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Sample records for nanophotonics active photonic

  1. Nano-photonics: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    2010-04-01

    Nanotech is at the scale of 10-9 meters, located at the mesocopic transition phase, which can take both classical mechanics (CM) and quantum mechanics (QM) descriptions bridging ten orders of magnitude phenomena, between the microscopic world of a single atom at 10-10 meters with the macroscopic world at meters. However, QM principles aid the understanding of any unusual property at the nanotech level. The other major difference between nano-photonics and other forms of optics is that the nano-scale is not very 'hands on'. For the most part, we will not be able to see the components with our naked eyes, but will be required to use some nanotech imaging tools, as follows:

  2. Active oxide nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, Matthew J.

    Materials that can be manipulated electrically or mechanically to induce a change in their intrinsic properties are highly relevant when suitably integrated with current technologies. These "active" materials, such as oxide-based ferroelectrics or materials with easily accessible changes of phase, find extensive use as mechanical resonators, solid-state memories, and optical modulators. Barium titanate, a tetragonal ferroelectric at room temperature, is a prime example of a material both mechanically and optically active. This thesis deals primarily with the deposition of active, oxide-based materials and their integration into device structures where either the mechanical or optical properties are exploited. The technologically interesting paradigms within which these active oxide materials have been investigated are microelectromechanical systems, plasmonics, and metamaterials. Microelectromechanical systems are devices that have been micromachined and rely on an applied voltage to induce a mechanical response. Mechanically active materials, such as piezoelectrics or ferroelectrics, can increase the response of these devices. Plasmonics deals with electromagnetic waves resonantly coupled into free electron oscillations at a metal-dielectric interface or metal nanoparticle. Coupling to these resonant modes allows surface plasmon polaritons to propagate along the metal with a nonlinear dispersion. Metamaterials are ordered, subwavelength, metal inclusions in a dielectric, which respond collectively to electromagnetic radiation. This response can yield a material permittivity or permeability not found in nature. The optical properties of metamaterials lead to effects such as negative index response and super lensing, and can be used to design optical cloaking structures. Here, devices utilizing these effects are investigated with an eye toward tuning or switching their resonant response using optically active oxide thin films. This manuscript follows the evolution

  3. Nano-photonic Light Trapping In Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Dennis M., Jr.

    Over the last several decades there have been significant advances in the study and understanding of light behavior in nanoscale geometries. Entire fields such as those based on photonic crystals, plasmonics and metamaterials have been developed, accelerating the growth of knowledge related to nanoscale light manipulation. Coupled with recent interest in cheap, reliable renewable energy, a new field has blossomed, that of nanophotonic solar cells. In this thesis, we examine important properties of thin-film solar cells from a nanophotonics perspective. We identify key differences between nanophotonic devices and traditional, thick solar cells. We propose a new way of understanding and describing limits to light trapping and show that certain nanophotonic solar cell designs can have light trapping limits above the so called ray-optic or ergodic limit. We propose that a necessary requisite to exceed the traditional light trapping limit is that the active region of the solar cell must possess a local density of optical states (LDOS) higher than that of the corresponding, bulk material. Additionally, we show that in addition to having an increased density of states, the absorber must have an appropriate incoupling mechanism to transfer light from free space into the optical modes of the device. We outline a portfolio of new solar cell designs that have potential to exceed the traditional light trapping limit and numerically validate our predictions for select cases. We emphasize the importance of thinking about light trapping in terms of maximizing the optical modes of the device and efficiently coupling light into them from free space. To further explore these two concepts, we optimize patterns of superlattices of air holes in thin slabs of Si and show that by adding a roughened incoupling layer the total absorbed current can be increased synergistically. We suggest that the addition of a random scattering surface to a periodic patterning can increase incoupling by

  4. Photon manipulation in silicon nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaari, Ali Wanis

    2011-12-01

    CD8+ T cells are the branch of the adaptive immune system responsible for recognizing and killing tumor cells or cells infected with intracellular pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes (LM). However, when CD8+ T cells target our own tissues, they can cause autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis. For CD8+ T cells to fulfill these functions, the T cell receptors (TCRs) on CD8+ T cells must recognize pathogens or antigens presented on the surface of target cells. TCR ligation triggers multiple signaling pathways that lead to the activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The goal of our research is to define the TCR-proximal signaling events that regulate CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity. To accomplish this goal, we are focusing on an adaptor protein Gads, which is critical for optimal TCR-mediated calcium mobilization. We reported the first analysis of the function of Gads in peripheral naive CD8+ T cells. To examine the function of Gads in CD8+ T cell mediated immune responses, we crossed Gads-/- mice with mice expressing an MHC class I-restricted transgenic TCR recognizing ovalbumin (OVA). The transgenic mice are called ovalbumin-specific T cell receptor-major histocompatibility complex class I restricted (OT-I) mice. We investigated the effect of Gads on the proliferation of CD8+ T cells following stimulation with peptide antigen in vivo and in vitro. We stimulated splenocytes from Gads+/+ OT-I and Gads -/- OT-I mice with the peptide agonist. The experiments revealed that Gads is required for optimal proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The regulation of Gads is most evident at the early time points of proliferation. Then we demonstrated that Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have impaired TCR-mediated exit from G0 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have delayed expression of c-myc and the activation markers CD69 and CD25, upon stimulation with peptide antigen. Next, we investigated how Gads affects CD8+ T cell

  5. Photon manipulation in silicon nanophotonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaari, Ali Wanis

    2011-12-01

    CD8+ T cells are the branch of the adaptive immune system responsible for recognizing and killing tumor cells or cells infected with intracellular pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes (LM). However, when CD8+ T cells target our own tissues, they can cause autoimmune diseases, such as type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis. For CD8+ T cells to fulfill these functions, the T cell receptors (TCRs) on CD8+ T cells must recognize pathogens or antigens presented on the surface of target cells. TCR ligation triggers multiple signaling pathways that lead to the activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The goal of our research is to define the TCR-proximal signaling events that regulate CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity. To accomplish this goal, we are focusing on an adaptor protein Gads, which is critical for optimal TCR-mediated calcium mobilization. We reported the first analysis of the function of Gads in peripheral naive CD8+ T cells. To examine the function of Gads in CD8+ T cell mediated immune responses, we crossed Gads-/- mice with mice expressing an MHC class I-restricted transgenic TCR recognizing ovalbumin (OVA). The transgenic mice are called ovalbumin-specific T cell receptor-major histocompatibility complex class I restricted (OT-I) mice. We investigated the effect of Gads on the proliferation of CD8+ T cells following stimulation with peptide antigen in vivo and in vitro. We stimulated splenocytes from Gads+/+ OT-I and Gads -/- OT-I mice with the peptide agonist. The experiments revealed that Gads is required for optimal proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The regulation of Gads is most evident at the early time points of proliferation. Then we demonstrated that Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have impaired TCR-mediated exit from G0 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, Gads-/- CD8+ T cells have delayed expression of c-myc and the activation markers CD69 and CD25, upon stimulation with peptide antigen. Next, we investigated how Gads affects CD8+ T cell

  6. Photonic Crystals from Order to Disorder: Perturbative Methods in Nanophotonics

    ScienceCinema

    Johnson, Steven G. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    Photonic crystals are periodic dielectric structures in which light can behave much differently than in a homogeneous medium. This talk gives an overview of some of the interesting properties and applications of these media, from switching in subwavelength microcavities to slow-light devices, to guiding light in air. However, some of the most interesting and challenging problems occur when the periodicity is disturbed, either by design or by inevitable fabrication imperfections. The talk focuses especially on small perturbations that have important effects, from slow-light tapers to surface roughness disorder, and will show that many classic perturbative approaches must be rethought for high-contrast nanophotonics. The combination of strong periodicity with large field discontinuities at interfaces causes standard methods to fail, but succumbs to new generalizations, while some problems remain open.

  7. Efficient photon triplet generation in integrated nanophotonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Michael G; Herrera, Felipe; Griesse-Nascimento, Sarah; Reshef, Orad; Evans, Christopher C; Guerreschi, Gian Giacomo; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Mazur, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Generation of entangled photons in nonlinear media constitutes a basic building block of modern photonic quantum technology. Current optical materials are severely limited in their ability to produce three or more entangled photons in a single event due to weak nonlinearities and challenges achieving phase-matching. We use integrated nanophotonics to enhance nonlinear interactions and develop protocols to design multimode waveguides that enable sustained phase-matching for third-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion (TOSPDC). We predict a generation efficiency of 0.13 triplets/s/mW of pump power in TiO2-based integrated waveguides, an order of magnitude higher than previous theoretical and experimental demonstrations. We experimentally verify our device design methods in TiO2 waveguides using third-harmonic generation (THG), the reverse process of TOSPDC that is subject to the same phase-matching constraints. We finally discuss the effect of finite detector bandwidth and photon losses on the energy-time coherence properties of the expected TOSPDC source. PMID:27137604

  8. Nanophotonics for Optoelectronic Devices: Extrinsic Silicon Photonic Receivers and Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grote, Richard R.

    The demand for high data rate communications and renewable energy sources has led to new materials and platforms for optoelectronic devices, which require nanometer scale feature sizes. Devices that operate in the visible and near-infrared commonly have active areas with dimensions on the order of the diffraction limit ( l2n , where lambda is the free space wavelength and n is the index of refraction), for which the ray optics modeling techniques and bulk focusing optics traditionally used in optoelectronic device design are no longer applicable. In this subwavelength regime, nanophotonic light-trapping strategies are required to localize electromagnetic fields in the active area. This dissertation details the application of nanophotonics to two optoelectronic systems: extrinsic photodetectors for silicon photonics and light-trapping in organic photovoltaics. Error-free reception of 10 Gb/s data at lambda = 1.55 mum is demonstrated with a Si+ ion-implanted silicon waveguide photodiode. To mitigate the relatively small absorption coefficient of ion-implanted silicon, resonant cavity enhancement using in-line Fabry-Perot and 1D photonic crystal cavities, as well as slow light enhancement using a coupled resonator optical waveguide are discussed. The extension of these photodiodes to the mid-infrared is demonstrated using Zn+ implantation to detect over a range of lambda = 2.2-2.4 mum, and a new method for modulation and switching in integrated optics by using interference in a resonant cavity, termed coherent perfect loss (CPL), is presented. Finally, the upper limit of nanophotonic light trapping is derived for organic photovoltaics with material anisotropy included.

  9. Organic nanophotonic materials: the relationship between excited-state processes and photonic performances.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2016-07-12

    Nanophotonics have recently captured broad attention because of their great potential in information processing and communication, which may allow rates and bandwidth beyond what is feasible in the realm of electronics. Organic materials could be well suitable for such applications due to their ability to generate, transmit, modulate and detect light in their lightweight and flexible nanoarchitectures. Their distinct nanophotonic properties strongly depend on their extrinsic morphologies and intrinsic molecular excited-state processes. In this feature article, we mainly focus on a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between molecular excited-state processes and the advanced photonic functionalities of organic micro/nano-crystals in recent organic nanophotonic research, and then expect to provide enlightenment for the design and development of tiny photonic devices with broadband tunable properties by tailoring the excited-state processes of organic microcrystals. PMID:26883812

  10. Nanophotonic Filters and Integrated Networks in Flexible 2D Polymer Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xuetao; Clevenson, Hannah; Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Li, Luozhou; Englund, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Polymers have appealing optical, biochemical, and mechanical qualities, including broadband transparency, ease of functionalization, and biocompatibility. However, their low refractive indices have precluded wavelength-scale optical confinement and nanophotonic applications in polymers. Here, we introduce a suspended polymer photonic crystal (SPPC) architecture that enables the implementation of nanophotonic structures typically limited to high-index materials. Using the SPPC platform, we demonstrate nanophotonic band-edge filters, waveguides, and nanocavities featuring quality (Q) factors exceeding 2, 300 and mode volumes (Vmode) below 1.7(λ/n)3. The unprecedentedly high Q/Vmode ratio results in a spectrally selective enhancement of radiative transitions of embedded emitters via the cavity Purcell effect with an enhancement factor exceeding 100. Moreover, the SPPC architecture allows straightforward integration of nanophotonic networks, shown here by a waveguide-coupled cavity drop filter with sub-nanometer spectral resolution. The nanoscale optical confinement in polymer promises new applications ranging from optical communications to organic opto-electronics, and nanophotonic polymer sensors. PMID:23828320

  11. Quantum nanophotonics: Controlling a photon with a single spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waks, Edo

    The implementation of quantum network and distributive quantum computation replies on strong interactions between stationary matter qubits and flying photons. The spin of a single electron confined in a quantum dot is considered as a promising matter qubit as it possesses microsecond coherence time and allows picosecond timescale control using optical pulses. The quantum dot spin can also interact with a photon by controlling the optical response of a strongly coupled cavity. In this talk I will discuss our recent work on an experimental realization of a spin-photon quantum phase switch using a single spin in a quantum dot strongly coupled to a photonic crystal cavity. We show large modulation of the cavity reflection spectrum by manipulating the spin states of the quantum dot, which enables us to control the quantum state of a reflected photon. We also show the complementary effect where the presence of a single photon switches the quantum state of the spin. The reported spin-photon quantum phase operation can switch spin or photon states in picoseconds timescale, representing an important step towards GHz semiconductor based quantum logic devices on-a-chip and solid-state implementations of quantum networks. Shuo Sun, Hyochul Kim, Glenn Solomon, co-authors.

  12. 2D materials for photon conversion and nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.

    2015-09-01

    The field of two-dimensional (2D) materials has the potential to enable unique applications across a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. While 2D-layered materials hold promise for next-generation photon-conversion intrinsic limitations and challenges exist that shall be overcome. Here we discuss the intrinsic limitations as well as application opportunities of this new class of materials, and is sponsored by the NSF program Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program, which links to the President's Materials Genome Initiative. We present general material-related details for photon conversion, and show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling MoS2/graphene/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for solar absorption up to 90%.

  13. Nanophotonic reservoir computing with photonic crystal cavities to generate periodic patterns.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Martin Andre Agnes; Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Wyffels, Francis; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) is a technique in machine learning inspired by neural systems. RC has been used successfully to solve complex problems such as signal classification and signal generation. These systems are mainly implemented in software, and thereby they are limited in speed and power efficiency. Several optical and optoelectronic implementations have been demonstrated, in which the system has signals with an amplitude and phase. It is proven that these enrich the dynamics of the system, which is beneficial for the performance. In this paper, we introduce a novel optical architecture based on nanophotonic crystal cavities. This allows us to integrate many neurons on one chip, which, compared with other photonic solutions, closest resembles a classical neural network. Furthermore, the components are passive, which simplifies the design and reduces the power consumption. To assess the performance of this network, we train a photonic network to generate periodic patterns, using an alternative online learning rule called first-order reduced and corrected error. For this, we first train a classical hyperbolic tangent reservoir, but then we vary some of the properties to incorporate typical aspects of a photonics reservoir, such as the use of continuous-time versus discrete-time signals and the use of complex-valued versus real-valued signals. Then, the nanophotonic reservoir is simulated and we explore the role of relevant parameters such as the topology, the phases between the resonators, the number of nodes that are biased and the delay between the resonators. It is important that these parameters are chosen such that no strong self-oscillations occur. Finally, our results show that for a signal generation task a complex-valued, continuous-time nanophotonic reservoir outperforms a classical (i.e., discrete-time, real-valued) leaky hyperbolic tangent reservoir (normalized root-mean-square errors=0.030 versus NRMSE=0.127). PMID:24807033

  14. Nano-photonic phenomena in van der Waals heterostructures (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basov, Dmitri N.

    2015-09-01

    van der Waals (vdW) crystals consist of individual atomic planes coupled by vdW interaction, similar to graphene monolayers in bulk graphite. We investigated van der Waals heterostructures assembled from atomically thin layers of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). We launched, detected and imaged plasmonic, phonon polaritonic and hybrid plasmon-phonon polariton waves in a setting of an antenna based nano-infrared apparatus. Hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hBN enabled sub-diffractional focusing in infrared frequencies. Because electronic, plasmonic and phonon polaritonic properties in van der Waals heterstructures are intertwined, gate voltage and/or details of layer assembly enable efficient control of nano-photonic effects.

  15. Deposited amorphous silicon-on-insulator technology for nano-photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Selvaraja, Shankar; Schaekers, Marc; Bogaerts, Wim; Van Thourhout, Dries

    2014-02-01

    Low-loss deposited amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) layers for nano-photonic integrated circuit have been prepared using complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible technology. Waveguide loss as low as 3.45 dB/cm is reported for films deposited at a low temperature (300 °C) using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process. The influence of the deposition parameters such as gas dilution, plasma power and pressure on the quality of the deposited material is thoroughly characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. We show that the optical quality of the deposited film can be directly assessed from distinct frequency bands (2090, 2000 and 840 cm-1) using FTIR, without the need for further waveguide loss measurements.

  16. Nanophotonic photon echo memory based on rare-earth-doped crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Tian; Kindem, Jonathan; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei; Caltech nano quantum optics Team

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth ions (REIs) are promising candidates for implementing solid-state quantum memories and quantum repeater devices. Their high spectral stability and long coherence times make REIs a good choice for integration in an on-chip quantum nano-photonic platform. We report the coupling of the 883 nm transition of Neodymium (Nd) to a Yttrium orthosilicate (YSO) photonic crystal nano-beam resonator, achieving Purcell enhanced spontaneous emission by 21 times and increased optical absorption. Photon echoes were observed in nano-beams of different doping concentrations, yielding optical coherence times T2 up to 80 μs that are comparable to unprocessed bulk samples. This indicates the remarkable coherence properties of Nd are preserved during nanofabrication, therefore opening the possibility of efficient on-chip optical quantum memories. The nano-resonator with mode volume of 1 . 6(λ / n) 3 was fabricated using focused ion beam, and a quality factor of 3200 was measured. Purcell enhanced absorption of 80% by an ensemble of ~ 1 × 106 ions in the resonator was measured, which fulfills the cavity impedance matching condition that is necessary to achieve quantum storage of photons with unity efficiency.

  17. Nanophotonic technologies for innovative all- optical signal processor using photonic crystals and quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Y.; Ikeda, N.; Ozaki, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Asakawa, K.; Ohkouchi, S.; Nakamura, S.

    2009-06-29

    GaAs-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (2DPC) slab waveguides (WGs) and InAs quantum dots (QDs) were developed for key photonic device structures in the future. An ultrasmall and ultrafast symmetrical Mach-Zehnder (SMZ)-type all-optical switch (PC-SMZ) and an optical flip-flop device (PC-FF) have been developed based on these nanophotonic structures for an ultrafast digital photonic network. To realize these devices, two important techniques were developed. One is a new simulation method, i.e., topology optimization method of 2DPC WGs with wide/flat bandwidth, high transmittance and low reflectivity. Another is a new selective-area-growth method, i.e., metal-mask molecular beam epitaxy method of InAs QDs. This technique contributes to achieving high-density and highly uniform InAs QDs in a desired area such as an optical nonlinearity-induced phase shift arm in the PC-FF. Furthermore, as a unique site-controlled QD technique, a nano-jet probe method is also developed for positioning QDs at the centre of the optical nonlinearity-induced phase shift arm.

  18. Atomic-scale photonic hybrids for mid-infrared and terahertz nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Joshua D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Tischler, Joseph G.; Glembocki, Orest J.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.; Reinecke, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The field of nanophotonics focuses on the ability to confine light to nanoscale dimensions, typically much smaller than the wavelength of light. The goal is to develop light-based technologies that are impossible with traditional optics. Subdiffractional confinement can be achieved using either surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) or surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs). SPPs can provide a gate-tunable, broad-bandwidth response, but suffer from high optical losses; whereas SPhPs offer a relatively low-loss, crystal-dependent optical response, but only over a narrow spectral range, with limited opportunities for active tunability. Here, motivated by the recent results from monolayer graphene and multilayer hexagonal boron nitride heterostructures, we discuss the potential of electromagnetic hybrids -- materials incorporating mixtures of SPPs and SPhPs -- for overcoming the limitations of the individual polaritons. Furthermore, we also propose a new type of atomic-scale hybrid the crystalline hybrid -- where mixtures of two or more atomic-scale (~3 nm or less) polar dielectric materials lead to the creation of a new material resulting from hybridized optic phonon behaviour of the constituents, potentially allowing direct control over the dielectric function. These atomic-scale hybrids expand the toolkit of materials for mid-infrared to terahertz nanophotonics and could enable the creation of novel actively tunable, yet low-loss optics at the nanoscale.

  19. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W.H.P.; Schuck, C.; Minaeva, O.; Li, M.; Goltsman, G.N.; Sergienko, A.V.; Tang, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  20. Photonic Band Gap Structures as a Gateway to Nano-Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    FRITZ, IAN J.; GOURLEY, PAUL L.; HAMMONS, G.; HIETALA, VINCENT M.; JONES, ERIC D.; KLEM, JOHN F.; KURTZ, SHARON L.; LIN, SHAWN-YU; LYO, SUNGKWUN K.; VAWTER, GREGORY A.; WENDT, JOEL R.

    1999-08-01

    This LDRD project explored the fundamental physics of a new class of photonic materials, photonic bandgap structures (PBG), and examine its unique properties for the design and implementation of photonic devices on a nano-meter length scale for the control and confinement of light. The low loss, highly reflective and quantum interference nature of a PBG material makes it one of the most promising candidates for realizing an extremely high-Q resonant cavity, >10,000, for optoelectronic applications and for the exploration of novel photonic physics, such as photonic localization, tunneling and modification of spontaneous emission rate. Moreover, the photonic bandgap concept affords us with a new opportunity to design and tailor photonic properties in very much the same way we manipulate, or bandgap engineer, electronic properties through modern epitaxy.

  1. Efficient and low-noise single-photon-level frequency conversion interfaces using silicon nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Davanço, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-06-01

    Optical frequency conversion has applications ranging from tunable light sources to telecommunications-band interfaces for quantum information science. Here, we demonstrate efficient, low-noise frequency conversion on a nanophotonic chip through four-wave-mixing Bragg scattering in compact (footprint <0.5 × 10–4 cm2) Si3N4 microring resonators. We investigate three frequency conversion configurations: spectral translation over a few nanometres within the 980 nm band; upconversion from 1,550 nm to 980 nm and downconversion from 980 nm to 1,550 nm. With conversion efficiencies ranging from 25% for the first process to >60% for the last two processes, a signal conversion bandwidth of >1 GHz, a required continuous-wave pump power of <60 mW and background noise levels between a few femtowatts and a few picowatts, these devices are suitable for quantum frequency conversion of single-photon states from InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Simulations based on coupled mode equations and the Lugiato–Lefever equation are used to model device performance, and show quantitative agreement with measurements.

  2. Diamond nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Beha, Katja; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition. PMID:23365803

  3. Nanophotonics of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: Two-dimensional photonic crystals and optical dipole antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and related nanostructures represent a novel class of condensed matters with intriguing properties due to their unique atomic structures and nanoscale morphologies. It is of particular interest to examine the interaction behavior and mechanism between the free electron gas within carbon nanotubes and the external electromagnetic wave, which may greatly facilitate the understanding of the physics of nanophotonics at the fundamental level. This dissertation is committed to investigate the optical responses of arrays of vertically aligned CNTs in different configurations, based on their fabrication by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and other techniques involved therein. The mechanisms of the photonic results are categorized into inter-CNT and intra-CNT contributions through data analysis on periodic and random CNT arrays, which then give rise to practical applications in photonic crystals and optical antennas. The growth and fabrication procedure of vertically aligned CNTs with optimized morphology and well-defined arrangement is first elaborated in this dissertation, owing to the tremendous difficulties encountered and efforts paid during the sample fabrication and optimization process, and the dominant effect of sample quality on the final results at the optical characterization stage. To fabricate periodic CNT arrays, a microsphere self-assembly technique is first adopted for catalyst patterning and a parametric study is carried out systematically for CNT growth by PECVD method. For random CNT arrays, the growth conditions are also modified so that small diameter CNTs can be grown and an IC industry-compatible procedure can be developed for practical application purposes. The inter-scatterer optical responses are studied by using hexagonal lattices of vertically aligned CNTs with various lattice constants and CNT morphologies. The diffraction patterns of theses CNT arrays are recorded and compared to theoretical

  4. Nano-photonic organic solar cell architecture for advanced light management utilizing dual photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2015-09-01

    Organic solar cells have rapidly increasing efficiencies, but typically absorb less than half of the incident solar spectrum. To increase broadband light absorption, we rigorously design experimentally realizable solar cell architectures based on dual photonic crystals. Our optimized architecture consists of a polymer microlens at the air-glass interface, coupled with a photonic-plasmonic crystal at the metal cathode. The microlens focuses light on the periodic nanostructure that generates strong light diffraction. Waveguiding modes and surface plasmon modes together enhance long wavelength absorption in P3HT-PCBM. The architecture has a period of 500 nm, with absorption and photocurrent enhancement of 49% and 58%, respectively.

  5. Photonics and Nanophotonics and Information and Communication Technologies in Modern Food Packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapulova, Olha; Sherstiuk, Valentyn; Shvalagin, Vitaliy; Kukhta, Aleksander

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of the problem of conjunction of information and communication technologies (ICT) with packaging industry and food production was made. The perspective of combining the latest advances of nanotechnology, including nanophotonics, and ICT for creating modern smart packaging was shown. There were investigated luminescent films with zinc oxide nanoparticles, which change luminescence intensity as nano-ZnO interacts with decay compounds of food products, for active and intelligent packaging. High luminescent transparent films were obtained from colloidal suspension of ZnO and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The influence of molecular mass, concentration of nano-ZnO, and film thickness on luminescent properties of films was studied in order to optimize the content of the compositions. The possibility of covering the obtained films with polyvinyl alcohol was considered for eliminating water soluble properties of PVP. The luminescent properties of films with different covers were studied. The insoluble in water composition based on ZnO stabilized with colloidal silicon dioxide and PVP in polymethylmethacrylate was developed, and the luminescent properties of films were investigated. The compositions are non-toxic, safe, and suitable for applying to the inner surface of active and intelligent packaging by printing techniques, such as screen printing, flexography, inkjet, and pad printing.

  6. Photonics and nanophotonics and information and communication technologies in modern food packaging.

    PubMed

    Sarapulova, Olha; Sherstiuk, Valentyn; Shvalagin, Vitaliy; Kukhta, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the problem of conjunction of information and communication technologies (ICT) with packaging industry and food production was made. The perspective of combining the latest advances of nanotechnology, including nanophotonics, and ICT for creating modern smart packaging was shown. There were investigated luminescent films with zinc oxide nanoparticles, which change luminescence intensity as nano-ZnO interacts with decay compounds of food products, for active and intelligent packaging. High luminescent transparent films were obtained from colloidal suspension of ZnO and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The influence of molecular mass, concentration of nano-ZnO, and film thickness on luminescent properties of films was studied in order to optimize the content of the compositions. The possibility of covering the obtained films with polyvinyl alcohol was considered for eliminating water soluble properties of PVP. The luminescent properties of films with different covers were studied. The insoluble in water composition based on ZnO stabilized with colloidal silicon dioxide and PVP in polymethylmethacrylate was developed, and the luminescent properties of films were investigated. The compositions are non-toxic, safe, and suitable for applying to the inner surface of active and intelligent packaging by printing techniques, such as screen printing, flexography, inkjet, and pad printing. PMID:26034421

  7. Single-photon transport through an atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a single-photon pulse traveling through a linear atomic chain coupled to a one-dimensional (1D) single mode photonic waveguide. We derive a time-dependent dynamical theory for this collective many-body system which allows us to study the real time evolution of the photon transport and the atomic excitations. Our analytical result is consistent with previous numerical calculations when there is only one atom. For an atomic chain, the collective interaction between the atoms mediated by the waveguide mode can significantly change the dynamics of the system. The reflectivity of a photon can be tuned by changing the ratio of coupling strength and the photon linewidth or by changing the number of atoms in the chain. The reflectivity of a single-photon pulse with finite bandwidth can even approach 100 % . The spectrum of the reflected and transmitted photon can also be significantly different from the single-atom case. Many interesting physical phenomena can occur in this system such as the photonic band-gap effects, quantum entanglement generation, Fano-like interference, and superradiant effects. For engineering, this system may serve as a single-photon frequency filter, single-photon modulation, and may find important applications in quantum information.

  8. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  9. Nanophotonics: Dressed Photon Technology for Qualitatively Innovative Optical Devices, Fabrication, and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, Motoichi

    This chapter reviews the theoretical picture of the dressed photon by combining the concepts of quantum field theory, optical science, and condensed-matter physics. Based on the exchange of dressed photons, energy transfer to an electric dipole-forbidden energy level is described. Furthermore, the possibility of coupling a dressed photon with a coherent phonon is presented, revealing a novel phonon-assisted process in light-matter interactions in nanometric space. Applications to qualitatively innovative optical devices, fabrication techniques, energy conversion, and systems are exemplified.

