytosis, typically altering the number of molecules and kinetics of release, and supports a direct disruption of the vesicle matrix by the nanoparticle. Overall, it is clear that various nanoparticle physicochemical properties, including size and surface coating, do modulate changes in cellular communication via exocytosis. PMID:22382603

  10. Comparative toxicity of 24 manufactured nanoparticles in human alveolar epithelial and macrophage cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Lanone, Sophie; Rogerieux, Françoise; Geys, Jorina; Dupont, Aurélie; Maillot-Marechal, Emmanuelle; Boczkowski, Jorge; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Hoet, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background A critical issue with nanomaterials is the clear understanding of their potential toxicity. We evaluated the toxic effect of 24 nanoparticles of similar equivalent spherical diameter and various elemental compositions on 2 human pulmonary cell lines: A549 and THP-1. A secondary aim was to elaborate a generic experimental set-up that would allow the rapid screening of cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles. We therefore compared 2 cytotoxicity assays (MTT and Neutral Red) and analyzed 2 time points (3 and 24 hours) for each cell type and nanoparticle. When possible, TC50 (Toxic Concentration 50 i.e. nanoparticle concentration inducing 50% cell mortality) was calculated. Results The use of MTT assay on THP-1 cells exposed for 24 hours appears to be the most sensitive experimental design to assess the cytotoxic effect of one nanoparticle. With this experimental set-up, Copper- and Zinc-based nanoparticles appear to be the most toxic. Titania, Alumina, Ceria and Zirconia-based nanoparticles show moderate toxicity, and no toxicity was observed for Tungsten Carbide. No correlation between cytotoxicity and equivalent spherical diameter or specific surface area was found. Conclusion Our study clearly highlights the difference of sensitivity between cell types and cytotoxicity assays that has to be carefully taken into account when assessing nanoparticles toxicity. PMID:19405955

  11. Development of biofuel cells based on gold nanoparticle decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Junichi; Hoa, Le Quynh; Sugano, Yasuhito; Ikeuchi, Tomohiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Masato; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2011-12-15

    This study focused on developing the synthesis of Au nanoparticle-decorated functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs) for monosaccharide (bio-fuel) oxidation reactions and practical application in air-biofuel cells. We developed a scalable and straightforward method to synthesize Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs which allow us to control the loading and size of the Au-NPs. The Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs exhibited better catalytic activities and stability than the Au sheet and subsequently resulted in a threefold increase in the power density of the air-glucose fuel cell with an exceptionally high open circuit voltage (~1.3 V). The catalytic efficiency was confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography with the superior of the Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs over a bare gold electrode. In addition, the application of this advanced catalyst to other monosaccharide oxidation reactions figured out that the configuration of -OH groups at C(2) and C(3) of the reactants plays an important role in the initial adsorption process, and thus, affects the required activation energy for further oxidation. The different monosaccharides lead to significantly different fuel cell performances in terms of power density, which coherently corresponds to the difference in the configuration of C(2) and C(3). Because two small air-glucose fuel cells using Au-NPs/f-MWCNTs can run a LED lamp, further applications of other monosaccharides as fuel in biofuel cells for equivalent required power devices may be possible. PMID:21983243

  12. Fabrication, performance and atmospheric stability of inverted ZnO nanoparticle/polymer solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhaolin

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs, ~5 nm) were first synthesized by a simple wet chemical method. A mixture of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) was used as the photoactive layer, and an inverted solar cell with a structure of ITO/ZnO NPs/P3HT:PCBM/MoO3/Ag was fabricated. Its performance and stability in the ambient atmosphere were investigated in detail. The results showed that the fabricated solar cell under 100 mW/cm2 AM1.5 illumination exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.28 %. In addition, illumination intensity had significant effect on open circuit voltage ( V oc), short circuit current ( J sc), fill factor (FF), and PCE of the fabricated solar cell. The dark storability (darkness, room temperature, and 50-60 % relative humidity) was shown to exceed 4,416 h without notable loss in PCE. The fabricated solar cell with excellent long-term stability was achieved in an ambient atmosphere; also, the stable mechanism of the solar cell in the ambient atmosphere was illuminated.

  13. Internalized Chitosan Nanoparticles Persist for Long Time in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Malatesta, M.; Grecchi, S.; Chiesa, E.; Cisterna, B.; Costanzo, M.; Zancanaro, C.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-based nanoparticles (chiNPs) are considered to be potentially good carriers for the sustained intracellular delivery of specific molecules. However, scarce attention has been paid to the long-lasting permanence of these NPs in the intracellular milieu, as well as to their intracellular fate (i.e., distribution, interaction with cell organelles, and degradation) in the long term. In the present study, the presence and subcellular location of FITC-labelled chiNPs were monitored in HeLa cells up to 14 days post-administration using multicolorfluorescence confocal microscopy and diaminobenzidine photo-oxidation at transmission electron microscopy. The main result of the present study is the demonstration that internalized chiNPs persist inside the cell up to two weeks, occurring in both the cytoplasm and nucleus; accordingly, chiNPs are able to pass from mother to daughter cells through several mitotic cycles. The cells did not show increased mortality or structural damage up to 14 days after chiNP exposure. PMID:25820565

  14. Ligand modified nanoparticles increases cell uptake, alters endocytosis and elevates glioma distribution and internalization

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huile; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Shuang; Cao, Shijie; Shen, Shun; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were widely used in drugs/probes delivery for improved disease diagnosis and/or treatment. Targeted delivery to cancer cells is a highly attractive application of NPs. However, few studies have been performed on the targeting mechanisms of these ligand-modified delivery systems. Additional studies are needed to understand the transport of nanoparticles in the cancer site, the interactions between nanoparticles and cancer cells, the intracellular trafficking of nanoparticles within the cancer cells and the subcellular destiny and potential toxicity. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) peptide can specifically bind IL-13R?2, a receptor that is highly expressed on glioma cells but is expressed at low levels on other normal cells. It was shown that the nanoparticels modification with the IL-13 peptide could improve glioma treatment by selectively increasing cellular uptake, facilitating cell internalization, altering the uptake pathway and increasing glioma localization. PMID:23982586

  15. Induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells by targeting mitochondria with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkandawire, M. M.; Lakatos, M.; Springer, A.; Clemens, A.; Appelhans, D.; Krause-Buchholz, U.; Pompe, W.; Rödel, G.; Mkandawire, M.

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell death. The ability to target Au nanoparticles into mitochondria of breast cancer cells and induce apoptosis reveals an alternative application of Au nanoparticles in photothermal therapy of cancer.A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell death. The ability to target Au nanoparticles into mitochondria of breast cancer cells and induce apoptosis reveals an alternative application of Au nanoparticles in photothermal therapy of cancer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: PPI-Mal-III G3 dendrimers; SEM of AuNPs and TEM of AuNP interaction with cancerous cells; and comparison of brightfield and caspase 3 fluorescence staining verifying apoptosis. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01483b

  16. Intracellular distribution of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in both human and mouse cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palihawadana Arachchige, Maheshika; Laha, Suvra; Rajagopal, Amulya; Kulkarni, Sanjana; Wang, Shuo; Flack, Amanda; Li, Chunying; Jena, Bhanu; Lawes, Gavin

    2014-03-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing interest in developing Fe3O4 nanoparticles for biomedical applications including targeted drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging. Understanding of the intracellular distribution of these nanoparticles is crucial when considering these nanoparticles for specific applications. We have synthesized Fe3O4 nanoparticles having average size of 14 nm using a co-precipitation technique, which were coated with dextran. We studied the structural and morphological characteristics of the nanoparticles using x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. We also characterized the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. In order to investigate the intracellular distribution of these Fe3O4 nanoparticles, we functionalized the dextran coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with a fluorescent dye, Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and cultured them with both mouse insulinoma MIN 6 cells and human pancreatic MIA PaCa 2 cells. Using optical microscope we investigated the intracellular distribution of the nanoparticles and the effects on cell growth.

  17. Nanoparticle labeling of mesenchymal stem cells for in vivo imaging and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricles, Laura M.; Nam, Seung Yun; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav; Suggs, Laura J.

    2011-03-01

    Stem cells can differentiate into multiple cell types, and thus have the potential to be used for tissue repair and regeneration. However, the participation of stem cells in wound repair and neovascularization is not well understood. As a result, there is a need to monitor and track stem cells in vivo in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanisms of the wound healing response. Noninvasive, long-term imaging is ideal in order to track stem cells within a single animal model. Thus, we are interested in developing an imaging approach to track gold nanoparticle loaded mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vivo after delivery via a hydrogel. This study assessed the effect on cell function of loading MSCs with gold nanoparticles. We examined the loading of MSCs with gold nanoparticles of various sizes and surface coatings using darkfield microscopy. We also examined the effect of nanoparticle loading on cell viability, proliferation, and differentiation. The feasibility of imaging nanoparticle loaded MSCs was examined by assessing cell viability and MSC tubulogenesis following laser irradiation. Our results demonstrate that loading MSCs with gold nanoparticles does not compromise cell function. These findings lend to the possibility of imaging MSCs in vivo with optical imaging.

  18. Cellular uptake of magnetic nanoparticle is mediated through energy-dependent endocytosis in A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Sung; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Noh, Mi Suk; Woo, Minah; Kim, Byung-Geol; Lee, Kee-Ho; Sohn, Byung-Hyuk; Park, Seung-Bum

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatible silica-overcoated magnetic nanoparticles containing an organic fluorescence dye, rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC), within a silica shell [50 nm size, MNP@SiO2(RITC)s] were synthesized. For future application of the MNP@SiO2(RITC)s into diverse areas of research such as drug or gene delivery, bioimaging, and biosensors, detailed information of the cellular uptake process of the nanoparticles is essential. Thus, this study was performed to elucidate the precise mechanism by which the lung cancer cells uptake the magnetic nanoparticles. Lung cells were chosen for this study because inhalation is the most likely route of exposure and lung cancer cells were also found to uptake magnetic nanoparticles rapidly in preliminary experiments. The lung cells were pretreated with different metabolic inhibitors. Our results revealed that low temperature disturbed the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into the cells. Metabolic inhibitors also prevented the delivery of the materials into cells. Use of TEM clearly demonstrated that uptake of the nanoparticles was mediated through endosomes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that magnetic nanoparticles can be internalized into the cells through an energy-dependent endosomal-lysosomal mechanism. PMID:17106221

  19. Adult Cardiac Progenitor Cell Aggregates Exhibit Survival Benefit Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    E-print Network

    Bauer, Michael

    Background: A major hurdle in the use of exogenous stems cells for therapeutic regeneration of injured myocardium remains the poor survival of implanted cells. To date, the delivery of stem cells into myocardium has largely ...

  20. Manganese-impregnated mesoporous silica nanoparticles for signal enhancement in MRI cell labelling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet-Nicolas, Rémy; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Nair, Mahesh M.; Chevallier, Pascale; Lagueux, Jean; Gossuin, Yves; Laurent, Sophie; Kleitz, Freddy; Fortin, Marc-André

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn2+ is already implemented as a ``positive'' cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(ii) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn2+ leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM-1 s-1 were measured at 60 MHz and 37 °C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness, while maintaining an open porosity and relatively high pore volume. Because these Mn-labelled M48SNs express strong ``positive'' contrast media properties at low concentrations, they are potentially applicable for cell tracking and drug delivery methodologies.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are used in drug delivery and cell tracking applications. As Mn2+ is already implemented as a ``positive'' cell contrast agent in preclinical imaging procedures (in the form of MnCl2 for neurological studies), the introduction of Mn in the porous network of MSNs would allow labelling cells and tracking them using MRI. These particles are in general internalized in endosomes, an acidic environment with high saline concentration. In addition, the available MSN porosity could also serve as a carrier to deliver medical/therapeutic substances through the labelled cells. In the present study, manganese oxide was introduced in the porous network of MCM-48 silica nanoparticles (Mn-M48SNs). The particles exhibit a narrow size distribution (~140 nm diam.) and high porosity (~60% vol.), which was validated after insertion of Mn. The resulting Mn-M48SNs were characterized by TEM, N2 physisorption, and XRD. Evidence was found with H2-TPR, and XPS characterization, that Mn(ii) is the main oxidation state of the paramagnetic species after suspension in water, most probably in the form of Mn-OOH. The colloidal stability as a function of time was confirmed by DLS in water, acetate buffer and cell culture medium. In NMR data, no significant evidence of Mn2+ leaching was found in Mn-M48SNs in acidic water (pH 6), up to 96 hours after suspension. High longitudinal relaxivity values of r1 = 8.4 mM-1 s-1 were measured at 60 MHz and 37 °C, with the lowest relaxometric ratios (r2/r1 = 2) reported to date for a Mn-MSN system. Leukaemia cells (P388) were labelled with Mn-M48SNs and nanoparticle cell internalization was confirmed by TEM. Finally, MRI contrast enhancement provided by cell labelling with escalated incubation concentrations of Mn-M48SNs was quantified at 1 T. This study confirmed the possibility of efficiently confining Mn into M48SNs using incipient wetness

  1. Enhanced relative biological effectiveness of proton radiotherapy in tumor cells with internalized gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Polf, Jerimy C.; Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Bronk, Lawrence F. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); David H. Koch Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata [David H. Koch Center, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2011-05-09

    The development and use of sensitizing agents to improve the effectiveness of radiotherapy have long been sought to improve our ability to treat cancer. In this letter, we have studied the relative biological effectiveness of proton beam radiotherapy on prostate tumor cells with and without internalized gold nanoparticles. The effectiveness of proton radiotherapy for the killing of prostate tumor cells was increased by approximately 15%-20% for those cells containing internalized gold nanoparticles.

  2. Oxidative stress induced by cerium oxide nanoparticles in cultured BEAS-2B cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eun-Jung Park; Jinhee Choi; Young-Kwon Park

    2008-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles of different sizes (15, 25, 30, 45nm) were prepared by the supercritical synthesis method, and cytotoxicity was evaluated using cultured human lung epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). Exposure of the cultured cells to nanoparticles (5, 10, 20, 40?g\\/ml) led to cell death, ROS increase, GSH decrease, and the inductions of oxidative stress-related genes such as heme oxygenase-1, catalase, glutathione

  3. An evidence on G2/M arrest, DNA damage and caspase mediated apoptotic effect of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles on human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa)

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyaraj, M. [Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Arun, R. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Sathishkumar, G. [Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); MubarakAli, D. [Central Inter-Disciplinary Research Facility, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute Campus, Pondicherry 607402 (India); Rajesh, M.; Sivanandhan, G.; Kapildev, G.; Manickavasagam, M. [Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Thajuddin, N. [Department of Microbiology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024 (India); Ganapathi, A., E-mail: aganapathi2007@gmail.com [Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, School of Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been synthesized using Podophyllum hexandrum L. • AuNPs induces the oxidative stress to cell death in human cervical carcinoma cells. • It activates the caspase-cascade to cellular death. • It is actively blocks G2/M phase of cell cycle. - Abstract: Current prospect of nanobiotechnology involves in the greener synthesis of nanostructured materials particularly noble metal nanoparticles for various biomedical applications. In this study, biologically (Podophyllum hexandrum L.) synthesized crystalline gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the size range between 5 and 35 nm were screened for its anticancereous potential against human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa). Stoichiometric proportion of the reaction mixture and conditions were optimized to attain stable nanoparticles with narrow size range. Different high throughput techniques like transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectroscopy were adopted for the physio-chemical characterization of AuNPs. Additionally, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study revealed that the water soluble fractions present in the plant extract solely influences the reduction of AuNPs. Sublimely, synthesized AuNPs exhibits an effective in vitro anticancer activity against HeLa cells via induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage. Furthermore, it was evidenced that AuNPs treated cells are undergone apoptosis through the activation of caspase cascade which subsequently leads to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby, this study proves that biogenic colloidal AuNPs can be developed as a promising drug candidature for human cervical cancer therapy.

  4. Photothermal therapy of cancer cells mediated by blue hydrogel nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Taeyjuana; Epstein, Tamir; Smith, Ron; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the utility of biologically compatible, nontoxic and cell-specific targetable hydrogel nanoparticles (NPs), which have Coomassie® Brilliant Blue G dye (Sigma-Aldrich, MO, USA) covalently linked into their polyacrylamide matrix, as candidates for photothermal therapy (PTT) of cancer cells. Materials & methods Hydrogel NPs with Coomassie Brilliant Blue G dye covalently linked into their polyacrylamide matrix were fabricated using a reverse micelle microemulsion polymerization method and were found to be 80–95 nm in diameter, with an absorbance value of 0.52. PTT-induced hyperthermia/thermolysis was achieved at 37°C using an inexpensive, portable, light-emitting diode array light source (590 nm, 25 mW/cm2). Results & conclusion Hydrogel NPs with Coomassie Brilliant Blue G dye linked into their polyacrylamide matrix are effective in causing PTT-induced thermolysis in immortalized human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) cells for varying NP concentrations and treatment times. These multifunctional particles have previously been used in cancer studies to enable delineation, for glioma surgery and in photoacoustic imaging studies. The addition of the PTT function would enable a three-pronged theranostic approach to cancer medicine, such as guided tumor surgery with intra-operative photoacoustic imaging and intra-operative PTT. PMID:23432340

  5. Genotoxic and cell-transforming effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Demir, E?ref; Akça, Hakan; Turna, Fatma; Aksakal, Sezgin; Burgucu, Durmu?; Kaya, Bülent; Tokgün, Onur; Vales, Gerard; Creus, Amadeu; Marcos, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro genotoxic and the soft-agar anchorage independent cell transformation ability of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and its microparticulated form has been evaluated in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and in mouse embryonic fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cells. Nano-TiO2 of two different sizes (21 and 50 nm) were used in this study. The comet assay, with and without the use of FPG enzyme, the micronucleus assay and the soft-agar colony assay were used. For both the comet assay and the frequency of micronuclei a statistically significant induction of DNA damage, was observed at the highest dose tested (1000 µg/mL). No oxidative DNA damage induction was observed when the comet assay was complemented with the use of FPG enzyme. Furthermore, long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 has also proved to induce cell-transformation promoting cell-anchorage independent growth in soft-agar. Results were similar for the two nano-TiO2 sizes. Negative results were obtained when the microparticulated form of TiO2 was tested, indicating the existence of important differences between the microparticulated and nanoparticulated forms. As a conclusion it should be indicated that the observed genotoxic/tranforming effects were only detected at the higher dose tested (1000 µg/mL) what play down the real risk of environmental exposures to this nanomaterial. PMID:25460650

  6. Optimum surface condition for plasmonic Ag nanoparticles in polycrystalline silicon thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jongsung; Park, Nochang; Varlamov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Excitation of surface plasmons in silver nanoparticles is a promising method for increasing the light absorption in solar cells and hence, the cell photocurrent. The optical environment is an important key factor to consider when designing plasmonic solar cells because it affects the surface plasmon characteristics. In this paper, we applied the silver nanoparticles on the rear side of polycrystalline silicon thin film solar cells and systematically investigated the optimum surface condition for maximising plasmonic enhanced light absorption in the cells. Three different environments, thermal silicon dioxide (SiO2), native SiO2, and oxide-free silicon surface were investigated. We found that the existence of the SiO2 layer between Si and nanoparticles has a major effect on Qscat and therefore, the absorption in the cells. We also found that nanoparticles on the thermal SiO2 layer showed that the peak of Qscat is located at the visible light wavelengths <700 nm, nanoparticles on the native SiO2 layer and directly on Si sample showed that their peaks of Qscat are positioned at the longer wavelengths >700 nm. The sample with nanoparticles on the native SiO2 layer showed the highest potential short circuit current density (Jsc) enhancement, 62.5%, and absolute Jsc enhancement, 32.3%. On the other hand, the sample with nanoparticles on the thermal SiO2 layer indicated 19.6% enhancement of Jsc.

  7. Labeling of HeLa cells using ZrO2:Yb(3+)-Er(3+) nanoparticles with upconversion emission.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Fdez, Andrea; López-Luke, Tzarara; Oliva, Jorge; Vivero-Escoto, Juan; Gonzalez-Yebra, Ana Lilia; Rojas, Ruben A Rodriguez; Martínez-Pérez, Andrea; de la Rosa, Elder

    2015-04-01

    This work reports the synthesis, structural characterization, and optical properties of ZrO2:Yb(3+)-Er(3+) (2–1 mol%) nanocrystals. The nanoparticles were coated with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) and further modified with biomolecules, such as Biotin-Anti-rabbit (mouse IgG) and rabbit antibody-AntiKi-67, through a conjugation method. The conjugation was successfully confirmed by Fourier transform infrared, zeta potential, and dynamic light scattering. The internalization of the conjugated nanoparticles in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells was followed by two-photon confocal microscopy. The ZrO2:Yb(3+)-Er(3+) nanocrystals exhibited strong red emission under 970-nm excitation. Moreover, the luminescence change due to the addition of APTES molecules and biomolecules on the nanocrystals was also studied. These results demonstrate that ZrO2:Yb(3+)-Er(3+) nanocrystals can be successfully functionalized with biomolecules to develop platforms for biolabeling and bioimaging. PMID:25879389

  8. Hydrous RuO2 nanoparticles as an efficient NIR-light induced photothermal agent for ablation of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiyin; Jiang, Xiaohong; Li, Bo; Liu, Xijian; Huang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yuxin; Ren, Qilong; Luo, Jie; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2015-07-28

    Metal oxides are receiving an incremental attention in recent years for their potential applications in ablation of cancer cells due to their efficient photothermal conversion and good biocompatibility, but the large sizes and poor photo-stability will seriously limit their practical application. Herein, hydrous RuO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal treatment and surface-modified with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating. PVP-coated RuO2 nanoparticles exhibit a well dispertion in saline solution, strong characteristic plasmonic absorption in NIR region, enhanced photothermal conversion efficiency of 54.8% and remarkable photo-stability under the irridation of an 808 nm laser. The nanoparticles were further employed as a new photothermal ablation agent for cancer cells which led rapidly to cellular deaths both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26055486

  9. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creang?, D. E.; Culea, M.; N?dejde, C.; Oancea, S.; Curecheriu, L.; Racuciu, M.

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm-1 or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  10. Toxicity study of cerium oxide nanoparticles in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Monika; Singh, Shailendra Pratap; Chinde, Srinivas; Rahman, Mohammed Fazlur; Mahboob, Mohammed; Grover, Paramjit

    2014-01-01

    The present study consisted of cytotoxic, genotoxic, and oxidative stress responses of human neuroblastoma cell line (IMR32) following exposure to different doses of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs; nanoceria) and its microparticles (MPs) for 24 hours. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays whereas genotoxicity was assessed using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus and comet assays. A battery of assays including lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide, reduced glutathione, nitric oxide, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase were performed to test the hypothesis that ROS was responsible for the toxicity of nanoceria. The results showed that nanosized CeO2 was more toxic than cerium oxide MPs. Hence, further study on safety evaluation of CeO2 NPs on other models is recommended. PMID:24510415

  11. Plasmonic nanoparticles enhanced dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Liu, Fang; Meng, Weisi; Huang, Yidong

    2013-12-01

    Here we present investigations on utilizing two kinds of plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) to enhance the efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The Au@PVP NPs is proposed and present the specialty of adhesiveness to dye molecules, which could help to localize additional dye molecules near the plasmonic NPs, hence increasing the optical absorption consequently the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the DSCs by 30% from 3.3% to 4.3%. Meanwhile, an irregular Au-Ag alloy popcorn-shaped NPs (popcorn NPs) with plenty of fine structures is also proposed and realized to enhance the light absorption of DSC. A pronounced absorption enhancement in a broadband wavelength range is observed due to the excitation of localized surface plasmon at different wavelengths. The PCE is enhanced by 32% from 5.94% to 7.85%.

  12. MRI of Breast Tumor Initiating Cells Using the Extra Domain-B of Fibronectin Targeting Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yujin; Kim, Hoe Suk; Park, Jinho; Li, Mulan; Tian, Lianji; Choi, YoonSeok; Choi, Byung Ihn; Jon, Sangyong; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2014-01-01

    The identification of breast tumor initiating cells (BTICs) is important for the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancers. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether the extra domain-B of fibronectin (EDB-FN) could be used as a new biomarker for BTICs and whether EDB-FN targeting superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) could be used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent for BTIC imaging in vitro and in vivo. BTICs (NDY-1) exhibited high EDB-FN expression, whereas non-BTICs (MCF-7, BT-474, SUM-225, MDA-MB-231) did not exhibit EDB-FN expression. Furthermore, Cy3.3-labeled EDB-FN specific peptides (APTEDB) showed preferential binding to the targeted NDY-1 cells. To construct an EDB-FN targeted imaging probe, APTEDB was covalently attached to a thermally cross-linked SPION (TCL-SPION) to yield APTEDB-TCL-SPION. In the in vitro MRI of cell phantoms, selective binding of APTEDB-TCL-SPION to NDY-1 cells was evident, but little binding was observed in MCF-7 cells. After the intravenous injection of APTEDB-TCL-SPION into the NDY-1 mouse tumor xenograft model, a significant decrease in the signal within the tumor was observed in the T2*-weighted images; however, there was only a marginal change in the signal of non-targeting SPIONs such as APTscramble-TCL-SPION or TCL-SPION. Taken together, we report for the first time that EDB-FN was abundantly expressed in BTICs and may therefore be useful as a new biomarker for identifying BTICs. Our study also suggests that APTEDB-TCL-SPION could be used as an MRI contrast agent for BTIC imaging. PMID:24955145

  13. A genetically engineered human pancreatic ? cell line exhibiting glucose-inducible insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ravassard, Philippe; Hazhouz, Yasmine; Pechberty, Séverine; Bricout-Neveu, Emilie; Armanet, Mathieu; Czernichow, Paul; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Despite intense efforts over the past 30 years, human pancreatic ? cell lines have not been available. Here, we describe a robust technology for producing a functional human ? cell line using targeted oncogenesis in human fetal tissue. Human fetal pancreatic buds were transduced with a lentiviral vector that expressed SV40LT under the control of the insulin promoter. The transduced buds were then grafted into SCID mice so that they could develop into mature pancreatic tissue. Upon differentiation, the newly formed SV40LT-expressing ? cells proliferated and formed insulinomas. The resulting ? cells were then transduced with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), grafted into other SCID mice, and finally expanded in vitro to generate cell lines. One of these cell lines, EndoC-?H1, expressed many ? cell–specific markers without any substantial expression of markers of other pancreatic cell types. The cells secreted insulin when stimulated by glucose or other insulin secretagogues, and cell transplantation reversed chemically induced diabetes in mice. These cells represent a unique tool for large-scale drug discovery and provide a preclinical model for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. This technology could be generalized to generate other human cell lines when the cell type–specific promoter is available. PMID:21865645

  14. Interaction of nanoparticles and cell-penetrating peptides with skin for transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinaki; Patlolla, Ram R.; Singh, Mandip

    2011-01-01

    Topical or transdermal drug delivery is challenging because the skin acts as a natural and protective barrier. Therefore, several methods have been examined to increase the permeation of therapeutic molecules into and through the skin. One approach is to use the nanoparticulate delivery system. Starting with liposomes and other vesicular systems, several other types of nanosized drug carriers have been developed such as solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, polymer-based nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles for dermatological applications. This review article discusses how different particulate systems can interact and penetrate into the skin barrier. In this review, the effectiveness of nanoparticles, as well as possible mode of actions of nanoparticles, is presented. In addition to nanoparticles, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated drug delivery into the skin and the possible mechanism of CPP-derived delivery into the skin is discussed. Lastly, the effectiveness and possible mechanism of CPP-modified nanocarriers into the skin are addressed. PMID:21028936

  15. Desulfurization activity and reusability of magnetite nanoparticle-coated Rhodococcus erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Bardania, Hassan; Raheb, Jamshid; Mohammad-Beigi, Hossein; Rasekh, Behnam; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2013-01-01

    The application of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles to the separation of desulfurizing bacterial cells and their influence on the desulfurization activity and reusability of the two bacterial strains Rhodococcus erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via the reverse coprecipitation method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the magnetite nanoparticles had sizes of 5.35 ± 1.13 (F1 nanoparticles) and 8.74 ± 1.18 nm (F2 nanoparticles) when glycine was added during the synthesis of nanoparticles and when it was absent from the reaction mixture, respectively. Glycine was added after the synthesis of both F1 and F2 nanoparticles to stabilize the nanoparticle dispersion. TEM images of cells treated with magnetite nanoparticles indicated that F1 nanoparticles were immobilized on the surface of bacterial cells more evenly than the F2 nanoparticles. Desulfurization activities of the F1 magnetite nanoparticle-coated R. erythropolis FMF and R. erythropolis IGTS8 cells (with sulfur-removal percentage values of 70 ± 4 and 73 ± 3, respectively), as examined with the spectrophotometric Gibbs assay (based on dibenzothiophene degradation and sulfur-removal percentage), were not significantly different from those for the free bacterial cells (67 ± 3 and 69 ± 4, respectively). These results indicate that magnetite nanoparticles cannot affect the desulfurization activity of cells examined in this work. Isolation of bacterial cells from the suspension using a magnet and evaluation of desulfurization activity of separated cells showed that Fe3 O4 nanoparticles can provide a high-efficiency recovery of bacterial cells from a suspension, with the reused magnetite nanoparticle-coated bacterial cells being able to maintain their desulfurization activity efficiently. PMID:23656694

  16. Active targeting docetaxel-PLA nanoparticles eradicate circulating lung cancer stem-like cells and inhibit liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Jiang, Yao; Zhang, Huifeng; Sun, Bo; Hou, Chunying; Zheng, Ji; Liu, Yanyong; Zuo, Pingping

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer related lethality worldwide, and metastasis to distant organs is the pivotal cause of death for the vast majority of lung cancer patients. Accumulated evidence indicates that lung cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) play important roles in metastagenesis, and these circulating CSLCs may be important targets to inhibit the subsequent metastasis. The present study was aimed at establishing CSLC-targeting polylactic acid (PLA) encapsulated docetaxel nanoparticles for antimetastatic therapy. Cyclic binding peptides were screened on CSLCs in vitro and the peptide CVKTPAQSC exhibiting high specific binding ability to pulmonary adenocarcinoma tissue was subsequently conjugated to the nanoparticles loaded with docetaxel (NDTX). Antimetastatic effect of CSLC-targeting nanoparticles loaded with docetaxel (TNDTX) was evaluated in a nude mouse model of liver metastasis. Results showed that, in the absence of targeting peptide, NDTX hardly exhibited any antimetastatic effect. However, TNDTX treatment significantly decreased the metastatic tumor area in the nude mouse liver. Histopathological and serological results also confirmed the antimetastatic efficacy of TNDTX. To our knowledge, this is the first report on establishing a CSLC-based strategy for lung cancer metastatic treatment, and we hope this will offer a potential therapeutic approach for management of metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25418453

  17. Translocation of cell penetrating peptide engrafted nanoparticles across skin layers.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Ram R; Desai, Pinaki R; Belay, Kalayu; Singh, Mandip S

    2010-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the ability of cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to translocate the lipid payload into the skin layers. Fluorescent dye (DID-oil) encapsulated nano lipid crystal nanoparticles (FNLCN) were prepared using Compritol, Miglyol and DOGS-NTA-Ni lipids by hot melt homogenization technique. The FNLCN surface was coated with TAT peptide (FNLCNT) or control YKA peptide (FNLCNY) and in vitro rat skin permeation studies were performed using Franz diffusion cells. Observation of lateral skin sections obtained using cryotome with a confocal microscope demonstrated that skin permeation of FNLCNT was time dependent and after 24h, fluorescence was observed upto a depth of 120 microm which was localized in the hair follicles and epidermis. In case of FNLCN and FNLCNY formulations fluorescence was mainly observed in the hair follicles. This observation was further supported by confocal Raman spectroscopy where higher fluorescence signal intensity was observed at 80 and 120 microm depth with FNLCNT treated skin and intensity of fluorescence peaks was in the ratio of 2:1:1 and 5:3:1 for FNLCNT, FNLCN, and FNLCNY treated skin sections, respectively. Furthermore, replacement of DID-oil with celecoxib (Cxb), a model lipophilic drug showed similar results and after 24h, the CXBNT formulation increased the Cxb concentration in SC by 3 and 6 fold and in epidermis by 2 and 3 fold as compared to CXBN and CXBNY formulations respectively. Our results strongly suggest that CPP can translocate nanoparticles with their payloads into deeper skin layers. PMID:20413152

  18. Release of magnetic nanoparticles from cell-encapsulating biodegradable nanobiomaterials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Inci, Fatih; Mullick, Omer; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Sung, Yuree; Kavaz, Doga; Li, Baoqiang; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Demirci, Utkan

    2012-08-28

    The future of tissue engineering requires development of intelligent biomaterials using nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have several applications in biology and medicine; one example is Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, MNPs have been encapsulated within cell-encapsulating hydrogels to create novel nanobiomaterials (i.e., M-gels), which can be manipulated and assembled in magnetic fields. The M-gels can be used as building blocks for bottom-up tissue engineering to create 3D tissue constructs. For tissue engineering applications of M-gels, it is essential to study the release of encapsulated MNPs from the hydrogel polymer network and the effect of MNPs on hydrogel properties, including mechanical characteristics, porosity, swelling behavior, and cellular response (e.g., viability, growth). Therefore, we evaluated the release of MNPs from photocrosslinkable gelatin methacrylate hydrogels as the polymer network undergoes biodegradation using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. MNP release correlated linearly with hydrogel biodegradation rate with correlation factors (Pearson product moment correlation coefficient) of 0.96 ± 0.03 and 0.99 ± 0.01 for MNP concentrations of 1% and 5%, respectively. We also evaluated the effect of MNPs on hydrogel mechanical properties, porosity, and swelling behavior, as well as cell viability and growth in MNP-encapsulating hydrogels. Fibroblasts encapsulated with MNPs in hydrogels remained viable (>80% at t = 144 h) and formed microtissue constructs in culture (t = 144 h). These results indicated that MNP-encapsulating hydrogels show promise as intelligent nanobiomaterials, with great potential to impact broad areas of bioengineering, including tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:22680777

  19. Release of Magnetic Nanoparticles from Cell-Encapsulating Biodegradable Nanobiomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Inci, Fatih; Mullick, Omer; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Sung, Yuree; Kavaz, Doga; Li, Baoqiang; Denkbas, Emir Baki; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    The future of tissue engineering requires development of intelligent biomaterials using nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have several applications in biology and medicine; one example is Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, MNPs have been encapsulated within cell-encapsulating hydrogels to create novel nanobiomaterials (i.e., M-gels), which can be manipulated and assembled in magnetic fields. The M-gels can be used as building blocks for bottom-up tissue engineering to create 3D tissue constructs. For tissue engineering applications of M-gels, it is essential to study the release of encapsulated MNPs from the hydrogel polymer network and the effect of MNPs on hydrogel properties, including mechanical characteristics, porosity, swelling behavior, and cellular response (e.g., viability, growth). Therefore, we evaluated the release of MNPs from photocrosslinkable gelatin methacrylate hydrogels as the polymer network undergoes biodegradation using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. MNP release correlated linearly with hydrogel biodegradation rate with correlation factors (Pearson product moment correlation coefficient) of 0.96 ± 0.03 and 0.99 ± 0.01 for MNP concentrations of 1% and 5%, respectively. We also evaluated the effect of MNPs on hydrogel mechanical properties, porosity, and swelling behavior, as well as cell viability and growth in MNP-encapsulating hydrogels. Fibroblasts encapsulated with MNPs in hydrogels remained viable (>80% at t = 144 h) and formed microtissue constructs in culture (t = 144 h). These results indicated that MNP-encapsulating hydrogels show promise as intelligent nanobiomaterials, with great potential to impact broad areas of bioengineering, including tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:22680777

  20. Effect of silver nanoparticles on human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Diendorf, Jörg; Epple, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Köller, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are one of the fastest growing products in nano-medicine due to their enhanced antibacterial activity at the nanoscale level. In biomedicine, hundreds of products have been coated with Ag-NP. For example, various medical devices include silver, such as surgical instruments, bone implants and wound dressings. After the degradation of these materials, or depending on the coating technique, silver in nanoparticle or ion form can be released and may come into close contact with tissues and cells. Despite incorporation of Ag-NP as an antibacterial agent in different products, the toxicological and biological effects of silver in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are not well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of both ionic and nanoparticulate silver on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages and on the secretion of the respective differentiation markers adiponectin, osteocalcin and aggrecan. Results: As shown through laser scanning microscopy, Ag-NP with a size of 80 nm (hydrodynamic diameter) were taken up into hMSCs as nanoparticulate material. After 24 h of incubation, these Ag-NP were mainly found in the endo-lysosomal cell compartment as agglomerated material. Cytotoxicity was observed for differentiated or undifferentiated hMSCs treated with high silver concentrations (?20 µg·mL?1 Ag-NP; ?1.5 µg·mL?1 Ag+ ions) but not with low-concentration treatments (?10 µg·mL?1 Ag-NP; ?1.0 µg·mL?1 Ag+ ions). Subtoxic concentrations of Ag-NP and Ag+ ions impaired the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas chondrogenic differentiation was unaffected after 21 d of incubation. In contrast to aggrecan, the inhibitory effect of adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by a decrease in the secretion of specific biomarkers, including adiponectin (adipocytes) and osteocalcin (osteoblasts). Conclusion: Aside from the well-studied antibacterial effect of silver, little is known about the influence of nano-silver on cell differentiation processes. Our results demonstrate that ionic or nanoparticulate silver attenuates the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs even at non-toxic concentrations. Therefore, more studies are needed to investigate the effects of silver species on cells at low concentrations during long-term treatment. PMID:25551033

  1. Differentiated human adipose-derived stem cells exhibit hepatogenic capability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Joseph C; Ludlow, John W; Sherwood, Sonya; Yu, Gang; Wu, Xiying; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2010-11-01

    The availability of suitable human livers for transplantation falls short of the number of potential patients. In addition, the availability of primary human hepatocytes for cell-therapy and drug development applications is significantly limited; less than 700 livers per year are available for such studies. However, the majority of these organs cannot be utilized due to pathological infections (e.g., HepB, HepC, or HIV) or excessive levels of steatosis. Thus, the number of cells needed for cell therapy applications far exceeds the number of cells available from donated livers. The ability to implant progenitor cell populations that can form liver tissue in situ, or can be differentiated in vitro would be a major advance in current cell-based therapies. In addition, and importantly for this application, the ability to utilize a non-hepatic progenitor cell to mimic hepatocytes in vitro would enable the scale-up production of cells for bioartifical liver assist devices, cell-therapy and drug discovery applications. We demonstrate the feasibility of inducing adipose-derived stromal (ASC) cells to express several features of human hepatocytes such as glycogen storage and expression of liver specific genes. Importantly, we also show that undifferentiated ASCs and ASC-derived hepatic cells engraft robustly into the liver in a mouse model of toxic injury. These data indicate a significant potential for the use of undifferentiated ASCs and ASC-derived hepatic cells as novel and valuable products for cell therapy. PMID:20458738

  2. Metallofullerene nanoparticles promote osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells through BMP signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kangning; Cao, Weipeng; Hao, Xiaohong; Xue, Xue; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuliang; Meng, Jie; Sun, Baoyun; Zhang, Jinchao; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis.Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33575a

  3. Structural responses of cells to intracellular magnetic force induced by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Han; Tong, Sheng; Bao, Gang; Wang, Biao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of intracellular force on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We generated intracellular force on endothelial cells under different magnetic fields using the cell uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Cell responses to intracellular force were observed using fluorescent microscopy. Our results indicated that nanoparticles were taken up by the cell by endocytosis and were deposited in lysosomes. Nanoparticles and lysosomes inside the cell could be relocated by the application of a magnetic force. The intracellular magnetic force could also be used to accelerate cell migration by adjusting the magnetic fields and giving the cell free culture space. No cytotoxicity of nanoparticles was found in our experiments. By comparing intracellular relocalization with migration of the whole cell, we obtained a better understanding of the self-defence mechanisms of cells based on their mechanical properties. Based on the promising mechanical properties and low cytotoxicity of our magnetic nanoparticles, their potential applications in cytomechanics and cell patterning are discussed. PMID:24336693

  4. NANOPARTICLES AND THEIR APPLICATIONS IN CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Edina C.; Wang, Andrew Z.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles can be engineered with distinctive compositions, sizes, shapes, and surface chemistries to enable novel techniques in a wide range of biological applications. The unique properties of nanoparticles and their behavior in biological milieu also enable exciting and integrative approaches to studying fundamental biological questions. This review will provide an overview of various types of nanoparticles and concepts of targeting nanoparticles. We will also discuss the advantages and recent applications of using nanoparticles as tools for drug delivery, imaging, sensing, and for the understanding of basic biological processes. PMID:24104563

  5. The Fischer rat thyroid cell line FRTL-5 exhibits a nondiploid karyotype.

    PubMed

    Tasevski, V; Benn, D; Peters, G; Luttrell, B; Simpson, A

    1998-07-01

    The FRTL-5 cell line is a stable thyroid cell line derived from the thyroid gland of the Fischer rat under defined culture conditions, which has been widely adopted as a model system for the study of thyroid cell function and for bioassay. While characterizing by flow cytometry FRTL-5 cells that were supplied to this laboratory by ATCC (American Type Cell Collection), we discovered that the cells (ATCC CRL8305) were not diploid, having approximately twofold the DNA content relative to a diploid control. The increase in DNA content also applied to cells originally supplied by the ATCC (described as passage 14) that when counted in metaphase had a modal chromosomal count of 84, indicating tetraploid status, double the expected 42 of a diploid rat cell. In a private communication, the ATCC confirmed these findings which nevertheless are contrary to previous literature reports where they were reported to be diploid. Tetraploid cells are less sensitive to thyrotropin (TSH) as measured by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, compared with diploid cells (p = < 0.001). Despite similar 3H-thymidine uptake in 0.2% fetal calf serum, tetraploid cells show increased 3H-thymidine uptake in 5% fetal calf serum in the absence of TSH (p = 0.001). The origin of these chromosomal changes is unclear, but these findings must raise doubts regarding the suitability of the tetraploid FRTL-5 cell line as a model for studies of human or animal thyroid physiology. PMID:9709917

  6. Silica nanoparticles for cell imaging and intracellular sensing.

    PubMed

    Korzeniowska, B; Nooney, R; Wencel, D; McDonagh, C

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications. In particular, nanobiophotonic approaches using fluorescence offers the potential of high sensitivity and selectivity in applications such as cell imaging and intracellular sensing. In this review, we focus primarily on the use of fluorescent silica NPs for these applications and, in so doing, aim to enhance and complement the key recent review articles on these topics. We summarize the main synthetic approaches, namely the Stöber and microemulsion processes, and, in this context, we deal with issues in relation to both covalent and physical incorporation of different types of dyes in the particles. The important issue of NP functionalization for conjugation to biomolecules is discussed and strategies published in the recent literature are highlighted and evaluated. We cite recent examples of the use of fluorescent silica NPs for cell imaging in the areas of cancer, stem cell and infectious disease research, and we review the current literature on the use of silica NPs for intracellular sensing of oxygen, pH and ionic species. We include a short final section which seeks to identify the main challenges and obstacles in relation to the potential widespread use of these particles for in vivo diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:24113689

  7. Silica nanoparticles for cell imaging and intracellular sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzeniowska, B.; Nooney, R.; Wencel, D.; McDonagh, C.

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications. In particular, nanobiophotonic approaches using fluorescence offers the potential of high sensitivity and selectivity in applications such as cell imaging and intracellular sensing. In this review, we focus primarily on the use of fluorescent silica NPs for these applications and, in so doing, aim to enhance and complement the key recent review articles on these topics. We summarize the main synthetic approaches, namely the Stöber and microemulsion processes, and, in this context, we deal with issues in relation to both covalent and physical incorporation of different types of dyes in the particles. The important issue of NP functionalization for conjugation to biomolecules is discussed and strategies published in the recent literature are highlighted and evaluated. We cite recent examples of the use of fluorescent silica NPs for cell imaging in the areas of cancer, stem cell and infectious disease research, and we review the current literature on the use of silica NPs for intracellular sensing of oxygen, pH and ionic species. We include a short final section which seeks to identify the main challenges and obstacles in relation to the potential widespread use of these particles for in vivo diagnostics and therapeutics.

  8. Hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells: polymeric nanoparticle uptake and lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Brüstle, Ivonne; Simmet, Thomas; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina; Mailänder, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The combination of stem cell therapy and nanoparticles promises to enhance the effect of cellular therapies by using nanocarriers as drug delivery devices to guide the further differentiation or homing of stem cells. The impact of nanoparticles on primary cell types remains much more elusive as most groups study the nanoparticle-cell interaction in malignant cell lines. Here, we report on the influence of polymeric nanoparticles on human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In this study we systematically investigated the influence of polymeric nanoparticles on the cell functionality and differentiation capacity of hHSCs and hMSCs to obtain a deeper knowledge of the interaction of stem cells and nanoparticles. As model systems of nanoparticles, two sets of either bioinert (polystyrene without carboxylic groups on the surface) or biodegradable (PLLA without magnetite) particles were analyzed. Flow cytometry and microscopy analysis showed high uptake rates and no toxicity for all four tested particles in hMSCs and hHSCs. During the differentiation process, the payload of particles per cell decreased. The PLLA-Fe particle showed a significant increase in the IL-8 release in hMSCs but not in hHSCs. We assume that this is due to an increase of free intracellular iron ions but obviously also depends on the cell type. For hHSCs and hMSCs, lineage differentiation into erythrocytes, granulocytes, and megakaryocytes or adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, was not influenced by the particles when analyzed with lineage specific cluster of differentiation markers. On the other hand qPCR analysis showed significant changes in the expression of some (but not all) investigated lineage markers for both primary cell types. PMID:25821678

  9. Hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells: polymeric nanoparticle uptake and lineage differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Brüstle, Ivonne; Simmet, Thomas; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Landfester, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Summary The combination of stem cell therapy and nanoparticles promises to enhance the effect of cellular therapies by using nanocarriers as drug delivery devices to guide the further differentiation or homing of stem cells. The impact of nanoparticles on primary cell types remains much more elusive as most groups study the nanoparticle–cell interaction in malignant cell lines. Here, we report on the influence of polymeric nanoparticles on human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In this study we systematically investigated the influence of polymeric nanoparticles on the cell functionality and differentiation capacity of hHSCs and hMSCs to obtain a deeper knowledge of the interaction of stem cells and nanoparticles. As model systems of nanoparticles, two sets of either bioinert (polystyrene without carboxylic groups on the surface) or biodegradable (PLLA without magnetite) particles were analyzed. Flow cytometry and microscopy analysis showed high uptake rates and no toxicity for all four tested particles in hMSCs and hHSCs. During the differentiation process, the payload of particles per cell decreased. The PLLA–Fe particle showed a significant increase in the IL-8 release in hMSCs but not in hHSCs. We assume that this is due to an increase of free intracellular iron ions but obviously also depends on the cell type. For hHSCs and hMSCs, lineage differentiation into erythrocytes, granulocytes, and megakaryocytes or adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, was not influenced by the particles when analyzed with lineage specific cluster of differentiation markers. On the other hand qPCR analysis showed significant changes in the expression of some (but not all) investigated lineage markers for both primary cell types. PMID:25821678

  10. Evaluating Cytotoxicity of Hyaluronate Targeted Solid Lipid Nanoparticles of Etoposide on SK-OV-3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Sadeghi Aliabadi, Hojatollah

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial ovarian carcinoma is one of the most fatal gynecological cancers. Etoposide is used in treating platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Sodium hyaluronate is a substance that binds to the CD44 receptors overexpressed in SK-OV-3 cells of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. The aim of the present work was to study the cytotoxicity effect of hyaluronate targeted solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of etoposide on SK-OV-3 cells. The cytotoxicity of the targeted and nontargeted SLNs of etoposide was compared to free drug on the SK-OV-3 cells by MTT assay method. The cellular uptake of the targeted and nontargeted nanoparticles containing sodium fluorescein was also studied. The difference of cell vitality between nontargeted nanoparticles and also targeted nanoparticles with free drug was significant. Targeted nanoparticles also caused more toxicity than nontargeted nanoparticles (P < 0.05). After 4 hours of incubating, the fluorescence was remarkably higher in the cells treated by targeted SLNs rather than nontargeted ones, and there was no observable fluorescence in cells incubated with pure sodium fluorescein. Hyaluronate targeted SLNs containing etoposide increased the cytotoxicity of etoposide on SK-OV-3 cells which may be a worthwhile potential method for reducing the prescribed dose and systemic side effects of this drug in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. PMID:24868467

  11. Number of Nanoparticles per Cell through a Spectrophotometric Method - A key parameter to Assess Nanoparticle-based Cellular Assays

    PubMed Central

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Cano-Cortés, Victoria; Altea-Manzano, Patricia; Pernagallo, Salvatore; Díaz-Mochón, Juan J.; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M.

    2015-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (eNPs) for biological and biomedical applications are produced from functionalised nanoparticles (NPs) after undergoing multiple handling steps, giving rise to an inevitable loss of NPs. Herein we present a practical method to quantify nanoparticles (NPs) number per volume in an aqueous suspension using standard spectrophotometers and minute amounts of the suspensions (up to 1??L). This method allows, for the first time, to analyse cellular uptake by reporting NPs number added per cell, as opposed to current methods which are related to solid content (w/V) of NPs. In analogy to the parameter used in viral infective assays (multiplicity of infection), we propose to name this novel parameter as multiplicity of nanofection. PMID:25976173

  12. High-Efficiency 6?? Multicrystalline Black Solar Cells Based on Metal-Nanoparticle-Assisted Chemical Etching

    E-print Network

    Hsu, W. Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) photovoltaic (PV) solar cells with nanoscale surface texturing by metal-nanoparticle-assisted etching are proposed to achieve high power efficiency. The investigation of average nanorod ...

  13. Spatial modulation spectroscopy for imaging and quantitative analysis of single dye-doped organic nanoparticles inside cells.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Mary Sajini; Devkota, Tuphan; Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K; Smith, Bradley D; Hartland, Gregory V

    2015-06-01

    Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:25964049

  14. Cytotoxicity and GMI bio-sensor detection of maghemite nanoparticles internalized into cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc-Béguin, F.; Nabily, S.; Gieraltowski, J.; Turzo, A.; Querellou, S.; Salaun, P. Y.

    2009-02-01

    In this work we determine conditions to produce cell samples for imaging with detection of the modification of the magnetic field by maghemite (Fe 2O 3) nanoparticles acting as a high sensitivity magnetic bio-sensor based on the giant magneto-impedance (GMI) effect. Mat Ly Lu cells are grown for 24 h with various maghemite nanoparticles concentrations (from 0 to 6 mg/ml). The percentage of viable cells is determined by counting labeled cells with trypan blue under an optical microscope. The quantity of nanoparticles internalized into the cells is evaluated by X-ray fluorescence analysis and expressed in iron moles per cell. The GMI bio-sensor was tested with the various samples. We observed that the best sensitivity of the GMI bio-sensor was obtained at a frequency of 1 MHz. To confirm these results in the presence of cell samples, four measurement frequencies were pre-selected (from 1 to 100 MHz) and tested. Cell growth conditions compatible with an acceptable percentage of cell viability for various concentrations of nanoparticles were also determined. These experiments allow us to conclude that cell growth with 0.1 mg/ml of nanoparticles for 24 h shows modifications of the magnetic field detectable optimally at 1 MHz frequency.

  15. Selective Activation of Antigen-Experienced T Cells by Anti-CD3 Constrained on Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ying-Chun; Edidin, Michael A.; Powell, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of T cells through the T cell receptor (TCR) is mediated by the TCR-CD3 signaling complex. Cross linking of this complex with antibodies directed against CD3 leads to potent activation of T cells. However, such activation is not antigen-specific. We exploited the observation that the TCR-CD3 complex is clustered on T cells that have been activated by antigen by using anti-CD3 nanoparticles to selectively activate antigen-experienced mouse T cells. We find that constraining anti-CD3 on the surface of a nanoparticle markedly and selectively enhances proliferation and cytokine production of antigen-experienced T cells but does not activate naïve T cells. This effect was recapitulated in heterogeneous cultures containing mixtures of antigen-specific CD4+ or CD8+ T cells and bystander T cells. Furthermore, in vivo anti-CD3 coated nanoparticles increased the expansion of antigen-specific T cells following vaccination. Overall, these findings indicate that anti-CD3 coated nanoparticles could be use to enhance the efficacy of vaccines and immunotherapy. The results also suggest constraining a ligand on the surface of a nanoparticle might as general strategy for selectively targeting clustered receptors. PMID:24098054

  16. Effects of PVA coated nanoparticles on human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Strehl, Cindy; Gaber, Timo; Maurizi, Lionel; Hahne, Martin; Rauch, Roman; Hoff, Paula; Häupl, Thomas; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Poole, A Robin; Hofmann, Heinrich; Buttgereit, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides new opportunities in human medicine, mainly for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often diagnosed after irreversible joint structural damage has occurred. There is an urgent need for a very early diagnosis of RA, which can be achieved by more sensitive imaging methods. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are already used in medicine and therefore represent a promising tool for early diagnosis of RA. The focus of our work was to investigate any potentially negative effects resulting from the interactions of newly developed amino-functionalized amino-polyvinyl alcohol coated (a-PVA) SPION (a-PVA-SPION), that are used for imaging, with human immune cells. We analyzed the influence of a-PVA-SPION with regard to cell survival and cell activation in human whole blood in general, and in human monocytes and macrophages representative of professional phagocytes, using flow cytometry, multiplex suspension array, and transmission electron microscopy. We found no effect of a-PVA-SPION on the viability of human immune cells, but cytokine secretion was affected. We further demonstrated that the percentage of viable macrophages increased on exposure to a-PVA-SPION. This effect was even stronger when a-PVA-SPION were added very early in the differentiation process. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that both monocytes and macrophages are able to endocytose a-PVA-SPION. Our findings demonstrate an interaction between human immune cells and a-PVA-SPION which needs to be taken into account when considering the use of a-PVA-SPION in human medicine.

  17. Biocompatibility evaluation of bioglass nanoparticles to chondrocyte cells by isothermal microcalorimetry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Doostmohammadi; A. Monshi; M. H. Fathi; R. Salehi; S. Karbasi; O. Braissant; A. U. Daniels

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at the biocompatibility evaluation of bioglass nanoparticles to chondrocyte cells using isothermal micro\\/nano calorimetry (IMNC), which is a new method to study cell\\/biomaterial interactions. For this purpose, 63S bioglass nanoparticles were made via sol-gel method and primary characterization was carried out on the particles. XRD analysis showed the amorphous structure of the glass and the particle size

  18. In vitro interaction of colloidal nanoparticles with mammalian cells: What have we learned thus far?

    PubMed Central

    Nazarenus, Moritz; Zhang, Qian; Soliman, Mahmoud G; del Pino, Pablo; Pelaz, Beatriz; Carregal-Romero, Susana; Rejman, Joanna; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J D; Zellner, Reinhard; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2014-01-01

    Summary The interfacing of colloidal nanoparticles with mammalian cells is now well into its second decade. In this review our goal is to highlight the more generally accepted concepts that we have gleaned from nearly twenty years of research. While details of these complex interactions strongly depend, amongst others, upon the specific properties of the nanoparticles used, the cell type, and their environmental conditions, a number of fundamental principles exist, which are outlined in this review. PMID:25247131

  19. Electron microscopy localization and characterization of functionalized composite organic-inorganic SERS nanoparticles on leukemia cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ai Leen Koh; Catherine M. Shachaf; Sailaja Elchuri; Garry P. Nolan; Robert Sinclair

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of electron microscopy as a powerful characterization tool to identify and locate antibody-conjugated composite organic-inorganic nanoparticle (COINs) surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles on cells. U937 leukemia cells labeled with antibody CD54-conjugated COINs were characterized in their native, hydrated state using wet scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in their dehydrated state using high-resolution SEM. In both

  20. Live cell plasma membranes do not exhibit a miscibility phase transition over a wide range of temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Saha, Suvrajit; Polley, Anirban; Huang, Hector; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan; Groves, Jay T

    2015-03-26

    Lipid/cholesterol mixtures derived from cell membranes as well as their synthetic reconstitutions exhibit well-defined miscibility phase transitions and critical phenomena near physiological temperatures. This suggests that lipid/cholesterol-mediated phase separation plays a role in the organization of live cell membranes. However, macroscopic lipid-phase separation is not generally observed in cell membranes, and the degree to which properties of isolated lipid mixtures are preserved in the cell membrane remain unknown. A fundamental property of phase transitions is that the variation of tagged particle diffusion with temperature exhibits an abrupt change as the system passes through the transition, even when the two phases are distributed in a nanometer-scale emulsion. We support this using a variety of Monte Carlo and atomistic simulations on model lipid membrane systems. However, temperature-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of labeled lipids and membrane-anchored proteins in live cell membranes shows a consistently smooth increase in the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature. We find no evidence of a discrete miscibility phase transition throughout a wide range of temperatures: 14-37 °C. This contrasts the behavior of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) blebbed from the same cells, which do exhibit phase transitions and macroscopic phase separation. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of a DiI probe in both cases reveals a significant environmental difference between the live cell and the GPMV. Taken together, these data suggest the live cell membrane may avoid the miscibility phase transition inherent to its lipid constituents by actively regulating physical parameters, such as tension, in the membrane. PMID:25747462

  1. Factors affecting T cell responses induced by fully synthetic glyco-gold-nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallarini, Silvia; Paoletti, Tiziana; Battaglini, Carolina Orsi; Ronchi, Paolo; Lay, Luigi; Bonomi, Renato; Jha, Satadru; Mancin, Fabrizio; Scrimin, Paolo; Lombardi, Grazia

    2012-12-01

    We have synthesized and characterized nearly monodisperse and highly pure gold nanoparticles (2 and 5 nm) coated with non-immunoactive mono- and disaccharides, modelled after the capsular polysaccharide of serogroup A of the Neisseria meningitidis bacterium. We have used them to test their ability to induce immune cell responses as a consequence of their multivalency. The results indicate that they are indeed immunoactive and that immunoactivity is strongly dependent on size, and larger, 5 nm nanoparticles perform far better than smaller, 2 nm ones. Immune response (activation of macrophages) initiates with the whole nanoparticle recognition by the surface of antigen-presenting cells, independent of the saccharide oligomerization (or charge) on the nanoparticle surface. The induction of T cell proliferation and the increase of IL-2 levels, a consequence of the expression of MHC II involved in antigen presentation, require the presence of a disaccharide on the nanoparticle, not just a monosaccharide. A possible explanation is that, at this stage, the saccharides are detached from the gold surface. These results may provide leads for designing new saccharide-based, nanoparticle-conjugate vaccines.We have synthesized and characterized nearly monodisperse and highly pure gold nanoparticles (2 and 5 nm) coated with non-immunoactive mono- and disaccharides, modelled after the capsular polysaccharide of serogroup A of the Neisseria meningitidis bacterium. We have used them to test their ability to induce immune cell responses as a consequence of their multivalency. The results indicate that they are indeed immunoactive and that immunoactivity is strongly dependent on size, and larger, 5 nm nanoparticles perform far better than smaller, 2 nm ones. Immune response (activation of macrophages) initiates with the whole nanoparticle recognition by the surface of antigen-presenting cells, independent of the saccharide oligomerization (or charge) on the nanoparticle surface. The induction of T cell proliferation and the increase of IL-2 levels, a consequence of the expression of MHC II involved in antigen presentation, require the presence of a disaccharide on the nanoparticle, not just a monosaccharide. A possible explanation is that, at this stage, the saccharides are detached from the gold surface. These results may provide leads for designing new saccharide-based, nanoparticle-conjugate vaccines. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S10 mentioned in the text related to the syntheses of nanosystems, nanoparticle characterization, and biological tests. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32338a

  2. CD133+CXCR4+ colon cancer cells exhibit metastatic potential and predict poor prognosis of patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC), which frequently metastasizes to the liver, is one of the three leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Growing evidence suggests that a subset of cells exists among cancer stem cells. This distinct subpopulation is thought to contribute to liver metastasis; however, it has not been fully explored in CRC yet. Methods Flow cytometry analysis was performed to detect distinct subsets with CD133 and CXCR4 markers in human primary and metastatic CRC tissues. The 'stemness' and metastatic capacities of different subpopulations derived from the colon cancer cell line HCT116 were compared in vitro and in vivo. The roles of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the metastatic process were also investigated. A survival curve was used to explore the correlation between the content of CD133+CXCR4+ cancer cells and patient survival. Results In human specimens, the content of CD133+CXCR4+ cells was higher in liver metastases than in primary colorectal tumors. Clonogenic and tumorigenic cells were restricted to CD133+ cells in the HCT116 cell line, with CXCR4 expression having no impact on the 'stemness' properties. We found that CD133+CXCR4+ cancer cells had a high metastatic capacity in vitro and in vivo. Compared with CD133+CXCR4- cells, CD133+CXCR4+ cancer cells experienced EMT, which contributed partly to their metastatic phenotype. We then determined that SDF-1/CXCL12 treatment could further induce EMT in CD133+CXCR4+ cancer cells and enhance their invasive behavior, while this could not be observed in CD133+CXCR4- cancer cells. Blocking SDF-1/CXCR4 interaction with a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 (1,10-[1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)]bis-1,4,8,11 -tetraazacyclotetradecane octahydrochloride), inhibited metastatic tumor growth in a mouse hepatic metastasis model. Finally, a high percentage of CD133+CXCR4+ cells in human primary CRC was associated with a reduced two-year survival rate. Conclusions Strategies targeting the SDF-1/CXCR4 interaction may have important clinical applications in the suppression of colon cancer metastasis. Further investigations on how high expression of CXCR4 and EMT occur in this identified cancer stem cell subset are warranted to provide insights into our understanding of tumor biology. PMID:22871210

  3. Biocompatibility of Fe3O4 nanoparticles evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using normal, glia and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankamwar, B.; Lai, T. C.; Huang, J. H.; Liu, R. S.; Hsiao, M.; Chen, C. H.; Hwu, Y. K.