  10. High efficiency light conversion between micro- and nano-photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically demonstrate a tapered waveguide that is compatible with a silicon waveguide and hybrid plasmonic waveguide simultaneously. As much as 90% of the energy can be transferred from the photonic mode to plasmonic mode and vice versa.

  11. Nano-photonics in III-V semiconductors for integrated quantum optical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasley, Nicholas Andrew

    This thesis describes the optical spectroscopic measurements of III-V semiconductors used to investigate a number of issues related to the development of integrated quantum optical circuits. The disorder-limited propagation of photons in photonic crystal waveguides in the slow-light regime is investigated. The analysis of Fabry-Perot resonances is used to map the mode dispersion and extract the photon localisation length. Andersonlocalised modes are observed at high group indices, when the localisation lengths are shorter than the waveguide lengths, consistent with the Fabry-Perot analysis. A spin-photon interface based on two orthogonal waveguides is introduced, where the polarisation emitted by a quantum dot is mapped to a path-encoded photon. Operation is demonstrated by deducing the spin using the interference of in-plane photons. A second device directly maps right and left circular polarisations to anti-parallel waveguides, surprising for a non-chiral structure but consistent with an off-centre dot. Two dimensional photonic crystal cavities in GaInP and full control over the spontaneous emission rate of InP quantum dots is demonstrated by spectrally tuning the exciton emission energy into resonance with the fundamental cavity mode. Fourier transform spectroscopy is used to investigate the short coherence times of InP quantum dots in GaInP photonic crystal cavities. Additional technological developments are also presented including a quantum dot registration technique, electrical tuning of quantum dot emission and uniaxial strain tuning of H1 cavity modes.

  12. Nanophotonics and supramolecular chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hill, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has become a key area in emerging bottom-up nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, supramolecular systems that can produce a photonic output are increasingly important research targets and present various possibilities for practical applications. Accordingly, photonic properties of various supramolecular systems at the nanoscale are important in current nanotechnology. In this short review, nanophotonics in supramolecular chemistry will be briefly summarized by introducing recent examples of control of photonic responses of supramolecular systems. Topics are categorized according to the fundamental actions of their supramolecular systems: (i) self-assembly; (ii) recognition; (iii) manipulation.

  13. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range. PMID:25410792

  14. Nanophotonic hybridization of narrow atomic cesium resonances and photonic stop gaps of opaline nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Philip J.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.; Mosk, Allard P.; Vos, Willem L.

    2015-01-01

    We study a hybrid system consisting of a narrow-band atomic optical resonance and the long-range periodic order of an opaline photonic nanostructure. To this end, we have infiltrated atomic cesium vapor in a thin silica opal photonic crystal. With increasing temperature, the frequencies of the opal's reflectivity peaks shift down by >20 % due to chemical reduction of the silica. Simultaneously, the photonic bands and gaps shift relative to the fixed near-infrared cesium D1 transitions. As a result the narrow atomic resonances with high finesse (ω /Δ ω =8 ×105 ) dramatically change shape from a usual dispersive shape at the blue edge of a stop gap, to an inverted dispersion line shape at the red edge of a stop gap. The line shape, amplitude, and off-resonance reflectivity are well modeled with a transfer-matrix model that includes the dispersion and absorption of Cs hyperfine transitions and the chemically reduced opal. An ensemble of atoms in a photonic crystal is an intriguing hybrid system that features narrow defectlike resonances with a strong dispersion, with potential applications in slow light, sensing, and optical memory.

  15. Photon transport in a one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguide QED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Zeng, Xiaodong; Nha, Hyunchul; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-06-01

    The waveguide quantum electrodynamics (QED) system may have important applications in quantum device and quantum information technology. In this article we review the methods being proposed to calculate photon transport in a one-dimensional (1D) waveguide coupled to quantum emitters. We first introduce the Bethe ansatz approach and the input–output formalism to calculate the stationary results of a single photon transport. Then we present a dynamical time-dependent theory to calculate the real-time evolution of the waveguide QED system. In the longtime limit, both the stationary theory and the dynamical calculation give the same results. Finally, we also briefly discuss the calculations of the multiphoton transport problems.

  16. Diamond electro-optomechanical resonators integrated in nanophotonic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P.; Ummethala, S.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Diewald, S.; Lewes-Malandrakis, G.; Brink, D.; Heidrich, N.; Nebel, C.

    2014-12-22

    Diamond integrated photonic devices are promising candidates for emerging applications in nanophotonics and quantum optics. Here, we demonstrate active modulation of diamond nanophotonic circuits by exploiting mechanical degrees of freedom in free-standing diamond electro-optomechanical resonators. We obtain high quality factors up to 9600, allowing us to read out the driven nanomechanical response with integrated optical interferometers with high sensitivity. We are able to excite higher order mechanical modes up to 115 MHz and observe the nanomechanical response also under ambient conditions.

  17. Nanophotonic Design for Broadband Light Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, Emily; Callahan, Dennis; Horowitz, Kelsey; Pala, Ragip; Atwater, Harry

    2014-10-13

    We describe nanophotonic design approaches for broadband light management including i) crossed-trapezoidal Si structures ii) Si photonic crystal superlattices, and iii) tapered and inhomogeneous diameter III-V/Si nanowire arrays.

  18. Multi-scale soft-lithographic lift-off and grafting (MS-SLLOG) process for active polymer nanophotonic device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yi-Chung; Truxal, Steven C.; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports a new microfabrication process named "Multi-Scale Soft-Lithographic Lift-Off and Grafting (MS-SLLOG)" used to construct active nanophotonic devices. MS-SLLOG is a low-temperature (less than 150°C) microfabrication technique that allows soft lithographically molded polymer micro-structures to be integrated together with silicon-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) structures to perform active control. Moreover, MS-SLLOG process allows us to achieve a hierarchical device structure seamlessly accommodating feature sizes ranging from tens of nanometer to sub-millimeters on a single chip for nanophotonic structure integration. To demonstrate the MS-SLLOG process capability, a strain-controlled micro-optical grating device is fabricated and experimentally characterized. The experimental results successfully show the operation of an active polymer nanophotonic device fabricated by the MS-SLLOG process.

  19. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  20. Active Integrated Filters for RF-Photonic Channelizers

    PubMed Central

    Nagdi, Amr El; Liu, Ke; LaFave, Tim P.; Hunt, Louis R.; Ramakrishna, Viswanath; Dabkowski, Mieczyslaw; MacFarlane, Duncan L.; Christensen, Marc P.

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical study of RF-photonic channelizers using four architectures formed by active integrated filters with tunable gains is presented. The integrated filters are enabled by two- and four-port nano-photonic couplers (NPCs). Lossless and three individual manufacturing cases with high transmission, high reflection, and symmetric couplers are assumed in the work. NPCs behavior is dependent upon the phenomenon of frustrated total internal reflection. Experimentally, photonic channelizers are fabricated in one single semiconductor chip on multi-quantum well epitaxial InP wafers using conventional microelectronics processing techniques. A state space modeling approach is used to derive the transfer functions and analyze the stability of these filters. The ability of adapting using the gains is demonstrated. Our simulation results indicate that the characteristic bandpass and notch filter responses of each structure are the basis of channelizer architectures, and optical gain may be used to adjust filter parameters to obtain a desired frequency magnitude response, especially in the range of 1–5 GHz for the chip with a coupler separation of ∼9 mm. Preliminarily, the measurement of spectral response shows enhancement of quality factor by using higher optical gains. The present compact active filters on an InP-based integrated photonic circuit hold the potential for a variety of channelizer applications. Compared to a pure RF channelizer, photonic channelizers may perform both channelization and down-conversion in an optical domain. PMID:22319352

  1. Dip-pen patterning of poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) chain-conformation-based nano-photonic elements

    PubMed Central

    Perevedentsev, Aleksandr; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Belton, Colin R.; Sharma, Sanjiv; Cass, Anthony E. G.; Maier, Stefan A.; Kim, Ji-Seon; Stavrinou, Paul N.; Bradley, Donal D. C.

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials are a promising new class of materials, in which sub-wavelength physical structures, rather than variations in chemical composition, can be used to modify the nature of their interaction with electromagnetic radiation. Here we show that a metamaterials approach, using a discrete physical geometry (conformation) of the segments of a polymer chain as the vector for a substantial refractive index change, can be used to enable visible wavelength, conjugated polymer photonic elements. In particular, we demonstrate that a novel form of dip-pen nanolithography provides an effective means to pattern the so-called β-phase conformation in poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) thin films. This can be done on length scales ≤500 nm, as required to fabricate a variety of such elements, two of which are theoretically modelled using complex photonic dispersion calculations. PMID:25598208

  2. Nanophotonic Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolee, Jessica A.; Walker, Bennett N.; Chen, Yong; Vertes, Akos

    2010-10-01

    Interactions between laser radiation and photonic structures at elevated laser intensities give rise to the production of positive and negative ions from adsorbates. These new types of ion sources exhibit properties that are significantly different from conventional laser desorption ionization sources. In this contribution comparisons are made between matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) of biomolecules with ion production from laser-induced silicon microcolumn arrays (LISMA) and nanopost arrays (NAPA). The sharp increase of ion yields from the nanophotonic ion sources follow a power law behavior with an exponent of up to n≈7, whereas in the case of MALDI n≈5. The strong field enhancement in the vicinity of the columns and posts scales with their aspect ratio. Slender high aspect ratio posts show reduced laser fluence threshold for ionization. Posts with diameters at or below the thermal diffusion length demonstrate high surface temperatures due to the radial confinement of the deposited energy. As a consequence enhanced fragmentation, i.e., lower survival yield of the molecular ions is observed. The origin of protons in the ionization of adsorbates was identified as the entrapped residues of the solvent.

  3. Special issue on graphene nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, A. Yu; Maier, S. A.; Martin-Moreno, L.

    2013-11-01

    Graphene nanophotonics has recently appeared as a new research area, which combines the topics of nanophotonics (devoted to studying the behavior of electromagnetic fields on the deep subwavelength scale) and the several extraordinary material properties of graphene. Apart from being the thinnest existing material, graphene is very attractive for photonics due to its extreme flexibility, high mobility and the possibility of controlling its carrier concentration (and hence its electromagnetic response) via external gate voltages. From its very birth, graphene nanophotonics has the potential for innovative technological applications, aiming to complement (or in some cases even replace) the existing semiconductor/metallic photonic platforms. It has already shown exceptional capabilities in many directions, such as for instance in photodetection, photovoltaics, lasing, etc [1]. A special place in graphene photonics belongs to graphene plasmonics, which studies both intrinsic plasmons in graphene and the combination of graphene with plasmons supported by metallic structures [2]. Here, apart from the dynamic control via external voltages previously mentioned, the use of graphene brings with it the remarkable property that graphene plasmons have a wavelength λp that can be even one hundred times smaller than that in free space λ (for instance λp ~ 100 nm at λ ~ 10 μm). This provides both extreme confinement and extreme enhancement of the electromagnetic field at the graphene sheet which, together with its high sensitivity to the doping level, opens many interesting perspectives for new optical devices. The collection of papers presented in this special issue highlights different aspects of nanophotonics in graphene and related systems. The timely appearance of this publication was apparent during the monographic workshop 'Graphene Nanophotonics', sponsored by the European Science Foundation and held during 3-8 March 2013, in Benasque (Spain). This special issue

  4. Lanthanide-Assisted Deposition of Strongly Electro-optic PZT Thin Films on Silicon: Toward Integrated Active Nanophotonic Devices.

    PubMed

    George, J P; Smet, P F; Botterman, J; Bliznuk, V; Woestenborghs, W; Van Thourhout, D; Neyts, K; Beeckman, J

    2015-06-24

    The electro-optical properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films depend strongly on the quality and crystallographic orientation of the thin films. We demonstrate a novel method to grow highly textured PZT thin films on silicon using the chemical solution deposition (CSD) process. We report the use of ultrathin (5-15 nm) lanthanide (La, Pr, Nd, Sm) based intermediate layers for obtaining preferentially (100) oriented PZT thin films. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate preferentially oriented intermediate Ln2O2CO3 layers providing an excellent lattice match with the PZT thin films grown on top. The XRD and scanning electron microscopy measurements reveal that the annealed layers are dense, uniform, crack-free and highly oriented (>99.8%) without apparent defects or secondary phases. The EDX and HRTEM characterization confirm that the template layers act as an efficient diffusion barrier and form a sharp interface between the substrate and the PZT. The electrical measurements indicate a dielectric constant of ∼650, low dielectric loss of ∼0.02, coercive field of 70 kV/cm, remnant polarization of 25 μC/cm(2), and large breakdown electric field of 1000 kV/cm. Finally, the effective electro-optic coefficients of the films are estimated with a spectroscopic ellipsometer measurement, considering the electric field induced variations in the phase reflectance ratio. The electro-optic measurements reveal excellent linear effective pockels coefficients of 110 to 240 pm/V, which makes the CSD deposited PZT thin film an ideal candidate for Si-based active integrated nanophotonic devices. PMID:26043103

  5. Nanophotonic materials and devices: driving the big data engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, R. A.

    2014-09-01

    Photonics has been critical to the growth of the Internet that now carries a vast array of information over optical fiber. The future growth of information technology, including the transmission and processing of vast amounts of data, will require a new class of photonic devices that readily integrate directly with semiconductor circuits and processors. Nanophotonics will play a key role in this development, providing both designer optical materials and radically smaller and lower power consumption devices. We present our developments in engineered nanophotonic polymer materials and electro-optic polymer/silicon nanowire devices in the context of this burgeoning field.

  6. Nanophotonic quantum computer based on atomic quantum transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, S. N.; Moiseev, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a scheme of a quantum computer based on nanophotonic elements: two buses in the form of nanowaveguide resonators, two nanosized units of multiatom multiqubit quantum memory and a set of nanoprocessors in the form of photonic quantum transistors, each containing a pair of nanowaveguide ring resonators coupled via a quantum dot. The operation modes of nanoprocessor photonic quantum transistors are theoretically studied and the execution of main logical operations by means of them is demonstrated. We also discuss the prospects of the proposed nanophotonic quantum computer for operating in high-speed optical fibre networks.

  7. Rational design for enhancing inflammation-responsive in vivo chemiluminescence via nanophotonic energy relay to near-infrared AIE-active conjugated polymer.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Hun; Singh, Ajay; Cho, Hong-Jun; Kim, Youngsun; Heo, Jeongyun; Lim, Chang-Keun; Park, Soo Young; Jang, Woo-Dong; Kim, Sehoon

    2016-04-01

    H2O2-specific peroxalate chemiluminescence is recognized as a potential signal for sensitive in vivo imaging of inflammation but the effect of underlying peroxalate-emitter energetics on its efficiency has rarely been understood. Here we report a simple nanophotonic way of boosting near-infrared chemiluminescence with no need of complicated structural design and synthesis of an energetically favored emitter. The signal enhancement was attained from the construction of a nanoparticle imaging probe (∼26 nm in size) by dense nanointegration of multiple molecules possessing unique photonic features, i.e., i) a peroxalate as a chemical fuel generating electronic excitation energy in response to inflammatory H2O2, ii) a low-bandgap conjugated polymer as a bright near-infrared emitter showing aggregation-induced emission (AIE), and iii) an energy gap-bridging photonic molecule that relays the chemically generated excitation energy to the emitter for its efficient excitation. From static and kinetic spectroscopic studies, a green-emissive BODIPY dye has proven to be an efficient relay molecule to bridge the energy gap between the AIE polymer and the chemically generated excited intermediate of H2O2-reacted peroxalates. The energy-relayed nanointegration of AIE polymer and peroxalate in water showed a 50-times boosted sensing signal compared to their dissolved mixture in THF. Besides the high H2O2 detectability down to 10(-9) M, the boosted chemiluminescence presented a fairly high tissue penetration depth (>12 mm) in an ex vivo condition, which enabled deep imaging of inflammatory H2O2 in a hair-covered mouse model of peritonitis. PMID:26826300

  8. Photonic crystals as templates and active devices for cellular and molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, G. J.

    2005-04-01

    Photonic crystals are emerging as an important class of engineered nanophotonic devices that possess unique optical properties and which can also provide textured surfaces for the study and control of cellular and molecular interactions. From among the many types of photonic crystal structures, two-dimensional (2D) and planar (slab) photonic crystals are the most attractive because of their ability to support guided-wave and active optical devices in semiconductor and polymer materials, serve as templates for device replication, and interface with colloidal and nanoparticle systems. This paper reports on the results of modeling and design efforts that show how 2d and slab silicon photonic crystals, based on their in-plane optical waveguiding and out-of-plane radiation properties, might be used to probe surface-bound cells and molecules or perform localized spectroscopy. The results of a parametric analysis show that photonic crystals comprised of high-index contrast materials (e.g. Si, air) are sensitive to geometric and material factors, potentially making them an effective medium to study molecular and cellular interactions critical to a number of biotechnological applications

  9. Integrating nanophotonic concepts and topics into optics curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, Gregory J.

    2007-06-01

    Nanophotonics has emerged as a new and important field of study, not only in research, but also in undergraduate optics and photonics education and training. Beyond the study of classical and quantum optics, it is important for students to learn about how the flow of light can be manipulated on a nanoscale level, and used in applications such as telecommunications, imaging, and medicine. This paper reports on our work to integrate basic nanophotonic concepts and topics into existing optics and optical electronics courses, as well as independent study projects, at the undergraduate level. Through classroom lectures, topical readings, computer modeling exercises, and laboratory experiments, students are introduced to nanophotonic concepts subsequent to a study of physical and geometrical optics. A compare and contrast methodology is employed to help students identify similarities and differences that exist in the optical behavior of bulk and nanostructured media. Training is further developed through engineering design and simulation exercises that use advanced, vector-diffraction-based, modeling software for simulating the performance of various materials and structures. To date, the addition of a nanophotonics component to the optics curriculum has proven successful, been enthusiastically received by students, and should serve as a basis for further course development efforts that emphasize the combined capabilities of nanotechnology and photonics.

  10. Controlling Quantum Transport with a Programmable Nanophotonic Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas; Steinbrecher, Gregory; Mower, Jacob; Lihini, Yoav; Prabhu, Mihika; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Lloyd, Seth; Englund, Dirk

    Recent experimental and theoretical work has revealed emergent, counter-intuitive quantum transport effects in a range of physical medial including solid-state and biological systems. Photonic integrated circuits are promising platforms for studying such effects. A central goal in for photonic quantum transport simulators has been the ability to rapidly control all parameters of the transport problem. Here, we present a large-scale programmable nanophotonic processor composed of 56 Mach-Zehnder interferometers that enables control over modal couplings and differential phases between modes--enabling observations of Anderson localization, environment-assisted quantum transport, ballistic transport, and a number of intermediate quantum transport regimes. Rapid programmability enables tens of thousands of realizations of disordered and noisy systems. In addition, low loss makes this nanophotonic processor a promising platform for many-boson quantum simulation experiments.

  11. Time domain topology optimization of 3D nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elesin, Y.; Lazarov, B. S.; Jensen, J. S.; Sigmund, O.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient parallel topology optimization framework for design of large scale 3D nanophotonic devices. The code shows excellent scalability and is demonstrated for optimization of broadband frequency splitter, waveguide intersection, photonic crystal-based waveguide and nanowire-based waveguide. The obtained results are compared to simplified 2D studies and we demonstrate that 3D topology optimization may lead to significant performance improvements.

  12. Nanophotonics technology watch at the European Patent Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbandt, Y.; Kallinger, C.; Scheu, M.; Förster, W.

    2008-04-01

    Since its inception, the nanotechnology working group at the European Patent Office has been constantly updating the content of its different nanotechnology classification tags which it applies to patent publications worldwide. The main technologies in the nanophotonics area are photonic crystals, surface plasmon devices, semiconductor superlattices and scanning near-field microscopy. Some patent statistics are shown and a brief summary of legal issues is given.

  13. Successful commercialization of nanophotonic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Supriya L.; Clarke, Roger B. M.; Hyde, Sam C. W.

    2006-08-01

    The exploitation of nanotechnology from proof of principle to realizable commercial applications encounters considerable challenges in regards to high volume, large scale, low cost manufacturability and social ethics. This has led to concerns over converting powerful intellectual property into realizable, industry attractive technologies. At The Technology Partnership we specifically address the issue of successful integration of nanophotonics into industry in markets such as biomedical, ophthalmic, energy, telecommunications, and packaging. In this paper we draw on a few examples where we have either developed industrial scale nanophotonic technology or engineering platforms which may be used to fortify nano/microphotonic technologies and enhance their commercial viability.

  14. Silicon integrated nanophotonics for on-chip interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Yurii

    2008-03-01

    Current trend in microelectronics industry is to increase the parallelism in computation by multi-threading, by building large scale multi-chip systems and, more recently, by increasing the number of cores on a single chip. With such increase of parallelization the interconnect bandwidth between the racks, chips or different cores is becoming a limiting factor for the design of high performance computer systems. The on-chip ultrahigh-bandwidth silicon-based photonic network might provide an attractive solution to this bandwidth bottleneck. We will review recent results on silicon nanophotonic circuits based on photonic wires and photonic crystals. Strong light confinement at the diffraction limit enables dramatic scaling of the device area and allows unprecedented control over optical signals. Silicon nanophotonic devices have immense capacity for low-loss, high-bandwidth data processing that might enable the design of ultra-compact on-chip optical networks. In particular we will show recent results on design and characterization of various ultra-compact (<0.03mm2) silicon nanophotonic circuits as optical delay lines, electro-optic modulators, broadband optical switches, wavelength filters, etc.

  15. Graphene nanophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Alexander Y.; Cubukcu, Ertugrul

    2015-09-01

    Graphene is known to possess a host of remarkable properties such as a zero bandgap at its Dirac point, broadband saturable optical absorption, ballistic carrier transport at room temperature, as well as extremely high stiffness and thermal conductivity. This has in turn made it a material of interest for many applications, ranging from fundamental physics studies to electronic devices. From a photonics perspective, graphene’s ability to support surface plasmon-polaritons with extremely small mode volumes in the infrared spectral regime and beyond renders it an ideal platform for strongly enhanced light-matter interactions at deeply subwavelength size scales. Together with its large bandwidth of operation, as well as intrinsic chemical stability and affinity to organic molecules, graphene serves as a natural candidate for numerous optics-based sensing applications. This article reviews recent works that highlight the various advantages of graphene in an optical sensing context. Specifically, it focuses on how the passive functionalization of graphene can improve the performance of existing optical sensors, and how its use as an active signal transduction element could lead to various novel or hybrid devices that extend the functionalities of traditional sensors.

  16. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from Optical MEMS and Nanophotonics 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Sasaki, Minoru; Yeh, J. Andrew

    2008-04-01

    This special issue on optical MEMS and nanophotonics features papers presented at the International Optical MEMS and Nanophotonics Conference held in Hualien, Taiwan, 12-16 August 2007, chaired by J Andrew Yeh. Minoru Sasaki and Chennupati Jagadish served as Program Co-Chairs of optical MEMS and nanophotonics, respectively. The conference featured a broad range of technologies in both topical areas with participation from academia, government laboratories and industry. The conference covered the latest technical developments in the fields of optical micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and integrated micro-optics. Integration and miniaturization of photonic and optical MEMS components and systems towards micro- and nanoscale for various applications were discussed. The conference also featured nanophotonics which is expected to provide high-speed, high-bandwidth and compact photonic devices. The interaction of light with nanoscale structures including generation, manipulation and detection was discussed at the conference and covered photonic crystals, quantum dots, nanowires and plasmonics. Integrated systems combining nanostructures and optical MEMS were discussed. We would like to thank Hans Zappe for suggesting the special issue and providing timely advice on various related matters and also to Julia Dickinson and Claire Bedrock for their professionalism and help. Carol Chan of the National Tsing Hua University is gratefully acknowledged for her help with the conference. Administration by staff from the Instrument Technology Research Center is highly appreciated. The assistance of the students of the National Dong Hua University and the National Tsing Hua University made the conference most enjoyable. The next conference will be held in Freiburg, Germany, 11-14 August 2008 and will be chaired by Hans Zappe.

  17. Novel Trapping and Scattering of Light in Resonant Nanophotonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei

    Nanophotonic structures provide unique ways to control light and alter its behaviors in ways not possible in macroscopic structures. In this thesis, we explore novel behaviors of light created by nanophotonic structures, with a common theme on resonance effects. The first half of the thesis focuses on a peculiar type of electromagnetic resonance, where the resonance lifetime diverges to infinity. These states, called bound states in the continuum, remain localized in space even though their frequency lie within a continuum of extended modes. We find such states in photonic crystal slabs and the surface of bulk photonic crystals. We show the conditions necessary for them to exist, and provide the first experimental observation of these unusual states. We also show that these states have a topological nature, with conserved and quantized topological charges that govern their generation, evolution, and annihilation. The second half of the thesis concerns light scattering from resonant nanophotonic structures, where resonances can enhance or suppress scattering at particular wavelengths and angles. We show that multiple resonances in one nanostructure and in the same multipole channel generally lead to a scattering dark state where the structure becomes transparent. Based on the coherent interference from multiple scatterers, we show there are geometries that can achieve a sharp structural color where the hue, saturation, and brightness are all viewing-angle independent. We also invent a new type of transparent display based on wavelength-selective light scattering from nanostructures.

  18. Photonic crystals with active organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yeheng

    The concept of photonic crystals, which involves periodically arranged dielectrics that form a new type of material having novel photonic properties, was first proposed about two decades ago. Since then, a number of applications in photonic technology have been explored. Specifically, organic and hybrid photonic crystals are promising because of the unique advantages of the organic materials. A one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (multilayer) has high reflectance across a certain wavelength range. We report on studies of 1D multilayer polymer films that were fabricated using spin-coating, free film stacking, and co-extrusion techniques. For example, a stack fabricated by placing a laser dye-doped gain medium between two multilayer reflecting polymer films forms a micro-resonator laser or distributed Bragg laser. The resulting laser system is made entirely of plastic and is only several tens of micrometers in thickness. When the gain, a dye-doped medium, comprises one type of a two-type multilayer film, it results a laser exhibiting distributed feedback. At the edge of the photonic band, the group velocity becomes small and the density of photon states becomes high, which leads to laser emission. Such distributed feedback lasers were fabricated using the co-extrusion technique. The refractive indices and the photonic lattice determine the photonic band gap, which can be tuned by changing these parameters. Materials with Kerr nonlinearity exhibit a change in refractive index depending on the incident intensity of the light. To demonstrate such switching, electrochemical etching techniques on silicon wafers were used to form two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals. By incorporating the nonlinear organic material into the 2D structure, we have made all-optical switches. The reflection of a beam from the 2D photonic crystal can be controlled by another beam because it induces a refractive index change in the active material by altering the reflection band. A mid

  19. Nanophotonic integrated circuits from nanoresonators grown on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Roger; Ng, Kar Wei; Ko, Wai Son; Parekh, Devang; Lu, Fanglu; Tran, Thai-Truong D.; Li, Kun; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2014-07-01

    Harnessing light with photonic circuits promises to catalyse powerful new technologies much like electronic circuits have in the past. Analogous to Moore’s law, complexity and functionality of photonic integrated circuits depend on device size and performance scale. Semiconductor nanostructures offer an attractive approach to miniaturize photonics. However, shrinking photonics has come at great cost to performance, and assembling such devices into functional photonic circuits has remained an unfulfilled feat. Here we demonstrate an on-chip optical link constructed from InGaAs nanoresonators grown directly on a silicon substrate. Using nanoresonators, we show a complete toolkit of circuit elements including light emitters, photodetectors and a photovoltaic power supply. Devices operate with gigahertz bandwidths while consuming subpicojoule energy per bit, vastly eclipsing performance of prior nanostructure-based optoelectronics. Additionally, electrically driven stimulated emission from an as-grown nanostructure is presented for the first time. These results reveal a roadmap towards future ultradense nanophotonic integrated circuits.

  20. Nanoimprint lithography: an enabling technology for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuhan; Liu, He; Wang, Yifei; Li, Yuanrui; Song, Boxiang; Bratkovsk, Alexandre; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wu, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is an indispensable tool to realize a fast and accurate nanoscale patterning in nanophotonics due to high resolution and high yield. The number of publication on NIL has increased from less than a hundred per year to over three thousand per year. In this paper, the most recent developments on NIL patterning transfer processes and its applications on nanophotonics are discussed and reviewed. NIL has been opening up new opportunities for nanophotonics, especially in fabricating optical meta-materials. With more researches on this low-cost high-throughput fabrication technology, we should anticipate a brighter future for nanophotonics and NIL.