    2010-02-01

    In order to reveal the biocompatibility of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and bipolar surfactant tetramethylammonium 11-aminoundecanoate cytotoxicity tests were performed as a function of concentration from low (0.1 µg ml-1) to higher concentration (100 µg ml-1) using various human glia, human breast cancer and normal cell lines. Cytotoxicity tests for human glia (D54MG, G9T, SF126, U87, U251, U373), human breast cancer (MB157, SKBR3, T47D) and normal (H184B5F5/M10, WI-38, SVGp12) cell lines exhibited almost nontoxicity and reveal biocompatibility of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the concentration range of 0.1-10 µg ml-1, while accountable cytotoxicity can be seen at 100 µg ml-1. The results of our studies suggest that Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with bipolar surfactant tetramethylammonium 11-aminoundecanoate are biocompatible and promising for bio-applications such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia.

  4. Enhance Cancer Cell Recognition and Overcome Drug Resistance Using Hyaluronic Acid and ?-Tocopheryl Succinate Based Multifunctional Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Desheng; Wang, Ai-Ting; Yang, Zhen-Zhen; Liu, Yu-Jie; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2015-06-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) presents a clinical obstacle to cancer chemotherapy. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a hyaluronic acid (HA) and ?-tocopheryl succinate (?-TOS) based nanoparticle to enhance cancer cell recognition and overcome MDR, and to explore the underlying mechanisms. A multifunctional nanoparticle, HTTP-50 NP, consisted of HA-?-TOS (HT) conjugate and d-?-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) with docetaxel loaded in its hydrophobic core. The promoted tumor cell recognition and accumulation, cytotoxicity, and mitochondria-specific apoptotic pathways for the HTTP-50 NP were confirmed in MCF-7/Adr cells (P-gp-overexpressing cancer model), indicating that the formulated DTX and the conjugated ?-TOS in the HTTP-50 NP could synergistically circumvent the acquired and intrinsic MDR in MCF-7/Adr cells. In vivo investigation on the MCF-7/Adr xenografted nude mice models confirmed that HTTP-50 NP possessed much higher tumor tissue accumulation and exhibited pronouncedly enhanced antiresistance tumor efficacy with reduced systemic toxicity compared with HTTP-0 NP and Taxotere. The mechanisms of the multifunctional HTTP-50 NP to overcome MDR and enhance antiresistance efficacy may be contributed by CD44 receptor-targeted delivery and P-gp efflux inhibition, and meanwhile to maximize antitumor efficacy by synergism of DTX and mitocan of ?-TOS killing tumor cells. PMID:25945733

  5. Porous Pd nanoparticles with high photothermal conversion efficiency for efficient ablation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jia-Wen; Fan, Shi-Xuan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Ling-Dong; Zheng, Xiao-Yu; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2014-04-21

    Nanoparticle (NP) mediated photothermal effect shows great potential as a noninvasive method for cancer therapy treatment, but the development of photothermal agents with high photothermal conversion efficiency, small size and good biocompatibility is still a big challenge. Herein, we report Pd NPs with a porous structure exhibiting enhanced near infrared (NIR) absorption as compared to Pd nanocubes with a similar size (almost two-fold enhancement with a molar extinction coefficient of 6.3 × 10(7) M(-1) cm(-1)), and the porous Pd NPs display monotonically rising absorbance from NIR to UV-Vis region. When dispersed in water and illuminated with an 808 nm laser, the porous Pd NPs give a photothermal conversion efficiency as high as 93.4%, which is comparable to the efficiency of Au nanorods we synthesized (98.6%). As the porous Pd NPs show broadband NIR absorption (650-1200 nm), this allows us to choose multiple laser wavelengths for photothermal therapy. In vitro photothermal heating of HeLa cells in the presence of porous Pd NPs leads to 100% cell death under 808 nm laser irradiation (8 W cm(-2), 4 min). For photothermal heating using 730 nm laser, 70% of HeLa cells were killed after 4 min irradiation at a relative low power density of 6 W cm(-2). These results demonstrated that the porous Pd nanostructure is an attractive photothermal agent for cancer therapy. PMID:24622916

  6. Reactive oxygen species-induced cytotoxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dadong; Bi, Hongsheng; Liu, Bing; Wu, Qiuxin; Wang, Daoguang; Cui, Yan

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have proved that zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles can cause toxicity in different cell lines, oxidative stress is often hypothesized to be an important factor in cytotoxicity of ZnO nanoparticles. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. The present study aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress in toxicity and possible involvement of mitochondria in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon exposure of retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) to ZnO nanoparticles. In this study, the effects of ZnO nanoparticles on mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS levels involved in hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical production were investigated via inverted fluorescence microscope and hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical assay kits, respectively. Furthermore, the mRNA of caspase-12 and the protein secreted into culture supernatant were also determined by means of real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA techniques. Our studies indicate that ZnO nanoparticles could apparently decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential, increase the production of ROS and lead to the overexpression of caspase-12 in RGC-5 cells, suggesting that ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity via ROS overproduction will trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress, lead to the RGC-5 cell damage and finally induce apoptosis/necrosis, the overexpression of caspase-12 may be involved in cell death in RGC-5 cells. PMID:23232460

  7. Invasive breast carcinoma cells from patients exhibit MenaINV- and macrophage-dependent transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Goswami, Sumanta; Jones, Joan G; Rohan, Thomas E; Pieri, Evan; Chen, Xiaoming; Adler, Esther; Cox, Dianne; Maleki, Sara; Bresnick, Anne; Gertler, Frank B; Condeelis, John S; Oktay, Maja H

    2014-11-25

    Metastasis is a complex, multistep process of cancer progression that has few treatment options. A critical event is the invasion of cancer cells into blood vessels (intravasation), through which cancer cells disseminate to distant organs. Breast cancer cells with increased abundance of Mena [an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-responsive cell migration protein] are present with macrophages at sites of intravasation, called TMEM sites (for tumor microenvironment of metastasis), in patient tumor samples. Furthermore, the density of these intravasation sites correlates with metastatic risk in patients. We found that intravasation of breast cancer cells may be prevented by blocking the signaling between cancer cells and macrophages. We obtained invasive breast ductal carcinoma cells of various subtypes by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from patients and found that, in an in vitro transendothelial migration assay, cells that migrated through a layer of human endothelial cells were enriched for the transcript encoding Mena(INV), an invasive isoform of Mena. This enhanced transendothelial migration required macrophages and occurred with all of the breast cancer subtypes. Using mouse macrophages and the human cancer cells from the FNAs, we identified paracrine and autocrine activation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). The paracrine or autocrine nature of the signal depended on the breast cancer cell subtype. Knocking down Mena(INV) or adding an antibody that blocks CSF-1R function prevented transendothelial migration. Our findings indicate that Mena(INV) and TMEM frequency are correlated prognostic markers and CSF-1 and Mena(INV) may be therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis of multiple breast cancer subtypes. PMID:25429076

  8. Invasive breast carcinoma cells from patients exhibit MenaINV- and macrophage-dependent transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Jeanine; Goswami, Sumanta; Jones, Joan G.; Rohan, Thomas E.; Pieri, Evan; Chen, Xiaoming; Adler, Esther; Cox, Dianne; Maleki, Sara; Bresnick, Anne; Gertler, Frank B.; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is a complex, multistep process of cancer progression that has few treatment options. A critical event is the invasion of cancer cells into blood vessels (intravasation), through which cancer cells disseminate to distant organs. Breast cancer cells with increased abundance of Mena [an epidermal growth factor (EGF)–responsive cell migration protein] are present with macrophages at sites of intravasation, called TMEM sites (for tumor microenvironment of metastasis), in patient tumor samples. Furthermore, the density of these intravasation sites correlates with metastatic risk in patients. We found that intravasation of breast cancer cells may be prevented by blocking the signaling between cancer cells and macrophages. We obtained invasive breast ductal carcinoma cells of various subtypes by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from patients and found that, in an in vitro transendothelial migration assay, cells that migrated through a layer of human endothelial cells were enriched for the transcript encoding MenaINV, an invasive isoform of Mena. This enhanced transendothelial migration required macrophages and occurred with all of the breast cancer subtypes. Using mouse macrophages and the human cancer cells from the FNAs, we identified paracrine and autocrine activation of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). The paracrine or autocrine nature of the signal depended on the breast cancer cell subtype. Knocking down MenaINV or adding an antibody that blocks CSF-1R function prevented transendothelial migration. Our findings indicate that MenaINV and TMEM frequency are correlated prognostic markers and CSF-1 and MenaINV may be therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis of multiple breast cancer subtypes. PMID:25429076

  9. Selective activation of antigen-experienced T cells by anti-CD3 constrained on nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ying-Chun; Edidin, Michael A; Powell, Jonathan D

    2013-11-15

    Activation of T cells through the TCR is mediated by the TCR-CD3 signaling complex. Cross linking of this complex with Abs directed against CD3 leads to potent activation of T cells. However, such activation is not Ag-specific. We exploited the observation that the TCR-CD3 complex is clustered on T cells that have been activated by Ag by using anti-CD3 nanoparticles to selectively activate Ag-experienced mouse T cells. We find that constraining anti-CD3 on the surface of a nanoparticle markedly and selectively enhances proliferation and cytokine production of Ag-experienced T cells but does not activate naive T cells. This effect was recapitulated in heterogeneous cultures containing mixtures of Ag-specific CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells and bystander T cells. Furthermore, in vivo anti-CD3-coated nanoparticles increased the expansion of Ag-specific T cells following vaccination. Overall, these findings indicate that anti-CD3-coated nanoparticles could be use to enhance the efficacy of vaccines and immunotherapy. The results also suggest constraining a ligand on the surface of a nanoparticle might as general strategy for selectively targeting clustered receptors. PMID:24098054

  10. J Cell Mol Med . Author manuscript Myoblasts from affected and non-affected FSHD muscles exhibit

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J Cell Mol Med . Author manuscript Page /1 15 Myoblasts from affected and non-affected FSHD muscles pathophysiological pathways in FSHD myoblasts and mature muscle cells but some of these reports were apparently , Jacques Mercier 1 2 , Yegor Vassetzky 3 , Dalila Laoudj-Chenivesse 1 * Muscle et pathologies1 INSERM : ERI

  11. Surface engineering of silica nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery: characterization and cell toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Tatiana; Kiill, Charlene P; de Souza, Ana Luiza R; Fangueiro, Joana F; Fernandes, Lisete; Doktorovová, Slavomira; Santos, Dario L; Garcia, Maria L; Gremião, Maria Palmira D; Souto, Eliana B; Silva, Amélia M

    2014-11-01

    The present work aimed at studying the interaction between insulin and SiNP surfaced with mucoadhesive polymers (chitosan, sodium alginate or polyethylene glycol) and the evaluation of their biocompatibility with HepG2 and Caco-2 cell lines, which mimic in vivo the target of insulin-loaded nanoparticles upon oral administration. Thus, a systematic physicochemical study of the surface-modified insulin-silica nanoparticles (Ins-SiNP) using mucoadhesive polymers has been described. The surfacing of nanoparticle involved the coating of silica nanoparticles (SiNP) with different mucoadhesive polymers, to achieve high contact between the systems and the gut mucosa to enhance the oral insulin bioavailability. SiNP were prepared by a modified Stöber method at room temperature via hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). Interaction between insulin and nanoparticles was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) studies. The high efficiency of nanoparticles' coating resulted in more stable system. FTIR spectra of insulin-loaded nanoparticles showed amide absorption bands which are characteristic of ?-helix content. In general, all developed nanoparticles demonstrated high biocompatible, at the tested concentrations (50-500 ?g/mL), revealing no or low toxicity in the two human cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Caco-2). In conclusion, the developed insulin-loaded SiNP surfaced with mucoadhesive polymers demonstrated its added value for oral administration of proteins. PMID:25466464

  12. Effects of nanoparticle charge and shape anisotropy on translocation through cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Nangia, Shikha; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2012-12-21

    Nanotoxicity is becoming a major concern as the use of nanoparticles in imaging, therapeutics, diagnostics, catalysis, sensing, and energy harvesting continues to grow dramatically. The tunable functionalities of the nanoparticles offer unique chemical interactions in the translocation process through cell membranes. The overall translocation rate of the nanoparticle can vary immensely on the basis of the charge of the surface functionalization along with shape and size. Using advanced molecular dynamics simulation techniques, we compute translocation rate constants of functionalized cone-, cube-, rod-, rice-, pyramid-, and sphere-shaped nanoparticles through lipid membranes. The computed results indicate that depending on the nanoparticle shape and surface functionalization charge, the translocation rates can span 60 orders of magnitude. Unlike isotropic nanoparticles, positively charged, faceted, rice-shaped nanoparticles undergo electrostatics-driven reorientation in the vicinity of the membrane to maximize their contact area and translocate instantaneously, disrupting lipid self-assembly and thereby causing significant membrane damage. In contrast, negatively charged nanoparticles are electrostatically repelled from the cell membrane and are less likely to translocate. Differences in translocation rates among various shapes may have implications on the structural evolution of pathogens from spherical to rodlike morphologies for enhanced efficacy. PMID:23088323

  13. Biocompatibility of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with osteoblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Si-Feng; Jia, Jing-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Chen, De-Sheng; Guo, Yong-Yuan; Cheng, Tao; Zhang, Xian-Long

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bone disorders (including osteoporosis, loosening of a prosthesis, and bone infections) are of great concern to the medical community and are difficult to cure. Therapies are available to treat such diseases, but all have drawbacks and are not specifically targeted to the site of disease. Chitosan is widely used in the biomedical community, including for orthopedic applications. The aim of the present study was to coat chitosan onto iron oxide nanoparticles and to determine its effect on the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Methods: Nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, x-ray diffraction, zeta potential, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Uptake of nanoparticles by osteoblasts was studied by transmission electron microscopy and Prussian blue staining. Viability and proliferation of osteoblasts were measured in the presence of uncoated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles or those coated with chitosan. Lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, total protein synthesis, and extracellular calcium deposition was studied in the presence of the nanoparticles. Results: Chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles enhanced osteoblast proliferation, decreased cell membrane damage, and promoted cell differentiation, as indicated by an increase in alkaline phosphatase and extracellular calcium deposition. Chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed good compatibility with osteoblasts. Conclusion: Further research is necessary to optimize magnetic nanoparticles for the treatment of bone disease. PMID:23118539

  14. Evaluation of cytotoxic, genotoxic and inflammatory responses of nanoparticles from photocopiers in three human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Photocopiers emit nanoparticles with complex chemical composition. Short-term exposures to modest nanoparticle concentrations triggered upper airway inflammation and oxidative stress in healthy human volunteers in a recent study. To further understand the toxicological properties of copier-emitted nanoparticles, we studied in-vitro their ability to induce cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, DNA damage, and apoptosis in relevant human cell lines. Methods Three cell types were used: THP-1, primary human nasal- and small airway epithelial cells. Following collection in a large volume photocopy center, nanoparticles were extracted, dispersed and characterized in the cell culture medium. Cells were doped at 30, 100 and 300 ?g/mL administered doses for up to 24 hrs. Estimated dose delivered to cells, was ~10% and 22% of the administered dose at 6 and 24 hrs, respectively. Gene expression analysis of key biomarkers was performed using real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in THP-1 cells at 5 ?g nanoparticles/mL for 6-hr exposure for confirmation purposes. Results Multiple cytokines, GM-CSF, IL-1?, IL-6, IL-8, IFN?, MCP-1, TNF-? and VEGF, were significantly elevated in THP-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression analysis confirmed up-regulation of the TNF-? gene in THP-1 cells, consistent with cytokine findings. In both primary epithelial cells, cytokines IL-8, VEGF, EGF, IL-1?, TNF-?, IL-6 and GM-CSF were significantly elevated. Apoptosis was induced in all cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with the significant up-regulation of key apoptosis-regulating genes P53 and Casp8 in THP-1 cells. No significant DNA damage was found at any concentration with the comet assay. Up-regulation of key DNA damage and repair genes, Ku70 and Rad51, were also observed in THP-1 cells, albeit not statistically significant. Significant up-regulation of the key gene HO1 for oxidative stress, implicates oxidative stress induced by nanoparticles. Conclusions Copier-emitted nanoparticles induced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, apoptosis and modest cytotoxicity but no DNA damage in all three-human cell lines. Taken together with gene expression data in THP-1 cells, we conclude that these nanoparticles are directly responsible for inflammation observed in human volunteers. Further toxicological evaluations of these nanoparticles, including across different toner formulations, are warranted. PMID:23968360

  15. Trisomy 12 chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells exhibit upregulation of integrin signaling that is modulated by NOTCH1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Riches, John C.; O’Donovan, Conor J.; Kingdon, Sarah J.; McClanahan, Fabienne; Clear, Andrew J.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Werner, Lillian; Croce, Carlo M.; Ramsay, Alan G.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Gribben, John G.

    2014-01-01

    The leukocyte adhesion cascade is important in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), as it controls migration of malignant cells into the pro-survival lymph node microenvironment. Circulating trisomy 12 CLL cells have increased expression of the integrins CD11a and CD49d, as well as CD38, but the tissue expression of these and other molecules, and the functional and clinical sequelae of these changes have not been described. Here, we demonstrate that circulating trisomy 12 CLL cells also have increased expression of the integrins CD11b, CD18, CD29, and ITGB7, and the adhesion molecule CD323. Notably, there was reduced expression of CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 in trisomy 12 cases with NOTCH1 mutations compared with wild type. Trisomy 12 cells also exhibit upregulation of intracellular integrin signaling molecules CALDAG-GEFI, RAP1B, and Ras-related protein ligand, resulting in enhanced very late antigen-4 [VLA-4] directed adhesion and motility. CD38 expression in CLL has prognostic significance, but the increased CD38 expression in trisomy 12 CLL cells must be taken into account in this subgroup, and the threshold of CD38 positivity should be raised to 40% for this marker to retain its prognostic value. In conclusion, trisomy 12 CLL cells exhibit functional upregulation of integrin signaling, with ?2-integrin expression being modulated by NOTCH1 mutation status. PMID:24829201

  16. Trisomy 12 chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells exhibit upregulation of integrin signaling that is modulated by NOTCH1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Riches, John C; O'Donovan, Conor J; Kingdon, Sarah J; McClanahan, Fabienne; Clear, Andrew J; Neuberg, Donna S; Werner, Lillian; Croce, Carlo M; Ramsay, Alan G; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Gribben, John G

    2014-06-26

    The leukocyte adhesion cascade is important in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), as it controls migration of malignant cells into the pro-survival lymph node microenvironment. Circulating trisomy 12 CLL cells have increased expression of the integrins CD11a and CD49d, as well as CD38, but the tissue expression of these and other molecules, and the functional and clinical sequelae of these changes have not been described. Here, we demonstrate that circulating trisomy 12 CLL cells also have increased expression of the integrins CD11b, CD18, CD29, and ITGB7, and the adhesion molecule CD323. Notably, there was reduced expression of CD11a, CD11b, and CD18 in trisomy 12 cases with NOTCH1 mutations compared with wild type. Trisomy 12 cells also exhibit upregulation of intracellular integrin signaling molecules CALDAG-GEFI, RAP1B, and Ras-related protein ligand, resulting in enhanced very late antigen-4 [VLA-4] directed adhesion and motility. CD38 expression in CLL has prognostic significance, but the increased CD38 expression in trisomy 12 CLL cells must be taken into account in this subgroup, and the threshold of CD38 positivity should be raised to 40% for this marker to retain its prognostic value. In conclusion, trisomy 12 CLL cells exhibit functional upregulation of integrin signaling, with ?2-integrin expression being modulated by NOTCH1 mutation status. PMID:24829201

  17. Recent patents and advances on applications of magnetic nanoparticles and thin films in cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Eslamian, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Cell manipulation is instrumental in most biological applications. One of the most promising methods in handling cells and other biological particles is the magnetic manipulation technique. In this technique, magnetic nanoparticles are employed to magnetize cells. Such cells then can be manipulated, sorted, or separated by applying an external magnetic field. In this work, first recent works and patents on the synthesis methods used for producing magnetic nanoparticles are investigated. These methods include co-precipitation, solvothermal, electrical wire explosion, microemulsion, laser pyrolysis, spray pyrolysis and carbon reduction. Then recent patents and articles on surface modification and functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles using polymers, dithiocarbamate, superparamagnetic shells, antibodies, graphene shells, and fluorescent materials are reviewed. Finally, different techniques on magnetic cell manipulation, such as direct attaching of magnetic particles to cells, employing intercellular markers or extra support molecules, as well as magnetic thin films, microfluidic channels and magnetic beads, are studied. PMID:25336173

  18. Paracrine signalling events in embryonic stem cell renewal mediated by affinity targeted nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Corradetti, Bruna; Freile, Paz; Pells, Steve; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Park, Jason; Fahmy, Tarek M; de Sousa, Paul A

    2012-10-01

    Stem cell growth and differentiation is controlled by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The latter includes growth factors, which are conventionally supplied in vitro in media exchanged daily. Here, we illustrate the use of affinity targeted biodegradable nanoparticles to mediate paracrine stimulation as an alternative approach to sustain the growth and pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells. Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) was encapsulated in biodegradable nanoparticles and targeted to the cell surface using an antibody to the oligosaccharide antigen SSEA-1. Sustained release of LIF from nanoparticles composed of a solid Poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) polyester or a hydrogel-based liposomal system, we term Nanolipogel, replenished once after each cell passage, proved as effective as daily replenishment with soluble LIF for maintenance of pluripotency after 5 passages using 10(4)-fold less LIF. Our study constitutes an alternative paradigm for stem cell culture, providing dynamic microenvironmental control of extrinsic bioactive factors benefiting stem cell manufacturing. PMID:22749449

  19. Poriferan survivin exhibits a conserved regulatory role in the interconnected pathways of cell cycle and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Luthringer, B; Isbert, S; Müller, W E G; Zilberberg, C; Thakur, N L; Wörheide, G; Stauber, R H; Kelve, M; Wiens, M

    2011-01-01

    Survivin orchestrates intracellular pathways during cell division and apoptosis. Its central function as mitotic regulator and inhibitor of cell death has major implications for tumor cell proliferation. Analyses in early-branching Metazoa so far propose an exclusive role of survivin as a chromosomal passenger protein, whereas only later during evolution a complementary antiapoptotic function might have arisen, concurrent with increased organismal complexity. To lift the veil on the ancestral function(s) of this key regulator, a survivin-like protein (SURVL) of one of the earliest-branching metazoan taxa was identified and functionally characterized. SURVL of the sponge Suberites domuncula shares considerable similarities with its metazoan homologs, ranging from conserved exon/intron structure to presence of protein-interaction domains. Whereas sponge tissue shows a low steady-state level, SURVL expression was significantly upregulated in rapidly proliferating primmorph cells. In addition, challenge of tissue and primmorphs with heavy metal or lipopeptide stimulated SURVL expression, concurrent with the expression of a newly discovered caspase. Complementary functional analyses in transfected HEK-293 cells revealed that heterologous expression of a SURVL–EFGP fusion not only promotes proliferation but also enhances resistance to cadmium-induced cell death. Taken together, these results suggest both a deep evolutionary conserved dual role of survivin and an equally conserved central position in the interconnected pathways of cell cycle and apoptosis. PMID:20651742

  20. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce rat retinal ganglion cell damage through bcl-2, caspase-9 and caspase-12 pathways.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dadong; Bi, Hongsheng; Wu, Qiuxin; Wang, Daoguang; Cui, Yan

    2013-06-01

    Nanomaterials, including zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, are being developed for a variety of commercial products. Recent reports showed that cells exposed to ZnO nanoparticles produced severe cytotoxicity accompanied by oxidative stress and genotoxicity. To understand the possible mechanism underlying oxidative stress of ZnO nanoparticles, the present investigation focused on the direct bioactivity of ZnO nanoparticles using a rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC-5) culture. At concentrations relevant to those used in vitro exposure of RGC-5 cells to ZnO nanoparticles, it was found that ZnO nanoparticles could inhibit cell proliferation in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Meanwhile, cell cycle arrest of S and G2/M phases occurred in RGC-5 cells induced by ZnO nanoparticles. Moreover, our results also demonstrated that the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elevated level of caspase-12 as well as decreased levels of bcl-2 and caspase-9 occurred after treatment with different concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles when compared to those in untreated cells. In summary, our findings suggest that ZnO nanoparticles could lead to the over generations of ROS and caspase-12 as well as decreased levels of bcl-2 and caspase-9. These results indicate that bcl-2, caspase-9 and caspase-12 may play significant roles in ZnO nanoparticle-induced RGC-5 cell damage. PMID:23862406

  1. MicroRNA-21 Exhibits Antiangiogenic Function by Targeting RhoB Expression in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bovy, Nicolas; Deroanne, Christophe; Lambert, Vincent; Gonzalez, Maria-Luz Alvarez; Colige, Alain; Rakic, Jean-Marie; Noël, Agnès; Martial, Joseph A.; Struman, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The recent discovery of the involvement of these RNAs in the control of angiogenesis renders them very attractive in the development of new approaches for restoring the angiogenic balance. Whereas miRNA-21 has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in endothelial cells, the potential function of this miRNA in angiogenesis has never been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings We first observed in endothelial cells a negative regulation of miR-21 expression by serum and bFGF, two pro-angiogenic factors. Then using in vitro angiogenic assays, we observed that miR-21 acts as a negative modulator of angiogenesis. miR-21 overexpression reduced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and the ability of these cells to form tubes whereas miR-21 inhibition using a LNA-anti-miR led to opposite effects. Expression of miR-21 in endothelial cells also led to a reduction in the organization of actin into stress fibers, which may explain the decrease in cell migration. Further mechanistic studies showed that miR-21 targets RhoB, as revealed by a decrease in RhoB expression and activity in miR-21 overexpressing cells. RhoB silencing impairs endothelial cell migration and tubulogenesis, thus providing a possible mechanism for miR-21 to inhibit angiogenesis. Finally, the therapeutic potential of miR-21 as an angiogenesis inhibitor was demonstrated in vivo in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization. Conclusions/Significance Our results identify miR-21 as a new angiogenesis inhibitor and suggest that inhibition of cell migration and tubulogenesis is mediated through repression of RhoB. PMID:21347332

  2. Hematopoietic stem cells exhibit a specific ABC transporter gene expression profile clearly distinct from other stem cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leilei Tang; Saskia M Bergevoet; Christian Gilissen; Theo de Witte; Joop H Jansen; Bert A van der Reijden; Reinier AP Raymakers

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters protect cells against unrelated (toxic) substances by pumping them across cell membranes. Earlier we showed that many ABC transporters are highly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compared to more committed progenitor cells. The ABC transporter expression signature may guarantee lifelong protection of HSCs but may also preserve stem cell integrity by extrusion of agents

  3. Enhancing the efficiency of gold nanoparticles treatment of cancer by increasing their rate of endocytosis and cell accumulation using rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Moustafa R K; Panikkanvalappil, Sajanlal R; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2014-03-26

    To minimize the toxicity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in cancer treatment, we have developed a technique, which utilizes lesser amount of AuNPs while exhibiting increased treatment efficiency. Rifampicin (RF) is known for its ability to enhance the accumulation of anticancer drugs in multidrug resistant (MDR) cancer cells. In this work we have shown that RF-conjugated AuNPs can greatly enhance the rate as well as efficiency of endocytosis of NPs and hence their concentration inside the cancer cell. Cell viability results showed a remarkable enhancement in the photothermal therapeutic effect of Au nanorods in presence of RF. This is expected to decrease the demand on the overall amount of AuNPs needed for treating cancer and thus decreasing its toxicity. PMID:24467386

  4. Highly efficient cellular labeling of mesoporous nanoparticles in human mesenchymal stem cells: implication for stem cell tracking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong-Ming Huang; Yann Hung; Bor-Sheng Ko; Szu-Chun Hsu; Wei-Hsuan Chen; Chung-Liang Chien; Chih-Pin Tsai; Chieh-Ti Kuo; Ju-Chiun Kang; Chung-Shi Yang; Chung-Yuan Mou; Yao-Chang Chen

    2005-01-01

    Tracking the distribution of stem cells is crucial to their therapeutic use. However, the usage of current vectors in cellular labeling is restricted by their low internalizing efficiency. Here, we reported a cellular labeling approach with a novel vector composed of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and 3T3-L1 cells, and

  5. ZnO nanoparticles and nanowire array hybrid photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    E-print Network

    Cao, Guozhong

    ZnO nanoparticles and nanowire array hybrid photoanodes for dye-sensitized solar cells Supan for dye-sensitized solar cell DSC with NW arrays to serve as a direct pathway for fast electron transport Institute of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3327339 Dye-sensitized solar cells DSCs have attracted a lot

  6. Theranostic Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles Biodegrade after Pro-Survival Drug Delivery and Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, Paul J.; Greasley, Sarah; Parker, Kelly A.; Campbell, Jos L.; Chang, Huan-Yu; Jones, Julian R.; Sinclair, Robert; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Jokerst, Jesse V.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing cell survival in stem cell therapy is an important challenge for the field of regenerative medicine. Here, we report theranostic mesoporous silica nanoparticles that can increase cell survival through both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. First, the nanoparticle offers ultrasound and MRI signal to guide implantation into the peri-infarct zone and away from the most necrotic tissue. Second, the nanoparticle serves as a slow release reservoir of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)—a protein shown to increase cell survival. Mesenchymal stem cells labeled with these nanoparticles had detection limits near 9000 cells with no cytotoxicity at the 250 µg/mL concentration required for labeling. We also studied the degradation of the nanoparticles and showed that they clear from cells in approximately 3 weeks. The presence of IGF increased cell survival up to 40% (p<0.05) versus unlabeled cells under in vitro serum-free culture conditions. PMID:25825602

  7. Detection of single photoluminescent diamond nanoparticles in cells and study of the internalization pathway.

    PubMed

    Faklaris, Orestis; Garrot, Damien; Joshi, Vandana; Druon, Frédéric; Boudou, Jean-Paul; Sauvage, Thierry; Georges, Patrick; Curmi, Patrick A; Treussart, François

    2008-12-01

    Diamond nanoparticles are promising photoluminescent probes for tracking intracellular processes, due to embedded, perfectly photostable color centers. In this work, the spontaneous internalization of such nanoparticles (diameter 25 nm) in HeLa cancer cells is investigated by confocal microscopy and time-resolved techniques. Nanoparticles are observed inside the cell cytoplasm at the single-particle and single-color-center level, assessed by time-correlation intensity measurements. Improvement of the nanoparticle signal-to-noise ratio inside the cell is achieved using a pulsed-excitation laser and time-resolved detection taking advantage of the long radiative lifetime of the color-center excited state as compared to cell autofluorescence. The internalization pathways are also investigated, with endosomal marking and colocalization analyses. The low colocalization ratio observed proves that nanodiamonds are not trapped in endosomes, a promising result in prospect of drug delivery by these nanoparticles. Low cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles in this cell line is also shown. PMID:18989862

  8. Immortalization and characterization of a cell line exhibiting a severe multiple sulphatase deficiency phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, K; Bielicki, J; Anson, D S

    1997-01-01

    Multiple sulphatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare genetic defect that causes a simultaneous deficiency of all known sulphatases. All available evidence suggests that the deficient gene product is normally responsible for the post-translational modification of a conserved cysteine residue to 2-amino-3-oxopropionic acid and that this modification is necessary for sulphatase activity. MSD often has an enzymically mild phenotype, with significant levels of residual sulphatase activity being detectable. Here we identify an MSD cell line in which the residual activity of the sulphatases assayed was generally very low. To characterize the phenotype of this cell line further, immortalized lines were established after transformation with simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen. Immortalized cell lines representing normal and MSD phenotypes were then transduced with a retroviral vector carrying the gene encoding human N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase. Analysis of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase protein synthesis and enzyme activity showed that transduced cell lines expressed large amounts of enzyme and that the specific activity of this enzyme was approx. 0.5-1.5% of normal, confirming that this cell line defines a severe phenotype for MSD. N-Acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase purified from a transduced MSD cell line seemed normal on denaturing PAGE. Kinetic analysis of the purified enzyme suggests that the residual activity is due to small amounts of normal enzyme rather than unmodified enzyme with low levels of residual activity. These cell lines and the availability of large amounts of inactive N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulphatase from MSD cells should facilitate the further study of this disorder. PMID:9337859

  9. Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells Exhibit a Restricted Repertoire of Functional Chemokine Receptors: Comparison with Human

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giselle Chamberlain; Karina Wright; Antal Rot; Brian Ashton; Jim Middleton; Peter Sommer

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-haematopoeitic, stromal cells that are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal tissues such as bone and cartilage. They are rare in bone marrow, but have the ability to expand many-fold in culture, and retain their growth and multi-lineage potential. The properties of MSCs make them ideal candidates for tissue engineering. It has been shown that MSCs,

  10. The Occurrence of Intercellular Bridges in Groups of Cells Exhibiting Synchronous Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Don W.; Ito, Susumu; Slautterback, David

    1959-01-01

    A previous electron microscopic study of the cat testis revealed that spermatids derived from the same spermatogonium are joined together by intercellular bridges. The present paper records the observation of similar connections between spermatocytes and between spermatids in Hydra, fruit-fly, opossum, pigeon, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, monkey, and man. In view of these findings, it is considered likely that a syncytial relationship within groups of developing male germ cells is of general occurrence and is probably responsible for their synchronous differentiation. When clusters of spermatids, freshly isolated from the germinal epithelium are observed by phase contrast microscopy, the constrictions between the cellular units of the syncytium disappear and the whole group coalesces into a spherical multinucleate mass. The significance of this observation in relation to the occurrence of abnormal spermatozoa in semen and the prevalence of multinucleate giant cells in pathological testes is discussed. In the ectoderm of Hydra, the clusters of cnidoblasts that arise from proliferation of interstitial cells are also connected by intercellular bridges. The development of nematocysts within these groups of conjoined cells is precisely synchronized. Both in the testis of vertebrates and the ectoderm of Hydra, a syncytium results from incomplete cytokinesis in the proliferation of relatively undifferentiated cells. The intercellular bridges between daughter cells are formed when the cleavage furrow encounters the spindle remnant and is arrested by it. The subsequent dissolution of the spindle filaments establishes free communication between the cells. The discovery of intercellular bridges in the two unrelated tissues discussed here suggests that a similar syncytial relationship may be found elsewhere in nature where groups of cells of common origin differentiate synchronously. PMID:13664686

  11. Oritavancin exhibits dual mode of action to inhibit cell-wall biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Joon; Cegelski, Lynette; Stueber, Dirk; Singh, Manmilan; Dietrich, Evelyne; Tanaka, Kelly S. E.; Parr, Thomas R.; Far, Adel Rafai; Schaefer, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Solid-state NMR measurements performed on intact whole cells of S. aureus labeled selectively in vivo have established that des-N-methylleucyl oritavancin (which has antimicrobial activity) binds to the cell-wall peptidoglycan, even though removal of the terminal N-methylleucyl residue destroys the D-Ala-D-Ala binding pocket. By contrast, the des-N-methylleucyl form of vancomycin (which has no antimicrobial activity) does not bind to the cell wall. Solid-state NMR has also determined that oritavancin and vancomycin are comparable inhibitors of transglycosylation, but that oritavancin is a more potent inhibitor of transpeptidation. This combination of effects on cell-wall binding and biosynthesis is interpreted in terms of a recent proposal that oritavancin-like glycopeptides have two cell-wall binding sites: the well-known peptidoglycan D-Ala-D-Ala pentapeptide stem terminus, and the pentaglycyl bridging segment. The resulting dual mode of action provides a structural framework for coordinated cell-wall assembly that accounts for the enhanced potency of oritavancin and oritavancin-like analogues against vancomycin-resistant organisms. PMID:18258256

  12. Dunaliella salina exhibits an antileukemic immunity in a mouse model of WEHI-3 leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Chen; Ho, Yung-Chyuan; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Lu, Fung-Jou

    2014-11-26

    Dunaliella salina has been shown to have antioxidant property and induce apoptotic cell death of human cancer cells in vitro. However, there is no information available on D. salina showing an antileukemia effect or immunomodulatory activity in vivo. This study applied D. salina to syngeneic leukemia-implanted mice (BALB/c and WEHI-3) to investigate its immunological and antileukemia properties. Oral administration of D. salina (184.5, 369, and 922.5 mg/kg) inhibited spleen metastasis and prolonged the survival in BALB/c mice that had received an intravenous injection of WEHI-3 cells. The results revealed that D. salina had reduced spleen enlargement in murine leukemia. It had also increased the population and proliferation of T-cells (CD3) and B-cells (CD19) following Con A/LPS treatment on flow cytometry and MTT assay, respectively. Furthermore, D. salina increased the phagocytosis of macrophages and enhanced the cytotoxicity of natural killer cells on flow cytometry and LDH assay. Moreover, D. salina enhanced the levels of interferon-? and interleukin 2 (IL-2) but reduced the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in leukemic mice. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the application of D. salina had beneficial effects on WEHI-3 leukemic mice by prolonging survival via modulating the immune responses. PMID:25380534

  13. Fluorescence Modified Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for High-Efficient Cellular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yuqing; Zhang, Yu; He, Shiying; Nie, Fang; Teng, Gaojun; Gu, Ning

    2009-04-01

    Labeling of cells with nanoparticles for living detection is of interest to various biomedical applications. In this study, novel fluorescent/magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and used in high-efficient cellular imaging. The nanoparticles coated with the modified chitosan possessed a magnetic oxide core and a covalently attached fluorescent dye. We evaluated the feasibility and efficiency in labeling cancer cells (SMMC-7721) with the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles exhibited a high affinity to cells, which was demonstrated by flow cytometry and magnetic resonance imaging. The results showed that cell-labeling efficiency of the nanoparticles was dependent on the incubation time and nanoparticles’ concentration. The minimum detected number of labeled cells was around 104 by using a clinical 1.5-T MRI imager. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy instruments were used to monitor the localization patterns of the magnetic nanoparticles in cells. These new magneto-fluorescent nanoagents have demonstrated the potential for future medical use.

  14. Statistical prediction of nanoparticle delivery: from culture media to cell.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Rowan; Hondow, Nicole; Brydson, Rik; Rees, Paul; Brown, Andrew P; Summers, Huw D

    2015-04-17

    The application of nanoparticles (NPs) within medicine is of great interest; their innate physicochemical characteristics provide the potential to enhance current technology, diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently a number of NP-based diagnostic and therapeutic agents have been developed for treatment of various diseases, where judicious surface functionalization is exploited to increase efficacy of administered therapeutic dose. However, quantification of heterogeneity associated with absolute dose of a nanotherapeutic (NP number), how this is trafficked across biological barriers has proven difficult to achieve. The main issue being the quantitative assessment of NP number at the spatial scale of the individual NP, data which is essential for the continued growth and development of the next generation of nanotherapeutics. Recent advances in sample preparation and the imaging fidelity of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) platforms provide information at the required spatial scale, where individual NPs can be individually identified. High spatial resolution however reduces the sample frequency and as a result dynamic biological features or processes become opaque. However, the combination of TEM data with appropriate probabilistic models provide a means to extract biophysical information that imaging alone cannot. Previously, we demonstrated that limited cell sampling via TEM can be statistically coupled to large population flow cytometry measurements to quantify exact NP dose. Here we extended this concept to link TEM measurements of NP agglomerates in cell culture media to that encapsulated within vesicles in human osteosarcoma cells. By construction and validation of a data-driven transfer function, we are able to investigate the dynamic properties of NP agglomeration through endocytosis. In particular, we statistically predict how NP agglomerates may traverse a biological barrier, detailing inter-agglomerate merging events providing the basis for predictive modelling of nanopharmacology. PMID:25797791

  15. Solution Processable Hybrid Solar Cells Based on Semiconductor Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu Sung

    The goal of this work is to develop low cost and highly efficient hybrid solar cells based on semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs). Hybrid solar cells have been demonstrated to take advantages of both inorganic and organic semiconductors by employing simple soluble process. In order to improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE), the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) of cadmium selenide (CdSe) tetrapods (TPs) and poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) are introduced as an electron acceptor and donor, respectively. The dimension of CdSe TPs and the 3D spatial distribution of CdSe TPs:P3HT photoactive blends are investigated to improve optical and electrical properties of photovoltaic devices. Hybrid solar cells having long-armed CdSe TPs and P3HT establish higher PCE of 1.12% when compared to device employing short-armed TPs of 0.80%. The device performance are improved by using longer armed CdSe TPs, which aids in better percolation connectivity and reduced charge hopping events, thus leading to better charge transport. The device architecture of hybrid solar cells is examined to assist vertical phase separation (VPS). Improvement of VPS in hybrid solar cells using CdSe TPs:P3HT photoactive blends is systematically manipulated by solution processed interfacial layers, resulting in enhanced device performance. Multi-layered hybrid solar cells assist better light absorption, efficient charge carrier transport, and increase of the surface contact area. In this work, hole transport assisting layer (HTAL)/BHJ photoactive layer (BPL)/electron transport assisting layer (ETAL) or HTAL/BPL/ETAL (HBE) multi-layered structure is introduced, similarly to p-type layer/intermixed photoactive layer/n-type layer (p-i-n) structure of organic photovoltaic devices. To further control the improvement of the device performance, the effects of nano-scale morphology from solvents having different boiling points, the various shapes of semiconductor NPs, and the emergence of blending NPs are demonstrated. The formation of favorable 3D networks in photoactive layer is attributed to enhance the efficient charge transport by the optimized combination of semiconductor NPs in polymer matrix.

  16. In vitro cytotoxicity screening of water-dispersible metal oxide nanoparticles in human cell lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jong Young Choi; Su Hee Lee; Hyon Bin Na; Kwangjin An; Taeghwan Hyeon; Tae Seok Seo

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we present in vitro cytotoxicity of iron oxide (Fe3O4) and manganese oxide (MnO) using live\\/dead cell assay, lactate dehydrogenase assay, and reactive oxygen species detection\\u000a with variation of the concentration of nanoparticles (5–500 ?g\\/ml), incubation time (18–96 h), and different human cell lines\\u000a (lung adenocarcinoma, breast cancer cells, and glioblastoma cells). The surface of nanoparticles is modified with polyethyleneglycol-derivatized

  17. Stable self-assembled nanostructured hen egg white lysozyme exhibits strong anti-proliferative activity against breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Sailendra; Paul, Subhankar; Srivastava, Ankit; Pastor, Ashutosh; Kundu, Bishwajit; Chaudhuri, Tapan K

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy side effects have long been a matter of great concern. Here we describe a structurally stable self-assembled nanostructured lysozyme (snLYZ) synthesized using a simple desolvation technique that exhibited anticancer activity, as well as excellent hemocompatibility. Field emission scanning electron microscopy; atomic force microscopy and dynamic particle size analyzer were used for analyzing the synthesized snLYZ. The analysis revealed spherical shape with an average size of 300nm. Circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed its gross change in secondary as well as the tertiary level of the structure. snLYZ also demonstrated excellent structural as well as the functional stability of LYZ in a wide range of pH and temperature with a fair level of protection against proteinase K digestion. When applied to MCF-7 breast cancer cells, it exhibited approximately 95% cell death within 24h, involving a reactive oxygen species (ROS) based mechanism, and showed excellent hemocompatibility. Fluorescence microscopy imaging revealed distinct cellular internalization of snLYZ and the formation of cytoplasmic granules, which initiated a cell-killing process through membrane damage. In order to mimic targeted therapy, we tagged folic acid with snLYZ, which further enhanced cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells. Therefore, this is the first report of its kind where we demonstrated the preparation of a highly stable self-assembled nanostructured lysozyme with a strong anti-proliferative activity against breast cancer cells. PMID:25935265

  18. Early CD8 T-cell memory precursors and terminal effectors exhibit equipotent in vivo degranulation.

    PubMed

    Yuzefpolskiy, Yevgeniy; Baumann, Florian M; Kalia, Vandana; Sarkar, Surojit

    2015-07-01

    Early after priming, effector CD8 T cells are distinguished into memory precursor and short-lived effector cell subsets (MPECs and SLECs). Here, we delineated a distinct in vivo heterogeneity in killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG-1) expression, which was strongly associated with diverse MPEC and SLEC fates. These in vivo MPECs and SLECs expressed equivalent levels of cytotoxic molecules and effector cytokines. Using a unique in vivo degranulation assay, we found that the MPECs and SLECs similarly encountered infected target cells and elaborated equivalent levels of cytotoxicity in vivo. These data provide direct in vivo evidence that memory-fated cells pass through a robust effector phase. Additionally, the preferential localization of the MPECs in the lymph nodes, where a lesser degree of cytotoxicity was elaborated, suggests that the MPECs may be protected from excessive stimulation and terminal differentiation by virtue of their differential tissue localization. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the linear decreasing potential model of memory differentiation.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 28 July 2014; doi:10.1038/cmi.2014.48. PMID:25066419

  19. A two-step route to planar perovskite cells exhibiting reduced hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Alexander H.; Quan, Li Na; Adachi, Michael M.; McDowell, Jeffrey J.; Xu, Jixian; Kim, Dong Ha; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-04-01

    A simple two-step method was used to produce efficient planar organolead halide perovskite solar cells. Films produced using solely iodine containing precursors resulted in poor morphology and failed devices, whereas addition of chlorine to the process greatly improved morphology and resulted in dense, uniform perovskite films. This process was used to produce perovskite solar cells with a fullerene-based passivation layer. The hysteresis effect, to which planar perovskite devices are otherwise prone, was greatly suppressed through the use of this interface modifier. The combined techniques resulted in perovskite solar cells having a stable efficiency exceeding 11%. This straightforward fabrication procedure holds promise in development of various optoelectronic applications of planar perovskite films.

  20. 3,39,4,49-Tetrachlorobiphenyl exhibits antiestrogenic and antitumorigenic activity in the rodent uterus and mammary cells and in human breast cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kavita Ramamoorthy; Mona Sethi Gupta; Gulan Sun; Andrew McDougal; Stephen H. Safe

    3,39,4,49-Tetrachlorobiphenyl (tetraCB) binds to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and several reports have demonstrated that AhR agonists exhibit antiestrogenic and antitumorigenic activities in human breast cancer cells, the rodent uterus and breast. In contrast, a recent study showed that 3,39,4,49-tetraCB bound the estrogen receptor (ER) and exhibited ER agonist activities, and we therefore have reinvestigated the estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities

  1. Induction of Inflammation in Vascular Endothelial Cells by Metal Oxide Nanoparticles: Effect of Particle Composition

    PubMed Central

    Gojova, Andrea; Guo, Bing; Kota, Rama S.; Rutledge, John C.; Kennedy, Ian M.; Barakat, Abdul I.

    2007-01-01

    Background The mechanisms governing the correlation between exposure to ultrafine particles and the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease remain unknown. Ultrafine particles appear to cross the pulmonary epithelial barrier into the bloodstream, raising the possibility of direct contact with the vascular endothelium. Objectives Because endothelial inflammation is critical for the development of cardiovascular pathology, we hypothesized that direct exposure of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to ultrafine particles induces an inflammatory response and that this response depends on particle composition. Methods To test the hypothesis, we incubated HAECs for 1–8 hr with different concentrations (0.001–50 ?g/mL) of iron oxide (Fe2O3), yttrium oxide (Y2O3), and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and subsequently measured mRNA and protein levels of the three inflammatory markers intra-cellular cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. We also determined nanoparticle interactions with HAECs using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Results Our data indicate that nanoparticle delivery to the HAEC surface and uptake within the cells correlate directly with particle concentration in the cell culture medium. All three types of nanoparticles are internalized into HAECs and are often found within intracellular vesicles. Fe2O3 nanoparticles fail to provoke an inflammatory response in HAECs at any of the concentrations tested; however, Y2O3 and ZnO nanoparticles elicit a pronounced inflammatory response above a threshold concentration of 10 ?g/mL. At the highest concentration, ZnO nanoparticles are cytotoxic and lead to considerable cell death. Conclusions These results demonstrate that inflammation in HAECs following acute exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles depends on particle composition. PMID:17431490

  2. Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Cardiomyocytes Exhibit Beat Rate Variability and Power-Law Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Yael; Weissman, Amir; Schick, Revital; Barad, Lili; Novak, Atara; Meiry, Gideon; Goldberg, Stanislav; Lorber, Avraham; Rosen, Michael R.; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Binah, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    Background The sinoatrial node is the main impulse-generating tissue in the heart. Atrioventricular conduction block and arrhythmias caused by sinoatrial node dysfunction are clinically important and generally treated with electronic pacemakers. Although an excellent solution, electronic pacemakers incorporate limitations that have stimulated research on biological pacing. To assess the suitability of potential biological pacemakers, we tested the hypothesis that the spontaneous electric activity of human embryonic stem cell– derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) and induced pluripotent stem cell– derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) exhibit beat rate variability and power-law behavior comparable to those of human sinoatrial node. Methods and Results We recorded extracellular electrograms from hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs under stable conditions for up to 15 days. The beat rate time series of the spontaneous activity were examined in terms of their power spectral density and additional methods derived from nonlinear dynamics. The major findings were that the mean beat rate of hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs was stable throughout the 15-day follow-up period and was similar in both cell types, that hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs exhibited intrinsic beat rate variability and fractal behavior, and that isoproterenol increased and carbamylcholine decreased the beating rate in both hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs. Conclusions This is the first study demonstrating that hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs exhibit beat rate variability and power-law behavior as in humans, thus supporting the potential capability of these cell sources to serve as biological pacemakers. Our ability to generate sinoatrial-compatible spontaneous cardiomyocytes from the patient’s own hair (via keratinocyte-derived iPSCs), thus eliminating the critical need for immunosuppression, renders these myocytes an attractive cell source as biological pacemakers. PMID:22261196

  3. TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material stimulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cells?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kathrin; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Geisler, Simon; Carriere, Marie; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Herlin, Nathalie; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly produced and used throughout recent years. Consequently the probability of exposure to nanoparticles has risen. Because of their small 1–100 nm size, the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials may differ from standard bulk materials and may pose a threat to human health. Only little is known about the effects of nanoparticles on the human immune system. In this study, we investigated the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material in the in vitro model of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cytokine-induced neopterin formation and tryptophan breakdown was monitored. Both biochemical processes are closely related to the course of diseases like infections, atherogenesis and neurodegeneration. OCTi60 (25 nm diameter) TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material increased neopterin production in unstimulated PBMC and stimulated cells significantly, the effects were stronger for OCTi60 compared to bulk material, while P25 TiO2 (25 nm diameter) nanoparticles had only little influence. No effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on tryptophan breakdown was detected in unstimulated cells, whereas in stimulated cells, IDO activity and IFN-? production were suppressed but only at the highest concentrations tested. Because neopterin was stimulated and tryptophan breakdown was suppressed in parallel, data suggests that the total effect of particles would be strongly pro-inflammatory. PMID:24361406

  4. Multi-ligand poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles inhibit activation of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Kona, Soujanya; Su, Lee-Chun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Dong, Jing-Fei; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Tang, Liping; Banerjee, Subhash; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2013-08-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) activation and inflammation is a key step in the initiation and progression of many cardiovascular diseases. Targeted delivery of therapeutic reagents to inflamed EC using nanoparticles is challenging as nanoparticles do not arrest on EC efficiently under high shear stress. In this study, we developed a novel polymeric platelet-mimicking nanoparticle for strong particle adhesion onto ECs and enhanced particle internalization by ECs. This nanoparticle was encapsulated with dexamethasone as the anti-inflammatory drug, and conjugated with polyethylene glycol, glycoprotein 1b, and trans-activating transcriptional peptide. The multi-ligand nanoparticle showed significantly greater adhesion on P-selectin, von Willebrand Factor, than the unmodified particles, and activated EC in vitro under both static and flow conditions. Treatment of injured rat carotid arteries with these multi-ligand nanoparticles suppressed neointimal stenosis more than unconjugated nanoparticles did. These results indicate that this novel multi-ligand nanoparticle is efficient to target inflamed EC and inhibit inflammation and subsequent stenosis. PMID:23640308

  5. Polymeric nanoparticle-mediated silencing of CD44 receptor in CD34+ acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gul-Uluda?, Hilal; Valencia-Serna, Juliana; Kucharski, Cezary; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Larratt, Loree; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Uluda?, Hasan

    2014-11-01

    The adhesion receptor CD44 plays an important role in the survival and retention of leukemic stem/progenitor cells (LSPC) within the bone marrow (BM) niche, as well as in the high relapse rates of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Down-regulating CD44 could be clinically relevant not only for suppression of the deregulated function of LSPC but also in LSPC response to chemotherapeutic agents. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery is a promising approach for AML treatment, and we recently reported effective siRNA delivery into difficult-to-transfect AML cell lines using lipid-substituted polyethylenimine/siRNA complexes (polymeric nanoparticles). In this study, we investigated polymeric nanoparticle-mediated silencing of CD44 in CD34+ LSPC cell models (leukemic KG-1 and KG-1a cell lines) as well as primary AML cells. Polymeric nanoparticle-mediated silencing decreased surface CD44 levels in KG-1, KG-1a and primary AML cells by up to 27%, 30% and 20% at day 3, respectively. Moreover, CD44 silencing resulted in induction of apoptosis in KG-1 cells, reduced adhesion of KG-1 and KG-1a cells to hyaluronic acid-coated cell culture plates and BM-MSC, and decreased adhesion of primary AML cells to BM-MSC. Our results suggest that polymeric nanoparticle-mediated silencing of CD44 might be a useful technique for inhibiting LSPC interactions with their microenvironment, thereby prohibiting leukemia progression or sensitizing LSPC to chemotherapy. PMID:25262448

  6. Sodium metavanadate exhibits carcinogenic tendencies in vitro in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Passantino, Lisa; Muñoz, Alexandra B; Costa, Max

    2013-10-01

    Pentavalent vanadium compounds induce intracellular changes in vitro that are consistent with those of other carcinogenic substances. While there is no clear evidence that vanadium compounds cause cancer in humans, vanadium pentoxide causes lung cancer in rodents after long-term inhalation exposures and in turn IARC has categorized it as a group 2B possible human carcinogen. The goal of this study was to investigate the carcinogenicity of NaVO3 in the human immortalized bronchial epithelial cell line, Beas-2B. Cells were treated with 10 ?M NaVO3 for 5 weeks, with or without recovery time, followed by gene expression microarray analysis. In a separate experiment, cells were exposed to 1-10 ?M NaVO3 for 4 weeks and then grown in soft agar to test for anchorage-independent growth. A dose-dependent increase in the number of colonies was observed. In scratch tests, NaVO3-transformed clones could repair a wound faster than controls. In a gene expression microarray analysis of soft agar clones there were 2010 differentially expressed genes (DEG) (adjusted p-value ? 0.05) in NaVO3-transformed clones relative to control clones. DEG from this experiment were compared with the DEG of 5 week NaVO3 exposure with or without recovery, all with adjusted p-values < 0.05, and 469 genes were altered in the same direction for transformed clones, 5 week NaVO3-treated cells, and the recovered cells. The data from this study imply that chronic exposure to NaVO3 causes changes that are consistent with cellular transformation including anchorage-independent growth, enhanced migration ability, and gene expression changes that were likely epigenetically inherited. PMID:23963610

  7. Fs-laser cell perforation using gold nanoparticles of different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, Markus; Fehlauer, Holger; Bintig, Willem; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The resulting effects of the interaction between nanoparticles and laser irradiation are a current matter in research. Depending on the laser parameters as well as the particles properties several effects may occur e.g. bubble formation, melting, fragmentation or an optical breakdown at the surface of the nanoparticle. Besides the investigations of these effects, we employed them to perforate the membrane of different cell lines and investigated nanoparticle mediated laser cell perforation as an alternative optical transfection method. Therefore, the gold nanoparticles (GNP) of different shapes were applied. Furthermore, we varied the methods for attaching GNP to the membrane, i.e. co-incubation of pure gold nanoparticles and bioconjugation of the surface of GNP. The optimal incubation time and the location of the GNP at the cell membrane were evaluated by multiphoton microscopy. If these GNP loaded cells are irradiated with a fs laser beam, small areas of the membrane can be perforated. Following, extra cellular molecules such as membrane impermeable dyes or foreign DNA (GFP vectors) are able to diffuse through the perforated area into the treated cells. We studied the dependence of the laser fluence, GNP concentration, GNP size and shape for successful nanoparticle mediated laser cell perforation. Due to a weak focusing of the laser beam a gentle cell treatment with high cell viabilities and high perforation efficiencies can be achieved. A further advantage of this perforation technique is the high number of cells that can be treated simultaneously. Additionally, we show applications of this method to primary and stem cells.

  8. Cell Studies of BiFeO3 nanoparticles for multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Suvra; Palihawadana Arachchige, Maheshika; Flack, Amanda; Paudel, Sagar; Singh, Jaipal; Rajagopal, Amulya; Kulkarni, Sanjana; Synder, Michael; Rakowski, Joe; Chen, Xuequn; Jena, Bhanu; Lawes, Gavin

    2014-03-01

    There is considerable interest in using nanoparticles as contrast agents to improve diagnostic imaging. BiFeO3 nanoparticles may be particularly interesting as multimodal contrast agents for both magnetic resonance imaging and x-ray imaging because these combine a large magnetic susceptibility with high atomic mass constituents. We synthesized BiFeO3 nanoparticles using a chemical co-precipitation technique. We measured the structural and morphological characteristics of these nanoparticles using x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and zeta potential, and probed the magnetic properties through both ac and dc magnetization studies. In order to investigate the cytotoxicity and intracellular distribution of these BiFeO3 nanoparticles, we cultured them with mouse insulinoma MIN 6 cells and used optical microscopy to investigate the distribution and cell growth. We discuss the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles, which will be crucial factor for determining possible biomedical applications together with a discussion of the cellular distribution of these nanoparticles.

  9. Platinum and platinum-alloy nanoparticle catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells: Understanding atomic-scale structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukrakpam, Rameshwori

    The development of active, robust, and low-cost nanocatalysts, which is crucial for advancement in fuel cell technology for transportation and stationary powers, has often been hampered by the lack of clear understanding of the correlation between nanostructural parameters of the catalysts and their electrocatalytic activity and stability. This dissertation work focuses on the fundamental understanding of factors governing the precise control of the nanostructural parameters (size, composition, shape, phase, etc) of platinum and platinum-based multimetallic alloy nanoparticle catalysts and their enhancement of electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells. Examples of monometallic (Pt nanocubes, etc.), bimetallic (PtCo, PtNi, PtIr, etc.), and trimetallic (PtIrCo, PtNiCo, etc) nanoparticles and catalysts with controllable sizes, shapes and compositions will be described. To gain fundamental insights, an array of advanced techniques was utilized for the characterization of the atomic-scale structures. Pt nanocubes with dominant (200) faces were found to exhibit an enhanced Pt-specific activity towards ORR. PtNi/C and PtCo/C catalysts were found to have size dependence for ORR. A change in the coordination number around Pt was also found to affect their electrocatalytic activity. PtIrCo/C catalysts thermally treated under different thermochemical conditions were found to exhibit a clear trend of fcc-type lattice shrinking with increase in temperature which was correlated with the increase in activity. The trimetallic catalysts were also found to exhibit a higher electrocatalytic activity for ORR than the bimetallic counterparts (PtIr/C and PtCo/C). These results have allowed us to establish the correlation between the nanostructural parameters (e.g., size, shape, composition, alloying/lattice strain, metal coordination structure, etc) and the electrocatalytic properties (activity and stability) for a series of nanocatalysts. The findings have significant implications for the implementation of the nanocatalysts in real fuel cells.