  1. Heterogeneous Integration of Materials on Si for Nanophotonics Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assefa, Solomon

    2009-03-01

    Optical interconnects are attractive candidates for achieving communication bandwidth well beyond terabit-per-second for high-performance multi-core microprocessors. Silicon has become a desirable material due to its transparency in the infrared wavelength range and the ease for integrating optical devices at the vicinity of CMOS circuitry utilizing standard processes. While state-of-the-art patterning techniques provide precise dimension control as well as pattern placement, standard doping and metallization steps enable utilization of phenomena such as carrier injection and depletion to render the devices tunable. As a result, large progress has been made on Si-based nanophotonic devices such as modulators, switches, and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems [1, 2]. To make photodetectors, however, a heterogeneous integration of other materials that absorb light in the infrared is necessary. Available in standard front-end CMOS processes for gate strain engineering, Germanium is suitable due to its high absorption coefficient at 1.3μm and 1.5μm wavelengths. Thus, Ge can be directly integrated into the process to fabricate compact photodetectors simultaneously with amplifier circuits in order to make a receiver for an optical network. Nevertheless, the integration of Ge photodetector into the CMOS process flow is very challenging due to process complexity and severe temperature constraints; as a result, photodetectors fabricated only after completing the front-end processes have been previously demonstrated. This talk will discuss Ge waveguide photodetectors that have been integrated into the front-end before the activation of CMOS well implants. By utilizing a lateral seeded crystallization method wherein the Ge waveguides are melted during high-temperature dopant activation, 20μm-long single-crystal Ge-on-insulator waveguides were formed. This approach eliminates the need for selective epitaxial growth of Ge, and avoids high-density misfit

  2. CALL FOR PAPERS: Topical issue on the fundamental aspects of nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockman, Mark; Zayats, Anatoly; Zheludev, Nikolay

    2005-05-01

    The broad goals of the new discipline of nanophotonics are to develop concepts of optical functionality on the smallest possible spatial scale, at the lowest possible energy level, and on the shortest possible timescale by employing light interactions with nanostructures. A topical issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be devoted to papers reporting new and challenging results in this burgeoning field. Focused topical reviews within the special issue remit will also be considered, but potential contributors of such reviews should first contact the Guest Editors. Papers in other areas will also be considered for the issue as long as they offer ideas relevant for the field of nanophotonics. The special issue topics will include, but are not limited to: • Plasmonic nanophotonics • Nano-transmission lines and nano-antennas • Light in confined geometries and nano-cavities • Single molecule and single nanoparticle photonics • Quantum and coherent effects in nanophotonics • Nonlinear and ultrafast nanophotonics • Interaction of electron beams with nanophotonic structures • Nano-bio-photonics • Nanoscale imaging and photolithography • Optical atom trapping and manipulation in nanostructures All papers will be peer reviewed, and the normal refereeing standards of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be maintained. There are no page charges. Advice on preparing your work for publication in the journal, including advice on figures, tables and references, is available from our website at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopa. Manuscripts should be submitted to the Publisher by 1 September 2005, although authors are strongly encouraged to submit their work as soon as possible. Please include a covering letter stating that the submission is intended for the nanophotonics topical issue, to avoid treatment as a regular submission. Submission address: Dr Claire Bedrock (Publisher) Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics

  3. The PHOTON explorations: sixteen activities, many uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Judith; Amatrudo, Kathryn; Robinson, Kathleen; Hanes, Fenna

    2014-07-01

    The PHOTON Explorations were adapted from favorite demonstrations of teacher participants in the PHOTON projects of the New England Board of Higher Education as well as Hands-on-Optics activities and interesting demonstrations found on the web. Since the end of project PHOTON2 in 2006, the sixteen inquiry-based activities have formed the basis for a hands-on "home lab" distance- learning course that has been used for college students, teacher professional development and corporate training. With the support of OSA, they have been brought to life in a series of sixteen short videos aimed at a middle school audience. The Explorations are regularly used as activities in outreach activities for middle and high school students and are introduced yearly to an international audience at an outreach workshop at SPIE's Optics and Photonics meeting. In this paper we will demonstrate the Explorations, trace their origins and explain the content. We will also provide details on the development of the Exploration videos, the online course, and outreach materials and give statistics on their use in each format. Links to online resources will be provided.

  4. New Perspectives in Silicon Micro and Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; De Stefano, L.; Calio, A.; Rea, I.; Mocella, V.; Dardano, P.; Romano, S.; Rao, S.; Rendina, I.

    2015-05-01

    In the last two decades, there has been growing interest in silicon-based photonic devices for many optical applications: telecommunications, interconnects and biosensors. In this work, an advance overview of our results in this field is presented. Proposed devices allow overcoming silicon intrinsic drawbacks limiting its application as a photonic substrate. Taking advantages of both non-linear and linear effects, size reduction at nanometric scale and new two-dimensional emerging materials, we have obtained a progressive increase in device performance along the last years. In this work we show that a suitable design of a thin photonic crystal slab realized in silicon nitride can exhibit a very strong field enhancement. This result is very promising for all photonic silicon devices based on nonlinear phenomena. Moreover we report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon photodetectors working at near-infrared wavelengths based on the internal photoemission absorption in a Schottky junction. We show as an increase in device performance can be obtained by coupling light into both micro-resonant cavity and waveguiding structures. In addition, replacing metal with graphene in a Schottky junction, a further improve in PD performance can be achieved. Finally, silicon-based microarray for biomedical applications, are reported. Microarray of porous silicon Bragg reflectors on a crystalline silicon substrate have been realized using a technological process based on standard photolithography and electrochemical anodization of the silicon. Our insights show that silicon is a promising platform for the integration of various optical functionalities on the same chip opening new frontiers in the field of low-cost silicon micro and nanophotonics.

  5. Quantum Optics in the Solid State with Diamond Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Nathalie; Evans, Ruffin; de Greve, Kristiaan; Goldman, Michael; High, Alex; Markham, Matthew; Stacey, Alastair; Twitchen, Daniel; Loncar, Marko; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2015-05-01

    Large-scale quantum networks will require efficient interfaces between photons and stationary quantum bits. Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are a promising candidate for quantum information processing because they are optically addressable, have spin degrees of freedom with long coherence times, and as solid-state entities, can be integrated into nanophotonic devices. An enabling feature of the NV center is its zero-phonon line (ZPL), which acts as an atom-like cycling transition that can be used for coherent optical manipulation and read-out of the spin. However, the ZPL only accounts for 3-5% of the total emission, and previously demonstrated methods of producing high densities of NV centers yield unstable ZPLs. We have developed techniques to fabricate high quality factor, small mode volume photonic crystal cavities directly out of diamond, and to deterministically position these photonic crystal cavities so that a stable NV center sits at the maximum electric field. We observe an enhancement of the spontaneous emission at the cavity resonance by a factor of up to 100. Crucially, we are able to control the NV center precisely using both microwave and resonant optical manipulation. These nanophotonic elements in diamond will provide key building blocks for quantum information processing such as single photon transistors, enabling distribution of entanglement over quantum networks.

  6. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  7. Nanophotonic quantum phase switch with a single atom.

    PubMed

    Tiecke, T G; Thompson, J D; de Leon, N P; Liu, L R; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2014-04-10

    By analogy to transistors in classical electronic circuits, quantum optical switches are important elements of quantum circuits and quantum networks. Operated at the fundamental limit where a single quantum of light or matter controls another field or material system, such a switch may enable applications such as long-distance quantum communication, distributed quantum information processing and metrology, and the exploration of novel quantum states of matter. Here, by strongly coupling a photon to a single atom trapped in the near field of a nanoscale photonic crystal cavity, we realize a system in which a single atom switches the phase of a photon and a single photon modifies the atom's phase. We experimentally demonstrate an atom-induced optical phase shift that is nonlinear at the two-photon level, a photon number router that separates individual photons and photon pairs into different output modes, and a single-photon switch in which a single 'gate' photon controls the propagation of a subsequent probe field. These techniques pave the way to integrated quantum nanophotonic networks involving multiple atomic nodes connected by guided light. PMID:24717513

  8. Macroscopic response in active nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Gandhi; John, Sajeev; Li, Er Ping

    2013-09-15

    We derive macroscopic equations of motion for the slowly varying electric field amplitude in three-dimensional active nonlinear optical nanostructures. We show that the microscopic Maxwell equations and polarization dynamics can be simplified to a macroscopic one-dimensional problem in the direction of group velocity. For a three-level active material, we derive the steady-state equations for normal mode frequency, threshold pumping, nonlinear Bloch mode amplitude, and lasing in photonic crystals. Our analytical results accurately recapture the results of exact numerical methods. PMID:24104802

  9. Enabling high-temperature nanophotonics for energy applications

    PubMed Central

    Yeng, Yi Xiang; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Bermel, Peter; Chan, Walker R.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The nascent field of high-temperature nanophotonics could potentially enable many important solid-state energy conversion applications, such as thermophotovoltaic energy generation, selective solar absorption, and selective emission of light. However, special challenges arise when trying to design nanophotonic materials with precisely tailored optical properties that can operate at high-temperatures (> 1,100 K). These include proper material selection and purity to prevent melting, evaporation, or chemical reactions; severe minimization of any material interfaces to prevent thermomechanical problems such as delamination; robust performance in the presence of surface diffusion; and long-range geometric precision over large areas with severe minimization of very small feature sizes to maintain structural stability. Here we report an approach for high-temperature nanophotonics that surmounts all of these difficulties. It consists of an analytical and computationally guided design involving high-purity tungsten in a precisely fabricated photonic crystal slab geometry (specifically chosen to eliminate interfaces arising from layer-by-layer fabrication) optimized for high performance and robustness in the presence of roughness, fabrication errors, and surface diffusion. It offers near-ultimate short-wavelength emittance and low, ultra-broadband long-wavelength emittance, along with a sharp cutoff offering 4∶1 emittance contrast over 10% wavelength separation. This is achieved via Q-matching, whereby the absorptive and radiative rates of the photonic crystal’s cavity resonances are matched. Strong angular emission selectivity is also observed, with short-wavelength emission suppressed by 50% at 75° compared to normal incidence. Finally, a precise high-temperature measurement technique is developed to confirm that emission at 1,225 K can be primarily confined to wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength. PMID:22308448

  10. Fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zongfu; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2010-01-01

    Establishing the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light-trapping schemes is of paramount importance and is becoming increasingly urgent for current solar cell research. The standard theory of light trapping demonstrated that absorption enhancement in a medium cannot exceed a factor of 4n2/ sin2θ, where n is the refractive index of the active layer, and θ is the angle of the emission cone in the medium surrounding the cell. This theory, however, is not applicable in the nanophotonic regime. Here we develop a statistical temporal coupled-mode theory of light trapping based on a rigorous electromagnetic approach. Our theory reveals that the conventional limit can be substantially surpassed when optical modes exhibit deep-subwavelength-scale field confinement, opening new avenues for highly efficient next-generation solar cells. PMID:20876131

  11. Workshop on photon activation therapy: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-04-18

    This Workshop was held concurrently with an IAEA Research Coordination Meeting on Exploration of the Possibility of High-LET Radiation for Non-conventional Radiotherapy in Cancer. The Workshop on Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) was given as a special session on April 18, as it was thoght PAT might eventually be found to be attractive to developing countries, which is a major concern of the IAEA. An effort was made to bring together representatives of the various groups known to be actively working on PAT; these included investigators from Sweden and Japan as well as the US. It is hoped that this compendium of papers will be of use to those currently active in this developing field, as well as to those who might join this area of endeavor in the future.

  12. Nanophotonics for Tailoring Light-Matter Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Wenjun

    In this thesis, we will theoretically explore three nanophotonics phenomena which enable strong light-matter interaction. The first phenomenon is plasmonic resonance, where the surface plasmon mode at metal and dielectric boundaries significantly enhances the optical response of nanoparticles. We propose an optimization-based theoretical approach to tailor the optical response of silver/silica multilayer nanospheres over the visible spectrum. We show that the structure that provides the largest cross-section per volume/mass, averaged over a wide frequency range, is the silver coated silica sphere. We also show how properly chosen mixture of several species of different nanospheres can have an even larger minimal cross-section per volume/mass over the entire visible spectrum. The second phenomenon is photonic chiral edge state, where the breaking of time-reversal symmetry forces light to travel in only one direction. Based on the directional coupling between one-way waveguide and conventional two-waveguide, we propose a new type of optical circulators, which has the potential for simultaneous broadband operation and small device footprint. The third phenomenon is Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS), where photon and phonon are coupled through optical forces such as electrostriction force and radiation pressure. We develop a general method of calculating SBS gain via the overlap integral between optical and elastic modes. Applying this method to a rectangular waveguide, we demonstrate that the distribution of optical force and elastic modal profile jointly determine the magnitude and scaling of SBS gains. Applying this method to a periodic waveguide, we demonstrate that SBS gain can be further enhanced in the slow light regime. Based on this framework, we theoretically characterize a novel class of hybrid photon-phonon waveguides. Our analysis reveals that photon-phonon coupling via SBS can be directed and tailored over an exceptionally wide frequency range

  13. Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2007-06-12

    Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

  14. Interacting single atoms with nanophotonics for chip-integrated quantum networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, Daniel James

    Underlying matter and light are their building blocks of tiny atoms and photons. The ability to control and utilize matter-light interactions down to the elementary single atom and photon level at the nano-scale opens up exciting studies at the frontiers of science with applications in medicine, energy, and information technology. Of these, an intriguing front is the development of quantum networks where N ≫ 1 single-atom nodes are coherently linked by single photons, forming a collective quantum entity potentially capable of performing quantum computations and simulations. Here, a promising approach is to use optical cavities within the setting of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). However, since its first realization in 1992 by Kimble et al., current proof-of-principle experiments have involved just one or two conventional cavities. To move beyond to N ≫ 1 nodes, in this thesis we investigate a platform born from the marriage of cavity QED and nanophotonics, where single atoms at ˜100 nm near the surfaces of lithographically fabricated dielectric photonic devices can strongly interact with single photons, on a chip. Particularly, we experimentally investigate three main types of devices: microtoroidal optical cavities, optical nanofibers, and nanophotonic crystal based structures. With a microtoroidal cavity, we realized a robust and efficient photon router where single photons are extracted from an incident coherent state of light and redirected to a separate output with high efficiency. We achieved strong single atom-photon coupling with atoms located ~100 nm near the surface of a microtoroid, which revealed important aspects in the atom dynamics and QED of these systems including atom-surface interaction effects. We present a method to achieve state-insensitive atom trapping near optical nanofibers, critical in nanophotonic systems where electromagnetic fields are tightly confined. We developed a system that fabricates high quality nanofibers with high

  15. Nanophotonic filters for digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Kirsty

    There has been an increasing demand for low cost, portable CMOS image sensors because of increased integration, and new applications in the automotive, mobile communication and medical industries, amongst others. Colour reproduction remains imperfect in conventional digital image sensors, due to the limitations of the dye-based filters. Further improvement is required if the full potential of digital imaging is to be realised. In alternative systems, where accurate colour reproduction is a priority, existing equipment is too bulky for anything but specialist use. In this work both these issues are addressed by exploiting nanophotonic techniques to create enhanced trichromatic filters, and multispectral filters, all of which can be fabricated on-chip, i.e. integrated into a conventional digital image sensor, to create compact, low cost, mass produceable imaging systems with accurate colour reproduction. The trichromatic filters are based on plasmonic structures. They exploit the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in arrays of subwavelength holes in metal films to filter light. The currently-known analytical expressions are inadequate for optimising all relevant parameters of a plasmonic structure. In order to obtain arbitrary filter characteristics, an automated design procedure was developed that integrated a genetic algorithm and 3D finite-difference time-domain tool. The optimisation procedure's efficacy is demonstrated by designing a set of plasmonic filters that replicate the CIE (1931) colour matching functions, which themselves mimic the human eye's daytime colour response.

  16. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Stebunov, Yury V.

    2015-06-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the nanophotonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic or plasmonic mode, cantilever is efficiently actuated and its response is directly read out using the same waveguide, which results in a very high sensitivity and capability of single-molecule detection even in atmosphere.

  17. All-nanophotonic NEMS biosensor on a chip

    PubMed Central

    Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.; Stebunov, Yury V.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated chemical and biological sensors give advantages in cost, size and weight reduction and open new prospects for parallel monitoring and analysis. Biosensors based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are the most attractive candidates for the integrated platform. However, actuation and transduction techniques (e.g. electrostatic, magnetomotive, thermal or piezoelectric) limit their operation to laboratory conditions. All-optical approach gives the possibility to overcome this problem, nevertheless, the existing schemes are either fundamentally macroscopic or excessively complicated and expensive in mass production. Here we propose a novel scheme of extremely compact NEMS biosensor monolithically integrated on a chip with all-nanophotonic transduction and actuation. It consists of the nanophotonic waveguide and the nanobeam cantilever placed above the waveguide, both fabricated in the same CMOS-compatible process. Being in the near field of the strongly confined photonic or plasmonic mode, cantilever is efficiently actuated and its response is directly read out using the same waveguide, which results in a very high sensitivity and capability of single-molecule detection even in atmosphere. PMID:26043287

  18. Experimental generation of single photons via active multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaosong; Zotter, Stefan; Kofler, Johannes; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-04-15

    An on-demand single-photon source is a fundamental building block in quantum science and technology. We experimentally demonstrate the proof of concept for a scheme to generate on-demand single photons via actively multiplexing several heralded photons probabilistically produced from pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversions (SPDCs). By utilizing a four-photon-pair source, an active feed-forward technique, and an ultrafast single-photon router, we show a fourfold enhancement of the output photon rate. Simultaneously, we maintain the quality of the output single-photon states, confirmed by correlation measurements. We also experimentally verify, via Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, that the router does not affect the indistinguishability of the single photons. Furthermore, we give numerical simulations, which indicate that photons based on multiplexing of four SPDC sources can outperform the heralding based on highly advanced photon-number-resolving detectors. Our results show a route for on-demand single-photon generation and the practical realization of scalable linear optical quantum-information processing.

  19. Butterfly scales as bionic templates for complex ordered nanophotonic materials: A pathway to biomimetic plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Pantelić, Dejan; Sarajlić, Milija; Savić-Šević, Svetlana; Matović, Jovan; Jelenković, Branislav; Vasiljević-Radović, Dana; Ćurčić, Srećko; Vuković, Slobodan; Pavlović, Vladimir; Buha, Jelena; Lačković, Vesna; Labudović-Borović, Milica; Ćurčić, Božidar

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we propose a possible use of butterfly scales as templates for ordered 2D or 3D nanophotonic materials, with complexity not easily reproducible by conventional micro/nanofabrication methods. Functionalization through laminar nanocompositing is utilized to impart novel properties to the biological scaffold. An extremely wide variability of butterfly scale forms, shapes, sizes and fine structures is observed in nature, many of them already possessing peculiar optical properties. Their nanophotonic functionalization ensures a large choice of forms and functions, including enhanced light localization, light and plasmon waveguiding and general metamaterial behavior, to mention a few. We show that one is able to achieve a combination of plasmonics and bionics, resulting in functionalities seldom if ever met in nature. As an illustration we have analyzed the photonic properties of the nanostructured scales on the wings of Purple Emperor butterflies Apatura ilia, Apatura iris and Sasakia charonda. Their intricate nanometer-sized structures produce remarkable ultraviolet-blue iridescence, spectrally and directionally narrow. We present our analysis of their plasmonic/nanophotonic functionalization including preliminary calculations and initial experimental results. As a simple example, we used radiofrequent sputtering to produce nanoaperture-based plasmonic structures at a fraction of the cost and necessary engineering efforts compared to the conventional top-down methods. We conclude that the described pathway to biomimetic plasmonics offers potentials for significant expansion of the nanophotonic and nanoplasmonic material toolbox.

  20. Active temporal multiplexing of indistinguishable heralded single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, C.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Collins, M. J.; Mahendra, A.; Helt, L. G.; Steel, M. J.; Choi, D.-Y.; Chae, C. J.; Leong, P. H. W.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is a fundamental challenge in quantum optics to deterministically generate indistinguishable single photons through non-deterministic nonlinear optical processes, due to the intrinsic coupling of single- and multi-photon-generation probabilities in these processes. Actively multiplexing photons generated in many temporal modes can decouple these probabilities, but key issues are to minimize resource requirements to allow scalability, and to ensure indistinguishability of the generated photons. Here we demonstrate the multiplexing of photons from four temporal modes solely using fibre-integrated optics and off-the-shelf electronic components. We show a 100% enhancement to the single-photon output probability without introducing additional multi-photon noise. Photon indistinguishability is confirmed by a fourfold Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference with a 91+/-16% visibility after subtracting multi-photon noise due to high pump power. Our demonstration paves the way for scalable multiplexing of many non-deterministic photon sources to a single near-deterministic source, which will be of benefit to future quantum photonic technologies.

  1. Active temporal multiplexing of indistinguishable heralded single photons.

    PubMed

    Xiong, C; Zhang, X; Liu, Z; Collins, M J; Mahendra, A; Helt, L G; Steel, M J; Choi, D-Y; Chae, C J; Leong, P H W; Eggleton, B J

    2016-01-01

    It is a fundamental challenge in quantum optics to deterministically generate indistinguishable single photons through non-deterministic nonlinear optical processes, due to the intrinsic coupling of single- and multi-photon-generation probabilities in these processes. Actively multiplexing photons generated in many temporal modes can decouple these probabilities, but key issues are to minimize resource requirements to allow scalability, and to ensure indistinguishability of the generated photons. Here we demonstrate the multiplexing of photons from four temporal modes solely using fibre-integrated optics and off-the-shelf electronic components. We show a 100% enhancement to the single-photon output probability without introducing additional multi-photon noise. Photon indistinguishability is confirmed by a fourfold Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference with a 91±16% visibility after subtracting multi-photon noise due to high pump power. Our demonstration paves the way for scalable multiplexing of many non-deterministic photon sources to a single near-deterministic source, which will be of benefit to future quantum photonic technologies. PMID:26996317

  2. Active temporal multiplexing of indistinguishable heralded single photons

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Z.; Collins, M. J.; Mahendra, A.; Helt, L. G.; Steel, M. J.; Choi, D. -Y.; Chae, C. J.; Leong, P. H. W.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    It is a fundamental challenge in quantum optics to deterministically generate indistinguishable single photons through non-deterministic nonlinear optical processes, due to the intrinsic coupling of single- and multi-photon-generation probabilities in these processes. Actively multiplexing photons generated in many temporal modes can decouple these probabilities, but key issues are to minimize resource requirements to allow scalability, and to ensure indistinguishability of the generated photons. Here we demonstrate the multiplexing of photons from four temporal modes solely using fibre-integrated optics and off-the-shelf electronic components. We show a 100% enhancement to the single-photon output probability without introducing additional multi-photon noise. Photon indistinguishability is confirmed by a fourfold Hong–Ou–Mandel quantum interference with a 91±16% visibility after subtracting multi-photon noise due to high pump power. Our demonstration paves the way for scalable multiplexing of many non-deterministic photon sources to a single near-deterministic source, which will be of benefit to future quantum photonic technologies. PMID:26996317

  3. Broadband directional coupling in aluminum nitride nanophotonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, Matthias; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2013-03-25

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)-on-insulator has emerged as a promising platform for the realization of linear and non-linear integrated photonic circuits. In order to efficiently route optical signals on-chip, precise control over the interaction and polarization of evanescently coupled waveguide modes is required. Here we employ nanophotonic AlN waveguides to realize directional couplers with a broad coupling bandwidth and low insertion loss. We achieve uniform splitting of incoming modes, confirmed by high extinction-ratio exceeding 33dB in integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. Optimized three-waveguide couplers furthermore allow for extending the coupling bandwidth over traditional side-coupled devices by almost an order of magnitude, with variable splitting ratio. Our work illustrates the potential of AlN circuits for coupled waveguide optics, DWDM applications and integrated polarization diversity schemes. PMID:23546114

  4. Mode conversion using stimulated Brillouin scattering in nanophotonic silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Aryanfar, Iman; Wolff, Christian; Steel, M J; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Poulton, Christopher G

    2014-11-17

    We theoretically and numerically investigate Stimulated Brillouin Scattering generated mode conversion in high-contrast suspended silicon nanophotonic waveguides. We predict significantly enhanced mode conversion when the linked effects of radiation pressure and motion of the waveguide boundaries are taken into account. The mode conversion is more than 10 times larger than would be predicted if the effect of radiation pressure is not taken into account: we find a waveguide length of 740 μm is required for 20dB of mode conversion, assuming a total pump power of 1W. This is sufficient to bring the effect into the realm of chip-scale photonic waveguides. We explore the interaction between the different types of acoustic modes that can exist within these waveguides, and show how the presence of these modes leads to enhanced conversion between the different possible optical modes. PMID:25402165

  5. Ultimate Limit of Light Extinction by Nanophotonic Structures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Verre, Ruggero; García de Abajo, F Javier; Apell, S Peter; Käll, Mikael

    2015-11-11

    Nanophotonic structures make it possible to precisely engineer the optical response at deep subwavelength scales. However, a fundamental understanding of the general performance limits remains a challenge. Here we use extensive electrodynamics simulations to demonstrate that the so-called f-sum rule sets a strict upper bound to the light extinction by nanostructures regardless their internal interactions and retardation effects. In particular, we show that the f-sum rule applies to arbitrarily complex plasmonic metal structures that exhibit an extraordinary spectral sensitivity to size, shape, near-field coupling effects, and incident polarization. The results may be used for benchmarking light scattering and absorption efficiencies, thus imposing fundamental limits on solar light harvesting, biomedical photonics, and optical communications. PMID:26478949

  6. Photonic devices and systems embedded with nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan; Soganci, Ibrahim Murat; Mutlugun, Evren; Tek, Sumeyra; Huyal, Ilkem Ozge

    2006-10-01

    We review our research work on the development of photonic devices and systems embedded with nanocyrstals for new functionality within EU Phoremost Network of Excellence on nanophotonics. Here we report on CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-based hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems used for scintillation to enhance optical detection and imaging in the ultraviolet range and for optical modulation via electric field dependent optical absorption and photoluminescence in the visible. In our collaboration with DYO, we also present photocatalytic TiO II nanoparticles incorporated in solgel matrix that are optically activated in the ultraviolet for the purpose of self-cleaning.

  7. Standardizing Activation Analysis: New Software for Photon Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Green, J.; Segebade, C.

    2011-06-01

    Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) of environmental, archaeological and industrial samples requires extensive data analysis that is susceptible to error. For the purpose of saving time, manpower and minimizing error, a computer program was designed, built and implemented using SQL, Access 2007 and asp.net technology to automate this process. Based on the peak information of the spectrum and assisted by its PAA library, the program automatically identifies elements in the samples and calculates their concentrations and respective uncertainties. The software also could be operated in browser/server mode, which gives the possibility to use it anywhere the internet is accessible. By switching the nuclide library and the related formula behind, the new software can be easily expanded to neutron activation analysis (NAA), charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Implementation of this would standardize the analysis of nuclear activation data. Results from this software were compared to standard PAA analysis with excellent agreement. With minimum input from the user, the software has proven to be fast, user-friendly and reliable.

  8. Scalable Fabrication of Integrated Nanophotonic Circuits on Arrays of Thin Single Crystal Diamond Membrane Windows.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Afaq H; Rath, Patrik; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kühn, Stefan; Pernice, Wolfram H P; Prawer, Steven

    2016-05-11

    Diamond has emerged as a promising platform for nanophotonic, optical, and quantum technologies. High-quality, single crystalline substrates of acceptable size are a prerequisite to meet the demanding requirements on low-level impurities and low absorption loss when targeting large photonic circuits. Here, we describe a scalable fabrication method for single crystal diamond membrane windows that achieves three major goals with one fabrication method: providing high quality diamond, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy; achieving homogeneously thin membranes, enabled by ion implantation; and providing compatibility with established planar fabrication via lithography and vertical etching. On such suspended diamond membranes we demonstrate a suite of photonic components as building blocks for nanophotonic circuits. Monolithic grating couplers are used to efficiently couple light between photonic circuits and optical fibers. In waveguide coupled optical ring resonators, we find loaded quality factors up to 66 000 at a wavelength of 1560 nm, corresponding to propagation loss below 7.2 dB/cm. Our approach holds promise for the scalable implementation of future diamond quantum photonic technologies and all-diamond photonic metrology tools. PMID:27111636

  9. Nanophotonic front electrodes for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetzold, Ulrich Wilhelm; Qiu, Weiming; Finger, Friedhelm; Poortmans, Jef; Cheyns, David

    2015-04-01

    In less than 3 years' time, a vast progress in power conversion efficiencies of organometal halide perovskite solar cells has been achieved by optimization of the device architecture, charge transport layers, and interfaces. A further increase in these efficiencies is expected from an improvement in the optical properties via anti-reflection coatings and nanophotonic light management concepts. In this contribution, we report on the development and implementation of a nanophotonic front electrode for perovskite solar cells. The nanostructures were replicated via the versatile and large-area compatible UV-nanoimprint lithography. The shallow design of the used transparent and conductive nanostructures enabled easy integration into our solution-based baseline process. Prototype methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells show an improvement of 5% in short-circuit current density and an improvement from 9.6% to 9.9% in power conversion efficiency compared to the flat reference device.