  10. A comprehensive review of the application of chalcogenide nanoparticles in polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jilian N.; Gonçalves, Agnaldo S.; Nogueira, Ana F.

    2014-05-01

    In this review the use of solution-processed chalcogenide quantum dots (CdS, CdSe, PbS, etc.) in hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells is explored. Such devices are known as potential candidates for low-cost and efficient solar energy conversion, and compose the so-called third generation solar cells. The incorporation of oxides and metal nanoparticles has also been successfully achieved in this new class of photovoltaic devices; however, we choose to explore here chalcogenide quantum dots in light of their particularly attractive optical and electronic properties. We address herein a comprehensive review of the historical background and state-of-the-art comprising the incorporation of such nanoparticles in polymer matrices. Later strategies for surface chemistry manipulation, in situ synthesis of nanoparticles, use of continuous 3D nanoparticles network (aerogels) and ternary systems are also reviewed.

  11. Study the cytotoxicity of different kinds of water-soluble nanoparticles in human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Lu [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Yang; Li, Xiaojie [Department of Pathophysiology, Prostate Diseases Prevention and Treatment Research Centre, Norman Bethune Medical School, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Department of Pathophysiology, Prostate Diseases Prevention and Treatment Research Centre, Norman Bethune Medical School, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Gao, Xue [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)] [Department of Analytical Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Preparation of three kinds of water-soluble QDs: CdTe, CdTe@SiO{sub 2}, Mn:ZnSe. ? Evaluated the cytotoxicity qualitatively and quantitatively. ? Fluorescent staining. ? Detected the total intracellular cadmium in cells. -- Abstract: Quantum nanoparticles have been applied extensively in biological and medical fields, the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles becomes the key point we should concern. In this paper, the cytotoxicity of three kinds of water-soluble nanoparticles: CdTe, CdTe@SiO{sub 2} and Mn:ZnSe was studied. We evaluated the nanoparticles toxicity qualitatively by observing the morphological changes of human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells at different incubation times and colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays were carried out to detect the cell viability quantitatively. The results showed that CdTe nanoparticles with high concentrations caused cells to die largely while CdTe@SiO{sub 2} and Mn:ZnSe nanoparticles had no obvious effect. For further study, we studied the relation between the cell viability and the total cadmium concentration in cells and found that the viability of cells treated with CdTe@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was higher than that treated with CdTe nanoparticles. We also discovered that the death rate of cells co-incubated with CdTe nanoparticles was proportional to the total intracellular cadmium concentrations.

  12. Intracellular heating of living cells through Néel relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jean-Paul; Gazeau, Florence; Wilhelm, Claire

    2008-02-01

    Maghemite and cobalt ferrite anionic magnetic nanoparticles enter tumor cells and can be used as heat sources when exposed to a high-frequency magnetic field. Comparative studies of the two particles enable to unravel the magnetic heating mechanisms (Néel relaxation vs. Brown relaxation) responsible for the cellular temperature rise, and also to establish a simple model, adjusted to the experimental results, allowing to predict the intracellular heating efficiency of iron oxide nanoparticles. Hence, we are able to derive the best nanoparticle design for a given material with a view to intracellular hyperthermia-based applications. PMID:17641885

  13. Impedance model for CdTe solar cells exhibiting constant phase element behaviour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Friesen; M. E Özsar; E. D Dunlop

    2000-01-01

    Different equivalent circuit models were used to fit the impedance spectra of CdTe solar cells at fixed d.c.-voltages and the resulting C–V (capacitance–voltage)-curves and C–f (capacitance-frequency)-curves were analysed. A simplified equivalent circuit model, which consists of a parallel resistor Rp and capacitor C in series with a resistor Rs, does not give a good fit to the experimental data and

  14. In vitro fermented nuts exhibit chemopreventive effects in HT29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lux, Stefanie; Scharlau, Daniel; Schlörmann, Wiebke; Birringer, Marc; Glei, Michael

    2012-10-01

    It is proven that nuts contain essential macro- and micronutrients, e.g. fatty acids, vitamins and dietary fibre (DF). Fermentation of DF by the gut microflora results in the formation of SCFA which are recognised for their chemopreventive potential, especially by influencing cell growth. However, little is known about cellular response to complex fermentation samples of nuts. Therefore, we prepared and analysed (pH, SCFA, bile acids, tocopherol, antioxidant capacity) fermentation supernatant (fs) fractions of nuts (almonds, macadamias, hazelnuts, pistachios, walnuts) after in vitro fermentation and determined their effects on growth of HT29 cells as well as their genotoxic/anti-genotoxic potential. The fermented nut samples contained 2- to 3-fold higher amounts of SCFA than the faeces control, but considerable reduced levels of bile acids. While most of the investigated native nuts comprised relatively high amounts of tocopherol (?-tocopherol in almonds and hazelnuts and ?- and ?-tocopherol in pistachios and walnuts), rather low concentrations were found in the fs. All nut extracts and nut fs showed a strong antioxidant potential. Furthermore, all fs, except the fs pistachio, reduced growth of HT29 cells significantly. DNA damage induced by H?O? was significantly reduced by the fs of walnuts after 15 min co-incubation of HT29 cells. In conclusion, this is the first study which presents the chemopreventive effects (reduction of tumour-promoting desoxycholic acid, rise in chemopreventive SCFA, protection against oxidative stress) of different nuts after in vitro digestion and fermentation, and shows the potential importance of nuts in the prevention of colon cancer. PMID:22172380

  15. Blood dendritic cells in systemic lupus erythematosus exhibit altered activation state and chemokine receptor function

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Velia Gerl; Alexandra Lischka; Daniel Panne; Patrick Großmann; Rita Berthold; Bimba Franziska Hoyer; Robert Biesen; Anne Bruns; Tobias Alexander; Annett Jacobi; Thomas Dörner; Gerd-Rüdiger Burmester; Andreas Radbruch; Falk Hiepe

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundDendritic cells (DCs) have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Reduced numbers of blood DCs and the accumulation of DCs at inflammatory sites have been observed in SLE. One crucial feature of DCs is their ability to migrate.ObjectiveTo analyse the maturation\\/activation state and the migratory capacity of different DC precursor subsets in SLE to further

  16. Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles with Exposed {001} Facets for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang; Qin, Zhengfei; Yang, Jianping; Li, Xing’ao

    2015-01-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were synthesized from Ti powder via a sequential hydrothermal reaction process. At the first-step hydrothermal reaction, H-titanate nanowires were obtained in NaOH solution with Ti powder, and at second-step hydrothermal reaction, anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were formed in NH4F solution. If the second-step hydrothermal reaction was carried out in pure water, the H-titanate nanowires were decomposed into random shape anatase-TiO2 nanostructures, as well as few impurity of H2Ti8O17 phase and rutile TiO2 phase. Then, the as-prepared TiO2 nanostructures synthesized in NH4F solution and pure water were applied to the photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), which exhibited power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.06% (VOC of 0.756?V, JSC of 14.80?mA/cm2, FF of 0.631) and 3.47% (VOC of 0.764?V, JSC of 6.86?mA/cm2, FF of 0.662), respectively. The outstanding performance of DSSCs based on anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets was attributed to the high activity and large special surface area for excellent capacity of dye adsorption. PMID:26190140

  17. Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles with Exposed {001} Facets for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Liang; Qin, Zhengfei; Yang, Jianping; Li, Xing'ao

    2015-01-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were synthesized from Ti powder via a sequential hydrothermal reaction process. At the first-step hydrothermal reaction, H-titanate nanowires were obtained in NaOH solution with Ti powder, and at second-step hydrothermal reaction, anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were formed in NH4F solution. If the second-step hydrothermal reaction was carried out in pure water, the H-titanate nanowires were decomposed into random shape anatase-TiO2 nanostructures, as well as few impurity of H2Ti8O17 phase and rutile TiO2 phase. Then, the as-prepared TiO2 nanostructures synthesized in NH4F solution and pure water were applied to the photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), which exhibited power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.06% (VOC of 0.756?V, JSC of 14.80?mA/cm(2), FF of 0.631) and 3.47% (VOC of 0.764?V, JSC of 6.86?mA/cm(2), FF of 0.662), respectively. The outstanding performance of DSSCs based on anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets was attributed to the high activity and large special surface area for excellent capacity of dye adsorption. PMID:26190140

  18. Cells exposed to nanosecond electrical pulses exhibit biomarkers of mechanical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Moen, Erick K.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2015-03-01

    Exposure of cells to very short (<1 ?s) electric pulses in the megavolt/meter range have been shown to cause disruption of the plasma membrane. This disruption is often characterized by the formation of numerous small pores (<2 nm in diameter) in the plasma membrane that last for several minutes, allowing the flow of ions into the cell. These small pores are called nanopores and the resulting damage to the plasma membrane is referred to as nanoporation. Nanosecond electrical pulse (nsEP) exposure can impart many different stressors on a cell, including electrical, electro-chemical, and mechanical stress. Thus, nsEP exposure is not a "clean" insult, making determination of the mechanism of nanoporation quite difficult. We hypothesize that nsEP exposure creates acoustic shock waves capable of causing nanoporation. Microarray analysis of primary adult human dermal fibroblasts (HDFa) exposed to nsEP, indicated several genes associated with mechanical stress were selectively upregulated 4 h post exposure. The idea that nanoporation is caused by external mechanical force from acoustic shock waves has, to our knowledge, not been investigated. This work will critically challenge the existing paradigm that nanoporation is caused solely by an electric-field driven event and could provide the basis for a plausible explanation for electroporation.

  19. Early- and late-born parvalbumin basket cell subpopulations exhibiting distinct regulation and roles in learning.

    PubMed

    Donato, Flavio; Chowdhury, Ananya; Lahr, Maria; Caroni, Pico

    2015-02-18

    Brain networks can support learning by promoting acquisition of task-relevant information or by adhering to validated rules, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Upon learning, local inhibitory parvalbumin (PV)-expressing Basket cell networks can switch to opposite configurations that either favor or interfere with further learning, but how this opposite plasticity is induced and relates to distinct learning requirements has remained unclear. Here, we show that PV Basket cells consist of hitherto unrecognized subpopulations, with distinct schedules of neurogenesis, input connectivities, output target neurons, and roles in learning. Plasticity of hippocampal early-born PV neurons was recruited in rule consolidation, whereas plasticity of late-born PV neurons was recruited in new information acquisition. This involved regulation of early-born neuron plasticity specifically through excitation, and of late-born neuron plasticity specifically through inhibition. Therefore, opposite learning requirements are implemented by distinct local networks involving PV Basket cell subpopulations specifically regulated through inhibition or excitation. PMID:25695271

  20. Compatibility and toxicity of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles on mammalian cell systems

    E-print Network

    Kral, Kelly M., 1979-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) produced normal growth curves in the presence of particles. However, the particles do still exhibit some toxicity towards the cells, as the maximum cell density of cells cultured with particles does not reach that ...

  1. Stem Cells: Physical Stimuli-Induced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Magnetic Nanoparticles (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 9/2015).

    PubMed

    Son, Boram; Kim, Hwan D; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Jinkyu; Shin, Heungsoo; Hwang, Nathaniel S; Park, Tai Hyun

    2015-06-01

    On page 1339, N. S. Hwang, T. H. Park, and co-workers induce chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells by physical stimulation using magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles isolated from magnetic bacteria are introduced into the mesenchymal stem cells. Then, the magnetic particle-incorporated mesenchymal stem cells are subjected to static magnetic field and/or magnet-derived shear stress. This magnetic nanoparticle-mediated physical stimulation can be used for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26109038

  2. Spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cells exhibit a distinct gene expression pattern from the breast cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chenfu Zhao; Lu Meng; Hongyu Hu; Xudong Wang; Fangyu Shi; Yajuan Wang; Qianqian Li; Aixing Lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spontaneous immortalisation of cultured mammary epithelial cells (MECs) is an extremely rare event, and the molecular mechanism behind spontaneous immortalisation of MECs is unclear. Here, we report the establishment of a spontaneously immortalised bovine mammary epithelial cell line (BME65Cs) and the changes in gene expression associated with BME65Cs cells. RESULTS: BME65Cs cells maintain the general characteristics of normal mammary

  3. Oxidative Damage of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles on Mouse Hepatic Cells In Vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ye Yuan; Jiaqi Tang; Chenxi Wei; Bing Han; Xu Yang

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess the biological safety of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, oxidative damage of which was studied. Mouse hepatic cells were exposed to different dose (50 ?g\\/mL, 100 ?g\\/mL, 200 ?g\\/mL, 400 ?g\\/mL) of Fe3O4 nanoparticles in vitro for 1 hour. Methods of 2, 7-dichlorohydrofluoroscein diacetate (DCFH-DA), 5, 5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), thiobarbituric acid (TBA) were used to detect reactive oxygen

  4. Detection and Isolation of Dendritic Cells Using Lewis X-functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rouhanifard, Sara H.; Xie, Ran; Zhang, Guoxin; Sun, Xiaoming; Chen, Xing; Wu, Peng

    2012-01-01

    DC-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) is a receptor found on dendritic cells (DCs) that recognizes antigens bearing mannose-rich or fucosylated glycans, including Lewis X (LeX). Here, we report the fabrication of magnetic nanoparticles coated with multivalent LeX glycans using the Cu (I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. The resulting nanoparticles are selective and biocompatible, serving as a highly efficient tool for DC detection and enrichment. PMID:22901307

  5. In vitro toxicity of nanoparticles in BRL 3A rat liver cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Hussain; K. L. Hess; J. M. Gearhart; K. T. Geiss; J. J. Schlager

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to address the current deficient knowledge of cellular response to nanosized particle exposure. The study evaluated the acute toxic effects of metal\\/metal oxide nanoparticles proposed for future use in industrial production methods using the in vitro rat liver derived cell line (BRL 3A). Different sizes of nanoparticles such as silver (Ag; 15, 100nm), molybdenum (MoO3; 30,

  6. Uptake and effects of manufactured silver nanoparticles in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Farkas; Paul Christian; Julián Alberto Gallego-Urrea; Norbert Roos; Martin Hassellöv; Knut Erik Tollefsen; Kevin V. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles are already widely used in technology, medicine and consumer products, but there are limited data on their effects on the aquatic environment. In this study the uptake and effect of citrate (AgNPCIT) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (AgNPPVP) coated manufactured silver nanoparticles, as well as AgNO3 (Ag+) were tested using primary gill cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Prior to use, the

  7. Gold nanoparticles induce nuclear damage in breast cancer cells, which is further amplified by hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Kodiha, Mohamed; Hutter, Eliza; Boridy, Sebastien; Juhas, Michal; Maysinger, Dusica; Stochaj, Ursula

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have emerged as promising tools for cancer research and therapy, where they can promote thermal killing. The molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not fully understood. The geometry and size of gold nanoparticles can determine the severity of cellular damage. Therefore, small and big gold nanospheres as well as gold nanoflowers were evaluated side-by-side. To obtain quantitative data at the subcellular and molecular level, we assessed how gold nanoparticles, either alone or in combination with mild hyperthermia, altered the physiology of cultured human breast cancer cells. Our analyses focused on the nucleus, because this organelle is essential for cell survival. We showed that all the examined gold nanoparticles associated with nuclei. However, their biological effects were quantitatively different. Thus, depending on the shape and size, gold nanoparticles changed multiple nuclear parameters. They redistributed stress-sensitive regulators of nuclear biology, altered the nuclear morphology, reorganized nuclear laminae and envelopes, and inhibited nucleolar functions. In particular, gold nanoparticles reduced the de novo biosynthesis of RNA in nucleoli, the subnuclear compartments that produce ribosomes. While small gold nanospheres and nanoflowers, but not big gold nanospheres, damaged the nucleus at normal growth temperature, several of these defects were further exacerbated by mild hyperthermia. Taken together, the toxicity of gold nanoparticles correlated with changes in nuclear organization and function. These results emphasize that the cell nucleus is a prominent target for gold nanoparticles of different morphologies. Moreover, we demonstrated that RNA synthesis in nucleoli provides quantitative information on nuclear damage and cancer cell survival. PMID:24740795

  8. Invasive urothelial carcinoma exhibiting basal cell immunohistochemical markers: A variant of urothelial carcinoma associated with aggressive features.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kien T; Truong, Luan D; Ball, Christopher G; Williams, Phillip; Flood, Trevor A; Belanger, Eric C

    2015-08-01

    We characterize invasive urothelial carcinoma (UC) exhibiting urothelial basal cell immunohistochemical markers. Consecutive invasive UCs were immunostained with CK20 and urothelial basal cell markers, cytokeratin 5 (CK5)/CD44. Immunostaining for CK5 and CD44 was scored as follows: positive for staining of more than 25% thickness of the epithelial nest or epithelium and low for lesser immunoreactivity. Invasive urothelial carcinoma (UC) exhibiting positive CK5/CD44 staining was designated as basal-like UC (BUC). In this study, of 251 invasive UC (pT1 in 57% and pT2-4 in 43%), BUC accounted for 40% of cases (accounting for most pT2-4 UC) and often presented as non-papillary UC without previous history of UC. In addition, BUC exhibited uniform nuclei with lesser degree of atypia than non BUC and decreased or negative cytokeratin 20 reactivity. Nested and microcystic variants of UC immunohistochemically stained as BUCs. Invasive non-BUCs were often papillary with marked cytologic atypia and pleomorphism, and accounted for most pT1 UC. The rates of perivesical invasion, lymph node and distant metastases were higher for BUC than non-BUC. All nine cases with absent/minimal residual in situ UC in 102 radical cystectomy specimens were from invasive non-BUC. BUC is distinguished from non-BUC due to this aggressive behavior, distinct immunohistochemical profile, and predominant non-papillary architecture. Our findings are consistent with recent studies identifying a subtype of muscle-invasive UC with molecular expression of basal cell and luminal cell molecular profiles. Our study further supports categorizing invasive UCs into these subtypes with different biological behaviors, possibly contributing to better therapeutic strategies. PMID:26100813

  9. DNAM-1-based chimeric antigen receptors enhance T cell effector function and exhibit in vivo efficacy against melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Zhang, Tong; Alcon, Andre; Sentman, Charles L

    2015-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies hold great potential for treating cancers, and new CARs that can target multiple tumor types and have the potential to target non-hematological malignancies are needed. In this study, the tumor recognition ability of a natural killer cell-activating receptor, DNAM-1 was harnessed to design CARs that target multiple tumor types. DNAM-1 ligands, PVR and nectin-2, are expressed on primary human leukemia, myeloma, ovarian cancer, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and Ewing sarcoma. DNAM-1 CARs exhibit high tumor cell cytotoxicity but low IFN-? secretion in vitro. In contrast to other CAR designs, co-stimulatory domains did not improve the expression and function of DNAM-1 CARs. A DNAM-1/CD3zeta CAR reduced tumor burden in a murine melanoma model in vivo. In conclusion, DNAM-1-based CARs may have the potential to treat PVR and nectin-2 expressing hematological and solid tumors. PMID:25549845

  10. The significance of a Cripto-1 positive subpopulation of human melanoma cells exhibiting stem cell-like characteristics.

    PubMed

    Strizzi, Luigi; Margaryan, Naira V; Gilgur, Alina; Hardy, Katharine M; Normanno, Nicola; Salomon, David S; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2013-05-01

    Cripto-1 (CR-1) protein function differs according to cellular or extracellular expression. In this study, we explore the significance of cell surface CR-1 expression in human melanoma cells. Cell surface CR-1-expressing human melanoma cells (CR1-CS+) were selected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and grown in vitro and in vivo in nude mice to study their growth characteristics. The CR1-CS+ melanoma cells were found to express increased levels of Oct4, MDR-1 and activated c-Src compared with cells lacking this subpopulation (CR1-CS-) or unsorted cells, used as control. CR1-CS+ show reduced proliferation rates and diminished spherical colony formation compared with control cells when cultured in vitro. Orthotopic injections of CR1-CS+ in nude mice formed slow growing tumors with histologic variability across different areas of the CR1-CS+ xenografts. CR-1-expressing cells from first generation CR1-CS+ tumors showed significantly increased tumor-forming rate and aggressiveness following subsequent transplants in nude mice. These data demonstrate that within a heterogeneous melanoma cell population there resides a slow proliferating, cell surface CR-1-expressing subpopulation capable of giving rise to a fast growing, aggressive progeny that may contribute to disease recurrence and progression. PMID:23574716

  11. Uptake and effects of manufactured silver nanoparticles in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cells.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Julia; Christian, Paul; Gallego-Urrea, Julián Alberto; Roos, Norbert; Hassellöv, Martin; Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Thomas, Kevin V

    2011-01-17

    Nanoparticles are already widely used in technology, medicine and consumer products, but there are limited data on their effects on the aquatic environment. In this study the uptake and effect of citrate (AgNP(CIT)) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (AgNP(PVP)) coated manufactured silver nanoparticles, as well as AgNO(3) (Ag(+)) were tested using primary gill cells of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Prior to use, the nanoparticles were characterized for size, surface charge and aggregation behavior. Gill cells were cultured either as monolayers on solid support, or as multilayers on a permeable support cell culturing system, enabling transport studies. The uptake of silver nanoparticles and Ag(+) after exposure to 10 mg L(-1) was determined with microscopical methods and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Cytotoxicity, in terms of membrane integrity, as well as oxidative stress (depletion of reduced glutathione) was tested at silver concentrations ranging from 0.1 mg L(-1) to 10 mg L(-1). Results show that AgNP(CIT) nanoparticles are readily taken up into gill cell monolayers while uptake was less for AgNP(PVP). In contrast, it appears that the slightly smaller AgNP(PVP) were transported through cultured multilayers to a higher extent, with transport rates generally being in the ng cm(-2) range for 48 h exposures. Transport rates for all exposures were dependent on the epithelial tightness. Moderate cytotoxic effects were seen for all silver treatments. Levels of reduced glutathione were elevated in contrast to control groups, pointing on a possible overcompensation reaction. Taken together silver nanoparticles were taken up into cells and did cause silver transport over cultured epithelial layers with uptake and transport rates being different for the two nanoparticle species. All silver treatments had measurable effects on cell viability. PMID:20952077

  12. Surface modification of PLGA nanoparticles by carbopol to enhance mucoadhesion and cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Surassmo, Suvimol; Saengkrit, Nattika; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong; Suktham, Kunat; Woramongkolchai, Noppawan; Wutikhun, Tuksadon; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2015-06-01

    Mucoadhesive poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles having a modified shell-matrix derived from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and Carbopol (CP), a biodegradable polymer coating, to improve the adhesion and cell transfection properties were developed. The optimum formulations utilized a CP concentration in the range of 0.05-0.2%w/v, and were formed using modified emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. The resulting CP-PLGA nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their physical and chemical properties. The absorbed CP on the PLGA shell-matrix was found to affect the particle size and surface charge, with 0.05% CP giving rise to smooth spherical particles (0.05CP-PLGA) with the smallest size (285.90nm), and strong negative surface charge (-25.70mV). The introduction of CP results in an enhancement of the mucoadhesion between CP-PLGA nanoparticles and mucin particles. In vitro cell internalization studies highlighted the potential of 0.05CP-PLGA nanoparticles for transfection into SiHa cells, with uptake being time dependent. Additionally, cytotoxicity studies of CP-PLGA nanoparticles against SiHa cancer cells indicated that low concentrations of the nanoparticles were non-toxic to cells (cell viability >80%). From the various formulations studied, 0.05CP-PLGA nanoparticles proved to be the optimum model carrier having the required mucoadhesive profile and could be an alternative therapeutic efficacy carrier for targeted mucosal drug delivery systems with biodegradable polymer. PMID:25937384

  13. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration.

    PubMed

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar ?1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar ?1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  15. Silicon nanoparticles: applications in cell biology and medicine

    PubMed Central

    O’Farrell, Norah; Houlton, Andrew; Horrocks, Benjamin R

    2006-01-01

    In this review, we describe the synthesis, physical properties, surface functionalization, and biological applications of silicon nanoparticles (also known as quantum dots). We compare them against current technologies, such as fluorescent organic dyes and heavy metal chalcogenide-based quantum dots. In particular, we examine the many different methods that can be used to both create and modify these nanoparticles and the advantages they may have over current technologies that have stimulated research into designing silicon nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:17722279

  16. Bendamustine, but not fludarabine, exhibits a low stem cell toxicity in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Schmidt-Hieber; A. Busse; B. Reufi; W. Knauf; E. Thiel; I. W. Blau

    2009-01-01

    Purpose  We investigated the in vitro toxicity of bendamustine and fludarabine to hematopoietic progenitors and stem cells from healthy\\u000a donors.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Clonogenic agar colony assays, non-clonogenic long-term liquid cultures (LTC) and apoptosis assays were used to assess the\\u000a cytotoxicity of both the agents.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Total colony-forming units (CFU) were more sensitive to fludarabine than to bendamustine in agar colony assays (IC50 0.7 ?M\\/L and

  17. Functional investigations on embryonic stem cells labeled with clinically translatable iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Liqin; Cao, Jianbo; Huang, Yue; Lin, Yu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiuqin; Liu, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI correlated well with histological studies. These findings demonstrate that Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have potential to be clinically translatable MRI probes and may enable non-invasive in vivo tracking of ESCs in experimental and clinical settings during cell-based therapies.Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI correlated well with histological studies. These findings demonstrate that Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have potential to be clinically translatable MRI probes and may enable non-invasive in vivo tracking of ESCs in experimental and clinical settings during cell-based therapies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01004c

  18. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Line; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Iversen, Frank; Liu, Zhuo; Thomsen, Karen; Pedersen, Michael; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Ploug, Michael; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific targeting peptide onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated USPIO nanoparticles by click chemistry resulted in a five times higher uptake in vitro in a uPAR positive cell line compared to nanoparticles carrying a non-binding control peptide. In accordance with specific receptor-mediated recognition, a low uptake was observed in the presence of an excess of ATF, a natural ligand for uPAR. The uPAR specific magnetic nanoparticles can potentially provide a useful supplement for tumor patient management when combined with MRI and drug delivery. PMID:23835641

  19. Nanoparticles for drug delivery to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jean C; Pulliam, Brian L; Edwards, David A

    2007-12-01

    The lungs are an attractive route for non-invasive drug delivery with advantages for both systemic and local applications. Incorporating therapeutics with polymeric nanoparticles offers additional degrees of manipulation for delivery systems, providing sustained release and the ability to target specific cells and organs. However, nanoparticle delivery to the lungs has many challenges including formulation instability due to particle-particle interactions and poor delivery efficiency due to exhalation of low-inertia nanoparticles. Thus, novel methods formulating nanoparticles into the form of micron-scale dry powders have been developed. These carrier particles exhibit improved handling and delivery, while releasing nanoparticles upon deposition in the lungs. This review covers the development of nanoparticle formulations for pulmonary delivery as both individual nanoparticles and encapsulated within carrier particles. PMID:17997181

  20. Xanthorrhizol exhibits antiproliferative activity on MCF-7 breast cancer cells via apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Yew Hoong; Azimahtol, Hawariah Lope Pihie; Abdullah, Noor Rain

    2006-01-01

    Xanthorrhizol is a natural sesquiterpenoid compound isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb (Zingiberaceae). Xanthorrhizol was tested for a variety of important pharmacological activities including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. An antiproliferation assay using the MTT method indicated that xanthorrhizol inhibited the proliferation of the human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, with an EC50 value of 1.71 microg/ml. Three parameters including annexin-V binding assay, Hoechst 33258 staining and accumulation of sub-G1 population in DNA histogram confirmed the apoptosis induction in response to xanthorrhizol treatment. Western-blotting revealed down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 protein expression. However, xanthorrhizol did not affect the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein, bax, at a concentration of 1 microg/ml, 2.5 microg/ml and 5 microg/ml. The level of p53 was greatly increased, whilst PARP-1 was cleaved to 85 kDa subunits, following the treatment with xanthorrhizol at a dose-dependent manner. These results, thereby, suggest that xanthorrhizol has antiproliferative effects on MCF-7 cells by inducing apoptosis through the modulation of bcl-2, p53 and PARP-1 protein levels. PMID:17201174

  1. Layer-by-layer coated gold nanoparticles: size-dependent delivery of DNA into cells.

    PubMed

    Elbakry, Asmaa; Wurster, Eva-Christina; Zaky, Alaa; Liebl, Renate; Schindler, Edith; Bauer-Kreisel, Petra; Blunk, Torsten; Rachel, Reinhard; Goepferich, Achim; Breunig, Miriam

    2012-12-21

    Because nanoparticles are finding uses in myriad biomedical applications, including the delivery of nucleic acids, a detailed knowledge of their interaction with the biological system is of utmost importance. Here the size-dependent uptake of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (20, 30, 50 and 80 nm), coated with a layer-by-layer approach with nucleic acid and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), into a variety of mammalian cell lines is studied. In contrast to other studies, the optimal particle diameter for cellular uptake is determined but also the number of therapeutic cargo molecules per cell. It is found that 20 nm AuNPs, with diameters of about 32 nm after the coating process and about 88 nm including the protein corona after incubation in cell culture medium, yield the highest number of nanoparticles and therapeutic DNA molecules per cell. Interestingly, PEI, which is known for its toxicity, can be applied at significantly higher concentrations than its IC(50) value, most likely because it is tightly bound to the AuNP surface and/or covered by a protein corona. These results are important for the future design of nanomaterials for the delivery of nucleic acids in two ways. They demonstrate that changes in the nanoparticle size can lead to significant differences in the number of therapeutic molecules delivered per cell, and they reveal that the toxicity of polyelectrolytes can be modulated by an appropriate binding to the nanoparticle surface. PMID:22911477