  10. Design of nanophotonic, hot-electron solar-blind ultraviolet detectors with a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-12-01

    Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection refers to photon detection specifically in the wavelength range of 200 nm-320 nm. Without background noises from solar radiation, it has broad applications from homeland security to environmental monitoring. The most commonly used solid state devices for this application are wide band gap (WBG) semiconductor photodetectors (Eg > 3.5 eV). However, WBG semiconductors are difficult to grow and integrate with Si readout integrated circuits (ROICs). In this paper, we design a nanophotonic metal-oxide-semiconductor structure on Si for solar-blind UV detectors. Instead of using semiconductors as the active absorber, we use Sn nano-grating structures to absorb UV photons and generate hot electrons for internal photoemission across the Sn/SiO2 interfacial barrier, thereby generating photocurrent between the metal and the n-type Si region upon UV excitation. Moreover, the transported hot electron has an excess kinetic energy >3 eV, large enough to induce impact ionization and generate another free electron in the conduction band of n-Si. This process doubles the quantum efficiency. On the other hand, the large metal/oxide interfacial energy barrier (>3.5 eV) also enables solar-blind UV detection by blocking the less energetic electrons excited by visible photons. With optimized design, ˜75% UV absorption and hot electron excitation can be achieved within the mean free path of ˜20 nm from the metal/oxide interface. This feature greatly enhances hot electron transport across the interfacial barrier to generate photocurrent. The simple geometry of the Sn nano-gratings and the MOS structure make it easy to fabricate and integrate with Si ROICs compared to existing solar-blind UV detection schemes. The presented device structure also breaks through the conventional notion that photon absorption by metal is always a loss in solid-state photodetectors, and it can potentially be extended to other active metal photonic devices.

  11. Engineering metallic nanostructures for plasmonics and nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Nathan C; Nagpal, Prashant; McPeak, Kevin M; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures now play an important role in many applications. In particular, for the emerging fields of plasmonics and nanophotonics, the ability to engineer metals on nanometric scales allows the development of new devices and the study of exciting physics. This review focuses on top-down nanofabrication techniques for engineering metallic nanostructures, along with computational and experimental characterization techniques. A variety of current and emerging applications are also covered. PMID:22790420

  12. Estimating ROI activity concentration with photon-processing and photon-counting SPECT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new class of imaging systems, referred to as photon-processing (PP) systems, are being developed that uses real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate multiple attributes per detected photon and store these attributes in a list format. PP systems could have a number of potential advantages compared to systems that bin photons based on attributes such as energy, projection angle, and position, referred to as photon-counting (PC) systems. For example, PP systems do not suffer from binning-related information loss and provide the potential to extract information from attributes such as energy deposited by the detected photon. To quantify the effects of this advantage on task performance, objective evaluation studies are required. We performed this study in the context of quantitative 2-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with the end task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a region of interest (ROI). We first theoretically outline the effect of null space on estimating the mean activity concentration, and argue that due to this effect, PP systems could have better estimation performance compared to PC systems with noise-free data. To evaluate the performance of PP and PC systems with noisy data, we developed a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based analytic method to estimate the activity concentration from PP systems. Using simulations, we studied the accuracy and precision of this technique in estimating the activity concentration. We used this framework to objectively compare PP and PC systems on the activity concentration estimation task. We investigated the effects of varying the size of the ROI and varying the number of bins for the attribute corresponding to the angular orientation of the detector in a continuously rotating SPECT system. The results indicate that in several cases, PP systems offer improved estimation performance compared to PC systems.

  13. Testing the quasi-absolute method in photon activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Starovoitova, V.; Segebade, C.

    2013-04-19

    In photon activation analysis (PAA), relative methods are widely used because of their accuracy and precision. Absolute methods, which are conducted without any assistance from calibration materials, are seldom applied for the difficulty in obtaining photon flux in measurements. This research is an attempt to perform a new absolute approach in PAA - quasi-absolute method - by retrieving photon flux in the sample through Monte Carlo simulation. With simulated photon flux and database of experimental cross sections, it is possible to calculate the concentration of target elements in the sample directly. The QA/QC procedures to solidify the research are discussed in detail. Our results show that the accuracy of the method for certain elements is close to a useful level in practice. Furthermore, the future results from the quasi-absolute method can also serve as a validation technique for experimental data on cross sections. The quasi-absolute method looks promising.

  14. Photon-photon absorption and the uniqueness of the spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the feedback of e(+)-e(-) pair reinjection in a plasma due to photon-photon absorption of its own radiation was examined. Under the assumption of continuous electron injection with a power law spectrum E to the minus gamma power and Compton losses only, it is shown that for gamma 2 the steady state electron distribution function has a unique form independent of the primary injection spectrum. This electron distribution function can, by synchrotron emission, reproduce the general characteristics of the observed radio to optical active galactic nuclei spectra. Inverse Compton scattering of the synchrotron photons by the same electron distribution can account for their X-ray spectra, and also implies gamma ray emission from these objects. This result is invoked to account for the similarity of these spectra, and it is consistent with observations of the diffuse gamma ray background.

  15. Precision tuning of silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Charlton J.

    In recent years, silicon photonics has begun to transition from research to commercialization. Decades of relentless advances in the field of computing have led to fundamental bottlenecks in the design of computers, especially in interconnect bandwidth density. For IBM, silicon photonics has become a potential technological solution for enabling the future of server systems and cutting-edge supercomputers. For Intel, silicon photonics has become a cost-effective solution for supplying the necessary bandwidth needed by future generations of consumer computing products. While the field of silicon photonics is now advancing at a rapid pace there is still a great deal of research to be done. This thesis investigates ways of improving the performance of fundamental silicon nanophotonic devices through post-fabrication processes. These devices include numerous optical resonator designs as well as slow-light waveguides. Optical resonators are used to confine photons both spatially and temporally. In recent years, there has been much research, both theoretical and experimental, into improving the design of optical resonators. Improving these devices through fabrication processes has generally been less studied. Optical waveguides are used to guide the flow of photons over chip-level distances. Slow-light waveguides have also been studied by many research groups in recent years and can be applied to an increasingly wide-range of applications. The work can be divided into several parts: Chapter 1 is an introduction to the field of silicon photonics as well as an overview of the fabrication, experimental and computational techniques used throughout this work. Chapters 2, 3 and 4 describe our investigations into the precision tuning of nanophotonic devices using laser-assisted thermal oxidation and atomic layer deposition. Chapters 5 and 6 describe our investigations into improving the sidewall roughness of silicon photonic devices using hydrogen annealing and excimer laser

  16. Non-line-of-sight active imaging of scattered photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Velten, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Laser Gated Viewing is a prominent sensing technology for optical imaging in harsh environments and can be applied to the vision through fog, smoke and other degraded environmental conditions as well as to the vision through sea water in submarine operation. A direct imaging of non-scattered photons (or ballistic photons) is limited in range and performance by the free optical path length i.e. the length in which a photon can propagate without interaction with scattering particles or object surfaces. The imaging and analysis of scattered photons can overcome these classical limitations and it is possible to realize a non-line-of-sight imaging. The spatial and temporal distribution of scattered photons can be analyzed by means of computational optics and their information of the scenario can be restored. In the case of Lambertian scattering sources the scattered photons carry information of the complete environment. Especial the information outside the line of sight or outside the visibility range is of high interest. Here, we discuss approaches for non line of sight active imaging with different indirect and direct illumination concepts (point, surface and volume scattering sources).

  17. Nanophotonic resonators for InP solar cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel A; Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy N

    2016-05-16

    We describe high efficiency thin-film InP solar cells that utilize a periodic array of TiO2 nanocylinders. These nanophotonic resonators are found to reduce the solar-weighted average reflectivity of an InP solar cell to ~1.3%, outperforming the best double-layer antireflection coatings. The coupling between Mie scattering resonances and thin-film interference effects accurately describes the optical enhancement provided by the nanocylinders. The spectrally resolved reflectivity and J-V characteristics of the device under AM1.5G illumination are determined via coupled optical and electrical simulations, resulting in a predicted power conversion efficiency > 23%. We conclude that the nanostructured coating reduces reflection without negatively affecting the electronic properties of the InP solar cell by separating the nanostructured optical components from the active layer of the device. PMID:27409965

  18. Origin of high strength and nanophotonic properties of crab shell (Paralithodes camtschaticus)

    SciTech Connect

    Aurognzeb, Deeder

    2009-03-01

    Understanding biomaterial is very important for superior material development. Here, we report structural and nanophotonic properties of crab shell. The fibrous shell is composed of nanocrystalline calcite, which gives the structure very high strength. Scanning electron microscope cross section and energy dispersive x-ray shows top surface (reddish) is fibrous with metal nanoparticle segregation, while the bottom layer is composed of layered nanohole array similar to air-dielectric photonic lattice structure. The air-dielectric nanohole arrays are disordered but correlated with fractal dimension >1 and able to block infrared. Nanocrystalline calcite and metal nanoparticles can also block extreme level of UV.

  19. Micro- and nanophotonic structures in the visible and near infrared spectral region for optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Bui, Huy; Van Nguyen, Thuy; Nguyen, The Anh; Son Pham, Thanh; Cam Hoang, Thi Hong; Ngo, Quang Minh

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we present some research results on the micro and nano-photonic structures in the visible and near infrared spectral region for optical devices that have been done within the framework of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Program of Institute of Materials Science. In the first part, we report the design and fabrication of 1D photonic structure based on porous silicon layers fabricated by electrochemical etching method and some of their potential applications such as optical filters, microcavity and optical sensors for distinguishing the content of bio-gasoline. In addition, we demonstrate some results on preparation of the 2D and 3D nanophotonic structures based on silica opal layers prepared by sol-gel and self-assembled methods. In the second part, we demonstrate the results of lasing emissions of erbium ions in the visible and near infrared zone from microcavity. The observation of emission of single-mode green light at the wavelength of 537 nm from erbium ions in the microcavity is interesting for the study of atom-photon interaction phenomenon. In the last part, we will show some new results of design and fabrication of nanocomposite based on nanoscale TiO2 and/or ZnO and nanoparticles of semiconductors and metals, which are oriented to the fabrication of energy conversion and photo-reactor devices. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2012, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  20. A quantum photonic dissipative transport theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Chan U.; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, a quantum transport theory for describing photonic dissipative transport dynamics in nanophotonics is developed. The nanophotonic devices concerned in this paper consist of on-chip all-optical integrated circuits incorporating photonic bandgap waveguides and driven resonators embedded in nanostructured photonic crystals. The photonic transport through waveguides is entirely determined from the exact master equation of the driven resonators, which is obtained by explicitly eliminating all the degrees of freedom of the waveguides (treated as reservoirs). Back-reactions from the reservoirs are fully taken into account. The relation between the driven photonic dynamics and photocurrents is obtained explicitly. The non-Markovian memory structure and quantum decoherence dynamics in photonic transport can then be fully addressed. As an illustration, the theory is utilized to study the transport dynamics of a photonic transistor consisting of a nanocavity coupled to two waveguides in photonic crystals. The controllability of photonic transport through the external driven field is demonstrated.

  1. Advanced active quenching circuits for single-photon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipčević, M.; Christensen, B. G.; Kwiat, P. G.; Gauthier, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Commercial photon-counting modules, often based on actively quenched solid-state avalanche photodiode sensors, are used in wide variety of applications. Manufacturers characterize their detectors by specifying a small set of parameters, such as detection efficiency, dead time, dark counts rate, afterpulsing probability and single photon arrival time resolution (jitter), however they usually do not specify the conditions under which these parameters are constant or present a sufficient description. In this work, we present an in-depth analysis of the active quenching process and identify intrinsic limitations and engineering challenges. Based on that, we investigate the range of validity of the typical parameters used by two commercial detectors. We identify an additional set of imperfections that must be specified in order to sufficiently characterize the behavior of single-photon counting detectors in realistic applications. The additional imperfections include rate-dependence of the dead time, jitter, detection delay shift, and "twilighting." Also, the temporal distribution of afterpulsing and various artifacts of the electronics are important. We find that these additional non-ideal behaviors can lead to unexpected effects or strong deterioration of the system's performance. Specifically, we discuss implications of these new findings in a few applications in which single-photon detectors play a major role: the security of a quantum cryptographic protocol, the quality of single-photon-based random number generators and a few other applications. Finally, we describe an example of an optimized avalanche quenching circuit for a high-rate quantum key distribution system based on time-bin entangled photons.

  2. True stopping of light: a new regime for nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsakmakidis, Kosmas L.; Zhang, Xiang; Hess, Ortwin

    2014-09-01

    The extremely large speed of light is a tremendous asset but also makes it challenging to control, store or shrink beyond its wavelength. Particularly, reducing the speed of light down to zero is of fundamental scientific interest that could usher in a host of important photonic applications, some of which are hitherto fundamentally inaccessible. These include cavity-free, low-threshold nanolasers, novel solar-cell designs for efficient harvesting of light, nanoscale quantum information processing (owing to the enhanced density of states), as well as enhanced biomolecular sensing. We shall here present nanoplasmonic-based schemes where timedependent sources excite "complex-frequency" modes in uniform (plasmonic) heterostructures, enabling complete and dispersion-free stopping of light pulses, resilient to realistic levels of dissipative, radiative and surface-roughness losses. Our theoretical and computational results demonstrate extraordinary large lightdeceleration factors (of the order of 15,000,000) in integrated nanophotonic media, comparable only to those attainable with ultracold atomic vapours or with quantum coherence effects, such as coherent population oscillations, in ruby crystals.

  3. Nanophotonic light trapping with patterned transparent conductive oxides.

    PubMed

    Vasudev, Alok P; Schuller, Jon A; Brongersma, Mark L

    2012-05-01

    Transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) play a crucial role in solar cells by efficiently transmitting sunlight and extracting photo-generated charge. Here, we show how nanophotonics concepts can be used to transform TCO films into effective photon management layers for solar cells. This is accomplished by patterning the TCO layer present on virtually every thin-film solar cell into an array of subwavelength beams that support optical (Mie) resonances. These resonances can be exploited to concentrate randomly polarized sunlight or to effectively couple it to guided and diffracted modes. We first demonstrate these concepts with a model system consisting of a patterned TCO layer on a thin silicon (Si) film and outline a design methodology for high-performance, TCO-based light trapping coatings. We then show that the short circuit current density from a 300 nm thick amorphous silicon (a-Si) cell with an optimized TCO anti-reflection coating can be enhanced from 19.9 mA/cm2 to 21.1 mA/cm2, out of a possible 26.0 mA/cm2, by using an optimized nanobeam array. The key differences and advantages over plasmonic light trapping layers will be discussed. PMID:22712089

  4. Optically Resonant Nanophotonic Devices for Label-Free Biomolecular Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Julie; Mandal, Sudeep; Erickson, David

    Optical devices, such as surface plasmon resonance chips and waveguide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometers, have long been successfully used as label-free biomolecular sensors. Recently, however, there has been increased interest in developing new approaches to biomolecular detection that can improve on the limit of detection, specificity, and multiplexibility of these early devices and address emerging challenges in pathogen detection, disease diagnosis, and drug discovery. As we describe in this chapter, planar optically resonant nanophotonic devices (such as ring resonators, whispering gallery modes, and photonic crystal cavities) are one method that shows promise in significantly advancing the technology. Here we first provide a short review of these devices focusing on a handful of approaches illustrative of the state of the art. We then frame the major challenge to improving the technology as being the ability to provide simultaneously spatial localization of the electromagnetic energy and biomolecular binding events. We then introduce our “Nanoscale Optofluidic Sensor Arrays” which represents our approach to addressing this challenge. It is demonstrated how these devices serve to enable multiplexed detection while localizing the electromagnetic energy to a volume as small as a cubic wavelength. Challenges involved in the targeted immobilization of biomolecules over such a small area are discussed and our solutions presented. In general, we have tried to write this chapter with the novice in mind, providing details on the fabrication and immobilization methods that we have used and how one might adapt our approach to their designs.

  5. Photonic network R and D activities in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aovama, Tomonori

    2005-11-01

    R and D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current, ongoing R and D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and WDM fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching, and control plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP over WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R and D programs for photonic networks over the next five years until 2010, by focusing on the report which has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R and D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis through the customer's initiative, to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  6. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light. PMID:26214251

  7. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  8. Dielectric resonator antenna for applications in nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Malheiros-Silveira, Gilliard N; Wiederhecker, Gustavo S; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2013-01-14

    Optical nanoantennas, especially of the dipole type, have been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated by many research groups. Likewise, the plasmonic waveguides and optical circuits have experienced significant advances. In radio frequencies and microwaves a category of antenna known as dielectric resonator antenna (DRA), whose radiant element is a dielectric resonator (DR), has been designed for several applications, including satellite and radar systems. In this letter, we explore the possibilities and advantages to design nano DRAs (NDRAs), i. e., DRAs for nanophotonics applications. Numerical demonstrations showing the fundamental antenna parameters for a circular cylindrical NDRA type have been carried out for the short (S), conventional (C), and long (L) bands of the optical communication spectrum. PMID:23389016

  9. Vertical optical ring resonators fully integrated with nanophotonic waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Abbas; Kleinert, Moritz; Stolarek, David; Zimmermann, Lars; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate full integration of vertical optical ring resonators with silicon nanophotonic waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates to accomplish a significant step towards 3D photonic integration. The on-chip integration is realized by rolling up 2D differentially strained TiO2 nanomembranes into 3D microtube cavities on a nanophotonic microchip. The integration configuration allows for out of plane optical coupling between the in-plane nanowaveguides and the vertical microtube cavities as a compact and mechanically stable optical unit, which could enable refined vertical light transfer in 3D stacks of multiple photonic layers. In this vertical transmission scheme, resonant filtering of optical signals at telecommunication wavelengths is demonstrated based on subwavelength thick walled microcavities. Moreover, an array of microtube cavities is prepared and each microtube cavity is integrated with multiple waveguides which opens up interesting perspectives towards parallel and multi-routing through a single cavity device as well as high-throughput optofluidic sensing schemes.

  10. Design of T-shaped nanophotonic wire waveguide for optical interconnection in H-tree network.

    PubMed

    Kurt, H; Giden, I H; Citrin, D S

    2011-12-19

    Nanophotonic wire waveguides play an important role for the realization of highly dense integrated photonic circuits. The miniaturization of optoelectronic devices and realization of ultra-small integrated circuits strongly demand compact waveguide branches. T-shaped versions of nanophotonic wires are the first stage of both power splitting and optical-interconnection systems based on guided-wave optics; however, the acute transitions at the waveguide junctions typically induce huge bending losses in terms of radiated modes. Both 2D and 3D finite-difference time-domain methods are employed to monitor the efficient light propagation. By introducing appropriate combinations of dielectric posts around the dielectric-waveguide junctions within the 4.096μm×4.096μm region, we are able to reduce the bending losses dramatically and increase the transmission efficiency from low values of 18% in the absence of the dielectric posts to approximately 49% and 43% in 2D and 3D cases, respectively. These findings may lead to the implementation of such T-junctions in near-future high-density integrated photonics to deliver optical-clock signals via H-tree network. PMID:22274265

  11. Hybrid Group IV Nanophotonic Structures Incorporating Diamond Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyuan Linda; Ishiwata, Hitoshi; Babinec, Thomas M; Radulaski, Marina; Müller, Kai; Lagoudakis, Konstantinos G; Dory, Constantin; Dahl, Jeremy; Edgington, Robert; Soulière, Veronique; Ferro, Gabriel; Fokin, Andrey A; Schreiner, Peter R; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A; Vučković, Jelena

    2016-01-13

    We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV(-)) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid diamond-SiC structures are realized by combining the growth of nano- and microdiamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV(-) color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ion-implantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV(-) on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV(-) centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV(-) lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow line widths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV(-) lines from all-diamond nanopillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV(-) centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing. PMID:26695059

  12. Millisecond Photon Lifetime in a Slow-Light Microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, V.; Rasoloniaina, A.; Guillemé, P.; Rochard, P.; Féron, P.; Mortier, M.; Levenson, A.; Bencheikh, K.; Yacomotti, A.; Dumeige, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Optical microcavities with ultralong photon storage times are of central importance for integrated nanophotonics. To date, record quality (Q ) factors up to 1011 have been measured in millimetric-size single-crystal whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators, and 1010 in silica or glass microresonators. We show that, by introducing slow-light effects in an active WGM microresonator, it is possible to enhance the photon lifetime by several orders of magnitude, thus circumventing both fabrication imperfections and residual absorption. The slow-light effect is obtained from coherent population oscillations in an erbium-doped fluoride glass microsphere, producing strong dispersion of the WGM (group index ng˜106). As a result, a photon lifetime up to 2.5 ms at room temperature has been measured, corresponding to a Q factor of 3 ×1012 at 1530 nm. This system could yield a new type of optical memory microarray with ultralong storage times.

  13. Polarization rotator-splitters in standard active silicon photonics platforms.

    PubMed

    Sacher, Wesley D; Barwicz, Tymon; Taylor, Benjamin J F; Poon, Joyce K S

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate various silicon-on-insulator polarization management structures based on a polarization rotator-splitter that uses a bi-level taper TM0-TE1 mode converter. The designs are fully compatible with standard active silicon photonics platforms with no new levels required and were implemented in the IME baseline and IME-OpSIS silicon photonics processes. We demonstrate a polarization rotator-splitter with polarization crosstalk < -13 dB over a bandwidth of 50 nm. Then, we improve the crosstalk to < -22 dB over a bandwidth of 80 nm by integrating the polarization rotator-splitter with directional coupler polarization filters. Finally, we demonstrate a polarization controller by integrating the polarization rotator-splitters with directional couplers, thermal tuners, and PIN diode phase shifters. PMID:24663698

  14. Ideal, constant-loss nanophotonic mode converter using a Lagrangian approach.

    PubMed

    Horth, Alexandre; Cheben, Pavel; Schmid, Jens H; Kashyap, Raman; Quitoriano, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-21

    Coupling light between an optical fiber and a silicon nanophotonic waveguide is a challenge facing the field of silicon photonics to which various mode converters have been proposed. Inverted tapers stand out as a practical solution enabling efficient and broadband mode conversion. Current design approaches often use linearly-shaped tapers and two dimensional approximations; however, these approaches have not been rigorously verified and there is not an overarching design framework to guide the design process. Here, using a Lagrangian formulation, we propose an original, constant-loss framework for designing shape-controlled photonic devices and apply this formalism to derive an ideal constant-loss taper (CLT). We specifically report on the experimental demonstration of a fabrication-tolerant, 15-µm-long CLT coupler, that produces 0.56 dB fiber-chip coupling efficiency, the highest efficiency-per-length ratio ever reported. PMID:27136856

  15. Control of photon transport properties in nanocomposite nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffa, M.; Fasano, V.; Camposeo, A.; Persano, L.; Pisignano, D.

    2016-02-01

    Active nanowires and nanofibers can be realized by the electric-field induced stretching of polymer solutions with sufficient molecular entanglements. The resulting nanomaterials are attracting an increasing attention in view of their application in a wide variety of fields, including optoelectronics, photonics, energy harvesting, nanoelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems. Realizing nanocomposite nanofibers is especially interesting in this respect. In particular, methods suitable for embedding inorganic nanocrystals in electrified jets and then in active fiber systems allow for controlling light-scattering and refractive index properties in the realized fibrous materials. We here report on the design, realization, and morphological and spectroscopic characterization of new species of active, composite nanowires and nanofibers for nanophotonics. We focus on the properties of light-confinement and photon transport along the nanowire longitudinal axis, and on how these depend on nanoparticle incorporation. Optical losses mechanisms and their influence on device design and performances are also presented and discussed.

  16. Strong optical activity from twisted-cross photonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Decker, M; Ruther, M; Kriegler, C E; Zhou, J; Soukoulis, C M; Linden, S; Wegener, M

    2009-08-15

    Following a recent theoretical suggestion and microwave experiments, we fabricate photonic metamaterials composed of pairs of twisted gold crosses using two successive electron-beam-lithography steps and intermediate planarization via a spin-on dielectric. The resulting two effective resonances of the coupled system lie in the 1-2 microm wavelength regime and exhibit pronounced circular dichroism, while the circular polarization conversion is very small. In between the two resonances, we find a fairly broad spectral regime with strong optical activity, i.e., with a pure rotation of incident linear polarization. The measured optical transmittance spectra agree well with theory. PMID:19684829

  17. Longitudinal photons in a relativistic magneto-active plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N. L.; Rehman, Ayesha; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2007-10-15

    This paper presents some aspects of interaction of superstrong high-frequency electromagnetic waves with strongly magnetized plasmas. The case in which the photon-photon interaction dominates the photon-plasma particle interaction is considered. Strictly speaking, the photon and photon bunch interaction leads to the self-modulation of the photon gas. Assuming that the density of the plasma does not change, the dispersion relation, which includes relativistic self-modulation, is investigated. The existence of longitudinal photons in a strong magnetic field has the well-known Bogoliubov-type energy spectrum. The stability of the photon flow is investigated and an expression for Landau damping of the photons is obtained. Finally, it has been shown that the interaction of even a very strong electromagnetic radiation with a plasma does not always lead to instability, but causes only a change in plasma properties, whereby the plasma remains stable.

  18. Nanophotonic light trapping in polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cells using periodically nanoimprint-structured glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Christiane; Xavier, Jolly; Preidel, Veit; Wyss, Philippe; Sontheimer, Tobias; Rech, Bernd; Probst, Jürgen; Hülsen, Christoph; Löchel, Bernd; Erko, Alexei; Burger, Sven; Schmidt, Frank; Back, Franziska; Rudigier-Voigt, Eveline

    2013-09-01

    A smart light trapping scheme is essential to tap the full potential of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film solar cells. Periodic nanophotonic structures are of particular interest as they allow to substantially surpass the Lambertian limit from ray optics in selected spectral ranges. We use nanoimprint-lithography for the periodic patterning of sol-gel coated glass substrates, ensuring a cost-effective, large-area production of thin-film solar cell devices. Periodic crystalline silicon nanoarchitectures are prepared on these textured substrates by high-rate silicon film evaporation, solid phase crystallization and chemical etching. Poly-Si microhole arrays in square lattice geometry with an effective thickness of about 2μm and with comparatively large pitch (2 μm) exhibit a large absorption enhancement (A900nm = 52%) compared to a planar film (A900nm ~ 7%). For the optimization of light trapping in the desired spectral region, the geometry of the nanophotonic structures with varying pitch from 600 nm to 800 nm is tailored and investigated for the cases of poly-Si nanopillar arrays of hexagonal lattice geometry, exhibiting an increase in absorption in comparison to planar film attributed to nanophotonic wave optic effects. These structures inspire the design of prospective applications such as highly-efficient nanostructured poly-Si thin-film solar cells and large-area photonic crystals.

  19. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  20. Frequency agile microwave photonic notch filter with anomalously high stopband rejection.

    PubMed

    Marpaung, David; Morrison, Blair; Pant, Ravi; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2013-11-01

    We report a novel class microwave photonic (MWP) notch filter with a very narrow isolation bandwidth (10 MHz), an ultrahigh stopband rejection (>60 dB), a wide frequency tuning (1-30 GHz), and flexible bandwidth reconfigurability (10-65 MHz). This performance is enabled by a new concept of sideband amplitude and phase controls using an electro-optic modulator and an optical filter. This concept enables energy efficient operation in active MWP notch filters, and opens up a pathway toward enabling low-power nanophotonic devices as high-performance RF filters. PMID:24177078

  1. Photonic crystal lasers using wavelength-scale embedded active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari; Takeda, Koji; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Fujii, Takuro; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Lasers with ultra-low operating energy are desired for use in chip-to-chip and on-chip optical interconnects. If we are to reduce the operating energy, we must reduce the active volume. Therefore, a photonic crystal (PhC) laser with a wavelength-scale cavity has attracted a lot of attention because a PhC provides a large Q-factor with a small volume. To improve this device's performance, we employ an embedded active region structure in which the wavelength-scale active region is buried with an InP PhC slab. This structure enables us to achieve effective confinement of both carriers and photons, and to improve the thermal resistance of the device. Thus, we have obtained a large external differential quantum efficiency of 55% and an output power of -10 dBm by optical pumping. For electrical pumping, we use a lateral p-i-n structure that employs Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation for p-type and n-type doping, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature continuous-wave operation with a threshold current of 7.8 µA and a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz. The results of an experimental bit error rate measurement with a 10 Gbit s-1 NRZ signal reveal the minimum operating energy for transferring a single bit of 5.5 fJ. These results show the potential of this laser to be used for very short reach interconnects. We also describe the optimal design of cavity quality (Q) factor in terms of achieving a large output power with a low operating energy using a calculation based on rate equations. When we assume an internal absorption loss of 20 cm-1, the optimized coupling Q-factor is 2000.