  2. Different endocytotic uptake mechanisms for nanoparticles in epithelial cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Dagmar A; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Michen, Benjamin; Blank, Fabian; Gehr, Peter; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2014-01-01

    Summary Precise knowledge regarding cellular uptake of nanoparticles is of great importance for future biomedical applications. Four different endocytotic uptake mechanisms, that is, phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis, were investigated using a mouse macrophage (J774A.1) and a human alveolar epithelial type II cell line (A549). In order to deduce the involved pathway in nanoparticle uptake, selected inhibitors specific for one of the endocytotic pathways were optimized regarding concentration and incubation time in combination with fluorescently tagged marker proteins. Qualitative immunolocalization showed that J774A.1 cells highly expressed the lipid raft-related protein flotillin-1 and clathrin heavy chain, however, no caveolin-1. A549 cells expressed clathrin heavy chain and caveolin-1, but no flotillin-1 uptake-related proteins. Our data revealed an impeded uptake of 40 nm polystyrene nanoparticles by J774A.1 macrophages when actin polymerization and clathrin-coated pit formation was blocked. From this result, it is suggested that macropinocytosis and phagocytosis, as well as clathrin-mediated endocytosis, play a crucial role. The uptake of 40 nm nanoparticles in alveolar epithelial A549 cells was inhibited after depletion of cholesterol in the plasma membrane (preventing caveolin-mediated endocytosis) and inhibition of clathrin-coated vesicles (preventing clathrin-mediated endocytosis). Our data showed that a combination of several distinguishable endocytotic uptake mechanisms are involved in the uptake of 40 nm polystyrene nanoparticles in both the macrophage and epithelial cell line. PMID:25383275

  3. Endothelial cell response to (co)polymer nanoparticles depending on the inflammatory environment and comonomer ratio.

    PubMed

    Wischke, Christian; Krüger, Anne; Roch, Toralf; Pierce, Benjamin F; Li, Wenzhong; Jung, Friedrich; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Endothelial cells lining the lumen of blood vessels serve as a physiological barrier controlling nanoparticle movement from the vasculature into the tissue. For exploring the effect of polymer hydrophilicity on nanoparticle interactions with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro, a series of monomodal poly[acrylonitrile-co-(N-vinylpyrrolidone)] model nanoparticles with increasing hydrophilicity as related to their increasing content (0-30 mol.%) of N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization. Nanoparticles with a low NVP content were rapidly endocytized into all cells independent from the particle dose with toxic effects only observed at high particle concentrations, while only 10-30% of the cells incorporated particles with ?20 mol.% NVP. Since pathologies are often related to inflammation, an inflammatory HUVEC culture condition with IL-1? stimulation has been introduced and suggested to be widely applied for studying nanocarriers, since cellular uptake in this assay was clearly increased for NVP contents ?20 mol.%. Importantly, the secretion of functional biological mediators by HUVECs was not relevantly influenced by the nanoparticles for both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. These findings may motivate concepts for nanocarriers specifically targeted to pathologic regions. Additionally, rapidly endocytized RhodaminB loaded particles with low NVP content may be explored for cell labeling and tracking. PMID:23429231

  4. Can plasmonic Al nanoparticles improve absorption in triple junction solar cells?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, L.; Pillai, S.; Green, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles located on the illuminated surface of a solar cell can perform the function of an antireflection layer, as well as a scattering layer, facilitating light-trapping. Al nanoparticles have recently been proposed to aid photocurrent enhancements in GaAs photodiodes in the wavelength region of 400–900?nm by mitigating any parasitic absorption losses. Because this spectral region corresponds to the top and middle sub-cell of a typical GaInP/GaInAs/Ge triple junction solar cell, in this work, we investigated the potential of similar periodic Al nanoparticles placed on top of a thin SiO2 spacer layer that can also serve as an antireflection coating at larger thicknesses. The particle period, diameter and the thickness of the oxide layers were optimised for the sub-cells using simulations to achieve the lowest reflection and maximum external quantum efficiencies. Our results highlight the importance of proper reference comparison, and unlike previously published results, raise doubts regarding the effectiveness of Al plasmonic nanoparticles as a suitable front-side scattering medium for broadband efficiency enhancements when compared to standard single-layer antireflection coatings. However, by embedding the nanoparticles within the dielectric layer, they have the potential to perform better than an antireflection layer and provide enhanced response from both the sub-cells. PMID:26138405

  5. Can plasmonic Al nanoparticles improve absorption in triple junction solar cells?

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Pillai, S; Green, M A

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles located on the illuminated surface of a solar cell can perform the function of an antireflection layer, as well as a scattering layer, facilitating light-trapping. Al nanoparticles have recently been proposed to aid photocurrent enhancements in GaAs photodiodes in the wavelength region of 400-900?nm by mitigating any parasitic absorption losses. Because this spectral region corresponds to the top and middle sub-cell of a typical GaInP/GaInAs/Ge triple junction solar cell, in this work, we investigated the potential of similar periodic Al nanoparticles placed on top of a thin SiO2 spacer layer that can also serve as an antireflection coating at larger thicknesses. The particle period, diameter and the thickness of the oxide layers were optimised for the sub-cells using simulations to achieve the lowest reflection and maximum external quantum efficiencies. Our results highlight the importance of proper reference comparison, and unlike previously published results, raise doubts regarding the effectiveness of Al plasmonic nanoparticles as a suitable front-side scattering medium for broadband efficiency enhancements when compared to standard single-layer antireflection coatings. However, by embedding the nanoparticles within the dielectric layer, they have the potential to perform better than an antireflection layer and provide enhanced response from both the sub-cells. PMID:26138405

  6. Encapsulation of selenium in chitosan nanoparticles improves selenium availability and protects cells from selenium-induced DNA damage response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium, an essential mineral, plays important roles in optimizing human health. Chitosan is an effective, naturally oriented material for synthesizing nanoparticles with polyanions and exhibit preferable properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradation and resistance to certain enzymes. We have...

  7. Uptake of folate-conjugated albumin nanoparticles to the SKOV3 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangke; Hou, Shixiang; Mao, Shengjun; Wei, Dapeng; Song, Xiangrong; Lu, Yi

    2004-12-01

    The bovine serum albumin nanoparticles (BSANPs) were prepared by a coacervation method and chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. Furthermore, the BSANPs were reacted with the activated folic acid to conjugate folate via amino groups of the BSANPs, to improve their intracellular uptake to target cells. The nanoparticles were apparently spherical with diameters less than 150 nm and their average diameter was 70 nm by a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a laser light scattering particle analyzer, respectively. An extent of folate conjugation with the BSANPs was 169 micromol/g BSA by spectrophotometric analysis. Cell uptake studies were carried out in SKOV3 cells (human ovarian cancer cell line) using fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled nanoparticles. The extent of BSANPs taken up by the cells was measured with a fluorescence spectrophotometer. The nanoparticles were taken up to the cells and levels of binding and uptake were increased with the time of incubation until 4 h. The levels of folate-conjugated BSANPs were higher than those of BSANPs and saturable. The association of folate-conjugated BSANPs to SKOV3 cells was inhibited by an excess amount of folic acid, suggesting that the binding and/or uptake were mediated by the folate receptor. These results implied that the folate-conjugated BSANPs might be useful as a drug carrier system to deliver drugs into the cells expressing folate receptor. PMID:15541922

  8. Application of antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles for optical molecular imaging of epithelial carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kah, James C. Y.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Lee, Caroline G. L.; Olivo, Malini C.

    2006-02-01

    Advanced optical technologies for in vivo imaging e.g. OCT and confocal reflectance endomicroscopy while being able to image stromal morphology, are unable to image biomolecular changes associated with carcinogenesis. Furthermore, the contrast between neoplastic and normal tissues from such advanced optical technologies is often too low to be of any clinical value. Due to their favorable optical properties including their ability to resonantly scatter light at surface plasmon resonance to present potentially good contrast for reflectance-mode imaging, we aim to develop gold nanoparticles as optical contrast agents coupled with these optical imaging systems to perform cancer targeting bioimaging for early diagnosis of epithelial carcinoma. In this study, 20 nm gold nanoparticles were synthesized and conjugated with anti-EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor). EGFR is a cell surface receptor biomarker that is highly expressed in majority of epithelial cancer compared to normal cells. The resulting anti-EGFR conjugated gold nanoparticles were allowed to interact with the nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells in vitro. The exact localization of the gold bioconjugates on the cell surface EGFR receptors was investigated using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. We have demonstrated that the binding and localization of the gold bioconjugates on the cell surface increased the reflectance and scattering properties of the CNE2 cells and provide good optical contrast for the cancer cells under confocal reflectance microscopy. Thus our study has demonstrated the potential of gold nanoparticles to target and illuminate cancer cells for bioimaging.

  9. Efficient internalization of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes by primary human macrophages and dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzmann, Andrea [Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Andersson, Britta [Clinical Allergy Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Vogt, Carmen [Functional Materials Division, School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Feliu, Neus [Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Ye Fei [Functional Materials Division, School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gabrielsson, Susanne [Clinical Allergy Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Toprak, Muhammet S. [Functional Materials Division, School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina [Laboratory for Materials, Biology Interactions, Swiss Federal Laboratories of Materials Testing and Research, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Laurent, Sophie [NMR and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of General, Organic and Biomedical Chemistry, University of Mons, Mons (Belgium); Vahter, Marie [Division of Metals and Health, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Krug, Harald [Laboratory for Materials, Biology Interactions, Swiss Federal Laboratories of Materials Testing and Research, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Muhammed, Mamoun [Functional Materials Division, School of Information and Communication Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Scheynius, Annika [Clinical Allergy Research Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Fadeel, Bengt, E-mail: bengt.fadeel@ki.se [Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are being considered for a wide range of biomedical applications, from magnetic resonance imaging to 'smart' drug delivery systems. The development of novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications must be accompanied by careful scrutiny of their biocompatibility. In this regard, particular attention should be paid to the possible interactions between nanoparticles and cells of the immune system, our primary defense system against foreign invasion. On the other hand, labeling of immune cells serves as an ideal tool for visualization, diagnosis or treatment of inflammatory processes, which requires the efficient internalization of the nanoparticles into the cells of interest. Here, we compare novel monodispersed silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with commercially available dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles displayed excellent magnetic properties. Furthermore, they were non-toxic to primary human monocyte-derived macrophages at all doses tested whereas dose-dependent toxicity of the smaller silica-coated nanoparticles (30 nm and 50 nm) was observed for primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not for the similarly small dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. No macrophage or dendritic cell secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed upon administration of nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were taken up to a significantly higher degree when compared to the dextran-coated nanoparticles, irrespective of size. Cellular internalization of the silica-coated nanoparticles was through an active, actin cytoskeleton-dependent process. We conclude that these novel silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising materials for medical imaging, cell tracking and other biomedical applications.

  10. Gold nanoparticles with different charge and moiety induce differential cell response on mesenchymal stem cell osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia'En Jasmine; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-06-01

    Stem cells exist in an in vivo microenvironment that provides biological and physiochemical cues to direct cell fate decisions. How the stem cells sense and respond to these cues is still not clearly understood. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used for manipulation of cell behavior due to their ease of synthesis and versatility in surface functionalization. In this study, AuNPs with amine (AuNP-NH2), carboxyl (AuNP-COOH) and hydroxyl (AuNP-OH) functional groups possessing different surface charge were synthesized. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were treated with the surface functionalized AuNPs and assessed for cell viability and osteogenic differentiation ability. The surface functionalized AuNPs were well tolerated by hMSCs and showed no acute toxicity. Positively charged AuNPs showed higher cellular uptake. AuNPs did not inhibit osteogenesis but ALP activity and calcium deposition were markedly reduced in AuNP-COOH treatment. Gene profiling revealed an upregulation of TGF-? and FGF-2 expression that promoted cell proliferation over osteogenic differentiation in hMSCs. These results provide some insight on the influence of surface functionalized AuNPs on hMSCs behavior and the use of these materials for strategic tissue engineering. PMID:25858865

  11. A stochastic model of cell survival for high-Z nanoparticle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Ngwa, Wil; Berbeco, Ross; Makrigiorgos, Mike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Hoegele, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg 93053 (Germany); Cifter, Fulya; Sajo, Erno [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present a stochastic framework for the assessment of cell survival in gold nanoparticle radiotherapy. Methods: The authors derive the equations for the effective macroscopic dose enhancement for a population of cells with nonideal distribution of gold nanoparticles (GNP), allowing different number of GNP per cell and different distances with respect to the cellular target. They use the mixed Poisson distribution formalism to model the impact of the aforementioned physical factors on the effective dose enhancement. Results: The authors show relatively large differences in the estimation of cell survival arising from using approximated formulae. They predict degeneration of the cell killing capacity due to different number of GNP per cell and different distances with respect to the cellular target. Conclusions: The presented stochastic framework can be used in interpretation of experimental cell survival or tumor control probability studies.

  12. Spatial modulation spectroscopy for imaging and quantitative analysis of single dye-doped organic nanoparticles inside cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadas, Mary Sajini; Devkota, Tuphan; Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K.; Smith, Bradley D.; Hartland, Gregory V.

    2015-05-01

    Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer.Imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticles in complex biological environments, such as the cell cytosol, is a challenging problem. For metal nanoparticles, Rayleigh scattering methods can be used, but for organic nanoparticles, such as dye-doped polymer beads or lipid nanoparticles, light scattering does not provide good contrast. In this paper, spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS) is used to image single organic nanoparticles doped with non-fluorescent, near-IR croconaine dye. SMS is a quantitative imaging technique that yields the absolute extinction cross-section of the nanoparticles, which can be used to determine the number of dye molecules per particle. SMS images were recorded for particles within EMT-6 breast cancer cells. The measurements allowed mapping of the nanoparticle location and the amount of dye in a single cell. The results demonstrate how SMS can facilitate efforts to optimize dye-doped nanoparticles for effective photothermal therapy of cancer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM imaging, calibration experiments for the SMS instrument with gold nanoparticles, SMS images of dye doped polymer beads from a commercial source, evidence for endosome uptake, and additional SMS images of dye-doped LPNPs in EMT-6 cells, and spectra of SRfluor680/croconaine doped lipid-polymer nanoparticles. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR01614B

  13. Nanoparticle translocation through a lipid bilayer tuned by surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Caramori, Giovanni Finoto; Rambo, Carlos Renato

    2013-02-21

    An enhanced understanding about the interactions between nanomaterials and cell membranes may have important implications for biomedical applications. In this work, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of gold nanoparticles interacting with lipid bilayers were performed to evaluate the effect of hydrophobicity, charge density and ligand length on lipid bilayers. The simulations accomplished indicate that hydrophobic and anionic nanoparticles do not exhibit significant interactions and different charge densities may induce pore formation or nanoparticle wrapping, resembling first stages of endocytosis. The suggested interplay between charge density and ligand length has important implications when designing nanoparticles for drug and gene delivery applications. Moreover, control of charge densities may induce internalization of nanoparticles into cells through different mechanisms such as passive translocation, for nanoparticles with low charge density, or endocytosis for higher charge densities, highlighting the role of surface chemistry in nanoparticle-cell interactions. PMID:23223270

  14. Development of drug-loaded chitosan-vanillin nanoparticles and its cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu-Wang; Wang, Guang; Yang, Zi-Ming; Duan, Wei; Peng, Zheng; Kong, Ling-Xue; Wang, Qing-Huang

    2014-04-01

    Abstract Chitosan as a natural polysaccharide derived from chitin of arthropods like shrimp and crab, attracts much interest due to its inherent properties, especially for application in biomedical materials. Presently, biodegradable and biocompatible chitosan nanoparticles are attractive for drug delivery. However, some physicochemical characteristics of chitosan nanoparticles still need to be further improved in practice. In this work, chitosan nanoparticles were produced by crosslinking chitosan with 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (vanillin) through a Schiff reaction. Chitosan nanoparticles were 200-250?nm in diameter with smooth surface and were negatively charged with a zeta potential of?-?17.4?mV in neutral solution. Efficient drug loading and drug encapsulation were achieved using 5-fluorouracil as a model of hydrophilic drug. Drug release from the nanoparticles was constant and controllable. The in vitro cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells and cellular uptake of the chitosan nanoparticles were evaluated by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium method, confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometer, respectively. The results indicate that the chitosan nanoparticles crosslinked with vanillin are a promising vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:24712731

  15. Cellular internalization pathway and transcellular transport of pegylated polyester nanoparticles in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Quanyin; Huang, Meng; Yao, Lei; Qi, Hong; Qiu, Yu; Jiang, Xinguo; Chen, Jun; Chen, Hongzhuan; Gao, Xiaoling

    2013-03-10

    Biodegradable polyester nanoparticles have now attracted growing interest as promising drug delivery system. However, a fundamental understanding about its cellular transport as well as the influence by the polymeric architecture is still lack, which remains a significant obstacle to optimal nanocarrier design. In this work, using Caco-2 cell model, we characterized the cellular transport pathway of pegylated polyester nanoparticles and determined the effect of polymer architecture including PEG chain length and core material on its cellular interaction and transcellular transport. The nanoparticles were found to undergo an energy-dependent, lipid raft-mediated, but caveolae-independent endocytosis. PEG chain length (from 2000 to 5000 Da) and core material (PLA/PLGA) hardly affected the cellular interaction and the intracellular itinerary of the nanoparticles. However, in the case of transcellular transport, the maximal transcellular transport efficiency for its payload was achieved by the PEG5000-PLA40000 nanoparticles which present higher drug loading capacity and slower drug release. The findings here revealed the cellular interaction mechanism of pegylated polyester nanoparticles and provided evidence for the role of polymer architectures in modulating the transcellular permeability of the agents loaded by the nanoparticles, and would be helpful in improving carrier design to enhance drug delivery. PMID:23380624

  16. Targeting cell membrane lipid rafts by stoichiometric functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a sphingolipid-binding domain Peptide.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Nieves, Daniel; Brun, Benjamin; Kraut, Rachel S; Fernig, David G

    2015-04-01

    A non-membrane protein-based nanoparticle agent for the tracking of lipid rafts on live cells is produced by stoichiometric functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a previously characterized sphingolipid- and cell membrane microdomain-binding domain peptide (SBD). The SBD peptide is inserted in a self-assembled monolayer of peptidol and alkane thiol ethylene glycol, on gold nanoparticles surface. The stoichiometric functionalization of nanoparticles with the SBD peptide, essential for single molecule tracking, is achieved by means of non-affinity nanoparticle purification. The SBD-nanoparticles have remarkable long-term resistance to electrolyte-induced aggregation and ligand-exchange and have no detectable non-specific binding to live cells. Binding and diffusion of SBD-nanoparticles bound to the membrane of live cells is measured by real-time photothermal microscopy and shows the dynamics of sphingolipid-enriched microdomains on cells membrane, with evidence for clustering, splitting, and diffusion over time of the SBD-nanoparticle labeled membrane domains. The monofunctionalized SBD-nanoparticle is a promising targeting agent for the tracking of lipid rafts independently of their protein composition and the labelling requires no prior modification of the cells. This approach has potential for further functionalization of the particles to manipulate the organization of, or targeting to microdomains that control signaling events and thereby lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25650337

  17. Autistic Children Exhibit Decreased Levels of Essential Fatty Acids in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brigandi, Sarah A.; Shao, Hong; Qian, Steven Y.; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai-Lin; Kang, Jing X.

    2015-01-01

    Omega-6 (n-6) and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are essential nutrients for brain development and function. However, whether or not the levels of these fatty acids are altered in individuals with autism remains debatable. In this study, we compared the fatty acid contents between 121 autistic patients and 110 non-autistic, non-developmentally delayed controls, aged 3–17. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of red blood cell (RBC) membrane phospholipids showed that the percentage of total PUFA was lower in autistic patients than in controls; levels of n-6 arachidonic acid (AA) and n-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were particularly decreased (p < 0.001). In addition, plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory AA metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were higher in a subset of the autistic participants (n = 20) compared to controls. Our study demonstrates an alteration in the PUFA profile and increased production of a PUFA-derived metabolite in autistic patients, supporting the hypothesis that abnormal lipid metabolism is implicated in autism. PMID:25946342

  18. Neutrophil differentiation into a unique hybrid population exhibiting dual phenotype and functionality of neutrophils and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Hironori; Geng, Shuo; Lu, Ran; Okamoto, Takashi; Yao, Yi; Mayuzumi, Nobuyasu; Kotol, Paul F; Chojnacki, Benjamin J; Miyazaki, Toru; Gallo, Richard L; Takashima, Akira

    2013-03-01

    Neutrophils have been reported to acquire surface expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules as well as T-cell stimulatory activities when cultured with selected cytokines. However, cellular identity of those unusual neutrophils showing antigen presenting cell (APC)-like features still remains elusive. Here we show that both immature and mature neutrophils purified from mouse bone marrow differentiate into a previously unrecognized "hybrid" population showing dual properties of both neutrophils and dendritic cells (DCs) when cultured with granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor but not with other tested growth factors. The resulting hybrid cells express markers of both neutrophils (Ly6G, CXCR2, and 7/4) and DCs (CD11c, MHC II, CD80, and CD86). They also exhibit several properties typically reserved for DCs, including dendritic morphology, probing motion, podosome formation, production of interleukin-12 and other cytokines, and presentation of various forms of foreign protein antigens to naïve CD4 T cells. Importantly, they retain intrinsic abilities of neutrophils to capture exogenous material, extrude neutrophil extracellular traps, and kill bacteria via cathelicidin production. Not only do our results reinforce the notion that neutrophils can acquire APC-like properties, they also unveil a unique differentiation pathway of neutrophils into neutrophil-DC hybrids that can participate in both innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:23305731

  19. Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Assembled Entirely from Immune Signals on Gold Nanoparticle Templates Promote Antigen-Specific T Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peipei; Chiu, Yu-Chieh; Tostanoski, Lisa H; Jewell, Christopher M

    2015-06-23

    Materials that allow modular, defined assembly of immune signals could support a new generation of rationally designed vaccines that promote tunable immune responses. Toward this goal, we have developed the first polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) coatings built entirely from immune signals. These immune-PEMs (iPEMs) are self-assembled on gold nanoparticle templates through stepwise electrostatic interactions between peptide antigen and polyanionic toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists that serve as molecular adjuvants. iPEMs do not require solvents or mixing, offer direct control over the composition and loading of vaccine components, and can be coated on substrates at any scale. These films also do not require other structural components, eliminating the potentially confounding effects caused by the inherent immune-stimulatory characteristics of many synthetic polymers. iPEM loading on gold nanoparticle substrates is tunable, and cryoTEM reveals iPEM shells coated on gold cores. These nanoparticles are efficiently internalized by primary dendritic cells (DCs), resulting in activation, selective triggering of TLR signaling, and presentation of the antigens used to assemble iPEMs. In coculture, iPEMs drive antigen-specific T cell proliferation and effector cytokines but not cytokines associated with more generalized inflammation. Compared to mice treated with soluble antigen and adjuvant, iPEM immunization promotes high levels of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in peripheral blood after 1 week. These enhancements result from increased DC activation and antigen presentation in draining lymph nodes. iPEM-immunized mice also exhibit a potent recall response after boosting, supporting the potential of iPEMs for designing well-defined vaccine coatings that provide high cargo density and eliminate synthetic film components. PMID:26035231

  20. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Lin Jianguo [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Sun Yuliang [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Bennouna, Soumaya [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Lo, Michael [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Wu Qingyang [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Bu Zhigao [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Pulendran, Bali [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Compans, Richard W. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)]. E-mail: compans@microbio.emory.edu; Yang Chinglai [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)]. E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection.

  1. Adhesion, Vitality and Osteogenic Differentiation Capacity of Adipose Derived Stem Cells Seeded on Nitinol Nanoparticle Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Strauß, Sarah; Neumeister, Anne; Barcikowski, Stephan; Kracht, Dietmar; Kuhbier, Jörn W.; Radtke, Christine; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Autologous cells can be used for a bioactivation of osteoimplants to enhance osseointegration. In this regard, adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) offer interesting perspectives in implantology because they are fast and easy to isolate. However, not all materials licensed for bone implants are equally suited for cell adhesion. Surface modifications are under investigation to promote cytocompatibility and cell growth. The presented study focused on influences of a Nitinol-nanoparticle coating on ASCs. Possible toxic effects as well as influences on the osteogenic differentiation potential of ASCs were evaluated by viability assays, scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence and alizarin red staining. It was previously shown that Nitinol-nanoparticles exert no cell toxic effects to ASCs either in soluble form or as surface coating. Here we could demonstrate that a Nitinol-nanoparticle surface coating enhances cell adherence and growth on Nitinol-surfaces. No negative influence on the osteogenic differentiation was observed. Nitinol-nanoparticle coatings offer new possibilities in implantology research regarding bioactivation by autologous ASCs, respectively enhancement of surface attraction to cells. PMID:23308190

  2. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, South Mimms, (United Kingdom))

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  3. A Bovine Lymphosarcoma Cell Line Infected with Theileria annulata Exhibits an Irreversible Reconfiguration of Host Cell Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Durrani, Zeeshan; Pillai, Sreerekha S.; Baird, Margaret; Shiels, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Theileria annulata, an intracellular parasite of bovine lymphoid cells, induces substantial phenotypic alterations to its host cell including continuous proliferation, cytoskeletal changes and resistance to apoptosis. While parasite induced modulation of host cell signal transduction pathways and NF?B activation are established, there remains considerable speculation on the complexities of the parasite directed control mechanisms that govern these radical changes to the host cell. Our objectives in this study were to provide a comprehensive analysis of the global changes to host cell gene expression with emphasis on those that result from direct intervention by the parasite. By using comparative microarray analysis of an uninfected bovine cell line and its Theileria infected counterpart, in conjunction with use of the specific parasitacidal agent, buparvaquone, we have identified a large number of host cell gene expression changes that result from parasite infection. Our results indicate that the viable parasite can irreversibly modify the transformed phenotype of a bovine cell line. Fifty percent of genes with altered expression failed to show a reversible response to parasite death, a possible contributing factor to initiation of host cell apoptosis. The genes that did show an early predicted response to loss of parasite viability highlighted a sub-group of genes that are likely to be under direct control by parasite infection. Network and pathway analysis demonstrated that this sub-group is significantly enriched for genes involved in regulation of chromatin modification and gene expression. The results provide evidence that the Theileria parasite has the regulatory capacity to generate widespread change to host cell gene expression in a complex and largely irreversible manner. PMID:23840536

  4. Assessment of Long-Term Effects of Nanoparticles in a Microcarrier Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Mrakovcic, Maria; Absenger, Markus; Riedl, Regina; Smole, Claudia; Roblegg, Eva; Fröhlich, Leopold F.; Fröhlich, Eleonore

    2013-01-01

    Nano-sized materials could find multiple applications in medical diagnosis and therapy. One main concern is that engineered nanoparticles, similar to combustion-derived nanoparticles, may cause adverse effects on human health by accumulation of entire particles or their degradation products. Chronic cytotoxicity must therefore be evaluated. In order to perform chronic cytotoxicity testing of plain polystyrene nanoparticles on the endothelial cell line EAhy 926, we established a microcarrier cell culture system for anchorage-dependent cells (BioLevitatorTM). Cells were cultured for four weeks and exposed to doses, which were not cytotoxic upon 24 hours of exposure. For comparison, these particles were also studied in regularly sub-cultured cells, a method that has traditionally been used to assess chronic cellular effects. Culturing on basal membrane coated microcarriers produced very high cell densities. Fluorescent particles were mainly localized in the lysosomes of the exposed cells. After four weeks of exposure, the number of cells exposed to 20 nm polystyrene particles decreased by 60% as compared to untreated controls. When tested in sub-cultured cells, the same particles decreased cell numbers to 80% of the untreated controls. Dose-dependent decreases in cell numbers were also noted after exposure of microcarrier cultured cells to 50 nm short multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Our findings support that necrosis, but not apoptosis, contributed to cell death of the exposed cells in the microcarrier culture system. In conclusion, the established microcarrier model appears to be more sensitive for the identification of cellular effects upon prolonged and repeated exposure to nanoparticles than traditional sub-culturing. PMID:23457616

  5. Peptide-mediated cell penetration and targeted delivery of gold nanoparticles into lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Dekiwadia, Chaitali D; Lawrie, Ann C; Fecondo, John V

    2012-08-01

    There is considerable interest in the sub-cellular targeting and delivery of biomolecules, therapeutic and imaging agents, and nanoparticles and nanoparticle conjugates into organelles for therapeutic and imaging purposes. To date, a number of studies have used sorting peptides for targeted delivery of cargo into different cell organelles but not into lysosomes. In this study, the delivery of 13-nm gold nanoparticles across the cell membrane followed by targeted localisation into the lysosomes of a mammalian cell line was examined using novel combinations of cell-penetrating peptides and lysosomal sorting peptides conjugated to the nanoparticles. Using a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques, we show that these nanoconjugates were efficiently and selectively delivered into the lysosomes with minimal cytotoxic effects. This novel targeted delivery system may underpin the development of a new strategy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases by exploiting the large surface area of nanoparticles to deliver drugs or replacement enzymes directly to the lysosomes. PMID:22764089

  6. Cell Permeable Au@ZnMoS4 Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Towards a Novel Cellular Copper Detoxifying Drug for Wilson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Vindya S.; Liu, Haijian; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Songping D.

    2015-01-01

    A layer-by-layer self-assembly method leads to the formation of Au@ZnMoS4 core-shell nanoparticles (NPs). The PEGylated Au@ZnMoS4 NPs are highly water-dispersible, exhibit no cytotoxicity and can penetrate the cell membrane to selectively remove copper(I) ions from HepG2 cells in the presence of other endogenous and biologically essential metal ions including Mg(II), Ca(II), Mn(II) and Fe(II), demonstrating their potential as a novel intracellular copper detoxifying agent. PMID:25698847

  7. The role of NaYF4 nanoparticles in inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenbin; Jiang, Huimin; Liu, Chunyu; He, Yeyuan; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2014-07-01

    NaYF4 nanoparticles are doped into PCDTBT:PCBM blend as a dual function additive to improve light absorption of inverted polymer solar cells. The dependence of device performance on NaYF4 in the blend film is investigated. The results show that the short-circuit current density is apparently enhanced by doping NaYF4 into the active layer while maintaining the open-circuit voltage and fill factor, leading to an increase in power conversion efficiency. NaYF4 maybe play two kinds of role for light absorption enhancement. Up-conversion (UC) emission from Y3+ is observed. The scattering effect of NaYF4 nanoparticles (NPs) enhances the light absorption in visible region. The performance of polymer solar cell doped with NaYF4 is compared with that of undoped. The concept of integrating nanoparticles into active layer suggests a promising and practical pathway for improving absorption of polymer solar cells.

  8. The anticancer properties of iron core–gold shell nanoparticles in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ya-Na; Wu, Ping-Ching; Yang, Li-Xing; Ratinac, Kyle R; Thordarson, Pall; Jahn, Kristina A; Chen, Dong-Hwang; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Braet, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Previously, iron core–gold shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) have been shown to possess cancer-preferential cytotoxicity in oral and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. However, CRC cell lines are less sensitive to Fe@Au treatment when compared with oral cancer cell lines. In this research, Fe@Au are found to decrease the cell viability of CRC cell lines, including Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480, through growth inhibition rather than the induction of cell death. The cytotoxicity induced by Fe@Au in CRC cells uses different subcellular pathways to the mitochondria-mediated autophagy found in Fe@Au-treated oral cancer cells, OECM1. Interestingly, the Caco-2 cell line shows a similar response to OECM1 cells and is thus more sensitive to Fe@Au treatment than the other CRC cell lines studied. We have investigated the underlying cell resistance mechanisms of Fe@Au-treated CRC cells. The resistance of CRC cells to Fe@Au does not result from the total amount of Fe@Au internalized. Instead, the different amounts of Fe and Au internalized appear to determine the different response to treatment with Fe-only nanoparticles in Fe@Au-resistant CRC cells compared with the Fe@Au-sensitive OECM1 cells. The only moderately cytotoxic effect of Fe@Au nanoparticles on CRC cells, when compared to the highly sensitive OECM1 cells, appears to arise from the CRC cells’ relative insensitivity to Fe, as is demonstrated by our Fe-only treatments. This is a surprising outcome, given that Fe has thus far been considered to be the “active” component of Fe@Au nanoparticles. Instead, we have found that the Au coatings, previously considered only as a passivating coating to protect the Fe cores from oxidation, significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of Fe@Au in certain CRC cells. Therefore, we conclude that both the Fe and Au in these core–shell nanoparticles are essential for the anticancer properties observed in CRC cells. PMID:24039416

  9. Lipid coated upconverting nanoparticles as NIR remote controlled transducer for simultaneous photodynamic therapy and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanjie; Dong, Chunhong; Zhao, Peiqi; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Zhongyun; Chang, Jin

    2014-05-15

    The application of photodynamic therapy in deep tissue is constrained by some pending problems, such as the limited penetration depth of excitation light and lacking of targeting ability. In this paper, a new kind of lipid coated upconverting nanoparticles consisiting of upconerting nanocrystal core and targeted lipid polymer shell was first reported for NIR triggered photodynamic therapy and cell imaging simultaneously. The lipid coated upconverting nanoparticles offers advantages to overcome the problem mentioned above. The UCN core works as a transducer to convert deeply penetrating near-infrared light to visible lights for activating photosensitizer and cell fluorescence imaging simultaneously. The amphiphilic lipid polymer RGD peptide conjugated poly (maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) grafted dioleoyl l-?-phosphatidylethanolamine (RGD-PMAO-DOPE) acts as a shield. It can protect the system from catching by RES and target the whole system to the lesions. The experiment results show that the lipid coated upconverting nanoparticle is individual nanosphere with an average size of 20 nm. The drug loading can reach 9%. After NIR exposed, the MC540 was activated to produce singlet oxygen (ROS) successfully by the upconverting fluorescence emitted from UCN. Importantly, compared with nanoparticle without RGD decoration, the lipid coated upconverting nanoparticle can co-deliver the MC540 and UCNs into the same cell with higher efficiency. Besides, the MC540 loaded UCN/RGD-PMAO-DOPE nanoparticles showed significant inhibitory effect on tumor cells after NIR shining. Our data suggests that MC540 loaded UCN/RGD-PMAO-DOPE nanoparticle may be a useful nanoplatform for future PDT treatment in deep-cancer therapy. PMID:24657139

  10. Facile Synthetic Route for Surface-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles: Cell Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Jung; Lee, Haeshin; Bae, Ki Hyun; Lee, Yuhan; Park, Jongnam; Cho, Seung-Woo; Hwang, Jin Young; Park, Hyunwook; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Tae Gwan

    2014-01-01

    Currently available methods to stably disperse iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in aqueous solution need to be improved due to potential aggregation, reduction of superparamagnetism, and the use of toxic reagents. Herein, we present a facile strategy for aqueous transfer and dispersion of organic-synthesized IONPs using only polyethylene glycol (PEG), a biocompatible polymer. A library of PEG derivatives was screened, and it was determined that amine-functionalized six-armed PEG, 6(PEG-NH2), was the most effective dispersion agent. The 6(PEG-NH2)-modified IONPs (IONP-6PEG) were stable after extensive washing, exhibited high superparamagnetism, and could be used as a platform material for secondary surface functionalization with bioactive polymers. IONP-6PEG biofunctionalized with hyaluronic acid (IONP-6PEG-HA) was shown to specifically label mesenchymal stem cells and demonstrate MR contrast potential with high r2 relaxivity (442.7 s?1mM?1) compared to the commercially available Feridex (182.1 s?1mM?1). PMID:21619063

  11. Tools Exhibits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alberto Rodrigues Da Silva

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a Live demonstrations of cutting-edge systems were an important and exciting part of the UML2004 conference. The tool exhibits\\u000a session provided an excellent opportunity where participants analysed and viewed relevant UML and MDA related tools in action\\u000a and discussed these systems with their creators or distributors. The tool exhibits session took place during the main conference,\\u000a from October 13 to 15,

  12. Nanoparticles with honeycomb cavities containing drugs blast cancer cells http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110418114208.htm[4/21/2011 11:52:08 AM

    E-print Network

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    Nanoparticles with honeycomb cavities containing drugs blast cancer cells http killer cell Nanoparticle Monoclonal antibody therapy ScienceDaily (Apr. 20, 2011) -- Melding Cancer Research and Treatment Center have produced an effective strategy that uses nanoparticles to blast

  13. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity. PMID:25955968

  14. Cell, Vol. 113, 597607, May 30, 2003, Copyright 2003 by Cell Press Development of Genetic Circuitry Exhibiting

    E-print Network

    Sontag, Eduardo

    , produced a few noisy oscillations that could be detected in selected single cells by using fluores that display toggle switch or The objective of our project was to develop a geneticoscillatory behavior. Both

  15. Effect of nanoparticles binding ?-amyloid peptide on nitric oxide production by cultured endothelial cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Antonina; Re, Francesca; Sesana, Silvia; Rivolta, Ilaria; Panariti, Alice; Brambilla, Davide; Nicolas, Julien; Couvreur, Patrick; Andrieux, Karine; Masserini, Massimo; Cazzaniga, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of a project designing nanoparticles for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, we have synthesized and characterized a small library of nanoparticles binding with high affinity to the ?-amyloid peptide and showing features of biocompatibility in vitro, which are important properties for administration in vivo. In this study, we focused on biocompatibility issues, evaluating production of nitric oxide by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and macrophages, used as models of cells which would be exposed to nanoparticles after systemic administration. Methods The nanoparticles tested were liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin, and PEGylated poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles (PEG-PACA). We measured nitric oxide production using the Griess method as well as phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and intracellular free calcium, which are biochemically related to nitric oxide production. MTT viability tests and caspase-3 detection were also undertaken. Results Exposure to liposomes did not affect the viability of endothelial cells at any concentration tested. Increased production of nitric oxide was detected only with liposomes carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin at the highest concentration (120 ?g/mL), together with increased synthase phosphorylation and intracellular calcium levels. Macrophages exposed to liposomes showed a slightly dose-dependent decrease in viability, with no increase in production of nitric oxide. Exposure to solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid decreased viability in both cell lines, starting at the lowest dose (10 ?g/mL), with increased production of nitric oxide detected only at the highest dose (1500 ?g/mL). Exposure to PEG-PACA affected cell viability and production of nitric oxide in both cell lines, but only at the highest concentration (640 ?g/mL). Conclusion Liposomal and PEG-PACA nanoparticles have a limited effect on vascular homeostasis and inflammatory response, rendering them potentially suitable for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, they highlight the importance of testing such nanoparticles for production of nitric oxide in vitro in order to identify a therapeutic dose range suitable for use in vivo. PMID:23717039

  16. Umbelliferone exhibits anticancer activity via the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shi-Min; Hu, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Jun

    2015-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly malignant tumor, associated with poor patient prognoses, and high rates of morbidity and mortality. To date, the therapeutic strategies available for the treatment of HCC remain limited. The present study aimed to elucidate the anticancer activity of umbelliferone, a naturally occurring coumarin derivative isolated from Ferula communis, against the HepG2 HCC cell line. A 3?(4,5?dimthylthaizol?2?yl)?2,5, diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate cell viability following umbelliferone treatment, and the effects of umbelliferone on cell cycle progression and apoptosis were evaluated using flow cytometry. The presence of morphological features characteristic of apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and apoptotic body formation, were evaluated in HepG2 cells following umbelliferone treatment. Cell cycle analysis conducted via propidium iodide (PI) staining indicated that umbelliferone treatment induced cell cycle arrest at S phase in HepG2 cells. Analysis with Annexin V and PI staining revealed that umbelliferone induced apoptotic events in HepG2 cells in a concentration?dependant manner (0?50 µM). Umbelliferone also induced dose?dependant DNA fragmentation. In conclusion, umbelliferone was found to exhibit significant anticancer effects via the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cancer cells. PMID:25997538

  17. Nanoparticle cerium oxide and mixed cerium oxides for improved fuel cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Stephen Michael

    While there is a rich body of literature concerning of properties of bulk cerium oxide and cerium cations in solution, the discussion has been inappropriately applied to nanoscale cerium oxide resulting in many unexpected or unexplained results. In particular, there is very limited understanding about the properties of cerium oxide and its potential use as a radical scavenger, and how the catalytic properties of cerium oxide change as the particle size approaches the nanoscale. For example, the involvement of Ce+4 and Ce+3 cations in reactions such as hydrogen peroxide decomposition have been investigated for both cerium cations and bulk cerium oxide. However, while both are assumed to decompose hydrogen peroxide through the same mechanism, whereby Ce+4 is involved in peroxide decomposition while Ce +3 is involved in radical scavenging, there has been very little done to address how the selectivity and activity of these reactions are affected by changing the majority cation population, as cerium cations in solution are predominantly in the +3 oxidation state while cerium cations are predominantly in the +4 oxidation state in cerium oxide. This matter is further complicated in cerium oxide nanoparticles where the surface concentration of Ce +3 cations is increased due to particle curvature effects. Due to the potential of controlling the surface cerium oxidation state using particle size and using this control to change the catalytic properties, this project investigated the effect of particle size and composition and the activity and selectivity of cerium oxide nanoparticles, and has served to expand the understanding of the properties of pure and mixed nanoparticle cerium oxide. This work explains the metric developed for measuring the catalytic properties of pure and mixed cerium oxide nanoparticles, which is also good at predicting the immediate and long-term behavior of nanoparticles in hydrogen fuel cells. This work also directly demonstrates praseodymium enrichment of cerium-praseodymium oxide nanoparticles and how both size and composition affected the catalytic properties. Finally, this project has given new direction for doped cerium oxide nanoparticles in hydrogen fuel cells. Both gadolinium and praseodymium doped cerium oxide nanoparticles have been shown to be poor choices for improving fuel cell lifetime, while zirconium doped cerium oxide nanoparticles show the greatest promise for improving fuel cell lifetime as the doped oxides give both better catalytic behavior than pure cerium, and unlike pure cerium oxide, does not ultimately dissolve to give a destructive nanoparticle.

  18. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/?m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ˜ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  19. Selective photothermal efficiency of citrate capped gold nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raji, V. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)] [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India); Kumar, Jatish [Division of photochemistry and photobiology, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences and Technology (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India)] [Division of photochemistry and photobiology, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences and Technology (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India); Rejiya, C.S.; Vibin, M.; Shenoi, Vinesh N. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)] [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India); Abraham, Annie, E-mail: annieab2@yahoo.co.in [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)] [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)

    2011-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles are recently having much attention because of their increased applications in biomedical fields. In this paper, we demonstrated the photothermal efficacy of citrate capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the destruction of A431 cancer cells. Citrate capped AuNPs were synthesized successfully and characterized by UV-visible-NIR spectrophotometry and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM). Further, AuNPs were conjugated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR) and applied for the selective photothermal therapy (PTT) of human epithelial cancer cells, A431. PTT experiments were conducted in four groups, Group I-control cells, Group II-cells treated with laser light alone, Group III-cells treated with unconjugated AuNP and further laser irradiation and Group IV-anti-EGFR conjugated AuNP treated cells irradiated by laser light. After laser irradiation, cell morphology changes that were examined using phase contrast microscopy along with the relevant biochemical parameters like lactate dehydrogenase activity, reactive oxygen species generation and caspase-3 activity were studied for all the groups to determine whether cell death occurs due to necrosis or apoptosis. From these results we concluded that, these immunotargeted nanoparticles could selectively induce cell death via ROS mediated apoptosis when cells were exposed to a low power laser light.

  20. Multifunctional AS1411-functionalized fluorescent gold nanoparticles for targeted cancer cell imaging and efficient photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jun; Xu, Yuanhong; Lou, Baohua; Li, Dan; Wang, Erkang

    2014-01-01

    Herein, one multifunctional AS1411-functionalized fluorescent gold nanoparticles (named NAANPs) is synthesized and successfully applied for both targeted cancer cell imaging and efficient photodynamic therapy (PDT). The NAANPs are obtained by functionalizing the gold nanoparticles with AS1411 aptamer and then bound with one porphyrin derivative N-methylmesoporphyrin IX (NMM). Using HeLa cells over expressing nucleolin as representative cancer cells, the formed NAANPs can target to the cell surface via the specific AS1411-nucleolin interaction, which can discriminate the cancer cells from normal ones (e.g. HEK293) unambiguously. That the fluorescence intensity of NMM increased significantly upon binding to AS1411 G-quadruplex makes the NAANPs appropriate fluorescence reagent for cell imaging. Meanwhile, NMM can also be used as a photosensitizer, thus irradiation of the NAANPs by the white light from a common electric torch can lead to efficient production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species for establishing a new type of PDT to cancer cells. Gold nanoparticles play the roles of both carrier and enhancer of the functional groups onto the cells. In addition, they not only possess inherently certain cytotoxicity to the cancer cells, but also boost the cellular uptake of the fluorescent groups. As a result, the efficiency of both the targeted cell imaging and PDT could be ensured. PMID:24274270

  1. Pattern Recognition of Cancer Cells Using Aptamer-Conjugated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bamrungsap, Suwussa; Chen, Tao; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Chen, Zhuo; Sefah, Kwame; Chen, Yan; Tan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanosensors based on reversible self-assembly of dispersed magnetic nanoparticles into stable nanoassemblies have been used as effective magnetic relaxation switches (MRSw) for the detection of molecular interactions. We report, for the first time, the design of MRSw based on aptamer-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (ACMNPs). The ACMNPs capitalize on the ability of aptamers to specifically bind target cancer cells, as well as the large surface area of MNPs to accommodate multiple aptamer binding events. The ACMNPs can detect as few as 10 cancer cells in 250 ?L of sample. The ACMNPs’ specificity and sensitivity are also demonstrated by detection in cell mixtures and complex biological media, including fetal bovine serum (FBS), human plasma, and whole blood. Furthermore, by using an array of ACMNPs, various cell types can be differentiated through pattern recognition, thus creating a cellular molecular profile which will allow clinicians to accurately identify cancer cells at the molecular and single cell level. PMID:22424140

  2. Conjugation of pH-responsive nanoparticles to neural stem cells improves intratumoral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Rachael; Weng, Yiming; Garcia, Elizabeth; Bhojane, Sukhada; Smith-Powell, Leslie; Kim, Seung U; Annala, Alexander J; Aboody, Karen S; Berlin, Jacob M

    2014-10-10

    Intratumoral drug delivery is an inherently appealing approach for concentrating toxic chemotherapies at the site of action. This mode of administration is currently used in a number of clinical treatments such as neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and even standalone therapies when radiation and surgery are not possible. However, even when injected locally, it is difficult to achieve efficient distribution of chemotherapeutics throughout the tumor. This is primarily attributed to the high interstitial pressure which results in gradients that drive fluid away from the tumor center. The stiff extracellular matrix also limits drug penetration throughout the tumor. We have previously shown that neural stem cells can penetrate tumor interstitium, actively migrating even to hypoxic tumor cores. When used to deliver therapeutics, these migratory neural stem cells result in dramatically enhanced tumor coverage relative to conventional delivery approaches. We recently showed that neural stem cells maintain their tumor tropic properties when surface-conjugated to nanoparticles. Here we demonstrate that this hybrid delivery system can be used to improve the efficacy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles when administered intratumorally. This was achieved by conjugating drug-loaded nanoparticles to the surface of neural stem cells using a bond that allows the stem cells to efficiently distribute nanoparticles throughout the tumor before releasing the drug for uptake by tumor cells. The modular nature of this system suggests that it could be used to improve the efficacy of many chemotherapy drugs after intratumoral administration. PMID:24952368

  3. Slowed diffusion of single nanoparticles in the extracellular microenvironment of living cells revealed by darkfield microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Xiong, Bin; He, Yan; Yeung, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    We obtained vertical distribution of diffusion coefficients of single gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the extracellular solution space of living cells with optical sectioning darkfield microscopy. It was identified that before reaching the plasma membrane surface during their cellular uptake process, AuNPs must diffuse through a viscous pericellular "buffer zone" several microns thick where their motion is retarded significantly. The pericellular layer exists in two different cell types and is unrelated to the surface chemistry of AuNPs. Further studies on its properties and manipulation may help the development of nanoparticle probes and carriers. PMID:21052644

  4. 6-Hydroxyflavone and Derivatives Exhibit Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity among Mono-, Di- and Polyhydroxylated Flavones in Kidney Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Preetpal Singh; Desai, Umesh R.; Zhou, Qibing

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses by kidney mesangial cells play a critical role in the glomerulonephritis. The anti-inflammatory potential of nineteen mono-, di- and polyhydroxylated flavones including fisetin, quercetin, morin, tricetin, gossypetin, apigenin and myricetin were investigated on rat mesangial cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as the inflammatory stimuli. 6-Hydroxyflavone and 4?,6-dihydroxyflavone exhibited high activity with IC50 in the range of 2.0 ?M, a much better inhibition potential in comparison to the well-studied polyhydroxylated flavones. Interestingly, the anti-inflammatory activity was not due to direct quenching of NO radicals. Investigation on derivatives with methylation, acetylation or sulfation of 6-hydroxyl group revealed that 6-methoxyflavone was the most potent with an IC50 of 192 nM. Mechanistic study indicated that the anti-inflammatory activity of 6-methoxyflavone arose via the inhibition of LPS-induced downstream inducible NO synthase in mesangial cells. The identification of 6-hydroxyflavone and 6-methoxyflavone with potent anti-inflammatory activity in kidney mesangial cells provides a new flavone scaffold and direction to develop naturally derived products for potential nephritis prevention and treatment. PMID:25790236

  5. Smooth Muscle Cells Isolated from Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms Exhibit Increased Genomic Damage, but Similar Tendency for Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Serhatli, Muge; Kacar, Omer; Adiguzel, Zelal; Tuncer, Altug; Hayran, Mutlu; Baysal, Kemal

    2012-01-01

    Aortic aneurysms (AA) are characterized by structural deterioration leading to progressive dilation. During the development of AA, two key structural changes are pronounced, one being degradation of extracellular matrix and the other loss of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) through apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced above physiological levels in dilated (aneurismal) part of the aorta compared to the nondilated part and they are known to be associated with both the extracellular matrix degradation and the loss of SMCs. In this study, we hypothesized that aneurismal SMCs are more prone to apoptosis and that at least some cells undergo apoptosis due to elevated ROS in the aortic wall. To test this hypothesis, we first isolated SMCs from thoracic aneurismal tissue and compared their apoptotic tendency with normal SMCs in response to H2O2, oxidized sterol, or UV treatment. Exposed cells exhibited morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, such as cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation, and DNA fragmentation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferased UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) further confirmed the fragmentation of nuclear DNA in these cells. Vascular SMCs were analyzed for their micronuclei (MN) and binucleate (BN) frequency as indicators of genomic abnormality. These data were then compared to patient parameters, including age, gender, hypertension, or aortic diameter for existing correlations. While the tendency for apoptosis was not significantly different compared to normal cells, both the %MN and %BN were higher in aneurismal SMCs. The data suggest that there is increased DNA damage in TAA samples, which might play a pivotal role in disease development. PMID:22871164

  6. 655. Compacted DNA Nanoparticles Effectively Transfect Brain Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Yurek; Anita Fletcher-Turner; Mark J. Cooper

    2005-01-01

    This study determined the feasibility of using DNA compacted into unimolecular nanoparticles as a gene therapy delivery system for post-mitotic brain cells. DNA compacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-substituted 30-mer lysine peptides has been shown to effectively transfect multiple types of non-dividing cells and tissues, including growth-arrested neuroblastoma cells, and may be a viable system for the delivery of neurotrophic factors,

  7. Formation and properties of magnetic chains for 100 nm nanoparticles used in separations of molecules and cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert J.; Hu, Wei; Fu, Cheryl Wong Po; Koh, Ai Leen; Gaster, Richard S.; Earhart, Christopher M.; Fu, Aihua; Heilshorn, Sarah C.; Sinclair, Robert; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    Optical observations of 100 nm metallic magnetic nanoparticles are used to study their magnetic field induced self assembly. Chains with lengths of tens of microns are observed to form within minutes at nanoparticle concentrations of 1010 per mL. Chain rotation and magnetophoresis are readily observed, and SEM reveals that long chains are not simple single particle filaments. Similar chains are detected for several 100 nm commercial bio-separation nanoparticles. We demonstrate the staged magnetic condensation of different types of nanoparticles into composite structures and show that magnetic chains bind to immunomagnetically labeled cells, serving as temporary handles which allow novel magnetic cell manipulations. PMID:20161001

  8. Antitumor activity of photo-stimulated zinc oxide nanoparticles combined with paclitaxel or cisplatin in HNSCC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Stephan; Scherzed, Agmal; Harnisch, Wilma; Froelich, Katrin; Ginzkey, Christian; Koehler, Christian; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2012-09-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) exhibit photocatalytic properties and are used in sunscreen cosmetics and for the degradation of environmental pollutants. Furthermore, ZnO-NPs have proven to induce tumor-selective cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in vitro. The aim of the current study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects of UVA-1-activated ZnO-NPs in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin in HNSCC. Three HNSCC cell lines (HLaC-78, Cal-27 and PJ-41) were incubated with ZnO-NPs at concentrations of 0.02 and 0.2 ?g/ml in combination with paclitaxel (0.5-5 nM) or cisplatin (0.03-3 ?M) for 24 h. Afterwards, cells were irradiated with UVA-1 for 15 min. Viability was measured by MTT assay, fluorescein-diacetate (FDA) test and annexin/propidiumiodide flow cytometry. A significant decrease in viable cells could be observed in all three HNSCC cell lines treated by photocatalytic therapy with 0.2 ?g/cm(2) ZnO-NPs alone. A combination with paclitaxel or cisplatin at low concentrations resulted in a further increase in cytotoxicity in vitro revealing a synergistic effect. Flow cytometry revealed a combination of apoptosis and necrosis. These results indicate that photocatalytic therapy of HNSCC with ZnO-NPs could enhance the cytotoxic action of chemotherapeutic agents synergistically, indicating a promising potential for ZnO-NPs in antitumor applications. PMID:22722055

  9. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by different metallic nanoparticles on human kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some manufactured nanoparticles are metal-based and have a wide variety of applications in electronic, engineering and medicine. Until now, many studies have described the potential toxicity of NPs on pulmonary target, while little attention has been paid to kidney which is considered to be a secondary target organ. The objective of this study, on human renal culture cells, was to assess the toxicity profile of metallic nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CdS) usable in industrial production. Comparative studies were conducted, to identify whether particle properties impact cytotoxicity by altering the intracellular oxidative status. Results Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, surface charge, dispersion and solubility. Cytotoxicity of NPs was then evaluated in IP15 (glomerular mesangial) and HK-2 (epithelial proximal) cell lines. ZnO and CdS NPs significantly increased the cell mortality, in a dose-dependent manner. Cytotoxic effects were correlated with the physicochemical properties of NPs tested and the cell type used. Analysis of reactive oxygen species and intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione revealed that particles induced stress according to their composition, size and solubility. Protein involved in oxidative stress such as NF-?b was activated with ZnO and CdS nanoparticles. Such effects were not observed with TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion On glomerular and tubular human renal cells, ZnO and CdS nanoparticles exerted cytotoxic effects that were correlated with metal composition, particle scale and metal solubility. ROS production and oxidative stress induction clearly indicated their nephrotoxic potential. PMID:21371295

  10. Induction of apoptosis in cancer cells by NiZn ferrite nanoparticles through mitochondrial cytochrome C release

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Rasedee, Abdullah; Flaifel, Moayad Husein; Ahmad, Sahrim Hj; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Alhassan, Fatah H; Taufiq-Yap, Yun H; Eid, Eltayeb EM; Arbab, Ismail Adam; Al-Asbahi, Bandar A; Webster, Thomas J; Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat El

    2013-01-01

    The long-term objective of the present study was to determine the ability of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles to kill cancer cells. NiZn ferrite nanoparticle suspensions were found to have an average hydrodynamic diameter, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of 254.2 ± 29.8 nm, 0.524 ± 0.013, and ?60 ± 14 mV, respectively. We showed that NiZn ferrite nanoparticles had selective toxicity towards MCF-7, HepG2, and HT29 cells, with a lesser effect on normal MCF 10A cells. The quantity of Bcl-2, Bax, p53, and cytochrome C in the cell lines mentioned above was determined by colorimetric methods in order to clarify the mechanism of action of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles in the killing of cancer cells. Our results indicate that NiZn ferrite nanoparticles promote apoptosis in cancer cells via caspase-3 and caspase-9, downregulation of Bcl-2, and upregulation of Bax and p53, with cytochrome C translocation. There was a concomitant collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential in these cancer cells when treated with NiZn ferrite nanoparticles. This study shows that NiZn ferrite nanoparticles induce glutathione depletion in cancer cells, which results in increased production of reactive oxygen species and eventually, death of cancer cells. PMID:24204141

  11. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24591829

  12. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24591829

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of Immune-Competent Human Cells Exposed to Engineered Zinc Oxide or Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Soile; Autio, Reija; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Arslan, Osman; Kunzmann, Andrea; Andersson-Willman, Britta; Wick, Peter; Mathur, Sanjay; Scheynius, Annika; Krug, Harald F.; Fadeel, Bengt; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive in vitro assessment of two commercial metal oxide nanoparticles, TiO2 and ZnO, was performed using human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM), monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC), and Jurkat T cell leukemia-derived cell line. TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be non-toxic whereas ZnO nanoparticles caused dose-dependent cell death. Subsequently, global gene expression profiling was performed to identify transcriptional response underlying the cytotoxicity caused by ZnO nanoparticles. Analysis was done with doses 1 µg/ml and 10 µg/ml after 6 and 24 h of exposure. Interestingly, 2703 genes were significantly differentially expressed in HMDM upon exposure to 10 µg/ml ZnO nanoparticles, while in MDDCs only 12 genes were affected. In Jurkat cells, 980 genes were differentially expressed. It is noteworthy that only the gene expression of metallothioneins was upregulated in all the three cell types and a notable proportion of the genes were regulated in a cell type-specific manner. Gene ontology analysis revealed that the top biological processes disturbed in HMDM and Jurkat cells were regulating cell death and growth. In addition, genes controlling immune system development were affected. Using a panel of modified ZnO nanoparticles, we obtained an additional support that the cellular response to ZnO nanoparticles is largely dependent on particle dissolution and show that the ligand used to modify ZnO nanoparticles modulates Zn2+ leaching. Overall, the study provides an extensive resource of transcriptional markers for mediating ZnO nanoparticle-induced toxicity for further mechanistic studies, and demonstrates the value of assessing nanoparticle responses through a combined transcriptomics and bioinformatics approach. PMID:23894303

  14. Monocytes, Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and THP-1 Cells Exhibit Different Cytokine Expression Patterns following Stimulation with Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Schildberger, Anita; Rossmanith, Eva; Eichhorn, Tanja; Strassl, Katharina; Weber, Viktoria

    2013-01-01

    THP-1 cells are widely applied to mimic monocytes in cell culture models. In this study, we compared the cytokine release from THP-1, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes, or whole blood after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and investigated the consequences of different cytokine profiles on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) activation. While Pseudomonas aeruginosa-stimulated (10?ng/mL) THP-1 secreted similar amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) as monocytes and PBMC, they produced lower amounts of interleukin(IL)-8 and no IL-6 and IL-10. Whole blood required a higher concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1000?ng/mL) to induce cytokine release than isolated monocytes or PBMC (10?ng/mL). HUVEC secreted more IL-6 and IL-8 after stimulation with conditioned medium derived from whole blood than from THP-1, despite equal concentrations of TNF-? in both media. Specific adsorption of TNF-? or selective cytokine adsorption from the conditioned media prior to HUVEC stimulation significantly reduced HUVEC activation. Our findings show that THP-1 differ from monocytes, PBMC, and whole blood with respect to cytokine release after stimulation with LPS. Additionally, we could demonstrate that adsorption of inflammatory mediators results in reduced endothelial activation, which supports the concept of extracorporeal mediator modulation as supportive therapy for sepsis. PMID:23818743

  15. Toxic Effect of Silica Nanoparticles on Endothelial Cells through DNA Damage Response via Chk1-Dependent G2/M Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Junchao; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Li, Yanbo; Zhou, Xianqing; Huang, Peili; Sun, Zhiwei