  2. Free-standing nanomechanical and nanophotonic structures in single-crystal diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael John

    Realizing complex three-dimensional structures in a range of material systems is critical to a variety of emerging nanotechnologies. This is particularly true of nanomechanical and nanophotonic systems, both relying on free-standing small-scale components. In the case of nanomechanics, necessary mechanical degrees of freedom require physically isolated structures, such as suspended beams, cantilevers, and membranes. For nanophotonics, elements like waveguides and photonic crystal cavities rely on light confinement provided by total internal reflection or distributed Bragg reflection, both of which require refractive index contrast between the device and surrounding medium (often air). Such suspended nanostructures are typically fabricated in a heterolayer structure, comprising of device (top) and sacrificial (middle) layers supported by a substrate (bottom), using standard surface nanomachining techniques. A selective, isotropic etch is then used to remove the sacrificial layer, resulting in free-standing devices. While high-quality, crystalline, thin film heterolayer structures are readily available for silicon (as silicon-on-insulator (SOI)) or III-V semiconductors (i.e. GaAs/AlGaAs), there remains an extensive list of materials with attractive electro-optic, piezoelectric, quantum optical, and other properties for which high quality single-crystal thin film heterolayer structures are not available. These include complex metal oxides like lithium niobate (LiNbO3), silicon-based compounds such as silicon carbide (SiC), III-V nitrides including gallium nitride (GaN), and inert single-crystals such as diamond. Diamond is especially attractive for a variety of nanoscale technologies due to its exceptional physical and chemical properties, including high mechanical hardness, stiffness, and thermal conductivity. Optically, it is transparent over a wide wavelength range (from 220 nm to the far infrared), has a high refractive index (n ~ 2.4), and is host to a vast

  3. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry: controlling the excitation dynamics for frequency up- and down-conversion in lanthanide-doped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-07-16

    Nanophotonics is an emerging science dealing with the interaction of light and matter on a nanometer scale and holds promise to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency conversion of infrared (IR) light. Scientists can control the excitation dynamics by using nanochemistry to produce hierarchically built nanostructures and tailor their interfaces. These nanophosphors can either perform frequency up-conversion from IR to visible or ultraviolet (UV) or down-conversion, which results in the IR light being further red shifted. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry open up numerous opportunities for these photon converters, including in high contrast bioimaging, photodynamic therapy, drug release and gene delivery, nanothermometry, and solar cells. Applications of these nanophosphors in these directions derive from three main stimuli. Light excitation and emission within the near-infrared (NIR) "optical transparency window" of tissues is ideal for high contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. This is due to low natural florescence, reduced scattering background, and deep penetration in tissues. Secondly, the naked eye is highly sensitive in the visible range, but it has no response to IR light. Therefore, many scientists have interest in the frequency up-conversion of IR wavelengths for security and display applications. Lastly, frequency up-conversion can convert IR photons to higher energy photons, which can then readily be absorbed by solar materials. Current solar devices do not use abundant IR light that comprises almost half of solar energy. In this Account, we present our recent work on nanophotonic control of frequency up- and down-conversion in fluoride nanophosphors, and their biophotonic and nanophotonic applications. Through nanoscopic control of phonon dynamics, electronic energy transfer, local crystal field, and surface-induced non-radiative processes, we were able to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency

  4. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons.

    PubMed

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection. PMID:25757068

  5. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons

    PubMed Central

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V.; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection. PMID:25757068

  6. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  7. Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Jérémie; Saenko, Suzanne V.; van der Marel, Dirk; Milinkovitch, Michel C.

    2015-03-01

    Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection.

  8. Progress in 2D photonic crystal Fano resonance photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weidong; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hongjun; Chuwongin, Santhad; Chadha, Arvinder; Seo, Jung-Hun; Wang, Ken X.; Liu, Victor; Ma, Zhenqiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance, Fano resonance is predominantly used to describe asymmetric-shaped resonances, which arise from the constructive and destructive interference of discrete resonance states with broadband continuum states. This phenomenon and the underlying mechanisms, being common and ubiquitous in many realms of physical sciences, can be found in a wide variety of nanophotonic structures and quantum systems, such as quantum dots, photonic crystals, plasmonics, and metamaterials. The asymmetric and steep dispersion of the Fano resonance profile promises applications for a wide range of photonic devices, such as optical filters, switches, sensors, broadband reflectors, lasers, detectors, slow-light and non-linear devices, etc. With advances in nanotechnology, impressive progress has been made in the emerging field of nanophotonic structures. One of the most attractive nanophotonic structures for integrated photonics is the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (2D PCS), which can be integrated into a wide range of photonic devices. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an in depth review of the progress made in the general area of Fano resonance photonics, focusing on the photonic devices based on 2D PCS structures. General discussions are provided on the origins and characteristics of Fano resonances in 2D PCSs. A nanomembrane transfer printing fabrication technique is also reviewed, which is critical for the heterogeneous integrated Fano resonance photonics. The majority of the remaining sections review progress made on various photonic devices and structures, such as high quality factor filters, membrane reflectors, membrane lasers, detectors and sensors, as well as structures and phenomena related to Fano resonance slow light effect, nonlinearity, and optical forces in coupled PCSs. It is expected that further advances in the field will lead to more significant advances towards 3D integrated photonics, flat

  9. Programmable nanoengineering templates for fabrication of three-dimensional nanophotonic structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Porous anodic alumina membranes (AAMs) have attracted great amount of attention due to their potential application as templates for nanoengineering. Template-guided fabrication and assembly of nanomaterials based on AAMs are cost-effective and scalable methods to program and engineer the shape and morphology of nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this work, perfectly ordered AAMs with the record large pitch up to 3 μm have been fabricated by properly controlling the anodization conditions and utilization of nanoimprint technique. Due to the capability of programmable structural design and fabrication, a variety of nanostructures, including nanopillar arrays, nanotower arrays, and nanocone arrays, have been successfully fabricated using nanoengineered AAM templates. Particularly, amorphous Si nanocones have been fabricated as three-dimensional nanophotonic structures with the characterization of their intriguing optical anti-reflection property. These results directly indicate the potential application of the reported approach for photonics and optoelectronics. PMID:23742170

  10. Broadband polarization independent nanophotonic coupler for silicon waveguides with ultra-high efficiency.

    PubMed

    Cheben, Pavel; Schmid, Jens H; Wang, Shurui; Xu, Dan-Xia; Vachon, Martin; Janz, Siegfried; Lapointe, Jean; Painchaud, Yves; Picard, Marie-Josée

    2015-08-24

    Coupling of light to and from integrated optical circuits has been recognized as a major practical challenge since the early years of photonics. The coupling is particularly difficult for high index contrast waveguides such as silicon-on-insulator, since the cross-sectional area of silicon wire waveguides is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than that of a standard single-mode fiber. Here, we experimentally demonstrate unprecedented control over the light coupling between the optical fiber and silicon chip by constructing the nanophotonic coupler with ultra-high coupling efficiency simultaneously for both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. We specifically demonstrate a subwavelength refractive index engineered nanostructure to mitigate loss and wavelength resonances by suppressing diffraction effects, enabling a coupling efficiency over 92% (0.32 dB) and polarization independent operation for a broad spectral range exceeding 100 nm. PMID:26368222

  11. High-Aspect-Ratio Nanophotonic Components Fabricated by Cl(2) RIBE

    SciTech Connect

    Zubrzycki, W.J.; Vawter, G.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1999-07-08

    We describe highly anisotropic reactive ion beam etching of nanophotonic structures in AlGaAs based on the ion beam divergence angle and chamber pressure. The divergence angle is shown to influence the shape of the upper portion of the etch while the chamber pressure controls the shape of the lower portion. This predictable region of parameter space resulted in highly anisotropic nanostructures. Deeply etched distributed Bragg reflectors are etched to an aspect ratio of 8:1 with 100 nm trench widths. The profile of the grating etch is straight with smooth sidewalls, flat bottoms, and squared corners. Two-dimensional photonic crystal post arrays are fabricated with smooth and vertical sidewalls, with structures as small as 180 nm in diameter and 2.0 {micro}m in height.

  12. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films.

    PubMed

    Rath, Patrik; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph; Pernice, Wolfram Hp

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices. PMID:23766953

  13. Grating-assisted coupling to nanophotonic circuits in microcrystalline diamond thin films

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Patrik; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Nebel, Christoph; Wild, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Summary Synthetic diamond films can be prepared on a waferscale by using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on suitable substrates such as silicon or silicon dioxide. While such films find a wealth of applications in thermal management, in X-ray and terahertz window design, and in gyrotron tubes and microwave transmission lines, their use for nanoscale optical components remains largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that CVD diamond provides a high-quality template for realizing nanophotonic integrated optical circuits. Using efficient grating coupling devices prepared from partially etched diamond thin films, we investigate millimetre-sized optical circuits and achieve single-mode waveguiding at telecoms wavelengths. Our results pave the way towards broadband optical applications for sensing in harsh environments and visible photonic devices. PMID:23766953

  14. Open-geometry Fourier modal method: modeling nanophotonic structures in infinite domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häyrynen, Teppo; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Gregersen, Niels

    2016-07-01

    We present an open geometry Fourier modal method based on a new combination of open boundary conditions and an efficient $k$-space discretization. The open boundary of the computational domain is obtained using basis functions that expand the whole space, and the integrals subsequently appearing due to the continuous nature of the radiation modes are handled using a discretization based on non-uniform sampling of the $k$-space. We apply the method to a variety of photonic structures and demonstrate that our method leads to significantly improved convergence with respect to the number of degrees of freedom, which may pave the way for more accurate and efficient modeling of open nanophotonic structures.

  15. Open-geometry Fourier modal method: modeling nanophotonic structures in infinite domains.

    PubMed

    Häyrynen, Teppo; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Gregersen, Niels

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-geometry Fourier modal method based on a new combination of open boundary conditions and an efficient k-space discretization. The open boundary of the computational domain is obtained using basis functions that expand the whole space, and the integrals subsequently appearing due to the continuous nature of the radiation modes are handled using a discretization based on nonuniform sampling of the k space. We apply the method to a variety of photonic structures and demonstrate that our method leads to significantly improved convergence with respect to the number of degrees of freedom, which may pave the way for more accurate and efficient modeling of open nanophotonic structures. PMID:27409686

  16. Programmable nanoengineering templates for fabrication of three-dimensional nanophotonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qingfeng; Leung, Siu-Fung; Tsui, Kwong-Hoi; Hua, Bo; Fan, Zhiyong

    2013-06-01

    Porous anodic alumina membranes (AAMs) have attracted great amount of attention due to their potential application as templates for nanoengineering. Template-guided fabrication and assembly of nanomaterials based on AAMs are cost-effective and scalable methods to program and engineer the shape and morphology of nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this work, perfectly ordered AAMs with the record large pitch up to 3 μm have been fabricated by properly controlling the anodization conditions and utilization of nanoimprint technique. Due to the capability of programmable structural design and fabrication, a variety of nanostructures, including nanopillar arrays, nanotower arrays, and nanocone arrays, have been successfully fabricated using nanoengineered AAM templates. Particularly, amorphous Si nanocones have been fabricated as three-dimensional nanophotonic structures with the characterization of their intriguing optical anti-reflection property. These results directly indicate the potential application of the reported approach for photonics and optoelectronics.

  17. EDITORIAL: The next photonic revolution The next photonic revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2009-11-01

    dependence upon active and switchable photonic metamaterials and nanophotonic devices. This revolution will lead to dramatic new science and applications on a global scale in all technologies using light, from data storage to optical processing of information, from sensing to light harvesting and energy conversion. Five plenary talks at the conference outlined its topical boundaries. They were given by Sir Michael Berry, Bristol University, UK, who spoke on the new topic of optical super-oscillations; Harry A Atwater, California Institute of Technology, USA, who gave an overview of recent developments in plasmonics; Christian Colliex, Université Paris-Sud, France, who presented the concept of electron energy-loss spectroscopy for the study of localized plasmons; Xiang Zhang, University of California at Berkeley, USA, who talked about recent achievements in the optical super-lens, and Antoinette Taylor, National Laboratory, Los Alamos, USA, who discussed recent work on tunable terahertz metamaterials. In the specially assigned `breakthrough' talks Steven Anlage, University of Maryland, USA, introduced the emerging field of superconducting meta-materials, Tobias Kippenberg, Max-Planck-Institut, Garching, Germany, talked about cavity optomechanics on a chip, while Misha Lukin, Harvard University, USA, explored the field of quantum plasmonics and Victor Prinz, Russian Academy of Science, Russia, introduced a novel class of metamaterials based on three-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. The topical scope of this special section, to a great extent, echoes the paradigm shift in the NANOMETA community and includes papers on nanofabrication of plasmonic structure, transformation optics and invisibility, mapping of fields in nanostructures, nonlinear and magnetoplasmonic media, coherent effects in metamaterials, loss compensation in nanostructures, slow light and ultrafast switching of plasmon signals, and many other topics. The Guest Editor of this special section and the co

  18. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, R. J.; Price, D. M.; Dixon, J. E.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Kok, P.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.; Makhonin, M. N.

    2016-03-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95+/-5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations.

  19. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer.

    PubMed

    Coles, R J; Price, D M; Dixon, J E; Royall, B; Clarke, E; Kok, P; Skolnick, M S; Fox, A M; Makhonin, M N

    2016-01-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95±5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations. PMID:27029961

  20. Chirality of nanophotonic waveguide with embedded quantum emitter for unidirectional spin transfer

    PubMed Central

    Coles, R. J.; Price, D. M.; Dixon, J. E.; Royall, B.; Clarke, E.; Kok, P.; Skolnick, M. S.; Fox, A. M.; Makhonin, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable quantum technologies may be achieved by faithful conversion between matter qubits and photonic qubits in integrated circuit geometries. Within this context, quantum dots possess well-defined spin states (matter qubits), which couple efficiently to photons. By embedding them in nanophotonic waveguides, they provide a promising platform for quantum technology implementations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the naturally occurring electromagnetic field chirality that arises in nanobeam waveguides leads to unidirectional photon emission from quantum dot spin states, with resultant in-plane transfer of matter-qubit information. The chiral behaviour occurs despite the non-chiral geometry and material of the waveguides. Using dot registration techniques, we achieve a quantum emitter deterministically positioned at a chiral point and realize spin-path conversion by design. We further show that the chiral phenomena are much more tolerant to dot position than in standard photonic crystal waveguides, exhibit spin-path readout up to 95±5% and have potential to serve as the basis of spin-logic and network implementations. PMID:27029961

  1. Photonic Activation of Plasminogen Induced by Low Dose UVB

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Manuel; Snabe, Torben; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Petersen, Steffen Bjørn; Campos, Sara R. R.; Baptista, António M.; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of plasminogen to its active form plasmin is essential for several key mechanisms, including the dissolution of blood clots. Activation occurs naturally via enzymatic proteolysis. We report that activation can be achieved with 280 nm light. A 2.6 fold increase in proteolytic activity was observed after 10 min illumination of human plasminogen. Irradiance levels used are in the same order of magnitude of the UVB solar irradiance. Activation is correlated with light induced disruption of disulphide bridges upon UVB excitation of the aromatic residues and with the formation of photochemical products, e.g. dityrosine and N-formylkynurenine. Most of the protein fold is maintained after 10 min illumination since no major changes are observed in the near-UV CD spectrum. Far-UV CD shows loss of secondary structure after illumination (33.4% signal loss at 206 nm). Thermal unfolding CD studies show that plasminogen retains a native like cooperative transition at ~70 ºC after UV-illumination. We propose that UVB activation of plasminogen occurs upon photo-cleavage of a functional allosteric disulphide bond, Cys737-Cys765, located in the catalytic domain and in van der Waals contact with Trp761 (4.3 Å). Such proximity makes its disruption very likely, which may occur upon electron transfer from excited Trp761. Reduction of Cys737-Cys765 will result in likely conformational changes in the catalytic site. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that reduction of Cys737-Cys765 in plasminogen leads to an increase of the fluctuations of loop 760–765, the S1-entrance frame located close to the active site. These fluctuations affect the range of solvent exposure of the catalytic triad, particularly of Asp646 and Ser74, which acquire an exposure profile similar to the values in plasmin. The presented photonic mechanism of plasminogen activation has the potential to be used in clinical applications, possibly together with other enzymatic treatments for the elimination of

  2. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  3. Photonic Network R&D Activities in Japan-Current Activities and Future Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Ken-Ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aoyama, Tomonori

    2005-10-01

    R&D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current ongoing R&D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching (OBS), and control-plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP-over-WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R&D programs for photonic networks over the next 5 years until 2010, by focusing on the report that has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R&D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis, through the customer's initiative to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  4. Active stabilization of a fiber-optic two-photon interferometer using continuous optical length control.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Beom; Kim, Heonoh

    2016-05-16

    The practical realization of long-distance entanglement-based quantum communication systems strongly rely on the observation of highly stable quantum interference between correlated single photons. This task must accompany active stabilization of the optical path lengths within the single-photon coherence length. Here, we provide two-step interferometer stabilization methods employing continuous optical length control and experimentally demonstrate two-photon quantum interference using an actively stabilized 6-km-long fiber-optic Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. The two-step active control techniques are applied for measuring highly stable two-photon interference fringes by scanning the optical path-length difference. The obtained two-photon interference visibilities with and without accidental subtraction are found to be approximately 90.7% and 65.4%, respectively. PMID:27409920

  5. Resonant Nanophotonic Spectrum Splitting for Ultrathin Multijunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present an approach to spectrum splitting for photovoltaics that utilizes the resonant optical properties of nanostructures for simultaneous voltage enhancement and spatial separation of different colors of light. Using metal–insulator–metal resonators commonly used in broadband metamaterial absorbers we show theoretically that output voltages can be enhanced significantly compared to single-junction devices. However, the approach is general and works for any type of resonator with a large absorption cross section. Due to its resonant nature, the spectrum splitting occurs within only a fraction of the wavelength, as opposed to traditional spectrum splitting methods, where many wavelengths are required. Combining nanophotonic spectrum splitting with other nanophotonic approaches to voltage enhancements, such as angle restriction and concentration, may lead to highly efficient but deeply subwavelength photovoltaic devices. PMID:26322319

  6. Silicon Nanophotonics for Many-Core On-Chip Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Moustafa

    Number of cores in many-core architectures are scaling to unprecedented levels requiring ever increasing communication capacity. Traditionally, architects follow the path of higher throughput at the expense of latency. This trend has evolved into being problematic for performance in many-core architectures. Moreover, the trends of power consumption is increasing with system scaling mandating nontraditional solutions. Nanophotonics can address these problems, offering benefits in the three frontiers of many-core processor design: Latency, bandwidth, and power. Nanophotonics leverage circuit-switching flow control allowing low latency; in addition, the power consumption of optical links is significantly lower compared to their electrical counterparts at intermediate and long links. Finally, through wave division multiplexing, we can keep the high bandwidth trends without sacrificing the throughput. This thesis focuses on realizing nanophotonics for communication in many-core architectures at different design levels considering reliability challenges that our fabrication and measurements reveal. First, we study how to design on-chip networks for low latency, low power, and high bandwidth by exploiting the full potential of nanophotonics. The design process considers device level limitations and capabilities on one hand, and system level demands in terms of power and performance on the other hand. The design involves the choice of devices, designing the optical link, the topology, the arbitration technique, and the routing mechanism. Next, we address the problem of reliability in on-chip networks. Reliability not only degrades performance but can block communication. Hence, we propose a reliability-aware design flow and present a reliability management technique based on this flow to address reliability in the system. In the proposed flow reliability is modeled and analyzed for at the device, architecture, and system level. Our reliability management technique is

  7. Toward large-area roll-to-roll printed nanophotonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karioja, Pentti; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna M.; Alajoki, Teemu; Tuominen, Jarkko; Hiltunen, Marianne; Siitonen, Samuli; Kontturi, Ville; Böhlen, Karl; Hauser, Rene; Charlton, Martin; Boersma, Arjen; Lieberzeit, Peter; Felder, Thorsten; Eustace, David; Haskal, Eliav

    2014-05-01

    Polymers have become an important material group in fabricating discrete photonic components and integrated optical devices. This is due to their good properties: high optical transmittance, versatile processability at relative low temperatures and potential for low-cost production. Recently, nanoimprinting or nanoimprint lithography (NIL) has obtained a plenty of research interest. In NIL, a mould is pressed against a substrate coated with a moldable material. After deformation of the material, the mold is separated and a replica of the mold is formed. Compared with conventional lithographic methods, imprinting is simple to carry out, requires less-complicated equipment and can provide high-resolution with high throughput. Nanoimprint lithography has shown potential to become a method for low-cost and high-throughput fabrication of nanostructures. We show the development process of nano-structured, large-area multi-parameter sensors using Photonic Crystal (PC) and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) methodologies for environmental and pharmaceutical applications. We address these challenges by developing roll-to-roll (R2R) UV-nanoimprint fabrication methods. Our development steps are the following: Firstly, the proof of concept structures are fabricated by the use of wafer-level processes in Si-based materials. Secondly, the master molds of successful designs are fabricated, and they are used to transfer the nanophotonic structures into polymer materials using sheet-level UV-nanoimprinting. Thirdly, the sheet-level nanoimprinting processes are transferred to roll-to-roll fabrication. In order to enhance roll-to-roll manufacturing capabilities, silicone-based polymer material development was carried out. In the different development phases, Photonic Crystal and SERS sensor structures with increasing complexities were fabricated using polymer materials in order to enhance sheet-level and roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. In addition, chemical and molecular

  8. 2D materials for nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Shuang; Pei, Jiajie; Lu, Yuerui

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have become very important building blocks for electronic, photonic, and phononic devices. The 2D material family has four key members, including the metallic graphene, transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) layered semiconductors, semiconducting black phosphorous, and the insulating h-BN. Owing to the strong quantum confinements and defect-free surfaces, these atomically thin layers have offered us perfect platforms to investigate the interactions among photons, electrons and phonons. The unique interactions in these 2D materials are very important for both scientific research and application engineering. In this talk, I would like to briefly summarize and highlight the key findings, opportunities and challenges in this field. Next, I will introduce/highlight our recent achievements. We demonstrated atomically thin micro-lens and gratings using 2D MoS2, which is the thinnest optical component around the world. These devices are based on our discovery that the elastic light-matter interactions in highindex 2D materials is very strong. Also, I would like to introduce a new two-dimensional material phosphorene. Phosphorene has strongly anisotropic optical response, which creates 1D excitons in a 2D system. The strong confinement in phosphorene also enables the ultra-high trion (charged exciton) binding energies, which have been successfully measured in our experiments. Finally, I will briefly talk about the potential applications of 2D materials in energy harvesting.

  9. High energy photon and particle luminosity from active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilek, J. A.; Caroff, L. J.; Noerdlinger, P. D.; Dove, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical calculation which follows the evolution of an initial photon and particle spectrum in an expanding, relativistic wind or jet, describes in particular the quasi-equilibrium distribution found for initial optical depths above 100 or so, and points out that this calculation may be relevant for the situation in luminous, compact nuclear sources.

  10. W-band active imaging by photonics-based synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Sekine, Norihiko; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a nondestructive electromagnetic-wave imaging system with a photonics-based W-band synthe- sizer, traveling-wave tube amplifier and focal-plane transistor array in real time manner. High-power amplifier with multi-watts output will enhance the quality of obtained images under transmission and reflection imaging configurations.

  11. Active photonic crystal devices in self-assembled electro-optic polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Neyman, P. J.; Vercellino, M.; Heflin, J. R.; Duncan, R.; Evoy, S.

    2004-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PC) offer novel and potent approaches for the control of light compared to traditional technologies. The development of a photonic crystal technology in electro-optic (EO) materials would now provide a novel approach for the development and integration of important "active devices" such as switch, interferometers, etc. We report the development of an active photonic crystal technology that uses ionically self-assembled multilayer (ISAM) as materials platform. Specifically, we concentrate on ISAM film grown from the alternate deposition of individual monolayers of Procion Red MX-5B (PR) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH). Films grown with this method show a second harmonic generation (SHG) factor (2) as high as 11 x 10-9 esu, and a r33 coefficient of 3 pm/V. Active photonic crystal are designed and demonstrated in this material using the FEMLAB software. In a first design, a simple switch is implemented by simple shift of the photonic crystal bandgap of a waveguiding structure. A Mach-Zehnder photonic crystal interferometer structure is also demonstrated, in which a 1800 phase shift is obtained between the two arms. We will report on the preliminary realization of active photonic devices using this material self-assembly and nanofabrication platform.

  12. Polymer/Perovskite Amplifying Waveguides for Active Hybrid Silicon Photonics.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Isaac; Juárez-Pérez, Emilio J; Bisquert, Juan; Mora-Seró, Iván; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2015-10-28

    The emission properties of hybrid halide perovskites are exploited to implement a stable and very low power operation waveguide optical amplifier integrated in a silicon platform. By optimizing its design with a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) encapsulation, this novel photonic device presents a net gain of around 10 dB cm(-1) and 3-4 nm linewidth with an energy threshold as low as 2 nJ pulse(-1) and exhibiting no degradation after one year. PMID:26331838

  13. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed. PMID:25822135

  14. Fabrication and characterization of micro- /nano structures for nanophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Hongsub

    The objective of this thesis is finding and developing fabrication methods to provide background techniques for potential applications with nanomaterials. The inclined UV lithography has announced to make three-dimensional fabrication process. With a movable stage, complex structures were achieved but difference of the refractive index, design of the final structures were limited. Refractive index matching medium between the substrate and the light source could reduce the refractive indices between the polymer and the substrate successfully. Nanoporous structures fabricated by multibeam interference lithography shows limitation of the usage since its periodicity. By insertion of the lift off resist layer between the patterned layer and the substrate, final photonic crystal structures could be partially removed for its own purpose and it provide potential application in the future. Two-step processing, combining with reactive ion etching system, nanoporous structures were on various substrates such as silicon and Polydimethylsiloxane. Photonic crystal template anodic aluminum oxide process has been described too. Large optical activity at visible wavelengths are of great attention in photonics. Dramatic enhancement of the optical activity of chiral poly(fluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) with photoresist was demonstrated and successive photo patterning of chiral polymer shows the potential usage of this material for the photonics applications. Two photon lithography also used to pattern a photoresist-chiral polymer mixture into planar shapes and enhanced chirality can be realized by tuning the wavelength-dependent chiral response at both the molecular and geometric level. Near infrared light induced photopolymerization in-situ was demonstrated which can be applied everywhere where ultraviolet-polymerization is employed such as dentistry, coating industry. Use of the ultraviolet upconverting nanoparticles doped into the polymer, we show that expensive femtosecond pulsed

  15. Optical investigation of nanophotonic lithium niobate-based optical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Makram A.; Al-Douri, Y.; Hashim, U.; Salim, Evan T.; Prakash, Deo; Verma, K. D.

    2015-10-01

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) nanophotonics are prepared on quartz substrate by sol-gel method. They have been deposited with different molarity concentrations and annealed at 500 °C. These samples are characterized and analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and ultraviolet-visible. The measured results show an importance of increasing molarity that indicates the structure starts to crystallize to become more regular. The estimated lattice constants, energy gaps and refractive index give good accordance with experimental results. Also, the calculated refractive index and optical dielectric constant are in agreement with experimental data.

  16. Green nanophotonics for future datacom and Ethernet networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimberg, Dieter; Arsenijević, Dejan; Larisch, Gunter; Li, Hui; Lott, James A.; Moser, Philip; Schmeckebier, Holger; Wolf, Philip

    2014-05-01

    The use of Internet has increased and continues to increase exponentially, mostly driven by consumers. Thus bit rates in networks from access to WDM and finally the computer clusters and supercomputers increase as well rapidly. Their cost of energy reaches today 5-6 % of raw electricity production. For 2023 a cross over is predicted, if no new "green" technologies or "green" devices" will reduce energy consumption by about 15% per year. We present two distinct approaches for access and computer networks based on nanophotonic devices to reduce power consumption in the next decade.

  17. Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett; Antonakos, Cory; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2013-01-01

    ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

  18. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-02-01

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500-3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip.

  19. An octave-spanning mid-infrared frequency comb generated in a silicon nanophotonic wire waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kuyken, Bart; Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Van Campenhout, Joris; Verheyen, Peter; Coen, Stéphane; Leo, Francois; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Gunther; Picqué, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs, sources with a spectrum consisting of hundred thousands evenly spaced narrow lines, have an exhilarating potential for new approaches to molecular spectroscopy and sensing in the mid-infrared region. The generation of such broadband coherent sources is presently under active exploration. Technical challenges have slowed down such developments. Identifying a versatile highly nonlinear medium for significantly broadening a mid-infrared comb spectrum remains challenging. Here we take a different approach to spectral broadening of mid-infrared frequency combs and investigate CMOS-compatible highly nonlinear dispersion-engineered silicon nanophotonic waveguides on a silicon-on-insulator chip. We record octave-spanning (1,500–3,300 nm) spectra with a coupled input pulse energy as low as 16 pJ. We demonstrate phase-coherent comb spectra broadened on a room-temperature-operating CMOS-compatible chip. PMID:25697764

  20. EDITORIAL: The next photonic revolution The next photonic revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2009-11-01

    dependence upon active and switchable photonic metamaterials and nanophotonic devices. This revolution will lead to dramatic new science and applications on a global scale in all technologies using light, from data storage to optical processing of information, from sensing to light harvesting and energy conversion. Five plenary talks at the conference outlined its topical boundaries. They were given by Sir Michael Berry, Bristol University, UK, who spoke on the new topic of optical super-oscillations; Harry A Atwater, California Institute of Technology, USA, who gave an overview of recent developments in plasmonics; Christian Colliex, Université Paris-Sud, France, who presented the concept of electron energy-loss spectroscopy for the study of localized plasmons; Xiang Zhang, University of California at Berkeley, USA, who talked about recent achievements in the optical super-lens, and Antoinette Taylor, National Laboratory, Los Alamos, USA, who discussed recent work on tunable terahertz metamaterials. In the specially assigned `breakthrough' talks Steven Anlage, University of Maryland, USA, introduced the emerging field of superconducting meta-materials, Tobias Kippenberg, Max-Planck-Institut, Garching, Germany, talked about cavity optomechanics on a chip, while Misha Lukin, Harvard University, USA, explored the field of quantum plasmonics and Victor Prinz, Russian Academy of Science, Russia, introduced a novel class of metamaterials based on three-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. The topical scope of this special section, to a great extent, echoes the paradigm shift in the NANOMETA community and includes papers on nanofabrication of plasmonic structure, transformation optics and invisibility, mapping of fields in nanostructures, nonlinear and magnetoplasmonic media, coherent effects in metamaterials, loss compensation in nanostructures, slow light and ultrafast switching of plasmon signals, and many other topics. The Guest Editor of this special section and the co

  1. An innovative nanophotonic information processing concept implementing cogent micro/nanosensors for space robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoli, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    Cogent sensors, defined as sensors that are capable of performing the transformation of raw data into information, are shown to be of the essence for realization of the long sought-after autonomous robots for space applications. A strongly miniaturized integration of sensing and information processing systems is needed for cogent sensors designed for autonomous sensing—information processing (IP)—actuating behavior. It is shown that the recently developed field of quantum holography (QH), stemming from geometric quantization of any holographic processes through the Heisenberg Group (G) and deeply different, as stressed in detail, from other meanings of "quantum holography" in the literature, supplies the nanophotonic tools for designing and assembling an associative memory (AM) as the brain implementing such strong cogency. An AM is designed through a free-space interconnected large planar multilayer architecture of quantum well-based two-port neurons implementing a shift register on the manifold of G, and whose input consists of photonic holograms from high frequency pulsed microlasers in the infrared band of em or em-transduced outside signals. The optoelectronics as relative, integrated into a hybrid chip involving photonic detectors, microlasers and electronic components for the clock control system, would allow cycle times as short as 30 ns with the large spatial bandwidth available in photonics. IP through QH concerns the encoding and decoding of holographic interference patterns, not of mere binary digital logical (syntactic) information. Accordingly, QH defines on the G's manifold an IP paradigm where information as experimental knowledge is processed; i.e., IP concerns both syntax and semantics. It is shown that such QH-neural brain would cogently deal with spurious signals as random noise that would be caused to die out on the way to the intended target through parallel massive and real-time IP.

  2. The role of high energy photons and particles in accretion flows in active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilek, Jean A.

    1988-01-01

    The creation of high energy pairs and photons in the conversion of gravitational to thermal energy is a process common to most accretion models for active galactic nuclei. These are two observational methods designed to explore this process: direct observations of the hot photons, through hard X-ray and gamma-ray data, and indirect observations of the energetic pairs, through their polarized, nonthermal low frequency radiation. However, interpretation of these observations in terms of the conditions in the inner accretion flow requires understanding of the various processes which modify the pair and photon distributions within the hot, dense core. These processes include opacity effects within the pair/photon plasma, Compton losses on external photons, further acceleration of the pairs and further radiation by the pairs, and the dynamic interaction of the pair/photon plasma with the surrounding gas. Current observational and theoretical work is reviewed and new directions are considered in a search for constraints on or tests of accretion models of active nuclei.

  3. Plasmonic Enhancement in BiVO4 Photonic Crystals for Efficient Water Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwu; Lin, Chia-Yu; Valev, Ventsislav K; Reisner, Erwin; Steiner, Ullrich; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2014-01-01

    Photo-electrochemical water splitting is a very promising and environmentally friendly route for the conversion of solar energy into hydrogen. However, the solar-to-H2 conversion efficiency is still very low due to rapid bulk recombination of charge carriers. Here, a photonic nano-architecture is developed to improve charge carrier generation and separation by manipulating and confining light absorption in a visible-light-active photoanode constructed from BiVO4 photonic crystal and plasmonic nanostructures. Synergistic effects of photonic crystal stop bands and plasmonic absorption are observed to operate in this photonic nanostructure. Within the scaffold of an inverse opal photonic crystal, the surface plasmon resonance is significantly enhanced by the photonic Bragg resonance. Nanophotonic photoanodes show AM 1.5 photocurrent densities of 3.1 ± 0.1 mA cm−2 at 1.23 V versus RHE, which is among the highest for oxide-based photoanodes and over 4 times higher than the unstructured planar photoanode. PMID:24916174

  4. Nanophotonic implementation of optoelectrowetting for microdroplet actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Christopher M.; Hill, Kyle A.; DeWachter, Mark A.; Huizing, Alexander M.; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2015-02-01

    The development and ultimate operation of a nanocomposite high-aspect-ratio photoinjection (HARP) device is presented in this work. The device makes use of a nanocomposite material as the optically active layer and the device achieves a large optical penetration depth with a high aspect ratio which provides a strong actuation force far away from the point of photoinjection. The nanocomposite material can be continuously illuminated and the position of the microdroplets can, therefore, be controlled to diffraction limited resolution. The nanocomposite HARP device shows great potential for future on-chip applications.

  5. Statistical analysis on activation and photo-bleaching of step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zetong; Lai, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Jihao; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Melanin is regarded as the most enigmatic pigments/biopolymers found in most organisms. We have shown previously that melanin goes through a step-wise multi-photon absorption process after the fluorescence has been activated with high laser intensity. No melanin step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) can be obtained without the activation process. The step-wise multi-photon activation fluorescence has been observed to require less laser power than what would be expected from a non-linear optical process. In this paper, we examined the power dependence of the activation process of melanin SMPAF at 830nm and 920nm wavelengths. We have conducted research using varying the laser power to activate the melanin in a point-scanning mode for multi-photon microscopy. We recorded the fluorescence signals and position. A sequence of experiments indicates the relationship of activation to power, energy and time so that we can optimize the power level. Also we explored regional analysis of melanin to study the spatial relationship in SMPAF and define three types of regions which exhibit differences in the activation process.

  6. Active quenching circuit for single-photon detection with Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Stipcević, Mario

    2009-03-20

    In this paper a novel construction of an active quenching circuit intended for single-photon detection is presented, along with a few original methods for its evaluation. The circuit has been combined with a standard avalanche photodiode C30902S to form a single-photon detector. This detector has a dead time of 39 ns, maximum random counting frequency of 14 MHz, small afterpulsing probability, an estimated peak detection efficiency of over 20%, and a dark count rate of less than 100 Hz. This simple and robust active quenching circuit can be built from off-the-shelf electronic components and is presented with the detailed schematic diagram. PMID:19305468

  7. Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol-gel and rf-sputtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Alombert-Goget, G.; Armellini, C.; Berneschi, S.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Boulard, B.; Brenci, M.; Chiappini, A.; Chiasera, A.; Duverger-Arfuso, C.; Féron, P.; Gonçalves, R. R.; Jestin, Y.; Minati, L.; Moser, E.; Nunzi Conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Rao, D. N.; Retoux, R.; Righini, G. C.; Speranza, G.

    2009-05-01

    The realization of photonic structures operating at visible and near infrared frequencies is a highly attractive scientific and technological challenge. Since optical fiber innovation, a huge of activity has been performed leading to interesting results, such as optical waveguides and planar lightwave circuits, microphotonic devices, optical microcavities, nanowires, plasmonic structures, and photonic crystals. These systems have opened new possibilities in the field of both basic and applied physics, in a large area covering Information Communication Technologies, Health and Biology, Structural Engineering, and Environment Monitoring Systems. Several materials and techniques are employed to successfully fabricate photonic structures. Concerning materials, Er3+-activated silica-based glasses still play an important role, although recently interesting results have been published about fluoride glass-ceramic waveguides. As far as regards the fabrication methods sol-gel route and rf sputtering have proved to be versatile and reliable techniques. In this article we will present a review of some Er3+-activated photonic structures fabricated by sol gel route and rf sputtering deposition. In the discussion on the sol-gel approach we focus our attention on the silica-hafnia binary system presenting an overview concerning fabrication protocols and structural, optical and spectroscopic assessment of SiO2-HfO2 waveguides activated by Er3+ ions. In order to put in evidence the reliability and versatility of the sol-gel route for photonics applications four different confined structures are briefly presented: amorphous waveguides, coated microspheres, monolithic waveguide laser, and core-shell nanospheres. As examples of rf sputtering technique, we will discuss Er3+-activated silica-hafnia and silica-germania waveguides, the latter system allowing fabrication of integrated optics structures by UV photo-imprinting. Finally, two examples of photonic crystal structures, one

  8. Advances in the theoretical understanding of photon upconversion in rare-earth activated nanophosphors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guokui

    2015-03-21

    Photon upconversion in rare earth activated phosphors involves multiple mechanisms of electronic transitions. Stepwise optical excitation, energy transfer, and various nonlinear and collective light-matter interaction processes act together to convert low-energy photons into short-wavelength light emission. Upconversion luminescence from nanomaterials exhibits additional size and surface dependencies. A fundamental understanding of the overall performance of an upconversion system requires basic theories on the spectroscopic properties of solids containing rare earth ions. This review article surveys the recent progress in the theoretical interpretations of the spectroscopic characteristics and luminescence dynamics of photon upconversion in rare earth activated phosphors. The primary aspects of upconversion processes, including energy level splitting, transition probability, line broadening, non-radiative relaxation and energy transfer, are covered with an emphasis on interpreting experimental observations. Theoretical models and methods for analyzing nano-phenomena in upconversion are introduced with detailed discussions on recently reported experimental results. PMID:25286989

  9. Hybrid quantum nanophotonic devices for coupling to rare-earth ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazono, Evan; Hartz, Alex; Zhong, Tian; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    With an assortment of narrow line-width transitions spanning the visible and IR spectrum and long spin coherence times, rare-earth doped crystals are the leading material system for solid-state quantum memories. Integrating these materials in an on-chip optical platform would create opportunities for highly integrated light-matter interfaces for quantum communication and quantum computing. Nano-photonic resonators with high quality factors and small mode volumes are required for efficient on-chip coupling to the small dipole moment of rare-earth ion transitions. However, direct fabrication of optical cavities in these crystals with current nanofabrication techniques is difficult and unparallelized, as either exotic etch chemistries or physical milling processes are required. We fabricated hybrid devices by mechanically transferring a nanoscale membrane of gallium arsenide (GaAs) onto a neodymium-doped yttrium silicon oxide (Y2SiO5) crystal and then using electron beam lithography and standard III-V dry etching to pattern nanobeam photonic crystal cavities and ring resonator cavities, a technique that is easily adapted to other frequency ranges for arbitrary dopants in any rare earth host system. Single crystalline GaAs was chosen for its low loss and high refractive index at the transition wavelength. We demonstrated the potential to evanescently couple between the cavity field and the 883 nm 4I9/2- 4F3/2 transition of nearby neodymium impurities in the host crystal by examining transmission spectra through a waveguide coupled to the resonator with a custom-built confocal microscope. The prospects and requirements for using this system for scalable quantum networks are discussed.

  10. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example 232Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  11. Metallic nanowires for subwavelength waveguiding and nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Deng; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hong-Xing

    2013-09-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly developing field concerning light manipulation at the nanoscale with many potential applications, of which plasmonic circuits are promising for future information technology. Plasmonic waveguides are fundamental elements for constructing plasmonic integrated circuits. Among the proposed different plasmonic waveguides, metallic nanowires have drawn much attention due to the highly confined electromagnetic waves and relatively low propagation loss. Here we review the recent research progress in the waveguiding characteristics of metallic nanowires and nanowire-based nanophotonic devices. Plasmon modes of both cylindrical and pentagonal metallic nanowires with and without substrate are discussed. Typical methods for exciting and detecting the plasmons in metallic nanowires are briefly summarized. Because of the multimode characteristic, the plasmon propagation and emission in the nanowire have many unique properties, benefiting the design of plasmonic devices. A few nanowire-based devices are highlighted, including quarter-wave plate, Fabry—Pérot resonator, router and logic gates.

  12. A nanophotonic atom trap toward collective atom-light interactions and the design of a novel protection layer for superconducting circuits toward a hybrid quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Meng, Y.; Park, D. H.; Dagenais, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2014-05-01

    A centimeter long silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguide with inverse-tapered ends has been developed to address and trap many cold neutral atoms (87Rb) for studying collective atom-light interactions and a hybrid quantum system. Two-color evanescent trapping fields (750 nm and 1064 nm) of guided modes (TE0) can confine cold neutral atoms above the waveguide, and its inverse-tapered waveguide-end has been used for higher input coupling. For a hybrid quantum system which couples trapped cold neutral atoms to superconducting (SC) circuits through magnetic dipole coupling, we consider a novel SC protection layer because SC circuits are vulnerable to the scattered light from trapping fields. Therefore, we design several types of dielectric and lossy multi-wavelength Bragg layers to protect SC circuits from NIR scattered optical photons and from a broadband MIR blackbody radiation of the nanophotonic device, considering the maximal back-transmission of the SC circuits' electro-magnetic fields through the layer and the heat transfer to SC circuits through the protection layer from absorbed scattered photons. This work is supported by ARO MURI award W911NF0910406.

  13. Quantum entanglement distribution with 810 nm photons through active telecommunication fibers.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Catherine; Meyer-Scott, Evan; Erven, Chris; Jennewein, Thomas

    2011-10-10

    We demonstrate the distribution of polarization-entangled photons for the purpose of quantum key distribution (QKD) along active telecom fibers. Entangled photon pairs of 810 nm wavelength generated by a Sagnac interferometer source were coupled into standard telecom single mode fibers. The fibers were either dark or carrying a standardized 1550 nm ethernet signals (1000BASE-ZX) with a nominal speed of 1 GBps from regular media converter devices, without any requirements on the optical power or spectrum transmitted. Our system demonstrates a QKD network covering 6 km in distance with a central service provider for classical and quantum data. PMID:21997067

  14. Two-Photon Activation of p-Hydroxyphenacyl Phototriggers: Toward Spatially Controlled Release of Diethyl Phosphate and ATP.

    PubMed

    Houk, Amanda L; Givens, Richard S; Elles, Christopher G

    2016-03-31

    Two-photon activation of the p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) photoactivated protecting group is demonstrated for the first time using visible light at 550 nm from a pulsed laser. Broadband two-photon absorption measurements reveal a strong two-photon transition (>10 GM) near 4.5 eV that closely resembles the lowest-energy band at the same total excitation energy in the one-photon absorption spectrum of the pHP chromophore. The polarization dependence of the two-photon absorption band is consistent with excitation to the same S3 ((1)ππ*) excited state for both one- and two-photon activation. Monitoring the progress of the uncaging reaction under nonresonant excitation at 550 nm confirms a quadratic intensity dependence and that two-photon activation of the uncaging reaction is possible using visible light in the range 500-620 nm. Deprotonation of the pHP chromophore under mildly basic conditions shifts the absorption band to lower energy (3.8 eV) in both the one- and two-photon absorption spectra, suggesting that two-photon activation of the pHP chromophore may be possible using light in the range 550-720 nm. The results of these measurements open the possibility of spatially and temporally selective release of biologically active compounds from the pHP protecting group using visible light from a pulsed laser. PMID:26962676

  15. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  16. Photon damping in cosmic-ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-04-07

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10/sup 20/ eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10/sup 15/. Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultra high energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can void disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultra high energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found.

  17. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qin; Skaar, Johannes; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-15

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  18. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors. PMID:24517746

  19. Photon-axion mixing within the jets of active galactic nuclei and prospects for detection

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.; Chadwick, P.M. E-mail: p.m.chadwick@durham.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    Very high energy γ-ray observations of distant active galactic nuclei (AGN) generally result in higher fluxes and harder spectra than expected, resulting in some tension with the level of the extragalactic background light (EBL). If hypothetical axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) were to exist, this tension could be relieved since the oscillation of photons to ALPs would mitigate the effects of EBL absorption and lead to softer inferred intrinsic AGN spectra. In this paper we consider the effect of photon-ALP mixing on observed spectra, including the photon-ALP mixing that would occur within AGN jets. We then simulate observations of three AGN with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a next generation γ-ray telescope, to determine its prospects for detecting the signatures of photon-ALP mixing on the spectra. We conclude that prospects for CTA detecting these signatures or else setting limits on the ALP parameter space are quite promising. We find that prospects are improved if photon-ALP mixing within the jet is properly considered and that the best target for observations is PKS 2155-304.

  20. Millisecond Photon Lifetime in a Slow-Light Microcavity.

    PubMed

    Huet, V; Rasoloniaina, A; Guillemé, P; Rochard, P; Féron, P; Mortier, M; Levenson, A; Bencheikh, K; Yacomotti, A; Dumeige, Y

    2016-04-01

    Optical microcavities with ultralong photon storage times are of central importance for integrated nanophotonics. To date, record quality (Q) factors up to 10^{11} have been measured in millimetric-size single-crystal whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) resonators, and 10^{10} in silica or glass microresonators. We show that, by introducing slow-light effects in an active WGM microresonator, it is possible to enhance the photon lifetime by several orders of magnitude, thus circumventing both fabrication imperfections and residual absorption. The slow-light effect is obtained from coherent population oscillations in an erbium-doped fluoride glass microsphere, producing strong dispersion of the WGM (group index n_{g}∼10^{6}). As a result, a photon lifetime up to 2.5 ms at room temperature has been measured, corresponding to a Q factor of 3×10^{12} at 1530 nm. This system could yield a new type of optical memory microarray with ultralong storage times. PMID:27081979

  1. New Generation of Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltsman, G. N.

    2015-09-01

    We present an overview of recent results for new generation of infrared and optical superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) that has already demonstrated a performance that makes them devices-of-choice for many applications. SNSPDs provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, SNSPDs are also compatible with an integrated optical platform as a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. By embedding SNSPDs in nanophotonic circuits we realize waveguide integrated single photon detectors which unite all desirable detector properties in a single device.

  2. Effect of effective mass mismatch in CdS/CdTe heterojunctions on the fundamental design parameters of nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa-Angulo, José R.; Villa-Angulo, Rafael; Solorio-Ferrales, Karina; Ahumada-Valdez, Silvia E.; Villa-Angulo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Single- and multiple-quantum well (QW) nanophotonic devices, such as detectors and solar cells, are often fabricated by the concatenation of low-dimensional heterojunctions of different semiconductors. Quantum effects dominate the well structure, with dimensions of the order of several nanometers. At this width regime, even small variations in the fundamental material properties, such as band gap, dielectric constant, lattice constant, and effective mass of the materials, may give rise to errors in determining the fundamental design parameters. This, in turn, can significantly affect the device performance. In cadmium-sulfide/cadmium-telluride (CdS/CdTe) material system, the failure to include the mismatch of electronic effective masses can lead to >30% shift from the real position of the eigenstate energy levels, and >40% shift from the real position of quasi-Fermi levels E and E. In addition, depending on the width of the QW active layer, the absorption coefficient value can lead to >12% shift from its real value. These results prompt the need for accurate estimation of such errors in the precise analysis and design of CdS/CdTe heterojunction-based nanophotonic devices.

  3. Understanding the nanophotonic light-trapping structure of diatom frustule for enhanced solar energy conversion: a theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangfan; Wang, Chen; Baker, Evan; Wang, Jane; Sun, Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Recent designs in nanophotonic light-trapping technologies offer promising potential to develop high-efficiency thin-film solar cell at dramatically reduced cost. However, the lack of a cost effective scalable nanomanufacturing technique remains the main road-block. In nature, diatoms exhibit high solar energy harvesting efficiency due to their frustules (i.e., hard porous cell wall made of silica) possessing remarkable hierarchical nano-features optimized for the photosynthetic process through millions of years evolution. To explore this unique light trapping effect, different species of diatoms (Coscinodiscus sp. and Coscinodiscus wailesii) are cultured and characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA) and Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method are employed to numerically study the nanophotonic light-trapping effect. The absorption efficiency is significantly enhanced over the spectrum region centered on 450nm and 700nm where the electric fields are found strongly confined within the active layer. The transmission and reflection spectra are also measured by optical spectroscopy and the experimental results are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  4. EDITORIAL: TaCoNa-Photonics 2008 TaCoNa-Photonics 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrin, Dmitry N.; Busch, Kurt; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2009-11-01

    This special section on theoretical and computational nano-photonics features papers presented at the first International Workshop on Theoretical and Computational Nano-Photonics (TaCoNa-Photonics 2008) held in Bad Honnef, Germany, 3-5 December 2008. The workshop covered a broad range of topics related to current developments and achievements in this interdisciplinary area of research. Since the late 1960s, the word `photonics' has been understood as the science of generating, controlling, and detecting light. Nowadays, a routine fabrication of complex structures with micro- and nano-scale dimensions opens up many new and exciting possibilities in photonics. The science of generating, routing and detecting light in micro- and nano-structured matter, `nano-photonics', is becoming more important both in research and technology and offers many promising applications. The inherently sub-wavelength character of the structures that nano-photonics deals with challenges modern theoretical and computational physics and engineering with many nontrivial questions: Up to what length-scale can one use a macroscopic phenomenological description of matter? Where is the interface between the classical and quantum description of light in nano-scale structures? How can one combine different physical systems, different time- and length-scales in a single computational model? How can one engineer nano-structured materials in order to achieve the desired optical properties for particular applications? Any attempt at answering these kinds of questions is impossible without the joint efforts of physicists, engineers, applied mathematicians and programmers. This is the reason why the major goal of the TaCoNa-Photonics workshops is to provide a forum where theoreticians and specialists in numerical methods from all branches of physics, engineering sciences and mathematics can compare their results, report on novel results and breakthroughs, and discuss new challenges ahead. In order to

  5. Hybrid Silicon Nanophotonic Devices: Enhancing Light Emission, Modulation, and Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Ryan Morrow

    Silicon has become an increasingly important photonic material for communications, information processing, and sensing applications. Silicon is inexpensive compared to compound semiconductors, and it is well suited for confining and guiding light at standard telecommunication wavelengths due to its large refractive index and minimal intrinsic absorption. Furthermore, silicon-based optical devices can be fabricated alongside microelectronics while taking advantage of advanced silicon processing technologies. In order to realize complete chip-based photonic systems, certain critical components must continue to be developed and refined on the silicon platform, including compact light sources, modulators, routers, and sensing elements. However, bulk silicon is not necessarily an ideal material for many active devices because of its meager light emission characteristics, limited refractive index tunability, and fundamental limitations in confining light beyond the diffraction limit. In this thesis, we present three examples of hybrid devices that use different materials to bring additional optical functionality to silicon photonics. First, we analyze high-index-contrast silicon slot waveguides and their integration with light-emitting erbium-doped glass materials. Theoretical and experimental results show significant enhancement of spontaneous emission rates in slot structures. We then demonstrate the integration of vanadium dioxide, a thermochromic phase-change material, with silicon waveguides to form micron-scale absorption modulators. It is shown experimentally that a 2-mum long waveguide-integrated device exhibits broadband modulation of more than 6.5 dB at wavelengths near 1550 nm. Finally, we demonstrate polymer-on-gold dielectric-loaded surface-plasmon waveguides and ring resonators coupled to silicon waveguides with 1.0+/-0.1 dB insertion loss. The plasmonic waveguides are shown to support a single surface mode at telecommunication wavelengths, with strong

  6. Two-photon, three-photon, and four-photon excellent near-infrared quantum cutting luminescence of Tm3+ ion activator emerged in Tm3+:YNbO4 powder phosphor one material simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaobo; Salamo, Gregory J.; Li, Song; Wang, Jieliang; Guo, Yuying; Gao, Yan; He, Lizhu; Ma, Hui; Tao, Jingfu; Sun, Ping; Lin, Wei; Liu, Quanlin

    2015-12-01

    In present study, two-photon, three-photon, and four photon near-infrared quantum cutting luminescence of Tm3+ ion activator in YNbO4 powder phosphor is reported. The visible to near-infrared excitation and emission spectra and fluorescence lifetimes of Tm0.038Y0.962NbO4 powder phosphor are measured. Tm0.038Y0.962NbO4 is found to possess intense two-photon, strong three-photon, and moderate four-photon quantum cutting 1820 nm 3F4→3H6 luminescence of the Tm3+ ion simultaneously. The up-limit of the two-, three-, and four-photon near-infrared quantum cutting efficiency are found to be approximately 166%, 198%, and 192%, respectively. These results are expected to be valuable in aiding the probing of new generation environmentally friendly germanium Ge solar cells, currently a popular condensed matter physical topic globally.

  7. EDITORIAL: Breeding new science by coupling photons with `nano'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay; Stockman, Mark; Zayats, Anatoly

    2006-04-01

    The new field of `nanophotonics' is concerned with the generation, transport, routing and detection of light in sub-wavelength structures. There is nothing new in the desire to use small structures to control waves that are much bigger than the structures, and the science of acoustics has been dealing with this problem since the early days of musical instruments. What makes nanophotonics so special is that it claims for optics the unexplored playfield of dimensions between those of objects the human eye can see with a lens, and those of the invisible elementary building blocks of the material world, molecules and atoms. Nanophotonics is a synthetic discipline that breaks into the fields of electrodynamics, solid state physics and laser physics. In growing from these disciplines it takes ideas from them, for instance from solid state physics by drawing analogies between electrons in crystals and photons in nanostructures, and from laser physics and traditional nonlinear optics by achieving strong fields not through an increase in optical power, but through its concentration. From an engineering perspective, nanophotonics promises to develop optical functionality on the smallest possible size scale (thus allowing for ultra-high-density integration), at the lowest possible energy level (thus allowing for single photon all-optical devices), and on the shortest possible timescale (thus allowing for optical devices operating within a single period of an optical wave). In this special issue we are, however, concerned with the fundamental aspects of nanophotonics, i.e. the physics that underpins these new, mind-boggling nanophotonic applications. This special issue opens with 4 articles derived from lectures at the Summer School Photonic Metamaterials: from Micro to Nanoscale, Erice, Italy, 1 7 August 2005. These reviews establish the hierarchy of nanophotonic structures and relevant length scales, explore wave interactions in nanostructured media, and examine nanophotonic

  8. Dynamic acousto-optic control of a strongly coupled photonic molecule

    PubMed Central

    Kapfinger, Stephan; Reichert, Thorsten; Lichtmannecker, Stefan; Müller, Kai; Finley, Jonathan J.; Wixforth, Achim; Kaniber, Michael; Krenner, Hubert J.