    2013-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles have become promising carriers for drug delivery or gene therapy. Endothelial cells could be directly exposed to silica nanoparticles by intravenous administration. However, the underlying toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells are still poorly understood. In order to clarify the cytotoxicity of endothelial cells induced by silica nanoparticles and its mechanisms, cellular morphology, cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as assessing cytotoxicity, resulted in a dose- and time- dependent manner. Silica nanoparticles-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation caused oxidative damage followed by the production of malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the inhibition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Both necrosis and apoptosis were increased significantly after 24 h exposure. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) decreased obviously in a dose-dependent manner. The degree of DNA damage including the percentage of tail DNA, tail length and Olive tail moment (OTM) were markedly aggravated. Silica nanoparticles also induced G2/M arrest through the upregulation of Chk1 and the downregulation of Cdc25C, cyclin B1/Cdc2. In summary, our data indicated that the toxic effect mechanisms of silica nanoparticles on endothelial cells was through DNA damage response (DDR) via Chk1-dependent G2/M checkpoint signaling pathway, suggesting that exposure to silica nanoparticles could be a potential hazards for the development of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23620807

  16. Size-Dependent Localization and Penetration of Ultrasmall Gold Nanoparticles in Cancer Cells, Multicellular Spheroids, and Tumors in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Keyang; Ma, Huili; Liu, Juan; Huo, Shuaidong; Kumar, Anil; Wei, Tuo; Zhang, Xu; Jin, Shubin; Gan, Yaling; Wang, Paul C.; He, Shengtai; Zhang, Xiaoning; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    This work demonstrated that ultrasmall gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) smaller than 10 nm display unique advantages over nanoparticles larger than 10 nm in terms of localization to, and penetration of, breast cancer cells, multicellular tumor spheroids, and tumors in mice. Au@tiopronin nanoparticles that have tunable sizes from 2 to 15 nm with identical surface coatings of tiopronin and charge were successfully prepared. For monolayer cells, the smaller the Au@tiopronin NPs, the more AuNPs found in each cell. In addition, the accumulation of Au NPs in the ex vivo tumor model was size-dependent: smaller AuNPs were able to penetrate deeply into tumor spheroids, whereas 15 nm nanoparticles were not. Owing to their ultrasmall nanostructure, 2 and 6 nm nanoparticles showed high levels of accumulation in tumor tissue in mice after a single intravenous injection. Surprisingly, both 2 and 6 nm Au@tiopronin nanoparticles were distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas 15 nm Au@tiopronin nanoparticles were found only in the cytoplasm, where they formed aggregates. The ex vivo multicellular spheroid proved to be a good model to simulate in vivo tumor tissue and evaluate nanoparticle penetration behavior. This work gives important insights into the design and functionalization of nanoparticles to achieve high levels of accumulation in tumors. PMID:22540892

  17. The use of dopamine-hyaluronate associate-coated maghemite nanoparticles to label cells.

    PubMed

    Babic, Michal; Horak, Daniel; Jendelova, Pavla; Herynek, Vit; Proks, Vladimir; Vanecek, Vaclav; Lesny, Petr; Sykova, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Sodium hyaluronate (HA) was associated with dopamine (DPA) and introduced as a coating for maghemite (?-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles obtained by the coprecipitation of iron(II) and iron(III) chlorides and oxidation with sodium hypochlorite. The effects of the DPA anchorage of HA on the ?-Fe(2)O(3) surface on the physicochemical properties of the resulting colloids were investigated. Nanoparticles coated at three different DPA-HA/?-Fe(2)O(3) and DPA/HA ratios were chosen for experiments with rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and human chondrocytes. The nanoparticles were internalized into rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via endocytosis as confirmed by Prussian Blue staining. The efficiency of mesenchymal stem cell labeling was analyzed. From among the investigated samples, efficient cell labeling was achieved by using DPA-HA-?-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles with DPA-HA/?-Fe(2)O(3) = 0.45 (weight/ weight) and DPA/HA = 0.038 (weight/weight) ratios. The particles were used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging for the labeling and visualization of cells. PMID:22619506

  18. Kefir exhibits anti?proliferative and pro?apoptotic effects on colon adenocarcinoma cells with no significant effects on cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Nathalie; El-Hayek, Stephany; Tarras, Omayr; El-Sabban, Marwan; El-Sibai, Mirvat; Rizk, Sandra

    2014-11-01

    Kefir, a fermented milk product, exhibits anti?tumoral activity in vivo; yet its mechanism of action remains elusive. Recent studies have focused on the mechanism of action of kefir on cancer cells in vitro. The current study aims at examining the effect of kefir on cell survival, proliferation, and motility of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Kefir's anti?cancer potential was tested on CRC cell lines, Caco?2 and HT?29, through cytotoxicity, proliferation, and apoptotic assays. The expression of certain genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis was measured using reverse transcriptase?polymerase chain reaction (RT?PCR) and western blotting. To assess the effect of kefir on cancer metastasis, wound?healing and time?lapse movies, in addition to collagen?based invasion assay, were used. The results show that cell?free fractions of kefir exhibit an anti?proliferative effect on Caco?2 and HT?29 cells. Analysis of DNA content by flow cytometry revealed the ability of kefir to induce cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Kefir was also found to induce apoptosis, as seen by cell death ELISA. Results from RT?PCR showed that kefir decreases the expression of transforming growth factor ? (TGF??); and transforming growth factor??1 (TGF??1) in HT?29 cells. Western blotting results revealed an upregulation in Bax:Bcl?2 ratio, confirming the pro?apoptotic effect of kefir, and an increase in p53 independent?p21 expression upon kefir treatment. MMP expression was not altered by kefir treatment. Furthermore, results from time?lapse motility movies, wound?healing, and invasion assays showed no effect on the motility of colorectal as well as breast (MCF?7 and MB?MDA?231) cancer cells upon kefir treatment. Our data suggest that kefir is able to inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis in HT?29 and Caco?2 CRC cells, yet it does not exhibit a significant effect on the motility and invasion of these cells in vitro. PMID:25189203

  19. Imaging Gold Nanoparticles in Living Cells Environments using Heterodyne Digital Holographic Microscopy

    E-print Network

    Warnasooriya, Nilanthi; Bun, Philippe; Tessier, Gilles; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Desbiolles, Pierre; Atlan, Michael; Abboud, Marie; Gross, Michel

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an imaging microscopic technique based on heterodyne digital holography where subwavelength-sized gold colloids can be imaged in cell environment. Surface cellular receptors of 3T3 mouse fibroblasts are labeled with 40 nm gold nanoparticles, and the biological specimen is imaged in a total internal reflection configuration with holographic microscopy. Due to a higher scattering efficiency of the gold nanoparticles versus that of cellular structures, accurate localization of a gold marker is obtained within a 3D mapping of the entire sample's scattered field, with a lateral precision of 5 nm and 100 nm in the x,y and in the z directions respectively, demonstrating the ability of holographic microscopy to locate nanoparticles in living cells environments.

  20. Enhancement of perovskite-based solar cells employing core-shell metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Saliba, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D; Sun, Yao; Shi, Xian; Wiesner, Ulrich; Snaith, Henry J

    2013-09-11

    Recently, inorganic and hybrid light absorbers such as quantum dots and organometal halide perovskites have been studied and applied in fabricating thin-film photovoltaic devices because of their low-cost and potential for high efficiency. Further boosting the performance of solution processed thin-film solar cells without detrimentally increasing the complexity of the device architecture is critically important for commercialization. Here, we demonstrate photocurrent and efficiency enhancement in meso-superstructured organometal halide perovskite solar cells incorporating core-shell Au@SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) delivering a device efficiency of up to 11.4%. We attribute the origin of enhanced photocurrent to a previously unobserved and unexpected mechanism of reduced exciton binding energy with the incorporation of the metal nanoparticles, rather than enhanced light absorption. Our findings represent a new aspect and lever for the application of metal nanoparticles in photovoltaics and could lead to facile tuning of exciton binding energies in perovskite semiconductors. PMID:23947387

  1. A study of shape optimization on the metallic nanoparticles for thin-film solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The shape of metallic nanoparticles used to enhance the performance of thin-film solar cells is described by Gielis' superformula and optimized by an evolutionary algorithm. As a result, we have found a lens-like nanoparticle capable of improving the short circuit current density to 19.93 mA/cm2. Compared with a two-scale nanospherical configuration recently reported to synthesize the merits of large and small spheres into a single structure, the optimized nanoparticle enables the solar cell to achieve a further 7.75% improvement in the current density and is much more fabrication friendly due to its simple shape and tolerance to geometrical distortions. PMID:24168131

  2. Vacuolar ATPase 'a2' isoform exhibits distinct cell surface accumulation and modulates matrix metalloproteinase activity in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Arpita; Katara, Gajendra K; Ibrahim, Safaa; Pamarthy, Sahithi; Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Gilman Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2015-02-28

    Tumor associated vacuolar H+-ATPases (V-ATPases) are multi-subunit proton pumps that acidify tumor microenvironment, thereby promoting tumor invasion. Subunit 'a' of its V0 domain is the major pH sensing unit that additionally controls sub-cellular targeting of V-ATPase and exists in four different isoforms. Our study reports an elevated expression of the V-ATPase-V0a2 isoform in ovarian cancer(OVCA) tissues and cell lines(A2780, SKOV-3 and TOV-112D). Among all V0'a' isoforms, V0a2 exhibited abundant expression on OVCA cell surface while normal ovarian epithelia did not. Sub-cellular distribution of V-ATPase-V0a2 confirmed its localization on plasma-membrane, where it was also co-associated with cortactin, an F-actin stabilizing protein at leading edges of cancer cells. Additionally, V0a2 was also localized in early and late endosomal compartments that are sites for modulations of several signaling pathways in cancer. Targeted inhibition of V-ATPase-V0a2 suppressed matrix metalloproteinase activity(MMP-9 & MMP-2) in OVCA cells. In conclusion, V-ATPase-V0a2 isoform is abundantly expressed on ovarian tumor cell surface in association with invasion assembly related proteins and plays critical role in tumor invasion by modulating the activity of matrix-degrading proteases. This study highlights for the first time, the importance of V-ATPase-V0a2 isoform as a distinct biomarker and possible therapeutic target for treatment of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:25686833

  3. Nanoparticle uptake and their co-localization with cell compartments - a confocal Raman microscopy study at single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrela-Lopis, I.; Romero, G.; Rojas, E.; Moya, S. E.; Donath, E.

    2011-07-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy, a non-invasive, non-destructive and label-free technique, was employed to study the uptake and localization of nanoparticles (NPs) in the Hepatocarcinoma human cell line HepG2 at the level of single cells. Cells were exposed to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the surface of which was engineered with polyelectrolytes and lipid layers, aluminium oxide and cerium dioxide nanoparticles. Raman spectra deconvolution was applied to obtain the spatial distributions of NPs together with lipids/proteins in cells. The colocalization of the NPs with different intracellular environments, lipid bodies, protein and DNA, was inferred. Lipid coated CNTs associated preferentially with lipid rich regions, whereas polyelectrolyte coated CNTs were excluded from lipid rich regions. Al2O3 NPs were found in the cytoplasm. CeO2 NPs were readily taken up and have been observed all over the cell. Raman z-scans proved the intracellular distribution of the respective NPs.

  4. Entire band absorption enhancement in double-side textured ultrathin solar cells by nanoparticle imprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Boyuan; Jia, Baohua; Fang, Jia; Hou, Guofu; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Min

    2015-06-01

    Entire band light management is crucial for amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cells, especially when the absorbing layer becomes ultrathin. Here, we propose and demonstrate a double-side texture strategy to effectively manage light in ultrathin solar cells via a simple and scalable nanoparticle imprinting technique. SiO2 nanoparticles are half embedded into the top surface of the solar cells to introduce the double-side texture. Using a solar cell with a 150 nm thick a-Si layer as an example, we observe significant enhancement over the entire absorption band of a-Si both theoretically and experimentally. A maximum short circuit current density enhancement as high as 43.9% has been achieved experimentally compared with a flat solar cell.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Measurements of Temperature and Cell Viability in Response to Nanoparticle Mediated Photothermal Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Jon R [ORNL; Rodgers, Amanda [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Harvie, Erica [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Carswell, William [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Torti, Suzy [Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Rylander, Christopher [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Rylander, Nichole M [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Nanoparticle enhanced photothermal therapy is a promising alternative to tumor resection. However, quantitative measurements of cellular response to these treatments are limited. This paper introduces a Bimodal Enhanced Analysis of Spatiotemporal Temperature (BEAST) algorithm to rapidly determine the viability of cancer cells in vitro following photothermal therapy alone or in combination with nanoparticles. Materials & Methods: To illustrate the capability of the BEAST viability algorithm, single wall carbon nanohorns were added to renal cancer (RENCA) cells in vitro and time-dependent spatial temperature maps measured with an infrared camera during laser therapy were correlated with post-treatment cell viability distribution maps obtained by cell-staining fluorescent microscopy. Conclusion: The BEAST viability algorithm accurately and rapidly determined the cell viability as function of time, space, and temperature.

  6. Mechanism of Cationic Nanoparticles and Cell-Penetrating Peptides Direct Translocate Across Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    Cationic Nanoparticles (NPs) and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are known effective intracellular delivery agents. These positively charged particles can bypass traditional endocytosis route to enter the cytosol, which is known as direct translocation. However, mechanism of direct translocation of both NPs and CPPs is not well understood. Using Coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulation, we found that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as well as HIV-1 Tat peptides can translocate across model biological membranes through nanoscale holes under a transmembrane (TM) potential. After the translocation, the TM is strongly weakened and the holes gradually reseal themselves, while the NPs/CPPs roam freely in the ``intracellular region.'' Both size and shape of the NPs/ CPPs are found to be a determine factor of their translocation behaviour, and the relationship between direct translocation and endocytosis is also discussed. The results provided here establish fundamental rules of direct translocation entry of NPs/CPPs, which may guide the rational design of cationic intracellular nanocarriers.

  7. Improving scattering layer through mixture of nanoporous spheres and nanoparticles in ZnO-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A scattering layer is utilized by mixing nanoporous spheres and nanoparticles in ZnO-based dye-sensitized solar cells. Hundred-nanometer-sized ZnO spheres consisting of approximately 35-nm-sized nanoparticles provide not only effective light scattering but also a large surface area. Furthermore, ZnO nanoparticles are added to the scattering layer to facilitate charge transport and increase the surface area as filling up large voids. The mixed scattering layer of nanoparticles and nanoporous spheres on top of the nanoparticle-based electrode (bilayer geometry) improves solar cell efficiency by enhancing both the short-circuit current (Jsc) and fill factor (FF), compared to the layer consisting of only nanoparticles or nanoporous spheres. PMID:24982606

  8. Dilemmas in the reliable estimation of the in-vitro cell viability in magnetic nanoparticle engineering: which tests and what protocols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, Clare; Wang, Lijun; Cheng, Woei Ping; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles [MNPs] made from iron oxides have many applications in biomedicine. Full understanding of the interactions between MNPs and mammalian cells is a critical issue for their applications. In this study, MNPs were coated with poly(ethylenimine) [MNP-PEI] and poly(ethylene glycol) [MNP-PEI-PEG] to provide a subtle difference in their surface charge and their cytotoxicity which were analysed by three standard cell viability assays: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium [MTS], CellTiter-Blue and CellTiter-Glo (Promega, Southampton, UK) in SH-SY5Y and RAW 264.7 cells The data were validated by traditional trypan blue exclusion. In comparison to trypan blue manual counting, the MTS and Titer-Blue assays appeared to have consistently overestimated the viability. The Titer-Glo also experienced a small overestimation. We hypothesise that interactions were occurring between the assay systems and the nanoparticles, resulting in incorrect cell viability evaluation. To further understand the cytotoxic effect of the nanoparticles on these cells, reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and cell membrane integrity were investigated. After pegylation, the MNP-PEI-PEG possessed a lower positive surface charge and exhibited much improved biocompatibility compared to MNP-PEI, as demonstrated not only by a higher cell viability, but also by a markedly reduced oxidative stress and cell membrane damage. These findings highlight the importance of assay selection and of dissection of different cellular responses in in-vitro characterisation of nanostructures.

  9. Human cardiac stem cells exhibit mesenchymal features and are maintained through Akt/GSK-3{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Tateishi, Kento [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]|[Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Ashihara, Eishi [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Honsho, Shoken [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]|[Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Takehara, Naofumi [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nomura, Tetsuyaital [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]|[Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Takahashi, Tomosaburo [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Ueyama, Tomomi [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Yamagishi, Masaaki; Yaku, Hitoshi [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan); Matsubara, Hiroaki [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]|[Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, Kyoto 602-8566 (Japan)]. E-mail: matsubah@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp; Oh, Hidemasa [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: hidemasa@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-01-19

    Recent evidence suggested that human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) may have the clinical application for cardiac repair; however, their characteristics and the regulatory mechanisms of their growth have not been fully investigated. Here, we show the novel property of hCSCs with respect to their origin and tissue distribution in human heart, and demonstrate the signaling pathway that regulates their growth and survival. Telomerase-active hCSCs were predominantly present in the right atrium and outflow tract of the heart (infant > adult) and had a mesenchymal cell-like phenotype. These hCSCs expressed the embryonic stem cell markers and differentiated into cardiomyocytes to support cardiac function when transplanted them into ischemic myocardium. Inhibition of Akt pathway impaired the hCSC proliferation and induced apoptosis, whereas inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) enhanced their growth and survival. We conclude that hCSCs exhibit mesenchymal features and that Akt/GSK-3{beta} may be crucial modulators for hCSC maintenance in human heart.

  10. Real-Time Nanoparticle–Cell Interactions in Physiological Media by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Particle–cell interactions in physiological media are important in determining the fate and transport of nanoparticles and biological responses to them. In this work, these interactions are assessed in real time using a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based platform. Industry-relevant CeO2 and Fe2O3 engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) of two primary particle sizes were synthesized by the flame spray pyrolysis (FSP) based Harvard Versatile Engineering Nanomaterials Generation System (Harvard VENGES) and used in this study. The ENPs were attached on AFM tips, and the atomic force between the tip and lung epithelia cells (A549), adhered on a substrate, was measured in biological media, with and without the presence of serum proteins. Two metrics were used to assess the nanoparticle cell: the detachment force required to separate the ENP from the cell and the number of bonds formed between the cell and the ENPs. The results indicate that these atomic level ENP–cell interaction forces strongly depend on the physiological media. The presence of serum proteins reduced both the detachment force and the number of bonds by approximately 50% indicating the important role of the protein corona on the particle cell interactions. Additionally, it was shown that particle to cell interactions were size and material dependent. PMID:25068097

  11. Surfaced-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell using gol nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong; Huang, Hao; Sun, Li-qing; Pan, Jian-ji; Chen, Wei-wei; Su, Ying; Feng, Shang-yuan; Li, Yong-zeng

    2010-11-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy of single living human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells(CNE-1) were tested and analyzed by gold nanoparticles incubation into cells. The characteristic Raman bands in the SERS spectra of living cells were tentatively assigned. Six obvious Raman bands (718, 1001, 1123, 1336, 1446, 1660 cm-1) were observed in the normal Raman spectroscopy of living CNE-1 cells. Colloidal gold nanoparticles that were introduced inside cells resulted in strongly enhanced Raman signals of the native chemical constituents of the cells, and over twenty SERS Raman bands were observed in the SERS spectroscopy of living CNE-1 cells. Four vibrations of the DNA backbone (1026, 1097, 1336 and 1585 cm-1) confirmed that some gold nanoparticles were able to enter the nucleus. The results showed that, based on colloidal gold, the SERS spectroscopy might provide a sensitive and structurally selective detecting method for native chemicals inside a cell, such as DNA and phenylalanine.

  12. The influence of yttrium dopant on the properties of anatase nanoparticles and the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingxin; Wang, Jinshu; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Hong; Jia, Xinjian; Su, Penglei

    2015-06-14

    TiO2 mesoporous nanoparticles (NPs) doped with yttrium (Y) ions are fabricated via an environmentally friendly and facile solvothermal method to serve as a photoanode for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption tests are used to characterize the influence of yttrium dopant on the properties of TiO2 NPs. The prepared Y-doped TiO2 NPs show the anatase phase and exhibit Ti-O-Y bonds. The photovoltaic performance is primarily associated with the morphological parameters of the NPs. At the optimum Y concentration of 3 at%, the short circuit current density increased from 13.20 to 15.74 mA cm(-2), full sun solar power conversion efficiencies increased from 6.09% up to 7.61% as compared to the blank DSSC. PMID:25978149

  13. Broadband light absorption enhancement in dye-sensitized solar cells with Au-Ag alloy popcorn nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuxiang; Cui, Kaiyu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation on the use of Au-Ag alloy popcorn-shaped nanoparticles (NPs) to realise the broadband optical absorption enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Both simulation and experimental results indicate that compared with regular plasmonic NPs, such as nano-spheres, irregular popcorn-shaped alloy NPs exhibit absorption enhancement over a broad wavelength range due to the excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) at different wavelengths. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSCs is enhanced by 16% from 5.26% to 6.09% by incorporating 2.38 wt% Au-Ag alloy popcorn NPs. Moreover, by adding a scattering layer on the exterior of the counter electrode, the popcorn NPs demonstrate an even stronger ability to increase the PCE by 32% from 5.94% to 7.85%, which results from the more efficient excitation of the LSP mode on the popcorn NPs. PMID:23817586

  14. Broadband light absorption enhancement in dye-sensitized solar cells with Au-Ag alloy popcorn nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuxiang; Cui, Kaiyu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation on the use of Au-Ag alloy popcorn-shaped nanoparticles (NPs) to realise the broadband optical absorption enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Both simulation and experimental results indicate that compared with regular plasmonic NPs, such as nano-spheres, irregular popcorn-shaped alloy NPs exhibit absorption enhancement over a broad wavelength range due to the excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) at different wavelengths. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSCs is enhanced by 16% from 5.26% to 6.09% by incorporating 2.38 wt% Au-Ag alloy popcorn NPs. Moreover, by adding a scattering layer on the exterior of the counter electrode, the popcorn NPs demonstrate an even stronger ability to increase the PCE by 32% from 5.94% to 7.85%, which results from the more efficient excitation of the LSP mode on the popcorn NPs.

  15. Using Magnetic Nanoparticles for Gene Transfer to Neural Stem Cells: Stem Cell Propagation Method Influences Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Mark R.; Adams, Christopher F.; Barraud, Perrine; Chari, Divya M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension “neurospheres” or 2-D adherent “monolayers”. MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields (“magnetofection technology”) mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population. PMID:25918990

  16. Gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation using fs and ps laser pulses for cell perforation and transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, D.; Schomaker, M.; Motekaitis, D.; Krawinkel, J.; Killian, D.; Escobar, H. M.; Junghanß, Christian; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    Manipulation of cells requires the delivery of membrane-impermeable substances like genetic materials or proteins into the cytoplasm. Thus delivery of molecules over the cell membrane barrier is one of the key technologies in molecular biology. Many techniques concerning especially the delivery foreign DNA have been developed. Notwithstanding there still is a range of applications where these standard techniques fail to raise the desired results due to low efficiencies, high toxicity or other safety issues. Especially the transfection of sensitive cell types like primary and stem cells can be problematic. Here we present an alternative, laser based technique to perforate the cell membrane and thus allowing efficient delivery of extra cellular molecules: Gold nanoparticles (GNP) are brought into close contact with the cell, were the laser-GNP interaction leads to membrane perforation. This allows the utilisation of a weakly focused laser beam leading to fast scanning of the sample and thus to a high throughput. To investigate the GNP-laser interaction in more detail we have compared membrane perforation obtained by different laser pulse lengths. From our results we assume strong light absorption for ps laser pulses and relatively small particles as the initiating perforation mechanism, whereas an enhanced near field scattering occurs at 200 nm GNP when using fs laser pulses. SEM and ESEM imaging were applied to give a deeper insight in the GNP-cell interaction and the effects of laser radiation on the GNP. Additionally dextran- FITC derivatives of varying sizes were used to investigate the impact of molecule size on delivery efficiency.

  17. Controlling the hydrophilicity and contact resistance of fuel cell bipolar plate surfaces using layered nanoparticle assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng Wang

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid nanostructured coatings exhibiting the combined properties of electrical conductivity and surface hydrophilicity were obtained by using Layer-by-Layer (LBL) assembly of cationic polymer, silica nanospheres, and carbon nanoplatelets. This work demonstrates that by controlling the nanoparticle zeta (zeta) potential through the suspension parameters (pH, organic solvent type and amount, and ionic content) as well as the assembly sequence, the nanostructure

  18. First principles study of the size effect of TiO2 anatase nanoparticles in dye-sensitized solar cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yinkai Lei; Huijun Liu; Wei Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Density of states of eight TiO2 anatase nanoparticles have been studied. The size effect of the TiO2 nanoparticles on the electron transport in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) has been investigated. For the small size nanoparticles (R < 2 nm), the smaller the particle is, the more the acceptable states locate at the bottom of the conduction band. As a result,

  19. Folate conjugated carboxymethyl chitosan–manganese doped zinc sulphide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and imaging of cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manjusha Elizabeth Mathew; Jithin C. Mohan; K. Manzoor; S. V. Nair; H. Tamura; R. Jayakumar

    2010-01-01

    We developed a novel folic acid (FA) conjugated carboxymethyl chitosan coordinated to manganese doped zinc sulphide quantum dot (FA–CMC–ZnS:Mn) nanoparticles. The system can be used for targeting, controlled drug delivery and also imaging of cancer cells. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using SEM, AFM, FT-IR, UV and DLS studies. The size range of 5-FU encapsulated FA–CMC–ZnS:Mn nanoparticles were from 130

  20. Targeting Diamond Nanoparticles into Folate-Receptor Expressing HeLa Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapina, V. A.; Vorobey, A. V.; Pavich, T. A.; Opitz, J.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied binding of synthesized folic acid-diamond nanoparticle conjugates to proliferatively active HeLa cells. In order to determine the binding of the complex to the cells, we used spectral luminescence methods and microscopy, which let us visualize localization of the conjugate in the cellular system in vitro. We show that the conjugate under study binds to folate-receptor expressing HeLa cells. We have established a determining role for the folate receptor in binding of the conjugate to the cells. Our studies suggest that is it possible to use the conjugate as a targeted nanoplatform for targeted delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to tumor cells.

  1. Synthesis of bombesin-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and their specific uptake in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Amanda L.; Hickey, Jennifer L.; Ablack, Amber L.; Lewis, John D.; Luyt, Leonard G.

    2011-01-01

    The imaging of molecular markers associated with disease offers the possibility for earlier detection and improved treatment monitoring. Receptors for gastrin-releasing peptide are overexpressed on prostate cancer cells offering a promising imaging target, and analogs of bombesin, an amphibian tetradecapeptide have been previously demonstrated to target these receptors. Therefore, the pan-bombesin analog [?-Ala11, Phe13, Nle14]bombesin-(7–14) was conjugated through a linker to dye-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for the development of a new potential magnetic resonance imaging probe. The peptide was conjugated via click chemistry, demonstrating a complementary alternative methodology to conventional peptide-nanoparticle conjugation strategies. The peptide-functionalized nanoparticles were then demonstrated to be selectively taken up by PC-3 prostate cancer cells relative to unfunctionalized nanoparticles and this uptake was inhibited by the presence of free peptide, confirming the specificity of the interaction. This study suggests that these nanoparticles have the potential to serve as magnetic resonance imaging probes for the detection of prostate cancer. PMID:22328862

  2. Immunomodulation of cystic fibrosis epithelial cells via NF-?B decoy oligonucleotide-coated polysaccharide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wardwell, Patricia R; Bader, Rebecca A

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling pathway is associated with enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators and is thought to play a critical role in diseases hallmarked by inflammation, including cystic fibrosis (CF). Small nucleic acids that interfere with gene expression have been proposed as promising therapeutics for a number of diseases. However, applications have been limited by low cellular penetration and a lack of stability. Nano-sized carrier systems have been suggested as a means of improving the effectiveness of nucleic acid-based treatments. In this study, we successfully coated polysialic acid-N-trimethyl chitosan (PSA-TMC) nanoparticles with NF-?? decoy oligonucleotides (ODNs). To demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity, the decoy ODN-coated PSA-TMC nanoparticles were administered to an in vitro model of CF generated via interleukin-1? or P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides stimulation of IB3-1 bronchial epithelial cells. While free ODN and PSA-TMC nanoparticles coated with scrambled ODNs did not have substantial impacts on the inflammatory response, the decoy ODN-coated PSA-TMC nanoparticles were able to reduce the secretion of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8, pro-inflammatory mediators of CF, by the epithelial cells, particularly at longer time points. In general, the results suggest that NF-?B decoy ODN-coated TMC-PSA nanoparticles may serve as an effective method of altering the pro-inflammatory environment associated with CF. PMID:25087735

  3. Angiopep-2 and activatable cell penetrating peptide dual modified nanoparticles for enhanced tumor targeting and penetrating.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ling; Zhang, Qianyu; Yang, Yuting; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2014-10-20

    Delivering chemotherapeutics by nanoparticles into tumor was influenced by at least two factors: specific targeting and highly efficient penetrating of the nanoparticles. In this study, two targeting ligands, angiopep-2 and activatable cell penetrating peptide (ACP), were functionalized onto nanoparticles for tumor targeting delivery. In this system, angiopep-2 is a ligand of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) which was highly expressed on tumor cells, and the ACP was constructed by the conjugation of RRRRRRRR (R8) with EEEEEEEE through a matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) sensitive linker, enabling the ACP with tumor microenvironment-responsive cell penetrating property. 4h incubation of ACP with MMP-2 leads to over 80% cleavage of ACP, demonstrating ACP indeed possessed MMP-2 responsive property. The constructed dual targeting nanoparticles (AnACNPs) were approximately 110 nm with a polydispersity index of 0.231. In vitro, ACP modification and angiopep-2 modification could both enhance the U-87 MG cell uptake because of the high expression of MMP-2 and LRP-1 on C6 cells. AnACNPs showed higher uptake level than the single ligand modified nanoparticles. The uptake of all particles was time- and concentration-dependent and endosomes were involved. In vivo, AnACNPs showed best tumor targeting efficiency. The distribution of AnACNPs in tumor was higher than all the other particles. After microvessel staining with anti-CD31 antibody, the fluorescent distribution demonstrated AnACNPs could distribute in the whole tumor with the highest intensity. In conclusion, a novel drug delivery system was developed for enhanced tumor dual targeting and elevated cell internalization. PMID:25138251