    2015-01-01

    Strongly confined photonic modes can couple to quantum emitters and mechanical excitations. To harness the full potential in quantum photonic circuits, interactions between different constituents have to be precisely and dynamically controlled. Here, a prototypical coupled element, a photonic molecule defined in a photonic crystal membrane, is controlled by a radio frequency surface acoustic wave. The sound wave is tailored to deliberately switch on and off the bond of the photonic molecule on sub-nanosecond timescales. In time-resolved experiments, the acousto-optically controllable coupling is directly observed as clear anticrossings between the two nanophotonic modes. The coupling strength is determined directly from the experimental data. Both the time dependence of the tuning and the inter-cavity coupling strength are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical calculations. The demonstrated mechanical technique can be directly applied for dynamic quantum gate operations in state-of-the-art-coupled nanophotonic, quantum cavity electrodynamic and optomechanical systems. PMID:26436203

  9. Complex Photonic Structures for Light Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Burresi, Matteo; Pratesi, Filippo; Riboli, Francesco; Wiersma, Diederik Sybolt

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, micro- and nanophotonics have roused a strong interest in the scientific community for their promising impact on the development of novel kinds of solar cells. Certain thin- and ultrathin-film solar cells are made of innovative, often cheap, materials which suffer from a low energy conversion efficiency. Light-trapping mechanisms based on nanophotonics principles are particularly suited to enhance the absorption of electromagnetic waves in these thin media without changing the material composition. In this review, the latest results achieved in this field are reported, with particular attention to the realization of prototypes, spanning from deterministic to disordered photonic architectures, and from dielectric to metallic nanostructures. PMID:26640755

  10. Photon-activated electron hopping in a single-electron trap enhanced by Josephson radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotkhov, S. V.; Jalali-Jafari, B.; Zorin, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Using a Josephson junction interferometer (DC SQUID) as a microwave source for irradiating a single-electron trap, both devices fabricated on the same chip, we study the process of photon-assisted tunneling as an effective mechanism of single photon detection. High sensitivity down to a very small oscillation amplitude v J ˜ 10 nV ≪ E act ≲ h f J and down to low photon absorption rates Γph ˜ (1-50) Hz, as well as a clear threshold type of operation with an activation energy Eact ˜ 400 μeV, is demonstrated for the trap with respect to the microwave photons of frequency fJ ˜ (100-200) GHz. Tunable generation is demonstrated with respect to the power and frequency of the microwave signal produced by the SQUID source biased within the subgap voltage range. A much weaker effect is observed at the higher junction voltages along the quasiparticle branch of the I-V curve; this response mostly appears due to the recombination phonons.

  11. Highly sensitive assay for acetylcholinesterase activity and inhibition based on a specifically reactive photonic nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Li, Xuesong; Cui, Jiecheng; Li, Jian; Lan, Yue; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Hui; Li, Guangtao

    2014-09-10

    Assays for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with high sensitivity and high selectivity as well as facile manipulation have been urgently required in various fields. In this work, a reaction-based photonic strategy was developed for the efficient assay of AChE activity and inhibition based on the synergetic combination of the specific thiol-maleimide addition reaction with photonic porous structure. It was found that various applications including detection of AChE activity, measurement of the related enzymatic kinetics, and screening of inhibitors could be efficiently implemented using such strategy. Remarkably, the unique photonic nanostructure endows the constructed sensing platform with high sensitivity with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 mU/mL for AChE activity, high selectivity, and self-reporting signaling. Moreover, the label-free solid film-based sensing approach described here has advantages of facile manipulation and bare-eye readout, compared with conventional liquid-phase methods, exhibiting promising potential in practical application for the AChE assay. PMID:25130420

  12. Devices and architectures for large-scale integrated silicon photonics circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beausoleil, Raymond G.; Faraon, Andrei; Fattal, David; Fiorentino, Marco; Peng, Zhen; Santori, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We present DWDM nanophotonics architectures based on microring resonator modulators and detectors. We focus on two implementations: an on chip interconnect for multicore processor (Corona) and a high radix network switch (HyperX). Based on the requirements of these applications we discuss the key constraints on the photonic circuits' devices and fabrication techniques as well as strategies to improve their performance.

  13. A quantum phase switch between a single solid-state spin and a photon.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuo; Kim, Hyochul; Solomon, Glenn S; Waks, Edo

    2016-06-01

    Interactions between single spins and photons are essential for quantum networks and distributed quantum computation. Achieving spin-photon interactions in a solid-state device could enable compact chip-integrated quantum circuits operating at gigahertz bandwidths. Many theoretical works have suggested using spins embedded in nanophotonic structures to attain this high-speed interface. These proposals implement a quantum switch where the spin flips the state of the photon and a photon flips the spin state. However, such a switch has not yet been realized using a solid-state spin system. Here, we report an experimental realization of a spin-photon quantum switch using a single solid-state spin embedded in a nanophotonic cavity. We show that the spin state strongly modulates the polarization of a reflected photon, and a single reflected photon coherently rotates the spin state. These strong spin-photon interactions open up a promising direction for solid-state implementations of high-speed quantum networks and on-chip quantum information processors using nanophotonic devices. PMID:26854569

  14. A quantum phase switch between a single solid-state spin and a photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuo; Kim, Hyochul; Solomon, Glenn S.; Waks, Edo

    2016-06-01

    Interactions between single spins and photons are essential for quantum networks and distributed quantum computation. Achieving spin–photon interactions in a solid-state device could enable compact chip-integrated quantum circuits operating at gigahertz bandwidths. Many theoretical works have suggested using spins embedded in nanophotonic structures to attain this high-speed interface. These proposals implement a quantum switch where the spin flips the state of the photon and a photon flips the spin state. However, such a switch has not yet been realized using a solid-state spin system. Here, we report an experimental realization of a spin–photon quantum switch using a single solid-state spin embedded in a nanophotonic cavity. We show that the spin state strongly modulates the polarization of a reflected photon, and a single reflected photon coherently rotates the spin state. These strong spin–photon interactions open up a promising direction for solid-state implementations of high-speed quantum networks and on-chip quantum information processors using nanophotonic devices.

  15. Acute two-photon imaging of the neurovascular unit in the cortex of active mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Gordon, Grant R.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon scanning fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique to observe physiological processes from the millimeter to the micron scale in the intact animal. In neuroscience research, a common approach is to install an acute cranial window and head bar to explore neocortical function under anesthesia before inflammation peaks from the surgery. However, there are few detailed acute protocols for head-restrained and fully awake animal imaging of the neurovascular unit during activity. This is because acutely performed awake experiments are typically untenable when the animal is naïve to the imaging apparatus. Here we detail a method that achieves acute, deep-tissue two-photon imaging of neocortical astrocytes and microvasculature in behaving mice. A week prior to experimentation, implantation of the head bar alone allows mice to train for head-immobilization on an easy-to-learn air-supported ball treadmill. Following just two brief familiarization sessions to the treadmill on separate days, an acute cranial window can subsequently be installed for immediate imaging. We demonstrate how running and whisking data can be captured simultaneously with two-photon fluorescence signals with acceptable movement artifacts during active motion. We also show possible applications of this technique by (1) monitoring dynamic changes to microvascular diameter and red blood cells in response to vibrissa sensory stimulation, (2) examining responses of the cerebral microcirculation to the systemic delivery of pharmacological agents using a tail artery cannula during awake imaging, and (3) measuring Ca2+ signals from synthetic and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators in astrocytes. This method will facilitate acute two-photon fluorescence imaging in awake, active mice and help link cellular events within the neurovascular unit to behavior. PMID:25698926

  16. Nanophotonics-enabled smart windows, buildings and wearables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoff; Gentle, Angus; Arnold, Matthew; Cortie, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Design and production of spectrally smart windows, walls, roofs and fabrics has a long history, which includes early examples of applied nanophotonics. Evolving nanoscience has a special role to play as it provides the means to improve the functionality of these everyday materials. Improvement in the quality of human experience in any location at any time of year is the goal. Energy savings, thermal and visual comfort indoors and outdoors, visual experience, air quality and better health are all made possible by materials, whose "smartness" is aimed at designed responses to environmental energy flows. The spectral and angle of incidence responses of these nanomaterials must thus take account of the spectral and directional aspects of solar energy and of atmospheric thermal radiation plus the visible and color sensitivity of the human eye. The structures required may use resonant absorption, multilayer stacks, optical anisotropy and scattering to achieve their functionality. These structures are, in turn, constructed out of particles, columns, ultrathin layers, voids, wires, pure and doped oxides, metals, polymers or transparent conductors (TCs). The need to cater for wavelengths stretching from 0.3 to 35 μm including ultraviolet-visible, near-infrared (IR) and thermal or Planck radiation, with a spectrally and directionally complex atmosphere, and both being dynamic, means that hierarchical and graded nanostructures often feature. Nature has evolved to deal with the same energy flows, so biomimicry is sometimes a useful guide.

  17. Plasmonic antennas as design elements for coherent ultrafast nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Brinks, Daan; Castro-Lopez, Marta; Hildner, Richard; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2013-01-01

    Broadband excitation of plasmons allows control of light-matter interaction with nanometric precision at femtosecond timescales. Research in the field has spiked in the past decade in an effort to turn ultrafast plasmonics into a diagnostic, microscopy, computational, and engineering tool for this novel nanometric–femtosecond regime. Despite great developments, this goal has yet to materialize. Previous work failed to provide the ability to engineer and control the ultrafast response of a plasmonic system at will, needed to fully realize the potential of ultrafast nanophotonics in physical, biological, and chemical applications. Here, we perform systematic measurements of the coherent response of plasmonic nanoantennas at femtosecond timescales and use them as building blocks in ultrafast plasmonic structures. We determine the coherent response of individual nanoantennas to femtosecond excitation. By mixing localized resonances of characterized antennas, we design coupled plasmonic structures to achieve well-defined ultrafast and phase-stable field dynamics in a predetermined nanoscale hotspot. We present two examples of the application of such structures: control of the spectral amplitude and phase of a pulse in the near field, and ultrafast switching of mutually coherent hotspots. This simple, reproducible and scalable approach transforms ultrafast plasmonics into a straightforward tool for use in fields as diverse as room temperature quantum optics, nanoscale solid-state physics, and quantum biology. PMID:24163355

  18. Imaging Nanophotonic Modes of Microresonators using a Focused Ion Beam

    PubMed Central

    Twedt, Kevin A.; Zou, Jie; Davanco, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik; McClelland, Jabez J.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    Optical microresonators have proven powerful in a wide range of applications, including cavity quantum electrodynamics1–3, biosensing4, microfludics5, and cavity optomechanics6–8. Their performance depends critically on the exact distribution of optical energy, confined and shaped by the nanoscale device geometry. Near-field optical probes9 can image this distribution, but the physical probe necessarily perturbs the near field, which is particularly problematic for sensitive high quality factor resonances10,11. We present a new approach to mapping nanophotonic modes that uses a controllably small and local optomechanical perturbation introduced by a focused lithium ion beam12. An ion beam (radius ≈50 nm) induces a picometer-scale dynamic deformation of the resonator surface, which we detect through a shift in the optical resonance wavelength. We map five modes of a silicon microdisk resonator (Q≥20,000) with both high spatial and spectral resolution. Our technique also enables in-situ observation of ion implantation damage and relaxation dynamics in a silicon lattice13,14. PMID:27087832

  19. Disorder improves nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paetzold, U. W. Smeets, M.; Meier, M.; Bittkau, K.; Merdzhanova, T.; Smirnov, V.; Carius, R.; Rau, U.; Michaelis, D.; Waechter, C.

    2014-03-31

    We present a systematic experimental study on the impact of disorder in advanced nanophotonic light-trapping concepts of thin-film solar cells. Thin-film solar cells made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared on imprint-textured glass superstrates. For periodically textured superstrates of periods below 500 nm, the nanophotonic light-trapping effect is already superior to state-of-the-art randomly textured front contacts. The nanophotonic light-trapping effect can be associated to light coupling to leaky waveguide modes causing resonances in the external quantum efficiency of only a few nanometer widths for wavelengths longer than 500 nm. With increasing disorder of the nanotextured front contact, these resonances broaden and their relative altitude decreases. Moreover, overall the external quantum efficiency, i.e., the light-trapping effect, increases incrementally with increasing disorder. Thereby, our study is a systematic experimental proof that disorder is conceptually an advantage for nanophotonic light-trapping concepts employing grating couplers in thin-film solar cells. The result is relevant for the large field of research on nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells which currently investigates and prototypes a number of new concepts including disordered periodic and quasi periodic textures.

  20. All-optical transistor using a photonic-crystal cavity with an active Raman gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, V. G.; Myslivets, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a design of an all-optical transistor based on a one-dimensional photonic-crystal cavity doped with a four-level N-type active Raman gain medium. The calculated results show that in a photonic-crystal cavity of this kind transmission and reflection of the probe (Raman) beam are strongly dependent on the optical switching power. Transmission and reflection of the probe beam can be greatly amplified or attenuated. Therefore the optical switching field can serve as a gate field of the transistor to effectively control propagation of the weak probe field. It is shown that the group velocity of the probe pulse can be controlled in the range from subluminal (slow light) to superluminal (fast light).

  1. Design and testing of an active quenching circuit for an avalanche photodiode photon detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbel, D.; Schwartz, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The photon-detection capabilities of avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating above their theoretical breakdown voltages are described, with particular attention given to the needs and methods of quenching an avalanche once breakdown has occurred. A brief background on the motives of and previous work with this mode of operation is presented. Finally, a description of the design and testing of an active quenching circuit is given. Although the active quenching circuit did not perform as expected, knowledge was gained as to the signal amplitudes necessary for quenching and the need for a better model for the above-breakdown circuit characteristics of the Geiger-mode APD.

  2. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  3. Four new two-photon polymerization initiators with varying donor and conjugated bridge: Synthesis and two-photon activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Fuying; Liu, Zhaodi; Zhang, Mingliang; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Shengyi; Wu, Jieying; Zhou, Hongping; Tian, YuPeng

    2014-01-01

    A specific series of dumbbell-shaped bis-carbazoles or bis-phenothiazines dyes (1, 2, 3 and 4) constructed with styrene or biphenylethyne as the π-bridge have been synthesized and characterized. Detailed spectral properties including linear absorption, one and two-photon fluorescence properties were investigated. The results show that extending conjugated chain and introducing donors have substantial effect on their photophysical properties. Among them, two-photon absorption cross sections (σ) of the four dyes in DMF determined by the Z-scan technique are successively increased from 1 to 4 with enhancing electron-donating ability and extending conjugated chain, but electron-donating ability has larger contribution to the σ values than extending conjugated chain based on the comparison of small molecules (D-π-D). Two-photon initiation polymerization (TPIP) microfabrication experiments have been carried out using compound 4 as an initiator under irradiation of 200 fs, 76 MHz femtosecond laser at 760 nm. The results confirm that the four dyes can be effectively used as organic two-photon photopolymerization initiators.

  4. Two-Photon Enzymatic Probes Visualizing Sub-cellular/Deep-brain Caspase Activities in Neurodegenerative Models

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Linghui; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Mao, Yanli; Li, Lin; Gao, Nengyue; Lim, Kah-Leong; Xu, Qing-Hua; Yao, Shao Q.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases work as a double-edged sword in maintaining cell homeostasis. Highly regulated caspase activities are essential during animal development, but dysregulation might lead to different diseases, e.g. extreme caspase activation is known to promote neurodegeneration. At present, visualization of caspase activation has mostly remained at the cellular level, in part due to a lack of cell-permeable imaging probes capable of direct, real-time investigations of endogenous caspase activities in deep tissues. Herein, we report a suite of two-photon, small molecule/peptide probes which enable sensitive and dynamic imaging of individual caspase activities in neurodegenerative models under physiological conditions. With no apparent toxicity and the ability of imaging endogenous caspases both in different subcellular organelles of mammalian cells and in brain tissues, these probes serve as complementary tools to conventional histological analysis. They should facilitate future explorations of caspases at molecular, cellular and organism levels and inspire development of novel two-photon probes against other enzymes. PMID:27210613

  5. Two-Photon Enzymatic Probes Visualizing Sub-cellular/Deep-brain Caspase Activities in Neurodegenerative Models.

    PubMed

    Qian, Linghui; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Mao, Yanli; Li, Lin; Gao, Nengyue; Lim, Kah-Leong; Xu, Qing-Hua; Yao, Shao Q

    2016-01-01

    Caspases work as a double-edged sword in maintaining cell homeostasis. Highly regulated caspase activities are essential during animal development, but dysregulation might lead to different diseases, e.g. extreme caspase activation is known to promote neurodegeneration. At present, visualization of caspase activation has mostly remained at the cellular level, in part due to a lack of cell-permeable imaging probes capable of direct, real-time investigations of endogenous caspase activities in deep tissues. Herein, we report a suite of two-photon, small molecule/peptide probes which enable sensitive and dynamic imaging of individual caspase activities in neurodegenerative models under physiological conditions. With no apparent toxicity and the ability of imaging endogenous caspases both in different subcellular organelles of mammalian cells and in brain tissues, these probes serve as complementary tools to conventional histological analysis. They should facilitate future explorations of caspases at molecular, cellular and organism levels and inspire development of novel two-photon probes against other enzymes. PMID:27210613

  6. Bilayer graphene: physics and application outlook in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hugen

    2015-05-01

    Layered materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichacogenides and black phosphorus have attracted lots of attention recently. They are emerging novel materials in electronics and photonics, with tremendous potential in revolutionizing the traditional electronics and photonics industry. Marrying layered material to the nanophotonics is being proved fruitful. With the recent emphasis and development of metasurfaces in nanophotonics, atomically thin materials can find their unique position and strength in this field. In this article, I will focus on one specific two dimensional material: bilayer graphene. Basic physics will be reviewed, such as band-gap opening, electron-phonon interaction, phonon-plasmon interaction and Fano resonances in the optical response. Moreover, I will review the application of bilayer graphene as a sensitive and fast photodetector. An outlook will be given in the final part of the paper.

  7. Deterministic Generation of Arbitrary Photonic States Assisted by Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tudela, A.; Paulisch, V.; Chang, D. E.; Kimble, H. J.; Cirac, J. I.

    2015-10-01

    A scheme to utilize atomlike emitters coupled to nanophotonic waveguides is proposed for the generation of many-body entangled states and for the reversible mapping of these states of matter to photonic states of an optical pulse in the waveguide. Our protocol makes use of decoherence-free subspaces (DFSs) for the atomic emitters with coherent evolution within the DFSs enforced by strong dissipative coupling to the waveguide. By switching from subradiant to superradiant states, entangled atomic states are mapped to photonic states with high fidelity. An implementation using ultracold atoms coupled to a photonic crystal waveguide is discussed.

  8. Magnetic quenching of photonic activity in Fe3O4-elastomer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Danhao; Hess, Dustin T.; Shetty, Pralav P.; Adu, Kofi W.; Bell, Richard C.; Terrones, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    We report a quenching phenomenon within the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum in the photonic response of a passive Fe3O4-silicone elastomer composite film due to magnetically aligned Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We performed systematic studies of the polarization dependence, the effect of particle size, and an in- and out-of-plane particle alignment on the optical response of the Fe3O4-silicone elastomer composites using a UV/vis/NIR spectrometer. We observed systematic redshifts in the response of the out-of-plane composite films with increasing particle alignment and weight that are attributed to dipole-induced effects. There were no observable shifts in the spectra of the in-plane films, suggesting the orientation of the magnetic dipole and the induced electric dipole play a crucial role in the optical response. A dramatic suppression to near quenching of the photonic response occurred in films containing moderate concentrations of the aligned nanoparticles. This is attributed to the interplay between the intra- and the interparticle dipoles. This occurred even when low magnetic fields were used during the curing process, suggesting that particle alignment and particle size limitation are critical in the manipulation of the photonic properties. A dipole approximation model is used to explain the quenching phenomenon. An active system of such a composite has a potential application in magneto-optic switches.

  9. Construction of Nanowire Heterojunctions: Photonic Function-Oriented Nanoarchitectonics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Jun; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-02-01

    Nanophotonics has received broad research interest because it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations of electronic circuits. So far, diverse photonic functions, such as light generation, modulation, and detection, have been realized based on various nano-materials. The exact structural features of these material systems, including geometric characteristics, surface morphology, and material composition, play a key role in determining the photonic functions. Therefore, rational designs and constructions of materials on both morphological and componential levels, namely nanoarchitectonics, are indispensable for any photonic device with specific functionalities. Recently, a series of nanowire heterojunctions (NWHJs), which are usually made from two or more kinds of material compositions, were constructed for novel photonic applications based on various interactions between different materials at the junctions, for instance, energy transfer, exciton-plasmon coupling, or photon-plasmon coupling. A summary of these works is necessary to get a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between photonic functions and architectonics of NWHJs, which will be instructive for designing novel photonic devices towards integrated circuits. Here, photonic function oriented nanoarchitectonics based on recent breakthroughs in nanophotonic devices are discussed, with emphasis on the design mechanisms, fabrication strategies, and excellent performances. PMID:26488887

  10. Optics and photonics at nanoscale: Principles and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    Nanophotonics is a multidisciplinary frontier of science that merges nanoscience and nanotechnology with conventional optics and photonics. We focus on two principal issues of nanophotonics: manipulation of optical field and light-matter interaction via various optical nanostructures. These two issues are behind all the efforts to explore, design, and build nanophotonic devices to accomplish the fundamental cause of large-scale optical integration for information processing, interconnection, and computing. We discuss various mechanisms of light-matter interaction enhancement to realize bright fluorescence, Raman, and nonlinear optical radiation, and explore methodologies and various devices for highly sensitive optical sensing and detecting, ultrahigh spatial resolution imaging, and high-efficiency energy conversion between light and electricity, heat, and other forms. All these concepts, insights, methodologies, and technologies in nanophotonics will set a solid platform to explore and achieve better future information and energy technologies that use light as powerful information and energy carriers and as prominent media to probe and manipulate the intrinsic properties of matters via light-matter interaction.

  11. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  12. Active photonic sensor communication cable for field application of optical data and power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthau, Eike; Rieske, Ralf; Zerna, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Omitting electrically conducting wires for sensor communication and power supply promises protection for sensor systems and monitored structures against lightning or high voltages, prevention of explosion hazards, and reduction of susceptibility to tampering. The ability to photonically power remote systems opens up the full range of electrical sensors. Power-over-fiber is an attractive option in electromagnetically sensitive environments, particularly for longterm, maintenance-free applications. It can deliver uninterrupted power sufficient for elaborate sensors, data processing or even actuators alongside continuous high speed data communication for remote sensor application. This paper proposes an active photonic sensor communication system, which combines the advantages of optical data links in terms of immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), high bandwidth, hardiness against tampering or eavesdropping, and low cable weight with the robustness one has come to expect from industrial or military electrical connectors. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented that implements a closed-loop regulation of the sensor power supply to guarantee continuous, reliable data communications while maintaining a highly efficient, adaptive sensor supply scheme. It is demonstrated that the resulting novel photonic sensor communication cable can handle sensors and actuators differing orders of magnitude with respect to power consumption. The miniaturization of the electro-optical converters and driving electronics is as important to the presented development as the energy efficiency of the detached, optically powered sensor node. For this reason, a novel photonic packaging technology based on wafer-level assembly of the laser power converters by means of passive alignment will be disclosed in this paper.

  13. Alternative materials lead to practical nanophotonic components (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Nathaniel; Ferrera, Marcello; DeVault, Clayton; Kim, Jongbum; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been a flurry of research in the field of alternative plasmonic materials, but for telecommunication applications, CMOS compatible materials titanium nitride and doped zinc oxides are among the most promising materials currently available. TiN is a gold-like ceramic with a permittivity cross-over near 500nm. In addition, TiN can attain ultra-thin, ultra-smooth epitaxial films on substrates such as c-sapphire, MgO, and silicon. Partnering TiN with CMOS compatible silicon nitride enables a fully solid state waveguide which is able to achieve a propagation length greater than 1cm for a ~8μm mode size at 1.55μm. Utilizing doped zinc oxide films as a dynamic material, high performance modulators can also be realized due to the low-loss achieved by the TiN/Si3N4 waveguide. Simply by placing a thin layer of aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) on top of the waveguide structure, a modulator with very low insertion loss is achieved. Our recent work has investigated optical tuning of AZO films by the pump-probe method, demonstrating a change in the refractive index of -0.17+0.25i at 1.3μm with an ultrafast response of 1ps. Assuming this change in the refractive index for the AZO film, a modulation of ~0.7dB/μm is possible in the structure with ~0.5dB insertion loss and an operational speed of 1THz. Further optimization of the design is expected to lead to an increased modulation depth without sacrificing insertion loss or speed. Consequently, nanophotonic technologies are reaching a critical point where many applications including telecom, medicine, and quantum science can see practical systems which provide new functionalities.

  14. Instrumental photon activation analysis using the linear accelerator at the Naval Postgraduate School. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.A.

    1982-10-01

    Charcoal, charcoal residue, potting soil, aluminum foil, bismuth germanate, and petroleum samples have been investigated using instrumental photon activation analysis (i.e., no radiochemistry). The major and minor elements routinely observed by this nondestructive method were: C, C1, Ca, Fe, Mg, Si, and K. A compreshensive review of the principles of IPAA was also included in the study. The principles were applied to a theroetical analysis of an oil sample in which the trace element concentrations were known. It was concluded that IPAA is a highly sensitive technique which could be used to fingerprint oils.

  15. Instrumental photon activation analysis using the linear accelerator at the Naval Postgraduate School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. A.

    1982-10-01

    Charcoal, charcoal residue, potting soil, aluminum foil, bismuth germanate, and petroleum samples have been investigated using instrumental photon activation analysis (i.e., no radiochemistry). The major and minor elements routinely observed by this nondestructive method were: C, C1, Ca, Fe, Mg, Si, and K. A comprehensive review of the principles of IPAA was also included in the study. The principles were applied to a theoretical analysis of an oil sample in which the trace element concentrations were known. It was concluded that IPAA is a highly sensitive technique which could be used to fingerprint oils.

  16. Irradiation system for two-photon induced activation of agents in novel intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klämpfl, Florian; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    This paper presents a newly designed irradiation system for the photochemically triggered two-photon activation of an agent loaded in novel intraocular lenses. After activation, this agent suppresses the formation of after-cataract, a very common disease after the treatment of an eye cataract by implanting an intraocular lens. For this application, intrinsic safety is also important: the laser radiation is applied to one of the most light-sensitive organs: the eye. This has to be taken into account during development of the system. Moreover, the activation uses a two-photon process so a relatively small laser focus is required. To address these issues in combination with economic requirements, a mirror based objective was designed and built, specifically tailored to these needs. Besides the laser beam guidance elements, the irradiation system consists of a camera based monitoring module and an illumination unit. While the first part of the paper shows the design of the system, the second part presents the results of the characterization of the system. The paper closes with a conclusion and an outlook discussing what further development is needed to prepare the system for treatments of human eyes.

  17. Using Photon Activation Analysis To Determine Concentrations Of Unknown Components In Reference Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Jaromy; Sun, Zaijing; Wells, Doug; Maschner, Herb

    2011-06-01

    Using certified multi-element reference materials for instrumental analyses one frequently is confronted with the embarrassing fact that the concentration of some desired elements are not given in the respective certificate, nonetheless are detectable, e.g. by photon activation analysis (PAA). However, these elements might be determinable with sufficient quality of the results using scaling parameters and the well-known quantities of a reference element within the reference material itself. Scaling parameters include: activation threshold energy, Giant Dipole Resonance (GDR) peak and endpoint energy of the bremsstrahlung continuum; integrated photo-nuclear cross sections for the isotopes of the reference element; bremsstrahlung continuum integral; target thickness; photon flux density. Photo-nuclear cross sections from the unreferenced elements must be known, too. With these quantities, the integral was obtained for both the known and unknown elements resulting in an inference of the concentration of the unreported element based upon the reported value, thus also the concentration of the unreferenced element in the reference material. A similar method to determine elements using the basic nuclear and experimental data has been developed for thermal neutron activation analysis some time ago (k{sub 0} Method).

  18. Fabrication and characterization of III-nitride nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Rajendra Prasad

    III-nitride photonic devices such as photodetectors (PDs), light emitting diode (LEDs), solar cells and optical waveguide amplifiers were designed, fabricated and characterized. High quality AlN epilayers were grown on sapphire and n-SiC substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition and utilized as active deep UV (DUV) photonic materials for the demonstration of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) detectors, Schottky barrier detectors, and avalanche photodetectors (APDs). AlN DUV PDs exhibited peak responsivity at 200 nm with a very sharp cutoff wavelength at 207 nm and extremely low dark current (<10 fA), very high breakdown voltages, high responsivity, and more than four orders of DUV to UV/visible rejection ratio. AlN Schottky PDs grown on n-SiC substrates exhibited high zero bias responsivity and a thermal energy limited detectivity of about 1.0 x 1015 cm Hz 1/2 W-1. The linear mode operation of AlN APDs with the shortest cutoff wavelength (210 nm) and a photocurrent multiplication of 1200 was demonstrated. A linear relationship between device size and breakdown field was observed for AlN APDs. Photovoltaic operation of InGaN solar cells in wavelengths longer than that of previous attainments was demonstrated by utilizing In xGa1-xN/GaN MQWs as the active layer. InxGa1-xN/GaN MQWs solar cells with x =0.3 exhibited open circuit voltage of about 2 V, a fill factor of about 60% and external quantum efficiency of 40% at 420 nm and 10% at 450 nm. The performance of InxGa1-xN/GaN MQWs solar cell was found to be highly correlated with the crystalline quality of the InxGa 1-xN active layer. The possible causes of poorer PV characteristics for higher In content in InGaN active layer were explained. Photoluminescence excitation studies of GaN:Er and In0.06Ga 0.94N:Er epilayers showed that Er emission intensity at 1.54 mum increases significantly as the excitation energy is tuned from below to above the energy bandgap of these epilayers. Current-injected 1.54 mum LEDs

  19. Brain single photon emission computed tomography: Newer activation and intervention studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikofsky, R.S.; Hellman, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings using non-xenon 133 tracers in combination with activation and intervention techniques are reviewed. Examination of the currently available data indicates that it is possible to detect the effects of a variety of activations and interventional procedures using SPECT rCBF with non-xenon 133 tracers. There are still many issues to be resolved before SPECT can reach the level of sophistication attained by xenon 133 and positron emission tomography in studying rCBF during activation or intervention. However, research to date indicates that SPECT rCBF studied with tracers other than xenon 133 has an excellent potential for increasing the ability to differentiate normal and pathological states. 97 refs.

  20. Large-Scale Nanophotonic Solar Selective Absorbers for High-Efficiency Solar Thermal Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Liu, Baoan; Ni, Yizhou; Liew, Kaiyang Kevin; Sze, Jeff; Chen, Shuo; Shen, Sheng

    2015-08-19

    An omnidirectional nanophotonic solar selective absorber is fabricated on a large scale using a template-stripping method. The nanopyramid nickel structure achieves an average absorptance of 95% at a wavelength range below 1.3 μm and a low emittance less than 10% at wavelength >2.5 μm. PMID:26134928

  1. Silicon integrated nanophotonics: from fundamental science to manufacturable technology (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Yurii A.

    2015-02-01

    The IBM Silicon Nanophotonics technology enables cost-efficient optical links that connect racks, modules, and chips together with ultralow power single-die optical transceivers. I will give an overview of its historical development, technology differentiators, current status and a roadmap.

  2. Opportunities for Low Cost Processing of Erbium 8-Quinolinolates for Active Integrated Photonic Applications.

    PubMed

    Penna, Stefano; Mattiello, Leonardo; Di Bartolo, Silvia; Pizzoleo, Angelo; Attanasio, Vincenzo; Beleffi, Giorgio Maria Tosi; Otomo, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Erbium-doped organic emitters are promising active materials for Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) due to their emission shown at 1550 nm combined to the potential low cost processing. In particular, Erbium Quinoline (ErQ) gained a strong interest in the last decade for the good emission efficiency. This contribution reports the results derived from the application of ErQ as active core material within a buried optical waveguide, following the development of a purposed optical process to control the refractive index of ErQ and then to define a patterned structure from a single thin film deposition step. The reported results show the potential of Er-doped organic materials for low cost processing and application to planar PICs. PMID:27451632

  3. The stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence guided ablation of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; DiMarzio, Charles

    2015-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated and excited by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low-cost and reliable method for detecting melanin. We have developed a device utilizing the melanin SMPAF to guide the ablation of melanin with a 975 nm CW laser. This method provides the ability of targeting individual melanin particles with micrometer resolution, and enables localized melanin ablation to be performed without collateral damage. Compared to the traditional selective photothermolysis, which uses pulsed lasers for melanin ablation, this method demonstrates higher precision and lower cost. Therefore, the SMPAF guided selective ablation of melanin is a promising tool of melanin ablation for both medical and cosmetic purposes.

  4. Stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanoma imaging for dermatologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Lian, Christine; Ma, Jie; Yu, Jingyi; Gu, Zetong; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has shown that the stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser, is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in a mouse hair and a formalin fixed mouse melanoma were compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) images and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) images, all of which were acquired at an excitation wavelength of 920 nm, to further prove the effectiveness of SMPAF in detecting melanin. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection to MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF can be a promising technology to enable melanoma imaging for dermatologists.

  5. Nano-photonic phenomena in van der Waals atomic layered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basov, Dmitri

    Layered van der Waals (vdW) crystals reveal diverse classes of light-matter modes (polaritons) including: surface plasmon polaritons in graphene, hyperbolic phonon polaritons in boron nitride, exciton polaritons in MoS2, Cooper pair plasmon polaritons in high-Tc cuprates, topological plasmon polaritons and many others. Polaritons in vdW materials are of considerable technological interest. For example, polaritonic modes enable sub diffractional focusing and imaging in infrared frequencies. Applications apart, infrared nano-imaging of propagating polaritons facilitates experimental access to new physics of vdW materials not attainable with conventional spectroscopic methods. I will discuss two recent experiments performed in our group that utilize unique virtues of polaritons. Nano-imaging of plasmon polaritons in moire superlattices formed in graphene on boron nitride has allowed us to establish the important features of the electronic structure of this interesting from of graphene. Pump-probe hyper-spectral images of non-equilibrium plasmon polaritons in graphene revealed novel aspects of carrier relaxation.

  6. Rapid detection of malignant bio-species using digital holographic pattern recognition and nano-photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Kukhtareva, Tatiana; Kukhtarev, Nickolai V.; Curley, Michael J.; Edwards, Vernessa; Creer, Marylyn

    2013-03-01

    There is a great need for rapid detection of bio-hazardous species particularly in applications to food safety and biodefense. It has been recently demonstrated that the colonies of various bio-species could be rapidly detected using culture-specific and reproducible patterns generated by scattered non-coherent light. However, the method heavily relies on a digital pattern recognition algorithm, which is rather complex, requires substantial computational power and is prone to ambiguities due to shift, scale, or orientation mismatch between the analyzed pattern and the reference from the library. The improvement could be made, if, in addition to the intensity of the scattered optical wave, its phase would be also simultaneously recorded and used for the digital holographic pattern recognition. In this feasibility study the research team recorded digital Gabor-type (in-line) holograms of colonies of micro-organisms, such as Salmonella with a laser diode as a low-coherence light source and a lensless high-resolution (2.0x2.0 micron pixel pitch) digital image sensor. The colonies were grown in conventional Petri dishes using standard methods. The digitally recorded holograms were used for computational reconstruction of the amplitude and phase information of the optical wave diffracted on the colonies. Besides, the pattern recognition of the colony fragments using the cross-correlation between the digital hologram was also implemented. The colonies of mold fungi Altenaria sp, Rhizophus, sp, and Aspergillus sp have been also generating nano-colloidal silver during their growth in specially prepared matrices. The silver-specific plasmonic optical extinction peak at 410-nm was also used for rapid detection and growth monitoring of the fungi colonies.

  7. Negligible photodesorption of methanol ice and active photon-induced desorption of its irradiation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Martín-Doménech, R.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Chen, Y.-J.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Methanol is a common component of interstellar and circumstellar ice mantles and is often used as an evolution indicator in star-forming regions. The observations of gas-phase methanol in the interiors of dense molecular clouds at temperatures as low as 10 K suggest that non-thermal ice desorption must be active. Ice photodesorption has been proposed to explain the abundances of gas-phase molecules toward the coldest regions. Aims: Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the potential photodesorption of methanol toward the coldest regions. Methods: Solid methanol was deposited at 8 K and UV-irradiated at various temperatures starting from 8 K. The irradiation of the ice was monitored by means of infrared spectroscopy and the molecules in the gas phase were detected using quadrupole mass spectroscopy. Fully deuterated methanol was used for confirmation of the results. Results: The photodesorption of methanol to the gas phase was not observed in the mass spectra at different irradiation temperatures. We estimate an upper limit of 3 × 10-5 molecules per incident photon. On the other hand, photon-induced desorption of the main photoproducts was clearly observed. Conclusions: The negligible photodesorption of methanol could be explained by the ability of UV-photons in the 114-180 nm (10.87-6.88 eV) range to dissociate this molecule efficiently. Therefore, the presence of gas-phase methanol in the absence of thermal desorption remains unexplained. On the other hand, we find CH4 to desorb from irradiated methanol ice, which was not found to desorb in the pure CH4 ice irradiation experiments.

  8. Passive active resonant coupler (PARC): A new platform for monolithic integration of photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Simarjeet

    The explosive growth of telecommunications and data traffic in recent years has hastened the emergence of optical communication networks. As the volume and complexity of network traffic increases, efficient methods are required for routing and distributing the associated optical signals. This in turn has put pressure on optical device technologies. Not only are new and more complex devices required, but they must also be manufactured and packaged in a cost-efficient way. Soon, there will be a shift in the paradigm from using discrete packaged devices in a module to monolithically integrated photonic circuits where multiple functions are achieved in a single chip. This offers a considerable challenge and a great opportunity for device engineers. It is the goal of this work to continue and expand the sphere of knowledge and applicability of Photonic Integrated circuits (PIC's) by proposing and demonstrating a new platform technology for monolithically integrating various active and passive optical devices. The platform, which has been named the ``Passive Active Resonant Coupler (PARC)'', utilizes single epitaxial growth and conventional fabrication schemes. PARC devices rely on coupling between vertical waveguides where each waveguide is optimized for its specific functionality. The coupling is achieved by using a new proposed scheme of resonance over some specially designed tapers. It has been shown experimentally for the first time that very high coupling efficiencies (less than 1 dB loss) can be achieved over very short lengths, typically less than 100 μm. Coupling between different kinds of active and passive waveguides has been experimentally demonstrated. A few basic PIC's such as the 1 × 2 optical switch and the 2 × 2 cross-point switch have been demonstrated by integrating active and passive waveguides using the PARC platform. The demonstrated integration work is in the 1.55 μm wavelength range using InP as a substrate. However, the PARC platform is

  9. Nanophotonics of Chloroplasts for Bio-Inspired Solar Energy Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Gourley, Cheryl R.

    2011-03-01

    In the search for new energy sources, lessons can be learned from chloroplast photonics. The nano-architecture of chloroplasts is remarkably well-adapted to mediate sunlight interactions for efficient energy conversion. We carried out experiments with chloroplasts isolated from spinach and leaf lettuce to elucidate the relationship between nano-architecture, biomolecular composition and photonic properties. We obtained high-resolution microscopic images of single chloroplasts to identify geometries of chloroplasts and interior grana. We performed micro-spectroscopy to identify strengths of absorption and fluorescence transitions and related them to broadband reflectance and transmittance spectra of whole leaf structures. Finally, the nonlinear optical properties were investigated with nanolaser spectroscopy by placing chloroplasts into micro-resonators and optically pumping. These spectra reveal chloroplast photonic modes and allow measurement of single chloroplast light scattering cross section, polarizability, and refractive index. The nanolaser spectra recorded at increasing pump powers enabled us to observe non-linear optics, photon dynamics, and stimulated emission from single chloroplasts. All of these experiments provide insight into plant photonics and inspiration of paradigms for synthetic biomaterials to harness sunlight in new ways.

  10. Nematic and blue phase liquid crystals for temperature stabilization and active optical tuning of silicon photonic devices (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-10-01

    We describe the underlying theories and experimental demonstrations of passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic devices clad in nematic liquid crystal mixtures, and active optical tuning of silicon photonic resonant structures combined with dye-doped nematic and blue phase liquid crystals. We show how modifications to the resonator device geometry allow for not only enhanced tuning of the resonator response, but also aid in achieving complete athermal operations of silicon photonic circuits. [Ref.: I.C. Khoo, "DC-field-assisted grating formation and nonlinear diffractions in methyl-red dye-doped blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 40, 60-63 (2015); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Enhanced optical tuning of modified-geometry resonators clad in blue phase liquid crystals," Opt. Lett. 39, 5435-5438 (2014); J. Ptasinski, I.C. Khoo, and Y. Fainman, "Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals," Materials 7(3), 2229-2241 (2014)].

  11. Active phase drift cancellation for optic-fiber frequency transfer using a photonic radio-frequency phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianguo; Wu, Guiling; Hu, Liang; Zou, Weiwen; Chen, Jianping

    2014-04-15

    We propose an active photonic phase drift cancellation scheme for frequency transfer over optical fiber based on a linear photonic RF phase shifter. The photonic RF phase shifter consists of a dual parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator and optical filter with the assistance of the local microwave signal. The phase drift induced by fiber transmission can be compensated by simply tuning the bias voltage of the modulator. The principle of the phase cancellation scheme based on the photonic phase shifter is demonstrated and validated experimentally by transferring a 0.5 GHz reference signal over a 20 km single-mode fiber with a root mean square jitter of less than 0.5 ps. PMID:24978989

  12. Reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of Jixueteng evaluated by electron spin resonance (ESR) and photon emission.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Toshizo; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takamichi, Maomi; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Maehata, Yojiro; Sugiyama, Shuta; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Todoki, Kazuo; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Hamada, Nobushiro

    2014-12-01

    Jixueteng, the dried stem of Spatholobus suberectus Dunn (Leguminosae), is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine that is commonly classified as a herb that promotes blood circulation and can be used to treat blood stasis. The aim of this study was to examine the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activity of Jixueteng and other herbal medicines. The ROS scavenging activities of the water extracts of Jixueteng, Cnidium officinale and Salvia miltiorrhiza were examined using an electron spin resonance (ESR) technique and faint luminescence measurement. The ESR signal intensities of the superoxide anion (O2·) and hydroxyl radical (HO·) were reduced more by Jixueteng than the other herbal medicines we tested. High photon emission intensity to hydrogen peroxide (H202) and HO· was observed in Jixueteng using the XYZ chemiluminescence system that was used as faint luminescence measurement and analysis. The results of the present study revealed that the ROS scavenging activity of 8% Jixueteng was the strongest among the herbal medicines we tested. It has been reported that Jixueteng includes various polyphenols. In the ROS scavenging activity by Jixueteng, it is supposed that the antioxidant activity caused by these polyphenols would contribute greatly. In conclusion, a water extract component of Jixueteng had potent free radical scavenging activity and an antioxidative effect that inhibited the oxidative actions of O2·⁻, H2O2 and HO·. Therefore, Jixueteng represents a promising therapeutic drug for reactive oxygen-associated pathologies. PMID:25632478

  13. Nanomaterials for photonic applications: Silica self-assembly and erbium titanate activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheol

    Nanomaterials are typically defined as amorphous or polycrystalline solids with particle diameters or grain sizes of 100 nm or less. Recently, a number of innovative efforts have opened the opportunity to a new class of materials, which allow to control both the flow of light and the dynamics of photons. The nanostructured periodic materials, Photonic Crystals, and waveguides embedded in them have been very attractive subjects of current research. Another attractive approach is to utilize rare earth emission within nanocrystals. The restricted geometry of rare earth ions in nanocrystals may affect luminescence behavior with respect to energy transfer and electron-phonon interactions in a bulk crystal, providing efficient light emission for future integration with optoelectronic devices. Based on such concepts addressed above, this dissertation has focused on two facets of nanomaterials investigation that are applicable to active 1.5 mum emission planar devices. First, the synthetic opaline films, 6 muM in thickness, were fabricated from self-assembly of a monodisperse colloidal suspensions of silica spheres with a diameter of 310 nm. This film showed an optical gap centered around 730 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 50 nm, exhibiting 20% of maximum reflectivity. This study showed that the photon bands are the result of interplay between the coherent scattering due to the periodic structure and the non-coherent (diffuse) scattering due to the individual spheres, the latter exhibiting Mie resonance, the scattering coefficient is inversely proportional to lambda2 in regions of optical wavelength. Further, it was indicated that Me resonance remaining in the photon bands should be nearly eliminated to minimize optical loss and maximize band gap strength. This may be possible by organizing uniform features of dielectric structures, whether opal or inverse-opal, with smaller building blocks, the size of which are below theoretical scattering limit. Second

  14. Active Detection of Shielded Special Nuclear Material in the Presence of Variable High Backgrounds Using a Mixed Photon-Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philip N.; Clemett, Ceri D.; Hill, Cassie; O'Malley, John; Campbell, Ben

    This paper describes and compares two approaches to the analysis of active interrogation data containing high photon backgrounds associated with mixed photon-neutron source flash active interrogation. Results from liquid scintillation detectors (EJ301/EJ309) fielded at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), in collaboration with the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), using the NRL Mercury Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) operating in both a photon and mixed photon-neutron mode at a Depleted Uranium (DU) target are presented. The standard approach applying a Figure of Merit (FOM) consisting of background sigma above background is compared with an approach looking to fit only the time-decaying photon signal with standard delayed photon emission from ∼10-MeV end-point-energy Bremsstrahlung photofission of DU. Examples where each approach does well and less well are presented together with a discussion of the relative limitations of both approaches to the type of mixed photon-neutron flash active interrogation being considered.

  15. Waveguide-integrated single- and multi-photon detection at telecom wavelengths using superconducting nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-04-13

    We investigate single- and multi-photon detection regimes of superconducting nanowire detectors embedded in silicon nitride nanophotonic circuits. At near-infrared wavelengths, simultaneous detection of up to three photons is observed for 120 nm wide nanowires biased far from the critical current, while narrow nanowires below 100 nm provide efficient single photon detection. A theoretical model is proposed to determine the different detection regimes and to calculate the corresponding internal quantum efficiency. The predicted saturation of the internal quantum efficiency in the single photon regime agrees well with plateau behavior observed at high bias currents.

  16. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  17. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, C.; Guo, X.; Fan, L.; Ma, X.; Poot, M.; Tang, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips. PMID:26792424

  18. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuck, C.; Guo, X.; Fan, L.; Ma, X.; Poot, M.; Tang, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips.

  19. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip.

    PubMed

    Schuck, C; Guo, X; Fan, L; Ma, X; Poot, M; Tang, H X

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips. PMID:26792424

  20. A quantum interface between single atoms and nanophotonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jeffrey Douglas

    Strong interactions between light and atoms at the single-quantum level are an important ingredient for quantum technologies, as well as for studies of fundamental effects in quantum optics. This thesis describes the development of a novel experimental platform that allows for trapping a single rubidium atom in the evanescent mode of a nano-fabricated optical cavity with sub-wavelength dimensions. By virtue of their small size, these cavities provide extremely large atom-photon coupling strengths and good prospects for scalability and integration into complex quantum optical circuits. Positioning the atom near the nano-structure is accomplished using a scanning optical tweezer dipole trap. As a first application, we have demonstrated a coherent optical switch, where a single gate photon controls the propagation of many subsequent signal photons, with the interaction mediated by the atom and cavity. We have also shown that the optical response of the combined atom-cavity system is nonlinear at the level of one or two photons.

  1. Analysis of marine sediment and lobster hepatopancreas reference materials by instrumental photon activation

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Davidson, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    By use of instrumental photon activation analysis, twelve trace (As, Ba, Cr, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr, U, Zn, and Zr) and eight minor (C, Na, Mg, Co, K, Ca, Tl, and Fe) elements were determined in a certified marine sediment standard reference material as well as eight trace (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, and Pb) and four minor (Na, Mg, Cl, and Ca) elements in a certified marine tissue (lobster hepatopancreas) standard reference material. The precision and accuracy of the present results when compared to the accepted values clearly demonstrate the reliability of this nondestructive technique and its applicability to marine environmental or marine geochemical studies. 24 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Engineering near-infrared single-photon emitters with optically active spins in ultrapure silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Stender, B; Trupke, M; Simin, D; Pflaum, J; Dyakonov, V; Astakhov, G V

    2015-01-01

    Vacancy-related centres in silicon carbide are attracting growing attention because of their appealing optical and spin properties. These atomic-scale defects can be created using electron or neutron irradiation; however, their precise engineering has not been demonstrated yet. Here, silicon vacancies are generated in a nuclear reactor and their density is controlled over eight orders of magnitude within an accuracy down to a single vacancy level. An isolated silicon vacancy serves as a near-infrared photostable single-photon emitter, operating even at room temperature. The vacancy spins can be manipulated using an optically detected magnetic resonance technique, and we determine the transition rates and absorption cross-section, describing the intensity-dependent photophysics of these emitters. The on-demand engineering of optically active spins in technologically friendly materials is a crucial step toward implementation of both maser amplifiers, requiring high-density spin ensembles, and qubits based on single spins. PMID:26151881

  3. Solid state photon upconversion utilizing thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as triplet sensitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tony C.; Congreve, Daniel N.; Baldo, Marc A.

    2015-07-01

    The ability to upconvert light is useful for a range of applications, from biological imaging to solar cells. But modern technologies have struggled to upconvert incoherent incident light at low intensities. Here, we report solid state photon upconversion employing triplet-triplet exciton annihilation in an organic semiconductor, sensitized by a thermally activated-delayed fluorescence (TADF) dye. Compared to conventional phosphorescent sensitizers, the TADF dye maximizes the wavelength shift in upconversion due to its small singlet-triplet splitting. The efficiency of energy transfer from the TADF dye is 9.1%, and the conversion yield of sensitizer exciton pairs to singlet excitons in the annihilator is 1.1%. Our results demonstrate upconversion in solid state geometries and with non-heavy metal-based sensitizer materials.

  4. Solid state photon upconversion utilizing thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as triplet sensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tony C.; Congreve, Daniel N.; Baldo, Marc A.

    2015-07-20

    The ability to upconvert light is useful for a range of applications, from biological imaging to solar cells. But modern technologies have struggled to upconvert incoherent incident light at low intensities. Here, we report solid state photon upconversion employing triplet-triplet exciton annihilation in an organic semiconductor, sensitized by a thermally activated-delayed fluorescence (TADF) dye. Compared to conventional phosphorescent sensitizers, the TADF dye maximizes the wavelength shift in upconversion due to its small singlet-triplet splitting. The efficiency of energy transfer from the TADF dye is 9.1%, and the conversion yield of sensitizer exciton pairs to singlet excitons in the annihilator is 1.1%. Our results demonstrate upconversion in solid state geometries and with non-heavy metal-based sensitizer materials.

  5. Packing of Large Two- and Three-Photon Activity Into Smallest Possible Unsymmetrical Fluorene Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Kundi, Varun; Thankachan, Pompozhi Protasis

    2016-05-01

    The quantum chemical study of one-, two-, and three-photon absorption (1PA, 2PA, and 3PA) properties for a set of compact fluorene derivatives (FD) with combination of different donor and acceptor moieties on both sides of fluorene ring system is presented. The main goal of the study is to pack large two-photon (2P) and three-photon (3P) activity into smallest possible chromophore. Linear, quadratic, and cubic response time-dependent density functional theory was used to calculate 1PA, 2PA, and 3PA properties, respectively. We used CAMB3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory for all the property calculations. The 2P and 3P transition probabilities were recalculated using two-state model approach and found to be in good agreement with the response theory results for first excited state. To include the contributions from higher states, the three-state model was also employed to recalculate the 2P transition probabilities and found to be in excellent agreement with response theory. The 2P/3P tensor elements were also analyzed to find reasons behind large 2P/3P activities. All the orbitals involved in transition processes were studied in detail by both molecular orbital pictures (qualitatively) and overlap diagnostic Λ-values (quantitatively). The study reveals that the novel fluorene derivatives FD-12 and FD-13 have shown large 2PA cross-section values of 1100 G.M. and 1030 G.M.; and 3PA transition probabilities of 6.10 × 10(10) a.u. and 4.85 × 10(10) a.u., respectively, for transition S0 → S1. The largest 3PA transition probability of 4.04 × 10(11) a.u. was found with FD-12 for S0 → S2 excitation. The linear relationship between Λ-values and 2PA cross-section values was also studied. PMID:27054876

  6. Wide field-of-view, multi-region, two-photon imaging of neuronal activity in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Stirman, Jeffrey N; Smith, Ikuko T; Kudenov, Michael W; Smith, Spencer L

    2016-08-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging provides an optical readout of neuronal activity in populations of neurons with subcellular resolution. However, conventional two-photon imaging systems are limited in their field of view to ∼1 mm(2), precluding the visualization of multiple cortical areas simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate a two-photon microscope with an expanded field of view (>9.5 mm(2)) for rapidly reconfigurable simultaneous scanning of widely separated populations of neurons. We custom designed and assembled an optimized scan engine, objective, and two independently positionable, temporally multiplexed excitation pathways. We used this new microscope to measure activity correlations between two cortical visual areas in mice during visual processing. PMID:27347754

  7. Determination of Interesting Toxicological Elements in PM2.5 by Neutron and Photon Activation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capannesi, Geraldo; Lopez, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Human activities introduce compounds increasing levels of many dangerous species for environment and population. In this way, trace elements in airborne particulate have a preeminent position due to toxic element presence affecting the biological systems. The main problem is the analytical determination of such species at ultratrace levels: a very specific methodology is necessary with regard to the accuracy and precision and contamination problems. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Instrumental Photon Activation Analysis assure these requirements. A retrospective element analysis in airborne particulate collected in the last 4 decades has been carried out for studying their trend. The samples were collected in urban location in order to determine only effects due to global aerosol circulation; semiannual samples have been used to characterize the summer/winter behavior of natural and artificial origin. The levels of natural origin element are higher than those in other countries owing to geological and meteorological factors peculiar to Central Italy. The levels of artificial elements are sometimes less than those in other countries, suggesting a less polluted general situation for Central Italy. However, for a few elements (e.g., Pb) the levels measured are only slight lower than those proposed as air ambient standard. PMID:23878525

  8. Triple-helical nanowires by tomographic rotatory growth for chiral photonics

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Marco; Tasco, Vittorianna; Todisco, Francesco; Cuscunà, Massimo; Benedetti, Alessio; Sanvitto, Daniele; Passaseo, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) helical chiral metamaterials resulted effective in manipulating circularly polarized light in the visible-infrared for advanced nano-photonics. Their potentialities are severely limited by the lack of full rotational symmetry preventing broadband operation, high signal-to-noise ratio, and inducing high optical activity sensitivity to structure orientation. Complex intertwined 3D structures like Multiple-Helical Nanowires could overcome these limitations, allowing the achievement of several chiro-optical effects combining chirality and isotropy. Here we report 3D triple-helical nanowires, engineered by the innovative Tomographic Rotatory Growth, based on Focused Ion Beam Induced Deposition. These three dimensional nanostructures show up to 37% of circular dichroism in a broad range (500-1000 nm), with a high signal-to-noise ratio (up to 24 dB). Optical activity up to 8° only due to the circular birefringence is also shown, tracing the way towards chiral photonic devices which can be integrated in optical nanocircuits to modulate the visible light polarization. PMID:25784379

  9. Molecular Imaging of Biological Samples on Nanophotonic Laser Desorption Ionization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Stopka, Sylwia A; Rong, Charles; Korte, Andrew R; Yadavilli, Sridevi; Nazarian, Javad; Razunguzwa, Trust T; Morris, Nicholas J; Vertes, Akos

    2016-03-24

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a comprehensive tool for the analysis of a wide range of biomolecules. The mainstream method for molecular MSI is matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, however, the presence of a matrix results in spectral interferences and the suppression of some analyte ions. Herein we demonstrate a new matrix-free MSI technique using nanophotonic ionization based on laser desorption ionization (LDI) from a highly uniform silicon nanopost array (NAPA). In mouse brain and kidney tissue sections, the distributions of over 80 putatively annotated molecular species are determined with 40 μm spatial resolution. Furthermore, NAPA-LDI-MS is used to selectively analyze metabolites and lipids from sparsely distributed algal cells and the lamellipodia of human hepatocytes. Our results open the door for matrix-free MSI of tissue sections and small cell populations by nanophotonic ionization. PMID:26929010

  10. Nanophotonic graphene-based racetrack-resonator add/drop filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth L., A.; da Silva, M. G.; Neves, D. M. C.; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2016-05-01

    We are presenting and analyzing a graphene-based nanophotonic device to operate as a resonator-add/drop filter, whose control is obtained by varying the graphene chemical potential. That device consists of graphene-based waveguides, two directional couplers and a racetrack resonator with 90° bends. Since the graphene chemical potential provides the achievement of the necessary parameters, the resonance and filtering of the signals are obtained by applying the correct value of the graphene chemical potential in the graphene nanoribbons. The results of this study should help in the development of new graphene-based nanophotonic devices operating in the terahertz and infrared range (including in the C-band of the International Telecommunication Union - ITU), for use in future communications networks.